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Sample records for osteoclast precursor cells

  1. Mechanical vibration inhibits osteoclast formation by reducing DC-STAMP receptor expression in osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Voglewede, Philip A; Liu, Dawei

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that physical inactivity leads to loss of muscle mass, but it also causes bone loss. Mechanistically, osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption have recently been shown to be regulated by vibration. However, the underlying mechanism behind the inhibition of osteoclast formation is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells affects osteoclast formation by the involvement of fusion-related molecules such as dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). RAW264.7 (a murine osteoclastic-like cell line) cells were treated with 20ng/ml receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). For 3 consecutive days, the cells were subjected to 1h of mechanical vibration with 20μm displacement at a frequency of 4Hz and compared to the control cells that were treated under the same condition but without the vibration. After 5days of culture, osteoclast formation was determined. Gene expression of DC-STAMP and P2X7R by RAW264.7 cells was determined after 1h of mechanical vibration, while protein production of the DC-STAMP was determined after 6h of postincubation after vibration. As a result, mechanical vibration of RAW264.7 cells inhibited the formation of osteoclasts. Vibration down-regulated DC-STAMP gene expression by 1.6-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.4-fold in the absence of RANKL. Additionally, DC-STAMP protein production was also down-regulated by 1.4-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.2-fold in the absence of RANKL in RAW264.7 cells in response to mechanical vibration. However, vibration did not affect P2X7R gene expression. Mouse anti-DC-STAMP antibody inhibited osteoclast formation in the absence of vibration. Our results suggest that mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells reduces DC-STAMP expression in osteoclast precursor cells leading to the inhibition of osteoclast formation.

  2. Reactive oxygen species are required for zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yu; Su, Fong-Chin; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Jou, I.-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Inhibiting osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors to reduce bone resorption is an important strategy to treat osteoclast-related diseases, such as osteoporosis, inflammatory bone loss, and malignant bone metastasis. However, the mechanism by which apoptosis is induced in the osteoclasts and their precursors are not completely understood. Here, we used nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA) to induce cell apoptosis in human and murine osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells. Caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis occurred following the ZA (100 μM) treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also generated in a time-dependent manner. Following knock-down of the p47phox expression, which is required for ROS activation, or co-treatment with the ROS inhibitor, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, ZA-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed in both osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells. The ROS-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways did not trigger cell apoptosis. However, a ROS-regulated Mcl-1 decrease simultaneously with glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β promoted cell apoptosis. These findings show that ZA induces apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells by triggering ROS- and GSK-3β-mediated Mcl-1 down-regulation. PMID:28281643

  3. Secretory clusterin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by attenuating M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Soon-Suk; Kang, Sang-Wook; Min, Bon-Hong; Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Youngsup; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We describe the expression and secretion of clusterin in osteoclasts. • Endogenous clusterin deficiency does not affect osteoclast formation. • Exogenous treatment with secretory clusterin decreases osteoclast differentiation. • Secretory clusterin attenuates osteoclast precursor cell proliferation by inhibiting M-CSF-mediated ERK activation. - Abstract: Secretory clusterin (sCLU)/apolipoprotein J is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Reduced sCLU in the joints of patients with bone erosive disease is associated with disease activity; however, its exact role has yet to be elucidated. Here, we report that CLU is expressed and secreted during osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) that are treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). CLU-deficient BMMs obtained from CLU{sup −/−} mice exhibited no significant alterations in OC differentiation in comparison with BMMs obtained from wild-type mice. In contrast, exogenous sCLU treatment significantly inhibited OC formation in both BMMs and OC precursor cultures. The inhibitory effect of sCLU was more prominent in BMMs than OC precursor cultures. Interestingly, treating BMMs with sCLU decreased the proliferative effects elicited by M-CSF and suppressed M-CSF-induced ERK activation of OC precursor cells without causing apoptotic cell death. This study provides the first evidence that sCLU reduces OC formation by inhibiting the actions of M-CSF, thereby suggesting its protective role in bone erosion.

  4. IL-4 inhibits TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibition of RANKL expression in TNF-α-activated stromal cells and direct inhibition of TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors via a T-cell-independent mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshiya; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Hakami, Zaki Weli; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2012-10-01

    It has been reported that osteoclastogenesis is induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Interleukin (IL)-4 is the most important cytokine involved in humoral immunity. However, no studies have investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. TNF-α was administered with and without IL-4 into the supracalvariae of mice. The number of osteoclasts and the levels of mRNA for cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphate, both osteoclast markers, in mice administered TNF-α and IL-4 were lower than those in mice administered TNF-α alone. The level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase form 5b (TRACP5b) as a marker of bone resorption in mice administered both TNF-α and IL-4 was also lower. We showed that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in osteoclast precursors in vitro. Expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in TNF-α-activated stromal cells was also inhibited. Furthermore, we investigated whether IL-4 had effects on both stromal cells and osteoclast precursors in TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. Using mice whose stromal cells and osteoclast precursors were chimeric for the presence of TNF receptors, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells, and TNF-α-responsive osteoclast precursors in vivo. IL-4 also inhibited TNF-α-induced RANKL expression in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells in vivo. This event is dependent on p38 inhibition in vitro. Additionally, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in T cell-depleted mice. In summary, we conclude that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibiting expression of RANKL in TNF-α-activated stromal cells, and directly inhibited TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors in vivo via a T cell-independent mechanism.

  5. High Glucose Alters the Secretome of Mechanically Stimulated Osteocyte-like Cells Affecting Osteoclast Precursor Recruitment and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maycas, Marta; Portolés, María Teresa; Matesanz, María Concepción; Buendía, Irene; Linares, Javier; Feito, María José; Arcos, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, María; Plotkin, Lilian; Esbrit, Pedro; Gortázar, Arancha R

    2017-01-31

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) induces bone deterioration, while mechanical stimulation promotes osteocyte-driven bone formation. We aimed to evaluate the interaction of acute exposure (24h) to high glucose (HG) with both the pro-survival effect conferred to osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by mechanical stimulation and the interaction of these cells with osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells. We found that 24h of HG (25 mM) pre-exposure prevented both cell survival and ERK and β-catenin nuclear translocation upon mechanical stimulation by fluid flow (FF) (10 min) in both MLO-Y4 and MC3T3-E1 cells. However, migration of RAW 264.7 cells was inhibited by MLO-Y4 cell-conditioned medium (CM), but not by MC3T3-E1 cell-CM, with HG or FF. This inhibitory effect was associated with consistent changes in VEGF, RANTES, MIP-1α, MIP-1β MCP-1 and GM-CSF in MLO-Y4 cell-CM. RAW264.7 proliferation was inhibited by MLO-Y4 CM under static or HG conditions, but itincreased by FF-CM with or without HG. In addition, both FF and HG abrogated the capacity of RAW 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, but in a different manner. Thus, HG-CM in static condition allowed formation of osteoclast-like cells, which were unable to resorb hydroxyapatite. In contrast, FF-CM prevented osteoclastogenesis even in HG condition. Moreover, HG did not affect basal RANKL or IL-6 secretion or their inhibition induced by FF in MLO-Y4 cells. In conclusion, this in vitro study demonstrates that HG exerts disparate effects on osteocyte mechanotransduction, and provides a novel mechanism by which DM disturbs skeletal metabolism through altered osteocyte-osteoclast communication. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Bone Anabolic Effects of Soluble Si: In Vitro Studies with Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and CD14+ Osteoclast Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Reis, S.; Castro, A.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is indispensable for many cellular processes including bone tissue metabolism. In this work, the effects of Si on human osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis were characterized. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and CD14+ stem cells, as osteoblast and osteoclast precursors, were treated with a wide range of Si concentrations, covering the physiological plasma levels. Si promoted a dose-dependent increase in hMSC proliferation, differentiation, and function, at levels similar to the normal basal plasma levels. Additionally, a decrease in the expression of the osteoclastogenic activators M-CSF and RANKL was observed. Also, Si elicited a decrease in osteoclastogenesis, which became significant at higher concentrations, as those observed after meals. Among the intracellular mechanisms studied, an upregulation of MEK and PKC signalling pathways was observed in both cell types. In conclusion, Si appears to have a direct positive effect on human osteogenesis, at basal plasma levels. On the other hand, it also seemed to be an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, but at higher concentrations, though yet in the physiological range. Further, an indirect effect of Si on osteoclastogenesis may also occur, through a downregulation of M-CSF and RANKL expression by osteoblasts. Thus, Si may be an important player in bone anabolic regenerative approaches. PMID:26798359

  7. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  8. Ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid acid, suppresses osteoclastogenesis in mononuclear precursor cells and induces apoptosis in mature osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    George, Kerri L; Saltman, Laura H; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B; Zurier, Robert B

    2008-03-01

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, prevents joint tissue injury in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis. Because activation of osteoclasts is central to the pathogenesis of bone erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we investigated the influence of AjA on osteoclast differentiation and survival. Osteoclast cultures were established by stimulation of RAW264.7 cells and primary mouse bone marrow cultures with receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Simultaneous addition of AjA (15 and 30 microM) and RANKL to both culture systems significantly suppressed development of multinucleated osteoclasts (osteoclastogenesis) in a dose dependent manner, as determined by quantification of multinuclear, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells. AjA impaired growth of RAW264.7 monocytes and prevented further osteoclast formation in cultures in which osteoclastogenesis had already begun. Reduction by AjA of both monocyte growth and osteoclast formation was associated with apoptosis, assayed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, and caspase activity. The anti-osteoclastogenic effects of AjA did not require the continuous presence of AjA in the cell cultures. Based on these findings, we propose that AjA or other nonpsychoactive synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents may be useful therapy for diseases such as RA and osteoporosis in which bone resorption is a central feature.

  9. The protocol for the isolation and cryopreservation of osteoclast precursors from mouse bone marrow and spleen.

    PubMed

    Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for physiological bone remodeling as well as pathological bone destruction in osteoporosis, periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis, and thus represent a pharmacological target for drug development. We aimed to characterize and compare the cytokine-induced osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow and spleen precursors. Established protocols used to generate osteoclasts from bone marrow were modified to examine osteoclastogenesis of the spleen cells of healthy mice. Osteoclast formation was successfully induced from spleen precursors using receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (50 ng/ml) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (50 ng/ml). Compared to bone marrow cultures, differentiation from spleen required a longer cultivation time (9 days for spleen, as compared to 5 days for marrow cultures) and a higher plating density of non-adherent cells (75,000/cm(2) for spleen, as compared to 50,000/cm(2) for bone marrow). Osteoclasts generated from spleen precursors expressed osteoclast marker genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9 and were capable of resorbing hydroxyapatite. The differentiation capacity of spleen and bone marrow precursors was comparable for BALB/c, C57BL/6 and FVB mice. We also developed and tested a cryopreservation protocol for the osteoclast precursors. While 70-80 % of cells were lost during the first week of freezing, during the subsequent 5 weeks the losses were within 2-5 % per week. Osteoclastogenesis from the recovered bone marrow precursors was successful up to 5 weeks after freezing. Spleen precursors retained their osteoclastogenic capacity for 1 week after freezing, but not thereafter. The described protocol is useful for the studies of genetically modified animals as well as for screening new osteoclast-targeting therapeutics.

  10. Regulation of RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation by vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Tintut, Yin; Abedin, Moeen; Cho, John; Choe, Andrea; Lim, Jina; Demer, Linda L

    2005-08-01

    Vascular calcification is a regulated process of biomineralization resembling osteogenesis. Many bone-related factors, including resorptive osteoclast-like cells, although in low abundance, have been found in calcified atherosclerotic lesions. The regulatory mechanisms governing them in the vasculature, however, are not clear. Previously, we found that calcifying vascular cells (CVC), a subpopulation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMC), undergo osteoblastic differentiation and form mineralized nodules. Since osteoblasts and marrow stromal preosteoblasts regulate osteoclastic differentiation in bone, we hypothesized that vascular cells also regulate differentiation of osteoclastic precursors in the artery wall. Peripheral blood monocytes, which are osteoclast precursors, were co-cultured with CVC or BASMC. Results showed that monocytes co-cultured with both of the vascular cells yielded fewer resorption pits than monocytes cultured alone. Furthermore, monocytes co-cultured with CVC had fewer resorption pits than those co-cultured with BASMC. Conditioned media from the vascular cells also inhibited resorptive activity of monocytes suggesting that the inhibitory effect was mediated in part by soluble factors. Compared with BASMC, CVC had lower mRNA expression for osteopontin, which promotes osteoclast attachment, but greater mRNA expression for the soluble inhibitory cytokine, IL-18. Increased osteoclastic differentiation was observed when neutralizing antibody to IL-18 receptor was added to the cultures of preosteoclasts with CVC conditioned media. Osteoprotegerin, another osteoclast inhibitory cytokine, was expressed at similar levels in both cultures. These results suggest that vascular cells inhibit osteoclastic differentiation, and that CVC have greater inhibitory effects than BASMC.

  11. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  12. Genetic modification of ER-Hoxb8 osteoclast precursors using CRISPR/Cas9 as a novel way to allow studies on osteoclast biology.

    PubMed

    Di Ceglie, Irene; van den Akker, Guus G H; Ascone, Giuliana; Ten Harkel, Bas; Häcker, Hans; van de Loo, Fons A J; Koenders, Marije I; van der Kraan, Peter M; de Vries, Teun J; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; van Lent, Peter L E M

    2016-12-05

    Osteoclasts are cells specialized in bone resorption. Currently, studies on murine osteoclasts are primarily performed on bone marrow-derived cells with the use of many animals and limited cells available. ER-Hoxb8 cells are conditionally immortalized monocyte/macrophage murine progenitor cells, recently described to be able to differentiate toward functional osteoclasts. Here, we produced an ER-Hoxb8 clonal cell line from C57BL/6 bone marrow cells that strongly resembles phenotype and function of the conventional bone marrow-derived osteoclasts. We then used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to specifically inactivate genes by biallelic mutation. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an adaptive immune system in Bacteria and Archaea and uses small RNAs and Cas nucleases to degrade foreign nucleic acids. Through specific-guide RNAs, the nuclease Cas9 can be redirected toward any genomic location to genetically modify eukaryotic cells. We genetically modified ER-Hoxb8 cells with success, generating NFATc1(-/-) and DC-STAMP(-/-) ER-Hoxb8 cells that lack the ability to differentiate into osteoclasts or to fuse into multinucleated osteoclasts, respectively. In conclusion, this method represents a markedly easy highly specific and efficient system for generating potentially unlimited numbers of genetically modified osteoclast precursors.

  13. Substrate Recognition by Osteoclast Precursors Induces C-src/Microtubule Association

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Amer, Yousef; Ross, F. Patrick; Schlesinger, Paul; Tondravi, M. Mehrdad; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    1997-01-01

    The osteoclast is distinguished from other macrophage polykaryons by its polarization, a feature induced by substrate recognition. The most striking component of the polarized osteoclast is its ruffled membrane, probably reflecting insertion of intracellular vesicles into the bone apposed plasmalemma. The failure of osteoclasts in c-src−/− osteopetrotic mice to form ruffled membranes indicates pp60c-src (c-src) is essential to osteoclast polarization. Interestingly, c-src itself is a vesicular protein that targets the ruffled membrane. This being the case, we hypothesized that matrix recognition by osteoclasts, and their precursors, induces c-src to associate with microtubules that traffic proteins to the cell surface. We find abundant c-src associates with tubulin immunoprecipitated from avian marrow macrophages (osteoclast precursors) maintained in the adherent, but not nonadherent, state. Since the two proteins colocalize only within adherent avian osteoclast-like cells examined by double antibody immunoconfocal microscopy, c-src/tubulin association reflects an authentic intracellular event. C-src/tubulin association is evident within 90 min of cell-substrate recognition, and the event does not reflect increased expression of either protein. In vitro kinase assay demonstrates tubulin-associated c-src is enzymatically active, phosphorylating itself as well as exogenous substrate. The increase in microtubule-associated kinase activity attending adhesion mirrors tubulin-bound c-src and does not reflect enhanced specific activity. The fact that microtubule-dissociating drugs, as well as cold, prevent adherence-induced c-src/tubulin association indicates the protooncogene complexes primarily, if not exclusively, with polymerized tubulin. Association of the two proteins does not depend upon protein tyrosine phosphorylation and is substrate specific, as it is induced by vitronectin and fibronectin but not type 1 collagen. Finally, consistent with cotransport of c

  14. The generation of osteoclasts from RAW 264.7 precursors in defined, serum-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Cristina; Kogawa, Masakazu; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the unique cell type capable of resorbing bone. The discovery of the TNF-ligand family member, RANKL, has allowed more reliable study of these important cells. The mouse monocytic cell line, RAW 264.7, has been shown to readily differentiate into osteoclasts upon exposure to recombinant RANKL. Unlike primary osteoclast precursors, there is no requirement for the addition of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). However, to date, their differentiation has always been studied in the context of added foetal calf serum (FCS). FCS is a complex and largely undefined mixture of growth factors and matrix proteins, and varies between batches. For this reason, osteoclastogenesis would ideally be studied in the context of a defined, serum-free medium. RAW 264.7 cells were cultured in serum-replete alpha-MEM or serum-deprived medium (SDM) shown previously to support the growth of human osteoclasts in a co-culture with normal osteoblasts. In SDM, in the presence of recombinant RANKL, RAW 264.7 cells readily differentiated into tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated osteoclast-like cells, a process that was enhanced with the addition of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D). While the osteoclasts grown in SDM were smaller in size compared with those derived in serum-replete media, their resorptive capacity was significantly increased as indicated by a twofold increase in average resorption pit size. In conclusion, we describe a defined model for studying osteoclast differentiation and activity in the absence of serum, which will be ideal for studying the role of agonistic and antagonistic molecules in this process.

  15. Osteoclast differentiation from human blood precursors on biomimetic calcium-phosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Ciapetti, Gabriela; Di Pompo, Gemma; Avnet, Sofia; Martini, Desirée; Diez-Escudero, Anna; Montufar, Edgar B; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Baldini, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    The design of synthetic bone grafts to foster bone formation is a challenge in regenerative medicine. Understanding the interaction of bone substitutes with osteoclasts is essential, since osteoclasts not only drive a timely resorption of the biomaterial, but also trigger osteoblast activity. In this study, the adhesion and differentiation of human blood-derived osteoclast precursors (OCP) on two different micro-nanostructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite materials consisting in coarse (HA-C) and fine HA (HA-F) crystals, in comparison with sintered stoichiometric HA (sin-HA, reference material), were investigated. Osteoclasts were induced to differentiate by RANKL-containing supernatant using cell/substrate direct and indirect contact systems, and calcium (Ca(++)) and phosphorus (P(5+)) in culture medium were measured. We observed that OCP adhered to the experimental surfaces, and that osteoclast-like cells formed at a rate influenced by the micro- and nano-structure of HA, which also modulate extracellular Ca(++). Qualitative differences were found between OCP on biomimetic HA-C and HA-F and their counterparts on plastic and sin-HA. On HA-C and HA-F cells shared typical features of mature osteoclasts, i.e. podosomes, multinuclearity, tartrate acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive staining, and TRAP5b-enzyme release. However, cells were less in number compared to those on plastic or on sin-HA, and they did not express some specific osteoclast markers. In conclusion, blood-derived OCP are able to attach to biomimetic and sintered HA substrates, but their subsequent fusion and resorptive activity are hampered by surface micro-nano-structure. Indirect cultures suggest that fusion of OCP is sensitive to topography and to extracellular calcium.

  16. Osteoclast precursor interaction with bone matrix induces osteoclast formation directly by an interleukin-1-mediated autocrine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenqiang; Xing, Lianping; Qin, Chunlin; Schwarz, Edward M; Boyce, Brendan F

    2008-04-11

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediate bone resorption in a variety of diseases affecting bone. Like TNF, IL-1 is secreted by osteoclast precursors (OCPs), but unlike TNF, it does not induce osteoclast formation directly from OCPs in vitro. TNF induces IL-1 expression and activates c-Fos, a transcription factor required in OCPs for osteoclast formation. Here, we examined whether IL-1 can induce osteoclast formation directly from OCPs overexpressing c-Fos and whether interaction with bone matrix affects OCP cytokine expression. We infected OCPs with c-Fos or green fluorescent protein retrovirus, cultured them with macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-1 on bone slices or plastic dishes, and assessed osteoclast and resorption pit formation and expression of IL-1 by OCPs. We used a Transwell assay to determine whether OCPs secrete IL-1 when they interact with bone matrix. IL-1 induced osteoclast formation directly from c-Fos-expressing OCPs on plastic. c-Fos-expressing OCPs formed osteoclasts spontaneously on bone slices without addition of cytokines. OCPs on bone secreted IL-1, which induced osteoclast formation from c-Fos-expressing OCPs in the lower Transwell dishes. The bone matrix proteins dentin sialoprotein and osteopontin, but not transforming growth factor-beta, stimulated OCP expression of IL-1 and induced c-Fos-expressing OCP differentiation into osteoclasts. Osteoclasts eroding inflamed joints have higher c-Fos expression compared with osteoclasts inside bone. We conclude that OCPs expressing c-Fos may induce their differentiation directly into osteoclasts by an autocrine mechanism in which they produce IL-1 through interaction with bone matrix. TNF could induce c-Fos expression in OCPs at sites of inflammation in bone to promote this autocrine mechanism and thus amplify bone loss.

  17. Inhibition of osteoclast formation by 3-methylcholanthrene, a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor: suppression of osteoclast differentiation factor in osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Naruse, M; Otsuka, E; Naruse, M; Ishihara, Y; Miyagawa-Tomita, S; Hagiwara, H

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), on osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclast-like cells, in cocultures with mouse spleen cells and clonal osteogenic stromal ST2 cells, are formed from spleen cells by a combination of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) produced by ST2 cells in response to 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3). 3MC dose-dependently inhibited the formation of mono- and multinuclear osteoclast-like cells. However, 3MC did not inhibit the formation of osteoclast-like cells from mouse spleen cells which was supported by the exogenous soluble RANKL and M-CSF. 3MC did not affect the formation of an actin ring and pits on slices of dentine by osteoclast-like cells, both of which are typical indices of osteoclast activity. These results suggest that 3MC affects osteoclast-supporting cells such as ST2 cells but not osteoclast precursor cells and mature osteoclastic cells. When we measured the expression levels of RANKL mRNA in ST2 cells, 3MC dose-dependently decreased the level of this mRNA. However, 3MC did not affect levels of mRNAs for osteoprotegerin (OPG), M-CSF, and the receptor of 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3) in ST2 cells. Furthermore, soluble RANKL was able to counteract the inhibitory effect of 3MC on the formation of osteoclast-like cells. Our findings indicate that 3MC inhibits osteoclastogenesis via the inhibition of RANKL expression in osteoblastic cells.

  18. PSTPIP2 deficiency in mice causes osteopenia and increased differentiation of multipotent myeloid precursors into osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Viorel; Charles, Julia F.; Henne, William M.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Nandi, Sayan; Ketchum, Halley; Harris, Renee; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    Missense mutations that reduce or abrogate myeloid cell expression of the F-BAR domain protein, proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), lead to autoinflammatory disease involving extramedullary hematopoiesis, skin and bone lesions. However, little is known about how PSTPIP2 regulates osteoclast development. Here we examined how PSTPIP2 deficiency causes osteopenia and bone lesions, using the mouse PSTPIP2 mutations, cmo, which fails to express PSTPIP2 and Lupo, in which PSTPIP2 is dysfunctional. In both models, serum levels of the pro-osteoclastogenic factor, MIP-1α, were elevated and CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R)–dependent production of MIP-1α by macrophages was increased. Treatment of cmo mice with a dual specificity CSF-1R and c-Kit inhibitor, PLX3397, decreased circulating MIP-1α and ameliorated the extramedullary hematopoiesis, inflammation, and osteopenia, demonstrating that aberrant myelopoiesis drives disease. Purified osteoclast precursors from PSTPIP2-deficient mice exhibit increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro and were used to probe the structural requirements for PSTPIP2 suppression of osteoclast development. PSTPIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation and a functional F-BAR domain were essential for PSTPIP2 inhibition of TRAP expression and osteoclast precursor fusion, whereas interaction with PEST-type phosphatases was only required for suppression of TRAP expression. Thus, PSTPIP2 acts as a negative feedback regulator of CSF-1R signaling to suppress inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22923495

  19. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MJVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors. Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-31

    Determine the sensitivity of MVNP transduced osteoclast precursors to RANK Ligand (RANKL) and TNF- alpha stimulation to form pagetic osteoclasts. -- Paget’s...herpesvirus (CLONTECH) (pVP16- hVDR) (13). To examine the interaction of TAFII-17 and VDR, 0.5 g of pM-TAFII-17, 0.5 g of pVP -16-hVDR, and 0.5 g of

  20. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  1. ADAM8 Enhances Osteoclast Precursor Fusion and Osteoclast Formation In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Hisako; García-Palacios, Verónica; Lu, Ganwei; Subler, Mark A; Zhang, Heju; Boykin, Christina S; Choi, Sun Jin; Zhao, Liena; Patrene, Kenneth; Galson, Deborah L; Blair, Harry C; Hadi, Tamer M; Windle, Jolene J; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Roodman, G David

    2011-01-01

    ADAM8 expression is increased in the interface tissue around a loosened hip prosthesis and in the pannus and synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but its potential role in these processes is unclear. ADAM8 stimulates osteoclast (OCL) formation, but the effects of overexpression or loss of expression of ADAM8 in vivo and the mechanisms responsible for the effects of ADAM8 on osteoclastogenesis are unknown. Therefore, to determine the effects of modulating ADAM expression, we generated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)–ADAM8 transgenic mice that overexpress ADAM8 in the OCL lineage and ADAM8 knockout (ADAM8 KO) mice. TRAP-ADAM8 mice developed osteopenia and had increased numbers of OCL precursors that formed hypermultinucleated OCLs with an increased bone-resorbing capacity per OCL. They also had an enhanced differentiation capacity, increased TRAF6 expression, and increased NF-κB, Erk, and Akt signaling compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. This increased bone-resorbing capacity per OCL was associated with increased levels of p-Pyk2 and p-Src activation. In contrast, ADAM8 KO mice did not display a bone phenotype in vivo, but unlike WT littermates, they did not increase RANKL production, OCL formation, or calvarial fibrosis in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in vivo. Since loss of ADAM8 does not inhibit basal bone remodeling but only blocks the enhanced OCL formation in response to TNF-α, these results suggest that ADAM8 may be an attractive therapeutic target for preventing bone destruction associated with inflammatory disease. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20683884

  2. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-02-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4(+) T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4(+) T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell-cell interactions.

  3. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4+ T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4+ T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4+ T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4+ T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell–cell interactions. PMID:25445456

  4. Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation by polycyclic aryl hydrocarbons is dependent on cell density and RANKL concentration.

    PubMed

    Voronov, I; Heersche, J N M; Casper, R F; Tenenbaum, H C; Manolson, M F

    2005-07-15

    We investigated the effect of representative polycyclic aryl hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) on osteoclast differentiation and function by using dispersed cancellous bone derived rabbit osteoclasts and the RAW264.7 cells. These cells differentiate into osteoclasts when exposed to receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). The rabbit osteoclasts were exposed to 10(-6) to 10(-9)M BaP or DMBA and the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells were counted. The effect of PAHs on osteoclast differentiation in dispersed rabbit osteoclast-containing stromal cell populations was cell density dependent, suggesting that the cell density of stromal cells, osteoclast precursors, and/or mature osteoclasts are factors regulating the effect of PAHs. To investigate the direct effect of BaP on osteoclast differentiation, RAW264.7 cells were exposed to 10(-5) to 10(-6) M BaP. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells cultured with 25 ng/ml soluble RANKL and 10(-5)M BaP for 5 days decreased osteoclast differentiation, TRAP activity levels, and resorption of bone-like substrata. The inhibition was prevented by 10(-6) to 10(-7) M resveratrol, an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist, and by higher concentrations of RANKL. To investigate the ability of RANKL to reverse BaP-mediated inhibition, gene expression was determined by RT-PCR. Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) mRNA, one of the genes activated by BaP, was present only in the groups exposed to BaP; the levels of CYP1B1 mRNA decreased in the presence of increasing concentrations of RANKL. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of PAHs on osteoclastogenesis are direct and likely involve interaction of the RANKL and PAH signaling pathways.

  5. Osteoclasts differentiate from resident precursors in an in vivo model of synchronized resorption: a temporal and spatial study in rats.

    PubMed

    Baroukh, B; Cherruau, M; Dobigny, C; Guez, D; Saffar, J L

    2000-11-01

    Osteoclasts differentiate from mononucleated precursors expressing monocyte markers, which gradually evolve to preosteoclasts expressing the osteoclast phenotype. Although the role of osteogenic cells in these changes has been well documented in vitro, their contribution in vivo has not been established. In this study, a synchronized wave of resorption was activated along the mandibular periosteum. The periosteum adjacent to the bone surface studied was separated by a computer-assisted technique into an osteogenic alkaline phosphatase-positive compartment and an outer nonosteogenic compartment. Specific markers (nonspecific esterase [NSE], tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase [TRAP], and ED1 antibody, a marker of the monocyte-macrophage lineage) were used to follow osteoclast differentiation quantitatively as a function of time after activation of resorption, from day 0 to day 4 (peak of resorption in this model). Local cell proliferation was assessed in parallel. Between day 0 and day 3, the thickness of the osteogenic compartment decreased by 50% (p < 0.0002). In the osteogenic compartment, proliferating cell numbers fell by 80% at 12 day, NSE(+) cells (located farthest from the bone surface) increased 3. 9-fold on day 4 vs. day 0 (p < 0.005), ED1(+) cells decreased between day 0 and day 2 (p < 0.02) before returning to their initial value, and TRAP(+) cells increased 2.7-fold between day 1 and day 3 (p < 0.0005). Resorption was absent in the site studied on day 0, but on day 4 there were 20.5 osteoclast nuclei per millimeter of bone surface. The cell ratio changed from 30.3 NSE(+) and ED1(+) (some of which were also TRAP(+)) cells per millimeter on day 0 to 37.6 mononucleated cells plus 20.5 osteoclast nuclei on day 4. In the nonosteogenic compartment, an entry of ED1(+)/NSE(-) was observed on 12 day (+23 cells, p < 0.02 vs. day 0). This was followed by a return of ED1(+) cell numbers to the control level on day 1, and a transient increase in NSE(+) cells (+47

  6. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor κB ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells function as novel osteoclast progenitors enhancing bone loss in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Deshane, Jessy; Jules, Joel; Lee, Carnella M.; Harris, Brittney A.; Feng, Xu; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced bone destruction is a hallmark of various carcinomas such as breast cancer, where osteolytic bone metastasis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Immune cells contribute to osteolysis in cancer growth but the factors contributing to aggressive bone destruction are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in this process at bone metastatic sites. Since MDSC originate from the same myeloid lineage as macrophages, which are osteoclast precursors, we hypothesized that MDSC may undergo osteoclast differentiation and contribute to enhanced bone destruction and tumor growth. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis, we confirmed that MDSC isolated from the tumor-bone microenvironment differentiated into functional osteoclasts both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide signaling was critical for differentiation of MDSC into osteoclasts. Remarkably, osteoclast differentiation did not occur in MDSC isolated from control or tumor-bearing mice that lacked bone metastasis, signifying the essential cross-talk between tumor cells and myeloid progenitors in the bone microenvironment as a requirement for osteoclast differentiation of MDSC. Overall, our results identify a wholly new facet to the multifunctionality of MDSC in driving tumor progression, in this case as a novel osteoclast progenitor that specifically drives bone metastasis during cancer progression. PMID:23243021

  8. Distinctive and selective route of PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 signaling in osteoclastic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Mi Yeong; Lee, Kyunghee; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-12-05

    Cell migration during specialized stages of osteoclast precursors, mononuclear preosteoclasts, and multinucleated mature osteoclasts remain uncertain. M-CSF- and osteopontin-induced osteoclastic cell migration was inhibited by function-blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to the integrin αv and β3 subunits, suggesting that integrin αvβ3 mediates migratory signaling induced by M-CSF and osteopontin. M-CSF and osteopontin stimulation was shown to regulate two branched signaling processes, PI3K/PKCα/RhoA axis and PI3K/PKCδ/Rac1 axis. Interestingly, inactivation of RhoA or Rac1 blocked preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration but not osteoclast precursor migration in a transwell-based cell migration assay. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration induced by Rac1 inactivation was more effective than that by RhoA inactivation. Collectively, our findings suggest that osteoclast precursor migration depends on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 bypassing RhoA and Rac1, whereas preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration relies on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 axis signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 with increased dependency on PKCδ/Rac1 signaling route as differentiation progresses.

  9. Immortalization of osteoclast precursors by targeting Bcl -XL and Simian virus 40 large T antigen to the osteoclast lineage in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hentunen, T A; Reddy, S V; Boyce, B F; Devlin, R; Park, H R; Chung, H; Selander, K S; Dallas, M; Kurihara, N; Galson, D L; Goldring, S R; Koop, B A; Windle, J J; Roodman, G D

    1998-01-01

    Cellular and molecular characterization of osteoclasts (OCL) has been extremely difficult since OCL are rare cells, and are difficult to isolate in large numbers. We used the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase promoter to target the bcl-XL and/or Simian Virus 40 large T antigen (Tag) genes to cells in the OCL lineage in transgenic mice as a means of immortalizing OCL precursors. Immunocytochemical studies confirmed that we had targeted Bcl-XL and/or Tag to OCL, and transformed and mitotic OCL were readily apparent in bones from both Tag and bcl-XL/Tag mice. OCL formation in primary bone marrow cultures from bcl-XL, Tag, or bcl-XL/Tag mice was twofold greater compared with that of nontransgenic littermates. Bone marrow cells from bcl-XL/Tag mice, but not from singly transgenic bcl-XL or Tag mice, have survived in continuous culture for more than a year. These cells form high numbers of bone-resorbing OCL when cultured using standard conditions for inducing OCL formation, with approximately 50% of the mononuclear cells incorporated into OCL. The OCL that form express calcitonin receptors and contract in response to calcitonin. Studies examining the proliferative capacity and the resistance of OCL precursors from these transgenic mice to apoptosis demonstrated that the increased numbers of OCL precursors in marrow from bcl-XL/Tag mice was due to their increased survival rather than an increased proliferative capacity compared with Tag, bcl-XL, or normal mice. Histomorphometric studies of bones from bcl-XL/Tag mice also confirmed that there were increased numbers of OCL precursors (TRAP + mononuclear cells) present in vivo. These data demonstrate that by targeting both bcl-XL and Tag to cells in the OCL lineage, we have immortalized OCL precursors that form bone-resorbing OCL with an efficiency that is 300-500 times greater than that of normal marrow. PMID:9649561

  10. Diamagnetic levitation promotes osteoclast differentiation from RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Yin, Chong; Li, Di-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting magnet with a high magnetic force field can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study, a specially designed superconducting magnet with large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF), which provides three apparent gravity levels (μg, 1 g, and 2 g), was used to study its influence on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from preosteoclast cell line RAW264.7. The effects of LGHMF on the viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, morphology in RAW264.7 cells were detected by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method, the Griess method, and the immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The changes induced by LGHMF in osteoclast formation, mRNA expression, and bone resorption were determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, semiquantity PCR, and bone resorption test, respectively. The results showed that: 1) LGHMF had no lethal effect on osteoclast precursors but attenuated NO release in RAW264.7 cells. 2) Diamagnetic levitation (μg) enhanced both the formation and bone resorption capacity of osteoclast. Moreover, diamagnetic levitation up-regulated mRNA expression of RANK, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, and NFATc1, while down-regulated RunX2 in comparison with controls. Furthermore, diamagnetic levitation induced obvious morphological alterations in osteoclast, including active cytoplasmic peripheral pseudopodial expansion, formation of pedosome belt, and aggregation of actin ring. 3) Magnetic field produced by LGHMF attenuated osteoclast resorption activity. Collectively, LGHMF with combined effects has multiple effects on osteoclast, which attenuated osteoclast resorption with magnetic field, whereas promoted osteoclast differentiation with diamagnetic levitation. Therefore, these findings indicate that diamagnetic levitation could be used as a novel ground-based microgravity simulator, which facilitates bone cell research of weightlessness condition.

  11. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  12. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  13. Mice lacking JunB are osteopenic due to cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Lukas; Hoebertz, Astrid; Beil, F Timo; Beil, Timo; Keon, Niamh; Karreth, Florian; Eferl, Robert; Scheuch, Harald; Szremska, Agnieszka; Amling, Michael; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina; Angel, Peter; Wagner, Erwin F

    2004-02-16

    Because JunB is an essential gene for placentation, it was conditionally deleted in the embryo proper. JunBDelta/Delta mice are born viable, but develop severe low turnover osteopenia caused by apparent cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects before a chronic myeloid leukemia-like disease. Although JunB was reported to be a negative regulator of cell proliferation, junBDelta/Delta osteoclast precursors and osteoblasts show reduced proliferation along with a differentiation defect in vivo and in vitro. Mutant osteoblasts express elevated p16(INK4a) levels, but exhibit decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression. Runx2 is transiently increased during osteoblast differentiation in vitro, whereas mature osteoblast markers such as osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein are strongly reduced. To support a cell-autonomous function of JunB in osteoclasts, junB was inactivated specifically in the macrophage-osteoclast lineage. Mutant mice develop an osteopetrosis-like phenotype with increased bone mass and reduced numbers of osteoclasts. Thus, these data reveal a novel function of JunB as a positive regulator controlling primarily osteoblast as well as osteoclast activity.

  14. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppress osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting superoxide and NFATc1 downregulation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    OMORI, AKINA; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; DEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; SUZUKI, KUNIAKI

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the natural polyphenols, rosmarinic acid and arbutin, on osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppressed osteoclast differentiation and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursor cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin inhibited superoxide production in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and the osteoclast marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin-K, decreased following treatments with rosmarinic acid and arbutin. Furthermore, resorption activity decreased with the number of osteoclasts. These results suggest that rosmarinic acid and arbutin may be useful for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, through mechanisms involving inhibition of superoxide and downregulation of NFATc1. PMID:26171153

  15. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) increases circulating osteoclast (OC) precursors numbers by promoting their proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNF inhibitors (TNFi) on the differentiation and activity of OC in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods. Seventeen RA patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers, in vitro OC differentiation assays, and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes was performed. Results. After TNFi therapy, patients had reduced RANKL surface expression in B-lymphocytes and the frequency of circulating classical CD14brightCD16− monocytes was decreased. Serum levels of sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and CTX-I were reduced in RA patients after TNFi treatment. Moreover, after exposure to TNFi, osteoclast differentiation and activity were decreased, as well as the expression of TRAF6 and cathepsin K. Conclusion. We propose that TNFi arrests bone loss and erosion, through two pathways: direct reduction of osteoclast precursor numbers and inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways acting through TRAF6. PMID:28286757

  16. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  17. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  18. Comparison of direct and indirect radiation effects on osteoclast formation from progenitor cells derived from different hemopoietic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Kawilarang-de Haas, E.W.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1987-07-01

    Hemopoietic stem and progenitor cells from different sources differ in radiosensitivity. Recently, we have demonstrated that the multinucleated cell responsible for bone resorption and marrow cavity formation, the osteoclast, is in fact of hemopoietic lineage. In this investigation we have studied the radiosensitivity of osteoclast formation from two different hemopoietic tissues: fetal liver and adult bone marrow. Development of osteoclasts from hemopoietic progenitors was induced by coculture of hemopoietic cell populations with fetal mouse long bones depleted of their own osteoclast precursor pool. During culture, osteoclasts developed from the exogenous cell population and invaded the calcified hypertrophic cartilage of the long bone model, thereby giving rise to the formation of a primitive marrow cavity. To analyze the radiosensitivity of osteoclast formation, either the hemopoietic cells or the bone rudiments were irradiated before coculture. Fetal liver cells were found to be less radiosensitive than bone marrow cells. The D0, Dq values and extrapolation numbers were 1.69 Gy, 5.30 Gy, and 24.40 for fetal liver cells and 1.01 Gy, 1.85 Gy, and 6.02 for bone marrow cells. Irradiation of the (pre)osteoclast-free long bone rudiments instead of the hemopoietic sources resulted in a significant inhibition of osteoclast formation at doses of 4 Gy or more. This indirect effect appeared to be more prominent in the cocultures with fetal than with adult hemopoietic cells. Furthermore, radiation doses of 8.0-10.0 Gy indirectly affected the appearance of other cell types (e.g., granulocytes) in the newly formed but underdeveloped marrow cavity. The results indicate that osteoclast progenitors from different hemopoietic sources exhibit a distinct sensitivity to ionizing irradiation. Radiation injury to long bone rudiments disturbs the osteoclast-forming capacity as well as the hemopoietic microenvironment.

  19. Co-culture with periodontal ligament stem cells enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shulan; Ye, Xin; Yu, Xinbo; Xu, Quanchen; Pan, Keqing; Lu, Shulai; Yang, Pishan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are characterized by having multipotential differentiation and immunoregulatory properties, which are the main mechanisms of PDLSCs-mediated periodontal regeneration. Periodontal or bone regeneration requires coordination of osteoblast and osteoclast, however, very little is known about the interactions between PDLSCs and osteoblast-like cells or osteoclast precursors. In this study, the indirect co-culture approach was introduced to preliminarily elucidate the effects of PDLSCs on differentiation of osteoblast-like cells and osteoclast precursors in vitro. Materials and methods: Human PDLSCs were obtained from premolars extracted and their stemness was identified in terms of their colony-forming ability, proliferative capacity, cell surface epitopes and multi-lineage differentiation potentials. A noncontact co-culture system of PDLSCs and preosteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 or osteoclast precursor cell line RAW264.7 was established, and osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 and osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 were evaluated. Results: PDLSCs exhibited features of mesenchymal stem cells. Further investigation through indirect co-culture system showed that PDLSCs enhanced ALP activity, expressions of ALP, Runx2, BSP, OPN mRNA and BSP, OPN proteins and mineralization matrix deposition in MC3T3-E1. Meanwhile, they improved maturation of osteoclasts and expressions of TRAP, CSTK, TRAF6 mRNA and TRAP, TRAF6 proteins in RAW264.7. Conclusions: PDLSCs stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of osteoblast precursors and osteoclastic differentiation of osteoclast precursors, at least partially, in a paracrine fasion. PMID:26823783

  20. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Supports Homing of Osteoclast Precursors to Peripheral Osteolytic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Ishii, Takenobu; Albassam, Abdullah; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Howait, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Ruiz-Torruella, Montserrat; Bahammam, Laila; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Van Dyke, Thomas; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-09-01

    By binding to its chemokine receptor CXCR4 on osteoclast precursor cells (OCPs), it is well known that stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) promotes the chemotactic recruitment of circulating OCPs to the homeostatic bone remodeling site. However, the engagement of circulating OCPs in pathogenic bone resorption remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated a possible chemoattractant role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), another ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), in the recruitment of circulating OCPs to the bone lytic lesion. To accomplish this, we used Csf1r-eGFP-knock-in (KI) mice to establish an animal model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced calvarial osteolysis. In the circulating Csf1r-eGFP+ cells of healthy Csf1r-eGFP-KI mice, Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells showed a greater degree of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis compared to a subset of Csf1r+/RANK+ cells in vitro. Therefore, Csf1r-eGFP+/CD11b+ cells were targeted as functionally relevant OCPs in the present study. Although expression of the two cognate receptors for MIF, CXCR2 and CXCR4, was elevated on Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells, transmigration of OCPs toward recombinant MIF in vitro was facilitated by ligation with CXCR4, but not CXCR2. Meanwhile, the level of PMMA-induced bone resorption in calvaria was markedly greater in wild-type (WT) mice compared to that detected in MIF-knockout (KO) mice. Interestingly, in contrast to the elevated MIF, diminished SDF-1 was detected in a particle-induced bone lytic lesion of WT mice in conjunction with an increased number of infiltrating CXCR4+ OCPs. However, such diminished SDF-1 was not found in the PMMA-injected calvaria of MIF-KO mice. Furthermore, stimulation of osteoblasts with MIF in vitro suppressed their production of SDF-1, suggesting that MIF can downmodulate SDF-1 production in bone tissue. Systemically administered anti-MIF neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited the homing of CXCR4+ OCPs, as well as

  1. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 delta: a novel osteoclast stimulating factor secreted by renal cell carcinoma bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kominsky, Scott L; Abdelmagid, Samir M; Doucet, Michele; Brady, Kelly; Weber, Kristy L

    2008-03-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) develop bone metastasis, which is characterized by extensive osteolysis leading to severe bone pain and pathologic fracture. Although the mechanism of RCC-induced osteolysis is unknown, studies of bone metastasis have shown that tumor-induced changes in bone remodeling are likely mediated by alterations in the bone microenvironment. Here, we report the discovery of a novel osteoclast stimulatory factor secreted by RCC bone metastasis (RBM). Through microarray analysis, we found expression of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 delta (MIP-1 delta), to be increased in RBM versus patient-matched primary RCC tissues and confirmed this finding by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ELISA (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MIP-1 delta expression in RBM tissues was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than in human bone marrow, suggesting a potential alteration of the bone microenvironment. The receptors for MIP-1 delta, CCR1 and CCR3, were expressed in both osteoclast precursors and mature, bone-resorbing osteoclasts as shown by qRT-PCR and Western analysis. In functional studies, MIP-1 delta stimulated chemotaxis of two osteoclast precursor cell types: murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) and RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, MIP-1 delta treatment of murine calvaria caused increased bone resorption as determined by measurement of released calcium. Correspondingly, MIP-1 delta significantly enhanced osteoclast formation and activity in response to RANKL in both BM-MNC and RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that MIP-1 delta expression is increased in RBM relative to RCC and bone marrow, and may promote RBM-induced osteolysis by stimulating the recruitment and differentiation of osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts.

  2. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Han-Ching; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1β, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer.

  3. Molecular Profiling of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and the Osteoclastic Localization of Ligand for Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Teresa; Atkins, Gerald J.; Trivett, Melanie K.; Johnson, Sandra A.; Kansara, Maya; Schlicht, Stephen L.; Slavin, John L.; Simmons, Paul; Dickinson, Ian; Powell, Gerald; Choong, Peter F.M.; Holloway, Andrew J.; Thomas, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a generally benign, osteolytic neoplasm comprising stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. The osteoclastic cells, which cause bony destruction, are thought to be recruited from normal monocytic pre-osteoclasts by stromal cell expression of the ligand for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL). This model forms the foundation for clinical trials in GCTs of novel cancer therapeutics targeting RANKL. Using expression profiling, we identified both osteoblast and osteoclast signatures within GCTs, including key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and function such as RANKL, a C-type lectin, osteoprotegerin, and the wnt inhibitor SFRP4. After ex vivo generation of stromal- and osteoclast-enriched cultures, we unexpectedly found that RANKL mRNA and protein were more highly expressed in osteoclasts than in stromal cells, as determined by expression profiling, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The expression patterns of molecules implicated in signaling between stromal cells and monocytic osteoclast precursors were analyzed in both primary and fractionated GCTs. Finally, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, neither GCTs nor the derived stromal cells demonstrated significant genomic gains or losses. These data raise questions regarding the role of RANKL in GCTs that may be relevant to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. PMID:15972958

  4. Adipokines in Psoriatic Arthritis Patients: The Correlations with Osteoclast Precursors and Bone Erosions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qingqing; Chen, Haiyan; Yu, Yiyun; Lin, Yinda; Yang, Xue; Kong, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Xue; Wan, Weiguo; Zou, Hejian

    2012-01-01

    Significant bone remodeling with disordered osteoclastogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). And there is a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in PsA patients. Adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, have recently been reported to be involved in the development and regulation of some autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the alternation of circulating osteoclastogenesis related cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)] and adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin, omentin) in PsA patients, and analysed the correlations between these factors and osteoclast precursors numbers, radiographic damage scores, and disease activity index. 41 PsA patients, 20 psoriasis patients, and 24 healthy controls were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for detecting the levels of TNF-α, OPG, RANKL and the adipokines. The numbers of osteoclast precursors (OCs) in peripheral blood were assessed. Radiographs of affected joints in PsA patients were scored for erosion, joint-space narrowing, osteolysis, and new bone formation. Compared with healthy controls, patients with PsA had higher TNF-α, RANKL, OCs, leptin and omentin but lower adiponectin and chemerin. Increased serum levels of TNF-α, RANKL, leptin, and omentin were positively correlated with OCs numbers. In contrast, serum adiponectin levels were decreased in PsA patients and negatively correlated with OCs numbers. TNF-α, RANKL and leptin were positively correlated with Psoriatic Arthritis Joint Activity Index (PsAJAI). Only TNF-α was positively correlated with radiographic damage scores. Our data demonstrated that systemic expression of soluble mediators of osteoclastogenesis and adipokines were disordered in PsA. Certain adipokines were elevated in the circulation of patients with PsA and might contribute to pathogenesis of arthritis. Prospective studies

  5. The small molecule harmine regulates NFATc1 and Id2 expression in osteoclast progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Doi, Masanori; Saeki, Makio; Fukuyasu, Sho; Akashi, Yoshihiro; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Kamisaki, Yoshinori

    2011-08-01

    Small molecule compounds that potently affect osteoclastogenesis could be useful as chemical probes for elucidating the mechanisms of various biological phenomena and as effective therapeutic strategies against bone resorption. An osteoclast progenitor cell-based high-throughput screening system was designed to target activation of NFAT, which is a key event for osteoclastogenesis. Orphan ligand library screening using this system identified the β-carboline derivative harmine, which is a highly potent inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), to be an NFAT regulator in osteoclasts. RAW264.7 cells highly expressed DYRK1A protein, and in vitro phosphorylation assay demonstrated that harmine directly inhibited the DYRK1A-mediated phosphorylation (in-activation) of NFATc1. Harmine promoted the dephosphorylation (activation) of NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells within 24h, and it significantly increased the expression of NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells and mouse primary bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) both in the presence and absence of RANKL stimulation. Although harmine promoted NFATc1 expression and stimulated target genes for osteoclastogenesis, cell-cell fusion and the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated osteoclasts from RAW264.7 cells and BMMs was significantly inhibited by harmine treatment. Meanwhile, harmine remarkably promoted the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation-2 (Id2), which is a negative regulator for osteoclastogenesis, in RAW264.7 cells and BMMs. An Id2-null-mutant showed slightly increased osteoclast formation from BMMs, and the harmine-mediated inhibition of osteoclast formation was abolished in the BMMs of Id2-null-mutant mice. These results suggest that harmine is a potent activator of NFATc1 that interferes with the function of DYRK1A in osteoclast precursors and also up-regulates Id2 protein, which may dominantly inhibit expression pathways associated with cell-cell fusion, thereby leading to

  6. Osteoclast-like cells in soft tissue leiomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C L M H; Sun, S G; Vlychou, M; Kliskey, K; Lau, Y S; Sabokbar, A; Athanasou, N A

    2010-03-01

    Giant cell-rich leiomyosarcoma of soft tissues is an unusual variant of malignant smooth muscle tumor characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). The nature of MNGCs and the cellular mechanisms underlying their accumulation in this tumor are poorly understood. Analysis of the expression of osteoclast, macrophage, and smooth muscle markers in two cases of giant cell-rich leiomyosarcoma revealed that the MNGCs in giant cell-rich leiomyosarcoma were negative for smooth muscle markers and that these cells expressed an osteoclast-like phenotype, being positive for CD45, CD68, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and CD51 but negative for CD14 and HLA-DR. Scattered tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) also expressed this phenotype. Leiomyosarcoma tumor cells strongly reacted for CD51 but were negative for CD14, CD45, and CD68. An analysis of 25 conventional (nongiant cell-containing) leiomyosarcomas found isolated CD68(+) MNGCs in three cases (12%), all of which were grade II/III leiomyosarcomas containing a prominent TAM infiltrate. Leiomyosarcoma-derived TAMs in the presence of receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were capable of differentiating into osteoclast-like cells capable of resorbing bone. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction studies showed that RANKL, osteoprotegerin, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand were expressed by leiomyosarcoma cells. Our findings indicate that the giant cells found in leiomyosarcomas are osteoclast-like and that they are formed from TAMs by a RANKL-dependent mechanism.

