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Sample records for osteoclast precursor cells

  1. MECHANICAL VIBRATION INHIBITS OSTEOCLAST FORMATION BY REDUCING DC-STAMP RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN OSTEOCLAST PRECURSOR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, R.N.; Voglewede, P.A.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that physical inactivity leads to loss of muscle mass, but it also causes bone loss. Mechanistically, osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption have recently been shown to be regulated by vibration. However, the underlying mechanism behind the inhibition of osteoclast formation is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells affects osteoclast formation by the involvement of fusion-related molecules such as dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). RAW264.7 (a murine osteoclastic-like cell line) cells were treated with 20 ng/ml receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). For 3 consecutive days, the cells were subjected to 1 hour of mechanical vibration with 20 µm displacement at a frequency of 4 Hz and compared to the control cells that were treated under the same condition but without the vibration. After 5 days of culture, osteoclast formation was determined. Gene expression of DC-STAMP and P2X7R by RAW264.7 cells were determined after 1 hour mechanical vibration, while protein production of the DC-STAMP was determined after 6 hours of post incubation after vibration. As a result, mechanical vibration of RAW264.7 cells inhibited the formation of osteoclasts. Vibration down-regulated DC-STAMP gene expression by 1.6-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.4-fold in the absence of RANKL. Additionally, DC-STAMP protein production was also down-regulated by 1.4-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.2-fold in the absence of RANKL in RAW264.7 cells in response to mechanical vibration. However, vibration did not affect P2X7R gene expression. Mouse anti-DC-STAMP antibody inhibited osteoclast formation in the absence of vibration. Our results suggest that mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells reduce DC-STAMP expression in osteoclast precursor cells leading to the inhibition of osteoclast formation. PMID:23994170

  2. Mechanical vibration inhibits osteoclast formation by reducing DC-STAMP receptor expression in osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Voglewede, Philip A; Liu, Dawei

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that physical inactivity leads to loss of muscle mass, but it also causes bone loss. Mechanistically, osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption have recently been shown to be regulated by vibration. However, the underlying mechanism behind the inhibition of osteoclast formation is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells affects osteoclast formation by the involvement of fusion-related molecules such as dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). RAW264.7 (a murine osteoclastic-like cell line) cells were treated with 20ng/ml receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). For 3 consecutive days, the cells were subjected to 1h of mechanical vibration with 20μm displacement at a frequency of 4Hz and compared to the control cells that were treated under the same condition but without the vibration. After 5days of culture, osteoclast formation was determined. Gene expression of DC-STAMP and P2X7R by RAW264.7 cells was determined after 1h of mechanical vibration, while protein production of the DC-STAMP was determined after 6h of postincubation after vibration. As a result, mechanical vibration of RAW264.7 cells inhibited the formation of osteoclasts. Vibration down-regulated DC-STAMP gene expression by 1.6-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.4-fold in the absence of RANKL. Additionally, DC-STAMP protein production was also down-regulated by 1.4-fold in the presence of RANKL and by 1.2-fold in the absence of RANKL in RAW264.7 cells in response to mechanical vibration. However, vibration did not affect P2X7R gene expression. Mouse anti-DC-STAMP antibody inhibited osteoclast formation in the absence of vibration. Our results suggest that mechanical vibration of osteoclast precursor cells reduces DC-STAMP expression in osteoclast precursor cells leading to the inhibition of osteoclast formation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactive oxygen species are required for zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Chen, Ching-Yu; Su, Fong-Chin; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Jou, I.-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Inhibiting osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors to reduce bone resorption is an important strategy to treat osteoclast-related diseases, such as osteoporosis, inflammatory bone loss, and malignant bone metastasis. However, the mechanism by which apoptosis is induced in the osteoclasts and their precursors are not completely understood. Here, we used nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA) to induce cell apoptosis in human and murine osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells. Caspase-3-mediated cell apoptosis occurred following the ZA (100 μM) treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also generated in a time-dependent manner. Following knock-down of the p47phox expression, which is required for ROS activation, or co-treatment with the ROS inhibitor, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, ZA-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed in both osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells. The ROS-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways did not trigger cell apoptosis. However, a ROS-regulated Mcl-1 decrease simultaneously with glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β promoted cell apoptosis. These findings show that ZA induces apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclast-like cells by triggering ROS- and GSK-3β-mediated Mcl-1 down-regulation. PMID:28281643

  4. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization and analysis of established cell lines of osteoclast precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, Shigehisa; Suzuki, Jun; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mizutamari, Megumi; Ishida-Kitagawa, Norihiro; Yogo, Keiichiro; Jat, Parmjit S.; Shishido, Tomoyuki . E-mail: shishid@bs.naist.jp

    2006-11-10

    Osteoclast precursor cells (OPCs) have previously been established from bone marrow cells of SV40 temperature-sensitive T antigen-expressing transgenic mice. Here, we use retrovirus-mediated gene transfer to conditionally immortalize OPCs by expressing temperature-sensitive large T antigen (tsLT) from wild type bone marrow cells. The immortalized OPCs proliferated at the permissive temperature of 33.5 deg. C, but stopped growing at the non-permissive temperature of 39 deg. C. In the presence of receptor activator of NF{kappa}B ligand (RANKL), the OPCs differentiated into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells and formed multinucleate osteoclasts at 33.5 deg. C. From these OPCs, we cloned two types of cell lines. Both differentiated into TRAP-positive cells, but one formed multinucleate osteoclasts while the other remained unfused in the presence of RANKL. These results indicate that the established cell lines are useful for analyzing mechanisms of differentiation, particularly multinucleate osteoclast formation. Retrovirus-mediated conditional immortalization should be a useful method to immortalize OPCs from primary bone marrow cells.

  5. Secretory clusterin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by attenuating M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Soon-Suk; Kang, Sang-Wook; Min, Bon-Hong; Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Youngsup; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We describe the expression and secretion of clusterin in osteoclasts. • Endogenous clusterin deficiency does not affect osteoclast formation. • Exogenous treatment with secretory clusterin decreases osteoclast differentiation. • Secretory clusterin attenuates osteoclast precursor cell proliferation by inhibiting M-CSF-mediated ERK activation. - Abstract: Secretory clusterin (sCLU)/apolipoprotein J is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Reduced sCLU in the joints of patients with bone erosive disease is associated with disease activity; however, its exact role has yet to be elucidated. Here, we report that CLU is expressed and secreted during osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) that are treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). CLU-deficient BMMs obtained from CLU{sup −/−} mice exhibited no significant alterations in OC differentiation in comparison with BMMs obtained from wild-type mice. In contrast, exogenous sCLU treatment significantly inhibited OC formation in both BMMs and OC precursor cultures. The inhibitory effect of sCLU was more prominent in BMMs than OC precursor cultures. Interestingly, treating BMMs with sCLU decreased the proliferative effects elicited by M-CSF and suppressed M-CSF-induced ERK activation of OC precursor cells without causing apoptotic cell death. This study provides the first evidence that sCLU reduces OC formation by inhibiting the actions of M-CSF, thereby suggesting its protective role in bone erosion.

  6. IL-4 inhibits TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibition of RANKL expression in TNF-α-activated stromal cells and direct inhibition of TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors via a T-cell-independent mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshiya; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Hakami, Zaki Weli; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2012-10-01

    It has been reported that osteoclastogenesis is induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Interleukin (IL)-4 is the most important cytokine involved in humoral immunity. However, no studies have investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-4 on TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. TNF-α was administered with and without IL-4 into the supracalvariae of mice. The number of osteoclasts and the levels of mRNA for cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphate, both osteoclast markers, in mice administered TNF-α and IL-4 were lower than those in mice administered TNF-α alone. The level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase form 5b (TRACP5b) as a marker of bone resorption in mice administered both TNF-α and IL-4 was also lower. We showed that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in osteoclast precursors in vitro. Expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in TNF-α-activated stromal cells was also inhibited. Furthermore, we investigated whether IL-4 had effects on both stromal cells and osteoclast precursors in TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in vivo. Using mice whose stromal cells and osteoclast precursors were chimeric for the presence of TNF receptors, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells, and TNF-α-responsive osteoclast precursors in vivo. IL-4 also inhibited TNF-α-induced RANKL expression in the presence of TNF-α-responsive stromal cells in vivo. This event is dependent on p38 inhibition in vitro. Additionally, IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation in T cell-depleted mice. In summary, we conclude that IL-4 inhibited TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation by inhibiting expression of RANKL in TNF-α-activated stromal cells, and directly inhibited TNF-α-activated osteoclast precursors in vivo via a T cell-independent mechanism.

  7. Induced osteoclastogenesis by fluoroquinolones in unstimulated and stimulated human osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Costa-Rodrigues, J; Martins, E G; Fernandes, M H

    2012-07-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of activity, known to disturb bone metabolism. The aim of this work was to characterize the cellular and molecular effects of five FQs (ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin) in unstimulated and stimulated human osteoclast precursors. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured in the absence (unstimulated) or in the presence of osteoclastogenic factors (M-CSF and RANKL, stimulated), and were treated with FQs (0.3×10(-9)-10(-3) M), for 21 days. In unstimulated PBMC cultures, FQs (excepting moxifloxacin) exhibited a high osteoclastogenic potential, as shown by a significant increase in the expression of osteoclastic genes, TRAP activity and, specially, number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and calcium phosphate resorbing ability, suggesting the presence of mature and functional osteoclasts. Norfloxacin and levofloxacin induced the higher effect, followed by ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. A decrease on apoptosis and an increase on M-CSF expression might have a possible contribution in the observed cellular behavior. In stimulated PBMC cultures, FQs further increase the osteoclastogenic response induced by M-CSF and RANKL (except ofloxacin). However, the osteoclastogenic response was much lower than that observed in unstimulated PBMC cultures. Both in unstimulated and stimulated PBMC cultures, for most of the FQs, the osteoclastogenic effects were observed in a wide range of concentrations, representative of plasmatic and tissue levels attained in several clinical settings. The various FQs differed on the stimulatory concentration range, the extent of the induced osteoclastogenic response and, also, on the dose- and time-dependent profile. Nevertheless, at high concentrations all the FQs seemed to elicit an increase on apoptosis. Additionally, some differences were noted in the intracellular signaling pathways tested, namely NFkB, MEK and PGE2

  8. Bone Impairment in Phenylketonuria Is Characterized by Circulating Osteoclast Precursors and Activated T Cell Increase

    PubMed Central

    Mussa, Alessandro; D'Amico, Lucia; Fiore, Ludovica; Garelli, Davide; Spada, Marco; Ferracini, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a rare inborn error of metabolism often complicated by a progressive bone impairment of uncertain etiology, as documented by both ionizing and non- ionizing techniques. Methodology Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures were performed to study osteoclastogenesis, in the presence or absence of recombinant human monocyte-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL). Flow cytometry was utilized to analyze osteoclast precursors (OCPs) and T cell phenotype. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were quantified in cell culture supernatants by ELISA. The effects of RANKFc and anti-TNF-α antibodies were also investigated to determine their ability to inhibit osteoclastogenesis. In addition, bone conditions and phenylalanine levels in PKU patients were clinically evaluated. Principal Findings Several in vitro studies in PKU patients' cells identified a potential mechanism of bone formation inhibition commonly associated with this disorder. First, PKU patients disclosed an increased osteoclastogenesis compared to healthy controls, both in unstimulated and M-CSF/RANKL stimulated PBMC cultures. OCPs and the measured RANKL/OPG ratio were higher in PKU patients compared to healthy controls. The addition of specific antagonist RANKFc caused osteoclastogenesis inhibition, whereas anti-TNF-α failed to have this effect. Among PBMCs isolated from PKU patients, activated T cells, expressing CD69, CD25 and RANKL were identified. Confirmatory in vivo studies support this proposed model. These in vivo studies included the analysis of osteoclastogenesis in PKU patients, which demonstrated an inverse relation to bone condition assessed by phalangeal Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS). This was also directly related to non-compliance to therapeutic diet reflected by hyperphenylalaninemia. Conclusions Our results indicate that PKU spontaneous osteoclastogenesis depends on the

  9. The proliferative human monocyte subpopulation contains osteoclast precursors.

    PubMed

    Lari, Roya; Kitchener, Peter D; Hamilton, John A

    2009-01-01

    Immediate precursors of bone-resorbing osteoclasts are cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Particularly during clinical conditions showing bone loss, it would appear that osteoclast precursors are mobilized from bone marrow into the circulation prior to entering tissues undergoing such loss. The observed heterogeneity of peripheral blood monocytes has led to the notion that different monocyte subpopulations may have special or restricted functions, including as osteoclast precursors. Human peripheral blood monocytes were sorted based upon their degree of proliferation and cultured in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The monocyte subpopulation that is capable of proliferation gave rise to significantly more multinucleated, bone-resorbing osteoclasts than the bulk of the monocytes. Human peripheral blood osteoclast precursors reside in the proliferative monocyte subpopulation.

  10. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Paglia, David N.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2–3 times) (P < .05) without alteration of osteoblast histomorphometric indices. We also demonstrated that loss of Runx1 in pluripotential myeloid precursors with LysM-Cre did not alter the number of myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow or their ability to differentiate into phagocytizing or antigen-presenting cells. This study demonstrates that abrogation of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells significantly and specifically enhanced the ability of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  11. High glucose alters the secretome of mechanically stimulated osteocyte-like cells affecting osteoclast precursor recruitment and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maycas, Marta; Portolés, María Teresa; Matesanz, María Concepción; Buendía, Irene; Linares, Javier; Feito, María José; Arcos, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, María; Plotkin, Lilian I; Esbrit, Pedro; Gortázar, Arancha R

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) induces bone deterioration, while mechanical stimulation promotes osteocyte-driven bone formation. We aimed to evaluate the interaction of acute exposure (24 h) to high glucose (HG) with both the pro-survival effect conferred to osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by mechanical stimulation and the interaction of these cells with osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells. We found that 24 h of HG (25 mM) pre-exposure prevented both cell survival and ERK and β-catenin nuclear translocation upon mechanical stimulation by fluid flow (FF) (10 min) in both MLO-Y4 and MC3T3-E1 cells. However, migration of RAW 264.7 cells was inhibited by MLO-Y4 cell-conditioned medium (CM), but not by MC3T3-E1 cell-CM, with HG or FF. This inhibitory effect was associated with consistent changes in VEGF, RANTES, MIP-1α, MIP-1β MCP-1, and GM-CSF in MLO-Y4 cell-CM. RAW264.7 proliferation was inhibited by MLO-Y4 CM under static or HG conditions, but it increased by FF-CM with or without HG. In addition, both FF and HG abrogated the capacity of RAW 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, but in a different manner. Thus, HG-CM in static condition allowed formation of osteoclast-like cells, which were unable to resorb hydroxyapatite. In contrast, FF-CM prevented osteoclastogenesis even in HG condition. Moreover, HG did not affect basal RANKL or IL-6 secretion or their inhibition induced by FF in MLO-Y4 cells. In conclusion, this in vitro study demonstrates that HG exerts disparate effects on osteocyte mechanotransduction, and provides a novel mechanism by which DM disturbs skeletal metabolism through altered osteocyte-osteoclast communication. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of Allium cepa L. on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Osteoclast Precursor Cell Viability, Count, and Morphology Using 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole-Staining.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tatiane; Figueiredo, Camila A; Brito, Carlos; Stavroullakis, Alexander; Prakki, Anuradha; Da Silva Velozo, Eudes; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio

    2014-01-01

    Allium cepa L. is known to possess numerous pharmacological properties. Our aim was to examine the in vitro effects of Allium cepa L. extract (AcE) on Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and Escherichia coli LPS-stimulated osteoclast precursor cells to determine cell viability to other future cell-based assays. Osteoclast precursor cells (RAW 264.7) were stimulated by Pg LPS (1 μg/mL) and E. coli LPS (1 μg/mL) in the presence or absence of different concentrations of AcE (10-1000 μg/mL) for 5 days at 37°C/5% CO2. Resazurin reduction and total protein content assays were used to detect cell viability. AcE did not affect cell viability. Resazurin reduction assay showed that AcE, at up to 1000 μg/mL, did not significantly affect cell viability and cellular protein levels. Additionally a caspase 3/7 luminescence assay was used to disclose apoptosis and there was no difference in apoptotic activity between tested groups and control group. Fluorescence images stained by DAPI showed no alteration on the morphology and cell counts of LPS-stimulated osteoclast precursor cells with the use of AcE in all tested concentrations when compared to control. These findings suggest that Allium cepa L. extract could be used for in vitro studies on Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS and Escherichia coli LPS-stimulated osteoclast precursor cells.

  13. Presence of osteoclast precursor cells during ex vivo expansion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for autologous use in cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Allers, Carolina; Lasala, Gabriel P; Minguell, José J

    2014-04-01

    To obtain a cell product competent for clinical use in terms of cell dose and biologic properties, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) must be expanded ex vivo. A retrospective analysis was performed of records of 76 autologous MSC products used in phase I or II clinical studies performed in a cohort of cardiovascular patients. In all cases, native MSCs present in patient bone marrow aspirates were separated and expanded ex vivo. The cell products were classified in two groups (A and B), according to biologic properties and expansion time (ex vivo passages) to reach the protocol-established cell dose. In group A, the population of adherent cells obtained during the expansion period (2 ± 1 passages) was composed entirely of MSCs and met the requirements of cell number and biologic features as established in the respective clinical protocol. In group B, in addition to MSCs, we observed during expansion a high proportion of ancillary cells, characterized as osteoclast precursor cells. In this case, although the biologic properties of the resulting MSC product were not affected, the yield of MSCs was significantly lower. The expansion cycles had to be increased (3 ± 1 passages). These results suggest that the presence of osteoclast precursor cells in bone marrow aspirates may impose a limit for the proper clinical use of ex vivo expanded autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A carboxy methyl tamarind polysaccharide matrix for adhesion and growth of osteoclast-precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Sanyasi, Sridhar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Goswami, Chandan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Goswami, Luna

    2014-01-30

    Remodeling of bone by tissue engineering is a realistic option for treating several bone-related pathophysiological ailments such as osteoporosis, bone tumor, bone cancer or abnormal bone development. But, these possibilities are hindered due to lack of proper natural and biodegradable surface on which bone precursor cells can adhere efficiently and grow further. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new hydrogel as an effective surface which can acts as a material for bone tissue engineering. This hydrogel has been prepared by chemically grafting a semi-synthetic polymer with a synthetic monomer, namely hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Carboxy methyl tamarind (CMT) was selected as the semi-synthetic polymer. The hydrogel was prepared at different mole ratios and at the ratio of 1:10 (CMT:HEMA) yielded the best hydrogel as characterized by several physico-chemical analysis such as UV spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and swelling properties. We further demonstrate that this material is suitable for effective adhesion, growth and further clustering of bone precursor cells (RAW 264.7). This material is also compatible for growing other sensitive cells such as neuronal cells (Neuro2a) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) demonstrating that this surface does not possess any cytotoxicity and is compatible for primary human cells too. We conclude that the hydrogel made of CMT:HEMA at a ratio of 1:10 can be suitable for bone tissue engineering and thus may have clinical as well as commercial application in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone Anabolic Effects of Soluble Si: In Vitro Studies with Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and CD14+ Osteoclast Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Reis, S.; Castro, A.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is indispensable for many cellular processes including bone tissue metabolism. In this work, the effects of Si on human osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis were characterized. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and CD14+ stem cells, as osteoblast and osteoclast precursors, were treated with a wide range of Si concentrations, covering the physiological plasma levels. Si promoted a dose-dependent increase in hMSC proliferation, differentiation, and function, at levels similar to the normal basal plasma levels. Additionally, a decrease in the expression of the osteoclastogenic activators M-CSF and RANKL was observed. Also, Si elicited a decrease in osteoclastogenesis, which became significant at higher concentrations, as those observed after meals. Among the intracellular mechanisms studied, an upregulation of MEK and PKC signalling pathways was observed in both cell types. In conclusion, Si appears to have a direct positive effect on human osteogenesis, at basal plasma levels. On the other hand, it also seemed to be an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis, but at higher concentrations, though yet in the physiological range. Further, an indirect effect of Si on osteoclastogenesis may also occur, through a downregulation of M-CSF and RANKL expression by osteoblasts. Thus, Si may be an important player in bone anabolic regenerative approaches. PMID:26798359

  16. Lipocalin-2 inhibits osteoclast formation by suppressing the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Kyung-Ae; Gwon, Mi-Ri; Jin Seong, Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2015-06-10

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily and plays a critical role in the regulation of various physiological processes, such as inflammation and obesity. In this study, we report that LCN2 negatively modulates the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, resulting in impaired osteoclast formation. The overexpression of LCN2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages or the addition of recombinant LCN2 protein inhibits the formation of multinuclear osteoclasts. LCN2 suppresses macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced proliferation of osteoclast precursor cells without affecting their apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, LCN2 decreases the expression of the M-CSF receptor, c-Fms, and subsequently blocks its downstream signaling cascades. In addition, LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and attenuates the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), which are important modulators in osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, LCN2 inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways, as demonstrated by the suppression of IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of p65, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Thus, LCN2 is an anti-osteoclastogenic molecule that exerts its effects by retarding the proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast lineage cells. - Highlights: • LCN2 expression is regulated during osteoclast development. • LCN2 suppresses M-CSF-mediated osteoclast precursor proliferation. • LCN2 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  17. Implication of the calcium sensing receptor and the Phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway in the extracellular calcium-mediated migration of RAW 264.7 osteoclast precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Cédric; Saidak, Zuzana; Boulanouar, Abdel Krim; Petit, Laurent; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Massy, Ziad; Brazier, Michel; Mentaverri, Romuald; Kamel, Saïd

    2010-05-01

    While the processes involved in the formation, maturation and apoptosis of osteoclasts have been investigated extensively in previous studies, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the localization and homing of osteoclast precursor cells to the bone environment in order to initiate the bone remodeling process. Recent studies have suggested that the extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(o)) concentration gradient present near the bone environment may be one of the participating factors, producing a chemoattractant effect on osteoclast precursors. Using the murine osteoclast precursor cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the RAW 264.7 cell line, we have shown that Ca(2+)(o) increases the migration of these cells in a directional manner. The participation of the calcium sensing receptor (CaR) in this effect was tested by knocking down its expression through RNA interference, which resulted in an abolition of the migratory response. By the use of specific pathway inhibitors and western blot analysis, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and phospholipase Cbeta pathways were shown to be implicated in the migratory effect. The implication of the Akt pathway in the Ca(2+)(o)-induced chemoattraction of RAW 264.7 cells was also confirmed by transducing the cells with the fusion protein TAT-dominant negative-Akt, which decreased the migratory effect. In contrast, the MAPK pathways (ERK1/2, p38 and JNK) were not involved in the production of the migratory effect. We conclude that through the activation of the CaR and subsequent signaling via the PI3K/Akt pathway, Ca(2+)(o) produces a chemoattractant effect on the osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that the Ca(2+)(o) gradient present near the bone may be one of the initiating factors for the homing of osteoclast precursors to bone, thus possibly playing a role in the initiation of bone remodeling. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid acid, suppresses osteoclastogenesis in mononuclear precursor cells and induces apoptosis in mature osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    George, Kerri L; Saltman, Laura H; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B; Zurier, Robert B

    2008-03-01

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, prevents joint tissue injury in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis. Because activation of osteoclasts is central to the pathogenesis of bone erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we investigated the influence of AjA on osteoclast differentiation and survival. Osteoclast cultures were established by stimulation of RAW264.7 cells and primary mouse bone marrow cultures with receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Simultaneous addition of AjA (15 and 30 microM) and RANKL to both culture systems significantly suppressed development of multinucleated osteoclasts (osteoclastogenesis) in a dose dependent manner, as determined by quantification of multinuclear, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells. AjA impaired growth of RAW264.7 monocytes and prevented further osteoclast formation in cultures in which osteoclastogenesis had already begun. Reduction by AjA of both monocyte growth and osteoclast formation was associated with apoptosis, assayed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, and caspase activity. The anti-osteoclastogenic effects of AjA did not require the continuous presence of AjA in the cell cultures. Based on these findings, we propose that AjA or other nonpsychoactive synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents may be useful therapy for diseases such as RA and osteoporosis in which bone resorption is a central feature.

  19. The protocol for the isolation and cryopreservation of osteoclast precursors from mouse bone marrow and spleen.

    PubMed

    Boraschi-Diaz, Iris; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for physiological bone remodeling as well as pathological bone destruction in osteoporosis, periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis, and thus represent a pharmacological target for drug development. We aimed to characterize and compare the cytokine-induced osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow and spleen precursors. Established protocols used to generate osteoclasts from bone marrow were modified to examine osteoclastogenesis of the spleen cells of healthy mice. Osteoclast formation was successfully induced from spleen precursors using receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (50 ng/ml) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (50 ng/ml). Compared to bone marrow cultures, differentiation from spleen required a longer cultivation time (9 days for spleen, as compared to 5 days for marrow cultures) and a higher plating density of non-adherent cells (75,000/cm(2) for spleen, as compared to 50,000/cm(2) for bone marrow). Osteoclasts generated from spleen precursors expressed osteoclast marker genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase 9 and were capable of resorbing hydroxyapatite. The differentiation capacity of spleen and bone marrow precursors was comparable for BALB/c, C57BL/6 and FVB mice. We also developed and tested a cryopreservation protocol for the osteoclast precursors. While 70-80 % of cells were lost during the first week of freezing, during the subsequent 5 weeks the losses were within 2-5 % per week. Osteoclastogenesis from the recovered bone marrow precursors was successful up to 5 weeks after freezing. Spleen precursors retained their osteoclastogenic capacity for 1 week after freezing, but not thereafter. The described protocol is useful for the studies of genetically modified animals as well as for screening new osteoclast-targeting therapeutics.

  20. Regulation of RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation by vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Tintut, Yin; Abedin, Moeen; Cho, John; Choe, Andrea; Lim, Jina; Demer, Linda L

    2005-08-01

    Vascular calcification is a regulated process of biomineralization resembling osteogenesis. Many bone-related factors, including resorptive osteoclast-like cells, although in low abundance, have been found in calcified atherosclerotic lesions. The regulatory mechanisms governing them in the vasculature, however, are not clear. Previously, we found that calcifying vascular cells (CVC), a subpopulation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMC), undergo osteoblastic differentiation and form mineralized nodules. Since osteoblasts and marrow stromal preosteoblasts regulate osteoclastic differentiation in bone, we hypothesized that vascular cells also regulate differentiation of osteoclastic precursors in the artery wall. Peripheral blood monocytes, which are osteoclast precursors, were co-cultured with CVC or BASMC. Results showed that monocytes co-cultured with both of the vascular cells yielded fewer resorption pits than monocytes cultured alone. Furthermore, monocytes co-cultured with CVC had fewer resorption pits than those co-cultured with BASMC. Conditioned media from the vascular cells also inhibited resorptive activity of monocytes suggesting that the inhibitory effect was mediated in part by soluble factors. Compared with BASMC, CVC had lower mRNA expression for osteopontin, which promotes osteoclast attachment, but greater mRNA expression for the soluble inhibitory cytokine, IL-18. Increased osteoclastic differentiation was observed when neutralizing antibody to IL-18 receptor was added to the cultures of preosteoclasts with CVC conditioned media. Osteoprotegerin, another osteoclast inhibitory cytokine, was expressed at similar levels in both cultures. These results suggest that vascular cells inhibit osteoclastic differentiation, and that CVC have greater inhibitory effects than BASMC.

  1. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  2. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  3. Genetic modification of ER-Hoxb8 osteoclast precursors using CRISPR/Cas9 as a novel way to allow studies on osteoclast biology.

    PubMed

    Di Ceglie, Irene; van den Akker, Guus G H; Ascone, Giuliana; Ten Harkel, Bas; Häcker, Hans; van de Loo, Fons A J; Koenders, Marije I; van der Kraan, Peter M; de Vries, Teun J; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; van Lent, Peter L E M

    2017-04-01

    Osteoclasts are cells specialized in bone resorption. Currently, studies on murine osteoclasts are primarily performed on bone marrow-derived cells with the use of many animals and limited cells available. ER-Hoxb8 cells are conditionally immortalized monocyte/macrophage murine progenitor cells, recently described to be able to differentiate toward functional osteoclasts. Here, we produced an ER-Hoxb8 clonal cell line from C57BL/6 bone marrow cells that strongly resembles phenotype and function of the conventional bone marrow-derived osteoclasts. We then used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to specifically inactivate genes by biallelic mutation. The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an adaptive immune system in Bacteria and Archaea and uses small RNAs and Cas nucleases to degrade foreign nucleic acids. Through specific-guide RNAs, the nuclease Cas9 can be redirected toward any genomic location to genetically modify eukaryotic cells. We genetically modified ER-Hoxb8 cells with success, generating NFATc1(-/-) and DC-STAMP(-/-) ER-Hoxb8 cells that lack the ability to differentiate into osteoclasts or to fuse into multinucleated osteoclasts, respectively. In conclusion, this method represents a markedly easy highly specific and efficient system for generating potentially unlimited numbers of genetically modified osteoclast precursors. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. Substrate Recognition by Osteoclast Precursors Induces C-src/Microtubule Association

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Amer, Yousef; Ross, F. Patrick; Schlesinger, Paul; Tondravi, M. Mehrdad; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    1997-01-01

    The osteoclast is distinguished from other macrophage polykaryons by its polarization, a feature induced by substrate recognition. The most striking component of the polarized osteoclast is its ruffled membrane, probably reflecting insertion of intracellular vesicles into the bone apposed plasmalemma. The failure of osteoclasts in c-src−/− osteopetrotic mice to form ruffled membranes indicates pp60c-src (c-src) is essential to osteoclast polarization. Interestingly, c-src itself is a vesicular protein that targets the ruffled membrane. This being the case, we hypothesized that matrix recognition by osteoclasts, and their precursors, induces c-src to associate with microtubules that traffic proteins to the cell surface. We find abundant c-src associates with tubulin immunoprecipitated from avian marrow macrophages (osteoclast precursors) maintained in the adherent, but not nonadherent, state. Since the two proteins colocalize only within adherent avian osteoclast-like cells examined by double antibody immunoconfocal microscopy, c-src/tubulin association reflects an authentic intracellular event. C-src/tubulin association is evident within 90 min of cell-substrate recognition, and the event does not reflect increased expression of either protein. In vitro kinase assay demonstrates tubulin-associated c-src is enzymatically active, phosphorylating itself as well as exogenous substrate. The increase in microtubule-associated kinase activity attending adhesion mirrors tubulin-bound c-src and does not reflect enhanced specific activity. The fact that microtubule-dissociating drugs, as well as cold, prevent adherence-induced c-src/tubulin association indicates the protooncogene complexes primarily, if not exclusively, with polymerized tubulin. Association of the two proteins does not depend upon protein tyrosine phosphorylation and is substrate specific, as it is induced by vitronectin and fibronectin but not type 1 collagen. Finally, consistent with cotransport of c

  5. The generation of osteoclasts from RAW 264.7 precursors in defined, serum-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Cristina; Kogawa, Masakazu; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the unique cell type capable of resorbing bone. The discovery of the TNF-ligand family member, RANKL, has allowed more reliable study of these important cells. The mouse monocytic cell line, RAW 264.7, has been shown to readily differentiate into osteoclasts upon exposure to recombinant RANKL. Unlike primary osteoclast precursors, there is no requirement for the addition of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). However, to date, their differentiation has always been studied in the context of added foetal calf serum (FCS). FCS is a complex and largely undefined mixture of growth factors and matrix proteins, and varies between batches. For this reason, osteoclastogenesis would ideally be studied in the context of a defined, serum-free medium. RAW 264.7 cells were cultured in serum-replete alpha-MEM or serum-deprived medium (SDM) shown previously to support the growth of human osteoclasts in a co-culture with normal osteoblasts. In SDM, in the presence of recombinant RANKL, RAW 264.7 cells readily differentiated into tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated osteoclast-like cells, a process that was enhanced with the addition of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D). While the osteoclasts grown in SDM were smaller in size compared with those derived in serum-replete media, their resorptive capacity was significantly increased as indicated by a twofold increase in average resorption pit size. In conclusion, we describe a defined model for studying osteoclast differentiation and activity in the absence of serum, which will be ideal for studying the role of agonistic and antagonistic molecules in this process.

  6. Differentiation of osteoblast and osteoclast precursors on pure and silicon-substituted synthesized hydroxyapatites.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Giorgia; Cacciotti, Ilaria; Palmero, Paola; Montanaro, Laura; Bianco, Alessandra; Campagnolo, Luisa; Camaioni, Antonella

    2012-10-01

    Calcium phosphate-based materials should show excellent bone-bonding and cell-mediated resorption characteristics at the same time, in order to be employed for bone replacement. In this perspective, pure (HAp) and silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HAp, 1.4% wt) porous cylinders were prepared starting from synthesized powders and polyethylene spheres used as porogens, and investigated as supports for osteoblast and osteoclast progenitor differentiation. A systematic and detailed biological characterization is reported, in terms of cell adhesion, viability, proliferation, differentiation and bioresorption, aimed at proposing a complete and reliable picture of bone cell in vitro behavior, comprehensive of both the osteogenesis and the bone resorption processes. In order to achieve this purpose, cytocompatibility, differentiation and gene expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were carried out using parietal bone-derived pre-osteoblasts obtained from neonatal mice and the bioresorption capability was assessed by seeding human peripheral blood monocytes, as osteoclast precursors. It resulted that both pure and Si-substituted HAps were able to promote differentiation of precursor cells in mature osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In particular, the Si-HAps enhanced the pre-osteoblast proliferation and showed higher osteoclast-mediated bioresorption capability, as supported by the presence of larger and more numerous resorption lacunae, whereas HAps promoted a more robust cell differentiation in terms of both osteocalcin gene expression by qRT-PCR and cell morphological evaluation by SEM analysis.

  7. Osteoclast differentiation from human blood precursors on biomimetic calcium-phosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Ciapetti, Gabriela; Di Pompo, Gemma; Avnet, Sofia; Martini, Desirée; Diez-Escudero, Anna; Montufar, Edgar B; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Baldini, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    The design of synthetic bone grafts to foster bone formation is a challenge in regenerative medicine. Understanding the interaction of bone substitutes with osteoclasts is essential, since osteoclasts not only drive a timely resorption of the biomaterial, but also trigger osteoblast activity. In this study, the adhesion and differentiation of human blood-derived osteoclast precursors (OCP) on two different micro-nanostructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite materials consisting in coarse (HA-C) and fine HA (HA-F) crystals, in comparison with sintered stoichiometric HA (sin-HA, reference material), were investigated. Osteoclasts were induced to differentiate by RANKL-containing supernatant using cell/substrate direct and indirect contact systems, and calcium (Ca(++)) and phosphorus (P(5+)) in culture medium were measured. We observed that OCP adhered to the experimental surfaces, and that osteoclast-like cells formed at a rate influenced by the micro- and nano-structure of HA, which also modulate extracellular Ca(++). Qualitative differences were found between OCP on biomimetic HA-C and HA-F and their counterparts on plastic and sin-HA. On HA-C and HA-F cells shared typical features of mature osteoclasts, i.e. podosomes, multinuclearity, tartrate acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive staining, and TRAP5b-enzyme release. However, cells were less in number compared to those on plastic or on sin-HA, and they did not express some specific osteoclast markers. In conclusion, blood-derived OCP are able to attach to biomimetic and sintered HA substrates, but their subsequent fusion and resorptive activity are hampered by surface micro-nano-structure. Indirect cultures suggest that fusion of OCP is sensitive to topography and to extracellular calcium.

  8. Osteoclast precursor interaction with bone matrix induces osteoclast formation directly by an interleukin-1-mediated autocrine mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhenqiang; Xing, Lianping; Qin, Chunlin; Schwarz, Edward M; Boyce, Brendan F

    2008-04-11

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediate bone resorption in a variety of diseases affecting bone. Like TNF, IL-1 is secreted by osteoclast precursors (OCPs), but unlike TNF, it does not induce osteoclast formation directly from OCPs in vitro. TNF induces IL-1 expression and activates c-Fos, a transcription factor required in OCPs for osteoclast formation. Here, we examined whether IL-1 can induce osteoclast formation directly from OCPs overexpressing c-Fos and whether interaction with bone matrix affects OCP cytokine expression. We infected OCPs with c-Fos or green fluorescent protein retrovirus, cultured them with macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-1 on bone slices or plastic dishes, and assessed osteoclast and resorption pit formation and expression of IL-1 by OCPs. We used a Transwell assay to determine whether OCPs secrete IL-1 when they interact with bone matrix. IL-1 induced osteoclast formation directly from c-Fos-expressing OCPs on plastic. c-Fos-expressing OCPs formed osteoclasts spontaneously on bone slices without addition of cytokines. OCPs on bone secreted IL-1, which induced osteoclast formation from c-Fos-expressing OCPs in the lower Transwell dishes. The bone matrix proteins dentin sialoprotein and osteopontin, but not transforming growth factor-beta, stimulated OCP expression of IL-1 and induced c-Fos-expressing OCP differentiation into osteoclasts. Osteoclasts eroding inflamed joints have higher c-Fos expression compared with osteoclasts inside bone. We conclude that OCPs expressing c-Fos may induce their differentiation directly into osteoclasts by an autocrine mechanism in which they produce IL-1 through interaction with bone matrix. TNF could induce c-Fos expression in OCPs at sites of inflammation in bone to promote this autocrine mechanism and thus amplify bone loss.

  9. PSTPIP2 deficiency in mice causes osteopenia and increased differentiation of multipotent myeloid precursors into osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Viorel; Charles, Julia F.; Henne, William M.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Nandi, Sayan; Ketchum, Halley; Harris, Renee; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    Missense mutations that reduce or abrogate myeloid cell expression of the F-BAR domain protein, proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), lead to autoinflammatory disease involving extramedullary hematopoiesis, skin and bone lesions. However, little is known about how PSTPIP2 regulates osteoclast development. Here we examined how PSTPIP2 deficiency causes osteopenia and bone lesions, using the mouse PSTPIP2 mutations, cmo, which fails to express PSTPIP2 and Lupo, in which PSTPIP2 is dysfunctional. In both models, serum levels of the pro-osteoclastogenic factor, MIP-1α, were elevated and CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R)–dependent production of MIP-1α by macrophages was increased. Treatment of cmo mice with a dual specificity CSF-1R and c-Kit inhibitor, PLX3397, decreased circulating MIP-1α and ameliorated the extramedullary hematopoiesis, inflammation, and osteopenia, demonstrating that aberrant myelopoiesis drives disease. Purified osteoclast precursors from PSTPIP2-deficient mice exhibit increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro and were used to probe the structural requirements for PSTPIP2 suppression of osteoclast development. PSTPIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation and a functional F-BAR domain were essential for PSTPIP2 inhibition of TRAP expression and osteoclast precursor fusion, whereas interaction with PEST-type phosphatases was only required for suppression of TRAP expression. Thus, PSTPIP2 acts as a negative feedback regulator of CSF-1R signaling to suppress inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22923495

  10. Inhibition of osteoclast formation by 3-methylcholanthrene, a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor: suppression of osteoclast differentiation factor in osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Naruse, M; Otsuka, E; Naruse, M; Ishihara, Y; Miyagawa-Tomita, S; Hagiwara, H

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effects of 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), a ligand for arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), on osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclast-like cells, in cocultures with mouse spleen cells and clonal osteogenic stromal ST2 cells, are formed from spleen cells by a combination of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) produced by ST2 cells in response to 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3). 3MC dose-dependently inhibited the formation of mono- and multinuclear osteoclast-like cells. However, 3MC did not inhibit the formation of osteoclast-like cells from mouse spleen cells which was supported by the exogenous soluble RANKL and M-CSF. 3MC did not affect the formation of an actin ring and pits on slices of dentine by osteoclast-like cells, both of which are typical indices of osteoclast activity. These results suggest that 3MC affects osteoclast-supporting cells such as ST2 cells but not osteoclast precursor cells and mature osteoclastic cells. When we measured the expression levels of RANKL mRNA in ST2 cells, 3MC dose-dependently decreased the level of this mRNA. However, 3MC did not affect levels of mRNAs for osteoprotegerin (OPG), M-CSF, and the receptor of 1alpha,25(OH)(2) Vitamin D(3) in ST2 cells. Furthermore, soluble RANKL was able to counteract the inhibitory effect of 3MC on the formation of osteoclast-like cells. Our findings indicate that 3MC inhibits osteoclastogenesis via the inhibition of RANKL expression in osteoblastic cells.

  11. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MJVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors. Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-31

    Determine the sensitivity of MVNP transduced osteoclast precursors to RANK Ligand (RANKL) and TNF- alpha stimulation to form pagetic osteoclasts. -- Paget’s...herpesvirus (CLONTECH) (pVP16- hVDR) (13). To examine the interaction of TAFII-17 and VDR, 0.5 g of pM-TAFII-17, 0.5 g of pVP -16-hVDR, and 0.5 g of

  12. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of C7 differentiation into osteoclast was low and constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only extended C7 cell cultures exponentially increased osteoclast+ cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot'. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may maintain the stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. -- Abstract: Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  13. Measles Virus Nucleocapsid (MVNP) Gene Expression and RANK Receptor Signaling in Osteoclast Precursors, Osteoclast Inhibitors Peptide Therapy for Pagets Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    of bone. Bone 27: 417–421 14 Kurihara N., Reddy S. V., Menaa C., Anderson D. and Roodman G. D. (2000) Osteoclasts expressing the measles virus nucleo ...of osteoclasts and other mononuclear cells in pagetic bone specimens. Similarly, caninedistempervirus (CDV) nucleo - capsid antigens were also...the paramyxoviral nucleo - capsid gene that is expressed in patients with Paget’s disease. Mouse models of MV infection were also developed in which CD46

  14. ADAM8 Enhances Osteoclast Precursor Fusion and Osteoclast Formation In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Hisako; García-Palacios, Verónica; Lu, Ganwei; Subler, Mark A; Zhang, Heju; Boykin, Christina S; Choi, Sun Jin; Zhao, Liena; Patrene, Kenneth; Galson, Deborah L; Blair, Harry C; Hadi, Tamer M; Windle, Jolene J; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Roodman, G David

    2011-01-01

    ADAM8 expression is increased in the interface tissue around a loosened hip prosthesis and in the pannus and synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but its potential role in these processes is unclear. ADAM8 stimulates osteoclast (OCL) formation, but the effects of overexpression or loss of expression of ADAM8 in vivo and the mechanisms responsible for the effects of ADAM8 on osteoclastogenesis are unknown. Therefore, to determine the effects of modulating ADAM expression, we generated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)–ADAM8 transgenic mice that overexpress ADAM8 in the OCL lineage and ADAM8 knockout (ADAM8 KO) mice. TRAP-ADAM8 mice developed osteopenia and had increased numbers of OCL precursors that formed hypermultinucleated OCLs with an increased bone-resorbing capacity per OCL. They also had an enhanced differentiation capacity, increased TRAF6 expression, and increased NF-κB, Erk, and Akt signaling compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. This increased bone-resorbing capacity per OCL was associated with increased levels of p-Pyk2 and p-Src activation. In contrast, ADAM8 KO mice did not display a bone phenotype in vivo, but unlike WT littermates, they did not increase RANKL production, OCL formation, or calvarial fibrosis in response to tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in vivo. Since loss of ADAM8 does not inhibit basal bone remodeling but only blocks the enhanced OCL formation in response to TNF-α, these results suggest that ADAM8 may be an attractive therapeutic target for preventing bone destruction associated with inflammatory disease. © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20683884

  15. Effect of radiation on the expression of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Zheng; Fan, Fei-Yue; Sun, Yuan-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Cancer radiation therapy can cause skeletal complications, such as osteopenia and osteoporosis. To understand the mechanism responsible for the skeletal complications, the expression profiles of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells were observed. Osteoclast formation was established by RAW264.7 cells that were treated with the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and detected using immunochemistry and morphological observations. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the expression of a panel of osteoclast markers, including the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), integrin β3 and the calcitonin receptor (CTR). RANKL-induced osteoclasts were TRAP-positive and multinucleated, and displayed a distinct morphology. RANKL-induced osteoclast precursor cells had increased TRAP and RANK expression and decreased CTR expression compared to the control cells not treated with RANKL. RAW264.7 cells irradiated with 2-Gy γ-rays had upregulated integrin β3 and RANK expression and downregulated CTR expression compared to the control RAW264.7 cells. The effect of radiation on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation enhanced the expression of CTR and inhibited the expression of RANK and TRAP. Therefore, radiation damage from 2-Gy γ-rays can promote the activities of osteoclast precursor cells, but not those of osteoclasts.

  16. Effect of radiation on the expression of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHANG, XIAO-DONG; LIU, ZHENG; FAN, FEI-YUE; SUN, YUAN-MING

    2012-01-01

    Cancer radiation therapy can cause skeletal complications, such as osteopenia and osteoporosis. To understand the mechanism responsible for the skeletal complications, the expression profiles of osteoclast marker genes in RAW264.7 cells were observed. Osteoclast formation was established by RAW264.7 cells that were treated with the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL) and detected using immunochemistry and morphological observations. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the expression of a panel of osteoclast markers, including the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), integrin β3 and the calcitonin receptor (CTR). RANKL-induced osteoclasts were TRAP-positive and multinucleated, and displayed a distinct morphology. RANKL-induced osteoclast precursor cells had increased TRAP and RANK expression and decreased CTR expression compared to the control cells not treated with RANKL. RAW264.7 cells irradiated with 2-Gy γ-rays had upregulated integrin β3 and RANK expression and downregulated CTR expression compared to the control RAW264.7 cells. The effect of radiation on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation enhanced the expression of CTR and inhibited the expression of RANK and TRAP. Therefore, radiation damage from 2-Gy γ-rays can promote the activities of osteoclast precursor cells, but not those of osteoclasts. PMID:22294242

  17. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-02-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4(+) T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4(+) T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4(+) T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell-cell interactions.

  18. Novel immunostimulatory effects of osteoclasts and macrophages on human γδ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Angela; Thompson, Keith

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely reported that T cells are capable of influencing osteoclast formation and bone remodelling, yet relatively little is known of the reciprocal effects of osteoclasts for affecting T cell function and/or activity. In this study we investigated the effects of human osteoclasts on the function of γδ T cells, a subset of non-CD4+ T cells implicated in a variety of inflammatory disease states. γδ T cells and CD4+ T cells were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and were co-cultured with autologous mature osteoclasts (generated by treatment with M-CSF and RANKL) before phenotypical and functional changes in the T cell populations were assessed. Macrophages, osteoclasts, and conditioned medium derived from macrophages or osteoclasts induced activation of γδ T cells, as determined by the expression of the early activation marker CD69. TNFα was a major mediator of this stimulatory effect on γδ T cells. Consistent with this stimulatory effect, osteoclasts augmented proliferation of IL-2-stimulated γδ T cells and also supported the survival of unstimulated γδ and CD4+ T cells, although these effects required co-culture with osteoclasts. Co-culture with osteoclasts also increased the proportion of γδ T cells producing IFNγ, but did not modulate IFNγ or IL-17 production by CD4+ T cells. We provide new insights into the in vitro interactions between human γδ T cells and osteoclasts/macrophages, and demonstrate that osteoclasts or their precursors are capable of influencing γδ T function both via the release of soluble factors and also through direct cell–cell interactions. PMID:25445456

  19. Osteoclast-gene expression profiling reveals osteoclast-derived CCR2 chemokines promoting myeloma cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Moreaux, Jérôme; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Rème, Thierry; Moine, Philippe; Requirand, Guilhem; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells (multiple myeloma cells, MMC), primarily in the bone marrow (BM). Osteolytic bone lesions are detected in 80% of patients, due to increased osteoclastic bone resorption and reduced osteoblastic bone formation. MMC are found closely associated to sites of increased bone resorption. Osteoclasts strongly support MMC survival and vice versa in vitro. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in osteoclast/MMC interaction, we have identified 552 genes overexpressed in osteoclasts compared to other BM cell subpopulations. Osteoclasts express specifically genes coding for four CCR2-targeting chemokines, and genes coding for MMC growth factors (IGF-1, APRIL). An anti-CCR2 MoAb blocked osteoclast chemoattractant activity for MMC and CCR2-chemokines are also MMC growth factors, promoting MAPK activation in MMC. An anti-IGF-1 receptor MoAb completely blocked the osteoclast-induced survival of MMC suppressing both osteoclast and MMC survival. Specific APRIL or IL-6 inhibitors partially blocked osteoclast-induced MMC survival. These in-vitro data may explain why newly-diagnosed patients whose MMC express high levels of CCR2 present numerous bone lesions. Taken together, this study displays additional mechanisms involved in osteoclast/MMC interaction and suggests using CCR2 and/or IGF-1 targeting strategies to block this interaction and prevent drug resistance. PMID:21097672

  20. Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation by polycyclic aryl hydrocarbons is dependent on cell density and RANKL concentration.

    PubMed

    Voronov, I; Heersche, J N M; Casper, R F; Tenenbaum, H C; Manolson, M F

    2005-07-15

    We investigated the effect of representative polycyclic aryl hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) on osteoclast differentiation and function by using dispersed cancellous bone derived rabbit osteoclasts and the RAW264.7 cells. These cells differentiate into osteoclasts when exposed to receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). The rabbit osteoclasts were exposed to 10(-6) to 10(-9)M BaP or DMBA and the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells were counted. The effect of PAHs on osteoclast differentiation in dispersed rabbit osteoclast-containing stromal cell populations was cell density dependent, suggesting that the cell density of stromal cells, osteoclast precursors, and/or mature osteoclasts are factors regulating the effect of PAHs. To investigate the direct effect of BaP on osteoclast differentiation, RAW264.7 cells were exposed to 10(-5) to 10(-6) M BaP. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells cultured with 25 ng/ml soluble RANKL and 10(-5)M BaP for 5 days decreased osteoclast differentiation, TRAP activity levels, and resorption of bone-like substrata. The inhibition was prevented by 10(-6) to 10(-7) M resveratrol, an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonist, and by higher concentrations of RANKL. To investigate the ability of RANKL to reverse BaP-mediated inhibition, gene expression was determined by RT-PCR. Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) mRNA, one of the genes activated by BaP, was present only in the groups exposed to BaP; the levels of CYP1B1 mRNA decreased in the presence of increasing concentrations of RANKL. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of PAHs on osteoclastogenesis are direct and likely involve interaction of the RANKL and PAH signaling pathways.

  1. Osteoclasts differentiate from resident precursors in an in vivo model of synchronized resorption: a temporal and spatial study in rats.

    PubMed

    Baroukh, B; Cherruau, M; Dobigny, C; Guez, D; Saffar, J L

    2000-11-01

    Osteoclasts differentiate from mononucleated precursors expressing monocyte markers, which gradually evolve to preosteoclasts expressing the osteoclast phenotype. Although the role of osteogenic cells in these changes has been well documented in vitro, their contribution in vivo has not been established. In this study, a synchronized wave of resorption was activated along the mandibular periosteum. The periosteum adjacent to the bone surface studied was separated by a computer-assisted technique into an osteogenic alkaline phosphatase-positive compartment and an outer nonosteogenic compartment. Specific markers (nonspecific esterase [NSE], tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase [TRAP], and ED1 antibody, a marker of the monocyte-macrophage lineage) were used to follow osteoclast differentiation quantitatively as a function of time after activation of resorption, from day 0 to day 4 (peak of resorption in this model). Local cell proliferation was assessed in parallel. Between day 0 and day 3, the thickness of the osteogenic compartment decreased by 50% (p < 0.0002). In the osteogenic compartment, proliferating cell numbers fell by 80% at 12 day, NSE(+) cells (located farthest from the bone surface) increased 3. 9-fold on day 4 vs. day 0 (p < 0.005), ED1(+) cells decreased between day 0 and day 2 (p < 0.02) before returning to their initial value, and TRAP(+) cells increased 2.7-fold between day 1 and day 3 (p < 0.0005). Resorption was absent in the site studied on day 0, but on day 4 there were 20.5 osteoclast nuclei per millimeter of bone surface. The cell ratio changed from 30.3 NSE(+) and ED1(+) (some of which were also TRAP(+)) cells per millimeter on day 0 to 37.6 mononucleated cells plus 20.5 osteoclast nuclei on day 4. In the nonosteogenic compartment, an entry of ED1(+)/NSE(-) was observed on 12 day (+23 cells, p < 0.02 vs. day 0). This was followed by a return of ED1(+) cell numbers to the control level on day 1, and a transient increase in NSE(+) cells (+47

  2. Stochastic differentiation into an osteoclast lineage from cloned macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Murata, Akihiko; Okuyama, Kazuki; Shimoda, Yuhki; Hikosaka, Mari; Yasuda, Hisataka; Yoshino, Miya

    2012-11-16

    Differentiation into osteoclasts is induced by a macrophage colony-stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear-factor κB ligand. The macrophage-like cell line, C7 has the potential to differentiate into osteoclasts when it is cultured with both factors for 6 days. Although C7 is an established cell line, the frequency of differentiation into this lineage was less than 10%, and the ratio was maintained at a constant level, even after repeated cloning. In this study, to increase the differentiation of C7 cells to osteoclasts, C7 derivative treatments with several activators and/or inhibitors were performed for 3 days prior to setting osteoclast induction analysis; however, a reagent to significantly up-regulate the frequency of differentiation was not found. Only extended cultures for osteoclastogenesis exponentially increased the frequency of osteoclast precursors. It is likely that C7 cell differentiation into committed osteoclast precursors is on 'autopilot' rather than requiring specific signals to drive this process.

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells function as novel osteoclast progenitors enhancing bone loss in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Deshane, Jessy; Jules, Joel; Lee, Carnella M.; Harris, Brittney A.; Feng, Xu; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced bone destruction is a hallmark of various carcinomas such as breast cancer, where osteolytic bone metastasis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Immune cells contribute to osteolysis in cancer growth but the factors contributing to aggressive bone destruction are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in this process at bone metastatic sites. Since MDSC originate from the same myeloid lineage as macrophages, which are osteoclast precursors, we hypothesized that MDSC may undergo osteoclast differentiation and contribute to enhanced bone destruction and tumor growth. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis, we confirmed that MDSC isolated from the tumor-bone microenvironment differentiated into functional osteoclasts both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide signaling was critical for differentiation of MDSC into osteoclasts. Remarkably, osteoclast differentiation did not occur in MDSC isolated from control or tumor-bearing mice that lacked bone metastasis, signifying the essential cross-talk between tumor cells and myeloid progenitors in the bone microenvironment as a requirement for osteoclast differentiation of MDSC. Overall, our results identify a wholly new facet to the multifunctionality of MDSC in driving tumor progression, in this case as a novel osteoclast progenitor that specifically drives bone metastasis during cancer progression. PMID:23243021

  4. Immortalization of osteoclast precursors by targeting Bcl -XL and Simian virus 40 large T antigen to the osteoclast lineage in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hentunen, T A; Reddy, S V; Boyce, B F; Devlin, R; Park, H R; Chung, H; Selander, K S; Dallas, M; Kurihara, N; Galson, D L; Goldring, S R; Koop, B A; Windle, J J; Roodman, G D

    1998-01-01

    Cellular and molecular characterization of osteoclasts (OCL) has been extremely difficult since OCL are rare cells, and are difficult to isolate in large numbers. We used the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase promoter to target the bcl-XL and/or Simian Virus 40 large T antigen (Tag) genes to cells in the OCL lineage in transgenic mice as a means of immortalizing OCL precursors. Immunocytochemical studies confirmed that we had targeted Bcl-XL and/or Tag to OCL, and transformed and mitotic OCL were readily apparent in bones from both Tag and bcl-XL/Tag mice. OCL formation in primary bone marrow cultures from bcl-XL, Tag, or bcl-XL/Tag mice was twofold greater compared with that of nontransgenic littermates. Bone marrow cells from bcl-XL/Tag mice, but not from singly transgenic bcl-XL or Tag mice, have survived in continuous culture for more than a year. These cells form high numbers of bone-resorbing OCL when cultured using standard conditions for inducing OCL formation, with approximately 50% of the mononuclear cells incorporated into OCL. The OCL that form express calcitonin receptors and contract in response to calcitonin. Studies examining the proliferative capacity and the resistance of OCL precursors from these transgenic mice to apoptosis demonstrated that the increased numbers of OCL precursors in marrow from bcl-XL/Tag mice was due to their increased survival rather than an increased proliferative capacity compared with Tag, bcl-XL, or normal mice. Histomorphometric studies of bones from bcl-XL/Tag mice also confirmed that there were increased numbers of OCL precursors (TRAP + mononuclear cells) present in vivo. These data demonstrate that by targeting both bcl-XL and Tag to cells in the OCL lineage, we have immortalized OCL precursors that form bone-resorbing OCL with an efficiency that is 300-500 times greater than that of normal marrow. PMID:9649561

  5. Distinctive and selective route of PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 signaling in osteoclastic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Mi Yeong; Lee, Kyunghee; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-12-05

    Cell migration during specialized stages of osteoclast precursors, mononuclear preosteoclasts, and multinucleated mature osteoclasts remain uncertain. M-CSF- and osteopontin-induced osteoclastic cell migration was inhibited by function-blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to the integrin αv and β3 subunits, suggesting that integrin αvβ3 mediates migratory signaling induced by M-CSF and osteopontin. M-CSF and osteopontin stimulation was shown to regulate two branched signaling processes, PI3K/PKCα/RhoA axis and PI3K/PKCδ/Rac1 axis. Interestingly, inactivation of RhoA or Rac1 blocked preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration but not osteoclast precursor migration in a transwell-based cell migration assay. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration induced by Rac1 inactivation was more effective than that by RhoA inactivation. Collectively, our findings suggest that osteoclast precursor migration depends on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 bypassing RhoA and Rac1, whereas preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration relies on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 axis signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 with increased dependency on PKCδ/Rac1 signaling route as differentiation progresses.

  6. Diamagnetic levitation promotes osteoclast differentiation from RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Chen, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Yin, Chong; Li, Di-Jie; Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2015-03-01

    The superconducting magnet with a high magnetic force field can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study, a specially designed superconducting magnet with large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF), which provides three apparent gravity levels (μg, 1 g, and 2 g), was used to study its influence on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation from preosteoclast cell line RAW264.7. The effects of LGHMF on the viability, nitric oxide (NO) production, morphology in RAW264.7 cells were detected by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method, the Griess method, and the immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The changes induced by LGHMF in osteoclast formation, mRNA expression, and bone resorption were determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, semiquantity PCR, and bone resorption test, respectively. The results showed that: 1) LGHMF had no lethal effect on osteoclast precursors but attenuated NO release in RAW264.7 cells. 2) Diamagnetic levitation (μg) enhanced both the formation and bone resorption capacity of osteoclast. Moreover, diamagnetic levitation up-regulated mRNA expression of RANK, Cathepsin K, MMP-9, and NFATc1, while down-regulated RunX2 in comparison with controls. Furthermore, diamagnetic levitation induced obvious morphological alterations in osteoclast, including active cytoplasmic peripheral pseudopodial expansion, formation of pedosome belt, and aggregation of actin ring. 3) Magnetic field produced by LGHMF attenuated osteoclast resorption activity. Collectively, LGHMF with combined effects has multiple effects on osteoclast, which attenuated osteoclast resorption with magnetic field, whereas promoted osteoclast differentiation with diamagnetic levitation. Therefore, these findings indicate that diamagnetic levitation could be used as a novel ground-based microgravity simulator, which facilitates bone cell research of weightlessness condition.

  7. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-β levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  8. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  9. Slight changes in the mechanical stimulation affects osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells in co-culture.

    PubMed

    Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Duda, Georg N; Bormann, Nicole; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2013-12-01

    Osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells are responsible for coordinated bone maintenance, illustrated by a balanced formation and resorption. Both parameters appear to be influenced by mechanical constrains acting on each of these cell types individually. We hypothesized that the interactions between both cell types are also influenced by mechanical stimulation. Co-cultures of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells were stimulated with 1,100 µstrain, 0.1 or 0.3 Hz for 1-5 min/day over 5 days. Two different setups depending on the differentiation of the osteoclast-like cells were used: i) differentiation assay for the fusion of pre-osteoclasts to osteoclasts, ii) resorption assay to determine the activity level of osteoclast-like cells. In the differentiation assay (co-culture of osteoblasts with unfused osteoclast precursor cells) the mechanical stimulation resulted in a significant decrease of collagen-1 and osteocalcin produced by osteoblast-like cells. Significantly more TRAP-iso5b was measured after stimulation for 3 min with 0.1 Hz, indicating enhanced osteoclastogenesis. In the resorption assay (co-culture of osteoblasts with fused osteoclasts) the stimulation for 3 min with 0.3 Hz significantly increased the resorption activity of osteoclasts measured by the pit formation and the collagen resorption. The same mechanical stimulation resulted in an increased collagen-1 production by the osteoblast-like cells. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was not different between the groups. These findings demonstrate that already small changes in duration or frequency of mechanical stimulation had significant consequences for the behavior of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells in co-culture, which partially depend on the differentiation status of the osteoclast-like cells.

  10. Mice lacking JunB are osteopenic due to cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Lukas; Hoebertz, Astrid; Beil, F Timo; Beil, Timo; Keon, Niamh; Karreth, Florian; Eferl, Robert; Scheuch, Harald; Szremska, Agnieszka; Amling, Michael; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina; Angel, Peter; Wagner, Erwin F

    2004-02-16

    Because JunB is an essential gene for placentation, it was conditionally deleted in the embryo proper. JunBDelta/Delta mice are born viable, but develop severe low turnover osteopenia caused by apparent cell-autonomous osteoblast and osteoclast defects before a chronic myeloid leukemia-like disease. Although JunB was reported to be a negative regulator of cell proliferation, junBDelta/Delta osteoclast precursors and osteoblasts show reduced proliferation along with a differentiation defect in vivo and in vitro. Mutant osteoblasts express elevated p16(INK4a) levels, but exhibit decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin A expression. Runx2 is transiently increased during osteoblast differentiation in vitro, whereas mature osteoblast markers such as osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein are strongly reduced. To support a cell-autonomous function of JunB in osteoclasts, junB was inactivated specifically in the macrophage-osteoclast lineage. Mutant mice develop an osteopetrosis-like phenotype with increased bone mass and reduced numbers of osteoclasts. Thus, these data reveal a novel function of JunB as a positive regulator controlling primarily osteoblast as well as osteoclast activity.

  11. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) increases circulating osteoclast (OC) precursors numbers by promoting their proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNF inhibitors (TNFi) on the differentiation and activity of OC in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods. Seventeen RA patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers, in vitro OC differentiation assays, and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes was performed. Results. After TNFi therapy, patients had reduced RANKL surface expression in B-lymphocytes and the frequency of circulating classical CD14brightCD16− monocytes was decreased. Serum levels of sRANKL, sRANKL/OPG ratio, and CTX-I were reduced in RA patients after TNFi treatment. Moreover, after exposure to TNFi, osteoclast differentiation and activity were decreased, as well as the expression of TRAF6 and cathepsin K. Conclusion. We propose that TNFi arrests bone loss and erosion, through two pathways: direct reduction of osteoclast precursor numbers and inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways acting through TRAF6. PMID:28286757

  12. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppress osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting superoxide and NFATc1 downregulation in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Omori, Akina; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Kuniaki

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the natural polyphenols, rosmarinic acid and arbutin, on osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppressed osteoclast differentiation and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursor cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin inhibited superoxide production in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and the osteoclast marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin-K, decreased following treatments with rosmarinic acid and arbutin. Furthermore, resorption activity decreased with the number of osteoclasts. These results suggest that rosmarinic acid and arbutin may be useful for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, through mechanisms involving inhibition of superoxide and downregulation of NFATc1.

  13. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppress osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting superoxide and NFATc1 downregulation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    OMORI, AKINA; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; DEYAMA, YOSHIAKI; SUZUKI, KUNIAKI

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the natural polyphenols, rosmarinic acid and arbutin, on osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin suppressed osteoclast differentiation and had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursor cells. Rosmarinic acid and arbutin inhibited superoxide production in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA expression of the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and the osteoclast marker genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin-K, decreased following treatments with rosmarinic acid and arbutin. Furthermore, resorption activity decreased with the number of osteoclasts. These results suggest that rosmarinic acid and arbutin may be useful for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, through mechanisms involving inhibition of superoxide and downregulation of NFATc1. PMID:26171153

  14. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  15. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  16. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I; Davison, Noel L; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones--cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  17. Comparison of direct and indirect radiation effects on osteoclast formation from progenitor cells derived from different hemopoietic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Kawilarang-de Haas, E.W.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1987-07-01

    Hemopoietic stem and progenitor cells from different sources differ in radiosensitivity. Recently, we have demonstrated that the multinucleated cell responsible for bone resorption and marrow cavity formation, the osteoclast, is in fact of hemopoietic lineage. In this investigation we have studied the radiosensitivity of osteoclast formation from two different hemopoietic tissues: fetal liver and adult bone marrow. Development of osteoclasts from hemopoietic progenitors was induced by coculture of hemopoietic cell populations with fetal mouse long bones depleted of their own osteoclast precursor pool. During culture, osteoclasts developed from the exogenous cell population and invaded the calcified hypertrophic cartilage of the long bone model, thereby giving rise to the formation of a primitive marrow cavity. To analyze the radiosensitivity of osteoclast formation, either the hemopoietic cells or the bone rudiments were irradiated before coculture. Fetal liver cells were found to be less radiosensitive than bone marrow cells. The D0, Dq values and extrapolation numbers were 1.69 Gy, 5.30 Gy, and 24.40 for fetal liver cells and 1.01 Gy, 1.85 Gy, and 6.02 for bone marrow cells. Irradiation of the (pre)osteoclast-free long bone rudiments instead of the hemopoietic sources resulted in a significant inhibition of osteoclast formation at doses of 4 Gy or more. This indirect effect appeared to be more prominent in the cocultures with fetal than with adult hemopoietic cells. Furthermore, radiation doses of 8.0-10.0 Gy indirectly affected the appearance of other cell types (e.g., granulocytes) in the newly formed but underdeveloped marrow cavity. The results indicate that osteoclast progenitors from different hemopoietic sources exhibit a distinct sensitivity to ionizing irradiation. Radiation injury to long bone rudiments disturbs the osteoclast-forming capacity as well as the hemopoietic microenvironment.