  7. Effects of Silicon on Osteoclast Cell Mediated Degradation, In Vivo Osteogenesis and Vasculogenesis of Brushite Cement

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are being widely used for treating small scale bone defects. Among the various CPCs, brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement is widely used due to its superior solubility and ability to form new bone. In the present study, we have studied the physical, mechanical, osteoclast-like-cells differentiation and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of silicon (Si) doped brushite cements. Addition of Si did not alter the phase composition of final product and regardless of Si level, all samples included β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and DCPD. 1.1 wt. % Si addition increased the compressive strength of undoped brushite cement from 4.78±0.21 MPa to 5.53±0.53 MPa, significantly. Cellular activity was studied using receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) supplemented osteoclast-like-cells precursor RAW 264.7 cell. Phenotypic expressions of the cells confirmed successful differentiation of RAW264.7 monocytes to osteoclast-like-cells on undoped and doped brushite cements. An increased activity of osteoclast-like cells was noticed due to Si doping in the brushite cement. An excellent new bone formation was found in all cement compositions, with significant increase in Si doped brushite samples as early as 4 weeks post implantation in rat femoral model. After 4 weeks of implantation, no significant difference was found in blood vessel formation between the undoped and doped cements, however, a significant increase in vasculgenesis was found in 0.8 and 1.1 wt. % Si doped brushite cements after 8 weeks. These results show the influence of Si dopant on physical, mechanical, in vitro osteoclastogenesis and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of brushite cements. PMID:26855779

  8. Substance P stimulates bone marrow stromal cell osteogenic activity, osteoclast differentiation, and resorption activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Zhao, Rong; Shi, Xiaoyou; Wei, Tzuping; Halloran, Bernard P.; Clark, David J.; Jacobs, Christopher R.; Kingery, Wade S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction SP is a neuropeptide distributed in the sensory nerve fibers that innervate the medullar tissues of bone, as well as the periosteum. Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of neuropeptide signaling after capsaicin treatment resulted in a loss of bone mass and we hypothesized that SP contributes to bone integrity by stimulating osteogenesis. Materials and Methods Osteoblast precursors (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and osteoclast precursors (bone marrow macrophages, BMMs) derived from C57BL/6 mice were cultured. Expression of the SP receptor (NK1) was detected by using immunocytochemical staining and PCR. Effects of SP on proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were studied by measuring BrdU incorporation, gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin and Runx2 protein levels with EIA and western blot assays, respectively. Effects of SP on BMMs were determined using a BrdU assay, counting multinucleated cells staining positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP+), measuring pit erosion area, and evaluating RANKL protein production and NF-κB activity with ELISA and western blot. Results The NK1 receptor was expressed in both BMSCs and BMMs. SP stimulated the proliferation of BMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10−12 M) of SP stimulated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression, increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and up-regulated Runx2 protein levels, and higher concentrations of SP (10−8 M) enhanced mineralization in differentiated BMSCs. SP also stimulated BMSCs to produce RANKL, but at concentrations too low to evoke osteoclastogenesis in co-culture with macrophages in the presence of SP. SP also activated NF-κB in BMMs and directly facilitate RANKL induced macrophage osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity. Conclusions NK1 receptors are expressed by osteoblast and osteoclast precursors and SP stimulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in

  9. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita V; Geisler, Carsten; Karlsson, Lars; Söderström, Kalle

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow as well as to inflammatory sites associated with enhanced bone erosion, including the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, little is known about the impact NK cells may have on mature osteoclasts and bone erosion. We studied the interaction between human NK cells and autologous monocyte-derived osteoclasts from healthy donors in vitro. We show that osteoclasts express numerous ligands for receptors present on activated NK cells. Co-culture experiments revealed that interleukin-15-activated, but not resting, NK cells trigger osteoclast apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in drastically decreased bone erosion. Suppression of bone erosion requires contact between NK cells and osteoclasts, but soluble factors also play a minor role. Antibodies masking leucocyte function-associated antigen-1, DNAX accessory molecule-1 or tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand enhance osteoclast survival when co-cultured with activated NK cells and restore the capacity of osteoclasts to erode bone. These results suggest that interleukin-15-activated NK cells may directly affect bone erosion under physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. The effects of Lycii Radicis Cortex on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JAE-HYUN; KIM, EUN-YOUNG; LEE, BINA; MIN, JU-HEE; SONG, DEA-UK; LIM, JEONG-MIN; EOM, JI WHAN; YEOM, MIJUNG; JUNG, HYUK-SANG; SOHN, YOUNGJOO

    2016-01-01

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a serious age-related disease. After the menopause, estrogen deficiency is common, and excessive osteoclast activity causes osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells generated from the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage precursor cells such as RAW 264.7 cells. The water extract of Lycii Radicis Cortex (LRC) is made from the dried root bark of Lycium chinense Mill. and is termed 'Jigolpi' in Korea. Its effects on osteoclastogenesis and post-menopausal osteoporosis had not previously been tested. In the present study, the effect of LRC on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was demonstrated using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and pit formation assay. Moreover, in order to analyze molecular mechanisms, we studied osteoclastogenesis-related markers such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), c-Fos, receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), TRAP, cathepsin K (CTK), matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), calcitonin receptor (CTR) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) using RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. Additionally, we also determined the effect of LRC on an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. We noted that LRC inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via suppressing osteoclastogenesis-related markers. It also inhibited osteoporosis in the OVX rat model by decreasing loss of bone density and trabecular area. These results suggest that LRC exerts a positive effect on menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26848104

  11. Dendritic Cell-Specific Transmembrane Protein (DC-STAMP) Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation via the Ca(2+) /NFATc1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Hui; Schwarz, Edward; Li, Dongge; Xu, Yuexin; Sheu, Tzong-Ren; Li, Jinbo; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Feng, Changyong; Wang, Baoli; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Albertorio-Saez, Liz; Wood, Ronald; Kim, Minsoo; Wang, Wensheng; Ritchlin, Christopher T

    2016-10-10

    DC-STAMP is a multi-pass transmembrane protein essential for cell-cell fusion between osteoclast precursors during osteoclast (OC) development. DC-STAMP-/- mice have mild osteopetrosis and form mononuclear cells with limited resorption capacity. The identification of an Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Inhibitory Motif (ITIM) on the cytoplasmic tail of DC-STAMP suggested a potential signaling function. The absence of a known DC-STAMP ligand, however, has hindered the elucidation of downstream signaling pathways. To address this problem, we engineered a light-activatable DC-STAMP chimeric molecule in which light exposure mimics ligand engagement that can be traced by downstream Ca(2+) signaling. Deletion of the cytoplasmic ITIM resulted in a significant elevation in the amplitude and duration of intracellular Ca(2+) flux. Decreased NFATc1 expression in DC-STAMP-/- cells was restored by DC-STAMP over-expression. Multiple biological phenotypes including cell-cell fusion, bone erosion, cell mobility, DC-STAMP cell surface distribution, and NFATc1 nuclear translocation were altered by deletion of the ITIM and adjacent amino acids. In contrast, mutations on each of the tyrosine residues surrounding the ITIM showed no effect on DC-STAMP function. Collectively, our results suggest that the ITIM on DC-STAMP is a functional motif that regulates osteoclast differentiation through the NFATc1/Ca(2+) axis. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 1-12, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Glucocorticoids suppress bone formation via the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Zhao, Haibo; Kitaura, Hideki; Bhattacharyya, Sandip; Brewer, Judson A; Muglia, Louis J; Ross, F Patrick; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2006-08-01

    The pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced (GC-induced) bone loss is unclear. For example, osteoblast apoptosis is enhanced by GCs in vivo, but they stimulate bone formation in vitro. This conundrum suggests that an intermediary cell transmits a component of the bone-suppressive effects of GCs to osteoblasts in the intact animal. Bone remodeling is characterized by tethering of the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Hence, the osteoclast is a potential modulator of the effect of GCs on osteoblasts. To define the direct impact of GCs on bone-resorptive cells, we compared the effects of dexamethasone (DEX) on WT osteoclasts with those derived from mice with disruption of the GC receptor in osteoclast lineage cells (GRoc-/- mice). While the steroid prolonged longevity of osteoclasts, their bone-degrading capacity was suppressed. The inhibitory effect of DEX on bone resorption reflects failure of osteoclasts to organize their cytoskeleton in response to M-CSF. DEX specifically arrested M-CSF activation of RhoA, Rac, and Vav3, each of which regulate the osteoclast cytoskeleton. In all circumstances GRoc-/- mice were spared the impact of DEX on osteoclasts and their precursors. Consistent with osteoclasts modulating the osteoblast-suppressive effect of DEX, GRoc-/- mice are protected from the steroid's inhibition of bone formation.

  13. The role of microRNAs in osteoclasts and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peifu; Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the exclusive cells of bone resorption. Abnormally activating osteoclasts can lead to low bone mineral density, which will cause osteopenia, osteoporosis, and other bone disorders. To date, the mechanism of how osteoclast precursors differentiate into mature osteoclasts remains elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel regulatory factors that play an important role in numerous cellular processes, including cell differentiation and apoptosis, by post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Recently, a number of studies have revealed that miRNAs participate in bone homeostasis, including osteoclastic bone resorption, which sheds light on the mechanisms underlying osteoclast differentiation. In this review, we highlight the miRNAs involved in regulating osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, and their roles in osteoporosis.

  14. Arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing both calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the pit

  15. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  16. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  17. Fibroblasts from the inner granulation tissue of the pseudocapsule in hips at revision arthroplasty induce osteoclast differentiation, as do stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, H; Jingushi, S; Shuto, T; Urabe, K; Ikenoue, T; Okazaki, K; Kukita, T; Kukita, A; Iwamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has previously been shown that many osteoclast precursors are included in the granulation tissue within the pseudocapsule obtained at revision arthroplasty from hips with osteolysis. In vitro culture of only cells isolated from the granulation tissue has been previously shown to generate many mature osteoclasts. Objective: To investigate the presence or otherwise of supporting cells, similar to stromal cells, which differentiate osteoclasts within the granulation tissue. Methods: Cells isolated from the granulation tissue were cultured alone, and after four weeks fibroblast-like cells (granulation fibroblasts) remained. Rat non-adherent bone marrow cells (NA-BMCs) were co-cultured with the granulation fibroblasts with or without 1α,25(OH)2D3 (10-8 M) or heat treated ROS 17/2.8 cell conditioned medium (ht ROSCM), or both. Multinucleated cells (MNCs), which formed, were assessed by biochemical and functional characterisation of osteoclasts. Receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Co-culture of NA-BMCs and granulation fibroblasts caused the formation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive MNCs, which had the calcitonin receptor (CTR), the Kat-1 antigen, which is specific to the surface of rat osteoclasts, and the ability to form pits in the presence of both 1α,25(OH)2D3 and ht ROSCM or in the presence of just ht ROSCM. RANKL was detected in fibroblast-like cells in the granulation tissue. Conclusion: These data suggest that granulation fibroblasts support osteoclast differentiation, as do osteoblasts/stromal cells, and may play a part in aseptic loosening. PMID:11796394

  18. Notch signaling promotes osteoclast maturation and resorptive activity

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Jason W; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2015-01-01

    The role of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation is controversial with conflicting experimental evidence indicating both stimulatory and inhibitory roles. Differences in experimental protocols and in vivo versus in vitro models may explain the discrepancies between studies. In this study, we investigated cell autonomous roles of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation and function by altering Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation using stimulation with immobilized ligands Jagged1 or Delta-like1 or by suppression with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or transcriptional inhibitor SAHM1. Stimulation of Notch signaling in committed osteoclast precursors resulted in larger osteoclasts with a greater number of nuclei and resorptive activity whereas suppression resulted in smaller osteoclasts with fewer nuclei and suppressed resorptive activity. Conversely, stimulation of Notch signaling in osteoclast precursors prior to induction of osteoclastogenesis resulted in fewer osteoclasts. Our data support a mechanism of context-specific Notch signaling effects wherein Notch stimulation inhibits commitment to osteoclast differentiation, but enhances the maturation and function of committed precursors. PMID:25914241

  19. Interleukin 18 inhibits osteoclast formation via T cell production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, N J; Udagawa, N; Elliott, J; Grail, D; Okamura, H; Kurimoto, M; Dunn, A R; Martin, T; Gillespie, M T

    1998-01-01

    IL-18 inhibits osteoclast (OCL) formation in vitro independent of IFN-gamma production, and this was abolished by the addition of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. We now establish that IL-18 was unable to inhibit OCL formation in cocultures using GM-CSF-deficient mice (GM-CSF -/-). Reciprocal cocultures using either wild-type osteoblasts with GM-CSF -/- spleen cells or GM-CSF -/- osteoblasts with wild-type spleen cells were examined. Wild-type spleen cells were required to elicit a response to IL-18 indicating that cells of splenic origin were the IL-18 target. As T cells comprise a large proportion of the spleen cell population, the role of T cells in osteoclastogenesis was examined. Total T cells were removed and repleted in various combinations. Addition of wild-type T cells to a GM-CSF -/- coculture restored IL-18 inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Major subsets of T cells, CD4+ and CD8+, were also individually depleted. Addition of either CD4+ or CD8+ wild-type T cells restored IL-18 action in a GM-CSF -/- background, while IL-18 was ineffective when either CD4+ or CD8+ GM-CSF -/- T cells were added to a wild-type coculture. These results highlight the involvement of T cells in IL-18-induced OCL inhibition and provide evidence for a new OCL inhibitory pathway whereby IL-18 inhibits OCL formation due to action upon T cells promoting the release of GM-CSF, which in turn acts upon OCL precursors. PMID:9449693

  20. Incorporation of RANKL promotes osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity on β-TCP ceramics.

    PubMed

    Choy, John; Albers, Christoph E; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Dolder, Silvia; Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Klenke, Frank M

    2014-12-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics are approved for the repair of osseous defects. In large defects, however, the substitution of the material by authentic bone is inadequate to provide sufficient long-term mechanical stability. We aimed to develop composites of β-TCP ceramics and receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) to enhance the formation of osteoclasts and promote cell mediated calcium phosphate resorption. RANKL was adsorbed superficially onto β-TCP ceramics or incorporated into a crystalline layer of calcium phosphate by the use of a co-precipitation technique. Murine osteoclast precursors were seeded onto the ceramics. After 15 days, the formation of osteoclasts was quantified cytologically and colorimetrically with tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) staining and TRAP activity measurements, respectively. Additionally, the expression of transcripts encoding the osteoclast gene products cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHA2 were quantified by real-time PCR. The activity of newly formed osteoclasts was evaluated by means of a calcium phosphate resorption assay. Superficially adsorbed RANKL did not induce the formation of osteoclasts on β-TCP ceramics. When co-precipitated onto β-TCP ceramics RANKL supported the formation of mature osteoclasts. The development of osteoclast lineage cells was further confirmed by the increased expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and NHA2. Incorporated RANKL stimulated the cells to resorb crystalline calcium phosphate. Our in vitro study shows that RANKL incorporated into β-TCP ceramics induces the formation of active, resorbing osteoclasts on the material surface. Once formed, osteoclasts mediate the release of RANKL thereby perpetuating their differentiation and activation. In vivo, the stimulation of osteoclast-mediated resorption may contribute to a coordinated sequence of material resorption and bone formation. Further in vivo studies

  1. An unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma with osteoclastic stromal changes mimicking carcinosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Naujokas, Agne; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    A 91-year-old man presented with an ulcerated nodule on his left lower eyelid. The tumor showed an epithelial component composed of basaloid and clear cells and a stroma that contained many osteoclastic giant cells. Strong, diffuse expression for cytokeratin 17 and p63 was noted in the epithelial component, whereas no staining was present in the sarcomatoid stroma, suggesting that the osteoclast-rich stromal component represented an unusual benign stromal reaction to the carcinoma rather than a manifestation of carcinosarcoma. Further supporting this interpretation was the absence of mitotic figures and low Ki-67 proliferation index (of approximately 1%) in the stromal cells. We herein reported a case of unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma, accompanied by a clear cell carcinomatous features and concurrent benign osteoclastic stromal changes.

  2. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Anna; Anginot, Adrienne; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Schiff, Claudine; Carle, Georges F; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2011-07-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  4. Osteoclasts and their precursors are present in the induced-membrane during bone reconstruction using the Masquelet technique.

    PubMed

    Gouron, Richard; Petit, Laurent; Boudot, Cédric; Six, Isabelle; Brazier, Michel; Kamel, Said; Mentaverri, Romuald

    2017-02-01

    In 2000, Masquelet reported a long bone reconstruction technique using an induced membrane formed around a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacer placed in the defect with appropriate stabilization followed by secondary bone graft after PMMA removal. This reconstruction procedure allows rapid and safe bone reformation for septic, traumatic, neoplastic or congenital bone defects. A rat model of the Masquelet technique was developed to further characterize the biological activities of this induced membrane. Our model allows healing of a critical-sized femoral defect (8 mm) by means of this procedure over a period of 18 weeks. Comparison of induced membranes obtained 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks after PMMA insertion indicated that this tissue changes over time. Several mineralization spots and bone cells were observed in contact with the PMMA, when assessed by Alizarin Red, Von Kossa, Alkaline phosphatase and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of the membranes. CTR (calcitonin receptor)- and RANK (Receptor Activator of Nuclear factor Kappa B)- positive mononuclear cells were detected in the induced membrane, confirming the presence of osteoclasts in this tissue. These cells were observed in a thin, highly cellular layer in the induced membrane in contact with the PMMA. Together, these findings suggest that the membrane is able to promote osteointegration of autologous corticocancellous bone grafts during the Masquelet technique by creating local conditions that may be favourable to graft bone remodelling and osteointegration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Clodronate acts on human osteoclastic cell proliferation, differentiation and function in a bioreversible manner

    PubMed Central

    Recenti, Raffaella; Leone, Giuseppe; Simi, Lisa; Orfei, Marco; Pinzani, Pamela; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Moneti, Gloriano; Carossino, Anna Maria; Franchi, Alessandro; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Background. Clodronate is used in high bone resorption diseases. Its action was defined as “cytotoxic” based on the induced cellular ATP loss, without any experimental verification of reversibility. In the present report the reversibility of clodronate action was tested on cultured human osteoclastic cell cultures. As “in vitro” bioeffects of clodronate are reversible, this compound should not be defined as “cytotoxic”. Introduction. Bisphosphonates are pyrophosphate analogs able to inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption widely used in the treatment of diseases with high bone turnover. Several evidences have shown that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R2side chain. The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates act on osteoclasts by preventing protein prenylation, while non-nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, like clodronate, are metabolized intracellularly to a β-γ-methylene analog of ATP that induces inhibition of the ADP/ATP translocase. Materials and Methods. In order to evaluate clodronate effects on osteoclastic cells and the bioreversibility of its action, we have used a human preosteoclastic (FLG 29.1) cell line and primary cultures of human osteoclast-like (HOC) cells. Functional and differentiative modifications were evaluated with immunocytochemical tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity (TRAcP) assay and with rapid quantitative detection of the complex “matrix metalloproteinase 9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase” (MMP9/TIMP1) by RT-PCR analysis based on “TaqMan” technology. The apoptosis phenomenon were detected by DNA ladder analysis and quantified by counting apoptotic cells with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis. Adenosine-5’-[ β - γ -dichloromethylene] triphosphate (AppCCl2p) was detected and identified in cell extract by HPLC-ESI-MS-MS Mass Spectrometry. Intracellular ATP modulation in the presence of

  6. Extracellular protons acidify osteoclasts, reduce cytosolic calcium, and promote expression of cell-matrix attachment structures.

    PubMed Central

    Teti, A; Blair, H C; Schlesinger, P; Grano, M; Zambonin-Zallone, A; Kahn, A J; Teitelbaum, S L; Hruska, K A

    1989-01-01

    Because metabolic acids stimulate bone resorption in vitro and in vivo, we focused on the cellular events produced by acidosis that might be associated with stimulation of bone remodeling. To this end, we exposed isolated chicken osteoclasts to a metabolic (butyric) acid and observed a fall in both intracellular pH and cytosolic calcium [( Ca2+]i). These phenomena were recapitulated when bone resorptive cells, alkalinized by HCO3 loading, were transferred to a bicarbonate-free environment. The acid-induced decline in osteoclast [Ca2+]i was blocked by either NaCN or Na3VO4, in a Na+-independent fashion, despite the failure of each inhibitor to alter stimulated intracellular acidification. Moreover, K+-induced membrane depolarization also reduced cytosolic calcium in a manner additive to the effect of protons. These findings suggest that osteoclasts adherent to bone lack functional voltage-operated Ca2+ channels, and they reduced [Ca2+]i in response to protons via a membrane residing Ca-ATPase. Most importantly, acidosis enhances formation of podosomes, the contact areas of the osteoclast clear zone, indicating increased adhesion to substrate, an early step in bone resorption. Thus, extracellular acidification of osteoclasts leads to decrements in intracellular pH and calcium, and appears to promote cell-matrix attachment. Images PMID:2547838

  7. The responses of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and endothelial cells to zirconium modified calcium-silicate-based ceramic.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Yogambha; Wu, Chengtie; Van Hummel, Annika; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges; Zreiqat, Hala

    2008-11-01

    In this study we have developed Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) (Baghdadite) ceramics by incorporating Zirconium in Ca-Si system and determined their biological properties. Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics possess apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid, indicating their potential bioactivity. The response of human osteoblast like cells (HOB), osteoclast and endothelial cells when cultured on Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that this material supports HOB cell attachment with organized cytoskeleton structure. Compared to CaSiO(3), Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics induced increased HOB proliferation and differentiation as shown by increased methyltetrazidium salt (MTS), alkaline phosphatase activity, and mRNA expression levels of bone-related genes (Collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, Bone Sialoprotein, receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand and osteoprotegerin). Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics supported the fusion of monocytes to form functional osteoclasts with their characteristic features of f-actin ring structures and the expression of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin consistent with functional activity. Osteoclasts cultured on Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) expressed increased levels of osteoclast-related genes; Cathepsin K, Carbonic Anhydrase II, Matrix metalloproteinase-9, receptor activator of NF-kappaB and Calcitonin Receptor, consistent with the formation of functional osteoclasts. In addition to HOB and osteoclasts, Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) supported the attachment of endothelial cells, which expressed the endothelial cell markers; ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin. Results presented here indicate that Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics have the potential for applications in bone tissue regeneration.

  8. Deflazacort increases osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow culture and the ratio of RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, H.; Kang, Y. S.; Hwang, C. S.; Moon, I. K.; Yim, C. H.; Choi, K. H.; Han, K. O.; Jang, H. C.; Yoon, H. K.; Han, I. K.

    2001-01-01

    Information on precise effects of deflazacort on bone cell function, especially osteoclasts, is quite limited. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to test effects of deflazacort on osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow cultures and on the regulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand (RANKL) mRNA expressions by RT-PCR in the ST2 marrow stromal cells. TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased after the treatment of deflazacort at 10(-9) to 10(-7) M alone for 6 days in a dose-dependent manner. Number of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells (MNCs) increased significantly with combined treatment of deflazacort at 10(-7) M and 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M compared to that of cultures treated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 alone (p<0.05). Exposure to deflazacort at 10(-7) M in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M in the last 3-day culture had greater stimulatory effect on osteoclast-like cell formation than that of the first 3-day culture did. Deflazacort at 10(-10) -10(-6) M downregulated OPG and upregulated RANKL in mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that deflazacort stimulate osteoclast precursor in the absence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and enhance differentiation of osteoclasts in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3. These effects are, in part, thought to be mediated by the regulation of the expression of OPG and RANKL mRNA in marrow stromal cells. PMID:11748360

  9. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic.

  10. Rab13 Is Upregulated During Osteoclast Differentiation and Associates with Small Vesicles Revealing Polarized Distribution in Resorbing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mulari, Mika T. K.; Büki, Kálmán G.; Vihko, Pirkko; Härkönen, Pirkko L.; Väänänen, H. Kalervo

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing multinucleated cells that undergo drastic changes in their polarization due to heavy vesicular trafficking during the resorption cycle. These events require the precise orchestration of membrane traffic in order to maintain the unique characteristics of the different membrane domains in osteoclasts. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in regulation of most, if not all, steps of vesicle trafficking. The investigators studied RAB genes in human osteoclasts and found that at least 26 RABs were expressed in osteoclasts. Out of these, RAB13 gene expression was highly upregulated during differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytic cells into osteoclasts. To study its possible function in osteoclasts, the investigators performed immunolocalization studies for Rab13 and various known markers of osteoclast vesicular trafficking. Rab13 localized to small vesicular structures at the superior parts of the osteoclast between the trans-Golgi network and basolateral membrane domain. Rab13 localization suggests that it is not involved in endocytosis or transcytosis of bone degradation products. In addition, Rab13 did not associate with early endosomes or recycling endosomes labeled with EEA1 or TRITC-conjugated transferrin, respectively. Its involvement in glucose transporter traffic was excluded as well. It is suggested that Rab13 is associated with a putative secretory function in osteoclasts. PMID:22562557

  11. Inhibitory effect of menaquinone-7 (vitamin K2) on osteoclast-like cell formation and osteoclastic bone resorption in rat bone tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Ma, Z J

    2001-12-01

    The effect of menaquinone-7 (MK-7; vitamin K2) on osteoclast-like cell formation and osteoclastic bone resorption in rat femoral tissues in vitro was investigated. The bone marrow cells were cultured for 7 days in a a-minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) containing a well-known bone resorbing agent [parathyroid hormone (1-34) (PTH) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)] with an effective concentration. Osteoclast-like cells were estimated by staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP), a marker enzyme of osteoclasts. The presence of PTH (10(-8) M) or PGE2 (10(-6) M) induced a remarkable increase in osteoclast-like multinucleated cells. These increases were significantly inhibited by MK-7 (10(-8) - 10(-5) M). MK-7 (10(-7) and 10(-6) M) significantly inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced osteoclast-like cell formation, whereas MK-7 did not inhibit dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (DcAMP) (10(-5) M)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of MK-7 is partly involved in protein kinase C signaling. The bone cells isolated from rat femoral tissues were cultured for 48 h in an alpha-MEM containing either vehicle or MK-7 (10(-8) - 10(-5) M). The presence of MK-7 (10(-6) and 10(-5) M) caused a significant decrease in the number of mature osteoclasts. Such a decrease was also seen in the presence of calcitonin (10(-10) - 10(-8) M), DcAMP (10(-6) and 10(-5) M), or calcium chloride (10(-4) and 10(-3) M). The effect of MK-7 (10(-6) M) in decreasing the number of osteoclasts was not further enhanced in the presence of calcitonin (10(-8) M), DcAMP (10(-5) M), or calcium chloride (10(-3) M), and was completely abolished by the presence of dibucaine (10(-6) M) or staurosporine (10(-7) M), which are inhibitors of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases. These results suggested that MK-7 has a suppressive effect on osteoclasts. Moreover, the femoral-metaphyseal tissues obtained from rats were cultured for 48 h in Dulbecco

  12. Sinomenine induces apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cell-derived osteoclasts in vitro via caspase-3 activation

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-gang; Li, Xiang-lian; Zeng, Xiang-zhou; Duan, Heng; Wang, Song; Lei, Lin-sheng; Li, Xiao-juan; Liu, Shu-wen

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Sinomenine (SIN) is an alkaloid found in the roots and stems of Sinomenium acutum, which has been used to treat rheumatic arthritis in China and Japan. In this study we investigated the effects of SIN on osteoclast survival in vitro and the mechanisms of the actions. Methods: Mature osteoclasts were differentiated from murine monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 through incubation in the presence of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL, 100 ng/mL) for 4 d. The cell viability was detected using the CCK-8 method. The survival and actin ring construction of the osteoclasts were scored using TRACP staining and phalloidin-FITC staining, respectively. The apoptosis of the osteoclasts was detected by DNA fragmentation and Hoechst 33258 staining, and the cell necrosis was indicated by LDH activity. The activation of caspase-3 in osteoclasts was measured using Western blotting and the caspase-3 activity colorimetric method. Results: SIN (0.25–2 mmol/L) inhibited the viability of mature osteoclasts in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners, but did not affect that of RAW264.7 cells. Consistently, SIN dose-dependently suppressed the survival of mature osteoclasts. The formation of actin ring, a marker associated with actively resorbing osteoclasts, was also impaired by the alkaloid. SIN (0.5 mmol/L) induced the apoptosis of mature osteoclasts, which was significantly attenuated in the presence of the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. SIN increased the cleavage of caspase-3 in mature osteoclasts in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners. Furthermore, SIN dose-dependently enhanced caspase-3 activity, which was blocked in the presence of Ac-DEVD-CHO. Conclusion: Sinomenine inhibits osteoclast survival in vitro through caspase-3-mediated apoptosis, thus it is a potential agent for treating excessive bone resorption diseases. PMID:24362325

  13. Cell fusion in osteoclasts plays a critical role in controlling bone mass and osteoblastic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Ninomiya, Ken; Miyamoto, Kana; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Yuiko

    2008-12-19

    The balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activity is central for maintaining the integrity of bone homeostasis. Here we show that mice lacking dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), an essential molecule for osteoclast cell-cell fusion, exhibited impaired bone resorption and upregulation of bone formation by osteoblasts, which do not express DC-STAMP, which led to increased bone mass. On the contrary, DC-STAMP over-expressing transgenic (DC-STAMP-Tg) mice under the control of an actin promoter showed significantly accelerated cell-cell fusion of osteoclasts and bone resorption, with decreased osteoblastic activity and bone mass. Bone resorption and formation are known to be regulated in a coupled manner, whereas DC-STAMP regulates bone homeostasis in an un-coupled manner. Thus our results indicate that inhibition of a single molecule provides both decreased osteoclast activity and increased bone formation by osteoblasts, thereby increasing bone mass in an un-coupled and a tissue specific manner.

  14. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  15. Sr-substituted bone cements direct mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts fate

    PubMed Central

    Panseri, Silvia; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Tampieri, Anna; Sprio, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Strontium-substituted apatitic bone cements enriched with sodium alginate were developed as a potential modulator of bone cells fate. The biological impact of the bone cement were investigated in vitro through the study of the effect of the nanostructured apatitic composition and the doping of strontium on mesenchymal stem cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoclasts behaviours. Up to 14 days of culture the bone cells viability, proliferation, morphology and gene expression profiles were evaluated. The results showed that different concentrations of strontium were able to evoke a cell-specific response, in fact an inductive effect on mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and pre-osteoblasts proliferation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclasts activity were observed. Moreover, the apatitic structure of the cements provided a biomimetic environment suitable for bone cells growth. Therefore, the combination of biological features of this bone cement makes it as promising biomaterials for tissue regeneration. PMID:28196118

  16. Positive regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by growth differentiation factor 15 upregulated in osteocytic cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Ochi, Hiroki; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakatani, Eri; Iezaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Hidano, Shinya; Kobayashi, Takashi; Takeda, Shu; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-04-01

    Osteocytes are thought to play a role as a mechanical sensor through their communication network in bone. Although osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone, little attention has been paid to their physiological and pathological functions in skeletogenesis. Here, we have attempted to delineate the pivotal functional role of osteocytes in regulation of bone remodeling under pathological conditions. We first found markedly increased osteoclastic differentiation by conditioned media (CM) from osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells previously exposed to hypoxia in vitro. Using microarray and real-time PCR analyses, we identified growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) as a key candidate factor secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia. Recombinant GDF15 significantly promoted osteoclastic differentiation in a concentration-dependent manner, with concomitant facilitation of phosphorylation of both p65 and inhibitory-κB in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. To examine the possible functional significance of GDF15 in vivo, mice were subjected to ligation of the right femoral artery as a hypoxic model. A significant increase in GDF15 expression was specifically observed in tibias of the ligated limb but not in tibias of the normally perfused limb. Under these experimental conditions, in cancellous bone of proximal tibias in the ligated limb, a significant reduction was observed in bone volume, whereas a significant increase was seen in the extent of osteoclast surface/bone surface when determined by bone histomorphometric analysis. Finally, the anti-GDF15 antibody prevented bone loss through inhibiting osteoclastic activation in tibias from mice with femoral artery ligation in vivo, in addition to suppressing osteoclastic activity enhanced by CM from osteocytes exposed to hypoxia in vitro. These findings suggest that GDF15 could play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bone loss relevant to hypoxia through promotion of osteoclastogenesis after

  17. Dendritic cells enhance UHMWPE wear particle-induced osteoclast differentiation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cang, Dingwei; Guo, Kaijin; Zhao, Fengchao

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used in large joint replacement. Osteolysis induced by the UHMWPE wear particles is one of the main causes of replacement failure. This study aims to elucidate whether dendritic cells play a role in UHMWPE particle-induced osteolysis. An in vitro Raw 264.7 and DC 2.4 coculture system was employed to examine the effects of dendritic cells on the inflammatory and osteoclastogenic responses of Raw 264.7 toward UHMWPE particles. The expression of cytokines, NF-κB, and osteoclast marker genes was analyzed by ELISA, western blot, or quantitative PCR. The osteoclast differentiation was measured by TRAP staining and flow cytometry. UHMWPE particles induced Raw 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, which was enhanced by coculturing with DC 2.4 cells. DC 2.4 cells augmented UHMWPE particle-elicited activation of NF-κB signaling, higher levels of TNF-α and MCP-1, and an increased expression of MMP-9, Calcr, and Ctsk, though DC 2.4 coculture alone did not significantly cause the aforementioned changes. These results suggest that dendritic cells, among other immune cells recruited by UHMWPE particle induced inflammation, could further exacerbate inflammation and osteolysis.

  18. Acid-inducible proton influx currents in the plasma membrane of murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Miyuki; Li, Guangshuai; Moriura, Yoshie; Hino, Yoshiko; Kawawaki, Junko; Sakai, Hiromu

    2016-05-01

    Acidification of the resorption pits, which is essential for dissolving bone, is produced by secretion of protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPases in the plasma membrane of bone-resorbing cells, osteoclasts. Consequently, osteoclasts face highly acidic extracellular environments, where the pH gradient across the plasma membrane could generate a force driving protons into the cells. Proton influx mechanisms during the acid exposure are largely unknown, however. In this study, we investigated extracellular-acid-inducible proton influx currents in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Decreasing extracellular pH to <5.5 induced non-ohmic inward currents. The reversal potentials depended on the pH gradients across the membrane and were independent of concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-), suggesting that they were carried largely by protons. The acid-inducible proton influx currents were not inhibited by amiloride, a widely used blocker for cation channels/transporters, or by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenesulfonate(DIDS) which blocks anion channels/transporters. Additionally, the currents were not significantly affected by V-ATPase inhibitors, bafilomycin A1 and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Extracellular Ca(2+) (10 mM) did not affect the currents, but 1 mM ZnCl2 decreased the currents partially. The intracellular pH in the vicinity of the plasma membrane was dropped by the acid-inducible H(+) influx currents, which caused overshoot of the voltage-gated H(+) channels after removal of acids. The H(+) influx currents were smaller in undifferentiated, mononuclear RAW cells and were negligible in COS7 cells. These data suggest that the acid-inducible H(+) influx (H(+) leak) pathway may be an additional mechanism modifying the pH environments of osteoclasts upon exposure to strong acids.

  19. Hyaluronan–CD44 interaction hampers migration of osteoclast-like cells by down-regulating MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Spessotto, Paola; Rossi, Francesca Maria; Degan, Massimo; Di Francia, Raffaele; Perris, Roberto; Colombatti, Alfonso; Gattei, Valter

    2002-01-01

    Osteoclast (OC) precursors migrate to putative sites of bone resorption to form functionally active, multinucleated cells. The preOC FLG 29.1 cells, known to be capable of irreversibly differentiating into multinucleated OC-like cells, displayed several features of primary OCs, including expression of specific integrins and the hyaluronan (HA) receptor CD44. OC-like FLG 29.1 cells adhered to and extensively migrated through membranes coated with fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminins, but, although strongly binding to HA, totally failed to move on this substrate. Moreover, soluble HA strongly inhibited OC-like FLG 29.1 cell migration on the permissive matrix substrates, and this behavior was dependent on its engagement with CD44, as it was fully restored by function-blocking anti-CD44 antibodies. HA did not modulate the cell–substrate binding affinity/avidity nor the expression levels of the corresponding integrins. MMP-9 was the major secreted metalloproteinase used by OC-like FLG 29.1 cells for migration, because this process was strongly inhibited by both TIMP-1 and GM6001, as well as by MMP-9–specific antisense oligonucleotides. After HA binding to CD44, a strong down-regulation of MMP-9 mRNA and protein was detected. These findings highlight a novel role of the HA–CD44 interaction in the context of OC-like cell motility, suggesting that it may act as a stop signal for bone-resorbing cells. PMID:12235127

  20. TULA-2, a novel histidine phosphatase regulates bone remodeling by modulating osteoclast function

    PubMed Central

    Back, Steven H.; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Barbe, Mary F.; Carpino, Nick C.; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.; Sanjay, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that depends on the intricate relationship between protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) for maintaining homeostasis. PTKs and PTPs act like molecular on and off switches and help modulate differentiation and the attachment of osteoclasts to bone matrix regulating bone resorption. The novel protein T-cell Ubiquitin Ligand-2 (TULA-2), which is abundantly expressed in osteoclasts, is a novel histidine phosphatase. Our results show that of the two family members only TULA-2 is expressed in osteoclasts and that its expression is sustained throughout the course of osteoclast differentiation suggesting that TULA-2 may play a role during early as well late stages of osteoclast differentiation. Skeletal analysis of mice that do not express TULA or TULA-2 proteins (DKO Mice) revealed that there was a decrease in bone volume due to increased osteoclast numbers and function. Furthermore, in vitro experiments indicated that bone marrow precursor cells from DKO mice have an increased potential to form osteoclasts. At the molecular level, the absence of TULA-2 in osteoclasts results in increased Syk phosphorylation at the Y352 and Y525/526 residues and activation of phospholipase C gamma 2 (PLCγ2) upon engagement of Immune-receptor-Tyrosine-based-Activation-Motif (ITAM)–mediated signaling. Furthermore, expression of a phosphatase-dead TULA-2 leads to increased osteoclast function. Taken together, these results suggest that TULA-2 negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:23149425

  1. Dihydroartemisinin prevents breast cancer-induced osteolysis via inhibiting both breast caner cells and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-Xuan; Hong, Jian-Xin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Yong-Yong; Yuan, Chi-Ting; Lei, Xin-Huan; Zhu, Min; Qin, An; Chen, Hai-Xiao; Hong, Dun

    2016-01-08

    Bone is the most common site of distant relapse in breast cancer, leading to severe complications which dramatically affect the patients' quality of life. It is believed that the crosstalk between metastatic breast cancer cells and osteoclasts is critical for breast cancer-induced osteolysis. In this study, the effects of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) on osteoclast formation, bone resorption, osteoblast differentiation and mineralization were initially assessed in vitro, followed by further investigation in a titanium-particle-induced osteolysis model in vivo. Based on the proved inhibitory effect of DHA on osteolysis, DHA was further applied to MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-induced mouse osteolysis model, with the underlying molecular mechanisms further investigated. Here, we verified for the first time that DHA suppressed osteoclast differentiation, F-actin ring formation and bone resorption through suppressing AKT/SRC pathways, leading to the preventive effect of DHA on titanium-particle-induced osteolysis without affecting osteoblast function. More importantly, we demonstrated that DHA inhibited breast tumor-induced osteolysis through inhibiting the proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells via modulating AKT signaling pathway. In conclusion, DHA effectively inhibited osteoclastogenesis and prevented breast cancer-induced osteolysis.

  2. Lack of ADAM10 in endothelial cells affects osteoclasts at the chondro-osseus junction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ren; Wang, Aimin; Hall, Katherine C; Otero, Miguel; Weskamp, Gisela; Zhao, Baohong; Hill, Daniel; Goldring, Mary B; Glomski, Krzysztof; Blobel, Carl P

    2014-02-01

    Mice lacking ADAM10 in endothelial cells (Adam10ΔEC mice) have shorter femurs, tibiae, and humeri than controls, raising questions about how endothelial cells could control long bone growth. We performed a histopathological evaluation of the femur and tibia growth plates at different postnatal stages, and assessed the distribution of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and endothelial cells at the growth plate. The growth plates in Adam10ΔEC mice appeared normal at P7 and P14, but a thickened zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes and increased trabecular bone density were apparent by P21 and later. The number of TRAP+ cells at the COJ was normal at P7 and P14, but was strongly reduced at P21 and later. Moreover, the density of endomucin-stained endothelial cells at the COJ was increased starting at P7. The defects in long bone growth in Adam10ΔEC mice could be caused by a lack of osteoclastogenesis at the COJ. Moreover, ADAM10 appears to regulate endothelial cell organization in the developing bone vasculature, perhaps in a similar manner as in the developing retinal vascular tree, where ADAM10 is thought to control Notch-dependent endothelial cell fate decisions. This study provides evidence for the regulation of osteoclast function by endothelial cells in vivo.

  3. The pathobiology of the osteoclast.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, T J

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews recent information concerning the origin of osteoclasts and the local and systemic regulation of their activity. It appears that much of the environmental responsiveness of osteoclasts is mediated by cells of the osteoblastic lineage, which exert a major influence on the localisation, induction, stimulation, and inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption. Some of the mechanisms by which osteoclast function may be disturbed by inflammatory and neoplastic diseases are discussed, and it is suggested that many pathological disturbances of osteoclastic bone resorption may be explicable as mimicry of physiological regulatory mechanisms by local hormones introduced into bone as the local regulators of the diseased tissue. Images PMID:2982920

  4. A study of osteoclasts on calvaria of normal and osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mice by vital staining with acridine orange.

    PubMed Central

    Green, P. M.; Marshall, M. J.; Nisbet, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    A novel staining procedure for enumerating osteoclasts on neonatal mouse calvaria with the vital fluorescent dye acridine orange is described. It has the advantage over Barnicot's neutral-red method in that the nuclei and cytoplasm of the osteoclast are stained differentially. The osteopetrotic calvarium (mi/mi) has fewer multinucleate osteoclasts than its normal counterpart (mi/+) and they are differently distributed. The osteopetrotic calvarium has more mononucleate cells which stain like osteoclasts with acridine orange than the normal calvarium and these cells also are differently distributed. These mononuclear cells may be mononuclear osteoclasts or their precursors. These observations suggest that the defect resulting in this osteopetrosis lies with osteoclast differentiation. Images Fig. 1 p[88]-a PMID:2418863

  5. Histochemical evidence of osteoclastic degradation of extracellular matrix in osteolytic metastasis originating from human lung small carcinoma (SBC-5) cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio; Takeuchi, Kiichi; Freitas, Paulo H L; Kawano, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Masaaki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of osteoclast migration and the degradation of unmineralized extracellular matrix in an osteolytic metastasis by examining a well-standardized lung cancer metastasis model of nude mice. SBC-5 human lung small carcinoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of 6-week-old BALB/c nu/nu mice under anesthesia. At 25-30 days after injection, the animals were sacrificed and their femora and/or tibiae were removed for histochemical analyses. Metastatic lesions were shown to occupy a considerable area extending from the metaphyses to the bone marrow region. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive osteoclasts were found in association with an alkaline phosphatase (ALPase)-positive osteoblastic layer lining the bone surface, but could also be localized in the ALPase-negative stromal tissues that border the tumor nodules. These stromal tissues were markedly positive for osteopontin, and contained a significant number of TRAPase-positive osteoclasts expressing immunoreactivity for CD44. We thus speculated that, mediating its affinity for CD44, osteopontin may serve to facilitate osteoclastic migration after their formation associated with ALPase-positive osteoblasts. We next examined the localization of cathepsin K and matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) in osteoclasts. Osteoclasts adjacent to the bone surfaces were positive for both proteins, whereas those in the stromal tissues in the tumor nests showed only MMP-9 immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy disclosed the presence of MMP-9 in the Golgi apparatus and in vesicular structures at the baso-lateral cytoplasmic region of the osteoclasts found in the stromal tissue. MMP-9-positive vesicular structures also contained fragmented extracellular materials. Thus, osteoclasts appear to either select an optimized function, namely secreting proteolytic enzymes from ruffled borders during bone resorption, or recognize the surrounding extracellular

  6. Advances in osteoclast biology reveal potential new drug targets and new roles for osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Brendan F

    2013-04-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated myeloid lineage cells formed in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) by fusion of bone marrow-derived precursors that circulate in the blood and are attracted to sites of bone resorption in response to factors, such as sphingosine-1 phosphate signaling. Major advances in understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating osteoclast functions have been made in the past 20 years, mainly from mouse and human genetic studies. These have revealed that osteoclasts express and respond to proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Some of these cytokines activate NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling to induce osteoclast formation and activity and also regulate communication with neighboring cells through signaling proteins, including ephrins and semaphorins. Osteoclasts also positively and negatively regulate immune responses and osteoblastic bone formation. These advances have led to development of new inhibitors of bone resorption that are in clinical use or in clinical trials; and more should follow, based on these advances. This article reviews current understanding of how bone resorption is regulated both positively and negatively in normal and pathologic states.

  7. Interleukin-3 plays dual roles in osteoclastogenesis by promoting the development of osteoclast progenitors but inhibiting the osteoclastogenic process

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Huixian; Shi, Zhenqi; Qiao, Ping; Li, Hui; McCoy, Erin M.; Mao, Ping; Xu, Hui; Feng, Xu; Wang, Shunqing

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells generates a population of hematopoietic cells. •IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts. •Osteoclasts derived from IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells are functional. •IL-3 promotes the development of osteoclast progenitors. •IL-3 inhibits the osteoclastogenic process. -- Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-3, a multilineage hematopoietic growth factor, is implicated in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. However, the role of IL-3 in osteoclastogenesis remains controversial; whereas early studies showed that IL-3 stimulates osteoclastogenesis, recent investigations demonstrated that IL-3 inhibits osteoclast formation. The objective of this work is to further address the role of IL-3 in osteoclastogenesis. We found that IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells generated a population of cells capable of differentiating into osteoclasts in tissue culture dishes in response to the stimulation of the monocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). The IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells were able to further proliferate and differentiate in response to M-CSF stimulation and the resulting cells were also capable of forming osteoclasts with M-CSF and RANKL treatment. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits M-CSF-/RANKL-induced differentiation of the IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells into osteoclasts. The flow cytometry analysis indicates that while IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells slightly affected the percentage of osteoclast precursors in the surviving populations, it considerably increased the percentage of osteoclast precursors in the populations after subsequent M-CSF treatment. Moreover, osteoclasts derived from IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells were fully functional. Thus, we conclude that IL-3 plays dual roles in osteoclastogenesis by promoting the development of osteoclast progenitors but inhibiting the

  8. Elevated marrow inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in subchondral osteosclerosis in human knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen; Patel, Amit; Hirschmann, Michael T; Pagenstert, Geert I; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor; Hügle, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subchondral osteosclerosis, characterized by an increase of hypomineralized bone material, is a pathological hallmark of osteoarthritis. The cellular components in the subchondral marrow compartment that participate in this aberrant bone remodeling process remain to be elucidated. This study assessed the presence of marrow inflammatory cells and their relative abundance between nonsclerotic and sclerotic tissues in knee osteoarthritis. Bone samples from osteoarthritic knee tibial plateaus were stratified for histological analyses using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Immunohistological analysis revealed the presence of CD20 (B-lymphocyte) and CD68 (macrophage), but not CD3 (T-lymphocyte) immunoreactive mononuclear cells in subchondral marrow tissues and their relative abundance was significantly increased in sclerotic compared with nonsclerotic bone samples. Multinucleated osteoclasts that stained positive for CD68 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, predominantly associated with CD34-positive blood vessels and their abundance was strongly increased in sclerotic samples. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity in outgrowth osteoblasts was induced by conditioned medium from nonsclerotic, but not sclerotic, bone pieces. These results suggest that an interaction between bone-resident cells and marrow inflammatory cells might play a role in aberrant bone remodeling leading to subchondral osteosclerosis. Elevated osteoclast activity in sclerotic bone suggests that bone formation and resorption activities are increased, yet uncoupled, in human knee osteoarthritis.

  9. Netrin-1 Is a Critical Autocrine/Paracrine Factor for Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Moore, Kathryn J; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Bone metabolism is a vital process that involves resorption by osteoclasts and formation by osteoblasts, which is closely regulated by immune cells. The neuronal guidance protein Netrin-1 regulates immune cell migration and inflammatory reactions, but its role in bone metabolism is unknown. During osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast precursors increase expression of Netrin-1 and its receptor Unc5b. Netrin-1 binds, in an autocrine and paracrine manner, to Unc5b to promote osteoclast differentiation in vitro, and absence of Netrin-1 or antibody-mediated blockade of Netrin-1 or Unc5b prevents osteoclast differentiation of both murine and human precursors. We confirmed the functional relationship of Netrin-1 in osteoclast differentiation in vivo using Netrin-1-deficient (Ntn1−/−) or wild-type (WT) bone marrow transplanted mice. Notably, Ntn1−/− chimeras have markedly diminished osteoclasts, as well as increased cortical and trabecular bone density and volume compared with WT mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Netrin-1 regulates osteoclast differentiation by altering cytoskeletal assembly. Netrin-1 increases regulator of Rho-GEF subfamily (LARG) and repulsive guidance molecule (RGMa) association with Unc5b, which increases expression and activation of cytoskeletal regulators RhoA and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Netrin-1 and its receptor Unc5b likely play a role in fusion of osteoclast precursors because Netrin-1 and DC-STAMP are tightly linked. These results identify Netrin-1 as a key regulator of osteoclast differentiation that may be a new target for bone therapies. PMID:25483983

  10. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Suppress Hif1α Protein Accumulation in Mouse Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Kobayashi, Tami; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Oike, Takatsugu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Kawana, Hiromasa; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Anti-bone resorptive drugs such as bisphosphonates, the anti-RANKL antibody (denosumab), or selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been developed to treat osteoporosis. Mechanisms underlying activity of bisphosphonates or denosumab in this context are understood, while it is less clear how SERMs like tamoxifen, raloxifene, or bazedoxifene inhibit bone resorption. Recently, accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) in osteoclasts was shown to be suppressed by estrogen in normal cells. In addition, osteoclast activation and decreased bone mass seen in estrogen-deficient conditions was found to require Hif1α. Here, we used western blot analysis of cultured osteoclast precursor cells to show that tamoxifen, raloxifene, or bazedoxifene all suppress Hif1α protein accumulation. The effects of each SERM on osteoclast differentiation differed in vitro. Our results suggest that interventions such as the SERMs evaluated here could be useful to inhibit Hif1α and osteoclast activity under estrogen-deficient conditions. PMID:27802325

  11. The Type II Collagen N-propeptide, PIIBNP, inhibits cell survival and bone resorption of osteoclasts via integrin-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinya; Wang, Zhepeng; Bryan, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Chikashi; Faccio, Roberta; Sandell, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Type IIB procollagen is characteristic of cartilage, comprising 50% of the extracellular matrix. The NH2-propeptide of type IIB collagen, PIIBNP, can kill tumor cells via binding to integrins αVβ3 and αVβ5. As osteoclasts rely on αVβ3 integrins for function in bone erosion, we sought to determine whether PIIBNP could inhibit osteoclast function. Methods We undertook in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate both osteoblast and osteoclast function in the presence of recombinant PIIBNP. Adhesion of osteoclasts to PIIBNP was analyzed by staining of attached cells with crystal violet. PIIBNP-induced cell death was evaluated by cell counting Trypan Blue stained cells. The mechanism of cell death was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL staining and western blotting to detect cleaved caspases. To determine the role of αVβ3 integrin, osteoclasts were pretreated with αV or β3 integrin specific siRNA before the treatment with PIIBNP. To explore PIIBNP function in vivo, a lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse calvaria lysis model was employed. Results Osteoclasts adhered to PIIBNP via an RGD-mediated mechanism. When osteoclasts were plated on extracellular matrix proteins, PIIBNP induced apoptosis of osteoclasts via caspase 3/8 activation. Osteoblasts and macrophages were not killed. Reduction of αV or β3 integrin levels on osteoclasts by siRNA reduced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, PIIBNP could inhibit bone resorption. Conclusion We conclude that PIIBNP can inhibit osteoclast survival and bone resorption via signal transduction through the αVβ3 integrins. Because of this property and the cell specificity, we propose that PIIBNP may play a role in vivo in protecting cartilage from osteoclast invasion and also could be a new therapeutic strategy for decreasing bone loss. PMID:21708300

  12. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  13. High bone mass in mice lacking Cx37 because of defective osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Davis, Hannah M; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2014-03-21

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37(-/-)) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37(-/-) mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37(-/-) mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37(+/+) littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37(-/-) bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37(+/+) cell cultures. Further, Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37(-/-) mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo.

  14. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  15. CathepsinKCre mediated deletion of βcatenin results in dramatic loss of bone mass by targeting both osteoclasts and osteoblastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Paula; Martin-Millan, Marta; Gonzalez-Martin, M. C.; Almeida, Maria; González-Macias, Jesús; Ros, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that activation of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in the osteoblast lineage leads to an increase in bone mass through a dual mechanism: increased osteoblastogenesis and decreased osteoclastogenesis. However, the effect of this pathway on the osteoclast lineage has been less explored. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in mature osteoclasts by generating mice lacking βcatenin in CathepsinK-expressing cells (Ctnnb1f/f;CtsKCre mice). These mice developed a severe low-bone-mass phenotype with onset in the second month and in correlation with an excessive number of osteoclasts, detected by TRAP staining and histomorphometric quantification. We found that WNT3A, through the canonical pathway, promoted osteoclast apoptosis and therefore attenuated the number of M-CSF and RANKL-derived osteoclasts in vitro. This reveals a cell-autonomous effect of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in controlling the life span of mature osteoclasts. Furthermore, bone Opg expression in Ctnnb1f/f;CtsKCre mice was dramatically decreased pointing to an additional external activation of osteoclasts. Accordingly, expression of CathepsinK was detected in TRAP-negative cells of the inner periosteal layer also expressing Col1. Our results indicate that the bone phenotype of Ctnnb1f/f;CtsKCre animals combines a cell-autonomous effect in the mature osteoclast with indirect effects due to the additional targeting of osteoblastic cells. PMID:27804995

  16. Osteopontin expression in co-cultures of human squamous cell carcinoma-derived cells and osteoblastic cells and its effects on the neoplastic cell phenotype and osteoclastic activation.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Lucas Novaes; de Castro Raucci, Larissa Moreira Spinola; Alonso, Gabriela Caroline; Coletta, Ricardo Della; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the temporal expression of osteopontin (OPN) in co-cultures of human osteoblastic cells (SAOS-2) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)-derived cells (SCC9) and examined the effects of osteoblast-derived OPN on the neoplastic cell phenotype. Additionally, the effects of these co-cultures on subsequent osteoclastic activity were explored. SCC9 cells were plated on Transwell® membranes that were either coated or not coated with Matrigel and were then co-cultured with SAOS-2 cells during the peak of OPN expression. SCC9 cells exposed to OPN-silenced SAOS-2 cultures and SCC9 cells cultured alone served as controls. SCC9 cells were quantitatively evaluated for cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, and invasion into Matrigel. The impact of co-culturing SAOS-2 and SCC9 cells on the resorptive capacity of U-937-derived osteoclastic cells was also investigated. Furthermore, a reciprocal induction of SAOS-2 and SCC9 cells in terms of OPN expression over the co-culture interval was identified. SAOS-2-secreted OPN altered the SCC9 cell phenotype, leading to enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation and higher Matrigel invasion. This invasion was also enhanced, albeit to a lesser degree, by co-culture with OPN-silenced SAOS-2 cells. Cell migration was not affected. Co-culture with SAOS-2 cells-mainly during the period of peak OPN expression-promoted over-expression of IL-6 and IL-8 by SCC9 cells and enhanced the resorptive capacity of osteoclastic cells. Taken together, these results suggest that osteoblast-derived OPN affects the interactions among OSCC-derived epithelial cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, which could contribute to the process of bone destruction during bone invasion by OSCC.

  17. Sodium hydrogen sulfide inhibits nicotine and lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastic differentiation and reversed osteoblastic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Kyung; Chung, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Sung-Chul; Auh, Q-Schick; Lee, Young-Man; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2013-05-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) stimulated or inhibited osteoclastic differentiation, little is known about the effects of H(2)S on the differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. To determine the possible bioactivities of H(2)S on bone metabolism, we investigated the in vitro effects of H(2)S on cytotoxicity, osteoblastic, and osteoclastic differentiation as well as the underlying mechanism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and nicotine-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs). The H(2)S donor, NaHS, protected hPDLCs from nicotine and LPS-induced cytotoxicity and recovered nicotine- and LPS-downregulated osteoblastic differentiation, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA expression of osteoblasts, including ALP, osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN), and mineralized nodule formation. Concomitantly, NaHS inhibited the differentiation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts in mouse bone marrow cells and blocked nicotine- and LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis regulatory molecules, such as RANKL, OPG, M-CSF, MMP-9, TRAP, and cathepsin K mRNA. NaHS blocked nicotine and LPS-induced activation of p38, ERK, MKP-1, PI3K, PKC, and PKC isoenzymes, and NF-κB. The effects of H(2)S on nicotine- and LPS-induced osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation were remarkably reversed by MKP-1 enzyme inhibitor (vanadate) and expression inhibitor (triptolide). Taken together, we report for the first time that H(2)S inhibited cytotoxicity and osteoclastic differentiation and recovered osteoblastic differentiation in a nicotine- and periodontopathogen-stimulated hPDLCs model, which has potential therapeutic value for treatment of periodontal and inflammatory bone diseases.