  18. Co-culture with periodontal ligament stem cells enhanced osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shulan; Ye, Xin; Yu, Xinbo; Xu, Quanchen; Pan, Keqing; Lu, Shulai; Yang, Pishan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are characterized by having multipotential differentiation and immunoregulatory properties, which are the main mechanisms of PDLSCs-mediated periodontal regeneration. Periodontal or bone regeneration requires coordination of osteoblast and osteoclast, however, very little is known about the interactions between PDLSCs and osteoblast-like cells or osteoclast precursors. In this study, the indirect co-culture approach was introduced to preliminarily elucidate the effects of PDLSCs on differentiation of osteoblast-like cells and osteoclast precursors in vitro. Materials and methods: Human PDLSCs were obtained from premolars extracted and their stemness was identified in terms of their colony-forming ability, proliferative capacity, cell surface epitopes and multi-lineage differentiation potentials. A noncontact co-culture system of PDLSCs and preosteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 or osteoclast precursor cell line RAW264.7 was established, and osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 and osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 were evaluated. Results: PDLSCs exhibited features of mesenchymal stem cells. Further investigation through indirect co-culture system showed that PDLSCs enhanced ALP activity, expressions of ALP, Runx2, BSP, OPN mRNA and BSP, OPN proteins and mineralization matrix deposition in MC3T3-E1. Meanwhile, they improved maturation of osteoclasts and expressions of TRAP, CSTK, TRAF6 mRNA and TRAP, TRAF6 proteins in RAW264.7. Conclusions: PDLSCs stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of osteoblast precursors and osteoclastic differentiation of osteoclast precursors, at least partially, in a paracrine fasion. PMID:26823783

  19. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Supports Homing of Osteoclast Precursors to Peripheral Osteolytic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Ishii, Takenobu; Albassam, Abdullah; Wisitrasameewong, Wichaya; Howait, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Tsuguno; Ruiz-Torruella, Montserrat; Bahammam, Laila; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Van Dyke, Thomas; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2016-09-01

    By binding to its chemokine receptor CXCR4 on osteoclast precursor cells (OCPs), it is well known that stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) promotes the chemotactic recruitment of circulating OCPs to the homeostatic bone remodeling site. However, the engagement of circulating OCPs in pathogenic bone resorption remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated a possible chemoattractant role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), another ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), in the recruitment of circulating OCPs to the bone lytic lesion. To accomplish this, we used Csf1r-eGFP-knock-in (KI) mice to establish an animal model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particle-induced calvarial osteolysis. In the circulating Csf1r-eGFP+ cells of healthy Csf1r-eGFP-KI mice, Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells showed a greater degree of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis compared to a subset of Csf1r+/RANK+ cells in vitro. Therefore, Csf1r-eGFP+/CD11b+ cells were targeted as functionally relevant OCPs in the present study. Although expression of the two cognate receptors for MIF, CXCR2 and CXCR4, was elevated on Csf1r+/CD11b+ cells, transmigration of OCPs toward recombinant MIF in vitro was facilitated by ligation with CXCR4, but not CXCR2. Meanwhile, the level of PMMA-induced bone resorption in calvaria was markedly greater in wild-type (WT) mice compared to that detected in MIF-knockout (KO) mice. Interestingly, in contrast to the elevated MIF, diminished SDF-1 was detected in a particle-induced bone lytic lesion of WT mice in conjunction with an increased number of infiltrating CXCR4+ OCPs. However, such diminished SDF-1 was not found in the PMMA-injected calvaria of MIF-KO mice. Furthermore, stimulation of osteoblasts with MIF in vitro suppressed their production of SDF-1, suggesting that MIF can downmodulate SDF-1 production in bone tissue. Systemically administered anti-MIF neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) inhibited the homing of CXCR4+ OCPs, as well as

  20. Characterization of inorganic phosphate transport in osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Matsuka, Naoko; Izuka, Michiyo; Haito, Sakiko; Sakai, Yuko; Nakamura, Rie; Segawa, Hiroko; Kuwahata, Masashi; Yamamoto, Hironori; Pike, Wesley J; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2005-04-01

    Osteoclasts possess inorganic phosphate (Pi) transport systems to take up external Pi during bone resorption. In the present study, we characterized Pi transport in mouse osteoclast-like cells that were obtained by differentiation of macrophage RAW264.7 cells with receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). In undifferentiated RAW264.7 cells, Pi transport into the cells was Na+ dependent, but after treatment with RANKL, Na+-independent Pi transport was significantly increased. In addition, compared with neutral pH, the activity of the Na+-independent Pi transport system in the osteoclast-like cells was markedly enhanced at pH 5.5. The Na+-independent system consisted of two components with Km of 0.35 mM and 7.5 mM. The inhibitors of Pi transport, phosphonoformic acid, and arsenate substantially decreased Pi transport. The proton ionophores nigericin and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone as well as a K+ ionophore, valinomycin, significantly suppressed Pi transport activity. Analysis of BCECF fluorescence indicated that Pi transport in osteoclast-like cells is coupled to a proton transport system. In addition, elevation of extracellular K+ ion stimulated Pi transport, suggesting that membrane voltage is involved in the regulation of Pi transport activity. Finally, bone particles significantly increased Na+-independent Pi transport activity in osteoclast-like cells. Thus, osteoclast-like cells have a Pi transport system with characteristics that are different from those of other Na+-dependent Pi transporters. We conclude that stimulation of Pi transport at acidic pH is necessary for bone resorption or for production of the large amounts of energy necessary for acidification of the extracellular environment.

  1. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 delta: a novel osteoclast stimulating factor secreted by renal cell carcinoma bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kominsky, Scott L; Abdelmagid, Samir M; Doucet, Michele; Brady, Kelly; Weber, Kristy L

    2008-03-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) develop bone metastasis, which is characterized by extensive osteolysis leading to severe bone pain and pathologic fracture. Although the mechanism of RCC-induced osteolysis is unknown, studies of bone metastasis have shown that tumor-induced changes in bone remodeling are likely mediated by alterations in the bone microenvironment. Here, we report the discovery of a novel osteoclast stimulatory factor secreted by RCC bone metastasis (RBM). Through microarray analysis, we found expression of the chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 delta (MIP-1 delta), to be increased in RBM versus patient-matched primary RCC tissues and confirmed this finding by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ELISA (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MIP-1 delta expression in RBM tissues was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than in human bone marrow, suggesting a potential alteration of the bone microenvironment. The receptors for MIP-1 delta, CCR1 and CCR3, were expressed in both osteoclast precursors and mature, bone-resorbing osteoclasts as shown by qRT-PCR and Western analysis. In functional studies, MIP-1 delta stimulated chemotaxis of two osteoclast precursor cell types: murine bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNC) and RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, MIP-1 delta treatment of murine calvaria caused increased bone resorption as determined by measurement of released calcium. Correspondingly, MIP-1 delta significantly enhanced osteoclast formation and activity in response to RANKL in both BM-MNC and RAW 264.7 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that MIP-1 delta expression is increased in RBM relative to RCC and bone marrow, and may promote RBM-induced osteolysis by stimulating the recruitment and differentiation of osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts.

  2. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Han-Ching; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1β, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer.

  3. Molecular Profiling of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone and the Osteoclastic Localization of Ligand for Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Teresa; Atkins, Gerald J.; Trivett, Melanie K.; Johnson, Sandra A.; Kansara, Maya; Schlicht, Stephen L.; Slavin, John L.; Simmons, Paul; Dickinson, Ian; Powell, Gerald; Choong, Peter F.M.; Holloway, Andrew J.; Thomas, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a generally benign, osteolytic neoplasm comprising stromal cells and osteoclast-like giant cells. The osteoclastic cells, which cause bony destruction, are thought to be recruited from normal monocytic pre-osteoclasts by stromal cell expression of the ligand for receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL). This model forms the foundation for clinical trials in GCTs of novel cancer therapeutics targeting RANKL. Using expression profiling, we identified both osteoblast and osteoclast signatures within GCTs, including key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and function such as RANKL, a C-type lectin, osteoprotegerin, and the wnt inhibitor SFRP4. After ex vivo generation of stromal- and osteoclast-enriched cultures, we unexpectedly found that RANKL mRNA and protein were more highly expressed in osteoclasts than in stromal cells, as determined by expression profiling, flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The expression patterns of molecules implicated in signaling between stromal cells and monocytic osteoclast precursors were analyzed in both primary and fractionated GCTs. Finally, using array-based comparative genomic hybridization, neither GCTs nor the derived stromal cells demonstrated significant genomic gains or losses. These data raise questions regarding the role of RANKL in GCTs that may be relevant to the development of molecularly targeted therapeutics for this disease. PMID:15972958

  4. Adipokines in Psoriatic Arthritis Patients: The Correlations with Osteoclast Precursors and Bone Erosions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qingqing; Chen, Haiyan; Yu, Yiyun; Lin, Yinda; Yang, Xue; Kong, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Xue; Wan, Weiguo; Zou, Hejian

    2012-01-01

    Significant bone remodeling with disordered osteoclastogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). And there is a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in PsA patients. Adipokines, especially leptin and adiponectin, have recently been reported to be involved in the development and regulation of some autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the alternation of circulating osteoclastogenesis related cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)] and adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin, omentin) in PsA patients, and analysed the correlations between these factors and osteoclast precursors numbers, radiographic damage scores, and disease activity index. 41 PsA patients, 20 psoriasis patients, and 24 healthy controls were recruited. Blood samples were obtained for detecting the levels of TNF-α, OPG, RANKL and the adipokines. The numbers of osteoclast precursors (OCs) in peripheral blood were assessed. Radiographs of affected joints in PsA patients were scored for erosion, joint-space narrowing, osteolysis, and new bone formation. Compared with healthy controls, patients with PsA had higher TNF-α, RANKL, OCs, leptin and omentin but lower adiponectin and chemerin. Increased serum levels of TNF-α, RANKL, leptin, and omentin were positively correlated with OCs numbers. In contrast, serum adiponectin levels were decreased in PsA patients and negatively correlated with OCs numbers. TNF-α, RANKL and leptin were positively correlated with Psoriatic Arthritis Joint Activity Index (PsAJAI). Only TNF-α was positively correlated with radiographic damage scores. Our data demonstrated that systemic expression of soluble mediators of osteoclastogenesis and adipokines were disordered in PsA. Certain adipokines were elevated in the circulation of patients with PsA and might contribute to pathogenesis of arthritis. Prospective studies

  5. Osteoclast-like cells in soft tissue leiomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C L M H; Sun, S G; Vlychou, M; Kliskey, K; Lau, Y S; Sabokbar, A; Athanasou, N A

    2010-03-01

    Giant cell-rich leiomyosarcoma of soft tissues is an unusual variant of malignant smooth muscle tumor characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs). The nature of MNGCs and the cellular mechanisms underlying their accumulation in this tumor are poorly understood. Analysis of the expression of osteoclast, macrophage, and smooth muscle markers in two cases of giant cell-rich leiomyosarcoma revealed that the MNGCs in giant cell-rich leiomyosarcoma were negative for smooth muscle markers and that these cells expressed an osteoclast-like phenotype, being positive for CD45, CD68, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and CD51 but negative for CD14 and HLA-DR. Scattered tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) also expressed this phenotype. Leiomyosarcoma tumor cells strongly reacted for CD51 but were negative for CD14, CD45, and CD68. An analysis of 25 conventional (nongiant cell-containing) leiomyosarcomas found isolated CD68(+) MNGCs in three cases (12%), all of which were grade II/III leiomyosarcomas containing a prominent TAM infiltrate. Leiomyosarcoma-derived TAMs in the presence of receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor were capable of differentiating into osteoclast-like cells capable of resorbing bone. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction studies showed that RANKL, osteoprotegerin, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand were expressed by leiomyosarcoma cells. Our findings indicate that the giant cells found in leiomyosarcomas are osteoclast-like and that they are formed from TAMs by a RANKL-dependent mechanism.

  6. The small molecule harmine regulates NFATc1 and Id2 expression in osteoclast progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Doi, Masanori; Saeki, Makio; Fukuyasu, Sho; Akashi, Yoshihiro; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Kamisaki, Yoshinori

    2011-08-01

    Small molecule compounds that potently affect osteoclastogenesis could be useful as chemical probes for elucidating the mechanisms of various biological phenomena and as effective therapeutic strategies against bone resorption. An osteoclast progenitor cell-based high-throughput screening system was designed to target activation of NFAT, which is a key event for osteoclastogenesis. Orphan ligand library screening using this system identified the β-carboline derivative harmine, which is a highly potent inhibitor of dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), to be an NFAT regulator in osteoclasts. RAW264.7 cells highly expressed DYRK1A protein, and in vitro phosphorylation assay demonstrated that harmine directly inhibited the DYRK1A-mediated phosphorylation (in-activation) of NFATc1. Harmine promoted the dephosphorylation (activation) of NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells within 24h, and it significantly increased the expression of NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells and mouse primary bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) both in the presence and absence of RANKL stimulation. Although harmine promoted NFATc1 expression and stimulated target genes for osteoclastogenesis, cell-cell fusion and the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated osteoclasts from RAW264.7 cells and BMMs was significantly inhibited by harmine treatment. Meanwhile, harmine remarkably promoted the expression of inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation-2 (Id2), which is a negative regulator for osteoclastogenesis, in RAW264.7 cells and BMMs. An Id2-null-mutant showed slightly increased osteoclast formation from BMMs, and the harmine-mediated inhibition of osteoclast formation was abolished in the BMMs of Id2-null-mutant mice. These results suggest that harmine is a potent activator of NFATc1 that interferes with the function of DYRK1A in osteoclast precursors and also up-regulates Id2 protein, which may dominantly inhibit expression pathways associated with cell-cell fusion, thereby leading to

  7. Decreased Ferroportin Promotes Myeloma Cell Growth and Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell–induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  8. Effects of Silicon on Osteoclast Cell Mediated Degradation, In Vivo Osteogenesis and Vasculogenesis of Brushite Cement

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are being widely used for treating small scale bone defects. Among the various CPCs, brushite (dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, DCPD) cement is widely used due to its superior solubility and ability to form new bone. In the present study, we have studied the physical, mechanical, osteoclast-like-cells differentiation and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of silicon (Si) doped brushite cements. Addition of Si did not alter the phase composition of final product and regardless of Si level, all samples included β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and DCPD. 1.1 wt. % Si addition increased the compressive strength of undoped brushite cement from 4.78±0.21 MPa to 5.53±0.53 MPa, significantly. Cellular activity was studied using receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) supplemented osteoclast-like-cells precursor RAW 264.7 cell. Phenotypic expressions of the cells confirmed successful differentiation of RAW264.7 monocytes to osteoclast-like-cells on undoped and doped brushite cements. An increased activity of osteoclast-like cells was noticed due to Si doping in the brushite cement. An excellent new bone formation was found in all cement compositions, with significant increase in Si doped brushite samples as early as 4 weeks post implantation in rat femoral model. After 4 weeks of implantation, no significant difference was found in blood vessel formation between the undoped and doped cements, however, a significant increase in vasculgenesis was found in 0.8 and 1.1 wt. % Si doped brushite cements after 8 weeks. These results show the influence of Si dopant on physical, mechanical, in vitro osteoclastogenesis and in vivo osteogenic and vasculogenic properties of brushite cements. PMID:26855779

  9. Low-energy irradiation stimulates formation of osteoclast-like cells via RANK expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Norihito; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Kasai, Kazutaka

    2006-04-01

    Low-energy laser irradiation (Ga-Al-As semiconductor laser, output 50 mW) was applied to rat osteoclast precursor cells for 1, 3, 6, or 10 min at 24-h intervals during the culture period. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinucleate cells was increased by approximately 1.3-fold in the 3- and 6-min irradiation groups. Further, osteoclasts appeared on day 2 in the laser irradiation groups but not until day 3 in the control groups. In immunohistochemical staining for receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK), the laser irradiation groups showed significantly greater amounts of staining in comparison with the control group on days 2 and 3. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results also showed that the expressions of RANK were upregulated. In the pit formation assay, resorption pits were significantly more abundant in the laser irradiation groups than in the controls. The present results suggest that low-energy laser irradiation facilitates differentiation and activation of osteoclasts via RANK expression.

  10. Substance P stimulates bone marrow stromal cell osteogenic activity, osteoclast differentiation, and resorption activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Zhao, Rong; Shi, Xiaoyou; Wei, Tzuping; Halloran, Bernard P.; Clark, David J.; Jacobs, Christopher R.; Kingery, Wade S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction SP is a neuropeptide distributed in the sensory nerve fibers that innervate the medullar tissues of bone, as well as the periosteum. Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of neuropeptide signaling after capsaicin treatment resulted in a loss of bone mass and we hypothesized that SP contributes to bone integrity by stimulating osteogenesis. Materials and Methods Osteoblast precursors (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and osteoclast precursors (bone marrow macrophages, BMMs) derived from C57BL/6 mice were cultured. Expression of the SP receptor (NK1) was detected by using immunocytochemical staining and PCR. Effects of SP on proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were studied by measuring BrdU incorporation, gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin and Runx2 protein levels with EIA and western blot assays, respectively. Effects of SP on BMMs were determined using a BrdU assay, counting multinucleated cells staining positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP+), measuring pit erosion area, and evaluating RANKL protein production and NF-κB activity with ELISA and western blot. Results The NK1 receptor was expressed in both BMSCs and BMMs. SP stimulated the proliferation of BMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10−12 M) of SP stimulated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression, increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and up-regulated Runx2 protein levels, and higher concentrations of SP (10−8 M) enhanced mineralization in differentiated BMSCs. SP also stimulated BMSCs to produce RANKL, but at concentrations too low to evoke osteoclastogenesis in co-culture with macrophages in the presence of SP. SP also activated NF-κB in BMMs and directly facilitate RANKL induced macrophage osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity. Conclusions NK1 receptors are expressed by osteoblast and osteoclast precursors and SP stimulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in

  11. RANKL induces heterogeneous DC-STAMP(lo) and DC-STAMP(hi) osteoclast precursors of which the DC-STAMP(lo) precursors are the master fusogens.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Kofi A; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Schwarz, Edward M

    2010-04-01

    Osteoclasts (OC) are multinucleated bone resorbing cells that form via RANKL-induced fusion of heterogeneous mononuclear OC precursors (OCP). Currently, there are no unique surface markers to distinguish these OCP populations, which are diagnostic for erosive and metabolic bone diseases using culture assays. Thus, we investigated expression of DC-STAMP, a surface receptor required for OCP fusion, during osteoclastogenesis in vitro using a novel monoclonal antibody (1A2). Immunoprecipitation-Western blot analysis of OCP membrane proteins detected 106 kDa dimeric and 53 kDa monomeric DC-STAMP in non-denaturing and denaturing conditions, respectively, with greater sensitivity versus rabbit anti-sera (KR104). 1A2 also detected 99.9% of undifferentiated monocytes as a single population by flow cytometry with a MFI 100-fold over background, while KR104 was not useful in this assay. Functionally, 1A2 inhibited OCP fusion in vitro. RANKL stimulation of OCP induced DC-STAMP(lo) and DC-STAMP(hi) cells, which mature into OC and mononuclear cells respectively as determined by fluorescent microscopy and TRAP assays. Addition of DC-STAMP(hi) cells to purified DC-STAMP(lo) cultures produced larger, more nucleated OC vs. pure DC-STAMP(lo) cultures. RT-qPCR analysis of these two populations showed that OC markers (Trap and Oc-stamp) and fusogenic gene expression (Cd9 and Cd47), were significantly increased in DC-STAMP(lo) vs. DC-STAMP(hi) cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that DC-STAMP is expressed on OCP as a dimer, which is efficiently detected by 1A2 via flow cytometry. RANKL induces osteoclastogenesis by stimulating DC-STAMP internalization in some OCP, and these DC-STAMP(lo) cells display the "master fusogen" phenotype. In contrast, DC-STAMP(hi) OCP can only act as mononuclear donors. J. Cell. Physiol. 223: 76-83, 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. RANKL induces heterogeneous DC-STAMPlo and DC-STAMPhi osteoclast precursors of which the DC-STAMPlo precursors are the master fusogens

    PubMed Central

    Mensah, Kofi A.; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts (OC) are multinucleated bone resorbing cells that form via RANKL-induced fusion of heterogeneous mononuclear OC precursors (OCP). Currently, there are no unique surface markers to distinguish these OCP populations, which are diagnostic for erosive and metabolic bone diseases using culture assays. Thus, we investigated expression of DC-STAMP, a surface receptor required for OCP fusion, during osteoclastogenesis in vitro using a novel monoclonal antibody (1A2). Immunoprecipitation-western blot analysis of OCP membrane proteins detected 106 kDa dimeric and 53 kDa monomeric DC-STAMP in non-denaturing and denaturing conditions respectively, with greater sensitivity vs. rabbit anti-sera (KR104). 1A2 also detected 99.9% of undifferentiated monocytes as a single population by flow cytometry with a MFI 100-fold over background, while KR104 was not useful in this assay. Functionally, 1A2 inhibited OCP fusion in vitro. RANKL stimulation of OCP induced DC-STAMPlo and DC-STAMPhi cells, which mature into OC and mononuclear cells respectively as determined by fluorescent microscopy and TRAP assays. Addition of DC-STAMPhi cells to purified DC-STAMPlo cultures produced larger, more nucleated OC vs. pure DC-STAMPlo cultures. RT-qPCR analysis of these two populations showed that OC markers (Trap and Oc-stamp) and fusogenic gene expression (Cd9 and Cd47), were significantly increased in DC-STAMPlo vs. DC-STAMPhi cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that DC-STAMP is expressed on OCP as a dimer, which is efficiently detected by 1A2 via flow cytometry. RANKL induces osteoclastogenesis by stimulating DC-STAMP internalization in some OCP, and these DC-STAMPlo cells display the “master fusogen” phenotype. In contrast, DC-STAMPhi OCP can only act as mononuclear donors. PMID:20039274

  13. Predictors of osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Cheng, Kevin; Niu, Xiaomei; Moore-King, Evadne; Fadojutimi-Akinsi, Margaret F; Minniti, Caterina P; Sable, Craig; Rana, Sohail; Dham, Niti; Campbell, Andrew; Ensing, Gregory; Kato, Gregory J; Gladwin, Mark T; Castro, Oswaldo L; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2011-08-01

    Bone changes are common in sickle cell disease, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) type 5b is produced by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In other forms of hemolytic anemia, increased iron stores are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesized that transfusional iron overload would be associated with increased osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease. We examined tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations in patients with sickle cell disease and normal controls of similar age and sex distribution at steady state. Serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentration was measured using an immunocapture enzyme assay and plasma concentrations of other cytokines were assayed using the Bio-Plex suspension array system. Tricuspid regurgitation velocity, an indirect measure of systolic pulmonary artery pressure, was determined by echocardiography. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations were higher in 58 adults with sickle cell disease than in 22 controls (medians of 4.4 versus 2.4 U/L, respectively; P=0.0001). Among the patients with sickle cell disease, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b independently correlated with blood urea nitrogen (standardized beta=0.40, P=0.003), interleukin-8 (standardized beta=0.30, P=0.020), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 5 (standardized beta=-0.28, P=0.031) concentrations, but not with serum ferritin concentration. Frequent blood transfusions (>10 units in life time) were not associated with higher tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels in multivariate analysis. There were strong correlations among tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, alkaline phosphatase and tricuspid regurgitation velocity (r>0.35, P<0.001). Patients with sickle cell disease have increased osteoclast activity as reflected by serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations. Our results may support a potential role of inflammation rather than increased

  14. Predictors of osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Cheng, Kevin; Niu, Xiaomei; Moore-King, Evadne; Fadojutimi-Akinsi, Margaret F.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Sable, Craig; Rana, Sohail; Dham, Niti; Campbell, Andrew; Ensing, Gregory; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Gordeuk, Victor R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Bone changes are common in sickle cell disease, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) type 5b is produced by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In other forms of hemolytic anemia, increased iron stores are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesized that transfusional iron overload would be associated with increased osteoclast activity in patients with sickle cell disease. Design and Methods We examined tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations in patients with sickle cell disease and normal controls of similar age and sex distribution at steady state. Serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentration was measured using an immunocapture enzyme assay and plasma concentrations of other cytokines were assayed using the Bio-Plex suspension array system. Tricuspid regurgitation velocity, an indirect measure of systolic pulmonary artery pressure, was determined by echocardiography. Results Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations were higher in 58 adults with sickle cell disease than in 22 controls (medians of 4.4 versus 2.4 U/L, respectively; P=0.0001). Among the patients with sickle cell disease, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b independently correlated with blood urea nitrogen (standardized beta=0.40, P=0.003), interleukin-8 (standardized beta=0.30, P=0.020), and chemokine C-C motif ligand 5 (standardized beta=−0.28, P=0.031) concentrations, but not with serum ferritin concentration. Frequent blood transfusions (>10 units in life time) were not associated with higher tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels in multivariate analysis. There were strong correlations among tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, alkaline phosphatase and tricuspid regurgitation velocity (r>0.35, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients with sickle cell disease have increased osteoclast activity as reflected by serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b concentrations. Our results may support a

  15. Interleukin-15-activated natural killer cells kill autologous osteoclasts via LFA-1, DNAM-1 and TRAIL, and inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shan; Madsen, Suzi H; Viller, Natasja N; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita V; Geisler, Carsten; Karlsson, Lars; Söderström, Kalle

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts reside on bone and are the main bone resorbing cells playing an important role in bone homeostasis, while natural killer (NK) cells are bone-marrow-derived cells known to play a crucial role in immune defence against viral infections. Although mature NK cells traffic through bone marrow as well as to inflammatory sites associated with enhanced bone erosion, including the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, little is known about the impact NK cells may have on mature osteoclasts and bone erosion. We studied the interaction between human NK cells and autologous monocyte-derived osteoclasts from healthy donors in vitro. We show that osteoclasts express numerous ligands for receptors present on activated NK cells. Co-culture experiments revealed that interleukin-15-activated, but not resting, NK cells trigger osteoclast apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in drastically decreased bone erosion. Suppression of bone erosion requires contact between NK cells and osteoclasts, but soluble factors also play a minor role. Antibodies masking leucocyte function-associated antigen-1, DNAX accessory molecule-1 or tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand enhance osteoclast survival when co-cultured with activated NK cells and restore the capacity of osteoclasts to erode bone. These results suggest that interleukin-15-activated NK cells may directly affect bone erosion under physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. The effects of Lycii Radicis Cortex on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activation in RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JAE-HYUN; KIM, EUN-YOUNG; LEE, BINA; MIN, JU-HEE; SONG, DEA-UK; LIM, JEONG-MIN; EOM, JI WHAN; YEOM, MIJUNG; JUNG, HYUK-SANG; SOHN, YOUNGJOO

    2016-01-01

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a serious age-related disease. After the menopause, estrogen deficiency is common, and excessive osteoclast activity causes osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells generated from the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage precursor cells such as RAW 264.7 cells. The water extract of Lycii Radicis Cortex (LRC) is made from the dried root bark of Lycium chinense Mill. and is termed 'Jigolpi' in Korea. Its effects on osteoclastogenesis and post-menopausal osteoporosis had not previously been tested. In the present study, the effect of LRC on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was demonstrated using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and pit formation assay. Moreover, in order to analyze molecular mechanisms, we studied osteoclastogenesis-related markers such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), c-Fos, receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), TRAP, cathepsin K (CTK), matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), calcitonin receptor (CTR) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) using RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. Additionally, we also determined the effect of LRC on an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model. We noted that LRC inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via suppressing osteoclastogenesis-related markers. It also inhibited osteoporosis in the OVX rat model by decreasing loss of bone density and trabecular area. These results suggest that LRC exerts a positive effect on menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26848104

  17. Osteoclasts and giant cells: macrophage–macrophage fusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vignery, Agnès

    2000-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a ubiquitous event that occurs in a wide range of biological processes. While intracellular membrane fusion mediating organelle trafficking is well understood, much less is known about cell–cell fusion mediating sperm cell–oocyte, myoblast–myoblast and macrophage–macrophage fusion. In the case of mononuclear phagocytes, their fusion is not only associated with the differentiation of osteoclasts, cells which play a key role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, but also of giant cells that are present in chronic inflammatory reactions and in tumours. Despite the biological and pathophysiological importance of intercellular fusion events, the actual molecular mechanism of macrophage fusion is still unclear. One of the main research themes in my laboratory has been to investigate the molecular mechanism of mononuclear phagocyte fusion. Our hypothesis has been that macrophage–macrophage fusion, similar to virus–cell fusion, is mediated by specific cell surface proteins. But, in contrast with myoblasts and sperm cells, macrophage fusion is a rare event that occurs in specific instances. To test our hypothesis, we established an in vitro cell–cell fusion assay as a model system which uses alveolar macrophages. Upon multinucleation, these macrophages acquire the osteoclast phenotype. This indicates that multinucleation of macrophages leads to a specific and novel functional phenotype in macrophages. To identify the components of the fusion machinery, we generated four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which block the fusion of alveolar macrophages and purified the unique antigen recognized by these mAbs. This led us to the cloning of MFR (Macrophage Fusion Receptor). MFR was cloned simultaneously as P84/SHPS-1/SIRPα/BIT by other laboratories. We subsequently showed that the recombinant extracellular domain of MFR blocks fusion. Most recently, we identified a lower molecular weight form of MFR that is missing two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig

  18. Dendritic Cell-Specific Transmembrane Protein (DC-STAMP) Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation via the Ca(2+) /NFATc1 Axis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Hui; Schwarz, Edward; Li, Dongge; Xu, Yuexin; Sheu, Tzong-Ren; Li, Jinbo; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Feng, Changyong; Wang, Baoli; Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Albertorio-Saez, Liz; Wood, Ronald; Kim, Minsoo; Wang, Wensheng; Ritchlin, Christopher T

    2017-09-01

    DC-STAMP is a multi-pass transmembrane protein essential for cell-cell fusion between osteoclast precursors during osteoclast (OC) development. DC-STAMP-/- mice have mild osteopetrosis and form mononuclear cells with limited resorption capacity. The identification of an Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Inhibitory Motif (ITIM) on the cytoplasmic tail of DC-STAMP suggested a potential signaling function. The absence of a known DC-STAMP ligand, however, has hindered the elucidation of downstream signaling pathways. To address this problem, we engineered a light-activatable DC-STAMP chimeric molecule in which light exposure mimics ligand engagement that can be traced by downstream Ca(2+) signaling. Deletion of the cytoplasmic ITIM resulted in a significant elevation in the amplitude and duration of intracellular Ca(2+) flux. Decreased NFATc1 expression in DC-STAMP-/- cells was restored by DC-STAMP over-expression. Multiple biological phenotypes including cell-cell fusion, bone erosion, cell mobility, DC-STAMP cell surface distribution, and NFATc1 nuclear translocation were altered by deletion of the ITIM and adjacent amino acids. In contrast, mutations on each of the tyrosine residues surrounding the ITIM showed no effect on DC-STAMP function. Collectively, our results suggest that the ITIM on DC-STAMP is a functional motif that regulates osteoclast differentiation through the NFATc1/Ca(2+) axis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2538-2549, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Involvement of Hydrogen Peroxide in the Differentiation of Clonal HD-11EM Cells Into Osteoclast-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Steinbeck, Marla J.; Kim, Jung-Keun; Trudeau, Mathew J.; Hauschka, Peter V.; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study uses the osteoclast precursor clonal line, HD-11EM, to study the potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating the differentiation of HD-11EM into osteoclast-like cells. HD-11EM cells are a newly established clonal cell line that, in response to 1α,25-(OH)2D3, differentiate into osteoclast-like cells that are multinucleated (more than three nuclei), express tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), and excavate resorption pits when cultured on dentin slices in the presence of osteoblasts (Hsia et al., 1995, J. Bone Miner. Res., 10(Suppl 1):S424; Hsia, and Hauschka, 1997, unpublished data). Here we demonstrate that HD-11EM express the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase specific cytochrome b558 subunits, and that stimulation of HD-11EM with 1 or 10 nM 1α,25-(OH)2D3 increases the extracellular release of H2O2 within 5–10 min. Ours is the first report that stimulation of a cell with 1α,25-(OH)2D3 enhances the activation of NADPH-oxidase and increases the basal release of superoxide and the formation of its dismutation product, H2O2. To determine the possible involvement of H2O2 in the differentiation of HD-11EM, these cells were exposed to glucose/glucose oxidase. This enzyme system was used to deliver a pure and continuous source of H2O2 in nanomole amounts consistent with quantities produced by HD-11EM in response to 1α,25-(OH)2D3. Both 1α,25-(OH)2D3 and the exogenously generated H2O2 stimulated a dose- and time-dependent increase in TRAP activity/cell and the number of multinucleated cells 24–48 hr after treatment. Northern analysis confirmed an increase in expression of TRAP mRNA in response to either 1α,25-(OH)2D3 or H2O2. Decreases in cell proliferation and v-myc mRNA were also observed in response to these agents. Taken together, our findings indicate that production of H2O2 by HD-11EM is an important local factor involved in differentiation of HD-11EM into osteoclast-like cells, and suggest

  20. Glucocorticoids suppress bone formation via the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Zhao, Haibo; Kitaura, Hideki; Bhattacharyya, Sandip; Brewer, Judson A; Muglia, Louis J; Ross, F Patrick; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2006-08-01

    The pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced (GC-induced) bone loss is unclear. For example, osteoblast apoptosis is enhanced by GCs in vivo, but they stimulate bone formation in vitro. This conundrum suggests that an intermediary cell transmits a component of the bone-suppressive effects of GCs to osteoblasts in the intact animal. Bone remodeling is characterized by tethering of the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Hence, the osteoclast is a potential modulator of the effect of GCs on osteoblasts. To define the direct impact of GCs on bone-resorptive cells, we compared the effects of dexamethasone (DEX) on WT osteoclasts with those derived from mice with disruption of the GC receptor in osteoclast lineage cells (GRoc-/- mice). While the steroid prolonged longevity of osteoclasts, their bone-degrading capacity was suppressed. The inhibitory effect of DEX on bone resorption reflects failure of osteoclasts to organize their cytoskeleton in response to M-CSF. DEX specifically arrested M-CSF activation of RhoA, Rac, and Vav3, each of which regulate the osteoclast cytoskeleton. In all circumstances GRoc-/- mice were spared the impact of DEX on osteoclasts and their precursors. Consistent with osteoclasts modulating the osteoblast-suppressive effect of DEX, GRoc-/- mice are protected from the steroid's inhibition of bone formation.