  18. Osteoclasts control reactivation of dormant myeloma cells by remodelling the endosteal niche

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michelle A.; McDonald, Michelle M.; Kovacic, Natasa; Hua Khoo, Weng; Terry, Rachael L.; Down, Jenny; Kaplan, Warren; Paton-Hough, Julia; Fellows, Clair; Pettitt, Jessica A.; Neil Dear, T.; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baldock, Paul A.; Rogers, Michael J.; Eaton, Colby L.; Vanderkerken, Karin; Pettit, Allison R.; Quinn, Julian M. W.; Zannettino, Andrew C. W.; Phan, Tri Giang; Croucher, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is largely incurable, despite development of therapies that target myeloma cell-intrinsic pathways. Disease relapse is thought to originate from dormant myeloma cells, localized in specialized niches, which resist therapy and repopulate the tumour. However, little is known about the niche, and how it exerts cell-extrinsic control over myeloma cell dormancy and reactivation. In this study, we track individual myeloma cells by intravital imaging as they colonize the endosteal niche, enter a dormant state and subsequently become activated to form colonies. We demonstrate that dormancy is a reversible state that is switched ‘on' by engagement with bone-lining cells or osteoblasts, and switched ‘off' by osteoclasts remodelling the endosteal niche. Dormant myeloma cells are resistant to chemotherapy that targets dividing cells. The demonstration that the endosteal niche is pivotal in controlling myeloma cell dormancy highlights the potential for targeting cell-extrinsic mechanisms to overcome cell-intrinsic drug resistance and prevent disease relapse. PMID:26632274

  19. Coexistence of reduced function of natural killer cells and osteoclasts in two distinct osteopetrotic mutations in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Popoff, S.N.; Jackson, M.E.; Koevary, S.B.; Marks, S.C. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent evidence suggesting that immune cells and their products (cytokines) play an important role in the regulation of skeletal development and function, particularly of the osteoclast, implies that immune cell dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of certain skeletal disorders. The mammalian osteopetroses are a pathogenetically heterogeneous group of skeletal disorders characterized by skeletal sclerosis resulting from reduced osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Using a {sup 51}Cr release microcytotoxicity assay we demonstrated that splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity was significantly reduced in two distinctly different osteopetrotic mutations in the rat, osteopetrosis (op) and toothless (tl). To determine whether this reduction in NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity is caused by decreased cell number and/or function in these osteopetrotic mutants, we quantitated NK cells by analyzing mononuclear cell suspensions labeled for two-color fluorescence with OX8 and OX19 monoclonal antibodies in a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Flow cytometry of these double-labeled cells revealed that the percentage of NK cells (OX8+/OX19- subset) in op and tl spleens was not significantly different from that of normal spleens. These results suggest that NK cells in these osteopetrotic mutants are functionally defective. Thus aberrations in osteoclast and NK cell function coexist in these mutations, and their developmental relationships deserve further study.

  20. Osteoclast Inhibitory Peptide-1 Therapy for Paget’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    precursor growth in methyl - cellulose cultures as described (3). Consistent with our previous findings that OIP-1 treatment inhibits CFU-GM colony...cells were cultured with hGM-CSF (10 ng/ml) in 1.2% methyl cellulose to form CFU-GM colonies. At the end of a 7-d culture period, CFU-GM colonies...inhibits osteoclast differentiation. Confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of OIP-1 with FcRIIB in osteoclasts, and we observed that OIP-1 carboxy

  1. Versatile Roles of V-ATPases Accessory Subunit Ac45 in Osteoclast Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Jiake; Dai, Ke R.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are macromolecular proton pumps that acidify intracellular cargos and deliver protons across the plasma membrane of a variety of specialized cells, including bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Extracellular acidification is crucial for osteoclastic bone resorption, a process that initiates the dissolution of mineralized bone matrix. While the importance of V-ATPases in osteoclastic resorptive function is well-defined, whether V-ATPases facilitate additional aspects of osteoclast function and/or formation remains largely obscure. Here we report that the V-ATPase accessory subunit Ac45 participates in both osteoclast formation and function. Using a siRNA-based approach, we show that targeted suppression of Ac45 impairs intracellular acidification and endocytosis, both are prerequisite for osteoclastic bone resorptive function in vitro. Interestingly, we find that knockdown of Ac45 also attenuates osteoclastogenesis owing to a reduced fusion capacity of osteoclastic precursor cells. Finally, in an effort to gain more detailed insights into the functional role of Ac45 in osteoclasts, we attempted to generate osteoclast-specific Ac45 conditional knockout mice using a Cathepsin K-Cre-LoxP system. Surprisingly, however, insertion of the neomycin cassette in the Ac45-FloxNeo mice resulted in marked disturbances in CNS development and ensuing embryonic lethality thus precluding functional assessment of Ac45 in osteoclasts and peripheral bone tissues. Based on these unexpected findings we propose that, in addition to its canonical function in V-ATPase-mediated acidification, Ac45 plays versatile roles during osteoclast formation and function. PMID:22087256

  2. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors in Osteoclast Lineage Cells Are a Negative Regulator of Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tai-yong; Pang, Wei-jun; Yang, Gong-she

    2015-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs) play a critical role in various pathological and physiological processes. Although recent research has identified AhRs as a key contributor to bone metabolism following studies in systemic AhR knockout (KO) or transgenic mice, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in this process remain unclear. In this study, we explored the function of AhR in bone metabolism using AhRRANKΔOc/ΔOc (RANKCre/+;AhRflox/flox) mice. We observed enhanced bone mass together with decreased resorption in both male and female 12 and 24-week-old AhRRANKΔOc/ΔOc mice. Control mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), an AhR agonist, exhibited decreased bone mass and increased bone resorption, whereas AhRCtskΔOc/ΔOc (CtskCre/+;AhRflox/flox) mice injected with 3MC appeared to have a normal bone phenotype. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from AhRRANKΔOc/ΔOc mice exhibited impaired osteoclastogenesis and repressed differentiation with downregulated expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), and cytochrome P450 genes Cyp1b1 and Cyp1a2. Collectively, our results not only demonstrated that AhR in osteoclast lineage cells is a physiologically relevant regulator of bone resorption, but also highlighted the need for further studies on the skeletal actions of AhR inhibitors in osteoclast lineage cells commonly associated with bone diseases, especially diseases linked to environmental pollutants known to induce bone loss. PMID:25615839

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors in osteoclast lineage cells are a negative regulator of bone mass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tai-yong; Pang, Wei-jun; Yang, Gong-she

    2015-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs) play a critical role in various pathological and physiological processes. Although recent research has identified AhRs as a key contributor to bone metabolism following studies in systemic AhR knockout (KO) or transgenic mice, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in this process remain unclear. In this study, we explored the function of AhR in bone metabolism using AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc) (RANK(Cre/+);AhR(flox/flox)) mice. We observed enhanced bone mass together with decreased resorption in both male and female 12 and 24-week-old AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc) mice. Control mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), an AhR agonist, exhibited decreased bone mass and increased bone resorption, whereas AhR(CtskΔOc/ΔOc) (Ctsk(Cre/+);AhR(flox/flox)) mice injected with 3MC appeared to have a normal bone phenotype. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc) mice exhibited impaired osteoclastogenesis and repressed differentiation with downregulated expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), and cytochrome P450 genes Cyp1b1 and Cyp1a2. Collectively, our results not only demonstrated that AhR in osteoclast lineage cells is a physiologically relevant regulator of bone resorption, but also highlighted the need for further studies on the skeletal actions of AhR inhibitors in osteoclast lineage cells commonly associated with bone diseases, especially diseases linked to environmental pollutants known to induce bone loss.

  4. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and monocytes in a miniaturized three-dimensional culture with mineral granules.

    PubMed

    Gamblin, Anne Laure; Renaud, Audrey; Charrier, Céline; Hulin, Philippe; Louarn, Guy; Heymann, Dominique; Trichet, Valérie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The pathologies of the skeleton have a significant socioeconomic impact on our population. Although therapies have improved the treatment of osteosarcoma and osteoporosis, their efficacy still remains limited. In this context, we developed a miniaturized 3-D culture model of bone cells on calcium phosphate ceramics. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were three-dimensionally cultured on particles of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, 125-200μm) in osteogenic media. The MSCs seeded on the BCP particles adhered and proliferated, producing abundant collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM). Light and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the MSCs created bridges between the BCP particles and formed a 3-D structure. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis in a scanning electron microscope confirmed the mineralization of the collagen matrix. The 96-well sized bone constructs were tested by immunohistology and transcription analysis, proving cell differentiation. Both techniques corroborated the osteoblastic differentiation with high production of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Peripheral blood CD14-positive monocytes (MOs) were pre-differentiated into osteoclasts prior to seeding on the 3-D constructs. Multinucleated and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells were also identified at the surface of the 3-D constructs after 90days of culture. In addition, cell viability within these constructs was measured by flow cytometry. In summary, we have developed a miniaturized 3-D culture of bone cell precursors with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. This 3-D culture may make it possible to test the effects of new drugs for bone healing, osteoporosis and osteosarcomas, in more appropriate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions than conventional 2-D cultures.

  5. Regulation and Biological Significance of Formation of Osteoclasts and Foreign Body Giant Cells in an Extraskeletal Implantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gazi Jased; Tatsukawa, Eri; Morishita, Kota; Shibata, Yasuaki; Suehiro, Fumio; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Yokoi, Taishi; Koji, Takehiko; Umeda, Masahiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of biomaterials induces a granulomatous reaction accompanied by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). The characterization of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone substitutes implanted in bone defects is more complicated because of healing with bone admixed with residual bone substitutes and their hybrid, and the appearance of two kinds of MNGCs, osteoclasts and FBGCs. Furthermore, the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs in the healing of implanted regions remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize MNGCs around bone substitutes using an extraskeletal implantation model and evaluate the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules were implanted into rat subcutaneous tissue with or without bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMCs), which include osteogenic progenitor cells. We also compared the biological significance of plasma and purified fibrin, which were used as binders for implants. Twelve weeks after implantation, osteogenesis was only detected in specimens implanted with BMMCs. The expression of two typical osteoclast markers, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin-K (CTSK), was analyzed, and TRAP-positive and CTSK-positive osteoclasts were only detected beside bone. In contrast, most of the MNGCs in specimens without the implantation of BMMCs were FBGCs that were negative for TRAP, whereas the degradation of β-TCP was detected. In the region implanted with β-TCP granules with plasma, FBGCs tested positive for CTSK, and when β-TCP granules were implanted with purified fibrin, FBGCs tested negative for CTSK. These results showed that osteogenesis was essential to osteoclastogenesis, two kinds of FBGCs, CTSK-positive and CTSK-negative, were induced, and the expression of CTSK was plasma-dependent. In addition, the implantation of BMMCs was suggested to contribute to osteogenesis and the replacement of implanted β-TCP granules to bone. PMID

  6. Osteocytes, not Osteoblasts or Lining Cells, are the Main Source of the RANKL Required for Osteoclast Formation in Remodeling Bone.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Campbell, Josh; Goellner, Joseph J; Dusevich, Vladimir; Bonewald, Lynda; Manolagas, Stavros C; O'Brien, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    The cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), encoded by the Tnfsf11 gene, is essential for osteoclastogenesis and previous studies have shown that deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene using a Dmp1-Cre transgene reduces osteoclast formation in cancellous bone by more than 70%. However, the Dmp1-Cre transgene used in those studies leads to recombination in osteocytes, osteoblasts, and lining cells making it unclear whether one or more of these cell types produce the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone. Because osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lining cells have distinct locations and functions, distinguishing which of these cell types are sources of RANKL is essential for understanding the orchestration of bone remodeling. To distinguish between these possibilities, we have now created transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of regulatory elements of the Sost gene, which is expressed in osteocytes but not osteoblasts or lining cells in murine bone. Activity of the Sost-Cre transgene in osteocytes, but not osteoblast or lining cells, was confirmed by crossing Sost-Cre transgenic mice with tdTomato and R26R Cre-reporter mice, which express tdTomato fluorescent protein or LacZ, respectively, only in cells expressing the Cre recombinase or their descendants. Deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene in Sost-Cre mice led to a threefold decrease in osteoclast number in cancellous bone and increased cancellous bone mass, mimicking the skeletal phenotype of mice in which the Tnfsf11 gene was deleted using the Dmp1-Cre transgene. These results demonstrate that osteocytes, not osteoblasts or lining cells, are the main source of the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in remodeling cancellous bone.

  7. Adoptive transfer of osteoclast-expanded natural killer cells for immunotherapy targeting cancer stem-like cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Anna K; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2016-07-01

    Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice-a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies.

  8. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsuda, Eisuke

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. {yields} Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D{sub 3} and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  9. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V

    2016-05-04

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss.

  10. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L.; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss. PMID:27142480

  11. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L.; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss.

  12. Avenanthramides Prevent Osteoblast and Osteocyte Apoptosis and Induce Osteoclast Apoptosis in Vitro in an Nrf2-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Gretel G.; Morales, Cynthya C.; Wallace, Taylor C.; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Oats contain unique bioactive compounds known as avenanthramides (AVAs) with antioxidant properties. AVAs might enhance the endogenous antioxidant cellular response by activation of the transcription factor Nrf2. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species plays a critical role in many chronic and degenerative diseases, including osteoporosis. In this disease, there is an imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, which is accompanied by increased osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and decreased osteoclast apoptosis. We investigated the ability of the synthethic AVAs 2c, 2f and 2p, to 1-regulate gene expression in bone cells, 2-affect the viability of osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts, and the generation of osteoclasts from their precursors, and 3-examine the potential involvement of the transcription factor Nrf2 in these actions. All doses of AVA 2c and 1 and 5 µM dose of 2p up-regulated collagen 1A expression. Lower doses of AVAs up-regulated OPG (osteoprotegerin) in OB-6 osteoblastic cells, whereas 100 μM dose of 2f and all concentrations of 2c down-regulated RANKL gene expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells. AVAs did not affect apoptosis of OB-6 osteoblastic cells or MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells; however, they prevented apoptosis induced by the DNA topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone, and hydrogen peroxide. AVAs prevented apoptosis of both wild type (WT) and Nrf2 Knockout (KO) osteoblasts, demonstrating that AVAs-induced survival does not require Nrf2 expression. Further, KO osteoclast precursors produced more mature osteoclasts than WT; and KO cultures exhibited less apoptotic osteoclasts than WT cultures. Although AVAs did not affect WT osteoclasts, AVA 2p reversed the low apoptosis of KO osteoclasts. These in vitro results demonstrate that AVAs regulate, in part, the function of osteoblasts and osteocytes and prevent osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and increase osteoclast apoptosis; further

  13. Coenzyme Q10 suppresses Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation and ameliorates experimental autoimmune arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Jhun, JooYeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Byun, Jae-Kyeong; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Jennifer; Jung, Young-Ok; Shin, Dongyun; Park, Sung Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant synthesized in human body. This enzyme promotes immune system function and can be used as a dietary supplement. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease leading to chronic joint inflammation. RA results in severe destruction of cartilage and disability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CoQ10 on inflammation and Th17 cell proliferation on an experimental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) mice model. CoQ10 or cotton seed oil as control was orally administrated once a day for seven weeks to mice with zymosan-induced arthritis (ZIA). Histological analysis of the joints was conducted using immunohistochemistry. Germinal center (GC) B cells, Th17 cells and Treg cells of the spleen tissue were examined by confocal microscopy staining. mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR and protein levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Flow cytometric analysis (FACS) was used to evaluate Th17 cells and Treg cells. CoQ10 mitigated the severity of ZIA and decreased serum immunoglobulin concentrations. CoQ10 also reduced RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, inflammatory mediators and oxidant factors. Th17/Treg axis was reciprocally controlled by CoQ10 treatment. Moreover, CoQ10 treatment on normal mouse and human cells cultured in Th17 conditions decreased the number of Th17 cells and enhanced the number of Treg cells. CoQ10 alleviates arthritis in mice with ZIA declining inflammation, Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that CoQ10 can be a potential therapeutic substance for RA.

  14. Huge undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sungho

    2014-03-14

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) is very rare, less than 1% of all pancreatic malignancies, and shows worse prognosis than that of invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We present a case of en bloc resection for a huge undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs that invaded the stomach and transverse mesocolon. A 67-year female was admitted for left upper quadrant pain and computed tomography demonstrated a mass occupying the lesser sac and abutting the stomach and pancreas. There were no distant metastases and the patient underwent subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, total gastrectomy, and segmental resection of the transverse colon. Histopathological examination confirmed an 11 cm-sized undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with OGCs. Immunohistochemical staining revealed reactivity with pan-cytokeratin in adenocarcinoma component, with vimentin in neoplastic multi-nucleated cells, with CD45/CD68 in OGCs, and with p53 in tumor cells, respectively. The patient had suffered from multiple bone metastases and survived 9 mo after surgery. This case supports the ductal epithelial origin of undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs and early diagnosis could result in favorable surgical outcomes. Investigations on the surgical role and prognostic factors need to be warranted in this tumor.

  15. Effects of different intensities of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on formation of osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyle; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Wu, Mei-Ling; Shih, Chung

    2003-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the beneficial therapeutic effects of selected low energy, time varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been documented with increasing frequency to treat therapeutically resistant problems of the musculoskeletal system. However, the underlying mechanisms at a cellular level are still not completely understood. In this study, the effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMF) on osteoclastogenesis, cultured from murine bone marrow cells and stimulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), were examined. Primary bone marrow cells were cultured from mature Wistar rats and exposed to ELF-PEMF stimulation daily for 7 days with different intensities of induced electric field (4.8, 8.7, and 12.2 micro V/cm rms) and stimulation times (0.5, 2, and 8 h/day). Recruitment and authentication of osteoclast-like cells were evaluated, respectively, by determining multinuclear, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive cells on day 8 of culture and by the pit formation assay. During the experiments, cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), and prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) were assayed using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These findings suggest that ELF-PEMF can both enhance (approximately 50%) and suppress (approximately 27%) the formation of osteoclast-like cells in bone marrow culture, depending on the induced electric field intensity. In addition, consistent correlations were observed between TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and osteoclast-like cell number after exposure to different induced electric field intensities of ELF-PEMF. This in vitro study could be considered as groundwork for in vivo ELF-PEMF clinical applications on some osteoclast-associated bone diseases.

  16. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity regulates osteoclast formation and function: inhibition by alendronate.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Rutledge, S J; Endo, N; Opas, E E; Tanaka, H; Wesolowski, G; Leu, C T; Huang, Z; Ramachandaran, C; Rodan, S B; Rodan, G A

    1996-01-01

    Alendronate (ALN), an aminobisphosphonate used in the treatment of osteoporosis, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption. Its molecular target is still unknown. This study examines the effects of ALN on the activity of osteoclast protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48), called PTPepsilon. Using osteoclast-like cells generated by coculturing mouse bone marrow cells with mouse calvaria osteoblasts, we found by molecular cloning and RNA blot hybridization that PTPepsilon is highly expressed in osteoclastic cells. A purified fusion protein of PTPepsilon expressed in bacteria was inhibited by ALN with an IC50 of 2 microM. Other PTP inhibitors--orthovanadate and phenylarsine oxide (PAO)-inhibited PTPepsilon with IC50 values of 0.3 microM and 18 microM, respectively. ALN and another bisphosphonate, etidronate, also inhibited the activities of other bacterially expressed PTPs such as PTPsigma and CD45 (also called leukocyte common antigen). The PTP inhibitors ALN, orthovanadate, and PAO suppressed in vitro formation of multinucleated osteoclasts from osteoclast precursors and in vitro bone resorption by isolated rat osteoclasts (pit formation) with estimated IC50 values of 10 microM, 3 microM, and 0.05 microM, respectively. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphatase activity plays an important role in osteoclast formation and function and is a putative molecular target of bisphosphonate action. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610169

  17. Characterization of Functional Reprogramming during Osteoclast Development Using Quantitative Proteomics and mRNA Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    An, Eunkyung; Narayanan, Manikandan; Manes, Nathan P.; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In addition to forming macrophages and dendritic cells, monocytes in adult peripheral blood retain the ability to develop into osteoclasts, mature bone-resorbing cells. The extensive morphological and functional transformations that occur during osteoclast differentiation require substantial reprogramming of gene and protein expression. Here we employ -omic-scale technologies to examine in detail the molecular changes at discrete developmental stages in this process (precursor cells, intermediate osteoclasts, and multinuclear osteoclasts), quantitatively comparing their transcriptomes and proteomes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000471. Our analysis identified mitochondrial changes, along with several alterations in signaling pathways, as central to the development of mature osteoclasts, while also confirming changes in pathways previously implicated in osteoclast biology. In particular, changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolism and redirection of energy flow from basic cellular function toward bone resorption appeared to play a key role in the switch from monocytic immune system function to specialized bone-turnover function. These findings provide new insight into the differentiation program involved in the generation of functional osteoclasts. PMID:25044017

  18. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  19. Kinetics of osteoclasts and their nuclei in evolving secondary Haversian systems.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Z F; Duck, B; Sekaly, G

    1981-01-01

    A study of osteoclast and osteoclast nuclear population kinetics within evolving secondary osteons was undertaken in young adult Beagle dogs. Autoradiographs of serial longitudinal rib biopsy sections taken from 1 hour to 15 days after tritiated thymidine injection were analysed as to the time and the rate of appearance of the labelled nuclei within the osteoclasts and their nuclei. Such systems contained an average of nine osteoclasts, each containing an average of nine nuclei. Labelled osteoclast nuclei first appeared within 24 hours, peaked at 10% at 4 days, and declined to 1% or less after 11.5 days more. Thus, the entry rate of new nuclei into (and their exit from) the population of osteoclast nuclei under steady state conditions approximates 8% per day. Therefore, the total mononuclear osteoclast population may be viewed as divided into functional units, i.e. osteoclasts. From the ratio of the osteoclast nuclei in the cutting cone to the number of osteoblasts in the closing cone (as well as from their rates of resorption and formation), it was deduced that the osteoclast per nucleus is approximately 20-40 times more efficient than the osteoblast. Because of the intrinsically different efficiencies and life spans of these two cell types, the rates of resorption and formation within evolving Haversian systems and the amounts of bone ultimately resorbed and formed by the system, are determined by the rate and duration of the respective precursor cell proliferation. It is at this level that factors which control the bone remodelling and balance must operate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7328046

  20. Undifferentiated Carcinoma with Osteoclast-Like Giant Cells of the Pancreas in a Patient with New Diagnosis of Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Freid, Lauren; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells are rare, with only 50 cases published to date. We report a case of a 67-year-old male with a new diagnosis of follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an incidental pancreatic body mass on abdominal imaging. Cytology from the pancreatic mass obtained via endoscopic ultrasound-directed fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells.

  1. NRROS Negatively Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting RANKL-Mediated NF-κB and Reactive Oxygen Species Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Kim, Nacksung

    2015-01-01

    Negative regulator of reactive oxygen species (NRROS) is known to repress ROS generation in phagocytes. In this study, we examined the roles of NRROS in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrate that NRROS negatively regulates the differentiation of osteoclasts, but not osteoblasts. Further, overexpression of NRROS in osteoclast precursor cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Conversely, osteoclast differentiation is enhanced upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRROS. Additionally, NRROS attenuates RANKL-induced NF-κB activation, as well as degradation of the NOX1 and NOX2 proteins, which are required for ROS generation. Based on our observations, we present NRROS as a novel negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26442864

  2. Plumbagin attenuates cancer cell growth and osteoclast formation in the bone microenvironment of mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Wang, Ting-yu; Fan, Qi-ming; Du, Lin; Xu, Jia-ke; Zhai, Zan-jing; Li, Hao-wei; Tang, Ting-ting

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of plumbagin, a naphthoquinone derived from the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica, on human breast cancer cell growth and the cancer cell-induced osteolysis in the bone microenvironment of mice. Methods: Human breast cancer cell subline MDA-MB-231SA with the ability to spread and grow in the bone was tested. The cell proliferation was determined using the CCK-8 assay. Apoptosis was detected with Annexin V/PI double-labeled flow cytometry. Red fluorescent protein-labeled MDA-MB-231SArfp cells were injected into the right tibia of female BALB/c-nu/nu mice. Three days after the inoculation, the mice were injected with plumbagin (2, 4, or 6 mg/kg, ip) 5 times per week for 7 weeks. The growth of the tumor cells was monitored using an in vivo imaging system. After the mice were sacrificed, the hind limbs were removed for radiographic and histological analyses. Results: Plumbagin (2.5–20 μmol/L) concentration-dependently inhibited the cell viability and induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231SA cells in vitro (the IC50 value of inhibition of cell viability was 14.7 μmol/L). Administration of plumbagin to breast cancer bearing mice delayed the tumor growth by 2–3 weeks and reduced the tumor volume by 44%–74%. The in vivo imaging study showed that plumbagin dose-dependently inhibited MDA-MB-231SArfp cell growth in bone microenvironment. Furthermore, X-ray images and micro-CT study demonstrated that plumbagin reduced bone erosion area and prevented a decrease in bone tissue volume. Histological studies showed that plumbagin dose-dependently inhibited the breast cancer cell growth, enhanced the cell apoptosis and reduced the number of TRAcP-positive osteoclasts. Conclusion: Plumbagin inhibits the cell growth and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells in mice bone microenvironment, leading to significant reduction in osteolytic lesions caused by the tumor cells. PMID:24384612

  3. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes induce apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cell-derived osteoclasts through mitochondria-mediated death pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shefang; Jiang, Yuanqin; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yifang; Wu, Yihui; Hou, Zhenqing; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted great interest with respect to biomaterials, particularly for use as an implant material in bone-tissue engineering. Accordingly, the bone-tissue compatibility of CNTs and their influence on new bone formation are important issues. In the present study, we examined the effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL)-supported osteoclastogenesis using a murine monocytic cell line RAW 264.7. MWCNTs significantly suppressed the differentiation of RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts. Treatment with MWCNTs induced apoptosis in osteoclasts as characterized by nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, but did not decrease the cell viability of the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. MWCNTs also induced loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsim) by regulating expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and caused release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. MWCNTs-induced apoptosis in osteoclasts was inhibited both by cyclosporin A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and by DEVD-CHO, a cell-permeable inhibitor of caspase-3. The present study suggests that MWCNTs suppresse osteoclastogenesis via the inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and the induction of apoptosis in osteoclasts, rendering them promising candidate for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases.

  4. Xanthohumol modulates the expression of osteoclast-specific genes during osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kwang Sik; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Young Seol; Lee, Young Soon; Choi, Eun Mi

    2013-12-01

    RANKL has been shown to play a critical role in osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Thus, agents that suppress RANKL signaling have a potential to suppress bone loss. In this study, we examined the ability of xanthohumol, a structurally simple prenylated chalcone, to suppress RANKL signaling during osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. Xanthohumol markedly inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP activity, multinucleated osteoclasts formation, and resorption-pit formation. In experiments to elucidate its mechanism of action, xanthohumol was found to suppress RANKL-induced expression of TRAF6, GAB2, ERK, c-Src, PI3K, and Akt genes. Moreover, RANKL-induced expressions of c-Fos and NFATc1, which are crucial transcription factors for osteoclastogenesis, were reduced by treatment with xanthohumol. Xanthohumol also inhibited RANKL-induced expression of bone-resorption related osteoclast-specific genes (carbonic anhydrase II, TCIRG, CLCN7, OSTM1, cathepsin K, and MMP-9). These data demonstrate that xanthohumol inhibits osteoclastogenesis by modulating RANKL signaling and may be useful for the prevention of bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis and periodontitis.

  5. Mesenchymal precursor cells in the blood of normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zvaifler, Nathan J; Marinova-Mutafchieva, Lilla; Adams, Gill; Edwards, Christopher J; Moss, Jill; Burger, Jan A; Maini, Ravinder N

    2000-01-01

    (FACS). BMPCs were concentrated in fractions 7 and 8, along with monocytes and lymphocytes. Elutriation fractions with more than 50% and less than 75% monocytes were collected and concentrated by centrifugation at 1200 rpm for 5 min, and the cell pellets were combined, reconstituted in DMEM plus 20% sterile heat-inactivated FCS, counted, washed in medium, repelleted, and then resuspended in DMEM to 5 × 106/ml and dispensed into either tissue-culture plastic slides or glass chamber slides. Cells thus obtained were observed in time-lapse cinematography, assayed for proliferation, and examined immunohistologically and histochemically, and their ability to become fibroblasts, osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and adipocytes was documented. Results: BMPCs were found in elutriation fractions containing less than 30% T cells and more than 60% monocytes from the blood of more than 100 normal persons. BMPCs adhered to plastic and glass and proliferated logarithmically in DMEM-20% FCS without added growth factors. The initial elutriate had only small, round, mononuclear cells; upon culture, these were replaced by fibroblast-like cells and large, round, stromal cells. The formation of cells with fibroblast-like and stromal morphology was not affected by eliminating CD34, CD3, or CD14 cells from the elutriation fraction. Osteogenic supplements (dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and β-glycero-phosphate) added to the culture inhibited fibroblast formation, and BMPCs assumed the cuboidal shape of osteoblasts. After 5 days in supplemented medium, the elutriated cells displayed AP and its production was doubled by the addition of BMP2 (1 ng) (P < 0.04). Two weeks later, 30% of the cells were very large and reacted with anti-osteocalcin antibody. The same cultures contained two other types of cell: sudanophlic adipocytes and multinucleated giant cells, which stain for TRAP and vitronectin receptors (attributes of osteoclasts). Cultured BMPCs were immunostained by antibodies to vimentin, type I

  6. Regulation of human umbilical cord blood-derived multi-potent stem cells by autogenic osteoclast-based niche-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bo; Jeong, Yun-Hyeok; Jung, Ji-Won; Seo, Kwangwon; Lee, Yong-Soon ||; Kang, Kyung-Sun ||. E-mail: kangpub@snu.ac.kr

    2007-05-25

    Stem cell niches provide the micro-environment for the development of stem cells. Under our culturing regimen, a kind of osteoclast-centralized structure supports the proliferation of MSCs, derived from human cord blood, once they reside on osteoclasts. MSCs in this structure expressed Oct4 which is a marker of embryonic stem cells. Floating daughter cells of MSCs colony showed abilities to differentiate into osteocyte, adipocyte, and neuronal progenitor cells. Compared with the easy senescence of MSCs without this niche-like structure in vitro, these results suggested that osteoclasts might play an important role the development and maintenance of Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs and might provide a means to expand UCB-MSCs in vitro, more easily, through a stem cell niche-like structure.

  7. Cancer Cell Expression of Autotaxin Controls Bone Metastasis Formation in Mouse through Lysophosphatidic Acid-Dependent Activation of Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Wannecq, Estelle; Descotes, Françoise; Jansen, Silvia; Deux, Blandine; Ribeiro, Johnny; Serre, Claire-Marie; Grès, Sandra; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Bollen, Mathieu; Saez, Simone; Aoki, Junken; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Background Bone metastases are highly frequent complications of breast cancers. Current bone metastasis treatments using powerful anti-resorbtive agents are only palliative indicating that factors independent of bone resorption control bone metastasis progression. Autotaxin (ATX/NPP2) is a secreted protein with both oncogenic and pro-metastatic properties. Through its lysosphospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, ATX controls the level of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the blood. Platelet-derived LPA promotes the progression of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer cells. We asked whether ATX was involved in the bone metastasis process. We characterized the role of ATX in osteolytic bone metastasis formation by using genetically modified breast cancer cells exploited on different osteolytic bone metastasis mouse models. Methodology/Principal Findings Intravenous injection of human breast cancer MDA-B02 cells with forced expression of ATX (MDA-B02/ATX) to inmmunodeficiency BALB/C nude mice enhanced osteolytic bone metastasis formation, as judged by increased bone loss, tumor burden, and a higher number of active osteoclasts at the metastatic site. Mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells induced the formation of osteolytic bone metastases after intracardiac injection in immunocompetent BALB/C mice. These cells expressed active ATX and silencing ATX expression inhibited the extent of osteolytic bone lesions and decreased the number of active osteoclasts at the bone metastatic site. In vitro, osteoclast differentiation was enhanced in presence of MDA-B02/ATX cell conditioned media or recombinant autotaxin that was blocked by the autotaxin inhibitor vpc8a202. In vitro, addition of LPA to active charcoal-treated serum restored the capacity of the serum to support RANK-L/MCSF-induced osteoclastogenesis. Conclusion/Significance Expression of autotaxin by cancer cells controls osteolytic bone metastasis formation. This work demonstrates a new role for LPA as a factor that stimulates

  8. Dynamic changes in the osteoclast cytoskeleton in response to growth factors and cell attachment are controlled by beta3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Roberta; Novack, Deborah V; Zallone, Alberta; Ross, F Patrick; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2003-08-04

    The beta3 integrin cytoplasmic domain, and specifically S752, is critical for integrin localization and osteoclast (OC) function. Because growth factors such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor and hepatocyte growth factor affect integrin activation and function via inside-out signaling, a process requiring the beta integrin cytoplasmic tail, we examined the effect of these growth factors on OC precursors. To this end, we retrovirally expressed various beta3 integrins with cytoplasmic tail mutations in beta3-deficient OC precursors. We find that S752 in the beta3 cytoplasmic tail is required for growth factor-induced integrin activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and membrane protrusion, thereby affecting OC adhesion, migration, and bone resorption. The small GTPases Rho and Rac mediate cytoskeletal reorganization, and activation of each is defective in OC precursors lacking a functional beta3 subunit. Activation of the upstream mediators c-Src and c-Cbl is also dependent on beta3. Interestingly, although the FAK-related kinase Pyk2 interacts with c-Src and c-Cbl, its activation is not disrupted in the absence of functional beta3. Instead, its activation is dependent upon intracellular calcium, and on the beta2 integrin. Thus, the beta3 cytoplasmic domain is responsible for activation of specific intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal reorganization critical for OC function.

  9. Macrophage-osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in osteoarthrotic subchondral acetabular cysts.

    PubMed

    Sabokbar, A; Crawford, R; Murray, D W; Athanasou, N A

    2000-06-01

    A macrophage infiltrate is commonly found in enlarging subchondral cysts in osteoarthrosis (OA) and the surrounding bone. To determine whether osteoclast differentiation by these cells contributes to the increase in the number of osteoclasts and bone resorption that accompanies OA cyst enlargement, we isolated macrophages from the wall of OA cysts and co-cultured them with osteoblast-like UMR106 cells in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and M-CSE After 14 days of incubation, co-cultures of UMR106 cells and cyst-derived macrophages showed evidence of osteoclast differentiation by expression of TRAP, VNR and formation of numerous lacunar pits. We found that, unlike osteoclast precursors in monocyte and other tissue macrophage populations, the addition of M-CSF to medium is not required for osteoclast differentiation. Our findings suggest that macrophage-osteoclast differentiation is one means whereby the osteolysis associated with the enlargement of OA cysts could be effected.

  10. Aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing NF-κB and NFATc1 activation and DC-STAMP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiang-zhou; He, Long-gang; Wang, Song; Wang, Keng; Zhang, Yue-yang; Tao, Lei; Li, Xiao-juan; Liu, Shu-wen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aconiti Lateralis Radix Preparata is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat chronic arthritis and is highly effective against rheumatoid arthritis. However, the effects of aconine, a derivative of aconitum alkaloids, on osteoclasts, which can absorb bone, remain unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of aconine on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro. Methods: The viability of mouse leukemic monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was measured using CCK-8 assays. Osteoclast differentiation was induced by incubation of RAW264.7 cells in the presence of RANKL, and assessed with TRAP staining assay. Bone resorption was examined with bone resorption pits assay. The expression of relevant genes and proteins was analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blots. The activation of NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) was examined using stable NF-κB and NFATc1 luciferase reporter gene systems, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Aconine (0.125, 0.25 μmol/L) did not affect the viability of RAW264.7 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorptive activity. Furthermore, aconine dose-dependently inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells, and subsequently reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific genes (c-Src, β3-Integrin, cathepsin K and MMP-9) and the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), which played an important role in cell-cell fusion. Conclusion: These findings suggest that aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 and the expression of the cell-cell fusion molecule DC-STAMP. PMID:26592521

  11. Paxillin Contracts the Osteoclast Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; DeSelm, Carl J.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.; Pol, Scott Vande; Choi, Kyunghee; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone resorption depends upon the cell’s ability to organize its cytoskeleton via the αvβ3 integrin and osteoclastogenic cytokines. Since paxillin associates with αvβ3, we asked if it participates in skeletal degradation. Unlike deletion of other αvβ3-associated cytoskeleton-regulating molecules, which impairs the cell’s ability to spread, paxillin-deficient (Pax−/−) osteoclasts, generated from embryonic stem cells, “superspread” in response to RANK ligand (RANKL) and form large, albeit dynamically atypical, actin bands. Despite their increased size, Pax−/− osteoclasts resorb bone poorly, excavating pits approximately 1/3 normal depth. Ligand-occupied αvβ3 or RANKL promotes paxillin serine and tyrosine phosphorylation, the latter via c-Src. The abnormal Pax−/− phenotype is rescued by WT paxillin but not that lacking its LD4 domain. In keeping with the appearance of mutant osteoclasts, WT paxillin, overexpressed in WT cells, contracts the cytoskeleton. Most importantly, the abnormal phenotype of Pax−/− osteoclasts likely represents failed RANKL-mediated delivery of myosin IIA to the actin cytoskeleton via the paxillin LD4 domain but is independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, in response to RANKL, paxillin associates with myosin IIA to contract the osteoclast cytoskeleton thereby promoting its bone-degrading capacity. PMID:22807029

  12. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species are essential for differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tominaga, Kumiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Tomoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2009-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidase (Nox) homologues have been suggested to regulate osteoclast differentiation. However, no bone abnormalities have been documented in Nox1 deficient, Nox2 deficient, or Nox3 mutant mice. During receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts, mRNA levels of Nox enzymes (Nox1-4) and their adaptor proteins were monitored by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. RAW264.7 cells constitutively expressed abundant Nox2 mRNA and small amounts of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. RANKL markedly attenuated Nox2 mRNA expression in association with reciprocal up-regulation of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. Introduction of small interference RNA targeting p67(phox) or p22(phox) into RAW264.7 cells effectively down-regulated ROS generation and significantly suppressed the RANKL-stimulated differentiation, which was assessed by appearance of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive, multinucleated cells having an ability to form resorption pits on calcium phosphate thin film-coated disks, and by expression of osteoclast marker genes (TRAP, cathepsin K, Atp6i, ClC-7, and NFATc1). Our results suggest that RANKL may stimulate switching between Nox homologues during osteoclast differentiation, and Nox-derived ROS may be crucial for RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  13. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressing the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the effects of esculetin on osteoclast differentiation and function. • Our data demonstrate for the first time that esculetin can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • Esculetin acts as an inhibitor of c-Fos and NFATc1 activation.

  14. Alpha-1 antitrypsin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and functions.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nardo, David; Chen, Mong-Jen; Elshikha, Ahmed S; Ahamed, Rubina; Elsayed, Eslam M; Bigot, Claire; Holliday, Lexie Shannon; Song, Sihong

    2017-03-21

    Osteoporosis is a global public health problem affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. We previously showed that treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory properties, mitigated bone loss in an ovariectomized mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of AAT on bone tissue are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of AAT on osteoclast formation and function in vitro. Our results showed that AAT dose-dependently inhibited the formation of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) induced osteoclasts derived from mouse bone marrow macrophages/monocyte (BMM) lineage cells and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 cells. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying this inhibition, we tested the effect of AAT on the gene expression of cell surface molecules, transcription factors, and cytokines associated with osteoclast formation. We showed that AAT inhibited M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor) induced cell surface RANK expression in osteoclast precursor cells. In addition, AAT inhibited RANKL-induced TNF-α production, cell surface CD9 expression, and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) gene expression. Importantly, AAT treatment significantly inhibited osteoclast-associated mineral resorption. Together, these results uncovered new mechanisms for the protective effects of AAT and strongly support the notion that AAT has therapeutic potential for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. CD147 promotes the formation of functional osteoclasts through NFATc1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Terasawa, Mariko; Baba, Misaki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2016-04-29

    CD147, a membrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is highly upregulated during dynamic cellular events including tissue remodelling. Elevated CD147 expression is present in the joint of rheumatoid arthritis patients. However, the role of CD147 in bone destruction remains unclear. To determine whether CD147 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, we studied its expression in mouse osteoclasts and its role in osteoclast differentiation and function. CD147 expression was markedly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of CD147 in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity, osteoclast precursor cells were transfected with CD147 siRNA. Decreased CD147 expression inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption, inhibited RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 and decreased the expression of the d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase Vo domain and cathepsin K. Therefore, CD147 plays a critical role in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts by upregulating NFATc1 through the autoamplification of its expression in osteoclastogenesis.

  16. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  17. A primitive cell origin for B-cell precursor ALL?

    PubMed

    Cox, C V; Blair, A

    2005-01-01

    A stem cell origin has been described for both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias. In contrast, childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is thought to arise in committed B-lineage cells. Recently described in vitro and in vivo model systems that support the proliferation and expansion of ALL cells have provided new tools to investigate the cellular targets for the origin of this malignancy. Evidence suggests that some subtypes of childhood ALL have a primitive cell origin and share many immunophenotypic characteristics with normal progenitor cells. These leukemic stem cells may be resistant to current therapeutic strategies designed to kill the bulk ALL cell population and subsequent relapses may arise from this population. More precise definition of these ALL stem cells through combined analyses of antigen expression, genetic lesions, and functionality is essential for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  18. Stability analysis of a Komarova type model for the interactions of osteoblast and osteoclast cells during bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jerez, S; Chen, B

    2015-06-01

    In order to analyze theoretically the dynamics of osteoblast and osteoclast cells in the bone remodeling process we first consider a simplified Komarova model. The existence of periodic solutions, which is consistent with the biophysical phenomenon, has been observed only numerically for the general model. By a stability analysis of the simplified model we provide sufficient conditions to obtain existence and uniqueness of positive periodic solutions. Considering recent biological evidence about the participation of another cells like osteocytes in the regulation of bone remodeling, we incorporate to the simplified model a new term as a way to model the signaling of external agents in the remodeling process. Finally, we demonstrate that this new model has stable positive non-periodic solutions. All the theoretical results are accompanied by computational simulations.

  19. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype.

  20. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C.; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone. PMID:26516894

  1. Osteoclasts and CD8 T cells form a negative feedback loop that contributes to homeostasis of both the skeletal and immune systems.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Zachary S; Aurora, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of dynamic regulatory loops that maintain homeostasis of the immune and skeletal systems. In this review, we highlight a number of these regulatory interactions that contribute to maintaining homeostasis. In addition, we review data on a negative regulatory feedback loop between osteoclasts and CD8 T cells that contributes to homeostasis of both the skeletal and immune systems.

  2. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Plays a Functional Role in Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption Activity*

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Vales, Rùben Lopez; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1−/− mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1−/− mice but not in Lpar2−/− and Lpar3−/− animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1−/− osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP+ osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss. PMID:24429286

  3. Human embryonic epidermis contains a diverse Langerhans cell precursor pool.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Mairhofer, Mario; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fiala, Christian; Prior, Marion; Eppel, Wolfgang; Kolbus, Andrea; Tschachler, Erwin; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2014-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the exact phenotype of the epidermal Langerhans cell (LC) precursors during human ontogeny has not been determined yet. These elusive precursors are believed to migrate into the embryonic skin and to express primitive surface markers, including CD36, but not typical LC markers such as CD1a, CD1c and CD207. The aim of this study was to further characterize the phenotype of LC precursors in human embryonic epidermis and to compare it with that of LCs in healthy adult skin. We found that epidermal leukocytes in first trimester human skin are negative for CD34 and heterogeneous with regard to the expression of CD1c, CD14 and CD36, thus contrasting the phenotypic uniformity of epidermal LCs in adult skin. These data indicate that LC precursors colonize the developing epidermis in an undifferentiated state, where they acquire the definitive LC marker profile with time. Using a human three-dimensional full-thickness skin model to mimic in vivo LC development, we found that FACS-sorted, CD207(-) cord blood-derived haematopoietic precursor cells resembling foetal LC precursors but not CD14(+)CD16(-) blood monocytes integrate into skin equivalents, and without additional exogenous cytokines give rise to cells that morphologically and phenotypically resemble LCs. Overall, it appears that CD14(-) haematopoietic precursors possess a much higher differentiation potential than CD14(+) precursor cells.

  4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shambhu K; Li, Ying; Li, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCPOGC) is an extremely rare non-endocrine pancreatic tumor. To date, some cases have been reported, however, histogenesis and biologic behavior of UCPOGC remain controversial. We report a case of an UCPOGC in a 54-year-old female, who presented with a three-month history of recurrent abdominal pain without any incentive. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a large cystic mass of 10.5 × 9.3 cm in the body and tail of the pancreas compressing the adjacent bowel loop and stomach. The preliminary diagnosis was considered as a malignant tumor of body and tail of the pancreas. The patient had open distal pancreatic mass resection with splenectomy and according to the results of histopathological and immunohistochemical studies, the diagnosis of an UCPOGC was established.

  5. Endostatin inhibits VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sipola, Annina; Nelo, Katri; Hautala, Timo; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Background Endostatin is a C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII which is a component of basement membranes with the structural properties of both collagens and proteoglycans. Endostatin has a major role in angiogenesis which is intimately associated with bone development and remodeling. Signaling between the endothelial cells and the bone cells, for example, may have a role in recruitment of osteoclastic precursor cells. Our study aims at exploring a possibility that endostatin, either as a part of basement membrane or as a soluble molecule, may control osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro. Methods Rat pit formation assay was employed in order to examine the effect of endostatin alone or in combination with vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) on bone resorption in vitro. Effect of these agents on osteoclast differentiation in vitro was also tested. Osteoclastogenesis and the number of osteoclasts were followed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) staining and resorption was evaluated by measuring the area of excavated pits. Results Endostatin inhibited the VEGF-A stimulated osteoclastic bone resorption, whereas endostatin alone had no effect on the basal resorption level in the absence of VEGF-A. In addition, endostatin could inhibit osteoclast differentiation in vitro independent of VEGF-A. Conclusion Our in vitro data indicate that collagen XVIII/endostatin can suppress VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption to the basal level. Osteoclastogenesis is also inhibited by endostatin. The regulatory effect of endostatin, however, is not critical since endostatin alone does not modify the basal bone resorption. PMID:16839420

  6. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  7. Role of neural precursor cells in promoting repair following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dibajnia, Pooya; Morshead, Cindi M

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of stroke have received considerable attention. Two broad approaches to stem cell-based therapies have been taken: the transplantation of exogenous stem cells, and the activation of endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (together termed neural precursors). Studies examining the transplantation of exogenous cells have demonstrated that neural stem and progenitor cells lead to the most clinically promising results. Endogenous activation of neural precursors has also been explored based on the fact that resident precursor cells have the inherent capacity to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature neurons in the uninjured adult brain. Studies have revealed that these neural precursor cell behaviours can be activated following stroke, whereby neural precursors will expand in number, migrate to the infarct site and differentiate into neurons. However, this innate response is insufficient to lead to functional recovery, making it necessary to enhance the activation of endogenous precursors to promote tissue repair and functional recovery. Herein we will discuss the current state of the stem cell-based approaches with a focus on endogenous repair to treat the stroke injured brain. PMID:23064725

  8. Nanocrystalline spherical hydroxyapatite granules for bone repair: in vitro evaluation with osteoblast-like cells and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, A; Dittrich, R; Lode, A; Despang, F; Gelinsky, M

    2013-07-01

    Conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite-based materials for bone repair show poor resorbability due to the loss of nanocrystallinity. The present study describes a method to establish nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite granules. The material was prepared by ionotropic gelation of an alginate sol containing hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. Subsequent thermal elimination of alginate at 650 °C yielded non-sintered, but unexpectedly stable hydroxyapatite granules. By adding stearic acid as an organic filler to the alginate/HA suspension, the granules exhibited macropores after thermal treatment. A third type of material was achieved by additional coating of the granules with silica particles. Microstructure and specific surface area of the different materials were characterized in comparison to the already established granular calcium phosphate material Cerasorb M(®). Cytocompatibility and potential for bone regeneration of the materials was evaluated by in vitro examinations with osteosarcoma cells and osteoclasts. Osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells proliferated on all examined materials and showed the typical increase of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity during cultivation. Expression of bone-related genes coding for ALP, osteonectin, osteopontin, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein II on the materials was proven by RT-PCR. Human monocytes were seeded onto the different granules and osteoclastogenesis was examined by activity measurement of tartrate-specific acid phosphatase (TRAP). Gene expression analysis after 23 days of cultivation revealed an increased expression of osteoclast-related genes TRAP, vitronectin receptor and cathepsin K, which was on the same level for all examined materials. These results indicate, that the nanocrystalline granular materials are of clinical interest, especially for bone regeneration.

  9. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Gracilaria verrucosa Extracts on Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Jin; Lee, Yong-Jin; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Yee, Sung-Tae; Son, Young-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bone remodeling, a physiological process characterized by bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, is important for the maintenance of healthy bone in adult humans. Osteoclasts play a critical role in bone erosion and osteoporosis and are bone-specific multinucleated cells generated through differentiation of monocyte/macrophage lineage precursors. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) has been reported to induce osteoclast differentiation. In this study, we explored whether Gracilaria verrucosa extracts (GE) could affect RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. GE significantly inhibited RANKL-activated osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting protein expression of c-fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), vital factors in RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. In addition, GE attenuated ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. In summary, GE can prevent osteoclastogenesis and hormone-related bone loss via blockage of c-fos-NFATc1 signaling. Our results suggest that GE may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:28335442

  10. Dopamine depletion impairs precursor cell proliferation in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Günter U; Rizk, Pamela; Muriel, Marie P; Duyckaerts, Charles; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Caille, Isabelle; Hirsch, Etienne C

    2004-07-01

    Cerebral dopamine depletion is the hallmark of Parkinson disease. Because dopamine modulates ontogenetic neurogenesis, depletion of dopamine might affect neural precursors in the subependymal zone and subgranular zone of the adult brain. Here we provide ultrastructural evidence showing that highly proliferative precursors in the adult subependymal zone express dopamine receptors and receive dopaminergic afferents. Experimental depletion of dopamine in rodents decreases precursor cell proliferation in both the subependymal zone and the subgranular zone. Proliferation is restored completely by a selective agonist of D2-like (D2L) receptors. Experiments with neural precursors from the adult subependymal zone grown as neurosphere cultures confirm that activation of D2L receptors directly increases the proliferation of these precursors. Consistently, the numbers of proliferating cells in the subependymal zone and neural precursor cells in the subgranular zone and olfactory bulb are reduced in postmortem brains of individuals with Parkinson disease. These observations suggest that the generation of neural precursor cells is impaired in Parkinson disease as a consequence of dopaminergic denervation.

  11. The collection of NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast includes numerous genes non-essential to physiologic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Coury, Fabienne; Sulyanto, Rosalyn; Sitara, Despina; Wu, Jing; Brady, Nicholas; Tsang, Kelly; Sigrist, Kirsten; Tollefsen, Douglas M.; He, Li; Storm, Daniel; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are specialized secretory cells of the myeloid lineage important for normal skeletal homeostasis as well as pathologic conditions of bone including osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis and cancer metastasis. Differentiation of these multinucleated giant cells from precursors is controlled by the cytokine RANKL, which through its receptor RANK initiates a signaling cascade culminating in the activation of transcriptional regulators which induce the expression of the bone degradation machinery. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) is the master regulator of this process and in its absence osteoclast differentiation is aborted both in vitro and in vivo. Differential mRNA expression analysis by microarray is used to identify genes of potential physiologic relevance across nearly all biologic systems. We compared the gene expression profile of murine wild-type and NFATc1-deficient osteoclast precursors stimulated with RANKL and identified that the majority of the known genes important for osteoclastic bone resorption require NFATc1 for induction. Here, five novel RANKL-induced, NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast are described: Nhedc2, Rhoc, Serpind1, Adcy3 and Rab38. Despite reasonable hypotheses for the importance of these molecules in the bone resorption pathway and their dramatic induction during differentiation, the analysis of mice with mutations in these genes failed to reveal a function in osteoclast biology. Compared to littermate controls, none of these mutants demonstrated a skeletal phenotype in vivo or alterations in osteoclast differentiation or function in vitro. These data highlight the need for rigorous validation studies to complement expression profiling results before functional importance can be assigned to highly regulated genes in any biologic process. PMID:22985540

  12. Rab27A Regulates Transport of Cell Surface Receptors Modulating Multinucleation and Lysosome-Related Organelles in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada-Sugawara, Megumi; Sakai, Eiko; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Izumi, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Noriaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Rab27A regulates transport of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and release of secretory granules in various types of cells. Here, we identified up-regulation of Rab27A during differentiation of osteoclasts (OCLs) from bone-marrow macrophages (BMMs), by DNA microarray analysis. Rab27A deficiency in OCLs, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown in RAW-D cell line or BMMs derived from ashen mice, which display genetic defects in Rab27A expression, induced multinucleated and giant cells. Upon stimulation with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), essential cytokines for OCL differentiation, phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src), and p-38 were slightly enhanced in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs. The cell surface level of c-fms, an M-CSF receptor, was slightly higher in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs, and down-regulation of RANK, a RANKL receptor, was delayed. In addition to receptors, OCLs derived from ashen mice exhibited aberrant actin ring formation, abnormal subcellular localization of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP2) and cathepsin K (CTSK), and marked reduction in resorbing activity. Thus, these findings suggest that Rab27A regulates normal transport of cell surface receptors modulating multinucleation and LROs in OCLs. PMID:25882854

  13. Osteoblasts of calvaria induce higher numbers of osteoclasts than osteoblasts from long bone.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qilong; Schoenmaker, Ton; Jansen, Ineke D C; Bian, Zhuan; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the existence of functional differences between osteoclasts harbored in different bones. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of such a heterogeneity are not yet understood. Since cells of the osteoblast lineage play a critical role in osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast heterogeneity may be due to osteoblasts that differ at the different bone sites. In the present study we evaluated possible differences in the capacity of calvaria and long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclastogenesis. Osteoblasts were isolated from calvaria and long bone of mice and co-cultured with osteoclast precursors obtained from bone marrow of both types of bone, spleen and peripheral blood. Irrespective of the source of the precursors, a significantly higher number of TRACP-positive multinucleated cells were formed with calvaria osteoblasts. The expression of osteoclastogenesis related genes was analyzed by qPCR. OPG was significantly higher expressed by long bone osteoblasts. The RANKL/OPG ratio and TNF-α gene expression were significantly higher in calvaria osteoblast cultures. OPG added to the culture system inhibited osteoclastogenesis in both groups. Blocking TNF-α had no effect on osteoclastogenesis. Calvaria and long bone osteoblasts were pre-stimulated with VitD3 for 5days. Subsequently, osteoclast precursors were added to these cultures. After a co-culture of 6days, it was shown that VitD3 pre-stimulation of long bone osteoblasts strongly improved their capacity to induce osteoclast formation. This coincided with an increased ratio of RANKL/OPG. Taken together, the data demonstrated differences in the capacity of calvaria and long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclastogenesis. This appeared to be due to differences in the expression of RANKL and OPG. VitD3 pre-stimulation improved the ability of long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclast formation. Our findings demonstrate bone-site specific differences in osteoblast-mediated formation of

  14. Cryopreservation of GABAergic Neuronal Precursors for Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are essential for stem cells storage in order to apply them in the clinic. Here we describe a new standardized cryopreservation protocol for GABAergic neural precursors derived from the medial glanglionic eminence (MGE), a promising source of GABAergic neuronal progenitors for cell therapy against interneuron-related pathologies. We used 10% Me2SO as cryoprotectant and assessed the effects of cell culture amplification and cellular organization, as in toto explants, neurospheres, or individualized cells, on post-thaw cell viability and retrieval. We confirmed that in toto cryopreservation of MGE explants is an optimal preservation system to keep intact the interneuron precursor properties for cell transplantation, together with a high cell viability (>80%) and yield (>70%). Post-thaw proliferation and self-renewal of the cryopreserved precursors were tested in vitro. In addition, their migration capacity, acquisition of mature neuronal morphology, and potency to differentiate into multiple interneuron subtypes were also confirmed in vivo after transplantation. The results show that the cryopreserved precursor features remained intact and were similar to those immediately transplanted after their dissection from the MGE. We hope this protocol will facilitate the generation of biobanks to obtain a permanent and reliable source of GABAergic precursors for clinical application in cell-based therapies against interneuronopathies. PMID:28122047

  15. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells Reverse Osteoporosis in NOD/SCID Mice by Altering Osteoblastic and Osteoclastic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Reeva; Lu, Jingwei; Kanji, Suman; Joseph, Matthew; Das, Manjusri; Noble, Garrett J.; McMichael, Brooke K.; Agarwal, Sudha; Hart, Richard T.; Sun, Zongyang; Lee, Beth S.; Rosol, Thomas J.; Jackson, Rebecca; Mao, Hai-Quan; Pompili, Vincent J.; Das, Hiranmoy

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a bone disorder associated with loss of bone mineral density and micro architecture. A balance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts activities maintains bone homeostasis. Increased bone loss due to increased osteoclast and decreased osteoblast activities is considered as an underlying cause of osteoporosis. Methods and Findings The cures for osteoporosis are limited, consequently the potential of CD34+ cell therapies is currently being considered. We developed a nanofiber-based expansion technology to obtain adequate numbers of CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood, for therapeutic applications. Herein, we show that CD34+ cells could be differentiated into osteoblastic lineage, in vitro. Systemically delivered CD34+ cells home to the bone marrow and significantly improve bone deposition, bone mineral density and bone micro-architecture in osteoporotic mice. The elevated levels of osteocalcin, IL-10, GM-CSF, and decreased levels of MCP-1 in serum parallel the improvements in bone micro-architecture. Furthermore, CD34+ cells improved osteoblast activity and concurrently impaired osteoclast differentiation, maturation and functionality. Conclusions These findings demonstrate a novel approach utilizing nanofiber-expanded CD34+ cells as a therapeutic application for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:22724005

  16. TRPV1 deletion impaired fracture healing and inhibited osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin-Hai; Liu, Meng; He, Yang; Xiao, E.; Zhao, Lu; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Hua-Qian; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Fracture healing, in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts play important roles, has drawn much clinical attention. Osteoclast deficiency or decreased osteoblast activity will impair fracture healing. TRPV1 is a member of the Ca2+ permeable cation channel subfamily, and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss, which makes TRPV1 a potential target for osteoporosis. However, whether long term TRPV1 inhibition or TRPV1 deletion will affect the fracture healing process is unclear. In this study, we found that the wild-type mice showed a well-remodeled fracture callus, whereas TRPV1 knockout mice still had an obvious fracture gap with unresorbed soft-callus 4 weeks post-fracture. The number of osteoclasts was reduced in the TRPV1 knockout fracture callus, and osteoclast formation and resorption activity were also impaired in vitro. TRPV1 deletion decreased the calcium oscillation frequency and peak cytoplasmic concentration in osteoclast precursors, subsequently reducing the expression and nuclear translocation of NFATc1 and downregulating DC-stamp, cathepsin K, and ATP6V. In addition, TRPV1 deletion caused reduced mRNA and protein expression of Runx2 and ALP in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and reduced calcium deposition in vitro. Our results suggest that TRPV1 deletion impairs fracture healing, and inhibited osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis. PMID:28225019

  17. TRPV1 deletion impaired fracture healing and inhibited osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    He, Lin-Hai; Liu, Meng; He, Yang; Xiao, E; Zhao, Lu; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Hua-Qian; Zhang, Yi

    2017-02-22

    Fracture healing, in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts play important roles, has drawn much clinical attention. Osteoclast deficiency or decreased osteoblast activity will impair fracture healing. TRPV1 is a member of the Ca(2+) permeable cation channel subfamily, and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss, which makes TRPV1 a potential target for osteoporosis. However, whether long term TRPV1 inhibition or TRPV1 deletion will affect the fracture healing process is unclear. In this study, we found that the wild-type mice showed a well-remodeled fracture callus, whereas TRPV1 knockout mice still had an obvious fracture gap with unresorbed soft-callus 4 weeks post-fracture. The number of osteoclasts was reduced in the TRPV1 knockout fracture callus, and osteoclast formation and resorption activity were also impaired in vitro. TRPV1 deletion decreased the calcium oscillation frequency and peak cytoplasmic concentration in osteoclast precursors, subsequently reducing the expression and nuclear translocation of NFATc1 and downregulating DC-stamp, cathepsin K, and ATP6V. In addition, TRPV1 deletion caused reduced mRNA and protein expression of Runx2 and ALP in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and reduced calcium deposition in vitro. Our results suggest that TRPV1 deletion impairs fracture healing, and inhibited osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis.

  18. Osteoclast radicals.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S

    1994-11-01

    In biological research, new ideas arise and quickly spread to encompass the entire field. Thus, the evolution of molecular biology has significantly changed our methods of approaching our research. A similar far-reaching finding has been the advent of radical reactions into biology. Although radical chemistry has been utilized for many technological advances that affect our daily lives, the appreciation of this same process within our cells has opened an unexplored arena for research enquiry. As cellular messengers, radical molecules seem whimsically designed: they are evanescent, rapidly and apparently indiscriminately reactive, and barely detectable by most biological methods. Yet, our initial probing of these reactive agents in cells and organisms has led us to postulate a virtually undescribed system of communication within and among cells which may have significant effects in multiple organs. In bone, radical reactants have been attributed with an important role in the control of bone resorption.

  19. Inhibition of differentiation and function of osteoclasts by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxi; Madhu, Vedavathi; Thomas, Candace; Yang, Xinlin; Du, Xeujun; Dighe, Abhijit S; Cui, Quanjun

    2015-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an FDA-approved organosulfur solvent that is reported to have therapeutic value in osteoarthritis and osteopenia. DMSO is used as a cryoprotectant for the cryopreservation of bone grafts and mesenchymal stem cells which are later used for bone repair. It is also used as a solvent in the preparation of various scaffolds used for bone tissue engineering purposes. DMSO has been reported to inhibit osteoclast formation in vitro but the mechanism involved has remained elusive. We investigated the effect of DMSO on osteoclast differentiation and function using a conventional model system of RAW 264.7 cells. The differentiation of RAW 264.7 cells was induced by adding 50 ng/ml RANKL and the effect of DMSO (0.01 and 1% v/v) on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was investigated. Addition of 1% DMSO significantly inhibited RANKL-induced formation of TRAP+, multinucleated, mature osteoclasts and osteoclast late-stage precursors (c-Kit(-) c-Fms(+) Mac-1(+) RANK(+)). While DMSO did not inhibit proliferation per se, it did inhibit the effect of RANKL on proliferation of RAW 264.7 cells. Key genes related to osteoclast function (TRAP, Integrin αVβ3, Cathepsin K and MMP9) were significantly down-regulated by DMSO. RANKL-induced expression of RANK gene was significantly reduced in the presence of DMSO. Our data, and reports from other investigators, that DMSO enhances osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and also prevents bone loss in ovarietcomized rats, suggest that DMSO has tremendous potential in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone diseases arising from uncontrolled activities of the osteoclasts.

  20. High throughput, quantitative analysis of human osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Nowell, Cameron J; Rueda, Patricia; Henriksen, Kim; Pierce, Tracie; Cook, Anna E; Pastoureau, Philippe; Sabatini, Massimo; Charman, William N; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J; Sexton, Patrick M; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-15

    Osteoclasts are multinuclear cells that degrade bone under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Osteoclasts are therefore a major target of osteoporosis therapeutics aimed at preserving bone. Consequently, analytical methods for osteoclast activity are useful for the development of novel biomarkers and/or pharmacological agents for the treatment of osteoporosis. The nucleation state of an osteoclast is indicative of its maturation and activity. To date, activity is routinely measured at the population level with only approximate consideration of the nucleation state (an 'osteoclast population' is typically defined as cells with ≥3 nuclei). Using a fluorescent substrate for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), a routinely used marker of osteoclast activity, we developed a multi-labelled imaging method for quantitative measurement of osteoclast TRAP activity at the single cell level. Automated image analysis enables interrogation of large osteoclast populations in a high throughput manner using open source software. Using this methodology, we investigated the effects of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) on osteoclast maturation and activity and demonstrated that TRAP activity directly correlates with osteoclast maturity (i.e. nuclei number). This method can be applied to high throughput screening of osteoclast-targeting compounds to determine changes in maturation and activity.

  1. Improved Single-Source Precursors for Solar-Cell Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Improved single-source precursor compounds have been invented for use in spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) of chalcopyrite semiconductor absorber layers of thin-film cells. A "single-source precursor compound" is a single molecular compound that contains all the required elements, which when used under the spray CVD conditions, thermally decomposes to form CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)S(y)Se(2-y).

  2. Ly49Q, an ITIM-bearing NK receptor, positively regulates osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mikihito; Nakashima, Tomoki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-12

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated cells that resorb bone, play a key role in bone remodeling. Although immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signaling is critical for osteoclast differentiation, the significance of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) has not been well understood. Here we report the function of Ly49Q, an Ly49 family member possessing an ITIM motif, in osteoclastogenesis. Ly49Q is selectively induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) ligand (RANKL) stimulation in bone marrow-derived monocyte/macrophage precursor cells (BMMs) among the Ly49 family of NK receptors. The knockdown of Ly49Q resulted in a significant reduction in the RANKL-induced formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells, accompanied by a decreased expression of osteoclast-specific genes such as Nfatc1, Tm7sf4, Oscar, Ctsk, and Acp5. Osteoclastogenesis was also significantly impaired in Ly49Q-deficient cells in vitro. The inhibitory effect of Ly49Q-deficiency may be explained by the finding that Ly49Q competed for the association of Src-homology domain-2 phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) with paired immunoglobulin-like receptor-B (PIR-B), an ITIM-bearing receptor which negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation. Unexpectedly, Ly49Q deficiency did not lead to impaired osteoclast formation in vivo, suggesting the existence of a compensatory mechanism. This study provides an example in which an ITIM-bearing receptor functions as a positive regulator of osteoclast differentiation.

  3. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  4. Direct microsensor measurement of nitric oxide production by the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S F; Adebanjo, O A; Moonga, B S; Awumey, E M; Malinski, T; Zaidi, M

    1999-05-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) triggers marked osteoclast retraction which closely resembles that due to Ca2+. The effect of Ca2+ has been attributed to a stimulated release of NO. Here, we show for the first time, by direct measurement with a microsensor, that osteoclasts do indeed produce NO and that this production is enhanced by a high Ca2+. We also show that the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, mimics the latter. Furthermore, osteoclasts on dentine produce more NO than osteoclasts on glass and NO release from dentine-plated osteoclasts is much less sensitive to stimulation by Ca2+. Finally, the microsomal Ca2+ store-depleting agent, thapsigargin, attenuates NO release only from osteoclasts on glass, suggesting that stored Ca2+ has the dominant effect in modulating NO release from non-resorbing cells. NO is a powerful inhibitor of bone resorption: a direct demonstration of its production is therefore strong evidence for a role in modulating osteoclast function.

  5. Focus Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Characterization of Osteoclastic Resorption of Calcium Phosphate Substrates.

    PubMed

    Diez-Escudero, Anna; Espanol, Montserrat; Montufar, Edgar B; Di Pompo, Gemma; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Baldini, Nicola; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the application of dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging for preclinical testing of calcium phosphates with osteoclast precursor cells and how this high-resolution imaging technique is able to reveal microstructural changes at a level of detail previously not possible. Calcium phosphate substrates, having similar compositions but different microstructures, were produced using low- and high-temperature processes (biomimetic calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite [CDHA] and stoichiometric sintered hydroxyapatite, respectively). Human osteoclast precursor cells were cultured for 21 days before evaluating their resorptive potential on varying microstructural features. Alternative to classical morphological evaluation of osteoclasts (OC), FIB-SEM was used to observe the subjacent microstructure by transversally sectioning cells and observing both the cells and the substrates. Resorption pits, indicating OC activity, were visible on the smoother surface of high-temperature sintered hydroxyapatite. FIB-SEM analysis revealed signs of acidic degradation on the grain surface under the cells, as well as intergranular dissolution. No resorption pits were evident on the surface of the rough CDHA substrates. However, whereas no degradation was detected by FIB sections in the material underlying some of the cells, early stages of OC-mediated acidic degradation were observed under cells with more spread morphology. Collectively, these results highlight the potential of FIB to evaluate the resorptive activity of OC, even in rough, irregular, or coarse surfaces where degradation pits are otherwise difficult to visualize.

  6. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP(+) cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP(+) cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP(+) cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis.

  7. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  8. Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Synthesize Neuromodulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sakry, Dominik; Yigit, Hatice; Dimou, Leda; Trotter, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NG2 protein-expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) are a persisting and major glial cell population in the adult mammalian brain. Direct synaptic innervation of OPC by neurons throughout the brain together with their ability to sense neuronal network activity raises the question of additional physiological roles of OPC, supplementary to generating myelinating oligodendrocytes. In this study we investigated whether OPC express neuromodulatory factors, typically synthesized by other CNS cell types. Our results show that OPC express two well-characterized neuromodulatory proteins: Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) and neuronal Pentraxin 2 (Nptx2/Narp). Expression levels of the enzyme PTGDS are influenced in cultured OPC by the NG2 intracellular region which can be released by cleavage and localizes to glial nuclei upon transfection. Furthermore PTGDS mRNA levels are reduced in OPC from NG2-KO mouse brain compared to WT cells after isolation by cell sorting and direct analysis. These results show that OPC can contribute to the expression of these proteins within the CNS and suggest PTGDS expression as a downstream target of NG2 signaling. PMID:25966014

  9. Pressure regulates osteoclast formation and MCSF expression in marrow culture.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Biskobing, D; Fan, X; Rubin, C; McLeod, K; Taylor, W R

    1997-01-01

    One of the forces generated during skeletal loading is hydrostatic pressure. In the work presented here, the ability of increased pressure to influence recruitment of osteoclasts was evaluated. Murine marrow cultures, with pO2 and pCO2 kept constant, were subjected to either control (1.0 atm) or elevated (1.37 or 2.0 atm) hydrostatic pressure. As compared to control, cultures pressurized for 6 days at 1.37 atm formed less osteoclast-like cells (OCLC) (71 +/- 6% of control, P < 0.0001). A similar degree of inhibition occurred in cultures exposed to pressure during days 2-4 only (62 +/- 6%), while treatment during days 5-7 failed to inhibit the OCLC number relative to control (99 +/- 5%). Delivery of 2.0 atm pressure on days 2-4 generated 52 +/- 4% OCLC compared to control. Since macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSF)-dependent proliferation of osteoclast precursors occurs during the pressure-sensitive period, semiquantitative RT-PCR for MCSF mRNA was performed after 3 days in 1.37 atm (days 2-4). As compared to controls, pressure caused a decrease in mRNA coding for the membrane bound form of MCSF (71.2 +/- 4% (n = 25, P < or = 0.05), while the MCSF RT-PCR product representing the secreted form showed no consistent change. This lack of response of the soluble MCSF RT-PCR product was expected, as levels of bioassayable MCSF were not altered by pressure. Extrapolating these data to in vivo conditions suggests that load-bearing will inhibit the formation of osteoclasts.

  10. Silicate modulates the cross-talk between osteoblasts (SaOS-2) and osteoclasts (RAW 264.7 cells): inhibition of osteoclast growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H C; Wang, X H; Wiens, M; Diehl-Seifert, B; Kropf, K; Schloßmacher, U; Müller, W E G

    2012-10-01

    It has been shown that inorganic monomeric and polymeric silica/silicate, in the presence of the biomineralization cocktail, increases the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) in osteogenic SaOS-2 sarcoma cells in vitro. In contrast, silicate does not affect the steady-state gene expression level of the osteoclastogenic ligand receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). In turn it can be expected that the concentration ratio of the mediators OPG/RANKL increases in the presence of silicate. In addition, silicate enhances the growth potential of SaOS-2 cells in vitro, while it causes no effect on RAW 264.7 cells within a concentration range of 10-100 µM. Applying a co-cultivation assay system, using SaOS-2 cells and RAW 264.7 cells, it is shown that in the presence of 10 µM silicate the number of RAW 264.7 cells in general, and the number of TRAP(+) RAW 264.7 cells in particular markedly decreases. The SaOS-2 cells retain their capacity of differential gene expression of OPG and RANKL in favor of OPG after exposure to silicate. It is concluded that after exposure of the cells to silicate a factor(s) is released from SaOS-2 cells that causes a significant inhibition of osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7 cells. It is assumed that it is an increased secretion of the cytokine OPG that is primarily involved in the reduction of the osteoclastogenesis of the RAW 264.7 cells. It is proposed that silicate might have the potential to stimulate osteogenesis in vivo and perhaps to ameliorate osteoporotic disorders.

  11. Imatinib mesylate suppresses bone metastases of breast cancer by inhibiting osteoclasts through the blockade of c-Fms signals.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Toru; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (imatinib) is a potent and selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases, Bcr-Abl, c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs). Recently, it has been reported that imatinib also targets the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor c-Fms. M-CSF signals are essential for the differentiation of osteoclasts. Bone metastases of breast cancer are frequently associated with osteoclastic bone destruction. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that osteoclasts play central roles in the development and progression of bone metastases. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of imatinib on bone metastases of breast cancer. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that imatinib inhibited the M-CSF-induced phosphorylation of c-Fms in osteoclast precursor cells as well as the PDGF-induced PDGFR phosphorylation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Imatinib also markedly reduced osteoclast formation in vitro. In contrast, those concentrations of imatinib did not affect osteoblast differentiation. We then examined the effects of imatinib on bone metastases of MDA-MB-231 cells in a nude mouse model. Radiographic and histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that imatinib significantly decreased bone metastases associated with the reduced number of osteoclasts. In support of the notion that the inhibition of c-Fms acts to suppress the development of bone metastases, we found that a specific inhibitor of c-Fms Ki20227 also decreased bone metastases. In conclusion, these results collectively suggest that imatinib reduced bone metastases, at least in part, by inhibiting osteoclastic bone destruction through the blockade of c-Fms signals. Our results also suggest that imatinib may have a protective effect against cancer treatment-induced bone loss.

  12. Relationship between fluoride exposure and osteoclast markers during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Junrui, Pei; Bingyun, Li; Yanhui, Gao; Xu, Jiaxun; Darko, Gottfried M; Dianjun, Sun

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal fluorosis is a metabolic bone disease caused by excessive accumulation of fluoride. Although the cause of this disease is known, the mechanism by which fluoride accumulates on the bone has not been clearly defined, thus there are no markers that can be used for screening skeletal fluorosis in epidemiology. In this study, osteoclasts were formed from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice-treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. The mRNA expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), calcitonin receptor (CTR), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and cathepsin K (CK) were detected using real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Results showed that fluoride between 0.5 and 8mg/l had no effect on osteoclast formation. However fluoride at 0.5mg/l level significantly decreased the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Fluoride concentration was negatively correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. On day 5 of osteoclast differentiation maturity, MMP9 and CK mRNA expression were not only negatively correlated with fluoride concentration, but directly correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR mRNA expression were positively correlated with the number of osteoclast and they had no correlation with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Thus, it can be seen that MMP9 and CK may reflect the change of activity of bone resorption as well the degree of fluoride exposure. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR can represent the change of number of osteoclast formed.

  13. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  14. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-05

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  15. MHC class II transactivator is an in vivo regulator of osteoclast differentiation and bone homeostasis co-opted from adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Benasciutti, Elisa; Mariani, Elisabetta; Oliva, Laura; Scolari, Maria; Perilli, Egon; Barras, Emmanuele; Milan, Enrico; Orfanelli, Ugo; Fazzalari, Nicola L; Campana, Lara; Capobianco, Annalisa; Otten, Luc; Particelli, Francesca; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Faccio, Roberta; Sitia, Roberto; Reith, Walter; Cenci, Simone

    2014-02-01

    The molecular networks controlling bone homeostasis are not fully understood. The common evolution of bone and adaptive immunity encourages the investigation of shared regulatory circuits. MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) is a master transcriptional co-activator believed to be exclusively dedicated for antigen presentation. CIITA is expressed in osteoclast precursors, and its expression is accentuated in osteoporotic mice. We thus asked whether CIITA plays a role in bone biology. To this aim, we fully characterized the bone phenotype of two mouse models of CIITA overexpression, respectively systemic and restricted to the monocyte-osteoclast lineage. Both CIITA-overexpressing mouse models revealed severe spontaneous osteoporosis, as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry, associated with increased osteoclast numbers and enhanced in vivo bone resorption, whereas osteoblast numbers and in vivo bone-forming activity were unaffected. To understand the underlying cellular and molecular bases, we investigated ex vivo the differentiation of mutant bone marrow monocytes into osteoclasts and immune effectors, as well as osteoclastogenic signaling pathways. CIITA-overexpressing monocytes differentiated normally into effector macrophages or dendritic cells but showed enhanced osteoclastogenesis, whereas CIITA ablation suppressed osteoclast differentiation. Increased c-fms and receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling underlay enhanced osteoclast differentiation from CIITA-overexpressing precursors. Moreover, by extending selected phenotypic and cellular analyses to additional genetic mouse models, namely MHC Class II deficient mice and a transgenic mouse line lacking a specific CIITA promoter and re-expressing CIITA in the thymus, we excluded MHC Class II expression and T cells from contributing to the observed skeletal phenotype. Altogether, our study provides compelling genetic evidence that CIITA, the molecular switch of antigen presentation

  16. Extracellular phosphates enhance activities of voltage-gated proton channels and production of reactive oxygen species in murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshuai; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuno, Miyuki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoclasts are highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells and play a significant role in bone remodelling. In the resorption pit, inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations increase because of degradation of hydroxyapatite. We studied effects of extracellular Pi on voltage-gated H(+) channels in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Extracellular Pi (1.25-20 mM) increased the H(+) channel currents dose dependently and reversibly. The Pi-induced increases were attenuated by removal of extracellular Na(+) and by phosphonoformic acid, a blocker of Na(+)-dependent Pi transporters. Pi increased the maximal conductance, decreased activation time constant, increased deactivation time constant, and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more negative voltages. The most marked change was enhanced gating which was mainly caused by elevation of intracellular Pi levels. The Pi-induced enhanced gating was partially inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203X and staurosporine, indicating that PKC-mediated phosphorylation was involved in part. The increase in the maximal conductance was mainly due to accompanying decrease in intracellular pH. These effects of Pi were not affected by intracellular Mg(2+), bafilomycin A1 (V-ATPase inhibitor) and removal of intracellular ATP. Extracellular Pi also upregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, decreased ROS production and partially attenuated the enhanced gating. In the cells during later passages where osteoclastogenesis declined, H(+) channel activities and ROS production were both modest. These results suggest that, in osteoclasts, ambient Pi is a common enhancer for H(+) channels and ROS production and that potentiation of H(+) channels may help ROS production.

  17. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  18. Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of the female breast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a case of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the breast occurring in a 50-year-old woman who presented with a palpable mass in her right breast. She first noticed the mass one month previously. Core needle biopsy showed connective tissue including epithelioid and spindle cells. The patient underwent total mastectomy without axillary lymph node dissection. Based on examination of the excised tumor, the initial pathologic diagnosis was atypical spindle-shaped and ovoid cells with uncertain malignant potential. Histological findings with immunomarkers led to the final diagnosis of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. This case highlights a rare and interesting variant of primary breast sarcoma and the important role of immunohistochemistry in defining histological type and differential diagnosis. Hence, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma has been a diagnosis of exclusion performed through sampling and critical use of ancillary diagnostic techniques. PMID:23351285

  19. RIP140 in monocytes/macrophages regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bomi; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.; Lin, Yi-Wei; Clarke, Bart L.; Gingery, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Osteolytic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, are characterized by diminished bone quality and increased fracture risk. The therapeutic challenge remains to maintain bone homeostasis with a balance between osteoclast-mediated resorption and osteoblast-mediated formation. Osteoclasts are formed by the fusion of monocyte/macrophage-derived precursors. Here we report, to our knowledge for the first time, that receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) expression in osteoclast precursors and its protein regulation are crucial for osteoclast differentiation, activity, and coupled bone formation. In mice, monocyte/macrophage–specific knockdown of RIP140 (mϕRIP140KD) resulted in a cancellous osteopenic phenotype with significantly increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Osteoclast precursors isolated from mϕRIP140KD mice had significantly increased differentiation potential. Furthermore, conditioned media from mϕRIP140KD primary osteoclast cultures significantly suppressed osteoblast differentiation. This suppressive activity was effectively and rapidly terminated by specific Syk-stimulated RIP140 protein degradation. Mechanistic analysis revealed that RIP140 functions primarily by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation through forming a transcription-suppressor complex with testicular receptor 4 (TR4) to repress osteoclastogenic genes. These data reveal that monocyte/macrophage RIP140/TR4 complexes may serve as a critical transcription regulatory complex maintaining homeostasis of osteoclast differentiation, activity, and coupling with osteoblast formation. Accordingly, we propose a potentially novel therapeutic strategy, specifically targeting osteoclast precursor RIP140 protein in osteolytic bone diseases.

  20. Diagnostic value of H3F3A mutations in giant cell tumour of bone compared to osteoclast-rich mimics.

    PubMed

    Presneau, Nadège; Baumhoer, Daniel; Behjati, Sam; Pillay, Nischalan; Tarpey, Patrick; Campbell, Peter J; Jundt, Gernot; Hamoudi, Rifat; Wedge, David C; Loo, Peter Van; Hassan, A Bassim; Khatri, Bhavisha; Ye, Hongtao; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2015-04-01

    Driver mutations in the two histone 3.3 (H3.3) genes, H3F3A and H3F3B, were recently identified by whole genome sequencing in 95% of chondroblastoma (CB) and by targeted gene sequencing in 92% of giant cell tumour of bone (GCT). Given the high prevalence of these driver mutations, it may be possible to utilise these alterations as diagnostic adjuncts in clinical practice. Here, we explored the spectrum of H3.3 mutations in a wide range and large number of bone tumours (n = 412) to determine if these alterations could be used to distinguish GCT from other osteoclast-rich tumours such as aneurysmal bone cyst, nonossifying fibroma, giant cell granuloma, and osteoclast-rich malignant bone tumours and others. In addition, we explored the driver landscape of GCT through whole genome, exome and targeted sequencing (14 gene panel). We found that H3.3 mutations, namely mutations of glycine 34 in H3F3A, occur in 96% of GCT. We did not find additional driver mutations in GCT, including mutations in IDH1, IDH2, USP6, TP53. The genomes of GCT exhibited few somatic mutations, akin to the picture seen in CB. Overall our observations suggest that the presence of H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations does not entirely exclude malignancy in osteoclast-rich tumours. However, H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations appear to be an almost essential feature of GCT that will aid pathological evaluation of bone tumours, especially when confronted with small needle core biopsies. In the absence of H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations, a diagnosis of GCT should be made with caution.

  1. Vascular expression of the chemokine CX3CL1 promotes osteoclast recruitment and exacerbates bone resorption in an irradiated murine model.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki Hoon; Ryu, Jae Won; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Lee, Soo-Han; Kim, Yuna; Hwang, Chang Sun; Choi, Je-Yong; Han, Ki Ok

    2014-04-01

    Circulating osteoclast precursor cells highly express CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1), which is the only receptor for the unique CX3C membrane-anchored chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1). An irradiated murine model was used to evaluate the role of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis in osteoclast recruitment and osteoclastogenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) promoted the migration of circulating CD11b+ cells to irradiated bones and dose-dependently increased the number of differentiated osteoclasts in irradiated bones. Notably, CX3CL1 was dramatically upregulated in the vascular endothelium after IR. IR-induced production of CX3CL1 by skeletal vascular endothelium promoted chemoattraction of circulating CX3CR1+/CD11b+ cells and triggered homing of these osteoclast precursor cells toward the bone remodeling surface, a specific site for osteoclast differentiation. CX3CL1 also increased the endothelium-derived expression of other chemokines including stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (CXCL2) by activating the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α pathway. These effects may further enhance osteoclastogenesis. A series of in vivo experiments confirmed that knockout of CX3CR1 in bone marrow-derived cells and functional inhibition of CX3CL1 using a specific neutralizing antibody significantly ameliorated osteoclastogenesis and prevented bone loss after IR. These results demonstrate that the de novo CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis plays a pivotal role in osteoclast recruitment and subsequent bone resorption, and verify its therapeutic potential as a new target for anti-resorptive treatment.

  2. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  3. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  4. Follicular Dendritic Cells Emerge from Ubiquitous Perivascular Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Krautler, Nike Julia; Kana, Veronika; Kranich, Jan; Tian, Yinghua; Perera, Dushan; Lemm, Doreen; Schwarz, Petra; Armulik, Annika; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Tallquist, Michelle; Buch, Thorsten; Oliveira-Martins, José B.; Zhu, Caihong; Hermann, Mario; Wagner, Ulrich; Brink, Robert; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Summary The differentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) is essential to the remarkable microanatomic plasticity of lymphoid follicles. Here we show that FDC arise from ubiquitous perivascular precursors (preFDC) expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRβ-Cre-driven reporter gene recombination resulted in FDC labeling, whereas conditional ablation of PDGFRβ+-derived cells abolished FDC, indicating that FDC originate from PDGFRβ+ cells. Lymphotoxin-α-overexpressing prion protein (PrP)+ kidneys developed PrP+ FDC after transplantation into PrP mice, confirming that preFDC exist outside lymphoid organs. Adipose tissue-derived PDGFRβ+ stromal-vascular cells responded to FDC maturation factors and, when transplanted into lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) kidney capsules, differentiated into Mfge8+CD21/35+ FcγRIIβ+PrP+ FDC capable of trapping immune complexes and recruiting B cells. Spleens of lymphocyte-deficient mice contained perivascular PDGFRβ+ FDC precursors whose expansion required both lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and lymphotoxin. The ubiquity of preFDC and their strategic location at blood vessels may explain the de novo generation of organized lymphoid tissue at sites of lymphocytic inflammation. PMID:22770220

  5. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva-related Activated Activin-like Kinase Signaling Enhances Osteoclast Formation during Heterotopic Ossification in Muscle Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masato; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okumoto, Katsumi; Tamura, Yukinori; Okada, Kiyotaka; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is characterized by extensive ossification within muscle tissues, and its molecular pathogenesis is responsible for the constitutively activating mutation (R206H) of the bone morphogenetic protein type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2). In this study, we investigated the effects of implanting ALK2 (R206H)-transfected myoblastic C2C12 cells into nude mice on osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle and subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells with BMP-2 in nude mice induced robust heterotopic ossification with an increase in the formation of osteoclasts in muscle tissues but not in subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells in muscle induced heterotopic ossification more effectively than that of empty vector-transfected cells. A co-culture of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells as well as the conditioned medium from ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells enhanced osteoclast formation in Raw264.7 cells more effectively than those with empty vector-transfected cells. The transfection of ALK2 (R206H) into C2C12 cells elevated the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, whereas the inhibition of TGF-β signaling suppressed the enhanced formation of osteoclasts in the co-culture with ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells and their conditioned medium. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the causal mutation transfection of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in myoblasts enhanced the formation of osteoclasts from its precursor through TGF-β in muscle tissues. PMID:24798338

  6. Effects and mechanisms of 8-prenylnaringenin on osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and osteoclast-like cells RAW264.7

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Kang, Lumei; Ma, Yuhui; Chen, Hongping; Kuang, Haibin; Huang, Qiren; He, Ming; Peng, Weijie

    2014-01-01

    8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is a phytoestrogen with the highest estrogenic activity. The objective of the present study was to confirm the superiority of 8-PN on bone metabolisms and the estrogen receptor (ER) subtype mediating effects of 8-PN. The osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and osteoclast-like cell line RAW264.7 were treated with 17β-estradiol (10−8 mol/L), genistein (10−5 mol/L), daidzein (10−5 mol/L), 8-PN (10−5 mol/L) alone or in the presence of ERα antagonist MPP (10−7 mol/L) and ERβ antagonist PTHPP (1.5 × 10−7 mol/L). It has been found that 8-PN did not affect osteoblast proliferation, and that 8-PN increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OCN) concentrations, and the mineralized nodules. 8-PN inhibited RAW264.7 differentiating into osteoclasts and reduced the pit area of bone resorption. 8-PN could also inhibit the protein and mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteoblasts, and conversely promote the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG). These effects of 8-PN were mainly inhibited not by PTHPP but by MPP and they were weaker than estrogen's effects but stronger than those of genistein and daidzein. In conclusion, the effects of 8-PN on promoting osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption were mediated by ERα instead of ERβ and the efficacy was more potent than that of the two classic phytoestrogens: genistein and daidzein. PMID:25473491

  7. Osteoclastic resorption of biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburgh, S; Layrolle, P; Barrère, F; de Bruijn, J; Schoonman, J; van Blitterswijk, C A; de Groot, K

    2001-08-01

    A new biomimetic method for coating metal implants enables the fast formation of dense and homogeneous calcium phosphate coatings. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were coated with a thin, carbonated, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) by immersion in a saturated solution of calcium, phosphate, magnesium, and carbonate. The ACP-coated disks then were processed further by incubation in calcium phosphate solutions to produce either crystalline carbonated apatite (CA) or octacalcium phosphate (OCP). The resorption behavior of these three biomimetic coatings was studied using osteoclast-enriched mouse bone-marrow cell cultures for 7 days. Cell-mediated degradation was observed for both carbonated apatite and octacalcium phosphate coatings. Numerous resorption lacunae characteristic of osteoclastic resorption were found on carbonated apatite after cell culture. The results showed that carbonated apatite coatings are resorbed by osteoclasts in a manner consistent with normal osteoclastic resorption. Osteoclasts also degraded the octacalcium phosphate coatings but not by classical pit formation.

  8. Chlorogenic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by down-regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-induced nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sung Chul; Lee, Cheol; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Hyun Mee; So, Hong-Seob; Lee, Myeung Su; Rho, Mun Chual; Oh, Jaemin

    2013-01-01

    Excessive osteoclastic bone resorption plays a critical role in inflammation-induced bone loss such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal bone erosion. Therefore, identification of osteoclast targeted-agents may be a therapeutic approach to the treatment of pathological bone loss. In this study, we isolated chlorogenic acid (CGA) from fructus of Gardenia jasminoides to discover anti-bone resorptive agents. CGA is a polyphenol with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities, however, its effects on osteoclast differentiation is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effect of CGA in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and RANKL signaling. CGA dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) without any evidence of cytotoxicity. CGA inhibited the phosphorylation of p38, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B (IκB), and IκB degradation by RANKL treatment. CGA suppressed the mRNA expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), TRAP and OSCAR in RANKL-treated bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Also, overexpression of NFATc1 in BMMs blocked the inhibitory effect of CGA on RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, to evaluate the effects of CGA in vivo, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone erosion study was carried out. CGA remarkably attenuated LPS-induced bone loss based on micro-computed tomography and histologic analysis of femurs. Taken together, our findings suggest that CGA may be a potential treatment option for osteoclast-related diseases with inflammatory bone destruction.

  9. Retinoid X receptors orchestrate osteoclast differentiation and postnatal bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-Gutiérrez, María P.; Rőszer, Tamás; Fuentes, Lucía; Núñez, Vanessa; Escolano, Amelia; Redondo, Juan Miguel; De Clerck, Nora; Metzger, Daniel; Valledor, Annabel F.; Ricote, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are important for maintenance of bone remodeling and mineral homeostasis. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation and activity is important for the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases associated with bone loss. Here, we demonstrate that retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are key elements of the transcriptional program of differentiating osteoclasts. Loss of RXR function in hematopoietic cells resulted in formation of giant, nonresorbing osteoclasts and increased bone mass in male mice and protected female mice from bone loss following ovariectomy, which induces osteoporosis in WT females. The increase in bone mass associated with RXR deficiency was due to lack of expression of the RXR-dependent transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family, protein B (MAFB) in osteoclast progenitors. Evaluation of osteoclast progenitor cells revealed that RXR homodimers directly target and bind to the Mafb promoter, and this interaction is required for proper osteoclast proliferation, differentiation, and activity. Pharmacological activation of RXRs inhibited osteoclast differentiation due to the formation of RXR/liver X receptor (LXR) heterodimers, which induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), resulting in indirect MAFB upregulation. Our study reveals that RXR signaling mediates bone homeostasis and suggests that RXRs have potential as targets for the treatment of bone pathologies such as osteoporosis. PMID:25574839

  10. Inflammatory Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Nevius, Erin; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Pereira, João P

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. Self-reactive B and T lymphocytes cooperate to promote antibody responses against self proteins and are major drivers of disease. T lymphocytes also promote RA independently of B lymphocytes mainly through the production of key inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, that promote pathology. While the innate signals that initiate self-reactive adaptive immune responses are poorly understood, the disease is predominantly caused by inflammatory cellular infiltration and accumulation in articular tissues, and by bone erosions driven by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are giant multinucleated cells formed by the fusion of multiple myeloid cells that require short-range signals, such as the cytokines MCSF and RANKL, for undergoing differentiation. The recruitment and positioning of osteoclast precursors to sites of osteoclast differentiation by chemoattractants is an important point of control for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Recently, the GPCR EBI2 and its oxysterol ligand 7a, 25 dihydroxycholesterol, were identified as important regulators of osteoclast precursor positioning in proximity to bone surfaces and of osteoclast differentiation under homeostasis. In chronic inflammatory diseases like RA, osteoclast differentiation is also driven by inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-1, and can occur independently of RANKL. Finally, there is growing evidence that the chemotactic signals guiding osteoclast precursors to inflamed articular sites contribute to disease and are of great interest. Furthering our understanding of the complex osteoimmune cell interactions should provide new avenues of therapeutic intervention for RA.

  11. Osteoblast protects osteoclast devoid of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters from oxidative cytotoxicity of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Kambe, Yuki; Sahara, Koichi; Kurokawa, Shintaro; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2007-12-01

    The view that ascorbic acid indirectly benefits osteoclastogenesis through expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL) by osteoblasts is prevailing. In this study, we have examined the direct effect of ascorbic acid on osteoclastogenesis in cultured mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow precursors. The absence of alkaline phosphatase and osteoblastic marker genes validated the usefulness of isolation procedures. Sustained exposure to ascorbic acid, but not to dehydroascorbic acid, significantly reduced the number of multinucleated cells positive to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. In cultured osteoclasts, mRNA expression was seen for glucose transporter-1 involved in membrane transport of dehydroascorbic acid, but not for sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters-1 and -2 that are both responsible for the transport of ascorbic acid. The inhibition by ascorbic acid was completely prevented by catalase, while ascorbic acid or hydrogen peroxide drastically increased the number of cells stained with propidium iodide and the generation of reactive oxygen species, in addition to inducing mitochondrial membrane depolarization in cultured osteoclasts. In pre-osteoclastic cell line RAW264.7 cells, ascorbic acid similarly inhibited the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, with a significant decrease in RANKL-induced NF-kappaB transactivation. Moreover, co-culture with osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells significantly prevented the ascorbic acid-induced decrease in the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that ascorbic acid may play a dual repulsive role in osteoclastogenesis toward bone remodeling through the direct cytotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress to osteoclasts, in addition to the indirect trophism mediated by RANKL from osteoblasts.

  12. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells generate pituicytes in vivo during neurohypophysis development.

    PubMed

    Virard, Isabelle; Coquillat, Delphine; Bancila, Mircea; Kaing, Sovann; Durbec, Pascale

    2006-02-01

    In the vertebrate brain, much remains to be understood concerning the origin of glial cell diversity and the potential lineage relationships between the various types of glia. Besides astrocytes and myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, other macroglial cell populations are found in discrete areas of the central nervous system (CNS). They share functional features with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes but also display specific characteristics. Such specialized cells, called pituicytes, are located in the neurohypophysis (NH). Our work focuses on the lineage of the pituicytes during rodent development. First, we show that cells identified with a combination of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) markers are present in the developing rat NH. In culture, neonatal NH progenitors also share major functional characteristics with OPCs, being both migratory and bipotential, i.e. able to give rise to type 2 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We then observe that, either in vitro or after transplantation into myelin-deficient Shiverer brain, pieces of NH generate myelinating oligodendrocytes, confirming the oligodendrogenic potentiality of NH cells. However, no mature oligodendrocyte can be found in the NH. This led us to hypothesize that the OPCs present in the developing NH might be generating other glial cells, especially the pituicytes. Consistent with this hypothesis, the OPCs appear during NH development before pituicytes differentiate. Finally, we establish a lineage relationship between olig1+ cells, most likely OPCs, and the pituicytes by fate-mapping experiments using genetically engineered mice. This constitutes the first demonstration that OPCs generate glial cells other than oligodendrocytes in vivo.

  13. Single Source Precursors for Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Harris, Jerry D.; Cowen, Jonathan; Buhro, William E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2002-01-01

    The development of thin film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provides an attractive cost solution to fabricating solar arrays with high specific power, (W/kg). The use of a polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer for thin film solar cells is considered as the next generation photovoltaic devices. At NASA GRC we have focused on the development of new single source precursors (SSP) and their utility to deposit the chalcopyrite semi-conducting layer (CIS) onto flexible substrates for solar cell fabrication. The syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering is described. Thin-film fabrication studies demonstrate the SSPs can be used in a spray CVD (chemical vapor deposition) process, for depositing CIS at reduced temperatures, which display good electrical properties, suitable for PV (photovoltaic) devices.

  14. Notch signaling acts before cell division to promote asymmetric cleavage and cell fate of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-10-21

    Asymmetric cell divisions in the central nervous system generate neurons of diverse fates. In Drosophila melanogaster, the protein Numb localizes asymmetrically to dividing neural precursor cells such that only one daughter cell inherits Numb. Numb inhibits Notch signaling in this daughter cell, resulting in a different cell fate from the Notch-induced fate in the other-Numb-negative-daughter cell. Precursor cells undergo asymmetric cytokinesis generating daughter cells of different sizes. I found that inactivation of Notch in fly embryonic neural precursor cells disrupted the asymmetric positioning of the cleavage furrow and produced daughter cells of the same size and fate. Moreover, inactivation of Notch at different times altered the degree of asymmetric Numb localization, such that earlier inactivation of Notch caused symmetric distribution of Numb and later inactivation produced incomplete asymmetric localization of Numb. The extent of asymmetrically localized Numb positively correlated with the degree of asymmetric cytokinesis and the size disparity in daughter cells. Loss of Numb or expression of constitutively active Notch led to premature specification of the precursor cells into the fate of one of the daughter cells. Thus, in addition to its role in the specification of daughter cell fate after division, Notch controls Numb localization in the precursor cells to determine the size and fate of daughter cells. Numb also inhibits Notch signaling in precursor cells to prevent Notch-induced differentiation of the precursor cell, forming an autoregulatory loop.

  15. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate inhibition of osteoclastic differentiation via NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Wang, Y.-H.; Ho, M.-L.; Hung, S.-H.; Chen, I.-S. Wang, G.-J.

    2009-02-20

    People who regularly drink tea have been found to have a higher bone mineral density (BMD) and to be at less risk of hip fractures than those who do not drink it. Green tea catechins such as (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) have been reported to increase osteogenic functioning in mesenchymal stem cells. However, its effect on osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on RANKL-activation osteoclastogenesis and NF-{kappa}B in RAW 264.7, a murine preosteoclast cell line. EGCG (10-100 {mu}M) significantly suppressed the RANKL-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and the formation of pits in murine RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). EGCG appeared to target osteoclastic differentiation at an early stage but had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursors. In addition, it significantly inhibited RANKL-induced NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation. We conclude that EGCG inhibits osteoclastogenesis through its activation of NF-{kappa}B.

  16. New methodology for evaluating osteoclastic activity induced by orthodontic load

    PubMed Central

    ARAÚJO, Adriele Silveira; FERNANDES, Alline Birra Nolasco; MACIEL, José Vinicius Bolognesi; NETTO, Juliana de Noronha Santos; BOLOGNESE, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is a dynamic process of bone modeling involving osteoclast-driven resorption on the compression side. Consequently, to estimate the influence of various situations on tooth movement, experimental studies need to analyze this cell. Objectives The aim of this study was to test and validate a new method for evaluating osteoclastic activity stimulated by mechanical loading based on the fractal analysis of the periodontal ligament (PDL)-bone interface. Material and Methods The mandibular right first molars of 14 rabbits were tipped mesially by a coil spring exerting a constant force of 85 cN. To evaluate the actual influence of osteoclasts on fractal dimension of bone surface, alendronate (3 mg/Kg) was injected weekly in seven of those rabbits. After 21 days, the animals were killed and their jaws were processed for histological evaluation. Osteoclast counts and fractal analysis (by the box counting method) of the PDL-bone interface were performed in histological sections of the right and left sides of the mandible. Results An increase in the number of osteoclasts and in fractal dimension after OTM only happened when alendronate was not administered. Strong correlation was found between the number of osteoclasts and fractal dimension. Conclusions Our results suggest that osteoclastic activity leads to an increase in bone surface irregularity, which can be quantified by its fractal dimension. This makes fractal analysis by the box counting method a potential tool for the assessment of osteoclastic activity on bone surfaces in microscopic examination. PMID:25760264

  17. Antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation by reducing nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding and prevents in vivo bone resorption induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyon Jong; Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Man; Lee, Seung Bok; Kim, Hyun-Duck; Su Kim, Ghi; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2006-05-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and bone mineral density or osteoporosis has recently been reported. As bone loss occurring in osteoporosis and inflammatory diseases is primarily due to increases in osteoclast number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be relevant to osteoclast differentiation, which requires receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) frequently present in inflammatory conditions has a profound synergy with RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA), a strong antioxidant clinically used for some time, on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. At concentrations showing no growth inhibition, alpha-LA potently suppressed osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow-derived precursor cells driven either by a high-dose RANKL alone or by a low-dose RANKL plus TNF-alpha (RANKL/TNF-alpha). alpha-LA abolished ROS elevation by RANKL or RANKL/TNF-alpha and inhibited NF-kappaB activation in osteoclast precursor cells. Specifically, alpha-LA reduced DNA binding of NF-kappaB but did not inhibit IKK activation. Furthermore, alpha-LA greatly suppressed in vivo bone loss induced by RANKL or TNF-alpha in a calvarial remodeling model. Therefore, our data provide evidence that ROS plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation through NF-kappaB regulation and the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has a therapeutic potential for bone erosive diseases.

  18. Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    multinucleated cells were observed in tissues from mice that received cells in collagen gels + CID, demonstrating that engineered RAW iRANK cells can...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0435 TITLE: Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 09/30/2014 – 09/29/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of

  19. Polarity and membrane transport in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Baron, R

    1989-01-01

    The osteoclast is a highly polarized non-epithelial cell. The apical pole of the cell is determined by the cell's attachment to the extracellular matrix. This attachment forms the sealing zone, delimiting the subosteoclastic bone resorbing compartment. The apical membrane of the cell forms the ruffled-border, which contains some specific membrane proteins and a proton pump ATPase, which acidifies the apical compartment. Newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes are vectorially transported into this apical compartment bound to mannose-6-phosphate receptors. The basolateral membrane is highly enriched in sodium pumps with beta and alpha 1 subunits. Associated with the acidification process is the carbonic anhydrase found in the cytoplasm and membrane-associated and a bicarbonate-chloride exchanger in the membrane.2 These features put the osteoclast in the same functional category as the kidney tubule intercalated cell and the gastric oxyntic cell, both of epithelial origin, which secrete acid in a polarized fashion.

  20. Precursors of executive function in infants with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Alexandra M; Telfer, Paul T; Kirkham, Fenella J; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    Executive dysfunction occurs in sickle cell anemia, but there are few early data. Infants with sickle cell anemia (n = 14) and controls (n = 14) performed the "A-not-B" and Object Retrieval search tasks, measuring precursors of executive function at 9 and 12 months. Significant group differences were not found. However, for the A-not-B task, 7 of 11 sickle cell anemia infants scored in the lower 2 performance categories at 9 months, but only 1 at 12 months (P = .024); controls obtained scores at 12 months that were statistically comparable to the scores they had already obtained at 9 months. On the Object Retrieval task, 9- and 12-month controls showed comparable scores, whereas infants with sickle cell anemia continued to improve (P = .027); at 9 months, those with lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation passed fewer trials (R s = 0.670, P = .024) and took longer to obtain the toy (R s = -0.664, P = .013). Subtle delays in acquiring developmental skills may underlie abnormal executive function in childhood.

  1. α-Tocotrienol inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption by suppressing RANKL expression and signaling and bone resorbing activity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Lee, Zang Hee

    2011-03-25

    Vitamin E, an essential nutrient with powerful antioxidant activity, is the mixture of two classes of compounds, tocopherols (TPs) and tocotrienols (TTs). Although TTs exhibit better bone protective activity than α-TP, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether α-TT and α-TP can modulate osteoclastic bone resorption. We found that α-TT but not α-TP inhibits osteoclastogenesis in coculture of osteoblasts and bone marrow cells induced by either IL-1 or combined treatment with 1α,25(OH)(2) vitamin D(3) and prostaglandin E(2). In accordance with this, only α-TT inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts. In addition, α-TT but not α-TP inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from precursors by suppression of c-Fos expression, possibly through inhibiting ERK and NF-κB activation. This anti-osteoclastogenic effect was reversed when c-Fos or an active form of NFATc1, a critical downstream of c-Fos during osteoclastogenesis, was overexpressed. Furthermore, only α-TT reduced bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts without affecting their survival. Overall, our results demonstrate that α-TT but not α-TP has anti-bone resorptive properties by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation, suggesting that α-TT may have therapeutic value for treating and preventing bone diseases characterized by excessive bone destruction.

  2. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro. PMID:6787164

  3. Glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing in peripheral osteoclasts resulting in the circadian expression rhythm of osteoclast-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Kondo, Hisataka; Noguchi, Toshihide; Togari, Akifumi

    2014-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are prevalent in bone metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Recently, we suggested that output signals from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are transmitted from the master circadian rhythm to peripheral osteoblasts through β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid signaling. In this study, we examined how the master circadian rhythm is transmitted to peripheral osteoclasts and the role of clock gene in osteoclast. Mice were maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods and sacrificed at Zeitgeber times 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20. mRNA was extracted from femur (cancellous bone) and analyzed for the expression of osteoclast-related genes and clock genes. Osteoclast-related genes such as cathepsin K (CTSK) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) showed circadian rhythmicity like clock genes such as period 1 (PER1), PER2 and brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1). In an in vitro study, not β-agonist but glucocorticoid treatment remarkably synchronized clock and osteoclast-related genes in cultured osteoclasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed the interaction between BMAL1 proteins and promoter region of CTSK and NFATc1. To examine whether endogenous glucocorticoids influence the osteoclast circadian rhythms, mice were adrenalectomized (ADX) and maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods at least two weeks before glucocorticoid injection. A glucocorticoid injection restarted the circadian expression of CTSK and NFATc1 in ADX mice. These results suggest that glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing to peripheral osteoclasts and osteoclast clock contributes to the circadian expression of osteoclast-related genes such as CTSK and NFATc1.

  4. Extracts of marine algae show inhibitory activity against osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that play a crucial role in bone resorption. The imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation results in osteoporosis. Therefore, substances that can suppress osteoclast formation are potential candidate materials for drug development or functional foods. There have been reports that extracts or purified compounds from marine micro- and macroalgae can suppress osteoclast differentiation. Symbioimine, isolated from the cultured dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., had suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation in osteoclast-like cells. Norzoanthamine, isolated from the colonial zoanthid Zoanthas sp., has been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice. With regard to marine extracts, the fucoxanthin-rich component from brown algae has been shown to have suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation. An extract of Sargassum fusiforme has recently been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity. This extract suppressed both osteoclast differentiation and accelerated osteoblast formation in separate in vitro experiments. It also showed antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice by regulating the balance between bone resorption and bone formation. These marine algae and their extracts may be sources of marine medicinal foods for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  5. Celastrol attenuates bone erosion in collagen-Induced arthritis mice and inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function in RANKL-induced RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ke; Xu, Lingxiao; Feng, Xiaoke; Zhang, Qiande; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f (TwHF) of the Celastraceae family has attracted increasing attention for its potential therapeutic application in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well accepted that TwHF exerts the antirheumatic activity and mainly depends on its potent anti-inflammatory property. To further explore the therapeutic potential of the well-defined TwHF-derived single compound - celastrol in RA, we study the therapeutic efficacy of celastrol on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and delineate its effects on osteoclast differentiation and functions in RANKL-induced osteoclast precursors RAW264.7 cell line. In CIA mice, daily injection of celastrol (beginning on day 28 after arthritis induction) markedly suppressed arthritis, and reduced bone damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone micro-computed tomography (CT). The effects were accompanied by reductions of osteoclast cells in joints, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, and expression of osteoclastic genes (Trap, Ctsk, Ctr, Mmp-9) and transcriptional factors (c-Fos, c-Jun and NFATc1). When RAW264.7 cells were treated with RANKL, celastrol inhibited the formation of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and the bone-resorbing activity in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, celastrol reduced the RANKL-induced expression of osteoclastic genes and transcriptional factors, as well as phosphorylation of NF-kB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These findings show that celastrol could directly inhibit osteoclast formation and function, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy of celastrol for managing RA, especially in preventing bone destruction.

  6. Circulating Osteogenic Precursor Cells in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Manavalan, J. S.; Cremers, S.; Dempster, D. W.; Zhou, H.; Dworakowski, E.; Kode, A.; Kousteni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with an increased risk of fractures and low bone formation. However, the mechanism for the low bone formation is not well understood. Recently, circulating osteogenic precursor (COP) cells, which contribute to bone formation, have been characterized in the peripheral circulation. Objective: Our objective was to characterize the number and maturity of COP cells in T2D. Patients, Design, and Setting: Eighteen postmenopausal women with T2D and 27 controls participated in this cross-sectional study at a clinical research center. Main Outcome Measures: COP cells were characterized using flow cytometry and antibodies against osteocalcin (OCN) and early stem cell markers. Histomorphometric (n = 9) and molecular (n=14) indices of bone turnover and oxidative stress were also measured. Results: The percentage of OCN+ cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was lower in T2D (0.8 ± 0.2 vs. 1.6 ± 0.4%; P < 0.0001), whereas the percentage of OCN+ cells coexpressing the early marker CD146 was increased (OCN+/CD146+: 33.3 ± 7 vs. 12.0 ± 4%; P < 0.0001). Reduced histomorphometric indices of bone formation were observed in T2D subjects, including mineralizing surface (2.65 ± 1.9 vs. 7.58 ± 2.4%, P = 0.02), bone formation rate (0.01 ± 0.1 vs. 0.05 ±0.2 μm3/um2 · d, P = 0.02), and osteoblast surface (1.23 ±0.9 vs. 4.60 ± 2.5%, P = 0.03). T2D subjects also had reduced molecular expression of the osteoblast regulator gene Runx2 but increased expression of the oxidative stress markers p66Shc and SOD2. Conclusions: Circulating OCN+ cells were decreased in T2D, whereas OCN+/CD146+ cells were increased. Histomorphometric indices of bone formation were decreased in T2D, as was molecular expression of osteoblastic activity. Stimulation of bone formation may have beneficial therapeutic skeletal consequences in T2D. PMID:22740707

  7. Bio-corrosion of stainless steel by osteoclasts--in vitro evidence.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Chan, Erwin; Gautschi, Oliver P; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Most metals in contact with biological systems undergo corrosion by an electrochemical process. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on stainless steel (SS) and directly corrode the metal alloy leading to the formation of corresponding metal ions, which may cause inflammatory reactions and activate the immune system. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures and evident resorption features on the surface of SS discs on which OC were cultured for 21 days. The findings were confirmed by atomic emission spectrometry investigations showing significantly increased levels of chromium, nickel, and manganese in the supernatant of OC cultures. Furthermore, significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis, were revealed in the same cultures by cytometric bead array analysis. Within the present study, it was shown that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate towards mature OC on SS. The mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and release corresponding metal ions, which induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that are known to enhance osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Enhanced corrosion and the subsequently released metal ions may therefore result in enhanced osteolytic lesions in the peri-prosthetic bone, contributing to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

  8. Treatment with hydrogen molecules prevents RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation associated with inhibition of ROS formation and inactivation of MAPK, AKT and NF-kappa B pathways in murine RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhu; Zhang, Qing-Xiang; Dong, Xiao-Xian; Li, Huai-Dong; Ma, Xin

    2014-09-01

    The bone protective effects of the hydrogen molecule (H2) have been demonstrated in several osteoporosis models while the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Osteoclast differentiation is an important factor related to the pathogenesis of bone-loss related diseases. In this work, we evaluated the effects of incubation with H2 on receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation. We found that treatment with H2 prevented RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells and BMMs. Treatment with H2 inhibits the ability to form resorption pits of BMMs stimulated by RANKL. Treatment with H2 reduced mRNA levels of osteoclast-specific markers including tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, metalloproteinase-9, carbonic anhydrase typeII, and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase. Treatment with H2 decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, suppressed NADPH oxidase activity, down-regulated Rac1 activity and Nox1 expression, reduced mitochondrial ROS formation, and enhanced nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 nuclear translocation and heme oxygenase-1 activity. In addition, treatment with H2 suppressed RANKL-induced expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 and c-Fos. Furthermore, treatment with H2 suppressed NF-κB activation and reduced phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, and protein kinases B (AKT) stimulated with RANKL. In conclusion, hydrogen molecules prevented RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation associated with inhibition of reactive oxygen species formation and inactivation of NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT pathways.