  1. The role of microRNAs in osteoclasts and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peifu; Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei; Zhang, Lihai

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the exclusive cells of bone resorption. Abnormally activating osteoclasts can lead to low bone mineral density, which will cause osteopenia, osteoporosis, and other bone disorders. To date, the mechanism of how osteoclast precursors differentiate into mature osteoclasts remains elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel regulatory factors that play an important role in numerous cellular processes, including cell differentiation and apoptosis, by post-transcriptional regulation of genes. Recently, a number of studies have revealed that miRNAs participate in bone homeostasis, including osteoclastic bone resorption, which sheds light on the mechanisms underlying osteoclast differentiation. In this review, we highlight the miRNAs involved in regulating osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption, and their roles in osteoporosis.

  2. Arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function by suppressing both calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the pit

  3. Arctigenin Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation and Function by Suppressing Both Calcineurin-Dependent and Osteoblastic Cell-Dependent NFATc1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Teruhito; Uehara, Shunsuke; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Li, Feng; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan-derived compound, is a constituent of the seeds of Arctium lappa. Arctigenin was previously shown to inhibit osteoclastogenesis; however, this inhibitory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Here, we showed that arctigenin inhibited the action of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), a key transcription factor for osteoclastogenesis. NFATc1 in osteoclast precursors was activated through two distinct pathways: the calcineurin-dependent and osteoblastic cell-dependent pathways. Among the several lignan-derived compounds examined, arctigenin most strongly inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow macrophage (BMM) cultures, in which the calcineurin-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. Arctigenin suppressed neither the activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases nor the up-regulation of c-Fos expression in BMMs treated with RANKL. However, arctigenin suppressed RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. Interestingly, the treatment of osteoclast-like cells with arctigenin converted NFATc1 into a lower molecular weight species, which was translocated into the nucleus even in the absence of RANKL. Nevertheless, arctigenin as well as cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor, suppressed the NFAT-luciferase reporter activity induced by ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in BMMs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that arctigenin inhibited the recruitment of NFATc1 to the promoter region of the NFATc1 target gene. Arctigenin, but not CsA suppressed osteoclast-like cell formation in co-cultures of osteoblastic cells and bone marrow cells, in which the osteoblastic cell-dependent NFATc1 pathway was activated. The forced expression of constitutively active NFATc1 rescued osteoclastogenesis in BMM cultures treated with CsA, but not that treated with arctigenin. Arctigenin also suppressed the pit

  4. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  5. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  6. Osteoclast cell-surface specializations and nuclear kinetics during egg-laying in Japanese quail

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.

    1981-09-01

    Medullary bone deposits serve as a reservoir of labile calcium for egg-shell calcification in birds. Quantitative transmission-electron-microscope methods and light-microscope autoradiographic cell-population-kinetic analyses were used to determine changes in cell-surface specializations and population dynamics of medullary bone osteoclasts during egg-laying in Japanese quail. Prior to egg-shell formation, from 0 to about 8 hours after the previous oviposition, very few osteoclast profiles had ruffled borders. The appearance of ruffled borders coincided with the beginning of egg-shell calcification, about 9-10 hours after the previous oviposition. During egg-shell calcification, about 10-21 hours after the previous oviposition, most osteoclast profiles had ruffled borders. Ruffled borders disappeared at the completion of egg-shell calcification and commencement of egg-shell pigmentation. Thus, functional activities of medullary bone osteoclasts appear to be closely synchronized with egg-shell calcification during egg-laying. From 1 to 48 hours after a single injection of 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR), very few labeled osteoclast nuclei were seen during egg-laying. Following multiple injections of 3H-TdR, the percentage of labeled nuclei reached a peak at about 170 hours after the first injection. At this peak-labeling time, relatively few of the osteoclast profiles that had labeled nuclei had two or more; although the average number of nuclei per osteoclast profile was about 3.6. These kinetic data suggest that the medullary bone osteoclast population has a prolonged rate of turnover compared to rapid changes in cell activities associated with each 24-hour egg-laying cycle; and collectively they would suggest that rapid changes in osteoclast functions occur independently of changes in cell-population dynamics.

  7. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  8. Fibroblasts from the inner granulation tissue of the pseudocapsule in hips at revision arthroplasty induce osteoclast differentiation, as do stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, H; Jingushi, S; Shuto, T; Urabe, K; Ikenoue, T; Okazaki, K; Kukita, T; Kukita, A; Iwamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has previously been shown that many osteoclast precursors are included in the granulation tissue within the pseudocapsule obtained at revision arthroplasty from hips with osteolysis. In vitro culture of only cells isolated from the granulation tissue has been previously shown to generate many mature osteoclasts. Objective: To investigate the presence or otherwise of supporting cells, similar to stromal cells, which differentiate osteoclasts within the granulation tissue. Methods: Cells isolated from the granulation tissue were cultured alone, and after four weeks fibroblast-like cells (granulation fibroblasts) remained. Rat non-adherent bone marrow cells (NA-BMCs) were co-cultured with the granulation fibroblasts with or without 1α,25(OH)2D3 (10-8 M) or heat treated ROS 17/2.8 cell conditioned medium (ht ROSCM), or both. Multinucleated cells (MNCs), which formed, were assessed by biochemical and functional characterisation of osteoclasts. Receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Co-culture of NA-BMCs and granulation fibroblasts caused the formation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive MNCs, which had the calcitonin receptor (CTR), the Kat-1 antigen, which is specific to the surface of rat osteoclasts, and the ability to form pits in the presence of both 1α,25(OH)2D3 and ht ROSCM or in the presence of just ht ROSCM. RANKL was detected in fibroblast-like cells in the granulation tissue. Conclusion: These data suggest that granulation fibroblasts support osteoclast differentiation, as do osteoblasts/stromal cells, and may play a part in aseptic loosening. PMID:11796394

  9. Notch signaling promotes osteoclast maturation and resorptive activity

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Jason W; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2015-01-01

    The role of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation is controversial with conflicting experimental evidence indicating both stimulatory and inhibitory roles. Differences in experimental protocols and in vivo versus in vitro models may explain the discrepancies between studies. In this study, we investigated cell autonomous roles of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation and function by altering Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation using stimulation with immobilized ligands Jagged1 or Delta-like1 or by suppression with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or transcriptional inhibitor SAHM1. Stimulation of Notch signaling in committed osteoclast precursors resulted in larger osteoclasts with a greater number of nuclei and resorptive activity whereas suppression resulted in smaller osteoclasts with fewer nuclei and suppressed resorptive activity. Conversely, stimulation of Notch signaling in osteoclast precursors prior to induction of osteoclastogenesis resulted in fewer osteoclasts. Our data support a mechanism of context-specific Notch signaling effects wherein Notch stimulation inhibits commitment to osteoclast differentiation, but enhances the maturation and function of committed precursors. PMID:25914241

  10. Nitensidine A, a guanidine alkaloid from Pterogyne nitens, induces osteoclastic cell death.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yasuhiro; Murase, Hayato; Satake, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Yuji; Regasini, Luis Octavio; da Silva Bolzani, Vanderlan; Efferth, Thomas; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Nitensidine A is a guanidine alkaloid isolated from Pterogyne nitens, a common plant in South America. To gain insight into the biological activity of P. nitens-produced compounds, we examined herein their biological effects on osteoclasts, multinucleated giant cells that regulate bone metabolism by resorbing bone. Among four guanidine alkaloids (i.e., galegine, nitensidine A, pterogynidine, and pterogynine), nitensidine A and pterogynine exhibited anti-osteoclastic effects at 10 μM by reducing the number of osteoclasts on the culture plate whereas galegine and pterogynidine did not. The anti-osteoclastic activities of nitensidine A and pterogynine were exerted in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas nitensidine A exhibited an approximate threefold stronger effect than pterogynine (IC50 values: nitensidine A, 0.93 ± 0.024 μM; pterogynine, 2.7 ± 0.40 μM). In the present study, the anti-osteoclastic effects of two synthetic nitensidine A derivatives (nitensidine AT and AU) were also examined to gain insight into the structural features of nitensidine A that exert an anti-osteoclastic effect. The anti-osteoclastic effect of nitensidine A was greatly reduced by substituting the imino nitrogen atom in nitensidine A with sulfur or oxygen. According to the differences in chemical structures and anti-osteoclastic effects of the four guanidine alkaloids and the two synthetic nitensidine A derivatives, it is suggested that the number, binding site, and polymerization degree of isoprenyl moiety in the guanidine alkaloids and the imino nitrogen atom cooperatively contribute to their anti-osteoclastic effects.

  11. Targeted transgenic expression of an osteoclastic transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase in cells of osteoclastic lineage increases bone resorption and bone loss in male young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Matilda H-C; Amoui, Mehran; Stiffel, Virginia; Srivastava, Apurva K; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William

    2009-04-24

    This study evaluated whether transgenic expression of PTP-oc (osteoclastic transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase) in cells of the osteoclast lineage would affect bone resorption and bone density in young adult mice. Transgenic mice were generated with a transgenic construct using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase exon 1C promoter to drive expression of rabbit PTP-oc in osteoclastic cells. pQCT evaluation of femurs of young adult male progeny of three lines showed that transgenic mice had reduced bone volume and area, cortical and trabecular bone mineral content, and density. Histomorphometric analyses at secondary spongiosa of the femur and at metaphysis of the L4 vertebra confirmed that male transgenic mice had decreased trabecular surface, reduced percentage of trabecular area, decreased trabecular number, increased trabecular separation, and increased osteoclast number per bone surface length. Consistent with an increase in bone resorption, the serum C-telopeptide level was 25% higher in transgenic mice than in wild-type littermates. However, the bone phenotype was not readily observed in female young adult transgenic mice. This could in part be due to potential interactions between estrogen and PTP-oc signaling, since the bone loss phenotype was seen in young adult ovariectomized transgenic mice by microcomputed tomography analysis. In vitro, the average pit area per resorption pit created by marrow-derived transgenic osteoclasts was approximately 50% greater than that created by wild-type osteoclasts. Transgenic osteoclasts showed a lower c-Src phosphotyrosine 527 level, greater c-Src kinase activity, and increased tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin. In summary, this study provides compelling in vivo evidence that PTP-oc is a positive regulator of osteoclasts.

  12. Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclastic Resorption of Tricalcium Phosphate: Effect of Strontium and Magnesium Doping

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2012-01-01

    Bone substitute materials are required to support the remodeling process, which consists of osteoclastic resorption and osteoblastic synthesis. Osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells, generate from differentiation of hemopoietic mononuclear cells. In the present study we have evaluated the effects of 1.0 wt% strontium (Sr) and 1.0 wt% magnesium (Mg) doping in beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the differentiation of mononuclear cells into osteoclast-like cells and its resorptive activity. In vitro osteoclast-like cell formation, adhesion, and resorption were studied using osteoclast precursor RAW 264.7 cell, supplemented with receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL). Osteoclast-like cell formation was noticed on pure and Sr doped β-TCP samples at day 8 which was absent on Mg doped β-TCP samples indicating decrease in initial osteoclast differentiation due to Mg doping. After 21 days of culture, osteoclast-like cell formation was evident on all samples with osteoclastic markers such as actin ring, multiple nuclei, and presence of vitronectin receptor αvβ3 integrin. After osteoclast differentiation, all substrates showed osteoclast-like cell mediated degradation, however; significantly restricted for Mg doped β-TCP samples. Our present results indicated substrate chemistry controlled osteoclast differentiation and resorptive activity which can be used in designing TCP based resorbable bone substitutes with controlled degradation properties. PMID:22566212

  13. The effect of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-alendronate conjugate nanoparticles on human osteoclast precursors.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Elisabetta; Avnet, Sofia; Granchi, Donatella; Fotia, Caterina; Salerno, Manuela; Micieli, Dorotea; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Pignatello, Rosario; Castelli, Francesco; Baldini, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) formed from polymers conjugated with bisphosphonates (BPs) allow the bone targeting of loaded drugs, such as doxorubicin, for the treatment of skeletal tumours. The additional antiosteoclastic effect of the conjugated BP could contribute to the inhibition of tumour-associated bone degradation. With this aim, we have produced NPs made of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) conjugated with alendronate (ALE). To show if ALE retained the antiosteoclastic properties after the conjugation with PLGA and the production of NPs, we treated human osteoclasts, derived from circulating precursors, with PLGA-ALE NPs and compared the effects on actin ring generation, apoptosis and type-I collagen degradation with those of free ALE and with NPs made of pure PLGA. PLGA-ALE NPs disrupted actin ring, induced apoptosis and inhibited collagen degradation. Unexpectedly, also NPs made of pure PLGA showed similar effects. Therefore, we cannot exclude that in addition to the observed antiosteoclastic activity dependent on ALE in PLGA-ALE NPs, there was also an effect due to pure PLGA. Still, as PLGA-ALE NPs are intended for the loading with drugs for the treatment of osteolytic bone metastases, the additional antiosteoclastic effect of PLGA-ALE NPs, and even of PLGA, may contribute to the inhibition of the disease-associated bone degradation.

  14. Interleukin 18 inhibits osteoclast formation via T cell production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, N J; Udagawa, N; Elliott, J; Grail, D; Okamura, H; Kurimoto, M; Dunn, A R; Martin, T; Gillespie, M T

    1998-01-01

    IL-18 inhibits osteoclast (OCL) formation in vitro independent of IFN-gamma production, and this was abolished by the addition of neutralizing antibodies to GM-CSF. We now establish that IL-18 was unable to inhibit OCL formation in cocultures using GM-CSF-deficient mice (GM-CSF -/-). Reciprocal cocultures using either wild-type osteoblasts with GM-CSF -/- spleen cells or GM-CSF -/- osteoblasts with wild-type spleen cells were examined. Wild-type spleen cells were required to elicit a response to IL-18 indicating that cells of splenic origin were the IL-18 target. As T cells comprise a large proportion of the spleen cell population, the role of T cells in osteoclastogenesis was examined. Total T cells were removed and repleted in various combinations. Addition of wild-type T cells to a GM-CSF -/- coculture restored IL-18 inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Major subsets of T cells, CD4+ and CD8+, were also individually depleted. Addition of either CD4+ or CD8+ wild-type T cells restored IL-18 action in a GM-CSF -/- background, while IL-18 was ineffective when either CD4+ or CD8+ GM-CSF -/- T cells were added to a wild-type coculture. These results highlight the involvement of T cells in IL-18-induced OCL inhibition and provide evidence for a new OCL inhibitory pathway whereby IL-18 inhibits OCL formation due to action upon T cells promoting the release of GM-CSF, which in turn acts upon OCL precursors. PMID:9449693

  15. Incorporation of RANKL promotes osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity on β-TCP ceramics.

    PubMed

    Choy, John; Albers, Christoph E; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Dolder, Silvia; Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Klenke, Frank M

    2014-12-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics are approved for the repair of osseous defects. In large defects, however, the substitution of the material by authentic bone is inadequate to provide sufficient long-term mechanical stability. We aimed to develop composites of β-TCP ceramics and receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) to enhance the formation of osteoclasts and promote cell mediated calcium phosphate resorption. RANKL was adsorbed superficially onto β-TCP ceramics or incorporated into a crystalline layer of calcium phosphate by the use of a co-precipitation technique. Murine osteoclast precursors were seeded onto the ceramics. After 15 days, the formation of osteoclasts was quantified cytologically and colorimetrically with tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) staining and TRAP activity measurements, respectively. Additionally, the expression of transcripts encoding the osteoclast gene products cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHA2 were quantified by real-time PCR. The activity of newly formed osteoclasts was evaluated by means of a calcium phosphate resorption assay. Superficially adsorbed RANKL did not induce the formation of osteoclasts on β-TCP ceramics. When co-precipitated onto β-TCP ceramics RANKL supported the formation of mature osteoclasts. The development of osteoclast lineage cells was further confirmed by the increased expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and NHA2. Incorporated RANKL stimulated the cells to resorb crystalline calcium phosphate. Our in vitro study shows that RANKL incorporated into β-TCP ceramics induces the formation of active, resorbing osteoclasts on the material surface. Once formed, osteoclasts mediate the release of RANKL thereby perpetuating their differentiation and activation. In vivo, the stimulation of osteoclast-mediated resorption may contribute to a coordinated sequence of material resorption and bone formation. Further in vivo studies

  16. An unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma with osteoclastic stromal changes mimicking carcinosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Naujokas, Agne; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    A 91-year-old man presented with an ulcerated nodule on his left lower eyelid. The tumor showed an epithelial component composed of basaloid and clear cells and a stroma that contained many osteoclastic giant cells. Strong, diffuse expression for cytokeratin 17 and p63 was noted in the epithelial component, whereas no staining was present in the sarcomatoid stroma, suggesting that the osteoclast-rich stromal component represented an unusual benign stromal reaction to the carcinoma rather than a manifestation of carcinosarcoma. Further supporting this interpretation was the absence of mitotic figures and low Ki-67 proliferation index (of approximately 1%) in the stromal cells. We herein reported a case of unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma, accompanied by a clear cell carcinomatous features and concurrent benign osteoclastic stromal changes.

  17. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Anna; Anginot, Adrienne; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Schiff, Claudine; Carle, Georges F; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2011-07-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  18. Regulation of Human Osteoclast Development by Dendritic Cell-Specific Transmembrane Protein (DC-STAMP)

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ya-Hui; Mensah, Kofi A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Ju, Yawen; Takahata, Masahiko; Feng, Changyong; McMahon, Loralee A.; Hicks, David G.; Panepento, Ben; Keng, Peter C.; Ritchlin, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts (OC) are bone-resorbing, multinucleated cells that are generated via fusion of OC precursors (OCP). The frequency of OCP is elevated in patients with erosive inflammatory arthritis and metabolic bone diseases. Although many cytokines and cell surface receptors are known to participate in osteoclastogenesis, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of this cellular transformation are poorly understood. Herein, we focused our studies on the dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), a seven-pass-transmembrane receptor-like protein known to be essential for cell-to-cell fusion during osteoclastogenesis. We identified an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in the cytoplasmic tail of DC-STAMP, and developed an anti-DC-STAMP monoclonal antibody 1A2 that detected DC-STAMP expression on human tumor giant cells, blocked OC formation in vitro, and distinguished four patterns of human PBMC with a positive correlation to OC potential. In freshly isolated monocytes, DC-STAMPhigh cells produced a higher number of OC in culture than DC-STAMPlow cells and the surface expression of DC-STAMP gradually declined during osteoclastogenesis. Importantly, we showed that DC-STAMP is phosphorylated on its tyrosine residues and physically interacts with SHP-1 and CD16, an SH2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase and an ITAM-associated protein, respectively. Taken together, these data show that DC-STAMP is a potential OCP biomarker in inflammatory arthritis. Moreover, in addition to its effect on cell fusion, DC-STAMP dynamically regulates cell signaling during osteoclastogenesis. PMID:21987375

  19. C3 Rho-Inhibitor for Targeted Pharmacological Manipulation of Osteoclast-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tautzenberger, Andrea; Förtsch, Christina; Zwerger, Christian; Dmochewitz, Lydia; Kreja, Ludwika; Ignatius, Anita; Barth, Holger

    2013-01-01

    The C3 toxins from Clostridium botulinum (C3bot) and Clostridium limosum (C3lim) as well as C3-derived fusion proteins are selectively taken up into the cytosol of monocytes/macrophages where the C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of Rho results in inhibition of Rho-signalling and characteristic morphological changes. Since the fusion toxin C2IN-C3lim was efficiently taken up into and inhibited proliferation of murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells, its effects on RAW 264.7-derived osteoclasts were investigated. C2IN-C3lim was taken up into differentiated osteoclasts and decreased their resorption activity. In undifferentiated RAW 264.7 cells, C2IN-C3lim-treatment significantly decreased their differentiation into osteoclasts as determined by counting the multi-nucleated, TRAP-positive cells. This inhibitory effect was concentration- and time-dependent and most efficient when C2IN-C3lim was applied in the early stage of osteoclast-formation. A single-dose application of C2IN-C3lim at day 0 and its subsequent removal at day 1 reduced the number of osteoclasts in a comparable manner while C2IN-C3lim-application at later time points did not reduce the number of osteoclasts to a comparable degree. Control experiments with an enzymatically inactive C3 protein revealed that the ADP-ribosylation of Rho was essential for the observed effects. In conclusion, the results indicate that Rho-activity is crucial during the early phase of osteoclast-differentiation. Other bone cell types such as pre-osteoblastic cells were not affected by C2IN-C3lim. Due to their cell-type selective and specific mode of action, C3 proteins and C3-fusions might be valuable tools for targeted pharmacological manipulation of osteoclast formation and activity, which could lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies against osteoclast-associated diseases. PMID:24386487

  20. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Inhibits Osteoclastogenesis on RAW 264.7 Cells and Human Primary Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Arriero, María del Mar; Ramis, Joana M.; Perelló, Joan; Monjo, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Background Inoxitol hexakisphosphate (IP6) has been found to have an important role in biomineralization and a direct effect inhibiting mineralization of osteoblasts in vitro without impairing extracellular matrix production and expression of alkaline phosphatase. IP6 has been proposed to exhibit similar effects to those of bisphosphonates on bone resorption, however, its direct effect on osteoclasts (OCL) is presently unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of IP6 on the RAW 264.7 monocyte/macrophage mouse cell line and on human primary osteoclasts. On one hand, we show that IP6 decreases the osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells induced by RANKL, without affecting cell proliferation or cell viability. The number of TRAP positive cells and mRNA levels of osteoclast markers such as TRAP, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K and MMP-9 was decreased by IP6 on RANKL-treated cells. On the contrary, when giving IP6 to mature osteoclasts after RANKL treatment, a significant increase of bone resorption activity and TRAP mRNA levels was found. On the other hand, we show that 1 µM of IP6 inhibits osteoclastogenesis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and their resorption activity both, when given to undifferentiated and to mature osteoclasts. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that IP6 inhibits osteoclastogenesis on human PBMNC and on the RAW264.7 cell line. Thus, IP6 may represent a novel type of selective inhibitor of osteoclasts and prove useful for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:22905230

  1. Inositol hexakisphosphate inhibits osteoclastogenesis on RAW 264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Arriero, María del Mar; Ramis, Joana M; Perelló, Joan; Monjo, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Inoxitol hexakisphosphate (IP6) has been found to have an important role in biomineralization and a direct effect inhibiting mineralization of osteoblasts in vitro without impairing extracellular matrix production and expression of alkaline phosphatase. IP6 has been proposed to exhibit similar effects to those of bisphosphonates on bone resorption, however, its direct effect on osteoclasts (OCL) is presently unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of IP6 on the RAW 264.7 monocyte/macrophage mouse cell line and on human primary osteoclasts. On one hand, we show that IP6 decreases the osteoclastogenesis in RAW 264.7 cells induced by RANKL, without affecting cell proliferation or cell viability. The number of TRAP positive cells and mRNA levels of osteoclast markers such as TRAP, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K and MMP-9 was decreased by IP6 on RANKL-treated cells. On the contrary, when giving IP6 to mature osteoclasts after RANKL treatment, a significant increase of bone resorption activity and TRAP mRNA levels was found. On the other hand, we show that 1 µM of IP6 inhibits osteoclastogenesis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and their resorption activity both, when given to undifferentiated and to mature osteoclasts. Our results demonstrate that IP6 inhibits osteoclastogenesis on human PBMNC and on the RAW264.7 cell line. Thus, IP6 may represent a novel type of selective inhibitor of osteoclasts and prove useful for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Choi, Joon-Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Park, Michael Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells is a rare pancreatic and periampullary neoplasm with less than 50 cases reported in the literature. Pathologically, this tumor mimics a giant cell tumor in bones. We report a case of undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells in a 55-year-old man presenting as a pancreatic mass with associated regional and distant lymphadenopathy. On T1- and T2-weighted images, the mass shows dark signal intensity which was atypical for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  3. Non-resorbing osteoclasts induce migration and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kreja, L; Brenner, R E; Tautzenberger, A; Liedert, A; Friemert, B; Ehrnthaller, C; Huber-Lang, M; Ignatius, A

    2010-02-01

    Osteoclast activity has traditionally been regarded as restricted to bone resorption but there is some evidence that also non-resorbing osteoclasts might influence osteoblast activity. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the hypothesis of an anabolic function of non-resorbing osteoclasts by investigating their capability to recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and to provoke their differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage. Bone-marrow-derived human MSC were exposed to conditioned media (CM) derived from non-resorbing osteoclast cultures, which were generated from human peripheral blood monocytes. Osteogenic marker genes (transcription factor Runx2, bone sialoprotein, alkaline phosphatase (AP), and osteopontin) were significantly increased. Osteogenic differentiation (OD) was also proved by von Kossa and AP staining occurred in the same range as in MSC cultures stimulated with osteogenic supplements. Chemotactic responses of MSC were measured with a modified Boyden chamber assay. CM from osteoclast cultures induced a strong migratory response in MSC, which was greatly reduced in the presence of an anti-human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor beta antibody. Correspondingly, significantly increased PDGF-BB concentrations were measured in the CM using a PDGF-BB immunoassay. CM derived from mononuclear cell cultures did not provoke MSC differentiation and had a significantly lower migratory effect on MSC suggesting that the effects were specifically mediated by osteoclasts. In conclusion, it can be suggested that human non-resorbing osteoclasts induce migration and OD of MSC. While effects on MSC migration might be mainly due to PDGF-BB, the factors inducing OD remain to be elucidated. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. The Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursor.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Constantinides, Michael G; Gudjonson, Herman; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-05-20

    The discovery of tissue-resident innate lymphoid cell populations effecting different forms of type 1, 2, and 3 immunity; tissue repair; and immune regulation has transformed our understanding of mucosal immunity and allergy. The emerging complexity of these populations along with compounding issues of redundancy and plasticity raise intriguing questions about their precise lineage relationship. Here we review advances in mapping the emergence of these lineages from early lymphoid precursors. We discuss the identification of a common innate lymphoid cell precursor characterized by transient expression of the transcription factor PLZF, and the lineage relationships of innate lymphoid cells with conventional natural killer cells and lymphoid tissue inducer cells. We also review the rapidly growing understanding of the network of transcription factors that direct the development of these lineages.

  5. Osteoclasts and their precursors are present in the induced-membrane during bone reconstruction using the Masquelet technique.

    PubMed

    Gouron, Richard; Petit, Laurent; Boudot, Cédric; Six, Isabelle; Brazier, Michel; Kamel, Said; Mentaverri, Romuald

    2017-02-01

    In 2000, Masquelet reported a long bone reconstruction technique using an induced membrane formed around a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) spacer placed in the defect with appropriate stabilization followed by secondary bone graft after PMMA removal. This reconstruction procedure allows rapid and safe bone reformation for septic, traumatic, neoplastic or congenital bone defects. A rat model of the Masquelet technique was developed to further characterize the biological activities of this induced membrane. Our model allows healing of a critical-sized femoral defect (8 mm) by means of this procedure over a period of 18 weeks. Comparison of induced membranes obtained 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks after PMMA insertion indicated that this tissue changes over time. Several mineralization spots and bone cells were observed in contact with the PMMA, when assessed by Alizarin Red, Von Kossa, Alkaline phosphatase and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining of the membranes. CTR (calcitonin receptor)- and RANK (Receptor Activator of Nuclear factor Kappa B)- positive mononuclear cells were detected in the induced membrane, confirming the presence of osteoclasts in this tissue. These cells were observed in a thin, highly cellular layer in the induced membrane in contact with the PMMA. Together, these findings suggest that the membrane is able to promote osteointegration of autologous corticocancellous bone grafts during the Masquelet technique by creating local conditions that may be favourable to graft bone remodelling and osteointegration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Clodronate acts on human osteoclastic cell proliferation, differentiation and function in a bioreversible manner

    PubMed Central

    Recenti, Raffaella; Leone, Giuseppe; Simi, Lisa; Orfei, Marco; Pinzani, Pamela; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Moneti, Gloriano; Carossino, Anna Maria; Franchi, Alessandro; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Background. Clodronate is used in high bone resorption diseases. Its action was defined as “cytotoxic” based on the induced cellular ATP loss, without any experimental verification of reversibility. In the present report the reversibility of clodronate action was tested on cultured human osteoclastic cell cultures. As “in vitro” bioeffects of clodronate are reversible, this compound should not be defined as “cytotoxic”. Introduction. Bisphosphonates are pyrophosphate analogs able to inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption widely used in the treatment of diseases with high bone turnover. Several evidences have shown that bisphosphonates can be divided into two groups with distinct molecular mechanisms of action depending on the nature of the R2side chain. The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates act on osteoclasts by preventing protein prenylation, while non-nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, like clodronate, are metabolized intracellularly to a β-γ-methylene analog of ATP that induces inhibition of the ADP/ATP translocase. Materials and Methods. In order to evaluate clodronate effects on osteoclastic cells and the bioreversibility of its action, we have used a human preosteoclastic (FLG 29.1) cell line and primary cultures of human osteoclast-like (HOC) cells. Functional and differentiative modifications were evaluated with immunocytochemical tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity (TRAcP) assay and with rapid quantitative detection of the complex “matrix metalloproteinase 9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase” (MMP9/TIMP1) by RT-PCR analysis based on “TaqMan” technology. The apoptosis phenomenon were detected by DNA ladder analysis and quantified by counting apoptotic cells with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis. Adenosine-5’-[ β - γ -dichloromethylene] triphosphate (AppCCl2p) was detected and identified in cell extract by HPLC-ESI-MS-MS Mass Spectrometry. Intracellular ATP modulation in the presence of

  7. Immune complex-induced inhibition of osteoclastogenesis is mediated via activating but not inhibitory Fcγ receptors on myeloid precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Grevers, Lilyanne C; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent; Verbeek, J Sjef; van den Berg, Wim B; van Lent, Peter L E M

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the role of Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) in osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function. Bone destruction was analysed in arthritic knee joints of several FcγR-knockout mouse strains. Unfractionated bone marrow cells were differentiated in vitro towards osteoclasts in the absence or presence of immune complexes (ICs) and stimulated thereafter for 24 h with tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, mature osteoclasts were stimulated with ICs. Experiments were analysed for osteoclast formation, bone resorption and the expression of FcγRs and osteoclast markers. Bone destruction was significantly increased in arthritic knee joints of FcγRIIB-deficient mice. All FcγR classes were highly expressed on osteoclast precursors. Expression of the inhibitory FcγRIIB was similar on mature osteoclasts compared to macrophages, whereas activating FcγR levels were significantly lower. IC stimulation of mature osteoclasts did not affect their number or their bone resorptive capacity. ICs significantly inhibited differentiation of unfractionated bone marrow cells towards osteoclasts, bone resorption and expression of osteoclast markers. In the presence of ICs, osteoclastogenesis of FcγRIIB(-/-) precursors and bone resorption remained inhibited. In contrast, ICs could not inhibit osteoclast formation or bone resorption of FcRγ-chain(-/-) precursors. When IC-inhibited osteoclastogenesis was followed by stimulation with TNFα or LPS, the inhibitory effects of ICs were overruled. Activating FcγRs mediate IC-induced inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, which might be overruled in the presence of proinflammatory mediators. This suggests that the balance of FcγR-mediated inflammation, through proinflammatory cytokine production, as well as the direct inhibitory effect of ICs on osteoclastogenesis determines the net effect on bone loss.