  9. Gradient isolation of glial cells: evidence that flat epithelial cells are astroglial cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Meller, K

    1987-07-01

    Discontinuous gradients of metrizamide were used to separate the cell components of monolayers of primary cultures of embryonic rat brains. These primary cell cultures were of two types: long-term cultures (more than a year) of embryonic rat brain, which contained several glial cell types, and monolayers of cell cultures (several weeks old), which contained a complex population of cells, including neuronal elements. The gradient separation produces fractions of pure flat epithelial cells that are able to survive and proliferate. After a few days, all flat epithelial cells become confluent and show a positive reaction to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); this indicates that these cells astroglial precursor cells. Following their maintenance in vitro for several months, all cultures give rise to a pure population of astrocytes identified not only by their characteristic morphology, but also by their content of GFAP. It is proposed that the differentiation controls are dependent on cell interactions that are influenced by the composition of the cell population and/or the molecular growth and differentiation factors released by these cells into the medium.

  10. RANK ligand signaling modulates the matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression during osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, Kumaran; Nishimura, Riko; Senn, Joseph; Youssef, Rimon F.; London, Steven D.; Reddy, Sakamuri V. . E-mail: reddysv@musc.edu

    2007-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation is tightly regulated by receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) signaling. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a type IV collagenase is highly expressed in osteoclast cells and plays an important role in degradation of extracellular matrix; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate MMP-9 gene expression are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that RANKL signaling induces MMP-9 gene expression in osteoclast precursor cells. We further show that RANKL regulates MMP-9 gene expression through TRAF6 but not TRAF2. Interestingly, blockade of p38 MAPK activity by pharmacological inhibitor, SB203580 increases MMP-9 activity whereas ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059 decreases RANKL induced MMP-9 activity in RAW264.7 cells. These data suggest that RANKL differentially regulates MMP-9 expression through p38 and ERK signaling pathways during osteoclast differentiation. Transient expression of MMP-9 gene (+ 1 to - 1174 bp relative to ATG start codon) promoter-luciferase reporter plasmids in RAW264.7 cells and RANKL stimulation showed significant increase (20-fold) of MMP-9 gene promoter activity; however, there is no significant change with respect to + 1 bp to - 446 bp promoter region and empty vector transfected cells. These results indicated that MMP-9 promoter sequence from - 446 bp to - 1174 bp relative to start codon is responsive to RANKL stimulation. Sequence analysis of the mouse MMP-9 gene promoter region further identified the presence of binding motif (- 1123 bp to - 1153 bp) for the nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1) transcription factor. Inhibition of NFATc1 using siRNA and VIVIT peptide inhibitor significantly decreased RANKL stimulation of MMP-9 activity. We further confirm by oligonucleotide pull-down assay that RANKL stimuli enhanced NFATc1 binding to MMP-9 gene promoter element. In addition, over-expression of constitutively active NFAT in RAW264.7 cells markedly increased (5-fold) MMP-9 gene promoter activity

  11. Inhibitor of DASH proteases affects expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts and reduces myeloma growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Angela; Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Aziz, Nazneen; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2009-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV activity and/or structure homologues (DASH) are serine proteases implicated in tumourigenesis. We previously found that a DASH protease, fibroblast activation protein (FAP), was involved in osteoclast-induced myeloma growth. Here we further demonstrated expression of various adhesion molecules in osteoclasts cultured alone or cocultured with myeloma cells, and tested the effects of DASH inhibitor, PT-100, on myeloma cell growth, bone disease, osteoclast differentiation and activity, and expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts. PT-100 had no direct effects on viability of myeloma cells or mature osteoclasts, but significantly reduced survival of myeloma cells cocultured with osteoclasts. Real-time PCR array for 85 adhesion molecules revealed upregulation of 17 genes in osteoclasts after coculture with myeloma cells. Treatment of myeloma/osteoclast cocultures with PT-100 significantly downregulated 18 of 85 tested genes in osteoclasts, some of which are known to play roles in tumourigenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PT-100 also inhibited osteoclast differentiation and subsequent pit formation. Resorption activity of mature osteoclasts and differentiation of osteoblasts were not affected by PT-100. In primary myelomatous severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-hu mice PT-100 reduced osteoclast activity, bone resorption and tumour burden. These data demonstrated that DASH proteases are involved in myeloma bone disease and tumour growth.

  12. Long-term fate of neural precursor cells following transplantation into developing and adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Lepore, A C; Neuhuber, B; Connors, T M; Han, S S W; Liu, Y; Daniels, M P; Rao, M S; Fischer, I

    2006-05-12

    Successful strategies for transplantation of neural precursor cells for replacement of lost or dysfunctional CNS cells require long-term survival of grafted cells and integration with the host system, potentially for the life of the recipient. It is also important to demonstrate that transplants do not result in adverse outcomes. Few studies have examined the long-term properties of transplanted neural precursor cells in the CNS, particularly in non-neurogenic regions of the adult. The aim of the present study was to extensively characterize the fate of defined populations of neural precursor cells following transplantation into the developing and adult CNS (brain and spinal cord) for up to 15 months, including integration of graft-derived neurons with the host. Specifically, we employed neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors, which represent neural precursor cells with lineage restrictions for neuronal and glial fate, respectively. Transplanted cells were prepared from embryonic day-13.5 fetal spinal cord of transgenic donor rats that express the marker gene human placental alkaline phosphatase to achieve stable and reliable graft tracking. We found that in both developing and adult CNS grafted cells showed long-term survival, morphological maturation, extensive distribution and differentiation into all mature CNS cell types (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). Graft-derived neurons also formed synapses, as identified by electron microscopy, suggesting that transplanted neural precursor cells integrated with adult CNS. Furthermore, grafts did not result in any apparent deleterious outcomes. We did not detect tumor formation, cells did not localize to unwanted locations and no pronounced immune response was present at the graft sites. The long-term stability of neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors and the lack of adverse effects suggest that transplantation of lineage-restricted neural precursor cells can

  13. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  14. Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    may have traumatized the soft tissue . We hypothesize that injecting a lower number of engineered RAW iRANK cells at each time point or performing...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0434 TITLE: Engineered osteoclasts for the treatment and prevention of heterotopic ossification PRINCIPAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0434 5b

  15. Lack of evidence for recipient precursor cells replenishing β-cells in transplanted islets.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Inada, Akari; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow and tissue precursor cells have been postulated to replenish grafts of transplanted islets. Several investigators have reported that bone marrow cells can promote the regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we investigated the potential of recipient-derived precursor cells to form new pancreatic endocrine cells in islet grafts transplanted under the kidney capsule. Mouse insulin promoter (MIP)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice, which express GFP only in β-cells, or β-actin GFP mice, which express GFP ubiquitously, were used to determine if the recipient-derived cells differentiate into β-cells or other types of endocrine cells. We transplanted MIP-GFP islets into wild-type mice, wild-type islets into MIP-GFP mice, β-actin GFP islets into wild-type mice, and wild-type islets into β-actin GFP mice. β-Actin GFP bone marrow cells were then injected into wild-type mice to evaluate the potential role of bone marrow stem cells to provide new islet cells to the graft. No β-cells with green fluorescence were seen in the graft when wild-type islets were transplanted into MIP-GFP mice. When wild-type islets were transplanted into β-actin GFP mice, no β-cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts. Similarly, no endocrine cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts after injection of β-actin GFP bone marrow cells into wild-type islet-transplanted wild-type mice. This study provides further support for the concept that recipient precursor cells do not produce new β-cells in grafts of transplanted islets.

  16. A male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyuki; Itano, Osamu; Oshima, Go; Chiba, Naokazu; Ishikawa, Hideki; Koyama, Yasumasa; Du, Wenlin; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2011-09-08

    We report a rare male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A 59-year-old Japanese man with diabetes visited our hospital, complaining of fullness in the upper abdomen. A laboratory analysis revealed anemia (Hemoglobin; 9.7 g/dl) and elevated C-reactive protein (3.01 mg/dl). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 274 U/ml and Carcinoembryonic antigen was 29.6 ng/ml. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a 14-cm cystic mass in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen that appeared to originate from the pancreatic tail. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy/total gastrectomy/cholecystectomy. The mass consisted of a multilocular cystic lesion. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by cuboidal or columnar epithelium, including mucinous epithelium. Sarcomatous mononuclear cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells were found in the stroma. Ovarian-type stroma was not seen. We made a diagnosis of osteoclast-like giant cell tumor originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. All surgical margins were negative, however, two peripancreatic lymph nodes were positive. The patient recovered uneventfully. Two months after the operation, multiple metastases occurred in the liver. He died 4 months after the operation.

  17. Podosome organization drives osteoclast-mediated bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Georgess, Dan; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Blangy, Anne; Jurdic, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the cells responsible for physiological bone resorption. A specific organization of their most prominent cytoskeletal structures, podosomes, is crucial for the degradation of mineralized bone matrix. Each podosome is constituted of an F-actin-enriched central core surrounded by a loose F-actin network, called the podosome cloud. In addition to intrinsic actin dynamics, podosomes are defined by their adhesion to the extracellular matrix, mainly via core-linking CD44 and cloud-linking integrins. These properties allow podosomes to collectively evolve into different patterns implicated in migration and bone resorption. Indeed, to resorb bone, osteoclasts polarize, actively secrete protons, and proteases into the resorption pit where these molecules are confined by a podosome-containing sealing zone. Here, we review recent advancements on podosome structure and regulatory pathways in osteoclasts. We also discuss the distinct functions of different podosome patterns during the lifespan of a single osteoclast. PMID:24714644

  18. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  19. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  20. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  1. Bovine dentine organic matrix down-regulates osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Sriarj, Wantida; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Takagi, Yuzo; Shimokawa, Hitoyata

    2009-01-01

    Physiological root resorption is a phenomenon that normally takes place in deciduous teeth; root resorption of permanent teeth occurs only under pathological conditions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are still unclear. Our previous study showed that osteoclasts cultured on deciduous dentine exhibited a higher degree of resorption and higher levels of cathepsin K and MMP-9 mRNA than osteoclasts cultured on permanent dentine. These results could be because of different susceptibilities to acid and the different organic matrices between deciduous and permanent dentine. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dentine extracts from bovine deciduous and permanent dentine on osteoclast activity. Osteoclasts, obtained from mouse bone marrow cells co-cultured with an osteoblast-rich fraction in the presence of 1,25-(OH)(2)-vitamin D3 and PGE2, were incubated with or without 0.6 M HCl extracts from bovine deciduous or permanent dentine for 48 h. TRAP positive cell number, TRAP activity, the areas of resorption pits, and mRNA levels of TRAP, v-ATPase, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and MMP-9 were examined. The results illustrated that TRAP activity, the resorbed area, and the mRNA levels of osteoclast marker genes seemed to be suppressed by both deciduous and permanent dentine extracts. These findings indicate that some factors that suppress osteoclast activity are contained in both deciduous and permanent dentine extracts. Although there was no significant difference in osteoclast activity between deciduous and permanent dentine extracts, osteoclasts incubated with permanent dentine extracts tend to exhibit less resorption activity than those incubated with deciduous dentine extracts. However, we could not clearly explain the causes of this.

  2. Increased apoptosis in osteoclasts and decreased RANKL immunoexpression in periodontium of cimetidine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Longhini, Renata; de Oliveira, Priscila Aparecida; de Souza Faloni, Ana Paula; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2013-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that histamine interferes with the recruitment, formation and activity of osteoclasts via H(1)- and H(2)-receptors. Cimetidine is a H(2)-receptor antagonist used for treatment of gastric ulcers that seems to prevent bone resorption. In this study, a possible cimetidine interference was investigated in the number of alveolar bone osteoclasts. The incidence of osteoclast apoptosis and immunoexpression of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) was also evaluated. Adult male rats were treated with 100 mg kg(-1) of cimetidine for 50 days (CimG); the sham group (SG) received saline. Maxillary fragments containing the first molars and alveolar bone were fixed, decalcified and embedded in paraffin. The sections were stained by H&E or submitted to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) method. TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling) method and immunohistochemical reactions for detecting caspase-3 and RANKL were performed. The number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts, the frequency of apoptotic osteoclasts and the numerical density of RANKL-positive cells were obtained. Osteoclast death by apoptosis was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In CimG, TRAP-positive osteoclasts with TUNEL-positive nuclei and caspase-3-immunolabeled osteoclasts were found. A significant reduction in the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and a high frequency of apoptotic osteoclasts were observed in CimG. Under TEM, detached osteoclasts from the bone surface showed typical features of apoptosis. Moreover, a significant reduction in the numerical density of RANKL-positive cells was observed in CimG. The significant reduction in the number of osteoclasts may be due to cimetidine-induced osteoclast apoptosis. However, RANKL immunoexpression reduction also suggests a possible interference of cimetidine treatment in the osteoclastogenesis.

  3. MiR-7b directly targets DC-STAMP causing suppression of NFATc1 and c-Fos signaling during osteoclast fusion and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ce; Zhang, Chengcheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Xiaochao; Jiang, Hong; Bai, Yan; Xiang, Junyu; Xu, Jianzhong; Dong, Shiwu

    2014-11-01

    DC-STAMP is a key regulating molecule of osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast precursor (OCP) fusion. Emerging lines of evidence showed that microRNAs play crucial roles in bone metabolism and osteoclast differentiation, but no microRNA has yet been reported to be directly related to OCPs fusion. Through a microarray, we found that the expression of miR-7b in RAW264.7 cells was significantly decreased after induction with M-CSF and RANKL. The overexpression of miR-7b in RAW264.7 cells attenuated the number of TRAP-positive cells number and the formation of multinucleated cells, whereas the inhibition of miR-7b enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Through a dual luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that miR-7b directly targets DC-STAMP. Other fusogenic molecules, such as CD47, ATP6v0d2, and OC-STAMP, were detected to be down-regulated in accordance with the inhibition of DC-STAMP. Because DC-STAMP also participates in osteoclast differentiation through the ITAM-ITIM network, multiple osteoclast-specific genes in the ITAM-ITIM network were detected to identify how DC-STAMP is involved in this process. The results showed that molecules associated with the ITAM-ITIM network, such as NFATc1 and OSCAR, which are crucial in osteoclastogenesis, were consistently altered due to DC-STAMP inhibition. These findings suggest that miR-7b inhibits osteoclastogenesis and cell-cell fusion by directly targeting DC-STAMP. In addition, the inhibition of DC-STAMP and its downstream signals changed the expression of other fusogenic genes and key regulating genes, such as Nfatc1, c-fos, Akt, Irf8, Mapk1, and Traf6. In conclusion, our findings indicate that miR-7b may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of osteoclast-related bone disorders.

  4. The natural flavonoid galangin inhibits osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB in collagen-induced arthritis and bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Jung, In-Tae; Choi, Junyoung; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Dong; Park, Dong-Suk; Choi, Do-Young

    2013-01-05

    We investigated the effect of galangin, a natural flavonoid, on osteoclastic bone destruction in collagen-induced arthritis and examined the molecular mechanisms by which galangin affects osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow derived macrophages. In mice with collagen-induced arthritis, administration of galangin significantly reduced the arthritis clinical score, edema and severity of disease without toxicity. Interestingly, galangin treatment during a later stage of collagen-induced arthritis, using mice with a higher clinical arthritis score, still significantly slowed the progression of the disease. Extensive cartilage and bone erosive changes as well as synovial inflammation, synovial hyperplasia and pannus formation were dramatically inhibited in arthritic mice treated with galangin. Furthermore, galangin-treated arthritic mice showed a significant reduction in the concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-17. We found that galangin inhibited osteoclastogenic factors and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages and osteoblast co-cultured cells, and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in osteoblasts. Galangin and NF-κB siRNA suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Also, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 reduced RANKL-induced expressions of phospho-c-Jun, c-fos and NFATc1 genes during osteoclast development. In addition, galangin suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our data suggest that galangin prevented osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis in osteoclast precursors as well as in collagen-induced arthritis mice without toxicity via attenuation of RANKL-induced activation of JNK, p38 and NF-κB pathways.

  5. Concomitant T-cell receptor alpha and delta gene rearrangements in individual T-cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Pelkonen, J; Hurwitz, J L

    1990-01-01

    A debate has recently surfaced concerning the degree of precommitment attained by alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell precursors prior to T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. It has been suggested that precursors may be precommitted to rearrange either alpha or delta genes, but not both, thus giving rise to alpha beta- and gamma delta-producing T cells, respectively. Alternatively, the precursors may be flexible with regard to potential TCR gene rearrangements. To address this controversy, the gene rearrangements among a group of T-cell hybridomas from fetal, newborn, and early postnatal mouse thymi were examined. Six probes spanning the delta and alpha loci were used in Southern blot analyses to characterize the rearrangements which occurred on homologous chromosomes in each cell. Although homologous chromosomes often rearranged in synchrony within the alpha locus, a number of hybridomas were found which had retained a delta rearrangement on one chromosome and an alpha rearrangement on the second. Results show that a precommitment by T cells to rearrange delta or alpha genes in a mutually exclusive manner is not an absolute feature of mouse thymocyte development. Images PMID:2164690

  6. Perspectives on the role of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Arias, Juan C.; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E.; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that targeted deletion of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cells of the ventricular zone impairs the maintenance of these cells in healthy and stroke-injured brain. Here we frame this exciting new finding in the context of our previous studies on Pannexin 1 in neural precursors as well as the close relationship between Pannexin 1 and purinergic receptors established by other groups. Moreover, we identify important gaps in our understanding of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology in terms of the underlying molecular mechanisms and functional/behavioural outcomes. PMID:27904473

  7. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  8. Enhancing Osteoclastic Resorption for the Prevention and Treatment of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    titration of OPG for inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclast formation by RAW264.7 cells. TRAP stain (violet) for osteoclast formation. Multinuclear...caALK2 HO model (Figures 2A & B and Figures 3A & B). We have adopted a sensitive passive range-of-motion assay based on one presented by Paul Yu2...orthotopic bone), were stained for the osteoclast marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) (Figure 4

  9. Defective co-activator recruitment in osteoclasts from microphthalmia-oak ridge mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudarshana M; Sif, Said; Ostrowski, Michael C; Sankar, Uma

    2009-07-01

    The three basic DNA-binding domain mutations of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf), Mitf(mi/mi), Mitf(or/or), and Mitf(wh/wh) affect osteoclast differentiation with variable penetrance while completely impairing melanocyte development. Mitf(or/or) mice exhibit osteopetrosis that improves with age and their osteoclasts form functional multinuclear osteoclasts, raising the question as to why the Mitf(or/or) mutation results in osteopetrosis. Here we show that Mitf(or/or) osteoclasts express normal levels of acid phosphatase 5 (Acp5) mRNA and significantly lower levels of Cathepsin K (Ctsk) mRNA during receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) ligand (RANKL)-mediated differentiation. Studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis indicate that low levels of Mitf(or/or) protein are recruited to the Ctsk promoter. However, enrichment of Mitf-transcriptional co-activators PU.1 and Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1) are severely impaired at the Ctsk promoter of Mitf(or/or) osteoclast precursors, indicating that defective recruitment of co-activators by the mutant Mitf(or/or) results in impaired Ctsk expression in osteoclasts. Cathepsin K may thus represent a unique class of Mitf-regulated osteoclast-specific genes that are important for osteoclast function.

  10. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  11. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  12. Induction of cytotoxic T cell precursors in vivo. Role of T helper cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Strain AS rats respond with two populations of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to stimulation in vitro by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)- incompatible strain HL rat tumor (HL-A2T2). One is specific for MHC alloantigens present on both HL-A2T2 and normal HL targets, the other is tumor specific. The activation of these killer cells requires helper T lymphocytes. The tumor-specific helper cells depend on syngeneic radioresistant accessory cells to present the tumor antigens in an immunogenic form. The appropriate helper-accessory cell interaction results in the production of soluble factors which then induce the maturation of precursor cells into effective killer cells. Studies with a procedure for inducing negative selection of T cells in vivo showed that short-term exposure to HL-A2T2 tumor induced selection only for TH but not cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTLp). Simultaneous injection of supernatants from concanavalin A-activated spleen cell cultures, however, did produce selection of CTLp. These and other findings suggest that under normal circumstances in vivo, both signals (recognition of antigen and acceptance of maturation factors) are provided in the vicinity of an antigen presenting macrophage-like accessory cell. PMID:6222131

  13. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals functionalized with alendronate as bioactive components for bone implant coatings to decrease osteoclastic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Ruggero; Iafisco, Michele; Tampieri, Anna; Jansen, John A.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.

    2015-02-01

    The integration of bone implants within native bone tissue depends on periprosthetic bone quality, which is severely decreased in osteoporotic patients. In this work, we have synthesized bone-like hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHA) using an acid-base neutralization reaction and analysed their physicochemical properties. Subsequently, we have functionalized the nHA with alendronate (nHAALE), a well-known bisphosphonate drug used for the treatment of osteoporosis. An in vitro osteoclastogenesis test was carried out to evaluate the effect of nHAALE on the formation of osteoclast-like cells from monocytic precursor cells (i.e. RAW264.7 cell line) showing that nHAALE significantly promoted apoptosis of osteoclast-like cells. Subsequently, nHA and nHAALE were deposited on titanium disks using electrospray deposition (ESD), for which characterisation of the deposited coatings confirmed the presence of alendronate in nHAALE coatings with nanoscale thickness of about 700 nm. These results indicate that alendronate linked to hydroxyapatite nanocrystals has therapeutic potential and nHAALE can be considered as an appealing coating constituent material for orthopaedic and oral implants for application in osteoporotic patients.

  14. Monocytes/Macrophages Upregulate the Hyaluronidase HYAL1 and Adapt Its Subcellular Trafficking to Promote Extracellular Residency upon Differentiation into Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Emeline; Boonen, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are giant bone-resorbing cells originating from monocytes/macrophages. During their differentiation, they overexpress two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin K and TRAP, which are secreted into the resorption lacuna, an acidified sealed area in contact with bone matrix where bone degradation takes place. Here we report that the acid hydrolase HYAL1, a hyaluronidase able to degrade the glycosaminoglycans hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate, is also upregulated upon osteoclastogenesis. The mRNA expression and protein level of HYAL1 are markedly increased in osteoclasts differentiated from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages or primary mouse bone marrow monocytes compared to these precursor cells. As a result, the HYAL1-mediated HA hydrolysis ability of osteoclasts is strongly enhanced. Using subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that HYAL1 proteins are sorted to the osteoclast lysosomes even though, in contrast to cathepsin K and TRAP, HYAL1 is poorly mannose 6-phosphorylated. We reported previously that macrophages secrete HYAL1 proforms by constitutive secretion, and that these are recaptured by the cell surface mannose receptor, processed in endosomes and sorted to lysosomes. Present work highlights that osteoclasts secrete HYAL1 in two ways, through lysosomal exocytosis and constitutive secretion, and that these cells promote the extracellular residency of HYAL1 through downregulation of the mannose receptor. Interestingly, the expression of the other main hyaluronidase, HYAL2, and of lysosomal exoglycosidases involved in HA degradation, does not increase similarly to HYAL1 upon osteoclastogenesis. Taken together, these findings point out the predominant involvement of HYAL1 in bone HA metabolism and perhaps bone remodeling via the resorption lacuna. PMID:27755597

  15. Cytokine expression in feline osteoclastic resorptive lesions.

    PubMed

    DeLaurier, A; Allen, S; deFlandre, C; Horton, M A; Price, J S

    2002-01-01

    Feline osteoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL) of the teeth are common in cats, and lead to pain, destruction of the periodontal ligament, and tooth loss. The expression of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 mRNA was higher in teeth with FORL than in normal teeth (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively), but no such differences were found between pathological and normal gingival tissue samples. There were no differences between teeth affected with FORL and normal teeth in respect of the expression of receptor activator of NF kappa B ligand (RANKL) mRNA or osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA. However, OPG mRNA expression was higher in gingival tissue associated with teeth affected with FORL than in normal gingival tissue (P<0.05), whereas the reverse was true of RANKL mRNA expression (P<0.05). OPG mRNA expression was significantly higher in teeth than in femoral and alveolar bone (P<0.001). RANKL and OPG mRNAs were detected in all tissues examined. The data suggest that the elevated expression of IL-l beta and IL-6 mRNA plays a role in the mediation of osteoclast activity in advanced FORL. In contrast, OPG and RANKL do not appear to regulate osteoclasts in advanced disease. The results also suggest that OPG and RANKL mRNA play a role in mediating inflammatory responses in gingival cells, and that OPG has an inhibiting effect on tooth resorption.

  16. Gene expression analysis of embryonic photoreceptor precursor cells using BAC-Crx-EGFP transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yuki; Sato, Shigeru; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ueno, Shinji; Koyasu, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2010-02-12

    Crx is a transcription factor which is predominantly expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells in the retina, and plays a crucial role in the terminal differentiation of both rods and cones. Crx is one of the earliest-expressed genes specifically in photoreceptor precursors, allowing us to trace photoreceptor precursor cells from embryonic stages to adult stage by visualizing Crx-expressing cells. In the current study, we generated a transgenic mouse line which expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) in the retina driven by the Crx promoter using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. EGFP-positive cells were observed in the presumptive photoreceptor layer in the retina at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5), and continued to be expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells up to adult stage. We sorted EGFP-positive photoreceptor precursors at E17.5 using fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), and subsequently performed microarray analysis of the FACS-sorted cells. We observed various photoreceptor genes, especially cone genes, are enriched in the EGFP-positive cells, indicating that embryonic cone photoreceptor precursors are enriched. In addition, we found that most of the EGFP-positive cells were post-mitotic cells. Thus, the transgenic line we established can serve as a useful tool to study both developing and mature photoreceptor cells, including embryonic cone precursors whose analysis has been difficult.

  17. Estrogens maintain bone mass by regulating expression of genes controlling function and life span in mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuuki; Youn, Ming-Young; Kondoh, Shino; Nakamura, Takashi; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Takada, Ichiro; Takaoka, Kunio; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-09-01

    Estrogens play a key role in regulation of bone mass and strength by controlling activity of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Cellular effects of estrogens are mediated predominantly by the action of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). In earlier studies, ablation of the ERalpha gene in mice did not result in osteoporotic phenotypes due to systemic endocrine disturbance and compensatory effects of elevated levels of testosterone. Despite the relatively well-established effects in osteoblasts, little is known about the direct action of estrogen in osteoclasts. Development in the last decade of more sophisticated genetic manipulation approaches opened new possibilities to explore cell-specific roles of nuclear receptors in bone tissue. Recently, we have generated osteoclast-specific ERalpha gene knockout mice and shown that in vivo estrogens directly regulate the life span of mature osteoclasts by inducing the expression of pro-apoptotic Fas ligand (FasL). Inhibitory effects of estrogens on osteoclast function were further studied in vitro. We observed sufficiently detectable ERalpha expression in osteoclasts differentiating from primary bone marrow cells or RAW264 cells, although levels of ERalpha were decreasing during progression of the differentiation into mature osteoclasts. Treatment with estrogens led to reduction in expression of osteoclast-specific genes controlling bone resorption activity. However, estrogens did not affect the size of multinucleated osteoclasts or number of nuclei in a mature osteoclast. In conclusion, in osteoclasts, estrogens function to inhibit bone resorption activity and vitality rather than differentiation.

  18. Derivation of Neural Precursor Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for DNA Methylomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Ivan; Park, Sun Joo; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent cells with competency to differentiate into all three-germ lineages. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic and epigenetic molecular mechanisms in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency. Stem cells are under unique molecular and cellular regulations different from somatic cells. Proper regulation should be ensured to maintain their unique self-renewal and undifferentiated characteristics. Understanding key mechanisms in stem cell biology will be important for the successful application of stem cells for regenerative therapeutic medicine. More importantly practical use of stem cells will require our knowledge on how to properly direct and differentiate stem cells into the necessary type of cells. Embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells have been used as study models to unveil molecular and cellular mechanisms in various signaling pathways. They are especially beneficial to developmental studies where in vivo molecular/cellular study models are not available. We have derived neural stem cells from human embryonic stem cells as a model to study the effect of teratogen in neural development. We have tested commercial neural differentiation system and successfully derived neural precursor cells exhibiting key molecular features of neural stem cells, which will be useful for experimental application.

  19. Mouse interleukin-1 receptor antagonist induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide blocks the effects of interleukin-1 on bone resorption and osteoclast-like cell formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ohsaki, Y; Ueda, N; Saito, N; Mundy, G R

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that P388D1 cell line murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans release interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitor. The IL-1 inhibitor was purified from conditioned media of P388D1 cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS for 72 h to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: acetic acid extraction from conditioned media; Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration chromatography; DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography; and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 hydrophobic support. The purified IL-1 inhibitor gave a single band of protein with a molecular mass of 26 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified IL-1 inhibitor was a heat- and acid-stable protein that was inactivated by digestion with trypsin and reduction with dithiothreitol. This inhibitory factor suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes and the proliferation of IL-1-dependent cell lines, D10.G4.1 and RPMI 1788, induced by IL-1. However, this inhibitor did not affect the proliferation of IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells induced by IL-2, the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes stimulated with a mitogenic dose of concanavalin A, and the proliferation of IL-6-dependent B9 cells induced by IL-6. Furthermore, the IL-1 inhibitor significantly blocked stimulation of bone resorption in organ cultures of newborn mouse calvaria and inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse marrow cultures. A monoclonal antibody prepared against the purified IL-1 inhibitor reacted with mouse recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1ra), and a polyclonal antibody to mouse rIL-1ra reacted with the IL-1 inhibitor by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. These results indicate that the IL-1 inhibitor is an identical molecule to rIL-1ra, suggesting that the IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1ra) released by macrophages stimulated with LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans may play an important mediative role

  20. Induction of Skin-Derived Precursor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Yoriko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Moriwaki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    The generation of full thickness human skin from dissociated cells is an attractive approach not only for treating skin diseases, but also for treating many systemic disorders. However, it is currently not possible to obtain an unlimited number of skin dermal cells. The goal of this study was to develop a procedure to produce skin dermal stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) were isolated as adult dermal precursors that could differentiate into both neural and mesodermal progenies and could reconstitute the dermis. Thus, we attempted to generate SKPs from iPSCs that could reconstitute the skin dermis. Human iPSCs were initially cultured with recombinant noggin and SB431542, an inhibitor of activin/nodal and TGFβ signaling, to induce neural crest progenitor cells. Those cells were then treated with SKP medium that included CHIR99021, a WNT signal activator. The induction efficacy from neural crest progenitor cells to SKPs was more than 97%. No other modifiers tested were able to induce those cells. Those human iPSC-derived SKPs (hiPSC-SKPs) showed a similar gene expression signature to SKPs isolated from human skin dermis. Human iPSC-SKPs differentiated into neural and mesodermal progenies, including adipocytes, skeletogenic cell types and Schwann cells. Moreover, they could be induced to follicular type keratinization when co-cultured with human epidermal keratinocytes. We here provide a new efficient protocol to create human skin dermal stem cells from hiPSCs that could contribute to the treatment of various skin disorders. PMID:27992514

  1. Mechanical regulation of osteoclastic genes in human osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, Ludwika Liedert, Astrid; Hasni, Sofia; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2008-04-11

    Bone adaptation to mechanical load is accompanied by changes in gene expression of bone-forming cells. Less is known about mechanical effects on factors controlling bone resorption by osteoclasts. Therefore, we studied the influence of mechanical loading on several key genes modulating osteoclastogenesis. Human osteoblasts were subjected to various cell stretching protocols. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate gene expression. Cell stretching resulted in a significant up-regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) immediate after intermittent loading (3 x 3 h, 3 x 6 h, magnitude 1%). Continuous loading, however, had no effect on RANKL expression. The expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), and osteoclast inhibitory lectin (OCIL) was not significantly altered. The data suggested that mechanical loading could influence osteoclasts recruitment by modulating RANKL expression in human osteoblasts and that the effects might be strictly dependent on the quality of loading.

  2. Transcriptional Modulator Ifrd1 Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation through Enhancing the NF-κB/NFATc1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Iezaki, Takashi; Fukasawa, Kazuya; Park, Gyujin; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Kanayama, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Onishi, Yuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Yukari; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio; Nakamura, Takashi; Vacher, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the synergistic actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Here, we show that the transcriptional coactivator/repressor interferon-related developmental regulator 1 (Ifrd1) is expressed in osteoclast lineages and represents a component of the machinery that regulates bone homeostasis. Ifrd1 expression was transcriptionally regulated in preosteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) through activator protein 1. Global deletion of murine Ifrd1 increased bone formation and decreased bone resorption, leading to a higher bone mass. Deletion of Ifrd1 in osteoclast precursors prevented RANKL-induced bone loss, although no bone loss was observed under normal physiological conditions. RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis was impaired in vitro in Ifrd1-deleted bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Ifrd1 deficiency increased the acetylation of p65 at residues K122 and K123 via the inhibition of histone deacetylase-dependent deacetylation in BMMs. This repressed the NF-κB-dependent transcription of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), an essential regulator of osteoclastogenesis. These findings suggest that an Ifrd1/NF-κB/NFATc1 axis plays a pivotal role in bone remodeling in vivo and represents a therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:27381458

  3. Early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in mouse bone marrow: Subosteal localization of B220+ cells during postirradiation regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, K.; Tepper, J.; Osmond, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The localization of early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in the bone marrow of young mice has been studied during recovery from sublethal whole body gamma-irradiation (150 rad). Initial studies by double immunofluorescence labeling of the B-lineage-associated cell surface glycoprotein, B220, and of mu heavy chains in bone marrow cell suspensions, demonstrated a sequential wave of regeneration of early B precursor cells, pre-B cells, and B cells. Early B precursor cells expressing B220 but not mu chains were enriched at 1-3 days following irradiation. After in vivo administration of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody 14.8 to detect B220+ cells in situ, light and electron microscope radioautography of femoral bone marrow sections revealed concentrations of labeled B220+ cells located peripherally near the cortical bone at 1-3 days following irradiation, increasing in numbers in more central areas by 5-7 days. Proliferative B220+ precursor cells were found within layers of bone-lining cells and in a subosteal area characterized by a prominent electron-dense extracellular matrix, often associated with stromal reticular cells. The results demonstrate that the precursor cells that are active in the bone marrow early in the recovery of B lymphopoiesis after gamma-irradiation are located both within and near the endosteum of the surrounding bone. The distinctive extracellular matrix and stromal cell associations noted in this region may contribute to a supportive local microenvironment for early hemopoietic progenitor cells.

  4. Accumulation of specific sterol precursors targets a MAP kinase cascade mediating cell-cell recognition and fusion.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Martin; Lichius, Alexander; Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Johannes; Nawrath, Thorben; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Read, Nick D; Schulz, Stefan; Fleißner, André

    2016-10-18

    Sterols are vital components of eukaryotic cell membranes. Defects in sterol biosynthesis, which result in the accumulation of precursor molecules, are commonly associated with cellular disorders and disease. However, the effects of these sterol precursors on the metabolism, signaling, and behavior of cells are only poorly understood. In this study, we show that the accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain specifically disrupts cell-cell communication and fusion in the fungus Neurospora crassa Genetically identical germinating spores of this fungus undergo cell-cell fusion, thereby forming a highly interconnected supracellular network during colony initiation. Before fusion, the cells use an unusual signaling mechanism that involves the coordinated and alternating switching between signal sending and receiving states of the two fusion partners. Accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain disrupts this coordinated cell-cell communication and suppresses cell fusion. These specific sterol precursors target a single ERK-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAK-1)-signaling cascade, whereas a second MAP kinase pathway (MAK-2), which is also involved in cell fusion, is unaffected. These observations indicate that a minor specific change in sterol structure can exert a strong detrimental effect on a key signaling pathway of the cell, resulting in the absence of cell fusion.

  5. Establishment of a cell line with features of early dendritic cell precursors from fetal mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Girolomoni, G; Lutz, M B; Pastore, S; Assmann, C U; Cavani, A; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P

    1995-08-01

    During ontogeny, the skin is progressively populated by major histocompatibility complex class II-negative dendritic cell (DC) precursors that then mature into efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC). To characterize these DC progenitors better, we generated myeloid cell lines from fetal mouse skin by infecting cell suspensions with a retroviral vector carrying an envAKR-mycMH2 fusion gene. These cells, represented by the line FSDC, displayed a dendritic morphology and their proliferation in serum-free medium was promoted by granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), but not macrophage-CSF. FSDC expressed strong surface-membrane ATP/ADPase activity, intracellular staining for 2A1 antigen, and a surface phenotype consistent with a myeloid precursor: H-2d,b+, I-Ad,b+, CD54+, CD11b+, CD11c+, 2.4G2+, F4/80+, CD44+, 2F8+, ER-MP 12-, Sca-1+, Sca-2+, NLDC-145-, B7.2+, B7.1-, J11d-, B220-, Thy-1-, and CD3-. FSDC stimulated poorly allogeneic or syngeneic T cells in the primary mixed-leukocyte reaction, and markedly increased this function after treatment with GM-CSF, GM-CSF and interleukin (IL)-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma); in contrast, stem cell factor, IL-1 alpha and tumor necrosis factor-alpha had no effect. Preculture with IFN-gamma was required for presentation of haptens to primed T cells in vitro. However, FSDC, even after cytokine activation, were less potent APC than adult epidermal Langerhans cells in both of the above assays. Finally, FSDC derivatized with haptens and injected either intravenously or subcutaneously could efficiently induce contact sensitivity responses in naive syngeneic mice. The results indicate that fetal mouse skin is colonized by myeloid precursors possessing a macrophage/immature DC-like surface phenotype and priming capacity in vivo. These cells need further differentiation and activation signals (e.g. cytokines) to express their antigen presenting potential in vitro.

  6. The thymus exports long-lived fully committed T cell precursors that can colonize primary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Lambolez, Florence; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Joret, Anne-Marie; Pasqualetto, Valérie; Cordier, Corinne; Di Santo, James P; Rocha, Benedita; Ezine, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    Thymic export of cells is believed to be restricted to mature T cells. Here we show that the thymus also exports fully committed T cell precursors that colonize primary lymphoid organs. These precursor cells exited the thymus before T cell receptor rearrangements and colonized lymphoid organs such as the thymus and the gut. Migration of the thymic T cell-committed precursors led to permanent colonization of the gut precursor compartment, improved the capacity of gut precursors to further differentiate into T cells and was sufficient for the generation of 'euthymic like' CD8alphaalpha(+) intraepithelial lymphocytes. These data demonstrate a new function for the thymus in peripheral seeding with T cell precursors that become long lived after thymus export.

  7. IPC: professional type 1 interferon-producing cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Type 1 interferon-(alpha, beta, omega)-producing cells (IPCs), also known as plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors (pDCs), represent 0.2%-0.8% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in both humans and mice. IPCs display plasma cell morphology, selectively express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and TLR9, and are specialized in rapidly secreting massive amounts of type 1 interferon following viral stimulation. IPCs can promote the function of natural killer cells, B cells, T cells, and myeloid DCs through type 1 interferons during an antiviral immune response. At a later stage of viral infection, IPCs differentiate into a unique type of mature dendritic cell, which directly regulates the function of T cells and thus links innate and adaptive immune responses. After more than two decades of effort by researchers, IPCs finally claim their place in the hematopoietic chart as the most important cell type in antiviral innate immunity. Understanding IPC biology holds future promise for developing cures for infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

  8. B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and stromal cells communicate through Galectin-3

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fei; Joo, Eun Ji; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Schiffer, Isabelle; Paz, Helicia; Fabbri, Muller; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The molecular interactions between B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) cells and stromal cells in the bone marrow that provide microenvironmentally-mediated protection against therapeutic drugs are not well-defined. Galectin-3 (Lgals3) is a multifunctional galactose-binding lectin with reported location in the nucleus, cytoplasm and extracellular space in different cell types. We previously reported that ALL cells co-cultured with stroma contain high levels of Galectin-3. We here establish that, in contrast to more mature B-lineage cancers, Galectin-3 detected in and on the ALL cells originates from stromal cells, which express it on their surface, secrete it as soluble protein and also in exosomes. Soluble and stromal-bound Galectin-3 is internalized by ALL cells, transported to the nucleus and stimulates transcription of endogenous LGALS3 mRNA. When human and mouse ALL cells develop tolerance to different drugs while in contact with protective stromal cells, Galectin-3 protein levels are consistently increased. This correlates with induction of Galectin-3 transcription in the ALL cells. Thus Galectin-3 sourced from stroma becomes supplemented by endogenous Galectin-3 production in the pre-B ALL cells that are under continuous stress from drug treatment. Our data suggest that stromal Galectin-3 may protect ALL cells through auto-induction of Galectin-3 mRNA and tonic NFκB pathway activation. Since endogenously synthesized Galectin-3 protects pre-B ALL cells against drug treatment, we identify Galectin-3 as one possible target to counteract the protective effects of stroma. PMID:25869099

  9. Isolation of neural precursor cells from skeletal muscle tissues and their differentiation into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Sik; Kim, Soyeon; Han, Dong Keun; Lee, Ji Youl; Ghil, Sung Ho

    2007-08-31

    Skeletal muscle contains several precursor cells that generate muscle, bone, cartilage and blood cells. Although there are reports that skeletal muscle-derived cells can trans-differentiate into neural-lineage cells, methods for isolating precursor cells, and procedures for successful neural induction have not been fully established. Here, we show that the preplate cell isolation method, which separates cells based on their adhesion characteristics, permits separation of cells possessing neural precursor characteristics from other cells of skeletal muscle tissues. We term these isolated cells skeletal muscle-derived neural precursor cells (SMNPs). The isolated SMNPs constitutively expressed neural stem cell markers. In addition, we describe effective neural induction materials permitting the neuron-like cell differentiation of SMNPs. Treatment with retinoic acid or forskolin facilitated morphological changes in SMNPs; they differentiated into neuron-like cells that possessed specific neuronal markers. These results suggest that the preplate isolation method, and treatment with retinoic acid or forskolin, may provide vital assistance in the use of SMNPs in cell-based therapy of neuronal disease.

  10. Generation of GABAergic and dopaminergic interneurons from endogenous embryonic olfactory bulb precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Vergaño-Vera, Eva; Yusta-Boyo, María J; de Castro, Fernando; Bernad, Antonio; de Pablo, Flora; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2006-11-01

    During the embryonic period, many olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons arise in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) from precursor cells expressing Dlx2, Gsh2 and Er81 transcription factors. Whether GABAergic and dopaminergic interneurons are also generated within the embryonic OB has not been studied thoroughly. In contrast to abundant Dlx2 and Gsh2 expression in ganglionic eminences (GE), Dlx2 and Gsh2 proteins are not expressed in the E12.5-13.5 mouse OB, whereas the telencephalic pallial domain marker Pax6 is abundant. We found GABAergic and dopaminergic neurons originating from dividing precursor cells in E13.5 OB and in short-term dissociated cultures prepared from the rostral half of E13.5 OB. In OB cultures, 22% of neurons were GAD+, of which 53% were Dlx2+, whereas none expressed Gsh2. By contrast, 70% of GAD+ cells in GE cultures were Dlx2+ and 16% expressed Gsh2. In E13.5 OB slices transplanted with EGFP-labeled E13.5 OB precursor cells, 31.7% of EGFP+ cells differentiated to GABAergic neurons. OB and LGE precursors transplanted into early postnatal OB migrated and differentiated in distinct patterns. Transplanted OB precursors gave rise to interneurons with dendritic spines in close proximity to synaptophysin-positive boutons. Interneurons were also abundant in differentiating OB neural stem cell cultures; the neurons responded to the neurotrophin Bdnf and expressed presynaptic proteins. In vivo, the Bdnf receptor TrkB colocalized with synaptic proteins at the glomeruli. These findings suggest that, in addition to receiving interneurons from the LGE, the embryonic OB contains molecularly distinct local precursor cells that generate mature GABAergic and dopaminergic neurons.

  11. Age-related impairment of T cell-induced skeletal muscle precursor cell function

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Breanna R.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. Recent evidence suggests that an age-associated loss of muscle precursor cell (MPC) functionality contributes to sarcopenia. The objectives of the present study were to examine the influence of activated T cells on MPCs and determine whether an age-related defect in this signaling occurs. MPCs were collected from the gastrocnemius and plantaris of 3-mo-old (young) and 32-mo-old (old) animals. Splenic T cells were harvested using anti-CD3 Dynabead isolation. T cells were activated for 48 h with costimulation of 100 IU/ml interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 5 μg/ml of anti-CD28. Costimulation increased 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation of T cells from 13.4 ± 4.6% in control to 64.8 ± 6.0% in costimulated cells. Additionally, T cell cytokines increased proliferation on MPCs isolated from young muscle by 24.0 ± 5.7%, whereas there was no effect on MPCs isolated from aged muscle. T cell cytokines were also found to be a chemoattractant. T cells were able to promote migration of MPCs isolated from young muscle; however, MPCs isolated from aged muscle did not respond to the T cell-released chemokines. Conversely, whereas T cell-released cytokines did not affect myogenesis of MPCs isolated from young animals, there was a decrease in MPCs isolated from old animals. These data suggest that T cells may play a critical role in mediating MPC function. Furthermore, aging may alter T cell-induced MPC function. These findings have implications for developing strategies aimed at increasing MPC migration and proliferation leading to an improved regenerative capacity of aged skeletal muscle. PMID:21325640

  12. Age-Related Effects of Advanced Glycation End Products (Ages) in Bone Matrix on Osteoclastic Resorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Gandhi, Chintan; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Appleford, Mark; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2015-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in bone extracellular matrix as people age. Previous studies have shown controversial results regarding the role of in situ AGEs accumulation in osteoclastic resorption. To address this issue, this study cultured human osteoclast cells directly on human cadaveric bone slices from different age groups (young and elderly) to warrant its relevance to in vivo conditions. The cell culture was terminated on the 3rd, 7th, and 10th day, respectively, to assess temporal changes in the number of differentiated osteoclasts, the number and size of osteoclastic resorption pits, the amount of bone resorbed, as well as the amount of matrix AGEs released in the medium by resorption. In addition, the in situ concentration of matrix AGEs at each resorption pit was also estimated based on its AGEs autofluorescent intensity. The results indicated that (1) osteoclastic resorption activities were significantly correlated with the donor age, showing larger but shallower resorption pits on the elderly bone substrates than on the younger ones; (2) osteoclast resorption activities were not significantly dependent on the in situ AGEs concentration in bone matrix, and (3) a correlation was observed between osteoclast activities and the concentration of AGEs released by the resorption. These results suggest that osteoclasts tend to migrate away from initial anchoring sites on elderly bone substrate during resorption compared to younger bone substrates. However, such behavior is not directly related to the in situ concentration of AGEs in bone matrix at the resorption sites.

  13. Wogonin inhibits osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting NFATc1 translocation into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    GENG, XIAOLIN; YANG, LIBIN; ZHANG, CHAO; QIN, HUA; LIANG, QIUDONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a natural product with the ability to inhibit nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus by high-throughput screening, and to investigate the effect of the natural product upon osteoclast differentiation and its underlying mechanism. An NFATc1 antagonist redistribution assay was performed in U2OS-NFATc1 cells against a natural product library, and Wogonin was found to have the ability to inhibit the NFATc1 translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The effect of Wogonin on NFATc1 transcription activation was further determined by luciferase assay. An osteoclast differentiation assay was executed to evaluate the effect of Wogonin on osteoclast differentiation. The effect of Wogonin upon the vital genes in osteoclast differentiation was investigated using fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The natural product Wogonin significantly inhibited the translocation of NFATc1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and its transcriptional activation activity. Wogonin also significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation and decreased the transcription of osteoclast-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and calcitonin receptor. In conclusion, the natural product Wogonin inhibited osteoclast differentiation through the inhibition of NFATc1 translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, and thus the downregulation of genes associated with osteoclast differentiation, which marked Wogonin as a potential treatment for osteoporosis. PMID:26622440

  14. Hyperglycemia Induced and Intrinsic Alterations in Type 2 Diabetes-Derived Osteoclast Function

    PubMed Central

    Catalfamo, Dana L.; Britten, Todd M.; Storch, Douglas I.; Calderon, Nadia L.; Sorenson, Heather L.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease-associated alveolar bone loss is a co-morbidity of type-2-diabetes, where the roles of osteoclasts are poorly understood. Objective To evaluate osteoclast differentiation and function in the context of type-2-diabetes. Materials/Methods Bone marrow-derived osteoclasts from db/db mice, a model of type-2-diabetes, as well as human osteoclasts derived from peripheral blood of individuals with type-2-diabetes were evaluated for differentiation, resorption, and soluble mediator expression. Results While db/db mice were hyperglycemic at time of cell harvest, human participants were glycemically controlled. Although db/db cultures resulted in a higher number of larger osteoclasts, individual cell RANKL-mediated bone resorption was similar to that observed in diabetes-free OCs. Osteoclasts derived from individuals with type-2-diabetes differentiated similarly to controls with again no difference in bone resorbing capacity. Murine and human type-2-diabetes cultures both displayed inhibition of LPS-induced deactivation and increased pro-osteoclastogenic mediator expression. Conclusions Hyperglycemia plays a role in aberrant osteoclast differentiation leading to an increased capacity for bone resorption. Osteoclasts derived from murine models of and individuals with type-2-diabetes are unable to be inhibited by LPS, again leading to increased capacity for bone resorption. Here environmental and intrinsic mechanisms associated with the increased alveolar bone loss observed in periodontal patients with type-2-diabetes are described. PMID:24079914

  15. Prolonged cultivation of hippocampal neural precursor cells shifts their differentiation potential and selects for aneuploid cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, The Duy; Widera, Darius; Greiner, Johannes; Müller, Janine; Martin, Ina; Slotta, Carsten; Hauser, Stefan; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) are lineage-restricted neural stem cells with limited self-renewal, giving rise to a broad range of neural cell types such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Despite this developmental potential, the differentiation capacity of NPCs has been controversially discussed concerning the trespassing lineage boundaries, for instance resulting in hematopoietic competence. Assessing their in vitro plasticity, we isolated nestin+/Sox2+, NPCs from the adult murine hippocampus. In vitro-expanded adult NPCs were able to form neurospheres, self-renew, and differentiate into neuronal, astrocytic, and oligodendrocytic cells. Although NPCs cultivated in early passage efficiently gave rise to neuronal cells in a directed differentiation assay, extensively cultivated NPCs revealed reduced potential for ectodermal differentiation. We further observed successful differentiation of long-term cultured NPCs into osteogenic and adipogenic cell types, suggesting that NPCs underwent a fate switch during culture. NPCs cultivated for more than 12 passages were aneuploid (abnormal chromosome numbers such as 70 chromosomes). Furthermore, they showed growth factor-independent proliferation, a hallmark of tumorigenic transformation. In conclusion, our findings substantiate the lineage restriction of NPCs from adult mammalian hippocampus. Prolonged cultivation results, however, in enhanced differentiation potential, which may be attributed to transformation events leading to aneuploid cells.

  16. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Mi; Niu, Meijuan; Seif, Elias; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5’ leader and 3’ trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5’ leader and long 3’ trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus. PMID:27101286

  17. Nestin Reporter Transgene Labels Multiple Central Nervous System Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Avery S.; Goings, Gwendolyn E.; Kim, Yongsoo; Miller, Richard J.; Chenn, Anjen; Szele, Francis G.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic neuroepithelia and adult subventricular zone (SVZ) stem and progenitor cells express nestin. We characterized a transgenic line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) specified to neural tissue by the second intronic enhancer of the nestin promoter that had several novel features. During embryogenesis, the dorsal telencephalon contained many and the ventral telencephalon few eGFP+ cells. eGFP+ cells were found in postnatal and adult neurogenic regions. eGFP+ cells in the SVZ expressed multiple phenotype markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein, Dlx, and neuroblast-specific molecules suggesting the transgene is expressed through the lineage. eGFP+ cell numbers increased in the SVZ after cortical injury, suggesting this line will be useful in probing postinjury neurogenesis. In non-neurogenic regions, eGFP was strongly expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not in astrocytes, even when they were reactive. This eGFP+ mouse will facilitate studies of proliferative neuroepithelia and adult neurogenesis, as well as of parenchymal oligodendrocytes. PMID:21527990

  18. Isolation of Precursor Cells from Waste Solid Fat Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, Diane; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2009-01-01

    A process for isolating tissue-specific progenitor cells exploits solid fat tissue obtained as waste from such elective surgical procedures as abdominoplasties (tummy tucks) and breast reductions. Until now, a painful and risky process of aspiration of bone marrow has been used to obtain a limited number of tissue- specific progenitor cells. The present process yields more tissue-specific progenitor cells and involves much less pain and risk for the patient. This process includes separation of fat from skin, mincing of the fat into small pieces, and forcing a fat saline mixture through a sieve. The mixture is then digested with collagenase type I in an incubator. After centrifugation tissue-specific progenitor cells are recovered and placed in a tissue-culture medium in flasks or Petri dishes. The tissue-specific progenitor cells can be used for such purposes as (1) generating three-dimensional tissue equivalent models for studying bone loss and muscle atrophy (among other deficiencies) and, ultimately, (2) generating replacements for tissues lost by the fat donor because of injury or disease.

  19. The transient appearance of zipper-like actin superstructures during the fusion of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Nakamura, Masanori; Yoda, Masaki; Tohmonda, Takahide; Uchikawa, Shinichi; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Multinucleated osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. Hypermultinucleated osteoclasts are often observed in some bone-related diseases such as Paget's disease and cherubism. The cellular mechanics controlling the size of osteoclasts is poorly understood. We introduced EGFP-actin into RAW 264.7 cells to monitor actin dynamics during osteoclast differentiation. Before their terminal differentiation into osteoclasts, syncytia displayed two main types of actin assembly, podosome clusters and clusters of zipper-like structures. The zipper-like structures morphologically resembled the adhesion zippers found at the initial stage of cell-cell adhesion in keratinocytes. In the zipper-like structure, Arp3 and cortactin overlapped with the distribution of dense F-actin, whereas integrin β3, paxillin and vinculin were localized to the periphery of the structure. The structure was negative for WGA-lectin staining and biotin labeling. The zipper-like structure broke down and transformed into a large actin ring, called a podosome belt. Syncytia containing clusters of zipper-like structures had more nuclei than those with podosome clusters. Differentiated osteoclasts with a podosome belt also formed the zipper-like structure at the cell contact site during cell fusion. The breakdown of the cell contact site resulted in the fusion of the podosome belts following plasma membrane fusion. Additionally, osteoclasts in mouse calvariae formed the zipper-like structure in the sealing zone. Therefore, we propose that the zipper-like actin superstructures might be involved in cell-cell interaction to achieve efficient multinucleation of osteoclasts. Understanding of the zipper-like structure might lead to selective therapeutics for bone diseases caused by hypermultinucleated osteoclasts.