  8. The responses of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and endothelial cells to zirconium modified calcium-silicate-based ceramic.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Yogambha; Wu, Chengtie; Van Hummel, Annika; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges; Zreiqat, Hala

    2008-11-01

    In this study we have developed Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) (Baghdadite) ceramics by incorporating Zirconium in Ca-Si system and determined their biological properties. Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics possess apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid, indicating their potential bioactivity. The response of human osteoblast like cells (HOB), osteoclast and endothelial cells when cultured on Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that this material supports HOB cell attachment with organized cytoskeleton structure. Compared to CaSiO(3), Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics induced increased HOB proliferation and differentiation as shown by increased methyltetrazidium salt (MTS), alkaline phosphatase activity, and mRNA expression levels of bone-related genes (Collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, Bone Sialoprotein, receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand and osteoprotegerin). Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics supported the fusion of monocytes to form functional osteoclasts with their characteristic features of f-actin ring structures and the expression of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin consistent with functional activity. Osteoclasts cultured on Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) expressed increased levels of osteoclast-related genes; Cathepsin K, Carbonic Anhydrase II, Matrix metalloproteinase-9, receptor activator of NF-kappaB and Calcitonin Receptor, consistent with the formation of functional osteoclasts. In addition to HOB and osteoclasts, Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) supported the attachment of endothelial cells, which expressed the endothelial cell markers; ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin. Results presented here indicate that Ca(3)ZrSi(2)O(9) ceramics have the potential for applications in bone tissue regeneration.

  9. Methionine down-regulates TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signalling in osteoclast precursors to reduce bone loss during osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, V; Khandelwal, M; Manglani, K; Gupta, S; Surolia, A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Studies have demonstrated that a moderate intake of amino acids is associated with development of bone health. Methionine, a sulphur-containing essential amino acid, has been largely implicated for improving cartilage formation, however its physiological significance on bone integrity and functionality have not been elucidated. We investigated whether methionine can prevent osteoporotic bone loss. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-resorptive effect of methionine, (250 mg kg−1 body wt administered in drinking water for 10 weeks), was evaluated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats by monitoring changes in bone turnover, formation of osteoclasts from blood-derived mononuclear cells and changes in the synthesis of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines. KEY RESULTS Methionine improved bone density and significantly decreased the degree of osteoclast development from blood mononuclear cells in OVX rats, as indicated by decreased production of osteoclast markers tartarate resistant acid phosphatase b (TRAP5b) and MIP-1α. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myeloid differentiation primary response 88 [MyD88], a signalling molecule in the toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling cascade, abolished the synthesis of both TRAP5b and MIP-1α in developing osteoclasts. Methionine supplementation disrupted osteoclast development by inhibiting TLR-4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS TLR-4/MyD88/NF-κB signalling pathway is integral for osteoclast development and this is down-regulated in osteoporotic system on methionine treatment. Methionine treatment could be beneficial for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24111943

  10. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic.

  11. Deflazacort increases osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow culture and the ratio of RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, H.; Kang, Y. S.; Hwang, C. S.; Moon, I. K.; Yim, C. H.; Choi, K. H.; Han, K. O.; Jang, H. C.; Yoon, H. K.; Han, I. K.

    2001-01-01

    Information on precise effects of deflazacort on bone cell function, especially osteoclasts, is quite limited. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to test effects of deflazacort on osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow cultures and on the regulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand (RANKL) mRNA expressions by RT-PCR in the ST2 marrow stromal cells. TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased after the treatment of deflazacort at 10(-9) to 10(-7) M alone for 6 days in a dose-dependent manner. Number of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells (MNCs) increased significantly with combined treatment of deflazacort at 10(-7) M and 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M compared to that of cultures treated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 alone (p<0.05). Exposure to deflazacort at 10(-7) M in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M in the last 3-day culture had greater stimulatory effect on osteoclast-like cell formation than that of the first 3-day culture did. Deflazacort at 10(-10) -10(-6) M downregulated OPG and upregulated RANKL in mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that deflazacort stimulate osteoclast precursor in the absence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and enhance differentiation of osteoclasts in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3. These effects are, in part, thought to be mediated by the regulation of the expression of OPG and RANKL mRNA in marrow stromal cells. PMID:11748360

  12. Inhibitory effect of menaquinone-7 (vitamin K2) on osteoclast-like cell formation and osteoclastic bone resorption in rat bone tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Ma, Z J

    2001-12-01

    The effect of menaquinone-7 (MK-7; vitamin K2) on osteoclast-like cell formation and osteoclastic bone resorption in rat femoral tissues in vitro was investigated. The bone marrow cells were cultured for 7 days in a a-minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) containing a well-known bone resorbing agent [parathyroid hormone (1-34) (PTH) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)] with an effective concentration. Osteoclast-like cells were estimated by staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP), a marker enzyme of osteoclasts. The presence of PTH (10(-8) M) or PGE2 (10(-6) M) induced a remarkable increase in osteoclast-like multinucleated cells. These increases were significantly inhibited by MK-7 (10(-8) - 10(-5) M). MK-7 (10(-7) and 10(-6) M) significantly inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced osteoclast-like cell formation, whereas MK-7 did not inhibit dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (DcAMP) (10(-5) M)-induced osteoclast-like cell formation. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of MK-7 is partly involved in protein kinase C signaling. The bone cells isolated from rat femoral tissues were cultured for 48 h in an alpha-MEM containing either vehicle or MK-7 (10(-8) - 10(-5) M). The presence of MK-7 (10(-6) and 10(-5) M) caused a significant decrease in the number of mature osteoclasts. Such a decrease was also seen in the presence of calcitonin (10(-10) - 10(-8) M), DcAMP (10(-6) and 10(-5) M), or calcium chloride (10(-4) and 10(-3) M). The effect of MK-7 (10(-6) M) in decreasing the number of osteoclasts was not further enhanced in the presence of calcitonin (10(-8) M), DcAMP (10(-5) M), or calcium chloride (10(-3) M), and was completely abolished by the presence of dibucaine (10(-6) M) or staurosporine (10(-7) M), which are inhibitors of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases. These results suggested that MK-7 has a suppressive effect on osteoclasts. Moreover, the femoral-metaphyseal tissues obtained from rats were cultured for 48 h in Dulbecco

  13. Rab13 Is Upregulated During Osteoclast Differentiation and Associates with Small Vesicles Revealing Polarized Distribution in Resorbing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mulari, Mika T. K.; Büki, Kálmán G.; Vihko, Pirkko; Härkönen, Pirkko L.; Väänänen, H. Kalervo

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing multinucleated cells that undergo drastic changes in their polarization due to heavy vesicular trafficking during the resorption cycle. These events require the precise orchestration of membrane traffic in order to maintain the unique characteristics of the different membrane domains in osteoclasts. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in regulation of most, if not all, steps of vesicle trafficking. The investigators studied RAB genes in human osteoclasts and found that at least 26 RABs were expressed in osteoclasts. Out of these, RAB13 gene expression was highly upregulated during differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytic cells into osteoclasts. To study its possible function in osteoclasts, the investigators performed immunolocalization studies for Rab13 and various known markers of osteoclast vesicular trafficking. Rab13 localized to small vesicular structures at the superior parts of the osteoclast between the trans-Golgi network and basolateral membrane domain. Rab13 localization suggests that it is not involved in endocytosis or transcytosis of bone degradation products. In addition, Rab13 did not associate with early endosomes or recycling endosomes labeled with EEA1 or TRITC-conjugated transferrin, respectively. Its involvement in glucose transporter traffic was excluded as well. It is suggested that Rab13 is associated with a putative secretory function in osteoclasts. PMID:22562557

  14. Thymus-expressed chemokine enhances Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS-induced osteoclast formation via NFATc1 activation.

    PubMed

    Usui, Michihiko; Okamatsu, Yoshimasa; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Hanatani, Tomoya; Moritani, Yuki; Sano, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Nakashima, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    P. gingivalis is a gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and a major periodontal pathogen. LPS produced by P. gingivalis promotes osteoclast formation. TECK is a CC chemokine whose expression is increased in gingival epithelial cells exposed to P. gingivalis LPS. In this study, we investigated the effect of TECK in osteoclastogenesis induced by P. gingivalis LPS. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) analysis and western blotting were performed to confirm TECK in MG63, human osteoblast cell line and primary murine osteoblasts and CCR9 in RAW 264.7 cells and murine bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) as osteoclast precursors. P. gingivalis LPS-treated BMMs and Raw 264.7 cells were cultured with or without TECK or TECK antibody to examine the effect of TECK on osteoclast formation. Cocultures with murine osteoblasts and bone marrow cells were also treated with or without TECK or TECK antibody. Luciferase assay and western blotting were used to determine whether TECK-CCR9 induced osteoclastogenesis was mediated through NFATc1 or NF-kB signaling. TECK was shown to be expressed by osteoblasts, and its receptor, CCR9, by osteoclast precursors. TECK increased P. gingivalis LPS-induced osteoclast numbers in an in vitro osteoclast formation assay using osteoclast precursors. The enhanced osteoclast formation by TECK was mediated by NFATc1, but not by NF-kB signaling. TECK may be a novel regulator of osteoclast formation induced by P. gingivalis LPS in periodontitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sinomenine induces apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cell-derived osteoclasts in vitro via caspase-3 activation

    PubMed Central

    He, Long-gang; Li, Xiang-lian; Zeng, Xiang-zhou; Duan, Heng; Wang, Song; Lei, Lin-sheng; Li, Xiao-juan; Liu, Shu-wen

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Sinomenine (SIN) is an alkaloid found in the roots and stems of Sinomenium acutum, which has been used to treat rheumatic arthritis in China and Japan. In this study we investigated the effects of SIN on osteoclast survival in vitro and the mechanisms of the actions. Methods: Mature osteoclasts were differentiated from murine monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 through incubation in the presence of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL, 100 ng/mL) for 4 d. The cell viability was detected using the CCK-8 method. The survival and actin ring construction of the osteoclasts were scored using TRACP staining and phalloidin-FITC staining, respectively. The apoptosis of the osteoclasts was detected by DNA fragmentation and Hoechst 33258 staining, and the cell necrosis was indicated by LDH activity. The activation of caspase-3 in osteoclasts was measured using Western blotting and the caspase-3 activity colorimetric method. Results: SIN (0.25–2 mmol/L) inhibited the viability of mature osteoclasts in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners, but did not affect that of RAW264.7 cells. Consistently, SIN dose-dependently suppressed the survival of mature osteoclasts. The formation of actin ring, a marker associated with actively resorbing osteoclasts, was also impaired by the alkaloid. SIN (0.5 mmol/L) induced the apoptosis of mature osteoclasts, which was significantly attenuated in the presence of the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. SIN increased the cleavage of caspase-3 in mature osteoclasts in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners. Furthermore, SIN dose-dependently enhanced caspase-3 activity, which was blocked in the presence of Ac-DEVD-CHO. Conclusion: Sinomenine inhibits osteoclast survival in vitro through caspase-3-mediated apoptosis, thus it is a potential agent for treating excessive bone resorption diseases. PMID:24362325

  16. Cell fusion in osteoclasts plays a critical role in controlling bone mass and osteoblastic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Ninomiya, Ken; Miyamoto, Kana; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Yuiko

    2008-12-19

    The balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activity is central for maintaining the integrity of bone homeostasis. Here we show that mice lacking dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), an essential molecule for osteoclast cell-cell fusion, exhibited impaired bone resorption and upregulation of bone formation by osteoblasts, which do not express DC-STAMP, which led to increased bone mass. On the contrary, DC-STAMP over-expressing transgenic (DC-STAMP-Tg) mice under the control of an actin promoter showed significantly accelerated cell-cell fusion of osteoclasts and bone resorption, with decreased osteoblastic activity and bone mass. Bone resorption and formation are known to be regulated in a coupled manner, whereas DC-STAMP regulates bone homeostasis in an un-coupled manner. Thus our results indicate that inhibition of a single molecule provides both decreased osteoclast activity and increased bone formation by osteoblasts, thereby increasing bone mass in an un-coupled and a tissue specific manner.

  17. Effect of mechanical stimulation on osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kadow-Romacker, A; Hoffmann, J E; Duda, G; Wildemann, B; Schmidmaier, G

    2009-01-01

    Bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts play an important role during maintenance, adaptation and healing of bone, and both cell types are influenced by physical activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a narrow mechanical stimulation window on osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells. Primary human cells were cultured on a bone-like structure (dentine) and three-point bending with approximately 1,100 microstrain was applied to the dentine at varying frequencies (0.1 and 0.3 Hz) and duration (1, 3 and 5 min daily over 5 days) resulting in different patterns of mechanical stimulation of osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells. The longest stimulation (5 min at 0.1 Hz) induced a significant increase in osteoblast alkaline phosphatase activity and a significant decrease in osteoprotegerin (OPG) production, and resulted in a significant increase in the soluble receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (sRANKL)/OPG ratio towards sRANKL in comparison to the unstimulated osteoblast-like cells. All stimulations caused a significant decrease in collagen type 1 synthesis. Stimulation for 1 min at 0.3 Hz decreased the fusion and resorption activity of the osteoclast-like cells. These results demonstrate a direct effect of mechanical stimuli on osteoblast-like cells as well as on osteoclast formation and activity in vitro. The change in the sRANKL/OPG ratio towards the stimulation of osteoclastogenesis stresses the necessity to investigate the effect of the same stimulation parameter on the co-culture of both cell types. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  19. [Frontiers in Live Bone Imaging Researches. Intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics].

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing giant polykaryons that differentiate from mononuclear macrophage/monocyte-lineage hematopoietic precursors. Upon the stimulation of essential factors such as M-CSF and RANKL, osteoclast precursor monocytes attach to the bone surface ( "migration" ), fuse with each other to form giant cells ( "differentiation" ) and mediate bone resorption ( "function" ). To reveal the regulatory mechanism of these three dynamic steps of osteoclastic activity, we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital multiphoton microscopy. By means of the system, we have recently succeeded in visualization of osteoclast migration, differentiation, and function in living bone tissues in vivo. In this review we summarize the latest data of intravital imaging of osteoclast dynamics, and discuss novel lines of osteoclast-targeted therapies that will impact future treatment of bone destructive diseases.

  20. Sr-substituted bone cements direct mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts fate

    PubMed Central

    Panseri, Silvia; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Tampieri, Anna; Sprio, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Strontium-substituted apatitic bone cements enriched with sodium alginate were developed as a potential modulator of bone cells fate. The biological impact of the bone cement were investigated in vitro through the study of the effect of the nanostructured apatitic composition and the doping of strontium on mesenchymal stem cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoclasts behaviours. Up to 14 days of culture the bone cells viability, proliferation, morphology and gene expression profiles were evaluated. The results showed that different concentrations of strontium were able to evoke a cell-specific response, in fact an inductive effect on mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and pre-osteoblasts proliferation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclasts activity were observed. Moreover, the apatitic structure of the cements provided a biomimetic environment suitable for bone cells growth. Therefore, the combination of biological features of this bone cement makes it as promising biomaterials for tissue regeneration. PMID:28196118

  1. Origin of giant cells in osteoclast-like giant cell tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Kupelioglu, A A; Yanagisawa, A; Yamaguchi, K; Hidaka, E; Matsuya, S; Ohbuchi, T; Tada, Y; Saisho, H; Kato, Y

    2000-10-01

    To clarify the origin of giant cells in osteoclast-like giant cell tumors (OGCTs) of the pancreas, we performed microscopical, immunohistochemical, and K-ras gene mutation analyses with a microdissection approach in 3 cases, featuring 4 cellular components (osteoclast-like giant cells [OGCs], pleomorphic large cells [PLCs], mononuclear cells, and ductal carcinoma cells). Two cases had abundant OGCs, and 1 case contained large number of both OGCs and PLCs. In each, none of the microdissected OGCs contained any K-ras gene mutation while they were positive for a histiocytic marker (CD-68). In contrast, PLCs, when present, frequently harbored K-ras gene mutations and were negative for CD-68. In all cases, mononuclear cells, a mixture of histiocyte-like and atypical, from microscopic and immunohistochemical viewpoints, also frequently showed K-ras alteration. Histiocyte-like mononuclear cell was equipped with a regular and oval nucleus similar to those in OGCs and was positive for CD-68. Atypical mononuclear cell showed an irregular, pleomorphic, or sometimes bizarre nucleus similar to those in PLCs and was negative for CD-68. All of the K-ras gene mutations found in PLCs and mononuclear cells were the same as in the ductal carcinoma cells within the same tumor. Thus, OGCs differ in origin from ductal cells and are strongly suggested to be nonneoplastic and of mesenchymal origin, whereas PLCs, which harbor K-ras gene mutations, are neoplastic and presumably derived from ductal carcinoma cells. Moreover, mononuclear cells may be classified into 2 types, histiocyte-like and atypical. Copyright 2000 by W.B. Saunders Company.

  2. Positive regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by growth differentiation factor 15 upregulated in osteocytic cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Ochi, Hiroki; Takarada, Takeshi; Nakatani, Eri; Iezaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Hiroko; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Hidano, Shinya; Kobayashi, Takashi; Takeda, Shu; Yoneda, Yukio

    2012-04-01

    Osteocytes are thought to play a role as a mechanical sensor through their communication network in bone. Although osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone, little attention has been paid to their physiological and pathological functions in skeletogenesis. Here, we have attempted to delineate the pivotal functional role of osteocytes in regulation of bone remodeling under pathological conditions. We first found markedly increased osteoclastic differentiation by conditioned media (CM) from osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells previously exposed to hypoxia in vitro. Using microarray and real-time PCR analyses, we identified growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) as a key candidate factor secreted from osteocytes under hypoxia. Recombinant GDF15 significantly promoted osteoclastic differentiation in a concentration-dependent manner, with concomitant facilitation of phosphorylation of both p65 and inhibitory-κB in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. To examine the possible functional significance of GDF15 in vivo, mice were subjected to ligation of the right femoral artery as a hypoxic model. A significant increase in GDF15 expression was specifically observed in tibias of the ligated limb but not in tibias of the normally perfused limb. Under these experimental conditions, in cancellous bone of proximal tibias in the ligated limb, a significant reduction was observed in bone volume, whereas a significant increase was seen in the extent of osteoclast surface/bone surface when determined by bone histomorphometric analysis. Finally, the anti-GDF15 antibody prevented bone loss through inhibiting osteoclastic activation in tibias from mice with femoral artery ligation in vivo, in addition to suppressing osteoclastic activity enhanced by CM from osteocytes exposed to hypoxia in vitro. These findings suggest that GDF15 could play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bone loss relevant to hypoxia through promotion of osteoclastogenesis after

  3. Dendritic cells enhance UHMWPE wear particle-induced osteoclast differentiation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cang, Dingwei; Guo, Kaijin; Zhao, Fengchao

    2015-10-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been widely used in large joint replacement. Osteolysis induced by the UHMWPE wear particles is one of the main causes of replacement failure. This study aims to elucidate whether dendritic cells play a role in UHMWPE particle-induced osteolysis. An in vitro Raw 264.7 and DC 2.4 coculture system was employed to examine the effects of dendritic cells on the inflammatory and osteoclastogenic responses of Raw 264.7 toward UHMWPE particles. The expression of cytokines, NF-κB, and osteoclast marker genes was analyzed by ELISA, western blot, or quantitative PCR. The osteoclast differentiation was measured by TRAP staining and flow cytometry. UHMWPE particles induced Raw 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, which was enhanced by coculturing with DC 2.4 cells. DC 2.4 cells augmented UHMWPE particle-elicited activation of NF-κB signaling, higher levels of TNF-α and MCP-1, and an increased expression of MMP-9, Calcr, and Ctsk, though DC 2.4 coculture alone did not significantly cause the aforementioned changes. These results suggest that dendritic cells, among other immune cells recruited by UHMWPE particle induced inflammation, could further exacerbate inflammation and osteolysis.

  4. Acid-inducible proton influx currents in the plasma membrane of murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Miyuki; Li, Guangshuai; Moriura, Yoshie; Hino, Yoshiko; Kawawaki, Junko; Sakai, Hiromu

    2016-05-01

    Acidification of the resorption pits, which is essential for dissolving bone, is produced by secretion of protons through vacuolar H(+)-ATPases in the plasma membrane of bone-resorbing cells, osteoclasts. Consequently, osteoclasts face highly acidic extracellular environments, where the pH gradient across the plasma membrane could generate a force driving protons into the cells. Proton influx mechanisms during the acid exposure are largely unknown, however. In this study, we investigated extracellular-acid-inducible proton influx currents in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Decreasing extracellular pH to <5.5 induced non-ohmic inward currents. The reversal potentials depended on the pH gradients across the membrane and were independent of concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), and HCO3 (-), suggesting that they were carried largely by protons. The acid-inducible proton influx currents were not inhibited by amiloride, a widely used blocker for cation channels/transporters, or by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-stilbenesulfonate(DIDS) which blocks anion channels/transporters. Additionally, the currents were not significantly affected by V-ATPase inhibitors, bafilomycin A1 and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. Extracellular Ca(2+) (10 mM) did not affect the currents, but 1 mM ZnCl2 decreased the currents partially. The intracellular pH in the vicinity of the plasma membrane was dropped by the acid-inducible H(+) influx currents, which caused overshoot of the voltage-gated H(+) channels after removal of acids. The H(+) influx currents were smaller in undifferentiated, mononuclear RAW cells and were negligible in COS7 cells. These data suggest that the acid-inducible H(+) influx (H(+) leak) pathway may be an additional mechanism modifying the pH environments of osteoclasts upon exposure to strong acids.

  5. Bropirimine inhibits osteoclast differentiation through production of interferon-β

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Ayako; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Kaneko, Kotaro; Inoue, Tomio; Chikazu, Daichi; Takami, Masamichi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-11-06

    Bropirimine is a synthetic agonist for toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). In this study, we investigated the effects of bropirimine on differentiation and bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts in vitro. Bropirimine inhibited osteoclast differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, it suppressed the mRNA expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), a master transcription factor for osteoclast differentiation, without affecting BMM viability. Bropirimine also inhibited osteoclast differentiation induced in co-cultures of mouse bone marrow cells (BMCs) and mouse osteoblastic UAMS-32 cells in the presence of activated vitamin D{sub 3}. Bropirimine partially suppressed the expression of RANKL mRNA in UAMS-32 cells induced by activated vitamin D{sub 3}. Finally, the anti-interferon-β (IFN-β) antibody restored RANKL-dependent differentiation of BMMs into osteoclasts suppressed by bropirimine. These results suggest that bropirimine inhibits differentiation of osteoclast precursor cells into osteoclasts via TLR7-mediated production of IFN-β.

  6. Hyaluronan–CD44 interaction hampers migration of osteoclast-like cells by down-regulating MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Spessotto, Paola; Rossi, Francesca Maria; Degan, Massimo; Di Francia, Raffaele; Perris, Roberto; Colombatti, Alfonso; Gattei, Valter

    2002-01-01

    Osteoclast (OC) precursors migrate to putative sites of bone resorption to form functionally active, multinucleated cells. The preOC FLG 29.1 cells, known to be capable of irreversibly differentiating into multinucleated OC-like cells, displayed several features of primary OCs, including expression of specific integrins and the hyaluronan (HA) receptor CD44. OC-like FLG 29.1 cells adhered to and extensively migrated through membranes coated with fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminins, but, although strongly binding to HA, totally failed to move on this substrate. Moreover, soluble HA strongly inhibited OC-like FLG 29.1 cell migration on the permissive matrix substrates, and this behavior was dependent on its engagement with CD44, as it was fully restored by function-blocking anti-CD44 antibodies. HA did not modulate the cell–substrate binding affinity/avidity nor the expression levels of the corresponding integrins. MMP-9 was the major secreted metalloproteinase used by OC-like FLG 29.1 cells for migration, because this process was strongly inhibited by both TIMP-1 and GM6001, as well as by MMP-9–specific antisense oligonucleotides. After HA binding to CD44, a strong down-regulation of MMP-9 mRNA and protein was detected. These findings highlight a novel role of the HA–CD44 interaction in the context of OC-like cell motility, suggesting that it may act as a stop signal for bone-resorbing cells. PMID:12235127

  7. Gadolinium inhibits prostate cancer PC3 cell migration and suppresses osteoclast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiao-Min; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Tian-Lan; Wang, Kui

    2011-11-01

    This study examined whether Gd (gadolinium) could suppress prostate cancer cell migration and prostate cancer cell-induced osteoclast differentiation. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] and colony forming assay showed that GdCl3 treatment inhibited both cell viability and colony forming ability in PC3 cells more significantly than that in DU145 cells. Annexin/PI (propidium iodide) staining showed an increase in apoptotic death of PC3 cells in the presence of GdCl3. Wound healing and adhesion assay indicated that GdCl3 suppressed PC3 cell migration. Western-blot analysis demonstrated that GdCl3 treatment inhibited phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Pretreatment with PTx (pertussis toxin), a Gi protein inhibitor, conferred resistance to GdCl3-induced colony formation, ERK and p38 phosphorylation in PC3 cells. Moreover, GdCl3 inhibited PC3 cell-induced osteoclast differentiation. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) indicated that GdCl3 decreased the expression of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand) in PC3 cells, whereas it increased the expression of OPG (osteoprotegerin) in PC3 and DU145 cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that GdCl3 inhibited PC3 cell migration mediated by the inactivation of both ERK and p38 MAPK pathways via PTx-sensitive G proteins, and also suppressed PC3 cell-induced osteoclast differentiation via regulating the mRNA expression of OPG and RANKL.

  8. Cadmium stimulates the osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in presence of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Guoying; Jin, Taiyi; Zhou, Zhijun; Gu, Shuzhu; Qiu, Jing; Xiao, Hanfang

    2012-06-01

    Low level of cadmium exposure may have direct effects on bone. But the probable mechanism is far from clarified. Using a co-culture system, the present study investigated the effects of low level of cadmium exposure on osteoclast differentiation in the presence of osteoblasts. Primary osteoblasts were isolated from calvarial bone of newborn Sprague Dawley rats. Primary osteoblasts and RAW264.7 cells were exposed to cadmium (0-60 nmol/l) in a co-culture system. Then, osteoblast viability was observed by MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Osteoclast formation and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b levels were determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of NF-kB ligand mRNA expression in osteoblasts were studied via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Viability of osteoblast was obviously decreased by Cd exposure (P < 0.05). Cadmium significantly stimulated the formation of osteoclasts in co-culture system (7.5-60 nmol/l) compared with the control. The levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b in RAW264.7 cells co-cultured with osteoblasts were significantly enhanced by cadmium exposure compared with that without cadmium. The mRNA expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand was upregulated by cadmium at 15 and 60 nmol/l. But cadmium had no obvious influence on osteoprotegerin mRNA expression. This data suggested that osteoblasts might be involved in the progress of cadmium effects on osteoclasts.

  9. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  10. Resolvin E1 regulates osteoclast fusion via DC-STAMP and NFATc1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Gyurko, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between the immune and skeletal systems in inflammatory bone diseases are well appreciated, but the underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate the resolution phase of inflammation and bone turnover have not been unveiled. Here we investigated the direct actions of the proresolution mediator resolvin E1 (RvE1) on bone-marrow-cell-derived osteoclasts in an in vitro murine model of osteoclast maturation and inflammatory bone resorption. Investigation of the actions of RvE1 treatment on the specific stages of osteoclast maturation revealed that RvE1 targeted late stages of osteoclast maturation to decrease osteoclast formation by 32.8%. Time-lapse vital microscopy and migration assays confirmed that membrane fusion of osteoclast precursors was inhibited. The osteoclast fusion protein DC-STAMP was specifically targeted by RvE1 receptor binding and was down-regulated by 65.4%. RvE1 did not affect the induction of the essential osteoclast transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) or its nuclear translocation; however, NFATc1 binding to the DC-STAMP promoter was significantly inhibited by 60.9% with RvE1 treatment as shown in electrophoresis mobility shift assay. Our findings suggest that proresolution mediators act directly on osteoclasts, in addition to down-regulation of inflammation, providing a novel mechanism for modulating osteoclast signaling in osteolytic inflammatory disease.

  11. TULA-2, a novel histidine phosphatase regulates bone remodeling by modulating osteoclast function

    PubMed Central

    Back, Steven H.; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Barbe, Mary F.; Carpino, Nick C.; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.; Sanjay, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that depends on the intricate relationship between protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) for maintaining homeostasis. PTKs and PTPs act like molecular on and off switches and help modulate differentiation and the attachment of osteoclasts to bone matrix regulating bone resorption. The novel protein T-cell Ubiquitin Ligand-2 (TULA-2), which is abundantly expressed in osteoclasts, is a novel histidine phosphatase. Our results show that of the two family members only TULA-2 is expressed in osteoclasts and that its expression is sustained throughout the course of osteoclast differentiation suggesting that TULA-2 may play a role during early as well late stages of osteoclast differentiation. Skeletal analysis of mice that do not express TULA or TULA-2 proteins (DKO Mice) revealed that there was a decrease in bone volume due to increased osteoclast numbers and function. Furthermore, in vitro experiments indicated that bone marrow precursor cells from DKO mice have an increased potential to form osteoclasts. At the molecular level, the absence of TULA-2 in osteoclasts results in increased Syk phosphorylation at the Y352 and Y525/526 residues and activation of phospholipase C gamma 2 (PLCγ2) upon engagement of Immune-receptor-Tyrosine-based-Activation-Motif (ITAM)–mediated signaling. Furthermore, expression of a phosphatase-dead TULA-2 leads to increased osteoclast function. Taken together, these results suggest that TULA-2 negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:23149425

  12. Osteoclast progenitors from cats with and without tooth resorption respond differently to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Booij-Vrieling, H E; de Vries, T J; Schoenmaker, T; Tryfonidou, M A; Penning, L C; Hazewinkel, H A W; Everts, V

    2012-04-01

    Both vitamin D and inflammatory cytokines can stimulate osteoclast formation and activity. We studied the effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)(2)D), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), on the formation and activity of feline osteoclasts, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cats with and without tooth resorption (TR(+) and TR(-)) as a source of osteoclast precursors. The formation of osteoclast-like cells (defined as multinucleated, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells) was assessed at 7 and 14 days. In the presence of M-CSF and RANKL, with and without IL-6, more osteoclasts were formed from TR(-) PBMCs than from TR(+) PBMCs on plastic. More osteoclasts were formed from TR(+) PBMCs on bone slices in the presence of M-CSF/RANKL with 1,25(OH)(2)D. This opposite effect may be due to a higher expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in TR(+) osteoclasts and precursors on bone. Formation of resorption pits was analyzed and confirmed with scanning electron microscopy. In conclusion, we propose that TR(+) PBMCs when cultured on bone are sensitive to 1,25(OH)(2)D, whereas the differentiation of TR(-) PMBCs on bone seem more sensitive to IL-6, suggesting that osteoclast precursors from cats with and without tooth resorption respond differently to osteoclast stimulating factors.

  13. Osteoclasts control reactivation of dormant myeloma cells by remodelling the endosteal niche.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michelle A; McDonald, Michelle M; Kovacic, Natasa; Hua Khoo, Weng; Terry, Rachael L; Down, Jenny; Kaplan, Warren; Paton-Hough, Julia; Fellows, Clair; Pettitt, Jessica A; Neil Dear, T; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baldock, Paul A; Rogers, Michael J; Eaton, Colby L; Vanderkerken, Karin; Pettit, Allison R; Quinn, Julian M W; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Phan, Tri Giang; Croucher, Peter I

    2015-12-03

    Multiple myeloma is largely incurable, despite development of therapies that target myeloma cell-intrinsic pathways. Disease relapse is thought to originate from dormant myeloma cells, localized in specialized niches, which resist therapy and repopulate the tumour. However, little is known about the niche, and how it exerts cell-extrinsic control over myeloma cell dormancy and reactivation. In this study, we track individual myeloma cells by intravital imaging as they colonize the endosteal niche, enter a dormant state and subsequently become activated to form colonies. We demonstrate that dormancy is a reversible state that is switched 'on' by engagement with bone-lining cells or osteoblasts, and switched 'off' by osteoclasts remodelling the endosteal niche. Dormant myeloma cells are resistant to chemotherapy that targets dividing cells. The demonstration that the endosteal niche is pivotal in controlling myeloma cell dormancy highlights the potential for targeting cell-extrinsic mechanisms to overcome cell-intrinsic drug resistance and prevent disease relapse.

  14. Lack of ADAM10 in endothelial cells affects osteoclasts at the chondro-osseus junction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ren; Wang, Aimin; Hall, Katherine C; Otero, Miguel; Weskamp, Gisela; Zhao, Baohong; Hill, Daniel; Goldring, Mary B; Glomski, Krzysztof; Blobel, Carl P

    2014-02-01

    Mice lacking ADAM10 in endothelial cells (Adam10ΔEC mice) have shorter femurs, tibiae, and humeri than controls, raising questions about how endothelial cells could control long bone growth. We performed a histopathological evaluation of the femur and tibia growth plates at different postnatal stages, and assessed the distribution of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and endothelial cells at the growth plate. The growth plates in Adam10ΔEC mice appeared normal at P7 and P14, but a thickened zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes and increased trabecular bone density were apparent by P21 and later. The number of TRAP+ cells at the COJ was normal at P7 and P14, but was strongly reduced at P21 and later. Moreover, the density of endomucin-stained endothelial cells at the COJ was increased starting at P7. The defects in long bone growth in Adam10ΔEC mice could be caused by a lack of osteoclastogenesis at the COJ. Moreover, ADAM10 appears to regulate endothelial cell organization in the developing bone vasculature, perhaps in a similar manner as in the developing retinal vascular tree, where ADAM10 is thought to control Notch-dependent endothelial cell fate decisions. This study provides evidence for the regulation of osteoclast function by endothelial cells in vivo.

  15. Silk fibroin hydrolysate inhibits osteoclastogenesis and induces apoptosis of osteoclasts derived from RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jeon-Woo; Kim, Hyeryeon; Jeon, Ha-Na; Park, Kyungho; Lee, Kwang-Gill; Yeo, Joo-Hong; Kweon, Haeyong; Lee, Heui-Sam; Jo, You-Young; Park, Yoo Kyoung

    2012-11-01

    Bone disease can be associated with bone resorption by osteoclasts, and interest in the development of antiresorptive agents has recently increased. The hydrolysate of silk fibroin has been studied with respect to such biomedical applications. In a previous study, silk fibroin showed indirect inhibitory effects on the differentiation of osteoclasts. To further evaluate the effect of a hydrolysate of silk fibroin on osteoclasts, we investigated the direct effects of the silk fibroin hydrolysate on osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis of osteoclasts induced by receptor activation of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). The silk fibroin hydrolysate inhibited RANKL-induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in RAW 264.7 cells. The inhibitory effect of the silk fibroin hydrolysate resulted in the decreased expression of osteoclast marker genes, such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cathepsin-K and calcitonin receptor (CTR). In addition, the silk fibroin hydrolysate blocked the signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and expression of transcription factors, such as nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) and NF-κB. Finally, the silk fibroin hydrolysate induced apoptosis signaling cascades. Taken together, the present results indicate that silk fibroin hydrolysate has antiresorptive activity by both inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and inducing osteoclast apoptosis.

  16. The pathobiology of the osteoclast.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, T J

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews recent information concerning the origin of osteoclasts and the local and systemic regulation of their activity. It appears that much of the environmental responsiveness of osteoclasts is mediated by cells of the osteoblastic lineage, which exert a major influence on the localisation, induction, stimulation, and inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption. Some of the mechanisms by which osteoclast function may be disturbed by inflammatory and neoplastic diseases are discussed, and it is suggested that many pathological disturbances of osteoclastic bone resorption may be explicable as mimicry of physiological regulatory mechanisms by local hormones introduced into bone as the local regulators of the diseased tissue. Images PMID:2982920

  17. Runx1-Mediated Regulation of Osteoclast Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Soung, Do Y.; Kalinowski, Judith; Baniwal, Sanjeev K.; Jacome-Galarza, Christian E.; Frenkel, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Excessive bone resorption is the cause of several metabolic bone diseases including osteoporosis. Thus, identifying factors that can inhibit osteoclast formation and/or activity may define new drug targets that can be used to develop novel therapies for these conditions. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the master regulator of hematopoiesis, Runx1, is expressed in preosteoclasts and may influence skeletal health. To examine the potential role of Runx1 in osteoclast formation and function, we deleted its expression in myeloid osteoclast precursors by crossing Runx1 floxed mice (Runx1F/F) with CD11b-Cre transgenic mice. Mice lacking Runx1 in preosteoclasts (CD11b-Cre;Runx1F/F) exhibited significant loss of femoral trabecular and cortical bone mass compared with that in Cre-negative mice. In addition, serum levels of collagen type 1 cross-linked C-telopeptide, a biomarker of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, were significantly elevated in CD11b-Cre;Runx1F/F mice compared with those in Runx1F/F mice. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase–positive osteoclasts that differentiated from bone marrow cells of CD11b-Cre;Runx1F/F mice in vitro were larger, were found in greater numbers, and had increased bone resorbing activity than similarly cultured cells from Runx1F/F mice. CD11b-Cre;Runx1F/F bone marrow cells that were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro also had elevated mRNA levels of osteoclast-related genes including vacuolar ATPase D2, cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinase 9, calcitonin receptor, osteoclast-associated receptor, nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1, and cFos. These data indicate that Runx1 expression in preosteoclasts negatively regulates osteoclast formation and activity and contributes to overall bone mass. PMID:24606124

  18. Icariin influences adipogenic differentiation of stem cells affected by osteoblast-osteoclast co-culture and clinical research adipogenic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuncong; Feng, Pengbo; Mo, Guoye; Li, Daxing; Li, Yongxian; Mo, Ling; Yang, Zhidong; Liang, De

    2017-04-01

    To build mouse osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and mouse osteoclast RAW264.7 co-culture system and to study the effect of icariin on the activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the co-culture system. In vitro acquisition and cultivation of mouse osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 and mouse RAW264.7 cells were conducted. Osteoblast and osteoclast activities of cells were detected by CCK-8 staining experiment, alizarin red staining and tartaric-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. We used different concentrations of icariin to interfere in osteoblast-osteoclast co-culture system. The effects of icariin on various genes were detected by PCR and Western blot methods The correction between the expression of PPARγ and BMD was analyzed in patients with osteoporosis. Mouse osteoblast-osteoclast co-culture system was built, and the osteogenic differentiation effect was enhanced. Icariin can improve the MC3T3-E1 osteogenic differentiation activity, enhance the expression of OPG and RANKL gene protein, reduce the NF-κb gene and protein expression, increase of ALP, TGF-b1 and RANKL gene expression level and reduce RANK gene expression. Icariin can act on MC3T3-E1 cells-RAW264.7 cells co-culture system, and promote the osteogenic activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, inhibit the osteoclast activity of RAW264.7 cells and reduce the level of BMSCs adipogenic differentiation. The expression level of PPAR-γ gene was negatively correlated with the level of BMD. Mouse MC3T3-E1 cells and mouse RAW264.7 cells could be co-cultured in vitro, and icariin could improve the osteogenic activity of MC3T3 cells-RAW264.7 cells and decrease the osteoclast activity. Icariin could inhibit adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs in the osteoblast-osteoclast co-culture, promoting osteogenic differentiation and inhibiting osteoclast differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Histochemical evidence of osteoclastic degradation of extracellular matrix in osteolytic metastasis originating from human lung small carcinoma (SBC-5) cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio; Takeuchi, Kiichi; Freitas, Paulo H L; Kawano, Yoshiro; Hoshino, Masaaki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dynamics of osteoclast migration and the degradation of unmineralized extracellular matrix in an osteolytic metastasis by examining a well-standardized lung cancer metastasis model of nude mice. SBC-5 human lung small carcinoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of 6-week-old BALB/c nu/nu mice under anesthesia. At 25-30 days after injection, the animals were sacrificed and their femora and/or tibiae were removed for histochemical analyses. Metastatic lesions were shown to occupy a considerable area extending from the metaphyses to the bone marrow region. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive osteoclasts were found in association with an alkaline phosphatase (ALPase)-positive osteoblastic layer lining the bone surface, but could also be localized in the ALPase-negative stromal tissues that border the tumor nodules. These stromal tissues were markedly positive for osteopontin, and contained a significant number of TRAPase-positive osteoclasts expressing immunoreactivity for CD44. We thus speculated that, mediating its affinity for CD44, osteopontin may serve to facilitate osteoclastic migration after their formation associated with ALPase-positive osteoblasts. We next examined the localization of cathepsin K and matrix metallo-proteinase-9 (MMP-9) in osteoclasts. Osteoclasts adjacent to the bone surfaces were positive for both proteins, whereas those in the stromal tissues in the tumor nests showed only MMP-9 immunoreactivity. Immunoelectron microscopy disclosed the presence of MMP-9 in the Golgi apparatus and in vesicular structures at the baso-lateral cytoplasmic region of the osteoclasts found in the stromal tissue. MMP-9-positive vesicular structures also contained fragmented extracellular materials. Thus, osteoclasts appear to either select an optimized function, namely secreting proteolytic enzymes from ruffled borders during bone resorption, or recognize the surrounding extracellular

  20. A study of osteoclasts on calvaria of normal and osteopetrotic (mi/mi) mice by vital staining with acridine orange.

    PubMed Central

    Green, P. M.; Marshall, M. J.; Nisbet, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    A novel staining procedure for enumerating osteoclasts on neonatal mouse calvaria with the vital fluorescent dye acridine orange is described. It has the advantage over Barnicot's neutral-red method in that the nuclei and cytoplasm of the osteoclast are stained differentially. The osteopetrotic calvarium (mi/mi) has fewer multinucleate osteoclasts than its normal counterpart (mi/+) and they are differently distributed. The osteopetrotic calvarium has more mononucleate cells which stain like osteoclasts with acridine orange than the normal calvarium and these cells also are differently distributed. These mononuclear cells may be mononuclear osteoclasts or their precursors. These observations suggest that the defect resulting in this osteopetrosis lies with osteoclast differentiation. Images Fig. 1 p[88]-a PMID:2418863

  1. Advances in osteoclast biology reveal potential new drug targets and new roles for osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Brendan F

    2013-04-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated myeloid lineage cells formed in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) by fusion of bone marrow-derived precursors that circulate in the blood and are attracted to sites of bone resorption in response to factors, such as sphingosine-1 phosphate signaling. Major advances in understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating osteoclast functions have been made in the past 20 years, mainly from mouse and human genetic studies. These have revealed that osteoclasts express and respond to proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Some of these cytokines activate NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling to induce osteoclast formation and activity and also regulate communication with neighboring cells through signaling proteins, including ephrins and semaphorins. Osteoclasts also positively and negatively regulate immune responses and osteoblastic bone formation. These advances have led to development of new inhibitors of bone resorption that are in clinical use or in clinical trials; and more should follow, based on these advances. This article reviews current understanding of how bone resorption is regulated both positively and negatively in normal and pathologic states. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Elevated marrow inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in subchondral osteosclerosis in human knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen; Patel, Amit; Hirschmann, Michael T; Pagenstert, Geert I; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor; Hügle, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subchondral osteosclerosis, characterized by an increase of hypomineralized bone material, is a pathological hallmark of osteoarthritis. The cellular components in the subchondral marrow compartment that participate in this aberrant bone remodeling process remain to be elucidated. This study assessed the presence of marrow inflammatory cells and their relative abundance between nonsclerotic and sclerotic tissues in knee osteoarthritis. Bone samples from osteoarthritic knee tibial plateaus were stratified for histological analyses using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Immunohistological analysis revealed the presence of CD20 (B-lymphocyte) and CD68 (macrophage), but not CD3 (T-lymphocyte) immunoreactive mononuclear cells in subchondral marrow tissues and their relative abundance was significantly increased in sclerotic compared with nonsclerotic bone samples. Multinucleated osteoclasts that stained positive for CD68 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, predominantly associated with CD34-positive blood vessels and their abundance was strongly increased in sclerotic samples. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity in outgrowth osteoblasts was induced by conditioned medium from nonsclerotic, but not sclerotic, bone pieces. These results suggest that an interaction between bone-resident cells and marrow inflammatory cells might play a role in aberrant bone remodeling leading to subchondral osteosclerosis. Elevated osteoclast activity in sclerotic bone suggests that bone formation and resorption activities are increased, yet uncoupled, in human knee osteoarthritis.

  3. Spontaneous generation of functional osteoclasts from synovial fluid mononuclear cells as a model of inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Stinne R; Einarsson, Halldór Bjarki; Hvid, Malene; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    In osteoimmunology, osteoclastogenesis is understood in the context of the immune system. Today, the in vitro model for osteoclastogenesis necessitates the addition of recombinant human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The peripheral joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) are characterized by an immune-mediated inflammation that can lead to bone destruction. Here, we evaluate spontaneous in vitro osteoclastogenesis in cultures of synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) activated only in vivo. SFMCs were isolated and cultured for 21 days at 0.5-1.0 × 10(6) cells/mL in culture medium. SFMCs and healthy control peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF as controls. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated cells were found in the SFMC cultures after 21 days. These cells expressed the osteoclast genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and integrin β3, formed lacunae on dentin plates and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and TRAP. Adding RANKL and M-CSF potentiated this secretion. In conclusion, we show that SFMCs from inflamed peripheral joints can spontaneously develop into functionally active osteoclasts ex vivo. Our study provides a simple in vitro model for studying inflammatory osteoclastogenesis. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Interleukin-3 plays dual roles in osteoclastogenesis by promoting the development of osteoclast progenitors but inhibiting the osteoclastogenic process

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Huixian; Shi, Zhenqi; Qiao, Ping; Li, Hui; McCoy, Erin M.; Mao, Ping; Xu, Hui; Feng, Xu; Wang, Shunqing

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells generates a population of hematopoietic cells. •IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts. •Osteoclasts derived from IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells are functional. •IL-3 promotes the development of osteoclast progenitors. •IL-3 inhibits the osteoclastogenic process. -- Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-3, a multilineage hematopoietic growth factor, is implicated in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis. However, the role of IL-3 in osteoclastogenesis remains controversial; whereas early studies showed that IL-3 stimulates osteoclastogenesis, recent investigations demonstrated that IL-3 inhibits osteoclast formation. The objective of this work is to further address the role of IL-3 in osteoclastogenesis. We found that IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells generated a population of cells capable of differentiating into osteoclasts in tissue culture dishes in response to the stimulation of the monocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). The IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells were able to further proliferate and differentiate in response to M-CSF stimulation and the resulting cells were also capable of forming osteoclasts with M-CSF and RANKL treatment. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits M-CSF-/RANKL-induced differentiation of the IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells into osteoclasts. The flow cytometry analysis indicates that while IL-3 treatment of bone marrow cells slightly affected the percentage of osteoclast precursors in the surviving populations, it considerably increased the percentage of osteoclast precursors in the populations after subsequent M-CSF treatment. Moreover, osteoclasts derived from IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells were fully functional. Thus, we conclude that IL-3 plays dual roles in osteoclastogenesis by promoting the development of osteoclast progenitors but inhibiting the

  5. Netrin-1 Is a Critical Autocrine/Paracrine Factor for Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Moore, Kathryn J; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    Bone metabolism is a vital process that involves resorption by osteoclasts and formation by osteoblasts, which is closely regulated by immune cells. The neuronal guidance protein Netrin-1 regulates immune cell migration and inflammatory reactions, but its role in bone metabolism is unknown. During osteoclast differentiation, osteoclast precursors increase expression of Netrin-1 and its receptor Unc5b. Netrin-1 binds, in an autocrine and paracrine manner, to Unc5b to promote osteoclast differentiation in vitro, and absence of Netrin-1 or antibody-mediated blockade of Netrin-1 or Unc5b prevents osteoclast differentiation of both murine and human precursors. We confirmed the functional relationship of Netrin-1 in osteoclast differentiation in vivo using Netrin-1-deficient (Ntn1−/−) or wild-type (WT) bone marrow transplanted mice. Notably, Ntn1−/− chimeras have markedly diminished osteoclasts, as well as increased cortical and trabecular bone density and volume compared with WT mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Netrin-1 regulates osteoclast differentiation by altering cytoskeletal assembly. Netrin-1 increases regulator of Rho-GEF subfamily (LARG) and repulsive guidance molecule (RGMa) association with Unc5b, which increases expression and activation of cytoskeletal regulators RhoA and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Netrin-1 and its receptor Unc5b likely play a role in fusion of osteoclast precursors because Netrin-1 and DC-STAMP are tightly linked. These results identify Netrin-1 as a key regulator of osteoclast differentiation that may be a new target for bone therapies. PMID:25483983

  6. Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 regulates osteoclast fusion in a cell heterotypic manner.

    PubMed

    Guterman-Ram, Gali; Pesic, Milena; Orenbuch, Ayelet; Czeiger, Tal; Aflalo, Anastasia; Levaot, Noam

    2018-01-01

    Monocyte fusion into osteoclasts, bone resorbing cells, plays a key role in bone remodeling and homeostasis; therefore, aberrant cell fusion may be involved in a variety of debilitating bone diseases. Research in the last decade has led to the discovery of genes that regulate osteoclast fusion, but the basic molecular and cellular regulatory mechanisms underlying the fusion process are not completely understood. Here, we reveal a role for Dyrk2 in osteoclast fusion. We demonstrate that Dyrk2 down regulation promotes osteoclast fusion, whereas its overexpression inhibits fusion. Moreover, Dyrk2 also promotes the fusion of foreign-body giant cells, indicating that Dyrk2 plays a more general role in cell fusion. In an earlier study, we showed that fusion is a cell heterotypic process initiated by fusion-founder cells that fuse to fusion-follower cells, the latter of which are unable to initiate fusion. Here, we show that Dyrk2 limits the expansion of multinucleated founder cells through the suppression of the fusion competency of follower cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Type II Collagen N-propeptide, PIIBNP, inhibits cell survival and bone resorption of osteoclasts via integrin-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinya; Wang, Zhepeng; Bryan, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Chikashi; Faccio, Roberta; Sandell, Linda J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Type IIB procollagen is characteristic of cartilage, comprising 50% of the extracellular matrix. The NH2-propeptide of type IIB collagen, PIIBNP, can kill tumor cells via binding to integrins αVβ3 and αVβ5. As osteoclasts rely on αVβ3 integrins for function in bone erosion, we sought to determine whether PIIBNP could inhibit osteoclast function. Methods We undertook in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate both osteoblast and osteoclast function in the presence of recombinant PIIBNP. Adhesion of osteoclasts to PIIBNP was analyzed by staining of attached cells with crystal violet. PIIBNP-induced cell death was evaluated by cell counting Trypan Blue stained cells. The mechanism of cell death was evaluated by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL staining and western blotting to detect cleaved caspases. To determine the role of αVβ3 integrin, osteoclasts were pretreated with αV or β3 integrin specific siRNA before the treatment with PIIBNP. To explore PIIBNP function in vivo, a lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse calvaria lysis model was employed. Results Osteoclasts adhered to PIIBNP via an RGD-mediated mechanism. When osteoclasts were plated on extracellular matrix proteins, PIIBNP induced apoptosis of osteoclasts via caspase 3/8 activation. Osteoblasts and macrophages were not killed. Reduction of αV or β3 integrin levels on osteoclasts by siRNA reduced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo, PIIBNP could inhibit bone resorption. Conclusion We conclude that PIIBNP can inhibit osteoclast survival and bone resorption via signal transduction through the αVβ3 integrins. Because of this property and the cell specificity, we propose that PIIBNP may play a role in vivo in protecting cartilage from osteoclast invasion and also could be a new therapeutic strategy for decreasing bone loss. PMID:21708300

  8. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Suppress Hif1α Protein Accumulation in Mouse Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Kobayashi, Tami; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Oike, Takatsugu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Kawana, Hiromasa; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Anti-bone resorptive drugs such as bisphosphonates, the anti-RANKL antibody (denosumab), or selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been developed to treat osteoporosis. Mechanisms underlying activity of bisphosphonates or denosumab in this context are understood, while it is less clear how SERMs like tamoxifen, raloxifene, or bazedoxifene inhibit bone resorption. Recently, accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1α) in osteoclasts was shown to be suppressed by estrogen in normal cells. In addition, osteoclast activation and decreased bone mass seen in estrogen-deficient conditions was found to require Hif1α. Here, we used western blot analysis of cultured osteoclast precursor cells to show that tamoxifen, raloxifene, or bazedoxifene all suppress Hif1α protein accumulation. The effects of each SERM on osteoclast differentiation differed in vitro. Our results suggest that interventions such as the SERMs evaluated here could be useful to inhibit Hif1α and osteoclast activity under estrogen-deficient conditions. PMID:27802325

  9. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and its type II receptor in giant cell tumors of bone. Possible involvement in osteoclast-like cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, M. H.; Fan, Y.; Wysocki, S. J.; Lau, A. T.; Robertson, T.; Beilharz, M.; Wood, D. J.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a relatively rare skeletal neoplasm characterized by multinuclear giant cells (osteoclast-like cells) scattered in a mass of mononuclear cells. The currently favored hypothesis for the origin of cells within GCT is that the multinuclear giant cells are reactive osteoclasts, whereas the truly neoplastic cells are the major component of the mononuclear population. However, the pathological significance and the precise relationship of tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells in GCT have not been fully established. In this study, we evaluated two GCTs for the presence of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcripts and attempted to establish a possible role for TGF-beta 1 in the interaction between tumor cells and osteoclast-like cells. By using in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis, we have demonstrated that TGF-beta 1 mRNA transcript is consistently detected in both tumor mononuclear cells and osteoclast-like cells, whereas TGF-beta type II receptor gene transcript is only present in osteoclast-like cells. Moreover, isolated rat osteoclasts were tested for their ability to migrate in response to GCT-conditioned medium (GCTCM) in an in vitro chemotactic assay. Our results showed that GCTCM stimulates the migration of osteoclasts in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, only osteoclasts containing less than three nuclei can migrate through 12-mu pore filters. Addition of monoclonal antibody against TGF-beta significantly reduced but did not abolish the chemotactic activity of GCTCM. Moreover, TGF-beta type II receptor mRNA has been demonstrated in the normal rat osteoclasts and may be involved in the chemotactic action of TGF-beta 1. We concluded that TGF-beta 1, possibly in concert with other cytokines, is involved in the recruitment of osteoclast-like cells in GCT by acting in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

  10. Amorphigenin inhibits Osteoclast differentiation by suppressing c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Gyu; Kwak, Han Bok; Choi, Eun-Yong; Kim, Hun Soo; Kim, Myung Hee; Kim, Seong Hwan; Choi, Min-Kyu; Chun, Churl Hong; Oh, Jaemin

    2010-01-01

    Among the several rotenoids, amorphigenin is isolated from the leaves of Amopha Fruticosa and it is known that has anti-proliferative effects and anti-cnacer effects in many cell types. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of amorphigenin on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and on LPS treated inflammatory bone loss model in vivo. We show here that amorphigenin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from bone marrow macrophages in a dose dependent manner without cellular toxicity. Anti-osteoclastogenic properties of amorphigenin were based on a down-regulation of c-fos and NFATc1. Amorphigenin markedly inhibited RANKL-induced p38 and NF-κB pathways, but other pathways were not affected. Micro-CT analysis of the femurs showed that amorphigenin protected the LPS-induced bone loss. We concluded that amorphigenin can prevent inflammation-induced bone loss. Thus we expect that amorphigenin could be a treatment option for bone erosion caused by inflammation. PMID:21267405

  11. High bone mass in mice lacking Cx37 because of defective osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Davis, Hannah M; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2014-03-21

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37(-/-)) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37(-/-) mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37(-/-) mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37(+/+) littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37(-/-) bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37(+/+) cell cultures. Further, Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37(-/-) mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo.

  12. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  13. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein, Linker for Activation of T cells (LAT), Regulates RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Jung Ha; Moon, Jang Bae; Lee, Jongwon; Kwak, Han bok; Park, Yong-Wook; Kim, Nacksung

    2012-01-01

    RANKL induces the formation of osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone resorption. Herein we investigate the role of the transmembrane adaptor proteins in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. LAT positively regulates osteoclast differentiation and is up-regulated by RANKL via c-Fos and NFATc1, whereas LAB and LIME act as negative modulators of osteoclastogenesis. In addition, silencing of LAT by RNA interference or overexpression of a LAT dominant negative in bone marrow-derived macrophage cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. Furthermore, LAT is involved in RANKL-induced PLCγ activation and NFATc1 induction. Thus, our data suggest that LAT acts as a positive regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22382685

  14. CathepsinKCre mediated deletion of βcatenin results in dramatic loss of bone mass by targeting both osteoclasts and osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Paula; Martin-Millan, Marta; Gonzalez-Martin, M C; Almeida, Maria; González-Macias, Jesús; Ros, Maria A

    2016-11-02

    It is well established that activation of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in the osteoblast lineage leads to an increase in bone mass through a dual mechanism: increased osteoblastogenesis and decreased osteoclastogenesis. However, the effect of this pathway on the osteoclast lineage has been less explored. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in mature osteoclasts by generating mice lacking βcatenin in CathepsinK-expressing cells (Ctnnb1(f/f);CtsKCre mice). These mice developed a severe low-bone-mass phenotype with onset in the second month and in correlation with an excessive number of osteoclasts, detected by TRAP staining and histomorphometric quantification. We found that WNT3A, through the canonical pathway, promoted osteoclast apoptosis and therefore attenuated the number of M-CSF and RANKL-derived osteoclasts in vitro. This reveals a cell-autonomous effect of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in controlling the life span of mature osteoclasts. Furthermore, bone Opg expression in Ctnnb1(f/f);CtsKCre mice was dramatically decreased pointing to an additional external activation of osteoclasts. Accordingly, expression of CathepsinK was detected in TRAP-negative cells of the inner periosteal layer also expressing Col1. Our results indicate that the bone phenotype of Ctnnb1(f/f);CtsKCre animals combines a cell-autonomous effect in the mature osteoclast with indirect effects due to the additional targeting of osteoblastic cells.

  15. CathepsinKCre mediated deletion of βcatenin results in dramatic loss of bone mass by targeting both osteoclasts and osteoblastic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Paula; Martin-Millan, Marta; Gonzalez-Martin, M. C.; Almeida, Maria; González-Macias, Jesús; Ros, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that activation of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in the osteoblast lineage leads to an increase in bone mass through a dual mechanism: increased osteoblastogenesis and decreased osteoclastogenesis. However, the effect of this pathway on the osteoclast lineage has been less explored. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in mature osteoclasts by generating mice lacking βcatenin in CathepsinK-expressing cells (Ctnnb1f/f;CtsKCre mice). These mice developed a severe low-bone-mass phenotype with onset in the second month and in correlation with an excessive number of osteoclasts, detected by TRAP staining and histomorphometric quantification. We found that WNT3A, through the canonical pathway, promoted osteoclast apoptosis and therefore attenuated the number of M-CSF and RANKL-derived osteoclasts in vitro. This reveals a cell-autonomous effect of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in controlling the life span of mature osteoclasts. Furthermore, bone Opg expression in Ctnnb1f/f;CtsKCre mice was dramatically decreased pointing to an additional external activation of osteoclasts. Accordingly, expression of CathepsinK was detected in TRAP-negative cells of the inner periosteal layer also expressing Col1. Our results indicate that the bone phenotype of Ctnnb1f/f;CtsKCre animals combines a cell-autonomous effect in the mature osteoclast with indirect effects due to the additional targeting of osteoblastic cells. PMID:27804995

  16. Osteopontin expression in co-cultures of human squamous cell carcinoma-derived cells and osteoblastic cells and its effects on the neoplastic cell phenotype and osteoclastic activation.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Lucas Novaes; de Castro Raucci, Larissa Moreira Spinola; Alonso, Gabriela Caroline; Coletta, Ricardo Della; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the temporal expression of osteopontin (OPN) in co-cultures of human osteoblastic cells (SAOS-2) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)-derived cells (SCC9) and examined the effects of osteoblast-derived OPN on the neoplastic cell phenotype. Additionally, the effects of these co-cultures on subsequent osteoclastic activity were explored. SCC9 cells were plated on Transwell® membranes that were either coated or not coated with Matrigel and were then co-cultured with SAOS-2 cells during the peak of OPN expression. SCC9 cells exposed to OPN-silenced SAOS-2 cultures and SCC9 cells cultured alone served as controls. SCC9 cells were quantitatively evaluated for cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, and invasion into Matrigel. The impact of co-culturing SAOS-2 and SCC9 cells on the resorptive capacity of U-937-derived osteoclastic cells was also investigated. Furthermore, a reciprocal induction of SAOS-2 and SCC9 cells in terms of OPN expression over the co-culture interval was identified. SAOS-2-secreted OPN altered the SCC9 cell phenotype, leading to enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation and higher Matrigel invasion. This invasion was also enhanced, albeit to a lesser degree, by co-culture with OPN-silenced SAOS-2 cells. Cell migration was not affected. Co-culture with SAOS-2 cells-mainly during the period of peak OPN expression-promoted over-expression of IL-6 and IL-8 by SCC9 cells and enhanced the resorptive capacity of osteoclastic cells. Taken together, these results suggest that osteoblast-derived OPN affects the interactions among OSCC-derived epithelial cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts, which could contribute to the process of bone destruction during bone invasion by OSCC.

  17. Sodium hydrogen sulfide inhibits nicotine and lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastic differentiation and reversed osteoblastic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Kyung; Chung, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Sung-Chul; Auh, Q-Schick; Lee, Young-Man; Lee, Sang-Im; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2013-05-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) stimulated or inhibited osteoclastic differentiation, little is known about the effects of H(2)S on the differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. To determine the possible bioactivities of H(2)S on bone metabolism, we investigated the in vitro effects of H(2)S on cytotoxicity, osteoblastic, and osteoclastic differentiation as well as the underlying mechanism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and nicotine-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs). The H(2)S donor, NaHS, protected hPDLCs from nicotine and LPS-induced cytotoxicity and recovered nicotine- and LPS-downregulated osteoblastic differentiation, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mRNA expression of osteoblasts, including ALP, osteopontin (OPN), and osteocalcin (OCN), and mineralized nodule formation. Concomitantly, NaHS inhibited the differentiation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts in mouse bone marrow cells and blocked nicotine- and LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis regulatory molecules, such as RANKL, OPG, M-CSF, MMP-9, TRAP, and cathepsin K mRNA. NaHS blocked nicotine and LPS-induced activation of p38, ERK, MKP-1, PI3K, PKC, and PKC isoenzymes, and NF-κB. The effects of H(2)S on nicotine- and LPS-induced osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation were remarkably reversed by MKP-1 enzyme inhibitor (vanadate) and expression inhibitor (triptolide). Taken together, we report for the first time that H(2)S inhibited cytotoxicity and osteoclastic differentiation and recovered osteoblastic differentiation in a nicotine- and periodontopathogen-stimulated hPDLCs model, which has potential therapeutic value for treatment of periodontal and inflammatory bone diseases.