  20. Early postradition recovery of hematopoietic stromal precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todriya, T.V.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was an immunohistochemical study of alpha-endorphin-producing cells and also a study of rat mast cells (MC in the antral mucosa of the human stomach. Men aged 18 to 30 years undergoing in-patient treatment wre studied. According to the results of radioimmunoassay, antibodies against alpha-endorphin did not react with enkephalins, beta-endorphin, or the C-terminal fragment of beta-endorphin, but had cross reactivity of about 10% with gammaendorphin. Results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's test at a 85% level of significance and they are shown. The facts presented here suggest that MC of human gastric mucosa include argyrophilic cells which contain alpha-endorphin.

  1. ATPase pumps in osteoclasts and osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Francis, Martin J O; Lees, Rita L; Trujillo, Elisa; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo; Heersche, Johan N M; Mobasheri, Ali

    2002-05-01

    Osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts are specialised cells of bone that play crucial roles in the formation, maintenance and resorption of bone matrix. Bone formation and resorption critically depend on optimal intracellular calcium and phosphate homeostasis and on the expression and activity of plasma membrane transport systems in all three cell types. Osteotropic agents, mechanical stimulation and intracellular pH are important parameters that determine the fate of bone matrix and influence the activity, expression, regulation and cell surface abundance of plasma membrane transport systems. In this paper the role of ATPase pumps is reviewed in the context of their expression in bone cells, their contribution to ion homeostasis and their relation to other transport systems regulating bone turnover.

  2. Characterization of MCSF-induced proliferation and subsequent osteoclast formation in murine marrow culture.

    PubMed

    Biskobing, D M; Fan, X; Rubin, J

    1995-07-01

    To clarify events involved in 1,25(OH)2D3-stimulated osteoclast-like cell (OCLC) formation in primary murine marrow culture, we have characterized kinetics of precursor proliferation and fusion and their dependence on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF). 3H-thymidine nuclear incorporation in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinucleated cells (TRAP+ MNCs) was assessed: 3H-thymidine incorporation was greatest when tracer was added during day 4 or 5, with labeled nuclei in 81% (day 4) and 90% (day 5) of the TRAP+ MNCs counted at the end of day 7. The percentage of total nuclei labeled was highest when 3H-thymidine was dosed on day 4 (58%), decreasing to 2% by day 7. Final TRAP+ MNC numbers were depleted by 80% when treated for 24 h with hydroxyurea on either day 3 or 4; this inhibition dropped to 57% and 12% when hydroxyurea was pulsed during days 5 or 6, respectively. The absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 during days 1-4 caused 70% attenuation of TRAP+ MNC formation; however, exposure to 3H-thymidine during day 4 in this experiment resulted in subsequent labeling of 81% of the TRAP+ MNCs formed, indicating that precursor proliferation occurred in the absence of 1,25(OH)2D3. To demonstrate that proliferation required MCSF, cultures were exposed to a monoclonal anti-MCSF antibody during days 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7. Inhibition of TRAP+ MNC formation was 85% when antibody was added during day 3. Antibody treatment after day 5 had little effect on the OCLC number. Fusion of precursors showed steady progression with OCLCs containing 4.8 +/- 0.3 nuclei at the end of day 4, 8.3 +/- 0.5 nuclei after day 5, 12.0 +/- 1.3 after day 6, and 13.7 +/- 1.5 at the end of day 7. This steady accretion of nuclei was unaffected by doses of MCSF antibody which blocked proliferation. In conclusion, we have shown that OCLCs arise from an MCSF-dependent expansion of the precursor pool occurring during days 3 and 4. Fusion of these precursors, which begins as proliferation diminishes, is

  3. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos.

    Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  4. The phase state of NiTi implant material affects osteoclastic attachment.

    PubMed

    Muhonen, V; Heikkinen, R; Danilov, A; Jämsä, T; Ilvesaro, J; Tuukkanen, J

    2005-12-01

    In the present work, the responses of mature osteoclasts cultured on austenite and martensite phases of NiTi shape memory implant material were studied. We used the sensitivity of osteoclasts to the underlying substrate and actin ring formation as an indicator of the adequacy of the implant surface. The results showed osteoclasts with actin ring on both NiTi phases. However, significantly more osteoclasts were present on the austenitic NiTi than on the martensitic NiTi. We also analyzed the surface free energy of the samples but found no significant difference between austenite and martensite phases. The results revealed that osteoclasts tolerated well the austenite phase of NiTi. The chemically identical martensitic NiTi was not as well tolerated by osteoclasts (e.g., indicated by diminished actin ring formation). This leads to the conclusion that certain physical properties specific to the martensitic NiTi have an adverse effect to the surviving of osteoclasts on this NiTi phase. These results confirm that mature, authentic osteoclasts can act as cell probes in experiments concerning aspects of biocompatibility of bone implant materials.

  5. Alpha-ketoglutarate Curbs Differentiation and Induces Cell Death in Mesenchymal Stromal Precursors with Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karmveer; Krug, Linda; Basu, Abhijit; Meyer, Patrick; Treiber, Nicolai; Vander Beken, Seppe; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Kochanek, Stefan; Bloch, Wilhelm; Geiger, Hartmut; Maity, Pallab; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2017-04-11

    Increased concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from dysfunctional mitochondria contribute to diverse aging-related degenerative disorders. But so far little is known about the impact of distinct ROS on metabolism and fate of stromal precursor cells. We here demonstrate that an increase in superoxide anion radicals due to superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2) deficiency in stromal precursor cells suppress osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation through fundamental changes in the global metabolite landscape. Our data identify impairment of the pyruvate and L-glutamine metabolism causing toxic accumulation of alpha-ketoglutarate in the Sod2 deficient and intrinsically aged stromal precursor cells as a major cause for their reduced lineage differentiation. Alpha-ketoglutarate accumulation led to enhanced nucleocytoplasmic vacuolation and chromatin condensation-mediated cell death in Sod2 deficient stromal precursor cells as a consequence of DNA damage, Hif-1α instability and reduced histone H3 (Lys27) acetylation. These findings hold promise for prevention and treatment of mitochondrial disorders commonly associated with aged individuals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Sonic hedgehog-expressing basal cells are general post-mitotic precursors of functional taste receptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Hirohito; Scott, Jennifer K.; Harada, Shuitsu; Barlow, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Taste buds contain ~60 elongate cells and several basal cells. Elongate cells comprise three functional taste cell types: I - glial cells, II - bitter/sweet/umami receptor cells, and III - sour detectors. Although taste cells are continuously renewed, lineage relationships among cell types are ill-defined. Basal cells have been proposed as taste bud stem cells, a subset of which express Sonic hedgehog (Shh). However, Shh+ basal cells turnover rapidly suggesting that Shh+ cells are precursors of some or all taste cell types. Results To fate map Shh-expressing cells, mice carrying ShhCreERT2 and a high (CAG-CAT-EGFP) or low (R26RLacZ) efficiency reporter allele were given tamoxifen to activate Cre in Shh+ cells. Using R26RLacZ, lineage-labeled cells occur singly within buds, supporting a post-mitotic state for Shh+ cells. Using either reporter, we show that Shh+ cells differentiate into all three taste cell types, in proportions reflecting cell type ratios in taste buds (I > II > III). Conclusions Shh+ cells are not stem cells, but are post-mitotic, immediate precursors of taste cells. Shh+ cells differentiate into each of the three taste cell types, and the choice of a specific taste cell fate is regulated to maintain the proper ratio within buds. PMID:24590958

  7. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator

    PubMed Central

    Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Yasuda, Hisataka; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire+ mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire+ mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire+ mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire+ mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire+ mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire+ mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire+ mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire+ mTECs. PMID:27401343

  8. Identification of embryonic precursor cells that differentiate into thymic epithelial cells expressing autoimmune regulator.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Nobuko; Takizawa, Nobukazu; Miyauchi, Maki; Yanai, Hiromi; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Shinzawa, Miho; Yoshinaga, Riko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yagi, Shintaro; Wu, Guoying; Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Reiko; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Penninger, Josef M; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro; Akiyama, Taishin

    2016-07-25

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) expressing autoimmune regulator (Aire) are critical for preventing the onset of autoimmunity. However, the differentiation program of Aire-expressing mTECs (Aire(+) mTECs) is unclear. Here, we describe novel embryonic precursors of Aire(+) mTECs. We found the candidate precursors of Aire(+) mTECs (pMECs) by monitoring the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK), which is required for Aire(+) mTEC differentiation. pMECs unexpectedly expressed cortical TEC molecules in addition to the mTEC markers UEA-1 ligand and RANK and differentiated into mTECs in reaggregation thymic organ culture. Introduction of pMECs in the embryonic thymus permitted long-term maintenance of Aire(+) mTECs and efficiently suppressed the onset of autoimmunity induced by Aire(+) mTEC deficiency. Mechanistically, pMECs differentiated into Aire(+) mTECs by tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6-dependent RANK signaling. Moreover, nonclassical nuclear factor-κB activation triggered by RANK and lymphotoxin-β receptor signaling promoted pMEC induction from progenitors exhibiting lower RANK expression and higher CD24 expression. Thus, our findings identified two novel stages in the differentiation program of Aire(+) mTECs.

  9. Carbon-Nanodot Solar Cells from Renewable Precursors.

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Adam; Kiat, Lim S; Dunn, Steve; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Briscoe, Joe

    2017-03-09

    It has recently been shown that waste biomass can be converted into a wide range of functional materials, including those with desirable optical and electronic properties, offering the opportunity to find new uses for these renewable resources. Photovoltaics is one area in which finding the combination of abundant, low-cost and non-toxic materials with the necessary functionality can be challenging. In this paper the performance of carbon nanodots derived from a wide range of biomaterials obtained from different biomass sources as sensitisers for TiO2 -based nanostructured solar cells was compared; polysaccharides (chitosan and chitin), monosaccharide (d-glucose), amino acids (l-arginine and l-cysteine) and raw lobster shells were used to produce carbon nanodots through hydrothermal carbonisation. The highest solar power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.36 % was obtained by using l-arginine carbon nanodots as sensitisers, whereas lobster shells, as a model source of chitin from actual food waste, showed a PCE of 0.22 %. By comparing this wide range of materials, the performance of the solar cells was correlated with the materials characteristics by carefully investigating the structural and optical properties of each family of carbon nanodots, and it was shown that the combination of amine and carboxylic acid functionalisation is particularly beneficial for the solar-cell performance.

  10. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol's effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  11. Alcohol-Induced Molecular Dysregulation in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Young; Roubal, Ivan; Lee, Youn Soo; Kim, Jin Seok; Hoang, Michael; Mathiyakom, Nathan; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Adverse effect of alcohol on neural function has been well documented. Especially, the teratogenic effect of alcohol on neurodevelopment during embryogenesis has been demonstrated in various models, which could be a pathologic basis for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). While the developmental defects from alcohol abuse during gestation have been described, the specific mechanisms by which alcohol mediates these injuries have yet to be determined. Recent studies have shown that alcohol has significant effect on molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation including genes involved in neural development. To test our hypothesis that alcohol induces molecular alterations during neural differentiation we have derived neural precursor cells from pluripotent human ESCs in the presence or absence of ethanol treatment. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling identified molecular alterations induced by ethanol exposure during neural differentiation of hESCs into neural rosettes and neural precursor cell populations. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional analysis on significantly altered genes showed potential ethanol’s effect on JAK-STAT signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and regulation of autophagy. We have further quantitatively verified ethanol-induced alterations of selected candidate genes. Among verified genes we further examined the expression of P2RX3, which is associated with nociception, a peripheral pain response. We found ethanol significantly reduced the level of P2RX3 in undifferentiated hESCs, but induced the level of P2RX3 mRNA and protein in hESC-derived NPCs. Our result suggests ethanol-induced dysregulation of P2RX3 along with alterations in molecules involved in neural activity such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction may be a molecular event

  12. Retinoic acid regulates the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laeng, P; Décimo, D; Pettmann, B; Janet, T; Labourdette, G

    1994-12-15

    Cultures of oligodendrocyte precursor cells can be grown from brain hemispheres of newborn rats. These cells, also called O-2A progenitor cells, can differentiate in vitro into oligodendrocytes or type 2 astrocytes. Basic FGF and PDGF are known to stimulate their proliferation and delay their differentiation. Lack or excess of retinoic acid (RA) has been known for a long time to alter brain development suggesting that this compound is involved in normal brain development. Here we report that RA partially inhibits both the proliferation and the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. It also down-regulates the mitogenic effect of bFGF on these cells while keeping them in an immature stage. RA is more effective than bFGF in inhibiting myelin basic protein mRNA expression in these cells, and like bFGF, it preserves their bipotential character. RA nuclear receptors RAR-alpha and their transcripts are expressed in oligodendrocyte precursor cells as seen by Western blot, Northern blot and in situ hybridization. The expression of RAR-alpha transcripts is stimulated transiently by RA alone or associated to bFGF. The expression of RAR-beta transcripts is not constitutive and is induced by RA alone or associated to bFGF and to a lesser extent by bFGF alone. These results suggest that retinoids participate in the control of the development of glial cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage.

  13. Plasma cell precursors: long-distance travelers looking for a home.

    PubMed

    Luther, Sanjiv A

    2010-07-23

    Little is known about the migration of plasma cell precursors to the lymph node medulla. In this issue of Immunity, Fooksman et al. (2010) propose that this migration is largely independent of chemotactic cues but follows a long linear walk of random orientation.

  14. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    PubMed

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  15. Electrical stimulation by enzymatic biofuel cell to promote proliferation, migration and differentiation of muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Ho; Jeon, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyug-Han; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is a very important biophysical cue for skeletal muscle maintenance and myotube formation. The absence of electrical signals from motor neurons causes denervated muscles to atrophy. Herein, we investigate for the first time the utility of an enzymatic biofuel cell (EBFC) as a promising means for mimicking native electrical stimulation. EBFC was set up using two different enzymes: one was glucose oxidase (GOX) used for the generation of anodic current followed by the oxidation of glucose; the other was Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) for the generation of cathodic current followed by the reduction of oxygen. We studied the behaviors of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) in terms of proliferation, migration and differentiation under different electrical conditions. The EBFC electrical stimulations significantly increased cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, the electrical stimulations promoted the differentiation of cells into myotube formation based on expressions at the gene and protein levels. The EBFC set up, with its free forms adjustable to any implant design, was subsequently applied to the nanofiber scaffolding system. The MPCs were demonstrated to be stimulated in a similar manner as the 2D culture conditions, suggesting potential applications of the EBFC system for muscle repair and regeneration.

  16. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Therapy to Limit Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction: The Effect of Cell Dosage

    PubMed Central

    Hamamoto, Hirotsugu; Gorman, Joseph H.; Ryan, Liam P.; Hinmon, Robin; Martens, Timothy P.; Schuster, Michael D.; Plappert, Theodore; Kiupel, Matti; St. John-Sutton, Martin G.; Itescu, Silviu; Gorman, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background This experiment assessed the dose-dependent effect of a unique allogeneic STRO-3–positive mesenchymal precursor cell (MPC) on postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling. The MPCs were administered in a manner that would simulate an off-the-self, early postinfarction, preventative approach to cardiac cell therapy in a sheep transmural myocardial infarct (MI) model. Methods Allogeneic MPCs were isolated from male crossbred sheep. Forty-six female sheep underwent coronary ligation to produce a transmural LV anteroapical infarction. One hour after infarction, the borderzone myocardium received an injection of 25, 75, 225, or 450 × 106 MPCs, or cell medium. Echocardiography was performed at 4 and 8 weeks after MI to quantify LV end-diastolic (LVEDV) and end-systolic volumes (LVESV), ejection fraction (EF), and infarct expansion. CD31 and smooth muscle actin (SMA) immunohistochemical staining was performed on infarct and borderzone specimens to quantify vascular density. Results Compared with controls, low-dose (25 and 75 × 106 cells) MPC treatment significantly attenuated infarct expansion and increases in LVEDV and LVESV. EF was improved at all cell doses. CD31 and SMA immunohistochemical staining demonstrated increased vascular density in the borderzone only at the lower cell doses. There was no evidence of myocardial regeneration within the infarct. Conclusion Allogeneic STRO-3 positive MPCs attenuate the remodeling response to transmural MI in a clinically relevant large-animal model. This effect is associated with vasculogenesis and arteriogenesis within the borderzone and infarct and is most pronounced at lower cell doses. PMID:19231391

  17. Subretinal transplantation of MACS purified photoreceptor precursor cells into the adult mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Dominic; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Grahl, Sandra; Ader, Marius

    2014-02-22

    Vision impairment and blindness due to the loss of the light-sensing cells of the retina, i.e. photoreceptors, represents the main reason for disability in industrialized countries. Replacement of degenerated photoreceptors by cell transplantation represents a possible treatment option in future clinical applications. Indeed, recent preclinical studies demonstrated that immature photoreceptors, isolated from the neonatal mouse retina at postnatal day 4, have the potential to integrate into the adult mouse retina following subretinal transplantation. Donor cells generated a mature photoreceptor morphology including inner and outer segments, a round cell body located at the outer nuclear layer, and synaptic terminals in close proximity to endogenous bipolar cells. Indeed, recent reports demonstrated that donor photoreceptors functionally integrate into the neural circuitry of host mice. For a future clinical application of such cell replacement approach, purified suspensions of the cells of choice have to be generated and placed at the correct position for proper integration into the eye. For the enrichment of photoreceptor precursors, sorting should be based on specific cell surface antigens to avoid genetic reporter modification of donor cells. Here we show magnetic-associated cell sorting (MACS) - enrichment of transplantable rod photoreceptor precursors isolated from the neonatal retina of photoreceptor-specific reporter mice based on the cell surface marker CD73. Incubation with anti-CD73 antibodies followed by micro-bead conjugated secondary antibodies allowed the enrichment of rod photoreceptor precursors by MACS to approximately 90%. In comparison to flow cytometry, MACS has the advantage that it can be easier applied to GMP standards and that high amounts of cells can be sorted in relative short time periods. Injection of enriched cell suspensions into the subretinal space of adult wild-type mice resulted in a 3-fold higher integration rate compared to

  18. Non-Invasive Optical Detection of Cathepsin K-Mediated Fluorescence Reveals Osteoclast Activity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Quinti, Luisa; Patntirapong, Somying; Hauschka, Peter V.; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Weissleder, Ralph; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient. PMID:19007918

  19. Murine osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation on strontium releasing hydroxyapatite forming cements.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish S; Roy, Abhijit; Lee, Boeun; Parekh, Shrey; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-06-01

    Ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds and self-setting cements containing Sr(2+) ions incorporated are particularly of interest in bone regeneration. To date, the approach widely used to incorporate Sr(2+) ions into HA cements has been the addition of Sr(2+) containing salts, such as SrCO3, SrCl2∙6H2O, or SrHPO4. However, this approach is dependent upon the relative solubility of Sr(2+) containing salts with respect to calcium phosphate (CaP) precursors. Therefore, in the current study Sr(2+) substituted dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was first synthesized and directly reacted with tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) to form Sr(2+) substituted HA forming cements. Rietveld refinement indicated that after one week of aging in phosphate buffered saline, cements prepared with and without Sr(2+) were composed of 75% HA and 25% unreacted TTCP by weight. Cements prepared with 10% Sr(2+) DCPD exhibited increased compressive strengths in comparison to unsubstituted cements. Increased MC3T3-E1 proliferation and differentiation were also observed on the cements prepared with increasing Sr(2+) content. It was concluded that both the scaffold microstructure and Sr(2+) ion release supported osteogenic differentiation. With respect to osteoclastic differentiation, no statistically significant differences in TRAP activity or cell morphology were observed. This suggests that the amount of Sr(2+) released may have been too low to influence osteoclast formation in comparison to unsubstituted cements. The results obtained herein demonstrate that the use of Sr(2+) substituted DCPD precursors rather than individually separate Sr(2+) containing salts may be a useful approach to prepare Sr(2+) containing HA cements.

  20. Role of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase in myeloma cell migration and induction of bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rakesh; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Pennisi, Angela; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Li, Xin; van Rhee, Frits; Usmani, Saad; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Myeloma cells typically grow in bone, recruit osteoclast precursors and induce their differentiation and activity in areas adjacent to tumor foci. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), of the TEC family, is expressed in hematopoietic cells and is particularly involved in B-lymphocyte function and osteoclastogenesis. We demonstrated BTK expression in clinical myeloma plasma cells, interleukin (IL) –6– or stroma–dependent cell lines and osteoclasts. SDF-1 induced BTK activation in myeloma cells and BTK inhibition by small hairpin RNA or the small molecule inhibitor, LFM-A13, reduced their migration toward stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). Pretreatment with LFM-A13 also reduced in vivo homing of myeloma cells to bone using bioluminescence imaging in the SCID-rab model. Enforced expression of BTK in myeloma cell line enhanced cell migration toward SDF-1 but had no effect on short-term growth. BTK expression was correlated with cell-surface CXCR4 expression in myeloma cells (n = 33, r = 0.81, P < 0.0001), and BTK gene and protein expression was more profound in cell-surface CXCR4-expressing myeloma cells. BTK was not upregulated by IL-6 while its inhibition had no effect on IL-6 signaling in myeloma cells. Human osteoclast precursors also expressed BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 and migrated toward SDF-1. LFM-A13 suppressed migration and differentiation of osteoclast precursors as well as bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. In primary myeloma-bearing SCID-rab mice, LFM-A13 inhibited osteoclast activity, prevented myeloma-induced bone resorption and moderately suppressed myeloma growth. These data demonstrate BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 association in myeloma cells and that BTK plays a role in myeloma cell homing to bone and myeloma-induced bone disease. PMID:23456977

  1. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereño-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Wilson, Ian A; Burton, Dennis R; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. Using deep mutational scanning and multitarget optimization, we developed a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. These methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  2. Interaction of type A lantibiotics with undecaprenol-bound cell envelope precursors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anna; Ulm, Hannah; Reder-Christ, Katrin; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja

    2012-06-01

    Lantibiotics are a unique group within the antimicrobial peptides characterized by the presence of thioether amino acids (lanthionine and methyllanthionine). These peptides are produced by and primarily act on Gram-positive bacteria exerting multiple activities at the cytoplasmic membrane of susceptible strains. Previously, the cell wall precursor lipid II was identified as the molecular target for the prototype lantibiotic nisin. Binding and sequestration of lipid II blocks the incorporation of the central cell wall precursor into the growing peptidoglycan network, thereby inhibiting the formation of a functional cell wall. Additionally, nisin combines this activity with a unique target-mediated pore formation, using lipid II as a docking molecule. The interaction with the pyrophosphate moiety of lipid II is crucial for nisin binding. We show that, besides binding to lipid II, nisin interacts with the lipid intermediates lipid III (undecaprenol-pyrophosphate-N-acetyl-glucosamine) and lipid IV (undecaprenol-pyrophosphate-N-acetyl-glucosamine-N-acetyl-mannosamine) of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis pathway. Binding of nisin to the precursors was observed at a stoichiometry of 2:1. The specific interaction with WTA precursors further promoted target-mediated pore formation in artificial lipid bilayers. Specific interactions with lipid III and lipid IV could also be demonstrated for related type A lantibiotics, for example, gallidermin, containing the conserved lipid-II-binding motif.

  3. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen

    DOE PAGES

    Jardine, Joseph G.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; ...

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. We employed deep mutational scanning and multi-target optimization to develop a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen asmore » a candidate human vaccine prime. Lastly, these methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.« less

  4. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Joseph G.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereno-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C.; Julien, Jean -Philippe; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R.

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. We employed deep mutational scanning and multi-target optimization to develop a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. Lastly, these methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  5. Selective beta-cell differentiation of dissociated embryonic pancreatic precursor cells cultured in synthetic polyethylene glycol hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mason, Mariah N; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2009-06-01

    Continuing advances in islet cell transplantation have been promising; however, several limitations, including severe shortage of transplantable islets, hinder the widespread use of this therapy. Pancreatic precursor cells are one alternative to cadaveric donor islets. These cells found in the developing pancreatic buds are capable of self-renewal and also have the innate ability to become insulin-producing beta-cells. For this work, bioinert polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels were chosen as the supportive three-dimensional matrix for encapsulation of dissociated pancreatic precursor cells obtained from the dorsal pancreatic bud of day-15 rat embryos. This culture system was selected in order to eliminate cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell signal heterogeneity present when intact pancreatic buds are embedded in protein-based gels, the typical in vitro culture conditions used to study this cell population. In this study it was found that (1) dissociated precursor cells maintain a robust viability for 7 days in PEG hydrogel culture, (2) encapsulated cells selectively differentiate into insulin-expressing beta-cells, and (3) differentiated beta-cells have releasable insulin stores, but are not achieving a mature, glucose responsive phenotype. These findings suggest that encapsulating dissociated pancreatic precursor cells in an environment designed to minimize the heterogeneous signaling cues present during development or in standard culture conditions generates a population highly enriched in pancreatic beta-cells; however, future efforts must focus on achieving glucose responsiveness in this cell population. Further, these results indicate that differentiation down a beta-cell lineage may be the default pathway in pancreatic development.

  6. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-06

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors.

  7. Extracellular Vesicles from Vascular Endothelial Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation and Motility of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurachi, Masashi; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    We previously examined the effect of brain microvascular endothelial cell (MVEC) transplantation on rat white matter infarction, and found that MVEC transplantation promoted remyelination of demyelinated axons in the infarct region and reduced apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). We also found that the conditioned medium (CM) from cultured MVECs inhibited apoptosis of cultured OPCs. In this study, we examined contribution of extracellular vesicles (EVs) contained in the CM to its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. Removal of EVs from the CM by ultracentrifugation reduced its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. To confirm whether EVs derived from MVECs are taken up by cultured OPCs, we labeled EVs with PKH67, a fluorescent dye, and added them to OPC cultures. Many vesicular structures labeled with PKH67 were found within OPCs immediately after their addition. Next we examined the effect of MVEC-derived EVs on OPC behaviors. After 2 days in culture with EVs, there was significantly less pyknotic and more BrdU-positive OPCs when compared to control. We also examined the effect of EVs on motility of OPCs. OPCs migrated longer in the presence of EVs when compared to control. To examine whether these effects on cultured OPCs are shared by EVs from endothelial cells, we prepared EVs from conditioned media of several types of endothelial cells, and tested their effects on cultured OPCs. EVs from all types of endothelial cells we examined reduced apoptosis of OPCs and promoted their motility. Identification of the molecules contained in EVs from endothelial cells may prove helpful for establishment of effective therapies for demyelinating diseases. PMID:27403742

  8. Neurogenesis and precursor cell differences in the dorsal and ventral adult canine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Aileen; Dalton, Marshall; Sidhu, Kuldip; Sachdev, Perminder; Reynolds, Brent; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-04-23

    During evolution a unique anterior-posterior flexure posited the canine dentate gyrus in two distinct dorsal and ventral positions. We therefore sought to explore neurogenesis and neurogenic cell-related difference along the canine hippocampal dorsal-ventral axis. Post mortem histological analysis revealed 49.1% greater doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells and a 158.5% greater percentage of double labeled DCX-positive/neuronal nuclei (NeuN) positive cells in the dorsal subgranular zone compared to the ventral. We then show neural precursor cells isolated from fresh hippocampal tissue are capable of proliferating long term, and after differentiation, express neuronal and glial markers. Dorsal hippocampal isolates produced a 120.0% higher frequency of sphere-forming neural precursor cells compared to ventral hippocampal tissue. Histological DCX and neurosphere assay results were highly correlated. Overall, we provide the first evidence that the dorsal canine hippocampus has a markedly higher rate of adult neurogenesis than the ventral hippocampus, possibly related to a greater frequency of contributory neural precursor cells.

  9. Homing of hemopoietic precursor cells to the embryonic thymus: characterization of an invasive mechanism induced by chemotactic peptides

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    During embryonic development, T cell precursors migrate to the thymus, where immunocompetency is acquired. Our previous studies have shown that avian hemopoietic precursor cells are recruited to the thymus by chemotactic peptides secreted by thymic epithelial cells (Champion, S., B. A. Imhof, P. Savagner, and J. P. Thiery, 1986, Cell, 44:781-790). In this study, we have characterized the homing of these precursor cells to the thymus in vivo by electron and light microscopy. Hemopoietic precursors could be seen to extravasate from blood or lymphatic vessels, migrate in the mesenchyme, traverse the perithymic basement membrane, and finally intercalate into the thymic epithelium. Labeled hemopoietic precursors injected into the blood circulation also followed the same pathway. Migrating hemopoietic precursor cells were found to express the fibronectin receptor complex. In the presence of thymic chemotactic peptides, hemopoietic precursors traverse a human amniotic basement membrane. This invasive process was inhibited by antibodies to laminin or to fibronectin, two major glycoproteins of the amniotic membrane, by monovalent Fab' fragments of antibodies to the fibronectin receptor, and, finally by synthetic peptides that contain the cell-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser of fibronectin. These results indicate that hemopoietic precursors respond to thymic chemotactic peptides by invasive behavior. Direct interactions between basement membrane components and fibronectin receptors appear to be required for this developmentally regulated invasion process. PMID:3793754

  10. Preparation of adult muscle fiber-associated stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Michael J; Conboy, Irina M

    2010-01-01

    In our studies of muscle regeneration we have developed, modified, and optimized techniques to isolate and study the stem and precursor cells to muscle tissue. Our goals have been to obtain for study muscle fibers in bulk, or the fiber-associated cells, separately from the other cells found in muscle. Using these techniques, myofiber-associated cells may be isolated from neonatal through adult muscle, from resting or from regenerating muscle, thus allowing one to investigate the cellular populations participating during the time course of these events. The protocol is applicable to any age and condition of muscle and may be adapted for other tissues.

  11. Carvacrol Inhibits Osteoclastogenesis and Negatively Regulates the Survival of Mature Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Vishwa; Kasonga, Abe; Kruger, Marlena Cathorina; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2016-07-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that undergoes continuous remodeling coupled with the action of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Osteoclast activity is elevated during osteoporosis and periodontitis resulting in excessive loss of trabecular and alveolar bone. Osteoclasts are formed in an inflammatory response to cytokine production receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) and bacterial challenge lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol present in Origanum vulgare and Thymus vulgaris, is a natural compound with known medicinal properties. We investigated the effects of carvacrol on osteoclast formation induced by RANKL and LPS. Carvacrol suppressed RANKL-induced formation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in RAW264.7 macrophages and human CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW264.7 macrophages. Investigation of the underlying molecular mechanisms revealed that carvacrol downregulated RANKL-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the suppression of NF-κB activation correlated with inhibition of inhibitor of kappaB (IκB) kinase (IKK) activation and attenuation of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBa) degradation. Carvacrol potentiated apoptosis in mature osteoclasts by caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation. Moreover, carvacrol did not affect the viability of proliferating MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that carvacrol mitigates osteoclastogenesis by impairing the NF-κB pathway and induction of apoptosis in mature osteoclasts.

  12. The effect of the degree of sulfation of glycosaminoglycans on osteoclast function and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Salbach, Juliane; Kliemt, Stefanie; Rauner, Martina; Rachner, Tilman D; Goettsch, Claudia; Kalkhof, Stefan; von Bergen, Martin; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Hintze, Vera; Scharnweber, Dieter; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2012-11-01

    To meet the growing need for bone replacement of our aging population, development of new adaptive biomaterials is essential. Collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as hyaluronan (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) are major components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone. We manufactured native and sulfate-modified GAG matrices, evaluated how these components modulate different functions of osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. GAGs were tested for their effects on osteoclast adhesion, viability, differentiation, morphology, and resorption as well as proteome alterations using murine RAW264.7 cells and primary human osteoclasts. Native and sulfated GAGs were stable and largely non-cytotoxic. Sulfation of GAGs led to a significant inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and resorption, which was largely dependent on the degree of sulfation of GAGs rather than the monosaccharide composition. Sulfation significantly reduced resorptive function by 14% (CS) and 43% (HA). Highly sulfated GAGs dose-dependently suppressed osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast-specific expression of TRAP, cathepsin K, SWAP-70, and OSCAR by 63-95%, and inhibited proteins involved in cytoskeletal rearrangement. In conclusion, highly sulfated GAGs significantly inhibit various functions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Whether these properties locally contribute to improved fracture or bone defect healing needs to be validated in vivo.

  13. 3BP2-deficient mice are osteoporotic with impaired osteoblast and osteoclast functions

    PubMed Central

    Levaot, Noam; Simoncic, Paul D.; Dimitriou, Ioannis D.; Scotter, Andrew; La Rose, Jose; Ng, Adeline H.M.; Willett, Thomas L.; Wang, Chiachien J.; Janmohamed, Salima; Grynpas, Marc; Reichenberger, Ernst; Rottapel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A fine balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts maintains bone homeostasis. In patients with cherubism, gain-of-function mutations in 3BP2, which is encoded by SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2), cause cystic lesions with activated osteoclasts that lead to craniofacial abnormalities. However, little is known about the function of wild-type 3BP2 in regulating bone homeostasis. Here we have shown that 3BP2 is required for the normal function of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Initial analysis showed that Sh3bp2–/–mice developed osteoporosis as a result of reduced bone formation despite the fact that bone resorption was impaired. We demonstrated using reciprocal bone marrow chimeras, a cell-intrinsic defect of the osteoblast and osteoclast compartments in vivo. Further, Sh3bp2–/– osteoblasts failed to mature and form mineralized nodules in vitro, while Sh3bp2–/– osteoclasts spread poorly and were unable to effectively degrade dentine matrix in vitro. Finally, we showed that 3BP2 was required for Abl activation in osteoblasts and Src activation in osteoclasts, and demonstrated that the in vitro defect of each cell type was restored by the respective expression of activated forms of these kinases. These findings reveal an unanticipated role for the 3BP2 adapter protein in osteoblast function and in coordinating bone homeostatic signals in both osteoclast and osteoblast lineages. PMID:21765218

  14. Osteoclast spreading kinetics are correlated with an oscillatory activation of a calcium-dependent potassium current.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Leon; Paret, Laurent; Ojeda, Carlos; Tourneur, Yves; Delmas, Pierre D; Chenu, Chantal

    2002-10-01

    Cell movement and spreading involve calcium-dependent processes and ionic channel activation. During bone resorption, osteoclasts alternate between spread, motile and resorptive phases. We investigated whether the electrical membrane properties of osteoclasts were linked to their membrane morphological changes. Rabbit osteoclasts were recorded by time-lapse videomicroscopy performed simultaneously with patch-clamp whole cell and single channel recordings. Original image analysis methods were developed and used to demonstrate for the first time an oscillatory activation of a spontaneous membrane current in osteoclasts, which is directly correlated to the membrane movement rate. This current was identified as a calcium-dependent potassium current (IK(Ca)) that is sensitive to both charybdotoxin and apamin and was generated by a channel with unitary conductance of approximately 25+/-2 pS. Blockade of this current also decreased osteoclast spreading and inhibited bone resorption in vitro, demonstrating a physiological role for this current in osteoclast activity. These results establish for the first time a temporal correlation between lamellipodia formation kinetics and spontaneous peaks of IK(Ca), which are both involved in the control of osteoclast spreading and bone resorption.

  15. Study of cell kinetics within evolving secondary Haversian systems.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Z F; Hooper, C

    1980-01-01

    A study of the origin, proliferation rate and migration of cells within the secondary evolving Haversian systems was undertaken in young adult Beagle dogs. Autoradiographs of serial longitudinal sections prepared from rib biopsies taken from one hour to eleven days after the injection of tritiated thymidine were subjected to semiquantitative analysis as to the time of appearance, number, location and transformation of various labelled cells. Numerous labelled osteoblasts appeared early (at 14-24 hours) in the most proximal closing cone. With time, this zone was seen to have been left behind the advancing cutting cone and the successive generations of osteoblasts. The first labelled osteocytes were seen at nine days after injection, in the distal closing cone. Labelled nuclei within the osteoclasts were few and appeared late (none before 24 hours). It is apparent that each self renewing cell population within these systems (i.e. osteoclasts, osteoblasts and endothelial cells) derives from its own immediate precursor and evolves at its own speed. The mononuclear osteoclasts' precursors divide locally and infrequently and the turnover of osteoclastic nuclei appears to be slow; consequently their life span and that of the osteoclasts appears to be longer than the time of the observation, i.e. 11 days. The proliferation of osteoblasts' precursors and osteoblasts recruitment is rapid. The life span of osteoblasts was found to be indeterminate; some osteoblasts may become osteocytes within a few days while others may continue to deposit bone for several weeks. Since the recruitment of osteoclastic nuclei is slow while that of the osteoblasts is fast, it is unlikely that the osteoclasts in the sites of lamellar bone remodelling modulate into osteoblasts. Images Fig. 2(cont.) Fig. 2 Fig. 3(cont.) Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7440406

  16. FSH-Receptor Isoforms and FSH-dependent Gene Transcription in Human Monocytes and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina; Wang, Yujuan; Sharrow, Allison C; Landau, Michael S; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte series respond to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by poorly characterized mechanisms. We studied FSH-receptors (FSH-R) and FSH response in nontransformed human monocytes and in osteoclasts differentiated from these cells. Western blot and PCR confirmed FSH-R expression on monocytes or osteoclasts, although at low levels relative to ovarian controls. Monocyte and osteoclast FSH-Rs differed from FSH-R from ovarian cells, reflecting variable splicing in exons 8–10. Monocytes produced no cAMP, the major signal in ovarian cells, in response to FSH. However, monocytes or osteoclasts transcribed TNFα in response to the FSH. No relation of expression of osteoclast FSH-R to the sex of cell donors or to exposure to sex hormones was apparent. Controls for FSH purity and endotoxin contamination were negative. Unamplified cRNA screening in adherent CD14 cells after 2 hours in 25 ng/ml FSH showed increased transcription of RANKL signalling proteins. Transcription of key proteins that stimulate bone turnover, TNFα and TSG-6, increased 2–3 fold after FSH treatment. Smaller but significant changes occurred in transcripts of selected signalling, adhesion, and cytoskeletal proteins. We conclude that monocyte and osteoclast FSH response diverges from that of ovarian cells, reflecting, at least in part, varying FSH-R isoforms. PMID:20171950

  17. Ebf2 is a selective marker of brown and beige adipogenic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Kissig, Megan; Rajakumari, Sona; Huang, Li; Lim, Hee-Woong; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2014-10-07

    Brown adipocytes and muscle and dorsal dermis descend from precursor cells in the dermomyotome, but the factors that regulate commitment to the brown adipose lineage are unknown. Here, we prospectively isolated and determined the molecular profile of embryonic brown preadipose cells. Brown adipogenic precursor activity in embryos was confined to platelet-derived growth factor α(+), myogenic factor 5(Cre)-lineage-marked cells. RNA-sequence analysis identified early B-cell factor 2 (Ebf2) as one of the most selectively expressed genes in this cell fraction. Importantly, Ebf2-expressing cells purified from Ebf2(GFP) embryos or brown fat tissue did not express myoblast or dermal cell markers and uniformly differentiated into brown adipocytes. Interestingly, Ebf2-expressing cells from white fat tissue in adult animals differentiated into brown-like (or beige) adipocytes. Loss of Ebf2 in brown preadipose cells reduced the expression levels of brown preadipose-signature genes, whereas ectopic Ebf2 expression in myoblasts activated brown preadipose-specific genes. Altogether, these results indicate that Ebf2 specifically marks and regulates the molecular profile of brown preadipose cells.

  18. CD34+ hematopoietic precursors are present in human decidua and differentiate into natural killer cells upon interaction with stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Paola; Vitale, Chiara; Montaldo, Elisa; Conte, Romana; Cantoni, Claudia; Fulcheri, Ezio; Darretta, Valeria; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the main lymphoid population in the maternal decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. Decidual NK (dNK) cells display a unique functional profile and play a key role in promoting tissue remodeling, neoangiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, little information exists on their origin and development. Here we discovered CD34+ hematopoietic precursors in human decidua (dCD34+). We show that dCD34+ cells differ from cord blood- or peripheral blood-derived CD34+ precursors. The expression of IL-15/IL-2 receptor common β-chain (CD122), IL-7 receptor α-chain (CD127), and mRNA for E4BP4 and ID2 transcription factors suggested that dCD34+ cells are committed to the NK cell lineage. Moreover, they could undergo in vitro differentiation into functional (i.e., IL-8– and IL-22–producing) CD56brightCD16−KIR+/− NK cells in the presence of growth factors or even upon coculture with decidual stromal cells. Their NK cell commitment was further supported by the failure to undergo myeloid differentiation in the presence of GM-CSF. Our findings strongly suggest that decidual NK cells may directly derive from CD34+ cell precursors present in the decidua upon specific cellular interactions with components of the decidual microenvironment. PMID:21248224

  19. Comparison of melatonin with growth factors in promoting precursor cells proliferation in adult mouse subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, secreted mainly by the pineal gland, plays roles in various physiological functions including protecting cell death. We showed in previous study that the proliferation and differentiation of precursor cells from the adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) can be modulated by melatonin via the MT1 melatonin receptor. Since melatonin and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) share some signaling pathway components, we investigated whether melatonin can promote the proliferation of precursor cells from the adult mouse SVZ via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase /mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathways in comparison with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Melatonin-induced ERK/MAPK pathways compared with EGF were measured by using in vitro and vivo models. We used neurosphere proliferation assay, immunocytochemistry, and immuno-blotting to analyze significant differences between melatonin and growth factor treatment. We also used specific antagonist and inhibitors to confirm the exactly signaling pathway including luzindole and U0126. We found that significant increase in proliferation was observed when two growth factors (EGF+bFGF) and melatonin were used simultaneously compared with EGF + bFGF or compared with melatonin alone. In addition, the present result suggested the synergistic effect occurred of melatonin and growth factors on the activating the ERK/MAPK pathway. This study exhibited that melatonin could act as a trophic factor, increasing proliferation in precursor cells mediated through the melatonin receptor coupled to ERK/MAPK signaling pathways. Understanding the mechanism by which melatonin regulates precursor cells may conduct to the development of novel strategies for neurodegenerative disease therapy. PMID:28275319

  20. The Keap1/Nrf2 Protein Axis Plays a Role in Osteoclast Differentiation by Regulating Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Fumiaki; Kajiya, Mikihito; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as intracellular signaling molecules in the regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include peroxidation of lipids and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. Cellular protective mechanisms against oxidative stress include transcriptional control of cytoprotective enzymes by the transcription factor, nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). This study investigated the relationship between Nrf2 and osteoclastogenesis. Stimulation of osteoclast precursors (mouse primary peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 cells) with RANKL resulted in the up-regulation of kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), a negative regulator of Nrf2. It also decreased the Nrf2/Keap1 ratio, and it down-regulated cytoprotective enzymes (heme oxygenase-1, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase). Nrf2 overexpression up-regulated the expression of cytoprotective enzymes, decreased ROS levels, decreased the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated cells, reduced marker genes for osteoclast differentiation, and attenuated bone destruction in both in vitro and in vivo models. Overexpression of Keap1 or RNAi knockdown of Nrf2 exerted the opposite actions. In addition, in vivo local Nrf2 overexpression attenuated lipopolysaccharide-mediated RANKL-dependent cranial bone destruction in vivo. This is the first study to show that the Keap1/Nrf2 axis regulates RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis through modulation of intracellular ROS signaling via expression of cytoprotective enzymes. This raises the exciting possibility that the Keap1-Nrf2 axis may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of bone destructive disease. PMID:23801334

  1. Acetylcholine stimulates cortical precursor cell proliferation in vitro via muscarinic receptor activation and MAP kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Maric, D; Li, B S; Hu, Q; Andreadis, J D; Grant, G M; Liu, Q Y; Shaffer, K M; Chang, Y H; Zhang, L; Pancrazio, J J; Pant, H C; Stenger, D A; Barker, J L

    2000-04-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that some neurotransmitters act as growth-regulatory signals during brain development. Here we report a role for the classical neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) to stimulate proliferation of neural stem cells and stem cell-derived progenitor cells during neural cell lineage progression in vitro. Neuroepithelial cells in the ventricular zone of the embryonic rat cortex were found to express the m2 subtype of the muscarinic receptor. Neural precursor cells dissociated from the embryonic rat cortical neuroepithelium were expanded in culture with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed the presence of m2, m3 and m4 muscarinic receptor subtype transcripts, while immunocytochemistry demonstrated m2 protein. ACh and carbachol induced an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and membrane currents in proliferating (BrdU+) cells, both of which were abolished by atropine. Exposure of bFGF-deprived precursor cells to muscarinic agonists not only increased both cell number and DNA synthesis, but also enhanced differentiation of neurons. These effects were blocked by atropine, indicating the involvement of muscarinic ACh receptors. The growth-stimulating effects were also antagonized by a panel of inhibitors of second messengers, including 1,2-bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) to chelate cytosolic Ca2+, EGTA to complex extracellular Ca2+, pertussis toxin, which uncouples certain G-proteins, the protein kinase C inhibitor H7 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD98059. Muscarinic agonists activated MAPK, which was significantly inhibited by atropine and the same panel of inhibitors. Thus, muscarinic receptors expressed by neural precursors transduce a growth-regulatory signal during neurogenesis via pathways involving pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins, Ca2+ signalling, protein kinase C activation, MAPK phosphorylation and DNA synthesis.

  2. Evidence for the presence of a proton pump of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase type in the ruffled borders of osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Microsomal membrane vesicles prepared either from chicken medullary bone or isolated osteoclasts were shown to have ATP-dependent H(+)- transport activity. This activity was N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive but resistant to oligomycin and orthovanadate, suggesting a vacuolar-type ATPase. Furthermore, immunological cross-reactivity of 60- and 70-kD osteoclast membrane antigens with Neurospora crassa vacuolar ATPase was observed when analyzed by immunoblotting. Same antibodies labeled only osteoclasts in chicken and rat bone in immunohistochemistry. Immunoelectronmicroscopy localized these antigens in apical membranes of rat osteoclasts and kidney intercalated cells of inner stripe of outer medulla. Pretreatment of animals with parathyroid hormone enhanced the immunoreaction in the apical membranes of osteoclasts. No immunoreaction was seen in osteoclasts when antibodies against gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase were used. These results suggest that osteoclast resorbs bone by secreting protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. PMID:2144003

  3. Identification of myocardial and vascular precursor cells in human and mouse epicardium.

    PubMed

    Limana, Federica; Zacheo, Antonella; Mocini, David; Mangoni, Antonella; Borsellino, Giovanna; Diamantini, Adamo; De Mori, Roberta; Battistini, Luca; Vigna, Elisa; Santini, Massimo; Loiaconi, Vincenzo; Pompilio, Giulio; Germani, Antonia; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2007-12-07

    During cardiac development, the epicardium is the source of multipotent mesenchymal cells, which give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle cells in coronary vessels and also, possibly, to cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether stem cells are retained in the adult human and murine epicardium and to investigate the regenerative potential of these cells following acute myocardial infarction. We show that c-kit(+) and CD34(+) cells can indeed be detected in human fetal and adult epicardium and that they represent 2 distinct populations. Both subsets of cells were negative for CD45, a cell surface marker that identifies the hematopoietic cell lineage. Immunofluorescence revealed that freshly isolated c-kit(+) and CD34(+) cells expressed early and late cardiac transcription factors and could acquire an endothelial phenotype in vitro. In the murine model of myocardial infarction, there was an increase in the absolute number and proliferation of epicardial c-kit(+) cells 3 days after coronary ligation; at this time point, epicardial c-kit(+) cells were identified in the subepicardial space and expressed GATA4. Furthermore, 1 week after myocardial infarction, cells coexpressing c-kit(+), together with endothelial or smooth muscle cell markers, were identified in the wall of subepicardial blood vessels. In summary, the postnatal epicardium contains a cell population with stem cell characteristics that retains the ability to give rise to myocardial precursors and vascular cells. These cells may play a role in the regenerative response to cardiac damage.

  4. CD22 is required for formation of memory B cell precursors within germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Craig P.; Draves, Kevin E.

    2017-01-01

    CD22 is a BCR co-receptor that regulates B cell signaling, proliferation and survival and is required for T cell-independent Ab responses. To investigate the role of CD22 during T cell-dependent (TD) Ab responses and memory B cell formation, we analyzed Ag-specific B cell responses generated by wild-type (WT) or CD22-/- B cells following immunization with a TD Ag. CD22-/- B cells mounted normal early Ab responses yet failed to generate either memory B cells or long-lived plasma cells, whereas WT B cells formed both populations. Surprisingly, B cell expansion and germinal center (GC) differentiation were comparable between WT and CD22-/- B cells. CD22-/- B cells, however, were significantly less capable of generating a population of CXCR4hiCD38hi GC B cells, which we propose represent memory B cell precursors within GCs. These results demonstrate a novel role for CD22 during TD humoral responses evident during primary GC formation and underscore that CD22 functions not only during B cell maturation but also during responses to both TD and T cell-independent antigens. PMID:28346517

  5. Ankfy1 is dispensable for neural stem/precursor cell development.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chao; Ding, Man; Chang, Lian-Sheng; Ren, Ming-Xin; Zhang, Hong-Feng; Lu, Zu-Neng; Fu, Hui

    2016-11-01

    There are few studies on the membrane protein Ankfy1. We have found Ankfy1 is specifically expressed in neural stem/precursor cells during early development in mice (murine). To further explore Ankfy1 function in neural development, we developed a gene knockout mouse with a mixed Balb/C and C57/BL6 genetic background. Using immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, neural defects were absent in mixed genetic Ankfy1 null mice during development and in adults up to 2 months old. However, Ankfy1 gene knockout mice with a pure genetic background were found to be lethal in the C57/BL6 inbred mice embryos, even after seven generations of backcrossing. Polymerase chain reaction confirmed homozygotes were unattainable as early as embryonic day 11.5. We conclude that Ankfy1 protein is dispensable in neural stem/precursor cells, but could be critical for early embryonic murine development, depending on the genetic background.

  6. Frizzled signalling controls orientation of asymmetric sense organ precursor cell divisions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gho, M; Schweisguth, F

    1998-05-14

    During metazoan development, cell-fate diversity is brought about, in part, by asymmetric cell divisions. In Drosophila, bristle mechanosensory organs are composed of four different cells that originate from a single precursor cell, pI, after two rounds of asymmetric division. At each division, distinct fates are conferred on sister cells by the asymmetric segregation of Numb, a negative regulator of Notch signalling. Here we show that the orientation of the mitotic spindles and the localization of the Numb crescent follow a stereotyped pattern. Mitosis of pI is orientated parallel to the anteroposterior axis of the fly. We show that signalling mediated by the Frizzled receptor polarizes pI along this axis, thereby specifying the orientation of the mitotic spindle and positioning the Numb crescent. The mitoses of the two cells produced by mitosis of pI are orientated parallel and orthogonal, respectively, to the division axis of pI. This difference in cell-division orientation is largely independent of the identity of the secondary precursor cells, and is regulated by Frizzled-independent mechanisms.

  7. Progranulin promotes the retinal precursor cell proliferation and the photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Sugitani, Sou; Izawa, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yuta; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted growth factor associated with embryo development, tissue repair, and inflammation. In a previous study, we showed that adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) is rich in PGRN. In the present study, we investigated whether PGRN is associated with retinal regeneration in the mammalian retina. We evaluated the effect of ASC-CM using the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced retinal damage model in mice. ASC-CM promoted the differentiation of photoreceptor cells following retinal damage. PGRN increased the number of BrdU+ cells in the outer nuclear layer following retinal damage some of which were Rx (retinal precursor cell marker) positive. PGRN also increased the number of rhodopsin+ photoreceptor cells in primary retinal cell cultures. SU11274, a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor inhibitor, attenuated the increase. These findings suggest that PGRN may affect the differentiation of retinal precursor cells to photoreceptor cells through the HGF receptor signaling pathway. PMID:27030285

  8. Potentiation of osteoclast bone-resorption activity by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, T P; Collin-Osdoby, P; Patel, N; Osdoby, P; Krukowski, M; Misko, T P; Settle, S L; Currie, M G; Nickols, G A

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the effects of modulating nitric oxide (NO) levels on osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in vitro and the effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on bone mineral density in vivo. Diaphorase-based histochemical staining for NOS activity of bone sections or highly enriched osteoclast cultures suggested that osteoclasts exhibit substantial NOS activity that may account for basal NO production. Chicken osteoclasts were cultured for 36 hr on bovine bone slices in the presence or absence of the NO-generating agent sodium nitroprusside or the NOS inhibitors N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and aminoguanidine. Nitroprusside markedly decreased the number of bone pits and the average pit area in comparison with control cultures. On the other hand, NOS inhibition by N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or aminoguanidine dramatically increased the number of bone pits and the average resorption area per pit. In a model of osteoporosis, aminoguanidine potentiated the loss of bone mineral density in ovariectomized rats. Aminoguanidine also caused a loss of bone mineral density in the sham-operated rats. Inhibition of NOS activity in vitro and in vivo resulted in an apparent potentiation of osteoclast activity. These findings suggest that endogenous NO production in osteoclast cultures may regulate resorption activity. The modulation of NOS and NO levels by cells within the bone microenvironment may be a sensitive mechanism for local control of osteoclast bone resorption. Images PMID:7513424

  9. New melanogenesis and photobiological processes in activation and proliferation of precursor melanocytes after UV-exposure: ultrastructural differentiation of precursor melanocytes from Langerhans cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbow, K.; Uesugi, T.

    1982-02-01

    Photobiological processes involving new melanogenesis after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light were experimentally studied in C57 black adult mice by histochemistry, cytochemistry, and autoradiography. The trunk and the plantar region of the foot, where no functioning melanocytes were present before exposure, were exposed to UV-A for 14 consecutive days. Both regions revealed a basically similar pattern for new melanogenesis which involved an activation of precursor melanocytes. Essentially all of ''indeterminate'' cells appeared to be precursor melanocytes, the fine structure of which could be differentiated even from poorly developed Langerhans cells. New melanogenesis was manifested by 4 stages of cellular and subcellular reactions of these cells as indicated by histochemistry of dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) and autoradiography of thymidine incorporation: (a) an initial lag in the activation of precursor melanocytes with development of Golgi cisternae and rough endoplasmic reticulum followed by formation of unmelanized melanosomes (day 0 to 2); (b) synthesis of active tyrosinase accumulated in Golgi cisternae and vesicles with subsequent formation of melanized melanosomes in these cells (day 3 to 5); (c) mitotic proliferation of many of these activated cells, followed by an exponential increase of new melanocytes (day 6 to 7); and (d) melanosome transfer with differentiation of 10 nm filaments and arborization of dendrites, but without any significant change in the melanocyte population (day 8 to 14). The melanosome transfer was, however, not obvious until after 7 days of exposure. The size of newly synthesized melanosomes was similar to that of tail skin where native melanocytes were present before exposure.

  10. Gene expression profiling of osteoclast differentiation by combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Rho, Jaerang; Altmann, Curtis R; Socci, Nicholas D; Merkov, Lubomir; Kim, Nacksung; So, Hongseob; Lee, Okbok; Takami, Masamichi; Brivanlou, Ali H; Choi, Yongwon

    2002-08-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balanced action of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Multinucleated, mature osteoclasts develop from hematopoietic stem cells via the monocyte-macrophage lineage, which also give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells. Despite their distinct physiologic roles in bone and the immune system, these cell types share many molecular and biochemical features. To provide insights into how osteoclasts differentiate and function to control bone metabolism, we employed a systematic approach to profile patterns of osteoclast-specific gene expression by combining suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis. Here we examined how gene expression profiles of mature osteoclast differ from macrophage or dendritic cells, how gene expression profiles change during osteoclast differentiation, and how Mitf, a transcription factor critical for osteoclast maturation, affects the gene expression profile. This approach revealed a set of genes coordinately regulated for osteoclast function, some of which have previously been implicated in several bone diseases in humans.