  18. Osteoclasts control reactivation of dormant myeloma cells by remodelling the endosteal niche

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michelle A.; McDonald, Michelle M.; Kovacic, Natasa; Hua Khoo, Weng; Terry, Rachael L.; Down, Jenny; Kaplan, Warren; Paton-Hough, Julia; Fellows, Clair; Pettitt, Jessica A.; Neil Dear, T.; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baldock, Paul A.; Rogers, Michael J.; Eaton, Colby L.; Vanderkerken, Karin; Pettit, Allison R.; Quinn, Julian M. W.; Zannettino, Andrew C. W.; Phan, Tri Giang; Croucher, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is largely incurable, despite development of therapies that target myeloma cell-intrinsic pathways. Disease relapse is thought to originate from dormant myeloma cells, localized in specialized niches, which resist therapy and repopulate the tumour. However, little is known about the niche, and how it exerts cell-extrinsic control over myeloma cell dormancy and reactivation. In this study, we track individual myeloma cells by intravital imaging as they colonize the endosteal niche, enter a dormant state and subsequently become activated to form colonies. We demonstrate that dormancy is a reversible state that is switched ‘on' by engagement with bone-lining cells or osteoblasts, and switched ‘off' by osteoclasts remodelling the endosteal niche. Dormant myeloma cells are resistant to chemotherapy that targets dividing cells. The demonstration that the endosteal niche is pivotal in controlling myeloma cell dormancy highlights the potential for targeting cell-extrinsic mechanisms to overcome cell-intrinsic drug resistance and prevent disease relapse. PMID:26632274

  19. Talin1 and Rap1 are critical for osteoclast function.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Izawa, Takashi; Zhu, Tingting; Chappel, Jean; Otero, Karel; Monkley, Susan J; Critchley, David R; Petrich, Brian G; Morozov, Alexei; Ginsberg, Mark H; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2013-02-01

    To determine talin1's role in osteoclasts, we mated TLN1(fl/fl) mice with those expressing cathepsin K-Cre (CtsK-TLN1) to delete the gene in mature osteoclasts or with lysozyme M-Cre (LysM-TLN1) mice to delete TLN1 in all osteoclast lineage cells. Absence of TLN1 impairs macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-stimulated inside-out integrin activation and cytoskeleton organization in mature osteoclasts. Talin1-deficient precursors normally express osteoclast differentiation markers when exposed to M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) ligand but attach to substrate and migrate poorly, arresting their development into mature resorptive cells. In keeping with inhibited resorption, CtsK-TLN1 mice exhibit an ∼5-fold increase in bone mass. Osteoclast-specific deletion of Rap1 (CtsK-Rap1), which promotes talin/β integrin recognition, yields similar osteopetrotic mice. The fact that the osteopetrosis of CtsK-TLN1 and CtsK-Rap1 mice is substantially more severe than that of those lacking αvβ3 is likely due to added failed activation of β1 integrins. In keeping with osteoclast dysfunction, mice in whom talin is deleted late in the course of osteoclastogenesis are substantially protected from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis and the periarticular osteolysis attending inflammatory arthritis. Thus, talin1 and Rap1 are critical for resorptive function, and their selective inhibition in mature osteoclasts retards pathological bone loss.

  20. Coexistence of reduced function of natural killer cells and osteoclasts in two distinct osteopetrotic mutations in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Popoff, S.N.; Jackson, M.E.; Koevary, S.B.; Marks, S.C. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent evidence suggesting that immune cells and their products (cytokines) play an important role in the regulation of skeletal development and function, particularly of the osteoclast, implies that immune cell dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of certain skeletal disorders. The mammalian osteopetroses are a pathogenetically heterogeneous group of skeletal disorders characterized by skeletal sclerosis resulting from reduced osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Using a {sup 51}Cr release microcytotoxicity assay we demonstrated that splenic natural killer (NK) cell activity was significantly reduced in two distinctly different osteopetrotic mutations in the rat, osteopetrosis (op) and toothless (tl). To determine whether this reduction in NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity is caused by decreased cell number and/or function in these osteopetrotic mutants, we quantitated NK cells by analyzing mononuclear cell suspensions labeled for two-color fluorescence with OX8 and OX19 monoclonal antibodies in a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Flow cytometry of these double-labeled cells revealed that the percentage of NK cells (OX8+/OX19- subset) in op and tl spleens was not significantly different from that of normal spleens. These results suggest that NK cells in these osteopetrotic mutants are functionally defective. Thus aberrations in osteoclast and NK cell function coexist in these mutations, and their developmental relationships deserve further study.

  1. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors in Osteoclast Lineage Cells Are a Negative Regulator of Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tai-yong; Pang, Wei-jun; Yang, Gong-she

    2015-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs) play a critical role in various pathological and physiological processes. Although recent research has identified AhRs as a key contributor to bone metabolism following studies in systemic AhR knockout (KO) or transgenic mice, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in this process remain unclear. In this study, we explored the function of AhR in bone metabolism using AhRRANKΔOc/ΔOc (RANKCre/+;AhRflox/flox) mice. We observed enhanced bone mass together with decreased resorption in both male and female 12 and 24-week-old AhRRANKΔOc/ΔOc mice. Control mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), an AhR agonist, exhibited decreased bone mass and increased bone resorption, whereas AhRCtskΔOc/ΔOc (CtskCre/+;AhRflox/flox) mice injected with 3MC appeared to have a normal bone phenotype. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from AhRRANKΔOc/ΔOc mice exhibited impaired osteoclastogenesis and repressed differentiation with downregulated expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), and cytochrome P450 genes Cyp1b1 and Cyp1a2. Collectively, our results not only demonstrated that AhR in osteoclast lineage cells is a physiologically relevant regulator of bone resorption, but also highlighted the need for further studies on the skeletal actions of AhR inhibitors in osteoclast lineage cells commonly associated with bone diseases, especially diseases linked to environmental pollutants known to induce bone loss. PMID:25615839

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors in osteoclast lineage cells are a negative regulator of bone mass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tai-yong; Pang, Wei-jun; Yang, Gong-she

    2015-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs) play a critical role in various pathological and physiological processes. Although recent research has identified AhRs as a key contributor to bone metabolism following studies in systemic AhR knockout (KO) or transgenic mice, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in this process remain unclear. In this study, we explored the function of AhR in bone metabolism using AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc) (RANK(Cre/+);AhR(flox/flox)) mice. We observed enhanced bone mass together with decreased resorption in both male and female 12 and 24-week-old AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc) mice. Control mice treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), an AhR agonist, exhibited decreased bone mass and increased bone resorption, whereas AhR(CtskΔOc/ΔOc) (Ctsk(Cre/+);AhR(flox/flox)) mice injected with 3MC appeared to have a normal bone phenotype. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from AhR(RANKΔOc/ΔOc) mice exhibited impaired osteoclastogenesis and repressed differentiation with downregulated expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), and cytochrome P450 genes Cyp1b1 and Cyp1a2. Collectively, our results not only demonstrated that AhR in osteoclast lineage cells is a physiologically relevant regulator of bone resorption, but also highlighted the need for further studies on the skeletal actions of AhR inhibitors in osteoclast lineage cells commonly associated with bone diseases, especially diseases linked to environmental pollutants known to induce bone loss.

  3. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and monocytes in a miniaturized three-dimensional culture with mineral granules.

    PubMed

    Gamblin, Anne Laure; Renaud, Audrey; Charrier, Céline; Hulin, Philippe; Louarn, Guy; Heymann, Dominique; Trichet, Valérie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The pathologies of the skeleton have a significant socioeconomic impact on our population. Although therapies have improved the treatment of osteosarcoma and osteoporosis, their efficacy still remains limited. In this context, we developed a miniaturized 3-D culture model of bone cells on calcium phosphate ceramics. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were three-dimensionally cultured on particles of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP, 125-200μm) in osteogenic media. The MSCs seeded on the BCP particles adhered and proliferated, producing abundant collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM). Light and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the MSCs created bridges between the BCP particles and formed a 3-D structure. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis in a scanning electron microscope confirmed the mineralization of the collagen matrix. The 96-well sized bone constructs were tested by immunohistology and transcription analysis, proving cell differentiation. Both techniques corroborated the osteoblastic differentiation with high production of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin. Peripheral blood CD14-positive monocytes (MOs) were pre-differentiated into osteoclasts prior to seeding on the 3-D constructs. Multinucleated and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells were also identified at the surface of the 3-D constructs after 90days of culture. In addition, cell viability within these constructs was measured by flow cytometry. In summary, we have developed a miniaturized 3-D culture of bone cell precursors with osteoblasts and osteoclasts. This 3-D culture may make it possible to test the effects of new drugs for bone healing, osteoporosis and osteosarcomas, in more appropriate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions than conventional 2-D cultures.

  4. Versatile Roles of V-ATPases Accessory Subunit Ac45 in Osteoclast Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Jiake; Dai, Ke R.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar-type H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are macromolecular proton pumps that acidify intracellular cargos and deliver protons across the plasma membrane of a variety of specialized cells, including bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Extracellular acidification is crucial for osteoclastic bone resorption, a process that initiates the dissolution of mineralized bone matrix. While the importance of V-ATPases in osteoclastic resorptive function is well-defined, whether V-ATPases facilitate additional aspects of osteoclast function and/or formation remains largely obscure. Here we report that the V-ATPase accessory subunit Ac45 participates in both osteoclast formation and function. Using a siRNA-based approach, we show that targeted suppression of Ac45 impairs intracellular acidification and endocytosis, both are prerequisite for osteoclastic bone resorptive function in vitro. Interestingly, we find that knockdown of Ac45 also attenuates osteoclastogenesis owing to a reduced fusion capacity of osteoclastic precursor cells. Finally, in an effort to gain more detailed insights into the functional role of Ac45 in osteoclasts, we attempted to generate osteoclast-specific Ac45 conditional knockout mice using a Cathepsin K-Cre-LoxP system. Surprisingly, however, insertion of the neomycin cassette in the Ac45-FloxNeo mice resulted in marked disturbances in CNS development and ensuing embryonic lethality thus precluding functional assessment of Ac45 in osteoclasts and peripheral bone tissues. Based on these unexpected findings we propose that, in addition to its canonical function in V-ATPase-mediated acidification, Ac45 plays versatile roles during osteoclast formation and function. PMID:22087256

  5. Regulation and Biological Significance of Formation of Osteoclasts and Foreign Body Giant Cells in an Extraskeletal Implantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gazi Jased; Tatsukawa, Eri; Morishita, Kota; Shibata, Yasuaki; Suehiro, Fumio; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Yokoi, Taishi; Koji, Takehiko; Umeda, Masahiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Ikeda, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of biomaterials induces a granulomatous reaction accompanied by foreign body giant cells (FBGCs). The characterization of multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) around bone substitutes implanted in bone defects is more complicated because of healing with bone admixed with residual bone substitutes and their hybrid, and the appearance of two kinds of MNGCs, osteoclasts and FBGCs. Furthermore, the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs in the healing of implanted regions remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize MNGCs around bone substitutes using an extraskeletal implantation model and evaluate the clinical significance of osteoclasts and FBGCs. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules were implanted into rat subcutaneous tissue with or without bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMMCs), which include osteogenic progenitor cells. We also compared the biological significance of plasma and purified fibrin, which were used as binders for implants. Twelve weeks after implantation, osteogenesis was only detected in specimens implanted with BMMCs. The expression of two typical osteoclast markers, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin-K (CTSK), was analyzed, and TRAP-positive and CTSK-positive osteoclasts were only detected beside bone. In contrast, most of the MNGCs in specimens without the implantation of BMMCs were FBGCs that were negative for TRAP, whereas the degradation of β-TCP was detected. In the region implanted with β-TCP granules with plasma, FBGCs tested positive for CTSK, and when β-TCP granules were implanted with purified fibrin, FBGCs tested negative for CTSK. These results showed that osteogenesis was essential to osteoclastogenesis, two kinds of FBGCs, CTSK-positive and CTSK-negative, were induced, and the expression of CTSK was plasma-dependent. In addition, the implantation of BMMCs was suggested to contribute to osteogenesis and the replacement of implanted β-TCP granules to bone. PMID

  6. Myeloma cell-induced disruption of bone remodelling compartments leads to osteolytic lesions and generation of osteoclast-myeloma hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Thomas L; Søe, Kent; Sondergaard, Teis E; Plesner, Torben; Delaisse, Jean-Marie

    2010-02-01

    Osteolytic lesions are a hallmark of multiple myeloma. They are due to the hyperactivity of bone resorbing osteoclasts and hypoactivity of bone forming osteoblasts, in response to neighbouring myeloma cells. This study identified a structure that deeply affects this response, because of its impact on the physical organisation of the myeloma cell microenvironment. The proximity between myeloma cells and osteoclasts or osteoblasts was shown to be conditioned by the recently discovered layer of flat cells that separates the osteoclasts and osteoblasts from the bone marrow, by forming a canopy over bone remodelling compartment (BRC). These canopies are frequently disrupted in myeloma, and this disruption correlates with increased proximity and density of myeloma cells. In vitro evidence indicates that this disruption may be due to direct contact between myeloma and BRC canopy cells. Importantly, this disruption and increased proximity and density of myeloma cells coincides with key myeloma-induced bone events, such as osteolytic lesions, impaired bone formation despite increased bone resorption, and fusion of myeloma cells with osteoclasts thereby forming myeloma-osteoclast hybrid cells. These findings strongly support a critical role of BRC canopies in myeloma-induced bone disease. BRC canopies could therefore be considered as a new therapeutic target.

  7. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L.; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss. PMID:27142480

  8. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L.; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss.

  9. Microgravity Induction of TRAIL Expression in Preosteoclast Cells Enhances Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Baird, Kelsey L; Stroebel, Maxwell; Kowal, Emily; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Reddy, Sakamuri V

    2016-05-04

    Evidence indicates that astronauts experience significant bone loss in space. We previously showed that simulated microgravity (μXg) using the NASA developed rotary cell culture system (RCCS) enhanced bone resorbing osteoclast (OCL) differentiation. However, the mechanism by which μXg increases OCL formation is unclear. RANK/RANKL signaling pathway is critical for OCL differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to increase osteoclastogenesis. We hypothesize that TRAIL may play an important role in μXg enhanced OCL differentiation. In this study, we identified by RT profiler PCR array screening that μXg induces high levels of TRAIL expression in murine preosteoclast cells in the absence of RANKL stimulation compared to ground based (Xg) cultures. We further identified that μXg elevated the adaptor protein TRAF-6 and fusion genes OC-STAMP and DC-STAMP expression in preosteoclast cells. Interestingly, neutralizing antibody against TRAIL significantly reduced μXg induced OCL formation. We further identified that over-expression of pTRAIL in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced OCL differentiation. These results indicate that TRAIL signaling plays an important role in the μXg increased OCL differentiation. Therefore, inhibition of TRAIL expression could be an effective countermeasure for μXg induced bone loss.

  10. Osteocytes, not Osteoblasts or Lining Cells, are the Main Source of the RANKL Required for Osteoclast Formation in Remodeling Bone.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Campbell, Josh; Goellner, Joseph J; Dusevich, Vladimir; Bonewald, Lynda; Manolagas, Stavros C; O'Brien, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    The cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), encoded by the Tnfsf11 gene, is essential for osteoclastogenesis and previous studies have shown that deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene using a Dmp1-Cre transgene reduces osteoclast formation in cancellous bone by more than 70%. However, the Dmp1-Cre transgene used in those studies leads to recombination in osteocytes, osteoblasts, and lining cells making it unclear whether one or more of these cell types produce the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone. Because osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lining cells have distinct locations and functions, distinguishing which of these cell types are sources of RANKL is essential for understanding the orchestration of bone remodeling. To distinguish between these possibilities, we have now created transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of regulatory elements of the Sost gene, which is expressed in osteocytes but not osteoblasts or lining cells in murine bone. Activity of the Sost-Cre transgene in osteocytes, but not osteoblast or lining cells, was confirmed by crossing Sost-Cre transgenic mice with tdTomato and R26R Cre-reporter mice, which express tdTomato fluorescent protein or LacZ, respectively, only in cells expressing the Cre recombinase or their descendants. Deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene in Sost-Cre mice led to a threefold decrease in osteoclast number in cancellous bone and increased cancellous bone mass, mimicking the skeletal phenotype of mice in which the Tnfsf11 gene was deleted using the Dmp1-Cre transgene. These results demonstrate that osteocytes, not osteoblasts or lining cells, are the main source of the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in remodeling cancellous bone.

  11. Adoptive transfer of osteoclast-expanded natural killer cells for immunotherapy targeting cancer stem-like cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Anna K; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2016-07-01

    Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice-a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 suppresses Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation and ameliorates experimental autoimmune arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Jhun, JooYeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Byun, Jae-Kyeong; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Jennifer; Jung, Young-Ok; Shin, Dongyun; Park, Sung Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant synthesized in human body. This enzyme promotes immune system function and can be used as a dietary supplement. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease leading to chronic joint inflammation. RA results in severe destruction of cartilage and disability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of CoQ10 on inflammation and Th17 cell proliferation on an experimental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) mice model. CoQ10 or cotton seed oil as control was orally administrated once a day for seven weeks to mice with zymosan-induced arthritis (ZIA). Histological analysis of the joints was conducted using immunohistochemistry. Germinal center (GC) B cells, Th17 cells and Treg cells of the spleen tissue were examined by confocal microscopy staining. mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR and protein levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Flow cytometric analysis (FACS) was used to evaluate Th17 cells and Treg cells. CoQ10 mitigated the severity of ZIA and decreased serum immunoglobulin concentrations. CoQ10 also reduced RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, inflammatory mediators and oxidant factors. Th17/Treg axis was reciprocally controlled by CoQ10 treatment. Moreover, CoQ10 treatment on normal mouse and human cells cultured in Th17 conditions decreased the number of Th17 cells and enhanced the number of Treg cells. CoQ10 alleviates arthritis in mice with ZIA declining inflammation, Th17 cells and osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that CoQ10 can be a potential therapeutic substance for RA.

  13. Everolimus restrains the paracrine pro-osteoclast activity of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Simone, Valeria; Ciavarella, Sabino; Brunetti, Oronzo; Savonarola, Annalisa; Cives, Mauro; Tucci, Marco; Opinto, Giuseppina; Maiorano, Eugenio; Silvestris, Franco

    2015-10-14

    Breast cancer (BC) cells secrete soluble factors that accelerate osteoclast (OC) differentiation, leading to the formation of osteolytic bone metastases. In the BOLERO-2 trial, BC patients with bone involvement who received Everolimus had a delayed tumor progression in the skeleton as a result of direct OC suppression through the inhibition of mTOR, in addition to the general suppressor effect on the cancer cells. Here, we explored the effect of Everolimus, as mTOR inhibitor, on the pro-OC paracrine activity of BC cells. Both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 BC cell lines were incubated with sub-lethal amounts of Everolimus, and their conditioned supernatants were assessed for their capacity to differentiate OCs from PBMC from healthy donors, as well as to interfere with their bone resorbing activity shown on calcium phosphate slices. We also measured the mRNA levels of major pro-OC factors in Everolimus-treated BC cells and their secreted levels by ELISA, and evaluated by immunoblotting the phosphorylation of transcription factors enrolled by pathways cooperating with the mTOR inhibition. Finally, the in vivo pro-OC activity of these cells was assessed in SCID mice after intra-tibial injections. We found that Everolimus significantly inhibited the differentiation of OCs and their in vitro bone-resorbing activity, and also found decreases of both mRNA and secreted pro-OC factors such as M-CSF, IL-6, and IL-1β, whose lower ELISA levels paralleled the defective phosphorylation of NFkB pathway effectors. Moreover, when intra-tibially injected in SCID mice, Everolimus-treated BC cells produced smaller bone metastases than the untreated cells. mTOR inhibition in BC cells leads to a suppression of their paracrine pro-OC activity by interfering with the NFkB pathway; this effect may also account for the delayed progression of bone metastatic disease observed in the BOLERO-2 trial.

  14. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsuda, Eisuke

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. {yields} Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D{sub 3} and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  15. Avenanthramides Prevent Osteoblast and Osteocyte Apoptosis and Induce Osteoclast Apoptosis in Vitro in an Nrf2-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Gretel G.; Morales, Cynthya C.; Wallace, Taylor C.; Plotkin, Lilian I.; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Oats contain unique bioactive compounds known as avenanthramides (AVAs) with antioxidant properties. AVAs might enhance the endogenous antioxidant cellular response by activation of the transcription factor Nrf2. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species plays a critical role in many chronic and degenerative diseases, including osteoporosis. In this disease, there is an imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, which is accompanied by increased osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and decreased osteoclast apoptosis. We investigated the ability of the synthethic AVAs 2c, 2f and 2p, to 1-regulate gene expression in bone cells, 2-affect the viability of osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts, and the generation of osteoclasts from their precursors, and 3-examine the potential involvement of the transcription factor Nrf2 in these actions. All doses of AVA 2c and 1 and 5 µM dose of 2p up-regulated collagen 1A expression. Lower doses of AVAs up-regulated OPG (osteoprotegerin) in OB-6 osteoblastic cells, whereas 100 μM dose of 2f and all concentrations of 2c down-regulated RANKL gene expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells. AVAs did not affect apoptosis of OB-6 osteoblastic cells or MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells; however, they prevented apoptosis induced by the DNA topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide, the glucocorticoid dexamethasone, and hydrogen peroxide. AVAs prevented apoptosis of both wild type (WT) and Nrf2 Knockout (KO) osteoblasts, demonstrating that AVAs-induced survival does not require Nrf2 expression. Further, KO osteoclast precursors produced more mature osteoclasts than WT; and KO cultures exhibited less apoptotic osteoclasts than WT cultures. Although AVAs did not affect WT osteoclasts, AVA 2p reversed the low apoptosis of KO osteoclasts. These in vitro results demonstrate that AVAs regulate, in part, the function of osteoblasts and osteocytes and prevent osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis and increase osteoclast apoptosis; further

  16. Huge undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sungho

    2014-03-14

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) is very rare, less than 1% of all pancreatic malignancies, and shows worse prognosis than that of invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. We present a case of en bloc resection for a huge undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs that invaded the stomach and transverse mesocolon. A 67-year female was admitted for left upper quadrant pain and computed tomography demonstrated a mass occupying the lesser sac and abutting the stomach and pancreas. There were no distant metastases and the patient underwent subtotal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, total gastrectomy, and segmental resection of the transverse colon. Histopathological examination confirmed an 11 cm-sized undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with OGCs. Immunohistochemical staining revealed reactivity with pan-cytokeratin in adenocarcinoma component, with vimentin in neoplastic multi-nucleated cells, with CD45/CD68 in OGCs, and with p53 in tumor cells, respectively. The patient had suffered from multiple bone metastases and survived 9 mo after surgery. This case supports the ductal epithelial origin of undifferentiated carcinoma with OGCs and early diagnosis could result in favorable surgical outcomes. Investigations on the surgical role and prognostic factors need to be warranted in this tumor.

  17. Pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma of the adrenal gland with osteoclast-like giant cells.

    PubMed

    Candanedo-González, Fernando A; Vela Chávez, Teresa; Cérbulo-Vázquez, Arturo

    2005-01-01

    Pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma (PLMS) of the adrenal gland is a rare tumor in an unusual location. A primary PLMS of the left adrenal gland is reported in a 59-yr-old Mexican woman who presented progressive flank pain and weight loss. The tumor measured 16 cm in diameter, showed markedly pleomorphic and osteoclast-like giant cells, necrosis, and high mitotic activity (average 15 per 10 high-power fields). The phenotype was supported by light microscopy and corroborated by immunohistochemistry. The neoplastic cells were strongly positive for muscle-specific actin, desmin, vimentin, and p53. They were negative for CD34, HMB45, estrogen receptors, and S-100 protein. The percentage of Ki-67 positive neoplastic cells was 7.6%. DNA content analysis by flow cytometry showed that tumor was diploid, with a high level of apoptosis. Extra-adrenal primary sites of origin were clinically excluded. The patient developed local recurrence and liver metastases 12 mo after initial treatment. She then received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy and the metastasis was resected. Twenty-four months later, she is alive with no evidence of disease. This is the second case of adrenal PLMS reported. This case exhibited a high histologic grade, aggressive behavior, and p53 overexpression, but diploid DNA content.

  18. Effects of different intensities of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on formation of osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyle; Chang, Walter Hong-Shong; Wu, Mei-Ling; Shih, Chung

    2003-09-01

    Over the past 30 years, the beneficial therapeutic effects of selected low energy, time varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been documented with increasing frequency to treat therapeutically resistant problems of the musculoskeletal system. However, the underlying mechanisms at a cellular level are still not completely understood. In this study, the effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMF) on osteoclastogenesis, cultured from murine bone marrow cells and stimulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), were examined. Primary bone marrow cells were cultured from mature Wistar rats and exposed to ELF-PEMF stimulation daily for 7 days with different intensities of induced electric field (4.8, 8.7, and 12.2 micro V/cm rms) and stimulation times (0.5, 2, and 8 h/day). Recruitment and authentication of osteoclast-like cells were evaluated, respectively, by determining multinuclear, tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive cells on day 8 of culture and by the pit formation assay. During the experiments, cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), and prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) were assayed using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These findings suggest that ELF-PEMF can both enhance (approximately 50%) and suppress (approximately 27%) the formation of osteoclast-like cells in bone marrow culture, depending on the induced electric field intensity. In addition, consistent correlations were observed between TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and osteoclast-like cell number after exposure to different induced electric field intensities of ELF-PEMF. This in vitro study could be considered as groundwork for in vivo ELF-PEMF clinical applications on some osteoclast-associated bone diseases.

  19. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  20. Alpinia officinarum Stimulates Osteoblast Mineralization and Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shim, Ki-Shuk; Lee, Chung-Jo; Yim, Nam-Hui; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Alpinia officinarum rhizome has been used as a traditional herbal remedy to treat inflammatory and internal diseases. Based on the previously observed inhibitory effect of A. officinarum rhizome in an arthritis model, we evaluated whether a water extract of A. officinarum rhizome (WEAO) would enhance in vitro osteoblast mineralization using calvarial osteoblast precursor cells or would inhibit in vitro osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption using bone marrow derived macrophages. In osteoblasts, WEAO enhanced the mRNA levels of transcription factor (runt-related transcription factor 2, smad1, smad5, and junB) and marker (bone morphogenetic protein-2, collagen type 1alpha1, and osteocalcin) genes related to osteoblast mineralization, consistent with increased alizarin red S staining intensity. WEAO markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation by suppressing the receptor activator for nuclear factor-[Formula: see text]B ligand-induced downregulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and V-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B and the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, nuclear factor-[Formula: see text]B, c-Src, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase to induce nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 expression. WEAO also suppressed the resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts by altering actin ring formation. Therefore, the results of this study demonstrate that WEAO stimulates osteoblast mineralization and inhibits osteoclast differentiation. Thus, WEAO may be a promising herbal candidate to treat or prevent pathological bone diseases by regulating the balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activity.

  1. Characterization of Functional Reprogramming during Osteoclast Development Using Quantitative Proteomics and mRNA Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    An, Eunkyung; Narayanan, Manikandan; Manes, Nathan P.; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In addition to forming macrophages and dendritic cells, monocytes in adult peripheral blood retain the ability to develop into osteoclasts, mature bone-resorbing cells. The extensive morphological and functional transformations that occur during osteoclast differentiation require substantial reprogramming of gene and protein expression. Here we employ -omic-scale technologies to examine in detail the molecular changes at discrete developmental stages in this process (precursor cells, intermediate osteoclasts, and multinuclear osteoclasts), quantitatively comparing their transcriptomes and proteomes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000471. Our analysis identified mitochondrial changes, along with several alterations in signaling pathways, as central to the development of mature osteoclasts, while also confirming changes in pathways previously implicated in osteoclast biology. In particular, changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolism and redirection of energy flow from basic cellular function toward bone resorption appeared to play a key role in the switch from monocytic immune system function to specialized bone-turnover function. These findings provide new insight into the differentiation program involved in the generation of functional osteoclasts. PMID:25044017

  2. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity regulates osteoclast formation and function: inhibition by alendronate.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Rutledge, S J; Endo, N; Opas, E E; Tanaka, H; Wesolowski, G; Leu, C T; Huang, Z; Ramachandaran, C; Rodan, S B; Rodan, G A

    1996-01-01

    Alendronate (ALN), an aminobisphosphonate used in the treatment of osteoporosis, is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption. Its molecular target is still unknown. This study examines the effects of ALN on the activity of osteoclast protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48), called PTPepsilon. Using osteoclast-like cells generated by coculturing mouse bone marrow cells with mouse calvaria osteoblasts, we found by molecular cloning and RNA blot hybridization that PTPepsilon is highly expressed in osteoclastic cells. A purified fusion protein of PTPepsilon expressed in bacteria was inhibited by ALN with an IC50 of 2 microM. Other PTP inhibitors--orthovanadate and phenylarsine oxide (PAO)-inhibited PTPepsilon with IC50 values of 0.3 microM and 18 microM, respectively. ALN and another bisphosphonate, etidronate, also inhibited the activities of other bacterially expressed PTPs such as PTPsigma and CD45 (also called leukocyte common antigen). The PTP inhibitors ALN, orthovanadate, and PAO suppressed in vitro formation of multinucleated osteoclasts from osteoclast precursors and in vitro bone resorption by isolated rat osteoclasts (pit formation) with estimated IC50 values of 10 microM, 3 microM, and 0.05 microM, respectively. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphatase activity plays an important role in osteoclast formation and function and is a putative molecular target of bisphosphonate action. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610169

  3. Tetraspanin 7 regulates sealing zone formation and the bone-resorbing activity of osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Haemin; Kim, Min Kyung; Song, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2016-09-02

    Tetraspanin family proteins regulate morphology, motility, fusion, and signaling in various cell types. We investigated the role of the tetraspanin 7 (Tspan7) isoform in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts. Tspan7 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis. When Tspan7 expression was reduced in primary precursor cells by siRNA-mediated gene knock-down, the generation of multinuclear osteoclasts was not affected. However, a striking cytoskeletal abnormality was observed: the formation of the podosome belt structure was inhibited and the microtubular network were disrupted by Tspan7 knock-down. Decreases in acetylated microtubules and levels of phosphorylated Src and Pyk2 in Tspan7 knock-down cells supported the involvement of Tspan7 in cytoskeletal rearrangement signaling in osteoclasts. This cytoskeletal defect interfered with sealing zone formation and subsequently the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts on dentin surfaces. Our results suggest that Tspan7 plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization required for the bone-resorbing function of osteoclasts by regulating signaling to Src, Pyk2, and microtubules. - Highlights: • Tspan7 expression is up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis. • Tspan7 regulates podosome belt organization in osteoclasts. • Tspan7 is crucial for sealing zone formation and bone-resorption by osteoclasts. • Src and Pyk2 phosphorylation and microtubule acetylation mediate Tspan7 function.

  4. Undifferentiated Carcinoma with Osteoclast-Like Giant Cells of the Pancreas in a Patient with New Diagnosis of Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Freid, Lauren; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells are rare, with only 50 cases published to date. We report a case of a 67-year-old male with a new diagnosis of follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an incidental pancreatic body mass on abdominal imaging. Cytology from the pancreatic mass obtained via endoscopic ultrasound-directed fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells.