  11. 3-Sulfanylhexanol precursor biogenesis in grapevine cells: the stimulating effect of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Thibon, Cécile; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Mérillon, Jean Michel; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2011-02-23

    Volatile thiols, compounds that contribute strongly to the varietal aroma, are present in much higher concentrations in sweet wines than in dry wines. This positive effect, due to the presence of Botrytis cinerea on the berries, in fact results from a strong enrichment of cysteine S-conjugate precursors in botrytized berries. In the present study, a convenient model was investigated to reproduce and therefore study this phenomenon. A Vitis vinifera cell culture was used as a simple model, and we focused on S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-cysteine (P-3SH), the cysteinylated precursor of 3-sulfanylhexanol. We demonstrated that grapevine cells were able to produce P-3SH and that the presence of B. cinerea considerably increased the precursor level (up to 1000-fold). This positive result was determined to be due to metabolites secreted by the fungus. These molecules were temperature sensitive, unstable over time, and their production was activated in the presence of grapevine cells. Moreover, part of the pathway leading to P-3SH was deciphered: it was directly derived from the cleavage of S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-glutathione, which itself was generated after a conjugation of glutathione on (E)-2-hexenal.

  12. Mitotic position and morphology of committed precursor cells in the zebrafish retina adapt to architectural changes upon tissue maturation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Isabell P; Ramos, Ana P; Strzyz, Paulina J; Leung, Louis C; Young, Stephen; Norden, Caren

    2014-04-24

    The development of complex neuronal tissues like the vertebrate retina requires the tight orchestration of cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the complexity of transcription factors and signaling pathways involved in retinogenesis has been studied extensively, the influence of tissue maturation itself has not yet been systematically explored. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of mitotic events during zebrafish retinogenesis that reveals three types of committed neuronal precursors in addition to the previously known apical progenitors. The identified precursor types present at distinct developmental stages and exhibit different mitotic location (apical versus nonapical), cleavage plane orientation, and morphology. Interestingly, the emergence of nonapically dividing committed bipolar cell precursors can be linked to an increase in apical crowding caused by the developing photoreceptor cell layer. Furthermore, genetic interference with neuronal subset specification induces ectopic divisions of committed precursors, underlining the finding that progressing morphogenesis can effect precursor division position.

  13. Repressor transcription factor 7-like 1 promotes adipogenic competency in precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Cristancho, Ana G; Schupp, Michael; Lefterova, Martina I; Cao, Shengya; Cohen, Daniel M; Chen, Christopher S; Steger, David J; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2011-09-27

    The identification of factors that define adipocyte precursor potential has important implications for obesity. Preadipocytes are fibroblastoid cells committed to becoming round lipid-laden adipocytes. In vitro, this differentiation process is facilitated by confluency, followed by adipogenic stimuli. During adipogenesis, a large number of cytostructural genes are repressed before adipocyte gene induction. Here we report that the transcriptional repressor transcription factor 7-like 1 (TCF7L1) binds and directly regulates the expression of cell structure genes. Depletion of TCF7L1 inhibits differentiation, because TCF7L1 indirectly induces the adipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in a manner that can be replaced by inhibition of myosin II activity. TCF7L1 is induced by cell contact in adipogenic cell lines, and ectopic expression of TCF7L1 alleviates the confluency requirement for adipocytic differentiation of precursor cells. In contrast, TCF7L1 is not induced during confluency of non-adipogenic fibroblasts, and, remarkably, forced expression of TCF7L1 is sufficient to commit non-adipogenic fibroblasts to an adipogenic fate. These results establish TCF7L1 as a transcriptional hub coordinating cell-cell contact with the transcriptional repression required for adipogenic competency.

  14. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  15. Zinc Deficiency Induces Apoptosis via Mitochondrial p53- and Caspase-Dependent Pathways in Human Neuronal Precursor Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S.; Gower-Winter, Shannon D.; Morgan, Thomas J., Jr.; Bishop, Brian; Levenson, Cathy W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that zinc deficiency leads to apoptosis of neuronal precursor cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition to the role of p53 as a nuclear transcription factor in zinc deficient cultured human neuronal precursors (NT-2), we have now identified the translocation of phosphorylated p53 to the mitochondria and p53-dependent…

  16. Hepatic precursors derived from murine embryonic stem cells contribute to regeneration of injured liver.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeonghoon; Factor, Valentina M; Uren, Tania; Takahama, Yasushi; Lee, Ju-Seog; Major, Marian; Feinstone, Stephen M; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2006-12-01

    We established an efficient system for differentiation, expansion and isolation of hepatic progenitor cells from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and evaluated their capacity to repopulate injured liver. Using mouse ES cells transfected with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene regulated by albumin (ALB) enhancer/promoter, we found that a serum-free chemically defined medium supports formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) and differentiation of hepatic lineage cells in the absence of exogenous growth factors or feeder cell layers. The first GFP+ cells expressing ALB were detected in close proximity to "beating" myocytes after 7 days of EB cultures. GFP+ cells increased in number, acquired hepatocyte-like morphology and hepatocyte-specific markers (i.e., ALB, AAT, TO, and G6P), and by 28 days represented more than 30% of cells isolated from EB outgrowths. The FACS-purified GFP+ cells developed into functional hepatocytes without evidence of cell fusion and participated in the repairing of diseased liver when transplanted into MUP-uPA/SCID mice. The ES cell-derived hepatocytes were responsive to normal growth regulation and proliferated at the same rate as the host hepatocytes after an additional growth stimulus from CCl(4)-induced liver injury. The transplanted GFP+ cells also differentiated into biliary epithelial cells. In conclusion, a highly enriched population of committed hepatocyte precursors can be generated from ES cells in vitro for effective cell replacement therapy.

  17. β-Amyloid precursor protein: function in stem cell development and Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Small, David H; Hu, Yanling; Bolós, Marta; Dawkins, Edgar; Foa, Lisa; Young, Kaylene M

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy may be a suitable approach for the treatment of many neurodegenerative diseases. However, one major impediment to the development of successful cell-based therapies is our limited understanding of the mechanisms that instruct neural stem cell behaviour, such as proliferation and cell fate specification. The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may play an important role in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Our recent work shows that in vitro, APP stimulates neural stem or progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. The effect on proliferation is mediated by an autocrine factor that we have identified as cystatin C. As cystatin C expression is also reported to inhibit the development of amyloid pathology in APP transgenic mice, our finding has implications for the possible use of cystatin C for the therapy of AD.

  18. TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) induced by RANKL negatively regulates osteoclasts survival and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mengrui; Wang, Yiping; Deng, Lianfu; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the principle bone-resorbing cells. Precise control of balanced osteoclast activity is indispensable for bone homeostasis. Osteoclast activation mediated by RANK-TRAF6 axis has been clearly identified. However, a negative regulation-machinery in osteoclast remains unclear. TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) is induced by about 10 folds during osteoclastogenesis, according to a genome-wide analysis of gene expression before and after osteoclast maturation, and confirmed by western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) transduced with lentivirus carrying tank-shRNA were induced to form osteoclast in the presence of RANKL and M-CSF. Tank expression was downregulated by 90% by Tank-shRNA, which is confirmed by western blot. Compared with wild-type (WT) cells, osteoclastogenesis of Tank-silenced BMMs was increased, according to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain on day 5 and day 7. Number of bone resorption pits by Tank-silenced osteoclasts was increased by 176% compared with WT cells, as shown by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) stain and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) analysis. Survival rate of Tank-silenced mature osteoclast is also increased. However, acid production of Tank-knockdown cells was not changed compared with control cells. IκBα phosphorylation is increased in tank-silenced cells, indicating that TANK may negatively regulate NF-κB activity in osteoclast. In conclusion, Tank, whose expression is increased during osteoclastogenesis, inhibits osteoclast formation, activity and survival, by regulating NF-κB activity and c-FLIP expression. Tank enrolls itself in a negative feedback loop in bone resorption. These results may provide means for therapeutic intervention in diseases of excessive bone resorption.

  19. Efficient delivery of human single fiber-derived muscle precursor cells via biocompatible scaffold.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Malerba, Alberto; Vitiello, Libero; Cimetta, Elisa; Piccoli, Martina; Messina, Chiara; Gamba, Pier Giorgio; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The success of cell therapy for skeletal muscle disorders depends upon two main factors: the cell source and the method of delivery. In this work we have explored the therapeutic potential of human muscle precursor cells (hMPCs), obtained from single human muscle fibers, implanted in vivo via micropatterned scaffolds. hMPCs were initially expanded and characterized in vitro by immunostaining and flow cytometric analysis. For in vivo studies, hMPCs were seeded onto micropatterned poly-lactic-glycolic acid 3D-scaffolds fabricated using soft-lithography and thermal membrane lamination. Seeded scaffolds were then implanted in predamaged tibialis anterior muscles of CD1 nude mice; hMPCs were also directly injected in contralateral limbs as controls. Similarly to what we previously described with mouse precursors cells, we found that hMPCs were able to participate in muscle regeneration and scaffold-implanted muscles contained a greater number of human nuclei, as revealed by immunostaining and Western blot analyses. These results indicate that hMPCs derived from single fibers could be a good and reliable cell source for the design of therapeutic protocols and that implantation of cellularized scaffolds is superior to direct injection for the delivery of myogenic cells into regenerating skeletal muscle.

  20. Sphedgehog is expressed by pigment cell precursors during early gastrulation in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Egaña, Ana L; Ernst, Susan G

    2004-10-01

    We have sequenced the Sphedgehog (Sphh) gene from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Sphh transcripts are detected first at the mesenchyme blastula stage, and they accumulate throughout early embryogenesis. The Sphh protein is produced by precursor pigment cells during early and midgastrulation. NiCl2 inhibits pigment cell differentiation in sea urchins. Here, we show that, in S. purpuratus, nickel affects a process(es) between 17 and 24 hr of development, corresponding to the time period when Sphh mRNA is first detected. However, nickel treatment does not alter the early expression of Sphh.

  1. Herba epimedii flavonoids suppress osteoclastic differentiation and bone resorption by inducing G2/M arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Zhang, Jinchao; Fong, Chichun; Yao, Xinsheng; Yang, Mengsu

    2012-12-01

    Accumulating evidences suggest that Herba epimedii has the potential benefits against osteoporosis. However, previous studies were focused on the crude extract, total flavonoids (TF) and icariin (ICA), and the detailed molecular mechanisms of action and structure-activity relationship (SAR) remain unclear. Herein we aimed to systematically investigate the effects of Herba epimedii flavonoids (HEF) on the activity of osteoclasts, and explore the potential SAR. Both ICA and baohuoside-1 (BS) significantly inhibited the proliferation of RAW 264.7 cells (IC(50) 25 μM and 67 μM, respectively). Treatment of ICA resulted in G2/M arrest and apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells as early as 12 h. Besides, HEF remarkably suppressed vitamin D-induced differentiation of osteoclasts in rabbit bone marrow cells and the bone resorption of rabbit mature osteoclasts in vitro. It is notable that the inhibitory effect of 100 μM ICA and BS on osteoclast formation is almost 90%; and the inhibition rate on bone resorption is 50% and 80%, respectively. Besides, RANKL-induced osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 cells and the expression of TRAP, CA II, CTSK and MMP-9 was significantly reduced by the treatment of 25 μM HEF and 17β-estradiol (ES), and the inhibitory strength increases in the order TF < ES < ICA < BS, which was blocked by ICI182780 suggesting that the regulation of osteoclast activity might be ER dependent. Furthermore, the free hydroxyl group at C-7 of BS played an important role in the SAR for anti-osteoclast action. To conclude, HEF could regulate the formation and activity of osteoclasts by inhibiting the proliferation and differentiation, inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and suppressing bone resorption of osteoclasts. Changes in osteoclast activity are probably mediated predominantly by interaction with nuclear estrogen receptors and via mitochondrial pathway. HEF, especially BS, has great potential for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

  2. Lack of effect of a granulocyte proliferation inhibitor or their committed precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lord, B I; Testa, N G; Wright, E G; Banerjee, R K

    1977-05-01

    Using the agar culture technique, we have measured the effect of granulocyte extracts GCE (and of erythrocyte-RCE and lymph node extracts-LNE) on the growth and proliferation of the committed granulocytic precursor cells, CFU-C. In addition we have determined their effects on the proliferation of the developing colony cells and on the ultimate cell production in the colonies. The results show that GCE has no effect on the growth or proliferative activity on the CFU-C. It does, however, reduce both the autoradiographic labelling indices of the developing colony cells and the net colony cellularities, acting as a cell cycle modulator. These are effects specific to the GCE since at the dose levels used, neither RCE nor LNE affected these measurements.

  3. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast differentiation and survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Prasad, Vikram; Hyung, Seok-Won; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Sang-Won; Bhargava, Aditi; Pearce, David; Lee, Youngkyun; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2012-12-24

    The precise regulation of Ca(2+) dynamics is crucial for proper differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Here we show the involvement of plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) isoforms 1 and 4 in osteoclastogenesis. In immature/undifferentiated cells, PMCAs inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Interestingly, nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) directly stimulated PMCA transcription, whereas the PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) efflux prevented NFATc1 activation, forming a negative regulatory loop. PMCA4 also had an anti-osteoclastogenic effect by reducing NO, which facilitates preosteoclast fusion. In addition to their role in immature cells, increased expression of PMCAs in mature osteoclasts prevented osteoclast apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Mice heterozygous for PMCA1 or null for PMCA4 showed an osteopenic phenotype with more osteoclasts on bone surface. Furthermore, PMCA4 expression levels correlated with peak bone mass in premenopausal women. Thus, our results suggest that PMCAs play important roles for the regulation of bone homeostasis in both mice and humans by modulating Ca(2+) signaling in osteoclasts.

  4. Bisphosphonate-functionalized hyaluronic acid showing selective affinity for osteoclasts as a potential treatment for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kootala, Sujit; Ossipov, Dmitri; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander; Hilborn, Jöns

    2015-08-01

    Current treatments for osteoporosis involve the administration of high doses of bisphosphonates (BPs) over a number of years. However, the efficiency of the absorption of these drugs and specificity towards targeted osteoclastic cells is still suboptimal. In this study, we have exploited the natural affinity of high (H) and low (L) molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) towards a cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) receptors on osteoclasts to use it as a biodegradable targeting vehicle. We covalently bonded BP to functionalised HA (HA-BP) and found that HA-BP conjugates were highly specific to osteoclastic cells and reduced mature osteoclast numbers significantly more than free BP. To study the uptake of HA-BP, we fluorescently derivatised the polymer-drug with fluorescein B isothiocyanate (FITC) and found that L-HA-BP could seamlessly enter osteoclastic cells. Alternatively, we tested polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a synthetic polymer delivery vehicle using similar chemistry to link BP and found that osteoclast numbers did not reduce in the same way. These findings could pave the way for biodegradable polymers to be used as vehicles for targeted delivery of anti-osteoporotic drugs.

  5. The planarian nanos-like gene Smednos is expressed in germline and eye precursor cells during development and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Handberg-Thorsager, Mette; Saló, Emili

    2007-05-01

    Planarians are highly regenerative organisms with the ability to remake all their cell types, including the germ cells. The germ cells have been suggested to arise from totipotent neoblasts through epigenetic mechanisms. Nanos is a zinc-finger protein with a widely conserved role in the maintenance of germ cell identity. In this work, we describe the expression of a planarian nanos-like gene Smednos in two kinds of precursor cells namely, primordial germ cells and eye precursor cells, during both development and regeneration of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. In sexual planarians, Smednos is expressed in presumptive male primordial germ cells of embryos from stage 8 of embryogenesis and throughout development of the male gonads and in the female primordial germ cells of the ovary. Thus, upon hatching, juvenile planarians do possess primordial germ cells. In the asexual strain, Smednos is expressed in presumptive male and female primordial germ cells. During regeneration, Smednos expression is maintained in the primordial germ cells, and new clusters of Smednos-positive cells appear in the regenerated tissue. Remarkably, during the final stages of development (stage 8 of embryogenesis) and during regeneration of the planarian eye, Smednos is expressed in cells surrounding the differentiating eye cells, possibly corresponding to eye precursor cells. Our results suggest that similar genetic mechanisms might be used to control the differentiation of precursor cells during development and regeneration in planarians.

  6. Intestinal label-retaining cells are secretory precursors expressing Lgr5.

    PubMed

    Buczacki, Simon J A; Zecchini, Heather Ireland; Nicholson, Anna M; Russell, Roslin; Vermeulen, Louis; Kemp, Richard; Winton, Douglas J

    2013-03-07

    The rapid cell turnover of the intestinal epithelium is achieved from small numbers of stem cells located in the base of glandular crypts. These stem cells have been variously described as rapidly cycling or quiescent. A functional arrangement of stem cells that reconciles both of these behaviours has so far been difficult to obtain. Alternative explanations for quiescent cells have been that they act as a parallel or reserve population that replace rapidly cycling stem cells periodically or after injury; their exact nature remains unknown. Here we show mouse intestinal quiescent cells to be precursors that are committed to mature into differentiated secretory cells of the Paneth and enteroendocrine lineage. However, crucially we find that after intestinal injury they are capable of extensive proliferation and can give rise to clones comprising the main epithelial cell types. Thus, quiescent cells can be recalled to the stem-cell state. These findings establish quiescent cells as an effective clonogenic reserve and provide a motivation for investigating their role in pathologies such as colorectal cancers and intestinal inflammation.

  7. PKCβII-mediated cross-talk of TRPV1/CB2 modulates the glucocorticoid-induced osteoclast overactivity.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Giulia; Torella, Marco; Manzo, Iolanda; Tortora, Chiara; Luongo, Livio; Punzo, Francesca; Colacurci, Nicola; Nobili, Bruno; Maione, Sabatino; Rossi, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the endovanilloid/endocannabinoid system in the glucocorticoid-induced osteoclast overactivity. Receptorial and enzymatic component of the endovanilloid/endocannabinoid system are expressed in bone cells, and dysregulated when bone mass is reduced. Moreover, blockade or desensitization of vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and/or stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) are beneficial for reducing number and activity of the bone cells modulating resorption, the osteoclasts. We have treated in vitro healthy woman derived osteoclasts with methylprednisolone in presence or not of CB2 or TRPV1 agonists/antagonists, analysing the effect on osteoclast function and morphology through a multidisciplinary approach. Moreover, a treatment with a protein kinase C inhibitor to evaluate osteoclast activity and endovanilloid/endocannabinoid component expression levels was performed in osteoclasts derived from healthy subjects in presence of not of methylprednisolone. Our results show, for the first time, that the endovanilloid/endocannabinoid system is dysregulated by the treatment with methylprednisolone, that the osteoclast activity is increased and that pharmacological compounds stimulating CB2 or inhibiting TRPV1 might reduce, possible inhibiting protein kinase C beta II, the methylprednisolone-induced osteoclast over-activation, suggesting their therapeutic use for protecting from the glucocorticoid-induced bone mass loss.

  8. Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    stereotaxic microinjection protocol that will allow us to induce HO lesions in the calf midbelly in a highly reproducible manner. The stereotaxic... protocol for the collection and storage of human HO specimens. During the next year we will begin collecting human HO samples. HO samples will be fixed...treated with AP20187 or 0.1% EtOH for 5 days. Cells were then fixed and stained for TRAP. Validation of osteoclast differentiation protocol for

  9. Engineered Osteoclasts for the Treatment and Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    stereotaxic microinjection protocol that will allow us to induce HO lesions in the calf midbelly in a highly reproducible manner. The stereotaxic...traumatic bone injuries. Subtask 1: Collection of human HO samples (PI: Sangeorzan, Harborview) We have currently established a protocol for...with AP20187 or 0.1% EtOH for 5 days. Cells were then fixed and stained for TRAP. Validation of osteoclast differentiation protocol for human iPS

  10. Beta-glycerophosphate accelerates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Noh, A Long Sae Mi; Yim, Mijung

    2011-03-01

    Despite numerous reports of the synergistic effects of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid in inducing the differentiation of osteoblasts, little is known about their roles in osteoclastic differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of beta-glycerophosphate on osteoclastogenesis in the presence of ascorbic acid using primary mouse bone marrow cultures treated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Beta-Glycerophosphate dose-dependently increased RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in the presence of ascorbic acid. This stimulatory effect was apparent when beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid were only added during the late stages of the culture period, indicating that they influence later events in osteoclastic differentiation. While the combination of beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid inhibited RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK and p38, and degradation of IkappaB, it increased the induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. In addition, beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid together enhanced the induction of COX-2 following RANKL stimulation. Taken together, our data suggest that beta-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid have synergistic effects on osteoclast formation, increasing RANKL-mediated induction of c-Fos, NFATc1 and COX-2 in osteoclast precursors.

  11. Malignant Precursor Cells Pre-Exist in Human Breast DCIS and Require Autophagy for Survival

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Virginia; Mariani, Brian D.; Gallagher, Rosa I.; Tran, Khoa; Banks, Stacey; Wiedemann, Joy; Huryk, Heather; Mueller, Claudius; Adamo, Luana; Deng, Jianghong; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Pastore, Lucia; Zaman, Syed; Menezes, Geetha; Mize, James; Johal, Jasbir; Edmiston, Kirsten; Liotta, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Background While it is accepted that a majority of invasive breast cancer progresses from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) precursor stage, very little is known about the factors that promote survival of DCIS neoplastic cells within the hypoxic, nutrient deprived intraductal microenvironment. Methodology and Principal Findings We examined the hypothesis that fresh human DCIS lesions contain pre-existing carcinoma precursor cells. We characterized these cells by full genome molecular cytogenetics (Illumina HumanCytoSNP profile), and signal pathway profiling (Reverse Phase Protein Microarray, 59 endpoints), and demonstrated that autophagy is required for survival and anchorage independent growth of the cytogenetically abnormal tumorigenic DCIS cells. Ex vivo organoid culture of fresh human DCIS lesions, without enzymatic treatment or sorting, induced the emergence of neoplastic epithelial cells exhibiting the following characteristics: a) spontaneous generation of hundreds of spheroids and duct-like 3-D structures in culture within 2–4 weeks; b) tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice; c) cytogenetically abnormal (copy number loss or gain in chromosomes including 1, 5, 6, 8, 13, 17) compared to the normal karyotype of the non-neoplastic cells in the source patient's breast tissue; d) in vitro migration and invasion of autologous breast stroma; and e) up-regulation of signal pathways linked to, and components of, cellular autophagy. Multiple autophagy markers were present in the patient's original DCIS lesion and the mouse xenograft. We tested whether autophagy was necessary for survival of cytogenetically abnormal DCIS cells. The lysosomotropic inhibitor (chloroquine phosphate) of autophagy completely suppressed the generation of DCIS spheroids/3-D structures, suppressed ex vivo invasion of autologous stroma, induced apoptosis, suppressed autophagy associated proteins including Atg5, AKT/PI3 Kinase and mTOR, eliminated cytogenetically abnormal spheroid forming cells from

  12. Apolipoprotein E inhibits osteoclast differentiation via regulation of c-Fos, NFATc1 and NF-κB

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo-Shin; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Zang Hee; Lee, Youngkyun; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2013-02-15

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays a major role in the transport and metabolism of lipid. Other functions of ApoE include modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The expression of ApoE in osteoblasts and its relevance with bone formation have also been reported. However, the effect of ApoE on osteoclasts has not yet been examined. Here, we investigated the role of ApoE in osteoclast differentiation using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) and RAW264.7 cells. We found a down-regulation of ApoE gene expression during osteoclastic differentiation of those cells. Overexpression of ApoE in BMMs and RAW264.7 cells significantly blocked the induction of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1), transcription factors critical for expression of osteoclast marker genes, by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL), the osteoclast differentiation factor. ApoE inhibited osteoclast differentiation, as measured by decreased number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNCs). In addition, ApoE reduced the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) and ATPase, H{sup +} transporting, lysosomal 38 kDa, V0 subunit d2 (ATP6v0d2), genes involved in cell–cell fusion during osteoclastogenesis. Knock-down of ApoE using a specific siRNA promoted the RANKL-mediated induction of osteoclast differentiation. While ApoE did not affect the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways by RANKL, the phosphorylation of p65 trans-activation domain on serine 536 and transcription activity of NF-κB were reduced by ApoE overexpression. These findings suggest that ApoE plays an inhibitory role in osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of RANKL-dependent activation of NF-κB and induction of c-Fos and NFATc1. - Highlights: ► Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) significantly inhibited osteoclast differentiation and activation of NF-κB. ► ApoE decreased the induction of osteoclast marker

  13. Lipodepsipeptide empedopeptin inhibits cell wall biosynthesis through Ca2+-dependent complex formation with peptidoglycan precursors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anna; Münch, Daniela; Schmidt, Yvonne; Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schiffer, Guido; Bendas, Gerd; Gross, Harald; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2012-06-08

    Empedopeptin is a natural lipodepsipeptide antibiotic with potent antibacterial activity against multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro and in animal models of bacterial infection. Here, we describe its so far elusive mechanism of antibacterial action. Empedopeptin selectively interferes with late stages of cell wall biosynthesis in intact bacterial cells as demonstrated by inhibition of N-acetylglucosamine incorporation into polymeric cell wall and the accumulation of the ultimate soluble peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid-pentapeptide in the cytoplasm. Using membrane preparations and the complete cascade of purified, recombinant late stage peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzymes and their respective purified substrates, we show that empedopeptin forms complexes with undecaprenyl pyrophosphate containing peptidoglycan precursors. The primary physiological target of empedopeptin is undecaprenyl pyrophosphate-N-acetylmuramic acid(pentapeptide)-N-acetylglucosamine (lipid II), which is readily accessible at the outside of the cell and which forms a complex with the antibiotic in a 1:2 molar stoichiometry. Lipid II is bound in a region that involves at least the pyrophosphate group, the first sugar, and the proximal parts of stem peptide and undecaprenyl chain. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate and also teichoic acid precursors are bound with lower affinity and constitute additional targets. Calcium ions are crucial for the antibacterial activity of empedopeptin as they promote stronger interaction with its targets and with negatively charged phospholipids in the membrane. Based on the high structural similarity of empedopeptin to the tripropeptins and plusbacins, we propose this mechanism of action for the whole compound class.

  14. The lantibiotic NAI-107 binds to bactoprenol-bound cell wall precursors and impairs membrane functions.

    PubMed

    Münch, Daniela; Müller, Anna; Schneider, Tanja; Kohl, Bastian; Wenzel, Michaela; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Maffioli, Sonia; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano; Wimmer, Reinhard; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2014-04-25

    The lantibiotic NAI-107 is active against Gram-positive bacteria including vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. To identify the molecular basis of its potency, we studied the mode of action in a series of whole cell and in vitro assays and analyzed structural features by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The lantibiotic efficiently interfered with late stages of cell wall biosynthesis and induced accumulation of the soluble peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid-pentapeptide (UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide) in the cytoplasm. Using membrane preparations and a complete cascade of purified, recombinant late stage peptidoglycan biosynthetic enzymes (MraY, MurG, FemX, PBP2) and their respective purified substrates, we showed that NAI-107 forms complexes with bactoprenol-pyrophosphate-coupled precursors of the bacterial cell wall. Titration experiments indicate that first a 1:1 stoichiometric complex occurs, which then transforms into a 2:1 (peptide: lipid II) complex, when excess peptide is added. Furthermore, lipid II and related molecules obviously could not serve as anchor molecules for the formation of defined and stable nisin-like pores, however, slow membrane depolarization was observed after NAI-107 treatment, which could contribute to killing of the bacterial cell.

  15. Characterization of the Murine Myeloid Precursor Cell Line MuMac-E8

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Stephan; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies. PMID:25546418

  16. Precursor for wind reversal in a square Rayleigh-Bénard cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podvin, Bérengère; Sergent, Anne

    2017-01-01

    We investigate large-scale circulation reversals in a two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard cell using a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD)-based, five-mode model. The Rayleigh number considered is Ra=5 ×107 and the Prandtl number is Pr=4.3 . A precursor event, corresponding to the action of a mode L* which disconnects the core region from the boundary layers before the onset of the reversal, is identified in the simulation. The five-mode model predicts correctly the behavior of the POD modes observed in the simulation, and in particular that of mode L*. The presence of mode L*, which was not included in an earlier, lower-dimensional version of the model [Podvin and Sergent, J. Fluid Mech. 766, 172 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.15], is found to be instrumental for the reversal dynamics of the model, which suggests that it may also be important for those of the simulation. Reversals can therefore be characterized by three time scales: the transition duration, the interreversal time, and the precursor duration, which separates the precursor event from the onset of the reversal. The distribution of the time scales is found to agree well with the simulation when small-scale intermittency is taken into account through the introduction of noise in the model coefficients.

  17. Decursin from Angelica gigas suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zheng, Ting; Kang, Ju-Hee; Li, Hua; Cho, Hyewon; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Yim, Mijung

    2016-03-05

    Osteoclasts are the only cells capable of breaking down bone matrix, and excessive activation of osteoclasts is responsible for bone-destructive diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of decursin from extract of Angelica gigas root on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation using mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Decursin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation without cytotoxicity. In particular, decursin maintains the characteristics of macrophages by blocking osteoclast differentiation by RANKL. Furthermore, the RANKL-stimulated bone resorption was diminished by decursin. Mechanistically, decursin blocked the RANKL-triggered ERK mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) phosphorylation, which results in suppression of c-Fos and the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) expression. In accordance with the in vitro study, decursin reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss in vivo. Therefore, decursin exerted an inhibitory effect on osteoclast formation and bone loss in vitro and in vivo. Decursin could be useful for the treatment of bone diseases associated with excessive bone resorption.

  18. Functional analysis of the defective T cell regulation of the antigen-specific PFC response in SLE patients: differentiation of suppressor precursor cells to suppressor effector cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, C J; Pot, K H; Kater, L; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Uytdehaag, F; Ballieux, R E

    1982-01-01

    The investigation described here is concerned with the T cell regulation of the antigen-specific antibody response which has been studied in patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Apart from the fact that T helper cell activity was found to be less efficient, it appeared that the peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) of patients in an active stage of the disease did not contain the suppressor precursor cells, which functions as the target cell for the inductive signal of T mu+ suppressor inducer cells. The absence of the suppressor precursor cells in SLE patients coincided with the absence of T gamma+ suppressor effector cells. Characterization of the (post-thymic) precursor cells (derived from normal donors) with the aid of monoclonal antibodies of the OKT series and several other markers pointed out that this population contains OKT4+ as well as OKT8+ cells. Further experiments demonstrated that the cells are capable of rosetting with autologous erythrocytes, and do not bear Fc receptors for IgM or IgG. Considering the various findings as a whole the conclusion is warranted that the post-thymic suppressor precursor T cell can differentiate into a suppressor effector cell only after interaction with T suppressor inducer cells. PMID:6210474

  19. Multiple hemopoietic lineages are found after stimulation of mouse bone marrow precursor cells with interleukin 3.

    PubMed Central

    Prystowsky, M. B.; Otten, G.; Naujokas, M. F.; Vardiman, J.; Ihle, J. N.; Goldwasser, E.; Fitch, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    When the murine T-lymphocyte clone L2 is stimulated with concanavalin A, it secretes at least two distinct factors that affect hemopoietic precursor cells, interleukin 3 (IL3) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). IL3 accounts for approximately 10% of the colony-stimulating activity in L2-cell-conditioned medium. The IL3 secreted by L2 cells is similar antigenically to the IL3 secreted by WEHI-3 cells. Like the IL3 from WEHI-3 cells, IL3 secreted by L2 cells does not bind to DEAE Sephacel and can be separated from the L2-cell GM-CSF, which does bind to DEAE. By assessment of the functional, morphologic, surface phenotypic, and cytochemical characteristics of bone marrow cells 6 days after stimulation with IL3 in liquid culture, four hemopoietic lineages were found, including macrophage, neutrophilic granulocyte, megakaryocyte, and basophil/mast cell. In addition, when bone marrow cells were stimulated with IL3 in semisolid medium, several types of colonies were found, including mixed colonies containing macrophage, megakaryocyte, and granulocyte lineages. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 1 PMID:6437231

  20. Pancortins interact with amyloid precursor protein and modulate cortical cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Heather C.; Townsend, Matthew; Bai, Jilin; Suth, Seiyam; Cavanaugh, William; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal precursor cell migration in the developing mammalian brain is a complex process requiring the coordinated interaction of numerous proteins. We have recently shown that amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a role in migration into the cortical plate through its interaction with two cytosolic signaling proteins, disabled 1 (DAB1) and disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). In order to identify extracellular factors that may signal through APP to regulate migration, we performed an unbiased mass spectrometry-based screen for factors that bind to the extracellular domain of APP in the rodent brain. Through this screen, we identified an interaction between APP and pancortins, proteins expressed throughout the developing and mature cerebral cortex. Via co-immunoprecipitation, we show that APP interacts with all four of the mammalian pancortin isoforms (AMY, AMZ, BMY, BMZ). We demonstrate that the BMZ and BMY isoforms of pancortin can specifically reduce β-secretase- but not α-secretase-mediated cleavage of endogenous APP in cell culture, suggesting a biochemical consequence of the association between pancortins and APP. Using in utero electroporation to overexpress and knock down specific pancortin isoforms, we reveal a novel role for pancortins in migration into the cortical plate. Interestingly, we observe opposing roles for alternate pancortin isoforms, with AMY overexpression and BMZ knock down both preventing proper migration of neuronal precursor cells. Finally, we show that BMZ can partially rescue a loss of APP expression and that APP can rescue effects of AMY overexpression, suggesting that pancortins act in conjunction with APP to regulate entry into the cortical plate. Taken together, these results suggest a biochemical and functional interaction between APP and pancortins, and reveal a previously unidentified role for pancortins in mammalian cortical development. PMID:22992957

  1. Melatonin and its precursors in Y79 human retinoblastoma cells: Effect of sodium butyrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Mei Hua; Coviella, Ignacio Lopez G.; Lynch, Harry J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    The release of melatonin and the production of its precursors, S-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, in cultured Y79 human retinoblastoma cells were studied. This biosynthetic capability was found to be dependent on cell differentiation, which was initiated by culturing Y79 cells for 7 days in dishes coated with poly-D-lysine to promote cell adhesion to the surface of the culture dishes. Differentiation was further induced by exposing the cell monolayer to sodium butyrate (3 mM) for 3 days. This protocol dramatically increased the release of melatonin, and the syntheses of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin in response to forskolin stimulation. Exposure to dopamine (10 micro-M) or L-DOPA (100 micro-M) markedly diminished the forskolin-stimulated release of melatonin, as well as the production of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin. These observations indicate that Y79 cells represent a primitive cell line which, following appropriate differentiation (e.g. treatment with sodium butyrate) can display biochemical characteristics similar to those of the human retina. Moreover, serotonin synthesis and melatonin release appear to be coupled in Y79 cells. The inhibition of melatonin release by dopamine supports the hypothesis that in these cells, melatonin and dopamine are components of a retinal feedback loop.

  2. Osteoblast precursor cell attachment on heat-treated calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Bumgardner, J D; Cavin, R; Carnes, D L; Ong, J L

    2003-06-01

    The influence of properties of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings on bone cell activity and bone-implant osseointegration is not well-established. This study investigated the effects of characterized CaP coatings of various heat treatments on osteoblast response. It was hypothesized that heat treatments of CaP coatings alter the initial osteoblast attachment. The 400 degrees C heat-treated coatings were observed to exhibit poor crystallinity and significantly greater phosphate or apatite species compared with as-sputtered and 600 degrees C heat-treated coatings. Similarly, human embryonic palatal mesenchyme (HEPM) cells, an osteoblast precursor cell line, seeded on 400 degrees C heat-treated coatings, exhibited significantly greater cell attachment compared with Ti surfaces, as-sputtered coatings, and 600 degrees C heat-treated coatings. The HEPM cells on Ti surfaces and heat-treated coatings were observed to attach through filopodia, and underwent cell division, whereas the cells on as-sputtered coatings displayed fewer filopodia extensions and cell damage. Analysis of the data suggested that heat treatment of CaP coatings affects cell attachment.

  3. The role of donor age and gender in the success of human muscle precursor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Meline N L; Hefermehl, Lukas J; Tremp, Mathias; Azzabi, Fahd; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Autologous cell transplantation for the treatment of muscle damage is envisioned to involve the application of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) isolated from adult skeletal muscle. At the onset of trauma, these cells are recruited to proliferate and rebuild injured muscle fibres. However, a variety of donor-specific cues may directly influence the yield and quality of cells isolated from a muscle biopsy. In this study, we isolated human MPCs and assessed the role of donor gender and age on the ability of these MPCs to form functional bioengineered muscle. We analysed the cell yield, growth and molecular expression in vitro, and the muscle tissue formation and contractility of the bioengineered muscle, from cells isolated from men and women in three different age groups: young (20-39 years), adult (40-59 years) and elderly (60-80 years). Our results suggest that human MPCs can be successfully isolated and grown from patients of all ages and both genders. However, young female donors provide fast-growing cells in vitro with an optimum contractile output in vivo and are therefore an ideal cell source for muscle reconstruction. Taken together, these findings describe the donor-related limitations of MPC transplantation and provide insights for a straightforward and unbiased clinical application of these cells for muscle reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Stochastic specification of primordial germ cells from mesoderm precursors in axolotl embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chatfield, Jodie; O'Reilly, Marie-Anne; Bachvarova, Rosemary F.; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Redwood, Catherine; Walmsley, Maggie; Patient, Roger; Loose, Mathew; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    A common feature of development in most vertebrate models is the early segregation of the germ line from the soma. For example, in Xenopus and zebrafish embryos primordial germ cells (PGCs) are specified by germ plasm that is inherited from the egg; in mice, Blimp1 expression in the epiblast mediates the commitment of cells to the germ line. How these disparate mechanisms of PGC specification evolved is unknown. Here, in order to identify the ancestral mechanism of PGC specification in vertebrates, we studied PGC specification in embryos from the axolotl (Mexican salamander), a model for the tetrapod ancestor. In the axolotl, PGCs develop within mesoderm, and classic studies have reported their induction from primitive ectoderm (animal cap). We used an axolotl animal cap system to demonstrate that signalling through FGF and BMP4 induces PGCs. The role of FGF was then confirmed in vivo. We also showed PGC induction by Brachyury, in the presence of BMP4. These conditions induced pluripotent mesodermal precursors that give rise to a variety of somatic cell types, in addition to PGCs. Irreversible restriction of the germ line did not occur until the mid-tailbud stage, days after the somatic germ layers are established. Before this, germline potential was maintained by MAP kinase signalling. We propose that this stochastic mechanism of PGC specification, from mesodermal precursors, is conserved in vertebrates. PMID:24917499

  5. Effect of heat-treated titanium surfaces on protein adsorption and osteoblast precursor cell initial attachment.

    PubMed

    Kern, Travis; Yang, Yunzhi; Glover, Renee; Ong, Joo L

    2005-03-01

    The clinical success of dental implants is governed in part by surface properties of implants and their interactions with the surrounding tissues. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of heat-treated titanium surfaces on protein adsorption and osteoblast precursor cell attachment in vitro. Passivated titanium samples used in this study were either non heat treated or heat treated at 750 degrees C for 90 minutes. It was observed that the contact angle on heat-treated titanium surfaces was statistically lower compared with the non-heat-treated titanium surfaces. The non-heat-treated titanium surface was also observed to be amorphous oxide, whereas heat treatment of titanium resulted in the conversion of amorphous oxide to crystalline anatase oxide. No significant difference in albumin and fibronectin adsorption was observed between the heat-treated and non-heat-treated titanium surfaces. In addition, no significant difference in initial cell attachment was observed between the two groups. It was concluded that heat treatment of titanium resulted in significantly more hydrophilic surfaces compared to non-heat-treated titanium surfaces. However, differences in oxide crystallinity and wettability were not observed to affect protein adsorption and initial osteoblast precursor cell attachment.

  6. Laser ablation of persistent twist cells in Drosophila: muscle precursor fate is not segmentally restricted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, E. R.; Keshishian, H.

    1999-01-01

    In Drosophila the precursors of the adult musculature arise during embryogenesis. These precursor cells have been termed Persistent Twist Cells (PTCs), as they continue to express the transcription factor Twist after that gene ceases expression elsewhere in the mesoderm. In the larval abdomen, the PTCs are associated with peripheral nerves in stereotypic ventral, dorsal, and lateral clusters, which give rise, respectively, to the ventral, dorsal, and lateral muscle fiber groups of the adult. We tested the developmental potential of the PTCs by using a microbeam laser to ablate specific clusters in larvae. We found that the ablation of a single segmental PTC cluster does not usually result in the deletion of the corresponding adult fibers of that segment. Instead, normal or near normal numbers of adult fibers can form after the ablation. Examination of pupae following ablation showed that migrating PTCs from adjacent segments are able to invade the affected segment, replenishing the ablated cells. However, the ablation of homologous PTCs in multiple segments does result in the deletion of the corresponding adult muscle fibers. These data indicate that the PTCs in an abdominal segment can contribute to the formation of muscle fibers in adjacent abdominal segments, and thus are not inherently restricted to the formation of muscle fibers within their segment of origin.

  7. BRAF activates PAX3 to control muscle precursor cell migration during forelimb muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeyoung; Watanabe, Shuichi; Hoelper, Soraya; Krüger, Marcus; Kostin, Sawa; Pöling, Jochen; Kubin, Thomas; Braun, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells is a key step during limb muscle development and depends on the activity of PAX3 and MET. Here, we demonstrate that BRAF serves a crucial function in formation of limb skeletal muscles during mouse embryogenesis downstream of MET and acts as a potent inducer of myoblast cell migration. We found that a fraction of BRAF accumulates in the nucleus after activation and endosomal transport to a perinuclear position. Mass spectrometry based screening for potential interaction partners revealed that BRAF interacts and phosphorylates PAX3. Mutation of BRAF dependent phosphorylation sites in PAX3 impaired the ability of PAX3 to promote migration of C2C12 myoblasts indicating that BRAF directly activates PAX3. Since PAX3 stimulates transcription of the Met gene we propose that MET signaling via BRAF fuels a positive feedback loop, which maintains high levels of PAX3 and MET activity required for limb muscle precursor cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18351.001 PMID:27906130

  8. Esophageal cancer-related gene 4 is a secreted inducer of cell senescence expressed by aged CNS precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kujuro, Yuki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kondo, Toru

    2010-05-04

    Mammalian aging is thought to be partially caused by the diminished capacity of stem/precursor cells to undergo self-renewing divisions. Although many cell-cycle regulators are involved in this process, it is unknown to what extent cell senescence, first identified as irreversible growth arrest in vitro, contributes to the aging process. Here, using a serum-induced mouse oligodendrocyte precursor cell (mOPC) senescence model, we identified esophageal cancer-related gene 4 (Ecrg4) as a senescence inducer with implications for the senescence-like state of postmitotic cells in the aging brain. Although mOPCs could proliferate indefinitely when cultured using the appropriate medium (OPC medium), they became senescent in the presence of serum and maintained their senescent phenotype even when the serum was subsequently replaced by OPC medium. We show that Ecrg4 was up-regulated in the senescent OPCs, its overexpression in OPCs induced senescence by accelerating the proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclins D1 and D3, and that its knockdown by a specific short hairpin RNA prevented these phenotypes. We also show that senescent OPCs secreted Ecrg4 and that recombinant Ecrg4 induced OPC senescence in culture. Moreover, increased Ecrg4 expression was observed in the OPCs and neural precursor cells in the aged mouse brain; this was accompanied by the expression of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, indicating the cells' entrance into senescence. These results suggest that Ecrg4 is a factor linking neural-cell senescence and aging.

  9. ETOH inhibits embryonic neural stem/precursor cell proliferation via PLD signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yuko; Hiroyama, Masami; Sanbe, Atsushi Yamauchi, Junji; Murase, Shoko; Tanoue, Akito

    2008-05-23

    While a mother's excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy is known to have adverse effects on fetal neural development, little is known about the underlying mechanism of these effects. In order to investigate these mechanisms, we investigated the toxic effect of ethanol (ETOH) on neural stem/precursor cell (NSC) proliferation. In cultures of NSCs, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated following stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). Exposure of NSCs to ETOH suppresses cell proliferation, while it has no effect on cell death. Phosphatidic acid (PA), which is a signaling messenger produced by PLD, reverses ETOH inhibition of NSC proliferation. Blocking the PLD signal by 1-butanol suppresses the proliferation. ETOH-induced suppression of NSC proliferation and the protective effect of PA for ETOH-induced suppression are mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. These results indicate that exposure to ETOH impairs NSC proliferation by altering the PLD signaling pathway.

  10. ETOH inhibits embryonic neural stem/precursor cell proliferation via PLD signaling.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuko; Hiroyama, Masami; Sanbe, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Junji; Murase, Shoko; Tanoue, Akito

    2008-05-23

    While a mother's excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy is known to have adverse effects on fetal neural development, little is known about the underlying mechanism of these effects. In order to investigate these mechanisms, we investigated the toxic effect of ethanol (ETOH) on neural stem/precursor cell (NSC) proliferation. In cultures of NSCs, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated following stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). Exposure of NSCs to ETOH suppresses cell proliferation, while it has no effect on cell death. Phosphatidic acid (PA), which is a signaling messenger produced by PLD, reverses ETOH inhibition of NSC proliferation. Blocking the PLD signal by 1-butanol suppresses the proliferation. ETOH-induced suppression of NSC proliferation and the protective effect of PA for ETOH-induced suppression are mediated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling. These results indicate that exposure to ETOH impairs NSC proliferation by altering the PLD signaling pathway.

  11. Gene Signature of High White Blood Cell Count in B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Holly; Rubenstein, Mara; Dombkowski, Alan A; Caldwell, J Timothy; Chu, Roland; Xavier, Ana C; Thummel, Ryan; Neely, Melody; Matherly, Larry H; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to identify genetic factors associated with the presenting white blood cell (WBC) count in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BP-ALL). Using ETV6-RUNX1-positive BP-ALL patient samples, a homogeneous subtype, we identified 16 differentially expressed genes based on the presenting WBC count (< 50,000/cumm vs > 50,000). We further confirmed that IL1R1, BCAR3, KCNH2, PIR, and ZDHHC23 were differentially expressed in a larger cohort of ETV6-RUNX1-negative BP-ALL patient samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated that expression levels of these genes could accurately categorize high and low WBC count subjects using two independent patient sets, representing positive and negative ETV6-RUNX1 cases. Further studies in leukemia cell line models will better delineate the role of these genes in regulating the white blood cell count and potentially identify new therapeutic targets.

  12. Archenteron precursor cells can organize secondary axial structures in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Benink, H; Wray, G; Hardin, J

    1997-09-01

    Local cell-cell signals play a crucial role in establishing major tissue territories in early embryos. The sea urchin embryo is a useful model system for studying these interactions in deuterostomes. Previous studies showed that ectopically implanted micromeres from the 16-cell embryo can induce ectopic guts and additional skeletal elements in sea urchin embryos. Using a chimeric embryo approach, we show that implanted archenteron precursors differentiate autonomously to produce a correctly proportioned and patterned gut. In addition, the ectopically implanted presumptive archenteron tissue induces ectopic skeletal patterning sites within the ectoderm. The ectopic skeletal elements are bilaterally symmetric, and flank the ectopic archenteron, in some cases resulting in mirror-image, symmetric skeletal elements. Since the induced patterned ectoderm and supernumerary skeletal elements are derived from the host, the ectopic presumptive archenteron tissue can act to 'organize' ectopic axial structures in the sea urchin embryo.

  13. Roles of neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 in tumor-associated cellular processes (Review).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sisen; Wu, Lihua

    2015-11-01

    Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9), a gene exclusively expressed in the brain during embryonic stages but not in brains of adult mice, is an important cytoskeletal protein and regarded as a 'router/hub' in cellular signal transduction processes connecting external stimulation signals with downstream target proteins that can directly promote tumor metastasis. Numerous studies showed that NEDD9 has an essential role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, migration and invasion. The roles of NEDD9, including the underlying mechanisms of its regulation of cell migration, its distinctive functions in various tumor stages and its association with other diseases, are required to be elucidated at large. Future studies of NEDD9 may provide a more profound understanding of the development of tumor invasiveness and NEDD9 may serve as a potential novel target for tumor therapy. The present review examined the significant roles of NEDD9 in the abovementioned processes.

  14. Expression of CD86 on human marrow CD34(+) cells identifies immunocompetent committed precursors of macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ryncarz, R E; Anasetti, C

    1998-05-15

    Macrophages and dendritic cells derive from a hematopoietic stem cell and the existence of a common committed progenitor has been hypothesized. We have recently found in normal human marrow a subset of CD34(+) cells that constitutively expresses HLA-DR and low levels of CD86, a natural ligand for the T cell costimulation receptor CD28. This CD34(+) subset can elicit responses from allogeneic T cells. In this study, we show that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells can also present tetanus toxoid antigen to memory CD4(+) T cells. CD86 is expressed at low levels in macrophages and high levels in dendritic cells. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are the common precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. CD34(+)/CD86(+) marrow cells cultured in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-generated macrophages. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF generated a predominant population of granulocytes. CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generated almost exclusively CD1a+/CD83(+) dendritic cells. In contrast, CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells cultured in GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha generated a variety of cell types, including a small population of dendritic cells. In addition, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells cultured in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor failed to generate CD15(+) granulocytes. Therefore, CD34(+)/CD86(+) cells are committed precursors of both macrophages and dendritic cells. The ontogeny of dendritic cells was recapitulated by stimulation of CD34(+)/CD86(-) cells with TNF-alpha that induced expression of CD86. Subsequent costimulation of CD86(+) cells with GM-CSF plus TNF-alpha lead to expression of CD83 and produced terminal dendritic cell differentiation. Thus, expression of CD86 on hematopoietic progenitor cells is regulated by TNF-alpha and denotes differentiation towards the macrophage or dendritic cell lineages.

  15. Learning-induced synaptic potentiation in implanted neural precursor cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungjoon; Heo, Hwon; Han, Ma Eum; Choi, Kyuhyun; Yi, Jee Hyun; Kang, Shin Jung; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Shin, Ki Soon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury and stroke results in cognitive dysfunctioning. Implantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) can improve the brain function by replacing lost neurons. Proper synaptic integration following neuronal differentiation of implanted cells is believed to be a prerequisite for the functional recovery. In the present study, we characterized the functional properties of immortalized neural progenitor HiB5 cells implanted into the rat hippocampus with chemically induced lesion. The implanted HiB5 cells migrated toward CA1 pyramidal layer and differentiated into vGluT1-positive glutamatergic neurons with morphological and electrophysiological properties of endogenous CA1 pyramidal cells. Functional synaptic integration of HiB5 cell-derived neurons was also evidenced by immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data. Lesion-caused memory deficit was significantly recovered after the implantation when assessed by inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning. Remarkably, IA learning preferentially produced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the synapses onto HiB5 cell-derived neurons, which occluded paring protocol-induced LTP ex vivo. We conclude that the implanted HiB5 cell-derived neurons actively participate in learning process through LTP formation, thereby counteracting lesion-mediated memory impairment. PMID:26634434

  16. A role of Sema6A expressed in oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsumasa; Tomooka, Yasuhiro

    2013-02-28

    Our previous study has confirmed that the distribution of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is disturbed in the embryonic cerebral cortex of Plexin-A4 knockout mice, and that Sema6A is expressed in OPCs in the region. The present study examined whether Sema6A expressed in OPCs is involved in their own migration, and used a clonal FBD-102b line as OPCs model. In an in vitro migration assay, Sema6A knockdown repressed the migration of FBD-102b cells. Additionally, in co-culture, 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Plexin-A4 were segregated from 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Sema6A. When FBD-102b cells were seeded in a spot and exposed to a gradient of both Sema3A and Sema6A, dispersion of FBD-102b cells was suppressed, and Plexin-A4 knockdown in FBD-102b cells attenuated the suppressive effect of the Semaphorins. These results indicate that Sema6A expressed in OPCs is involved in their autonomous migration through ligand-receptor interaction with Plexin-A4 expressed in surrounding cells.

  17. Curcumol suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast formation by attenuating the JNK signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Mingxiang; Chen, Xianying; Lv, Chaoyang; Yi, Xilu; Zhang, Yao; Xue, Mengjuan; He, Shunmei; Zhu, Guoying; Wang, Hongfu

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Curcumol suppresses osteoclasts differentiation in vitro. • Curcumol impairs JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway. • Curcumol may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases. - Abstract: Osteoclasts, derived from hemopoietic progenitors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, have a unique role in bone resorption, and are considered a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of such pathologic bone diseases as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. In the present study, we demonstrate that curcumol, one of the major components of the essential oil of Rhizoma Curcumae, exhibits an inhibitory effect on receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation with both bone marrow-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, RANKL-induced mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, and cathepsin K, is prominently reduced in the presence of curcumol. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of action was investigated, and curcumol inhibited osteoclastogenesis by specifically impairing RANKL-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling, which was further identified in rescue studies by means of anisomycin, a JNK signaling-specific activator. Taken together, these findings suggest that curcumol suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation through the JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic treatment for bone resorption-associated diseases.

  18. Berberine Sulfate Attenuates Osteoclast Differentiation through RANKL Induced NF-κB and NFAT Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Song, Fangming; Liu, Qian; Yang, Mingli; Zhao, Jinmin; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Ge; Quinn, Julian M W; Tickner, Jennifer; Xu, Jiake

    2015-11-13

    Osteoporosis, a metabolic bone disease, is characterized by an excessive formation and activation of osteoclasts. Anti-catabolic treatment using natural compounds has been proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy against the osteoclast related osteolytic diseases. In this study, the activity of berberine sulfate (an orally available form of berberine) on osteoclast differentiation and its underlying molecular mechanisms of action were investigated. Using bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) derived osteoclast culture system, we showed that berberine sulfate at the dose of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μM significantly inhibited the formation of osteoclasts. Notably, berberine sulfate at these doses did not affect the BMM viability. In addition, we observed that berberine sulfate inhibited the expression of osteoclast marker genes, including cathepsin K (Ctsk), nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP, Acp5) and Vacuolar-type H+-ATPase V0 subunit D2 (V-ATPase d2). Luciferase reporter gene assay and Western blot analysis further revealed that berberine sulfate inhibits receptor for activation of nuclear factor ligand (RANKL)-induced NF-κB and NFAT activity. Taken together, our results suggest that berberine sulfate is a natural compound potentially useful for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  19. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  20. CNS Schwann cells display oligodendrocyte precursor-like potassium channel activation and antigenic expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Kristel; Imbschweiler, Ilka; Ulrich, Reiner; Kovermann, Peter; Fahlke, Christoph; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärnter, Wolfgang; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2014-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injury triggers production of myelinating Schwann cells from endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs). These CNS Schwann cells may be attractive candidates for novel therapeutic strategies aiming to promote endogenous CNS repair. However, CNS Schwann cells have been so far mainly characterized in situ regarding morphology and marker expression, and it has remained enigmatic whether they display functional properties distinct from peripheral nervous system (PNS) Schwann cells. Potassium channels (K+) have been implicated in progenitor and glial cell proliferation after injury and may, therefore, represent a suitable pharmacological target. In the present study, we focused on the function and expression of voltage-gated K+ channels Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits in purified adult canine CNS and PNS Schwann cell cultures using electrophysiology and microarray analysis and characterized their antigenic phenotype. We show here that K+ channels differed significantly in both cell types. While CNS Schwann cells displayed prominent K D-mediated K+ currents, PNS Schwann cells elicited K(D-) and K(A-type) K+ currents. Inhibition of K+ currents by TEA and Ba2+ was more effective in CNS Schwann cells. These functional differences were not paralleled by differential mRNA expression of Kv(1-12) and accessory β-subunits. However, O4/A2B5 and GFAP expressions were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in CNS than in PNS Schwann cells. Taken together, this is the first evidence that CNS Schwann cells display specific properties not shared by their peripheral counterpart. Both Kv currents and increased O4/A2B5 expression were reminiscent of OLPs suggesting that CNS Schwann cells retain OLP features during maturation.

  1. Mast cell diversion of T-lineage precursor cells by the essential T-lineage transcription factor GATA-3

    PubMed Central

    Taghon, Tom; Yui, Mary A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2011-01-01

    GATA-3 is essential for T cell development from the earliest stages. However, highly abundant GATA-3 can drive T-lineage precursors to a non-T fate, depending on Notch signaling and developmental stage. GATA-3 overexpression blocked pro-T cell survival when Notch-Delta signals were present, but enhanced viability in their absence. In double-negative (DN1) and DN2 but not DN3 fetal thymocytes, GATA-3 overexpression rapidly induced mast cell lineage respecification with high frequency by direct transcriptional reprogramming. Normal DN2 thymocytes also displayed mast cell potential, when interleukin 3 and stem cell factor were added in the absence of Notch signaling. Our results suggest a close relationship between the pro-T and mast cell programs and a new role for Notch in T-lineage fidelity. PMID:17603486

  2. Rejuvenation of MPTP-induced human neural precursor cell senescence by activating autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liang; Dong, Chuanming; Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Yang, Danjing; Zhu, Hongwen; Xu, Jun

    2015-08-21

    Aging of neural stem cell, which can affect brain homeostasis, may be caused by many cellular mechanisms. Autophagy dysfunction was found in aged and neurodegenerative brains. However, little is known about the relationship between autophagy and human neural stem cell (hNSC) aging. The present study used 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to treat neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line H9 and investigate related molecular mechanisms involved in this process. MPTP-treated NPCs were found to undergo premature senescence [determined by increased senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased proliferation] and were associated with impaired autophagy. Additionally, the cellular senescence phenotypes were manifested at the molecular level by a significant increase in p21 and p53 expression, a decrease in SOD2 expression, and a decrease in expression of some key autophagy-related genes such as Atg5, Atg7, Atg12, and Beclin 1. Furthermore, we found that the senescence-like phenotype of MPTP-treated hNPCs was rejuvenated through treatment with a well-known autophagy enhancer rapamycin, which was blocked by suppression of essential autophagy gene Beclin 1. Taken together, these findings reveal the critical role of autophagy in the process of hNSC aging, and this process can be reversed by activating autophagy. - Highlights: • We successfully establish hESC-derived neural precursor cells. • MPTP treatment induced senescence-like state in hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP treatment induced impaired autophagy of hESC-derived NPCs. • MPTP-induced hESC-derived NPC senescence was rejuvenated by activating autophagy.

  3. Altered expression and phosphorylation of amyloid precursor protein in heat shocked neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G; Refolo, L M; Merril, C R; Wallace, W

    1993-07-01

    The pathology of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal degeneration, indicates that neurons affected by AD exist under conditions of stress. In fact, the brains of AD patients undergo many changes classically associated with the heat shock response, which is one form of a stress response. These changes include reduced protein synthesis, disrupted cytoskeleton, increased number of proteins associated with ubiquitin, and the induction of heat shock proteins. To investigate the response of neurons to stress, we examined neuronal PC12 cells incubated at either 37 degrees C (control cells) or 45 degrees C (heat-shocked cells). After a 30 min exposure at 45 degrees C, the heat-shocked cells exhibited several features characteristic of the classical heat shock response including a 45% reduction in total protein synthesis, the induction of heat shock protein 72, and an increased phosphorylation of the protein synthesis initiation factor eIF-2 alpha. We used this cellular model system to study the neuronal response to stress specifically focusing on protein synthesis elongation factor 2 (EF-2) and the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein (APP), the precursor form of beta-amyloid peptide. Hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 has been observed in the neocortex and hippocampus of AD brain. However, in our system, we find no hyperphosphorylation of EF-2 in response to heat shock. Heat-shocked neuronal PC12 cells exhibited two additional APP-like polypeptides not present in controls. We also found a significant decrease in the phosphorylation state of APP in response to heat shock.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Connexin43 and connexin47 alterations after neural precursor cells transplantation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Theotokis, Paschalis; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Touloumi, Olga; Lagoudaki, Roza; Lourbopoulos, Athanasios; Nousiopoulou, Evangelia; Kesidou, Evangelia; Poulatsidou, Kyriaki-Nepheli; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Karacostas, Dimitris; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Irinopoulou, Theano; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    Exogenous transplanted neural precursor cells (NPCs) exhibit miscellaneous immune-modulatory effects in models of autoimmune demyelination. However, the regional interactions of NPCs with the host brain tissue in remissive inflammatory events have not been adequately studied. In this study we used the chronic MOG-induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in C57BL/six mice. Based on previous data, we focused on neuropathology at Day 50 post-induction (D50) and studied the expression of connexin43 (Cx43) and Cx47, two of the main glial gap junction (GJ) proteins, in relation to the intraventricular transplantation of GFP(+) NPCs and their integration with the host tissue. By D50, NPCs had migrated intraparenchymally and were found in the corpus callosum at the level of the lateral ventricles and hippocampus. The majority of GFP(+) cells differentiated with simple or ramified processes expressing mainly markers of mature GLIA (GFAP and NogoA) and significantly less of precursor glial cells. GFP(+) NPCs expressed connexins and formed GJs around the hippocampus more than lateral ventricles. The presence of NPCs did not alter the increase in Cx43 GJ plaques at D50 EAE, but prevented the reduction of oligodendrocytic Cx47, increased the number of oligodendrocytes, local Cx47 levels and Cx47 GJ plaques per cell. These findings suggest that transplanted NPCs may have multiple effects in demyelinating pathology, including differentiation and direct integration into the panglial syncytium, as well as amelioration of oligodendrocyte GJ loss, increasing the supply of potent myelinating cells to the demyelinated tissue.

  5. Melatonin and its precursors in Y79 human retinoblastoma cells - Effect of sodium butyrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Mei H.; Lopez G.-Coviella, Ignacio; Lynch, Harry J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the release of melatonin and the production of its precursors, 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin, in cultured Y79 human retinoblastoma cells. This biosynthetic capability was found to be dependent on cell differentiation, which was initiated by culturing Y79 cells for 7 days in dishes coated with poly-D-lysine to promote cell adhesion to the surface of the culture dishes. Differentiation was further induced by exposing the cell monolayer to sodium butyrate (3 mM) for three days. This protocol dramatically increased the release of melatonin, and the syntheses of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin in response to forskolin stimulation. Exposure to dopamine or L-DOPA markedly diminished the forskolin-stimulated release of melatonin, as well as the production of 5-hydroxytryptophan and serotonin. These observations indicate that Y79 cells represent a primitive cell line which, following appropriate differentiation can display biochemical characteristics similar to those of the human retina. Moreover, serotonin synthesis and melatonin release appear to be coupled in Y79 ceils.

  6. Biochemical precursor effects on the fatty acid production in cell suspension cultures of Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed

    Parra, O; Gallego, A M; Urrea, A; Rojas, L F; Correa, C; Atehortúa, L

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa butter (CB) is composed of 96% palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic fatty acids that are responsible for the hardness, texture and fusion properties of chocolate. Through in vitro plant cell culture it is possible to modify CB lipid profiles and to study the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway on a subcellular level, evaluating fundamental aspects to enhance in vitro fatty acid production in a specific and controlled way. In this research, culture media was supplemented with acetate, biotin, pyruvate, bicarbonate and glycerol at three different concentrations and the effects on the biomass production (g/L), cell viability, and fatty acids profile and production was evaluated in in vitro cell suspensions culture. It was found that biotin stimulated fatty acid synthesis without altering cell viability and cell growth. It was also evident a change in the lipid profile of cell suspensions, increasing middle and long chain fatty acids proportion, which are unusual to those reported in seeds; thus implying that it is possible to modify lipid profiles according to the treatment used. According to the results of sucrose gradients and enzyme assays performed, it is proposed that cacao cells probably use the pentose phosphate pathway, mitochondria being the key organelle in the carbon flux for the synthesis of reductant power and fatty acid precursors.

  7. Cannabidiol Activates Neuronal Precursor Genes in Human Gingival Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2016-12-05

    In the last years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from oral tissues have received considerable interest in regenerative medicine since they can be obtained with minimal invasive procedure and exhibit immunomodulatory properties. This study was aimed to investigate whether in vitro pre-treatment of MSCs obtained from human gingiva (hGMSCs) with Cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid component produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, may promote human gingiva derived MSCs to differentiate toward neuronal precursor cells. Specifically, we have treated the hGMSCs with CBD (5 µM) for 24 h in order to evaluate the expression of genes involved in cannabidiol signaling, cell proliferation, self-renewal and multipotency, and neural progenitor cells differentiation. Next generation sequencing (NGS) demonstrated that CBD activates genes associated with G protein coupled receptor signaling in hGMSCs. Genes involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis were regulated. Moreover, genes associated with the biological process of neuronal progenitor cells (NCPs) proliferation, neuron differentiation, neurogenesis, and nervous system development were significantly modulated. From our results, we hypothesize that human gingiva-derived MSCs conditioned with CBD could represent a valid method for improving the hGMSCs phenotype and thus might be a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-16, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Increases the Risk of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis by Stimulating Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Haiqing; Guan, Qingbo; Zhao, Jiajun; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to observe the changes in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women, to research the relationship between FSH and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and to observe the effects of FSH on osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. Methods We analyzed 248 postmenopausal women with normal bone metabolism. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to detect serum FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure forearm BMD. Then, we analyzed the age-related changes in serum FSH, LH and E2. Additionally, FSH serum concentrations were compared between a group of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and a control group. Osteoclasts were induced from RAW264.7 cells in vitro by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), and these cells were treated with 0, 5, 10, and 20 ng/ml FSH. After the osteoclasts matured, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining was used to identify osteoclasts, and the mRNA expression levels of genes involved in osteoclastic phenotypes and function, such as receptor activator of NF-κB (Rank), Trap, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) and Cathepsin K, were detected in different groups using real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Results 1. FSH serum concentrations in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis increased notably compared with the control group. 2. RANKL induced RAW264.7 cell differentiation into mature osteoclasts in vitro. 3. FSH increased mRNA expression of genes involved in osteoclastic phenotypes and function, such as Rank, Trap, Mmp-9 and Cathepsin K, in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions The circulating concentration of FSH may play an important role in the acceleration of bone loss in postmenopausal women. FSH increases osteoclastogenesis in vitro. PMID:26241313

  9. Generation of Valpha14 NKT cells in vitro from hematopoietic precursors residing in bone marrow and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Michio; Kobayashi, Kumi; Watanabe, Hiroko; Huang, Yi-Ying; Okamoto, Naoki; Kanie, Osamu; Goji, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masumi

    2004-03-01

    We previously reported the generation of Valpha14 invariant TCR+ (Valpha14i) NK1.1+ natural killer T (NKT) cells in the cytokine-activated suspension culture of murine fetal liver cells. In this study, we attempted to apply this finding to the induction of Valpha14i NKT cell differentiation in the culture of hematopoietic precursors residing in bone marrow or peripheral blood. Preferential generation of NKT cells was found in the culture of Thy-1(+)-depleted bone marrow cells in the presence of culture supernatant from Con A-stimulated spleen T cells and a combination of recombinant IL-3, IL-4, IL-7 and GM-CSF. NKT cell development from peripheral blood hematopoietic precursors was induced when they were cultured on stromal cell monolayers prepared from Thy-1(+)-depleted bone marrow or fetal liver cells, suggesting that certain environments derived from hematopoietic organs are required for the induction of NKT cells from precursors in vitro. A significant fraction of NKT cells generated in the culture were positive for staining with CD1-alpha-galactosylceramide tetramer, indicating that Valpha14i NKT cells were the major subset among the NKT cells. The present methods for obtaining NKT cells in the culture of bone marrow or peripheral blood cells are applicable to the treatment of patients suffering from diseases with numerical and functional disorders of NKT cells.

  10. Measurement of precursor miRNA in exosomes from human ESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian Sheng; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been shown to secrete exosomes that are cardioprotective against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a mouse model. To elucidate this cardioprotective mechanism, we have characterized the protein, nucleic acid, and lipid composition of MSC exosomes. Here we describe the isolation and analysis of RNA in MSC exosome. We have previously reported that RNAs in MSC exosome are primarily small RNA molecules of <300 nt and they include many miRNAs. Many of these miRNAs are in the precursor form suggesting that pre-miRNAs, and not mature miRNAs are preferentially loaded into exosomes. The protocols described here include assays to ascertain the presence of pre-miRNAs, profiling of miRNA and pre-miRNA, and quantitative estimation of mature and pre-miRNA.

  11. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Plümpe, Tobias; Ehninger, Dan; Steiner, Barbara; Klempin, Friederike; Jessberger, Sebastian; Brandt, Moritz; Römer, Benedikt; Rodriguez, Gerardo Ramirez; Kronenberg, Golo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Background In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX) expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. Results We found that (1) 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2) the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3) positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. Conclusion These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:17105671

  12. Disruption of the dynein-dynactin complex unveils motor-specific functions in osteoclast formation and bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pei Ying; Cheng, Tak Sum; Zhao, Haibo; Ye, Shiqiao; Sm Ang, Estabelle; Khor, Ee Cheng; Feng, Hao-Tian; Xu, Jiake; Zheng, Ming H; Pavlos, Nathan J

    2013-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone resorption requires strict interplay between acidified carrier vesicles, motor proteins, and the underlying cytoskeleton in order to sustain the specialized structural and functional polarization of the ruffled border. Cytoplasmic dynein, a large processive mechanochemical motor comprising heavy, intermediate, and light chains coupled to the dynactin cofactor complex, powers unilateral motility of diverse cargos to microtubule minus-ends. We have recently shown that regulators of the dynein motor complex constitute critical components of the osteoclastic bone resorptive machinery. Here, by selectively modulating endogenous dynein activity, we show that the integrity of the dynein-dynactin motor complex is an essential requirement for both osteoclast formation and function. Systematic dissection of the osteoclast dynein-dynactin complex revealed that it is differentially localized throughout RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and activation, undergoing microtubule-coupled reorganization upon the establishment of cellular polarization. In osteoclasts actively resorbing bone, dynein-dynactin intimately co-localizes with the CAP-Gly domain-containing microtubule plus-end protein CLIP-170 at the resorptive front, thus orientating the ruffled border as a microtubule plus-end domain. Unexpectedly, disruption of the dynein-dynactin complex by exogenous p50/dynamitin expression retards osteoclast formation in vitro, owing largely to prolonged mitotic stasis of osteoclast progenitor cells. More importantly, loss of osteoclastic dynein activity results in a drastic redistribution of key intracellular organelles, including the Golgi and lysosomes, an effect that coincides with impaired cathepsin K secretion and diminished bone resorptive function. Collectively, these data unveil a previously unrecognized role for the dynein-dynactin motor complex in osteoclast formation and function, serving not only to regulate their timely maturation but also the delivery

  13. An Atlas of Network Topologies Reveals Design Principles for Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Precursor Cell Fate Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xianfeng; Tang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The vulval precursor cell (VPC) fate patterning in Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic model experimental system for cell fate determination and patterning in development. Despite its apparent simplicity (six neighboring cells arranged in one dimension) and many experimental and computational efforts, the patterning strategy and mechanism remain controversial due to incomplete knowledge of the complex biology. Here, we carry out a comprehensive computational analysis and obtain a reservoir of all possible network topologies that are capable of VPC fate patterning under the simulation of various biological environments and regulatory rules. We identify three patterning strategies: sequential induction, morphogen gradient and lateral antagonism, depending on the features of the signal secreted from the anchor cell. The strategy of lateral antagonism, which has not been reported in previous studies of VPC patterning, employs a mutual inhibition of the 2° cell fate in neighboring cells. Robust topologies are built upon minimal topologies with basic patterning strategies and have more flexible and redundant implementations of modular functions. By simulated mutation, we find that all three strategies can reproduce experimental error patterns of mutants. We show that the topology derived by mapping currently known biochemical pathways to our model matches one of our identified functional topologies. Furthermore, our robustness analysis predicts a possible missing link related to the lateral antagonism strategy. Overall, we provide a theoretical atlas of all possible functional networks in varying environments, which may guide novel discoveries of the biological interactions in vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans and related species.

  14. An Atlas of Network Topologies Reveals Design Principles for Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Precursor Cell Fate Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Xianfeng; Tang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The vulval precursor cell (VPC) fate patterning in Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic model experimental system for cell fate determination and patterning in development. Despite its apparent simplicity (six neighboring cells arranged in one dimension) and many experimental and computational efforts, the patterning strategy and mechanism remain controversial due to incomplete knowledge of the complex biology. Here, we carry out a comprehensive computational analysis and obtain a reservoir of all possible network topologies that are capable of VPC fate patterning under the simulation of various biological environments and regulatory rules. We identify three patterning strategies: sequential induction, morphogen gradient and lateral antagonism, depending on the features of the signal secreted from the anchor cell. The strategy of lateral antagonism, which has not been reported in previous studies of VPC patterning, employs a mutual inhibition of the 2° cell fate in neighboring cells. Robust topologies are built upon minimal topologies with basic patterning strategies and have more flexible and redundant implementations of modular functions. By simulated mutation, we find that all three strategies can reproduce experimental error patterns of mutants. We show that the topology derived by mapping currently known biochemical pathways to our model matches one of our identified functional topologies. Furthermore, our robustness analysis predicts a possible missing link related to the lateral antagonism strategy. Overall, we provide a theoretical atlas of all possible functional networks in varying environments, which may guide novel discoveries of the biological interactions in vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans and related species. PMID:26114587

  15. Technical note: Isolation and characterization of ovine brown adipocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Hou, Y Q; Dahanayaka, S; Satterfield, M C; Burghardt, R C; Bazer, F W; Wu, G

    2015-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a critical role in regulating body temperature in newborn lambs. Availability of a stable BAT cell line would be invaluable for biochemical studies to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for nutritional regulation of fetal BAT growth and development. Ovine brown adipocyte precursor cells (BAPC) were isolated from fetal lambs at d 90 of gestation and cultured to establish a stable cell line. These cells were characterized by adipogenic differentiation and expression of a hallmark gene, (). The BAPC doubled every 24 h. After a 9-d induction with a serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle Ham/F12 medium, BAPC differentiated into brown adipocytes with large lipid droplets. The differentiation medium induced expression of mRNA and protein in BAPC. Furthermore, after BAPC were passaged 30 times, they maintained similar cell morphology, the potential for adipogenic differentiation, and the ability to express . Taken together, we have established a stable ovine BAPC cell line for studying nutritional regulation of BAT growth and development in the fetus.

  16. Inhibition of amyloid precursor protein processing enhances gemcitabine-mediated cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Neha Kabra; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-10-18

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at a very late stage at which point treatment options are minimal. Current chemotherapeutic interventions prolong survival marginally, thereby emphasizing the acute need for better treatment options to effectively manage this disease. Studies from different laboratories have shown that the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in various cancers but its significance is not known. Here we sought to determine the role of APP in pancreatic cancer cell survival and proliferation. Our results show that pancreatic cancer cells secrete high levels of sAPPα, the α-secretase cleaved ectodomain fragment of APP, as compared with normal non-cancerous cells. Treatment of cells with batimastat or GI254023X, inhibitors of the α-secretase ADAM10, prevented sAPPα generation and reduced cell survival. Additionally, inhibition of sAPPα significantly reduced anchorage independent growth of the cancer cells. The effect of batimastat on cell survival and colony formation was enhanced when sAPPα downregulation was combined with gemcitabine treatment. Moreover, treatment of batimastat-treated cells with recombinant sAPPα reversed the inhibitory effect of the drug thereby indicating that sAPPα can indeed induce proliferation of cancer cells. Down-regulation of APP and ADAM10 brought about similar results, as did batimastat treatment, thereby confirming that APP processing is important for growth and proliferation of these cells. These results suggest that inhibition of sAPPα generation might enhance the effectiveness of the existing chemotherapeutic regimen for a better outcome.

  17. Inhibition of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing Enhances Gemcitabine-mediated Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Neha Kabra; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma or pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at a very late stage at which point treatment options are minimal. Current chemotherapeutic interventions prolong survival marginally, thereby emphasizing the acute need for better treatment options to effectively manage this disease. Studies from different laboratories have shown that the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) is overexpressed in various cancers but its significance is not known. Here we sought to determine the role of APP in pancreatic cancer cell survival and proliferation. Our results show that pancreatic cancer cells secrete high levels of sAPPα, the α-secretase cleaved ectodomain fragment of APP, as compared with normal non-cancerous cells. Treatment of cells with batimastat or GI254023X, inhibitors of the α-secretase ADAM10, prevented sAPPα generation and reduced cell survival. Additionally, inhibition of sAPPα significantly reduced anchorage independent growth of the cancer cells. The effect of batimastat on cell survival and colony formation was enhanced when sAPPα downregulation was combined with gemcitabine treatment. Moreover, treatment of batimastat-treated cells with recombinant sAPPα reversed the inhibitory effect of the drug thereby indicating that sAPPα can indeed induce proliferation of cancer cells. Down-regulation of APP and ADAM10 brought about similar results, as did batimastat treatment, thereby confirming that APP processing is important for growth and proliferation of these cells. These results suggest that inhibition of sAPPα generation might enhance the effectiveness of the existing chemotherapeutic regimen for a better outcome. PMID:24022491

  18. Disturbed CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in paediatric precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van den Berk, Lieke C J; van der Veer, Arian; Willemse, Marieke E; Theeuwes, Myrte J G A; Luijendijk, Mirjam W; Tong, Wing H; van der Sluis, Inge M; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L

    2014-07-01

    Malignant cells infiltrating the bone marrow (BM) interfere with normal cellular behaviour of supporting cells, thereby creating a malignant niche. We found that CXCR4-receptor expression was increased in paediatric precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) cells compared with normal mononuclear haematopoietic cells (P < 0·0001). Furthermore, high CXCR4-expression correlated with an unfavourable outcome in BCP-ALL (5-year cumulative incidence of relapse ± standard error: 38·4% ± 6·9% in CXCR4-high versus 12% ± 4·6% in CXCR4-low expressing cases, P < 0·0001). Interestingly, BM levels of the CXCR4-ligand (CXCL12) were 2·7-fold lower (P = 0·005) in diagnostic BCP-ALL samples compared with non-leukaemic controls. Induction chemotherapy restored CXCL12 levels to normal. Blocking the CXCR4-receptor with Plerixafor showed that the lower CXCL12 serum levels at diagnosis could not be explained by consumption by the leukaemic cells, nor did we observe an altered CXCL12-production capacity of BM-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) at this time-point. We rather observed that a very high density of leukaemic cells negatively affected CXCL12-production by the BM-MSC while stimulating the secretion levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). These results suggest that highly proliferative leukaemic cells are able to down-regulate secretion of cytokines involved in homing (CXCL12), while simultaneously up-regulating those involved in haematopoietic mobilization (G-CSF). Therefore, interference with the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis may be an effective way to mobilize BCP-ALL cells.

  19. ECM components guide IL-10 producing regulatory T-cell (TR1) induction from effector memory T-cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Wu, Rebecca P; Falk, Ben A; Lord, James D; Long, S Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Teng, Brandon; Holt, Gregory E; Standifer, Nathan E; Braun, Kathleen R; Xie, Cindy Fang; Samuels, Peter L; Vernon, Robert B; Gebe, John A; Wight, Thomas N; Nepom, Gerald T

    2011-05-10

    We describe a role for ECM as a biosensor for inflammatory microenvironments that plays a critical role in peripheral immune tolerance. We show that hyaluronan (HA) promotes induction of Foxp3- IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (TR1) from conventional T-cell precursors in both murine and human systems. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ECM component inducing regulatory T cells. Intact HA, characteristic of healing tissues, promotes induction of TR1 capable of abrogating disease in an IL-10-dependent mouse colitis model whereas fragmentary HA, typical of inflamed tissues, does not, indicating a decisive role for tissue integrity in this system. The TR1 precursor cells in this system are CD4(+)CD62L(-)FoxP3(-), suggesting that effector memory cells assume a regulatory phenotype when they encounter their cognate antigen in the context of intact HA. Matrix integrity cues might thereby play a central role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. This TR1 induction is mediated by CD44 cross-linking and signaling through p38 and ERK1/2. This induction is suppressed, also in a CD44-dependent manner, by osteopontin, a component of chronically inflamed ECM, indicating that CD44 signaling serves as a nexus for fate decisions regarding TR1 induction. Finally, we demonstrate that TR1 induction signals can be recapitulated using synthetic matrices. These results reveal important roles for the matrix microenvironment in immune regulation and suggest unique strategies for immunomodulation.

  20. Generation of the heterodimeric precursor GP3 of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Kiess, Michael; Getzlaff, Rita; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Frank, Ronald

    2010-09-01

    The cell wall of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exclusively consists of hydroxyproline-containing glycoproteins. Protein chemical analysis of its polypeptide constituents was hindered by their cross-linking via peroxidase-catalysed intermolecular isodityrosine formation and transaminase-dependent processes. To overcome this problem, we have identified putative soluble precursors using polyclonal antibodies raised against deglycosylation products of the highly purified insoluble wall fraction and analysed their amino acid sequence. The occurrence of the corresponding polypeptide in the insoluble glycoprotein framework was finally probed by epitope mapping of the polyclonal antibodies using overlapping scan peptides which, together, cover the whole amino acid sequence of the putative precursor. As a control, peptide fragments released from the insoluble wall fraction by trypsin treatment were analysed by mass spectroscopy. By this approach, the heterodimeric, chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP3 proved to be a constituent of the insoluble extracellular matrix of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Furthermore, we have shown that the polypeptide backbones of both GP3 subunits are encoded by the same gene and differ by a C-terminal truncation in the case of GP3A.

  1. Degradation of algal organic matter using microbial fuel cells and its association with trihalomethane precursor removal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Dongmei; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Zhiwei; Xu, Yongpeng; Cui, Fuyi

    2012-07-01

    In order to provide an alternative for removal of algal organic matter (AOM) produced during algal blooms in aquatic environment, microbial fuel cell (MFC) was used to study AOM degradation and its association with THM precursor removal. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals in MFCs were 81 ± 6% and 73 ± 3% for AOM from Microcystis aeruginosa (AOM(M)) and Chlorella vulgaris (AOM(C)), respectively. THM precursor was also effectively degraded (AOM(M) 85 ± 2%, AOM(C) 72 ± 4%). The major AOM components (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) were obviously removed in MFCs. The contribution of each component to the THM formation potential (THMFP) was obtained based on calculation. The THMFP produced from soluble microbial products was very low. If the energy input during operation process was not considered, MFCs treatment could recover electrical energy of 0.29 ± 0.02 kWh/kg COD (AOM(M)) and 0.35 ± 0.06 kWh/kg COD (AOM(C)).

  2. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: a myogenic precursor cell hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kallestad, Kristen M; Hebert, Sadie L; McDonald, Abby A; Daniel, Mark L; Cu, Sharon R; McLoon, Linda K

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin(-/-) (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a subpopulation

  3. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  4. Hippocalcin Is Required for Astrocytic Differentiation through Activation of Stat3 in Hippocampal Neural Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Jeong; Park, Shin-Young; Han, Joong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Hippocalcin (Hpca) is a neuronal calcium sensor protein expressed in the mammalian brain. However, its function in neural stem/precursor cells has not yet been studied. Here, we clarify the function of Hpca in astrocytic differentiation in hippocampal neural precursor cells (HNPCs). When we overexpressed Hpca in HNPCs in the presence or absence of bFGF, expression levels of nerve-growth factors such as neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), together with the proneural basic helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors NeuroD and neurogenin 1 (Ngn1), increased significantly. In addition, there was an increase in the number of cells expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an astrocyte marker, and in branch outgrowth, indicating astrocytic differentiation of the HNPCs. Downregulation of Hpca by transfection with Hpca siRNA reduced expression of NT-3, NT-4/5, BDNF, NeuroD, and Ngn1 as well as levels of GFAP protein. Furthermore, overexpression of Hpca increased the phosphorylation of STAT3 (Ser727), and this effect was abolished by treatment with a STAT3 inhibitor (S3I-201), suggesting that STAT3 (Ser727) activation is involved in Hpca-mediated astrocytic differentiation. As expected, treatment with Stat3 siRNA or STAT3 inhibitor caused a complete inhibition of astrogliogenesis induced by Hpca overexpression. Taken together, this is the first report to show that Hpca, acting through Stat3, has an important role in the expression of neurotrophins and proneural bHLH transcription factors, and that it is an essential regulator of astrocytic differentiation and branch outgrowth in HNPCs. PMID:27840601

  5. Development of a chemically defined serum-free medium for differentiation of rat adipose precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deslex, S.; Negrel, R.; Ailhaud, G.

    1987-01-01

    Stromal-vascular cells from the epididymal fat pad of 4-week-old rats, when cultured in a medium containing insulin or insulin-like growth factor, IFG-I, triiodothyronine and transferrin, were able to undergo adipose conversion. Over ninety percent of the cells accumulated lipid droplets and this proportion was reduced in serum-supplemented medium. The adipose conversion was assessed by the development of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activities, (/sup 14/)glucose incorporation into polar and neutral lipids, triacylglycerol accumulation and lipolysis in response to isoproterenol. Similar results were obtained with stromal-vascular cells from rat subcutaneous and retroperitoneal adipose tissues. Stromal-vascular cells required no adipogenic factors in addition to the components of the serum-free medium. Insulin was required within a physiological range of concentrations for the emergence of LPL and at higher concentrations for that of GPDH. When present at concentrations ranging from 2 to 50 nM, IGF-I was able to replace insulin for the expression of both LPL and and GPDH. The development of a serum free, chemically defined medium for the differentiation of diploid adiopose precursor cells opens up the possibility of characterizing inhibitors or activators of the adipose conversion process.

  6. Overexpression of amyloid precursor protein increases copper content in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suazo, Miriam; Hodar, Christian; Morgan, Carlos; Cerpa, Waldo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2009-05-15

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. However, its physiological function remains elusive. Cu{sup 2+} binding and reduction activities have been described in the extracellular APP135-156 region, which might be relevant for cellular copper uptake and homeostasis. Here, we assessed Cu{sup 2+} reduction and {sup 64}Cu uptake in two human HEK293 cell lines overexpressing APP. Our results indicate that Cu{sup 2+} reduction increased and cells accumulated larger levels of copper, maintaining cell viability at supra-physiological levels of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Moreover, wild-type cells exposed to both Cu{sup 2+} ions and APP135-155 synthetic peptides increased copper reduction and uptake. Complementation of function studies in human APP751 transformed Fre1 defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells rescued low Cu{sup 2+} reductase activity and increased {sup 64}Cu uptake. We conclude that Cu{sup 2+} reduction activity of APP facilitates copper uptake and may represent an early step in cellular copper homeostasis.

  7. Human Neural Precursor Cells Promote Neurologic Recovery in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Tran, Ha; Kopf, Alexandra; Walsh, Craig M.; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Macklin, Wendy B.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs) results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activated T cells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments. PMID:24936469

  8. Transformation of quiescent adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells into malignant glioma through a multistep reactivation process.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Rui Pedro; Kasina, Anita; McNeill, Robert S; Harbin, Jordan E; Foreman, Oded; Verhaak, Roel G W; Nishiyama, Akiko; Miller, C Ryan; Zong, Hui

    2014-10-07

    How malignant gliomas arise in a mature brain remains a mystery, hindering the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. We previously showed that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can be transformed into glioma when mutations are introduced perinatally. However, adult OPCs rarely proliferate compared with their perinatal counterparts. Whether these relatively quiescent cells have the potential to transform is unknown, which is a critical question considering the late onset of human glioma. Additionally, the premalignant events taking place between initial mutation and a fully developed tumor mass are particularly poorly understood in glioma. Here we used a temporally controllable Cre transgene to delete p53 and NF1 specifically in adult OPCs and demonstrated that these cells consistently give rise to malignant gliomas. To investigate the transforming process of quiescent adult OPCs, we then tracked these cells throughout the premalignant phase, which revealed a dynamic multistep transformation, starting with rapid but transient hyperproliferative reactivation, followed by a long period of dormancy, and then final malignant transformation. Using pharmacological approaches, we discovered that mammalian target of rapamycin signaling is critical for both the initial OPC reactivation step and late-stage tumor cell proliferation and thus might be a potential target for both glioma prevention and treatment. In summary, our results firmly establish the transforming potential of adult OPCs and reveal an actionable multiphasic reactivation process that turns slowly dividing OPCs into malignant gliomas.

  9. PERK Activation Promotes Medulloblastoma Tumorigenesis by Attenuating Premalignant Granule Cell Precursor Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yeung; Li, Xiting; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; McKinnon, Peter J; Ron, David; Lin, Wensheng

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggests that activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress negatively or positively influences cell transformation by regulating apoptosis. Patched1 heterozygous deficient (Ptch1(+/-)) mice reproduce human Gorlin's syndrome and are regarded as the best animal model to study tumorigenesis of the sonic hedgehog subgroup of medulloblastomas. It is believed that medulloblastomas in Ptch1(+/-) mice results from the transformation of granule cell precursors (GCPs) in the developing cerebellum. Here, we determined the role of PERK signaling on medulloblastoma tumorigenesis by assessing its effects on premalignant GCPs and tumor cells. We found that PERK signaling was activated in both premalignant GCPs in young Ptch1(+/-) mice and medulloblastoma cells in adult mice. We demonstrated that PERK haploinsufficiency reduced the incidence of medulloblastomas in Ptch1(+/-) mice. Interestingly, PERK haploinsufficiency enhanced apoptosis of premalignant GCPs in young Ptch1(+/-) mice but had no significant effect on medulloblastoma cells in adult mice. Moreover, we showed that the PERK pathway was activated in medulloblastomas in humans. These results suggest that PERK signaling promotes medulloblastoma tumorigenesis by attenuating apoptosis of premalignant GCPs during the course of malignant transformation.

  10. Osteoclasts and osteoblasts migrate in opposite directions in response to a constant electrical field

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrier, J.; Ross, S.M.; Kanehisa, J.; Aubin, J.E.

    1986-12-01

    The authors have investigated in vitro the effects of the electrical field produced by constant current on freshly isolated rabbit osteoclasts and on well characterized clonal rat osteoblastlike cells. At field strengths of 0.1 and 1 V/mm, the osteoclasts migrated rapidly toward the positive electrode, whereas the osteoblastlike cells migrated in the opposite direction, toward the negative electrode. Thus, different cell types from the same tissue can respond differently to the same electrical signal. These results have important implications for hypotheses concerning the cellular mechanism of galvanotaxis, and may also clarify the cellular basis of the clinical application of electrical stimulation of bone healing.

  11. Efficiency Enhancement of Perovskite Solar Cells by Pumping Away the Solvent of Precursor Film Before Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing-Yang; Yuan, Da-Xing; Mu, Hao-Ran; Igbari, Femi; Bao, Qiaoliang; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    A new approach to improve the quality of MAPbI3 - x Cl x perovskite film was demonstrated. It involves annealing the precursor film after pumping away the solvent, which can decrease the influence of solvent evaporation rate for the growth of the MAPbI3 - x Cl x perovskite film. The resulting film showed improved morphology, stronger absorption, fewer crystal defects, and smaller charge transfer resistance. The corresponding device demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with a reference device. The averaged value of power conversion efficiency increased from 10.61 to 12.56 %, and a champion efficiency of 14.0 % was achieved. This work paves a new way to improve the efficiency of perovskite solar cells.

  12. Efficiency Enhancement of Perovskite Solar Cells by Pumping Away the Solvent of Precursor Film Before Annealing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing-Yang; Yuan, Da-Xing; Mu, Hao-Ran; Igbari, Femi; Bao, Qiaoliang; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    A new approach to improve the quality of MAPbI3 - x Cl x perovskite film was demonstrated. It involves annealing the precursor film after pumping away the solvent, which can decrease the influence of solvent evaporation rate for the growth of the MAPbI3 - x Cl x perovskite film. The resulting film showed improved morphology, stronger absorption, fewer crystal defects, and smaller charge transfer resistance. The corresponding device demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with a reference device. The averaged value of power conversion efficiency increased from 10.61 to 12.56 %, and a champion efficiency of 14.0 % was achieved. This work paves a new way to improve the efficiency of perovskite solar cells.

  13. Detection of normal B-cell precursors that give rise to colonies producing both kappa and lambda light immunoglobulin chains.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, H; Paige, C J

    1987-01-01

    The pre-B-cell cloning assay is an in vitro differentiation system in which B-lymphocyte precursors expand and generate colonies containing immunoglobulin-secreting cells. Analysis of surface characteristics, growth requirements, and kinetics suggested that these cells represent early stages of the B-cell differentiation pathway. Here we describe a modification of the assay, which allowed us to determine the differentiative potential of these clonable pre-B cells. Using a nitrocellulose protein-transfer technique, we studied immunoglobulin light chain expression in colonies derived from fetal mouse liver B-cell precursors; in particular, we explored whether the B-cell precursors are already committed to the expression of a particular light chain gene at the initiation of culture. Our results show that fetal liver-derived B-cell progenitors generate colonies in vitro that secrete kappa and lambda light chains at a ratio similar to that found in colonies derived from adult splenic B cells. Further, we document the existence of colonies that are derived from single cells and that simultaneously secrete both types of light chains. This indicates that the progenitors of (kappa + lambda)-producing colonies are light chain-uncommitted at the initiation of culture. These cells are able to rearrange their light chain genes in vitro and differentiate along the B-cell pathway to form colonies secreting both kappa and lambda chains. PMID:3110779

  14. Different Mechanisms Must Be Considered to Explain the Increase in Hippocampal Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation by Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Walker, Tara L.; Fischer, Tim J.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The number of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus is strongly increased by physical activity. The mechanisms through which this behavioral stimulus induces cell proliferation, however, are not yet understood. In fact, even the mode of proliferation of the stem and progenitor cells is not exactly known. Evidence exists for several mechanisms including cell cycle shortening, reduced cell death and stem cell recruitment, but as yet no model can account for all observations. An appreciation of how the cells proliferate, however, is crucial to our ability to model the neurogenic process and predict its behavior in response to pro-neurogenic stimuli. In a recent study, we addressed modulation of the cell cycle length as one possible mode of regulation of precursor cell proliferation in running mice. Our results indicated that the observed increase in number of proliferating cells could not be explained through a shortening of the cell cycle. We must therefore consider other mechanisms by which physical activity leads to enhanced precursor cell proliferation. Here we review the evidence for and against several different hypotheses and discuss the implications for future research in the field. PMID:27536215

  15. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  16. Expression and regulation of the 67-kda laminin-binding protein and its precursor gene in lymphoid-cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Zhang, X; Sobel, M; Kondoh, N; Papas, T; Bhat, N

    1993-12-01

    The 67-kDa laminin-binding protein is a non-integrin laminin-binding protein that mediates cancer cell adhesion and migration. The expression of the 67-kDa laminin-binding protein and of its putative precursor, a 37-kDa polypeptide, was studied in peripheral T-cells and T-lymphoma cell lines. Immunofluorescence experiments detected antigen in both the cytosol and on the cell membrane. On immunoblots of T-cell protein extracts, both the 37-kDa precursor and the mature 67-kDa protein were present. The mRNA for the precursor was expressed in both immature and mature thymocytes. In three independent T-lymphoma cell lines, the mRNA levels were decreased after prolonged stimulation with phorbol esters. Since the latter directly activate protein kinase C, it appears that regulation of the 37-kDa precursor in T-cells may be mediated by the signal transduction cascade associated with protein kinase C activation.

  17. Dual-Source Precursor Approach for Highly Efficient Inverted Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Deying; Zhao, Lichen; Wu, Jiang; Hu, Qin; Zhang, Yifei; Xu, Zhaojian; Liu, Yi; Liu, Tanghao; Chen, Ke; Yang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Rui; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-03-15

    The highest efficiencies reported for perovskite solar cells so far have been obtained mainly with methylammonium and formamidinium mixed cations. Currently, high-quality mixed-cation perovskite thin films are normally made by use of antisolvent protocols. However, the widely used "antisolvent"-assisted fabrication route suffers from challenges such as poor device reproducibility, toxic and hazardous organic solvent, and incompatibility with scalable fabrication process. Here, a simple dual-source precursor approach is developed to fabricate high-quality and mirror-like mixed-cation perovskite thin films without involving additional antisolvent process. By integrating the perovskite films into the planar heterojunction solar cells, a power conversion efficiency of 20.15% is achieved with negligible current density-voltage hysteresis. A stabilized power output approaching 20% is obtained at the maximum power point. These results shed light on fabricating highly efficient perovskite solar cells via a simple process, and pave the way for solar cell fabrication via scalable methods in the near future.

  18. Triazole RGD antagonist reverts TGFβ1-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in endothelial precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Francesca; Peppicelli, Silvia; Fabbrizzi, Pierangelo; Biagioni, Alessio; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Menchi, Gloria; Calorini, Lido; Pupi, Alberto; Trabocchi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis is the dramatic consequence of a dysregulated reparative process in which activated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) and Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) play a central role. When exposed to TGFβ1, fibroblast and epithelial cells differentiate in myofibroblasts; in addition, endothelial cells may undergo endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) and actively participate to the progression of fibrosis. Recently, the role of αv integrins, which recognize the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) tripeptide, in the release and signal transduction activation of TGFβ1 became evident. In this study, we present a class of triazole-derived RGD antagonists that interact with αvβ3 integrin. Above different compounds, the RGD-2 specifically interferes with integrin-dependent TGFβ1 EndoMT in Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells (ECPCs) derived from circulating Endothelial Precursor Cells (ECPCs). The RGD-2 decreases the amount of membrane-associated TGFβ1, and reduces both ALK5/TGFβ1 type I receptor expression and Smad2 phosphorylation in ECPCs. We found that RGD-2 antagonist reverts EndoMT, reducing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin expression in differentiated ECPCs. Our results outline the critical role of integrin in fibrosis progression and account for the opportunity of using integrins as target for anti-fibrotic therapeutic treatment.

  19. Amyloid Precursor Protein Enhances Nav1.6 Sodium Channel Cell Surface Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Tan, Francis Chee Kuan; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Dawe, Gavin S.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is commonly associated with Alzheimer disease, but its physiological function remains unknown. Nav1.6 is a key determinant of neuronal excitability in vivo. Because mouse models of gain of function and loss of function of APP and Nav1.6 share some similar phenotypes, we hypothesized that APP might be a candidate molecule for sodium channel modulation. Here we report that APP colocalized and interacted with Nav1.6 in mouse cortical neurons. Knocking down APP decreased Nav1.6 sodium channel currents and cell surface expression. APP-induced increases in Nav1.6 cell surface expression were Go protein-dependent, enhanced by a constitutively active Go protein mutant, and blocked by a dominant negative Go protein mutant. APP also regulated JNK activity in a Go protein-dependent manner. JNK inhibition attenuated increases in cell surface expression of Nav1.6 sodium channels induced by overexpression of APP. JNK, in turn, phosphorylated APP. Nav1.6 sodium channel surface expression was increased by T668E and decreased by T668A, mutations of APP695 mimicking and preventing Thr-668 phosphorylation, respectively. Phosphorylation of APP695 at Thr-668 enhanced its interaction with Nav1.6. Therefore, we show that APP enhances Nav1.6 sodium channel cell surface expression through a Go-coupled JNK pathway. PMID:25767117

  20. Langerhans cell precursors acquire RANK/CD265 in prenatal human skin.

    PubMed

    Schöppl, Alice; Botta, Albert; Prior, Marion; Akgün, Johnnie; Schuster, Christopher; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the first barrier against foreign pathogens and the prenatal formation of a strong network of various innate and adaptive cells is required to protect the newborn from perinatal infections. While many studies about the immune system in healthy and diseased adult human skin exist, our knowledge about the cutaneous prenatal/developing immune system and especially about the phenotype and function of antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs) in human skin is still scarce. It has been shown previously that LCs in healthy adult human skin express receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), an important molecule prolonging their survival. In this study, we investigated at which developmental stage LCs acquire this important molecule. Immunofluorescence double-labeling of cryostat sections revealed that LC precursors in prenatal human skin either do not yet [10-11 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA)] or only faintly (13-15 weeks EGA) express RANK. LCs express RANK at levels comparable to adult LCs by the end of the second trimester. Comparable with adult skin, dermal antigen-presenting cells at no gestational age express this marker. These findings indicate that epidermal leukocytes gradually acquire RANK during gestation - a phenomenon previously observed also for other markers on LCs in prenatal human skin.

  1. Altered neutrophil immunophenotypes in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Elen; Bacelar, Thiago S.; Ciudad, Juana; Ribeiro, Maria Cecília M.; Garcia, Daniela R.N.; Sedek, Lukasz; Maia, Simone F.; Aranha, Daniel B.; Machado, Indyara C.; Ikeda, Arissa; Baglioli, Bianca F.; Lopez-Duarte, Nathalia; Teixeira, Lisandra A. C.; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Silva, Maria Luiza M.; Land, Marcelo G.P.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of evidences suggest a genetic predisposition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that might favor the occurrence of the driver genetic alterations. Such genetic background might also translate into phenotypic alterations of residual hematopoietic cells. Whether such phenotypic alterations are present in bone marrow (BM) cells from childhood B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL remains to be investigated. Here we analyzed the immunophenotypic profile of BM and peripheral blood (PB) maturing/matured neutrophils from 118 children with BCP-ALL and their relationship with the features of the disease. Our results showed altered neutrophil phenotypes in most (77%) BCP-ALL cases. The most frequently altered marker was CD10 (53%), followed by CD33 (34%), CD13 (15%), CD15/CD65 (10%) and CD123 (7%). Of note, patients with altered neutrophil phenotypes had younger age (p = 0.03) and lower percentages of BM maturing neutrophils (p = 0.004) together with greater BM lymphocyte (p = 0.04), and mature B-cell (p = 0.03) counts. No significant association was found between an altered neutrophil phenotype and other disease features. These findings point out the potential existence of an altered residual hematopoiesis in most childhood BCP-ALL cases. PMID:27028865

  2. SYK as a New Therapeutic Target in B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Qazi, Sanjive

    2014-01-01

    The identification of SYK as a master regulator of apoptosis controlling the activation of the PI3-K/AKT, NFκB, and STAT3 pathways—three major anti-apoptotic signaling pathways in B-lineage leukemia/lymphoma cells—prompts the hypothesis that rationally designed inhibitors targeting SYK may overcome the resistance of malignant B-lineage lymphoid cells to apoptosis and thereby provide the foundation for more effective multi-modality treatment regimens for poor prognosis B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL). In recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies, a liposomal nanoparticle (LNP) formulation of a SYK substrate-binding site inhibitor, known as C61, has been developed as a nanomedicine candidate against poor prognosis and relapsed BPL. This nanoscale formulation of C61 exhibited a uniquely favorable pharmacokinetics and safety profile in mice, induced apoptosis in radiation-resistant primary leukemic cells taken directly from BPL patients as well as in vivo clonogenic BPL xenograft cells, destroyed the leukemic stem cell fraction of BPL blasts, and exhibited potent in vivo anti-leukemic activity in xenograft models of aggressive BPL. Further development of C61-LNP may provide the foundation for new and effective treatment strategies against therapy-refractory BPL. PMID:24851191

  3. Suppressive effects of the leaf of Terminalia catappa L. on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and bone weight loss in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomoyuki; Nakajima, Chie; Nishimoto, Sogo; Takami, Masamichi; Woo, Je-Tae; Yazawa, Kazunaga

    2012-01-01

    Oral administration of Terminalia catappa extract (TCE; 1,000 mg/kg) for 5 wk suppressed bone weight loss and trabecular bone loss in ovariectomized mice. An in vitro experiment showed that TCE (1.3-20 µg/mL) did not increase alkaline phosphatase activity, which would indicate osteoclast formation, in osteoblast-like 3T3-L1 cells. On the other hand, TCE (12.5 µg/mL) markedly decreased the number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells, which would indicate osteoclast formation, in a co-culture system (bone marrow cells/osteoblastic UAMS-32 cells). A detailed analysis of the stages of osteoclast differentiation revealed that TCE mainly suppressed the differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells into osteoclast progenitor cells in the presence of M-CSF and TGF-β. An additional experiment using fractionated TCE revealed that the water-soluble fraction suppressed the bone weight loss in OVX-mice and osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Therefore, the suppressive effects of TCE on bone weight loss in mice might be due to the suppressive effects of highly polar components on the early stage of osteoclast differentiation.

  4. Telencephalic neural precursor cells show transient competence to interpret the dopaminergic niche of the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Baizabal, José-Manuel; Valencia, Concepción; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Covarrubias, Luis

    2011-01-15

    Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs) generate complex stereotypic arrays of neuronal subtypes in the brain. This process involves the integration of patterning cues that progressively restrict the fate of specific NPCs. Yet the capacity of NPCs to interpret foreign microenvironments during development remains poorly defined. The aim of this work was to test the competence of mouse telencephalic NPCs to respond to the dopaminergic niche of the mesencephalon. Telencephalic NPCs isolated from midgestation mouse embryos (E10.5) and transplanted to age-matched mesencephalic explants efficiently differentiated into neurons but were largely unable to produce midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons. Instead, E10.5 telencephalic NPCs behaved as restricted gabaergic progenitors that maintained ectopic expression of Foxg1 and Pax6. In contrast, E8.5 telencephalic NPCs were able to differentiate into Lmx1a(+)/Foxa2(+)/TH(+) neurons in the dopaminergic niche of the mesencephalic explants. In addition, these early telencephalic NPCs showed region-dependent expression of Nkx6.1, Nkx2.2 and site-specific differentiation into gabaergic neurons within the mesencephalic tissue. Significant dopaminergic differentiation of E8.5 telencephalic NPCs was not observed after transplantation to E12.5 mesencephalic explants, suggesting that inductive signals in the dopaminergic niche rapidly decay after midgestation. Moreover, we employed transplantation of embryonic stem cells-derived precursors to demonstrate that extinction of inductive signals within the telencephalon lags behind the commitment of residing NPCs. Our data indicate that the plasticity to interpret multiple instructive niches is an early and ephemeral feature of the telencephalic neural lineage.

  5. Antioxidant Protection of NADPH-Depleted Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Is Dependent on Supply of Reduced Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Saraswat Ohri, Sujata; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway is the main source of NADPH, which by reducing oxidized glutathione, contributes to antioxidant defenses. Although oxidative stress plays a major role in white matter injury, significance of NADPH for oligodendrocyte survival has not been yet investigated. It is reported here that the NADPH antimetabolite 6-amino-NADP (6AN) was cytotoxic to cultured adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as OPC-derived oligodendrocytes. The 6AN-induced necrosis was preceded by increased production of superoxide, NADPH depletion, and lower supply of reduced glutathione. Moreover, survival of NADPH-depleted OPCs was improved by the antioxidant drug trolox. Such cells were also protected by physiological concentrations of the neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (10−8 M). The protection by dehydroepiandrosterone was associated with restoration of reduced glutathione, but not NADPH, and was sensitive to inhibition of glutathione synthesis. A similar protective mechanism was engaged by the cAMP activator forskolin or the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) ligand G1. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine reduced cytotoxicity of 6AN. Taken together, NADPH is critical for survival of OPCs by supporting their antioxidant defenses. Consequently, injury-associated inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway may be detrimental for the myelination or remyelination potential of the white matter. Conversely, steroid hormones and cAMP activators may promote survival of NADPH-deprived OPCs by increasing a NADPH-independent supply of reduced glutathione. Therefore, maintenance of glutathione homeostasis appears as a critical effector mechanism for OPC protection against NADPH depletion and preservation of the regenerative potential of the injured white matter. PMID:27449129

  6. New insights into glycopeptide antibiotic binding to cell wall precursors using SPR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Juan; Bayón, Carlos; Ardá, Ana; Marinelli, Flavia; Gandolfi, Raffaella; Molinari, Francesco; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesús; Hernáiz, María J

    2014-06-10

    Glycopeptide antibiotics, such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, are used to treat life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. They inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis by binding to the D-Ala-D-Ala C-terminus of peptidoglycan precursors. Vancomycin-resistant bacteria replace the dipeptide with the D-Ala-D-Lac depsipeptide, thus reducing the binding affinity of the antibiotics with their molecular targets. Herein, studies of the interaction of teicoplanin, teicoplanin-like A40926, and of their semisynthetic derivatives (mideplanin, MDL63,246, dalbavancin) with peptide analogues of cell-wall precursors by NMR spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are reported. NMR spectroscopy revealed the existence of two different complexes in solution, when the different glycopeptides interact with Ac2KdAlaDAlaOH. Despite the NMR experimental conditions, which are different from those employed for the SPR measurements, the NMR spectroscopy results parallel those deduced in the chip with respect to the drastic binding difference existing between the D-Ala and the D-Lac terminating analogues, confirming that all these antibiotics share the same primary molecular mechanism of action and resistance. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between the glycopeptide antibiotics and immobilized AcKdAlaDAlaOH by SPR suggest a dimerization process that was not observed by NMR spectroscopy in DMSO solution. Moreover, in SPR, all glycopeptides with a hydrophobic acyl chain present stronger binding with a hydrophobic surface than vancomycin, indicating that additional interactions through the employed surface are involved. In conclusion, SPR provides a tool to differentiate between vancomycin and other glycopeptides, and the calculated binding affinities at the surface seem to be more relevant to in vitro antimicrobial activity than the estimations from NMR spectroscopy analysis.

  7. Co-culture of hepatoma cells with hepatocytic precursor (stem-like) cells inhibits tumor cell growth and invasion by downregulating Akt/NF-κB expression

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Cheng-Jun; Xu, Miao; Li, Wei-Qing; Yang, Jia-Mei; Yan, Hong-Zhu; Liu, Hui-Min; Xia, Chun-Yan; Yu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocytic stem cells (HSCs) have inhibitory effects on hepatocarcinoma cells. The present study investigated the effects of HSC activity in hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro. A Transwell co-culture system of hepatocytic precursor (stem-like) WB-F344 cells and hepatoma CBRH-7919 cells was used to assess HSC activity in metastasized hepatoma cells in vitro. Nude mouse xenografts were used to assess HSC activity in vivo. Co-culture of hepatoma CBRH-7919 cells with WB-F344 cells suppressed the growth and colony formation, tumor cell migration and invasion capacity of CBRH-7919 cells. The nude mouse xenograft assay demonstrated that the xenograft size of CBRH-7919 cells following co-culture with WB-F344 cells was significantly smaller compared with that of control cells. Furthermore, the expression levels of the epithelial markers E-cadherin and β-catenin were downregulated, while the mesenchymal markers α-SMA and vimentin were upregulated. Co-culture of CBRH-7919 cells with WB-F344 cells downregulated NF-κB and phospho-Akt expression. In conclusion, hepatocytic precursor (stem-like) WB-F344 cells inhibited the growth, colony formation and invasion capacity of metastasized hepatoma CBRH-7919 cells in vitro and in vivo by downregulating Akt/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27895771

  8. Dendritic Cell-M