  5. Kinetics of osteoclasts and their nuclei in evolving secondary Haversian systems.

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Z F; Duck, B; Sekaly, G

    1981-01-01

    A study of osteoclast and osteoclast nuclear population kinetics within evolving secondary osteons was undertaken in young adult Beagle dogs. Autoradiographs of serial longitudinal rib biopsy sections taken from 1 hour to 15 days after tritiated thymidine injection were analysed as to the time and the rate of appearance of the labelled nuclei within the osteoclasts and their nuclei. Such systems contained an average of nine osteoclasts, each containing an average of nine nuclei. Labelled osteoclast nuclei first appeared within 24 hours, peaked at 10% at 4 days, and declined to 1% or less after 11.5 days more. Thus, the entry rate of new nuclei into (and their exit from) the population of osteoclast nuclei under steady state conditions approximates 8% per day. Therefore, the total mononuclear osteoclast population may be viewed as divided into functional units, i.e. osteoclasts. From the ratio of the osteoclast nuclei in the cutting cone to the number of osteoblasts in the closing cone (as well as from their rates of resorption and formation), it was deduced that the osteoclast per nucleus is approximately 20-40 times more efficient than the osteoblast. Because of the intrinsically different efficiencies and life spans of these two cell types, the rates of resorption and formation within evolving Haversian systems and the amounts of bone ultimately resorbed and formed by the system, are determined by the rate and duration of the respective precursor cell proliferation. It is at this level that factors which control the bone remodelling and balance must operate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7328046

  6. Plumbagin attenuates cancer cell growth and osteoclast formation in the bone microenvironment of mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Wang, Ting-yu; Fan, Qi-ming; Du, Lin; Xu, Jia-ke; Zhai, Zan-jing; Li, Hao-wei; Tang, Ting-ting

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of plumbagin, a naphthoquinone derived from the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica, on human breast cancer cell growth and the cancer cell-induced osteolysis in the bone microenvironment of mice. Methods: Human breast cancer cell subline MDA-MB-231SA with the ability to spread and grow in the bone was tested. The cell proliferation was determined using the CCK-8 assay. Apoptosis was detected with Annexin V/PI double-labeled flow cytometry. Red fluorescent protein-labeled MDA-MB-231SArfp cells were injected into the right tibia of female BALB/c-nu/nu mice. Three days after the inoculation, the mice were injected with plumbagin (2, 4, or 6 mg/kg, ip) 5 times per week for 7 weeks. The growth of the tumor cells was monitored using an in vivo imaging system. After the mice were sacrificed, the hind limbs were removed for radiographic and histological analyses. Results: Plumbagin (2.5–20 μmol/L) concentration-dependently inhibited the cell viability and induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231SA cells in vitro (the IC50 value of inhibition of cell viability was 14.7 μmol/L). Administration of plumbagin to breast cancer bearing mice delayed the tumor growth by 2–3 weeks and reduced the tumor volume by 44%–74%. The in vivo imaging study showed that plumbagin dose-dependently inhibited MDA-MB-231SArfp cell growth in bone microenvironment. Furthermore, X-ray images and micro-CT study demonstrated that plumbagin reduced bone erosion area and prevented a decrease in bone tissue volume. Histological studies showed that plumbagin dose-dependently inhibited the breast cancer cell growth, enhanced the cell apoptosis and reduced the number of TRAcP-positive osteoclasts. Conclusion: Plumbagin inhibits the cell growth and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells in mice bone microenvironment, leading to significant reduction in osteolytic lesions caused by the tumor cells. PMID:24384612

  7. Expression of Phospholipase D in Periodontitis and Its Role in the Inflammatory and Osteoclastic Response by Nicotine- and Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Yun; Kim, Young-Suk; Lee, So-Youn; Bae, Won-Jung; Park, Yong-Duk; Hyun, Yong-Cheol; Kang, KyungLhi; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the expression of phospholipase D (PLD) 1 and PLD2 in periodontal patients and in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs) exposed to nicotine plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis (Toll-like receptor 2 ligand). Furthermore, the effects of PLD isoform inhibition on the inflammatory response and osteoclast differentiation and its mechanisms were determined. Proinflammatory mediators were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To silence the gene expression of the PLD isoforms, cells were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting PLD1 or PLD2. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were used as osteoclast precursor cells for in vitro osteoclastogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were used to assess signaling pathways. Chronic smokers with periodontitis exhibited significantly higher PLD1 and PLD2 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression than non-smokers with periodontitis and healthy controls. Nicotine and LPS upregulated PLD1 and PLD2 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner in HPDLCs. Pharmacologic and siRNA-mediated inhibition of PLD1 and PLD2 attenuated the nicotine- and LPS-induced upregulation of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, production of NO, and prostaglandin E2, and mRNA expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-8. The conditioned media from HPDLCs treated with PLD isoform inhibitors or siRNA against PLD inhibited receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation, as well as protein expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 and c-Fos, in BMMs. In addition, PLD isoform inhibitors and siRNA inhibited the nicotine- and LPS-induced activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, protein kinase C, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, mitogen

  8. NRROS Negatively Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting RANKL-Mediated NF-κB and Reactive Oxygen Species Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Kim, Nacksung

    2015-01-01

    Negative regulator of reactive oxygen species (NRROS) is known to repress ROS generation in phagocytes. In this study, we examined the roles of NRROS in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrate that NRROS negatively regulates the differentiation of osteoclasts, but not osteoblasts. Further, overexpression of NRROS in osteoclast precursor cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Conversely, osteoclast differentiation is enhanced upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRROS. Additionally, NRROS attenuates RANKL-induced NF-κB activation, as well as degradation of the NOX1 and NOX2 proteins, which are required for ROS generation. Based on our observations, we present NRROS as a novel negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26442864

  9. CD147 promotes the formation of functional osteoclasts through NFATc1 signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Terasawa, Mariko; Baba, Misaki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2016-04-29

    CD147, a membrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is highly upregulated during dynamic cellular events including tissue remodelling. Elevated CD147 expression is present in the joint of rheumatoid arthritis patients. However, the role of CD147 in bone destruction remains unclear. To determine whether CD147 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, we studied its expression in mouse osteoclasts and its role in osteoclast differentiation and function. CD147 expression was markedly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of CD147 in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity, osteoclast precursor cells were transfected with CD147 siRNA. Decreased CD147 expression inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption, inhibited RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 and decreased the expression of the d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase Vo domain and cathepsin K. Therefore, CD147 plays a critical role in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts by upregulating NFATc1 through the autoamplification of its expression in osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • CD147 expression was markedly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation. • Downregulation of CD147 expression inhibited osteoclastgenesis and bone resorption. • Decreased CD147 expression inhibited RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of NFATc1.

  10. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes induce apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cell-derived osteoclasts through mitochondria-mediated death pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shefang; Jiang, Yuanqin; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yifang; Wu, Yihui; Hou, Zhenqing; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted great interest with respect to biomaterials, particularly for use as an implant material in bone-tissue engineering. Accordingly, the bone-tissue compatibility of CNTs and their influence on new bone formation are important issues. In the present study, we examined the effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL)-supported osteoclastogenesis using a murine monocytic cell line RAW 264.7. MWCNTs significantly suppressed the differentiation of RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts. Treatment with MWCNTs induced apoptosis in osteoclasts as characterized by nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, but did not decrease the cell viability of the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. MWCNTs also induced loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsim) by regulating expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and caused release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. MWCNTs-induced apoptosis in osteoclasts was inhibited both by cyclosporin A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and by DEVD-CHO, a cell-permeable inhibitor of caspase-3. The present study suggests that MWCNTs suppresse osteoclastogenesis via the inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and the induction of apoptosis in osteoclasts, rendering them promising candidate for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases.

  11. IL-37 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Jafari; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Ishida, Masahiko; Sugisawa, Haruki; Ochi, Yumiko; Kishikawa, Akiko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2016-07-01

    IL-37 is a newly defined member of the IL-1 cytokine family. It has been reported that IL-37 inhibited innate immunity and inflammatory responses in autoimmune diseases and tumors. IL-37 also inhibited Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immunological reaction. LPS is a bacterial cell wall component that is capable of inducing osteoclast formation and pathological bone resorption. However, there is no study to investigate the effect of IL-37 on LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of IL-37 in LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. LPS was administrated with or without IL-37 by subcutaneous injection on mice calvariae. The number of osteoclasts, the level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K mRNA, the ratio of the bone resorption pits and the level of C-terminal telopeptide fragments of type I collagen cross-Links as a marker of bone resorption in mice administrated both LPS and IL-37 were lower than that in mice administrated LPS alone. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to analyze osteoclast related cytokines RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels in vivo. RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNAs were increased in the LPS alone administrated mice as compared with PBS administrated groups. On the other hand, RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNAs were inhibited in the IL-37 and LPS administrated mice as compared with LPS alone administrated group. In vitro analysis, there was no effect of IL-37 in RANKL-induced osteoclast formation, TNF-α-induced osteoclast formation and cell viability from bone marrow macrophages as osteoclast precursor and LPS-induced RANKL expression from stromal cells. These results indicated that IL-37 inhibited LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption via inhibition of LPS-induced osteoclast related cytokines, but might not directly inhibit osteoclast formation on osteoclast precursor and RANKL expression on stromal cells. Copyright © 2016

  12. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on the expression of NFATc1 and CAII in mouse osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    He, Jianquan; Zhang, Yongsheng; Chen, Jian; Zheng, Suyu; Huang, Hui; Dong, Xiaoyu

    2015-02-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have proven to be an effective noninvasive method in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. This study evaluated the effects of PEMF on the expression of the NFATc1, CAII and RANK genes in mouse osteoclast-like cells. Bone marrow from bilateral tibiae and femurs was cultured in differentiation medium in the presence of soluble macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). After 5 days, the osteoclast-like cells were confirmed by both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and bone resorption assays. The osteoclast-like cells were divided into five groups and exposed to the following treatments for 3 days: M-CSF; M-CSF + RANKL; M-CSF + RANKL + osteoprotegerin (OPG), M-CSF + RANKL + premarin (E2); and M-CSF + RANKL + PEMF. The numbers of multinucleated, TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells and resorption pits formed were determined. The expression of NFATc1, CAII and RANK mRNA was determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PEMF substantially reduced the number of osteoclast-like cells in the culture with M-CSF + RANKL. The level of NFATc1, CAII, and RANK mRNA expression was decreased in the M-CSF + RANKL + PEMF group compared to the M-CSF + RANKL group (p = 0.007, p = 0.039, p = 0.001, respectively). The mRNA expression of NFATc1, CAII, and RANK was not higher in the M-CSF + RANKL + OPG group compared to the M-CSF + RANKL + PEMF group (p = 0.682, p = 0.200, p = 0.924, respectively). In addition, there was no difference in the expression of mRNA from NFATc1, CAII, and RANK between the M-CSF + RANKL + PEMF group and the M-CSF + RANKL + E2 group (p = 0.853, p = 0.509, p = 0.664, respectively). These data suggest that PEMF might modulate the process of osteoclastogenesis and subsequent bone resorption, at least partially, through NFATc1, CAII and RANK.

  13. Ginsenoside Re Promotes Osteoblast Differentiation in Mouse Osteoblast Precursor MC3T3-E1 Cells and a Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Min; Kim, Dong Hyun; Han, Ho-Jin; Park, Chan-Mi; Ganipisetti, Srinivas Rao; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kim, Young Ock; Park, Chun Geun; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Soung, Nak-Kyun

    2016-12-29

    Bone homeostasis is tightly regulated to balance bone formation and bone resorption. Many anabolic drugs are used as bone-targeted therapeutic agents for the promotion of osteoblast-mediated bone formation or inhibition of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. Previous studies showed that ginsenoside Re has the effect of the suppression of osteoclast differentiation in mouse bone-marrow derived macrophages and zebrafish. Herein, we investigated whether ginsenoside Re affects osteoblast differentiation and mineralization in in vitro and in vivo models. Mouse osteoblast precursor MC3T3-E1 cells were used to investigate cell viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralization. In addition, we examined osteoblastic signaling pathways. Ginsenoside Re affected ALP activity without cytotoxicity, and we also observed the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation through the activation of osteoblast markers including runt-related transcription factor 2, type 1 collagen, ALP, and osteocalcin in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, Alizarin red S staining indicated that ginsenoside Re increased osteoblast mineralization in MC3T3-E1 cells and zebrafish scales compared to controls. These results suggest that ginsenoside Re promotes osteoblast differentiation as well as inhibits osteoclast differentiation, and it could be a potential therapeutic agent for bone diseases.

  14. Xanthohumol modulates the expression of osteoclast-specific genes during osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kwang Sik; Rhee, Sang Youl; Kim, Young Seol; Lee, Young Soon; Choi, Eun Mi

    2013-12-01

    RANKL has been shown to play a critical role in osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Thus, agents that suppress RANKL signaling have a potential to suppress bone loss. In this study, we examined the ability of xanthohumol, a structurally simple prenylated chalcone, to suppress RANKL signaling during osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. Xanthohumol markedly inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP activity, multinucleated osteoclasts formation, and resorption-pit formation. In experiments to elucidate its mechanism of action, xanthohumol was found to suppress RANKL-induced expression of TRAF6, GAB2, ERK, c-Src, PI3K, and Akt genes. Moreover, RANKL-induced expressions of c-Fos and NFATc1, which are crucial transcription factors for osteoclastogenesis, were reduced by treatment with xanthohumol. Xanthohumol also inhibited RANKL-induced expression of bone-resorption related osteoclast-specific genes (carbonic anhydrase II, TCIRG, CLCN7, OSTM1, cathepsin K, and MMP-9). These data demonstrate that xanthohumol inhibits osteoclastogenesis by modulating RANKL signaling and may be useful for the prevention of bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis and periodontitis.

  15. Mesenchymal precursor cells in the blood of normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zvaifler, Nathan J; Marinova-Mutafchieva, Lilla; Adams, Gill; Edwards, Christopher J; Moss, Jill; Burger, Jan A; Maini, Ravinder N

    2000-01-01

    (FACS). BMPCs were concentrated in fractions 7 and 8, along with monocytes and lymphocytes. Elutriation fractions with more than 50% and less than 75% monocytes were collected and concentrated by centrifugation at 1200 rpm for 5 min, and the cell pellets were combined, reconstituted in DMEM plus 20% sterile heat-inactivated FCS, counted, washed in medium, repelleted, and then resuspended in DMEM to 5 × 106/ml and dispensed into either tissue-culture plastic slides or glass chamber slides. Cells thus obtained were observed in time-lapse cinematography, assayed for proliferation, and examined immunohistologically and histochemically, and their ability to become fibroblasts, osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and adipocytes was documented. Results: BMPCs were found in elutriation fractions containing less than 30% T cells and more than 60% monocytes from the blood of more than 100 normal persons. BMPCs adhered to plastic and glass and proliferated logarithmically in DMEM-20% FCS without added growth factors. The initial elutriate had only small, round, mononuclear cells; upon culture, these were replaced by fibroblast-like cells and large, round, stromal cells. The formation of cells with fibroblast-like and stromal morphology was not affected by eliminating CD34, CD3, or CD14 cells from the elutriation fraction. Osteogenic supplements (dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and β-glycero-phosphate) added to the culture inhibited fibroblast formation, and BMPCs assumed the cuboidal shape of osteoblasts. After 5 days in supplemented medium, the elutriated cells displayed AP and its production was doubled by the addition of BMP2 (1 ng) (P < 0.04). Two weeks later, 30% of the cells were very large and reacted with anti-osteocalcin antibody. The same cultures contained two other types of cell: sudanophlic adipocytes and multinucleated giant cells, which stain for TRAP and vitronectin receptors (attributes of osteoclasts). Cultured BMPCs were immunostained by antibodies to vimentin, type I

  16. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibits receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2017-01-01

    The adipokine nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), also known as pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor or the insulin-mimetic hormone visfatin, has a crucial role in the conversion of nicotinamide to nicotinamide mononucleotide during biosynthesis of the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Previous reports have demonstrated the inhibitory effects of Nampt on osteoclast formation from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD14+ monocytes. However, the effects of Nampt on bone marrow macrophage (BMM)-derived osteoclastogenesis and its precise role in the process remain unclear. The present in vitro study used recombinant Nampt and BMMs as osteoclast precursors demonstrated that Nampt suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis by decreasing the phosphorylation of various early signal transducers, including c-Jun N-terminal kinase, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3 β, Bruton's tyrosine kinase and phospholipase C γ-2. In addition, western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that Nampt downregulates the mRNA and protein expression levels of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1, leading to a decrease in the expression of osteoclast-specific genes including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, osteoclast-associated receptor and cathepsin K. However, the bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts treated with Nampt was similar to untreated control osteoclasts. This finding indicates that Nampt exerts its anti-osteoclastogenic activity by targeting osteoclast precursor cells rather than mature osteoclasts. Consequently, the present study demonstrated that Nampt acts as a negative regulator of RANKL-mediated differentiation of BMMs into osteoclasts, suggesting the potential therapeutic targets to treat bone-related disorders such as osteoporosis. PMID:28035412

  17. Dynamic changes in the osteoclast cytoskeleton in response to growth factors and cell attachment are controlled by beta3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Roberta; Novack, Deborah V; Zallone, Alberta; Ross, F Patrick; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2003-08-04

    The beta3 integrin cytoplasmic domain, and specifically S752, is critical for integrin localization and osteoclast (OC) function. Because growth factors such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor and hepatocyte growth factor affect integrin activation and function via inside-out signaling, a process requiring the beta integrin cytoplasmic tail, we examined the effect of these growth factors on OC precursors. To this end, we retrovirally expressed various beta3 integrins with cytoplasmic tail mutations in beta3-deficient OC precursors. We find that S752 in the beta3 cytoplasmic tail is required for growth factor-induced integrin activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and membrane protrusion, thereby affecting OC adhesion, migration, and bone resorption. The small GTPases Rho and Rac mediate cytoskeletal reorganization, and activation of each is defective in OC precursors lacking a functional beta3 subunit. Activation of the upstream mediators c-Src and c-Cbl is also dependent on beta3. Interestingly, although the FAK-related kinase Pyk2 interacts with c-Src and c-Cbl, its activation is not disrupted in the absence of functional beta3. Instead, its activation is dependent upon intracellular calcium, and on the beta2 integrin. Thus, the beta3 cytoplasmic domain is responsible for activation of specific intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal reorganization critical for OC function.

  18. Role of FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) in osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Miho; Nagai, Tatsuo; Matsushita, Reiko; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Hirohata, Shunsei

    2013-11-01

    We previously disclosed the enhanced expression of FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) messenger RNA (mRNA) in bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in which systemic osteoporosis takes place. Since BM CD34(+) cells are precursors of osteoclasts, it is possible that FKBP5 overexpression might lead to osteoporosis by affecting osteoclastogenesis. We therefore explore the influences of FKBP5 in osteoclast differentiation. Stable transfectants of RAW264.7 overexpressing murine FKBP5 gene were established. Osteoclast differentiation was induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand and was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and pit formation assay. FKBP5 transfectants of RAW264.7 generated higher numbers of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells with increased activity of pit formation on calcium phosphate-coated culture slides than mock transfectants. The enhancement of osteoclast differentiation of FKBP5 transfectants was only partially inhibited by N-acetyl L-cysteine. Finally, glucocorticoid enhanced FKBP5 mRNA expression as well as osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that FKBP5 promotes osteoclast differentiation by a mechanism distinct from NF-κB activation. Moreover, the data suggest that FKBP5 might play a role in bone destruction and development of osteoporosis in RA as well as in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

  19. Regulation of human umbilical cord blood-derived multi-potent stem cells by autogenic osteoclast-based niche-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bo; Jeong, Yun-Hyeok; Jung, Ji-Won; Seo, Kwangwon; Lee, Yong-Soon ||; Kang, Kyung-Sun ||. E-mail: kangpub@snu.ac.kr

    2007-05-25

    Stem cell niches provide the micro-environment for the development of stem cells. Under our culturing regimen, a kind of osteoclast-centralized structure supports the proliferation of MSCs, derived from human cord blood, once they reside on osteoclasts. MSCs in this structure expressed Oct4 which is a marker of embryonic stem cells. Floating daughter cells of MSCs colony showed abilities to differentiate into osteocyte, adipocyte, and neuronal progenitor cells. Compared with the easy senescence of MSCs without this niche-like structure in vitro, these results suggested that osteoclasts might play an important role the development and maintenance of Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs and might provide a means to expand UCB-MSCs in vitro, more easily, through a stem cell niche-like structure.

  20. Cancer Cell Expression of Autotaxin Controls Bone Metastasis Formation in Mouse through Lysophosphatidic Acid-Dependent Activation of Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Wannecq, Estelle; Descotes, Françoise; Jansen, Silvia; Deux, Blandine; Ribeiro, Johnny; Serre, Claire-Marie; Grès, Sandra; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Bollen, Mathieu; Saez, Simone; Aoki, Junken; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Background Bone metastases are highly frequent complications of breast cancers. Current bone metastasis treatments using powerful anti-resorbtive agents are only palliative indicating that factors independent of bone resorption control bone metastasis progression. Autotaxin (ATX/NPP2) is a secreted protein with both oncogenic and pro-metastatic properties. Through its lysosphospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, ATX controls the level of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the blood. Platelet-derived LPA promotes the progression of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer cells. We asked whether ATX was involved in the bone metastasis process. We characterized the role of ATX in osteolytic bone metastasis formation by using genetically modified breast cancer cells exploited on different osteolytic bone metastasis mouse models. Methodology/Principal Findings Intravenous injection of human breast cancer MDA-B02 cells with forced expression of ATX (MDA-B02/ATX) to inmmunodeficiency BALB/C nude mice enhanced osteolytic bone metastasis formation, as judged by increased bone loss, tumor burden, and a higher number of active osteoclasts at the metastatic site. Mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells induced the formation of osteolytic bone metastases after intracardiac injection in immunocompetent BALB/C mice. These cells expressed active ATX and silencing ATX expression inhibited the extent of osteolytic bone lesions and decreased the number of active osteoclasts at the bone metastatic site. In vitro, osteoclast differentiation was enhanced in presence of MDA-B02/ATX cell conditioned media or recombinant autotaxin that was blocked by the autotaxin inhibitor vpc8a202. In vitro, addition of LPA to active charcoal-treated serum restored the capacity of the serum to support RANK-L/MCSF-induced osteoclastogenesis. Conclusion/Significance Expression of autotaxin by cancer cells controls osteolytic bone metastasis formation. This work demonstrates a new role for LPA as a factor that stimulates

  1. Cancer cell expression of autotaxin controls bone metastasis formation in mouse through lysophosphatidic acid-dependent activation of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    David, Marion; Wannecq, Estelle; Descotes, Françoise; Jansen, Silvia; Deux, Blandine; Ribeiro, Johnny; Serre, Claire-Marie; Grès, Sandra; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Bollen, Mathieu; Saez, Simone; Aoki, Junken; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Clézardin, Philippe; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2010-03-17

    Bone metastases are highly frequent complications of breast cancers. Current bone metastasis treatments using powerful anti-resorptive agents are only palliative indicating that factors independent of bone resorption control bone metastasis progression. Autotaxin (ATX/NPP2) is a secreted protein with both oncogenic and pro-metastatic properties. Through its lysosphospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, ATX controls the level of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the blood. Platelet-derived LPA promotes the progression of osteolytic bone metastases of breast cancer cells. We asked whether ATX was involved in the bone metastasis process. We characterized the role of ATX in osteolytic bone metastasis formation by using genetically modified breast cancer cells exploited on different osteolytic bone metastasis mouse models. Intravenous injection of human breast cancer MDA-B02 cells with forced expression of ATX (MDA-B02/ATX) to immunodeficiency BALB/C nude mice enhanced osteolytic bone metastasis formation, as judged by increased bone loss, tumor burden, and a higher number of active osteoclasts at the metastatic site. Mouse breast cancer 4T1 cells induced the formation of osteolytic bone metastases after intracardiac injection in immunocompetent BALB/C mice. These cells expressed active ATX and silencing ATX expression inhibited the extent of osteolytic bone lesions and decreased the number of active osteoclasts at the bone metastatic site. In vitro, osteoclast differentiation was enhanced in presence of MDA-B02/ATX cell conditioned media or recombinant autotaxin that was blocked by the autotaxin inhibitor vpc8a202. In vitro, addition of LPA to active charcoal-treated serum restored the capacity of the serum to support RANK-L/MCSF-induced osteoclastogenesis. Expression of autotaxin by cancer cells controls osteolytic bone metastasis formation. This work demonstrates a new role for LPA as a factor that stimulates directly cancer growth and metastasis, and osteoclast

  2. Metaplastic ossification of the temporal artery with osteoclast-like giant cells: a mimicker of giant cell (temporal) arteritis.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Miroslav; Truskinovsky, Alexander M

    2017-05-11

    To describe a patient presenting with suspected giant cell (temporal) arteritis (GCA) in whom subsequent temporal artery biopsy showed luminal narrowing by medial calcification, metaplastic ossification, and fibrointimal proliferation, consistent with calciphylaxis. A 55-year-old man with end-stage renal disease presented with unilateral loss of vision and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and was initially treated as though he had GCA; however, a subsequent temporal artery biopsy showed marked luminal narrowing by medial calcification, metaplastic ossification, and fibrointimal proliferation, consistent with calciphylaxis. In addition, the tunica media of the affected artery contained multinucleate giant cells, but these represented osteoclasts and foreign body giant cells reacting to calcium, rather than a part of GCA. This is a rare report of metaplastic ossification and the finding of non-GCA-related giant cells in the tunica media of the temporal artery, thus representing a clinical and histopathologic mimicker of GCA. The clinical differential diagnosis of GCA includes other etiologies that can present similarly; however, temporal artery biopsy can discern the underlying pathology. Importantly, the identification of giant cells is not required for the diagnosis of GCA, and likewise, as our case shows, the finding of giant cells in the wall of a temporal artery does not always imply a diagnosis of GCA.

  3. Aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing NF-κB and NFATc1 activation and DC-STAMP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiang-zhou; He, Long-gang; Wang, Song; Wang, Keng; Zhang, Yue-yang; Tao, Lei; Li, Xiao-juan; Liu, Shu-wen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aconiti Lateralis Radix Preparata is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat chronic arthritis and is highly effective against rheumatoid arthritis. However, the effects of aconine, a derivative of aconitum alkaloids, on osteoclasts, which can absorb bone, remain unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of aconine on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro. Methods: The viability of mouse leukemic monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was measured using CCK-8 assays. Osteoclast differentiation was induced by incubation of RAW264.7 cells in the presence of RANKL, and assessed with TRAP staining assay. Bone resorption was examined with bone resorption pits assay. The expression of relevant genes and proteins was analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blots. The activation of NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) was examined using stable NF-κB and NFATc1 luciferase reporter gene systems, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results: Aconine (0.125, 0.25 μmol/L) did not affect the viability of RAW264.7 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorptive activity. Furthermore, aconine dose-dependently inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 in RAW264.7 cells, and subsequently reduced the expression of osteoclast-specific genes (c-Src, β3-Integrin, cathepsin K and MMP-9) and the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), which played an important role in cell-cell fusion. Conclusion: These findings suggest that aconine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and NFATc1 and the expression of the cell-cell fusion molecule DC-STAMP. PMID:26592521

  4. Macrophage-osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in osteoarthrotic subchondral acetabular cysts.

    PubMed

    Sabokbar, A; Crawford, R; Murray, D W; Athanasou, N A

    2000-06-01

    A macrophage infiltrate is commonly found in enlarging subchondral cysts in osteoarthrosis (OA) and the surrounding bone. To determine whether osteoclast differentiation by these cells contributes to the increase in the number of osteoclasts and bone resorption that accompanies OA cyst enlargement, we isolated macrophages from the wall of OA cysts and co-cultured them with osteoblast-like UMR106 cells in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and M-CSE After 14 days of incubation, co-cultures of UMR106 cells and cyst-derived macrophages showed evidence of osteoclast differentiation by expression of TRAP, VNR and formation of numerous lacunar pits. We found that, unlike osteoclast precursors in monocyte and other tissue macrophage populations, the addition of M-CSF to medium is not required for osteoclast differentiation. Our findings suggest that macrophage-osteoclast differentiation is one means whereby the osteolysis associated with the enlargement of OA cysts could be effected.

  5. Paxillin Contracts the Osteoclast Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; DeSelm, Carl J.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.; Pol, Scott Vande; Choi, Kyunghee; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone resorption depends upon the cell’s ability to organize its cytoskeleton via the αvβ3 integrin and osteoclastogenic cytokines. Since paxillin associates with αvβ3, we asked if it participates in skeletal degradation. Unlike deletion of other αvβ3-associated cytoskeleton-regulating molecules, which impairs the cell’s ability to spread, paxillin-deficient (Pax−/−) osteoclasts, generated from embryonic stem cells, “superspread” in response to RANK ligand (RANKL) and form large, albeit dynamically atypical, actin bands. Despite their increased size, Pax−/− osteoclasts resorb bone poorly, excavating pits approximately 1/3 normal depth. Ligand-occupied αvβ3 or RANKL promotes paxillin serine and tyrosine phosphorylation, the latter via c-Src. The abnormal Pax−/− phenotype is rescued by WT paxillin but not that lacking its LD4 domain. In keeping with the appearance of mutant osteoclasts, WT paxillin, overexpressed in WT cells, contracts the cytoskeleton. Most importantly, the abnormal phenotype of Pax−/− osteoclasts likely represents failed RANKL-mediated delivery of myosin IIA to the actin cytoskeleton via the paxillin LD4 domain but is independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, in response to RANKL, paxillin associates with myosin IIA to contract the osteoclast cytoskeleton thereby promoting its bone-degrading capacity. PMID:22807029

  6. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species are essential for differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tominaga, Kumiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Tomoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2009-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidase (Nox) homologues have been suggested to regulate osteoclast differentiation. However, no bone abnormalities have been documented in Nox1 deficient, Nox2 deficient, or Nox3 mutant mice. During receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts, mRNA levels of Nox enzymes (Nox1-4) and their adaptor proteins were monitored by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. RAW264.7 cells constitutively expressed abundant Nox2 mRNA and small amounts of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. RANKL markedly attenuated Nox2 mRNA expression in association with reciprocal up-regulation of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. Introduction of small interference RNA targeting p67(phox) or p22(phox) into RAW264.7 cells effectively down-regulated ROS generation and significantly suppressed the RANKL-stimulated differentiation, which was assessed by appearance of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive, multinucleated cells having an ability to form resorption pits on calcium phosphate thin film-coated disks, and by expression of osteoclast marker genes (TRAP, cathepsin K, Atp6i, ClC-7, and NFATc1). Our results suggest that RANKL may stimulate switching between Nox homologues during osteoclast differentiation, and Nox-derived ROS may be crucial for RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  7. Esculetin attenuates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-mediated osteoclast differentiation through c-Fos/nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jong Min; Park, Sun-Hyang; Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Ahn, Sung-Jun; Lee, Myeung Su; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2015-05-29

    Esculetin exerts various biological effects on anti-oxidation, anti-tumors, and anti-inflammation. However, the involvement of esculetin in the bone metabolism process, particularly osteoclast differentiation has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we first confirmed the inhibitory effect of esculetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation. We then revealed the relationship between esculetin and the expression of osteoclast-specific molecules to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. Esculetin interfered with the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cell c1 (NFATc1) both at the mRNA and protein level with no involvement in osteoclast-associated early signaling pathways, suppressing the expression of various transcription factors exclusively expressed in osteoclasts such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp), cathepsin K, αvβ3 integrin, and calcitonin receptor (Ctr). Additionally, esculetin inhibited the formation of filamentous actin (F-actin) ring-positive osteoclasts during osteoclast differentiation. However, the development of F-actin structures and subsequent bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts, which are observed in osteoclast/osteoblast co-culture systems were not affected by esculetin. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that esculetin inhibits RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis via direct suppression of c-Fos and NFATc1 expression and exerts an inhibitory effect on actin ring formation during osteoclastogenesis. - Highlights: • We first investigated the effects of esculetin on osteoclast differentiation and function. • Our data demonstrate for the first time that esculetin can suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • Esculetin acts as an inhibitor of c-Fos and NFATc1 activation.

  8. Innate lymphoid cells, precursors and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gronke, Konrad; Kofoed-Nielsen, Michael; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) have only recently been recognized as a separate entity of the lymphoid lineage. Their subpopulations share common characteristics in terms of early development and major transcriptional circuitry with their related cousins of the T cell world. It is currently hypothesized that ILCs constitute an evolutionary older version of the lymphoid immune system. They are found at all primary entry points for pathogens such as mucosal surfaces of the lung and gastrointestinal system, the skin and the liver, which is the central contact point for pathogens that breach the intestinal barrier and enter the circulation. There, ILC contribute to the first line defense as well as to organ homeostasis. However, ILC are not only involved in classical defense tasks, but also contribute to the organogenesis of lymphoid organs as well as tissue remodeling and even stem cell regeneration. ILC may, therefore, implement different functions according to their emergence in ontogeny, their development and their final tissue location. We will review here their early development from precursors of the fetal liver and the adult bone marrow as well as their late plasticity in adaptation to their environment. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and functions.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Mohammad Ahsanul; Nardo, David; Chen, Mong-Jen; Elshikha, Ahmed S; Ahamed, Rubina; Elsayed, Eslam M; Bigot, Claire; Holliday, Lexie Shannon; Song, Sihong

    2017-03-21

    Osteoporosis is a global public health problem affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. We previously showed that treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory properties, mitigated bone loss in an ovariectomized mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect of AAT on bone tissue are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of AAT on osteoclast formation and function in vitro. Our results showed that AAT dose-dependently inhibited the formation of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) induced osteoclasts derived from mouse bone marrow macrophages/monocyte (BMM) lineage cells and the murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7 cells. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms underlying this inhibition, we tested the effect of AAT on the gene expression of cell surface molecules, transcription factors, and cytokines associated with osteoclast formation. We showed that AAT inhibited M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor) induced cell surface RANK expression in osteoclast precursor cells. In addition, AAT inhibited RANKL-induced TNF-α production, cell surface CD9 expression, and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP) gene expression. Importantly, AAT treatment significantly inhibited osteoclast-associated mineral resorption. Together, these results uncovered new mechanisms for the protective effects of AAT and strongly support the notion that AAT has therapeutic potential for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  10. CD147 promotes the formation of functional osteoclasts through NFATc1 signalling.

    PubMed

    Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Terasawa, Mariko; Baba, Misaki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2016-04-29

    CD147, a membrane glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is highly upregulated during dynamic cellular events including tissue remodelling. Elevated CD147 expression is present in the joint of rheumatoid arthritis patients. However, the role of CD147 in bone destruction remains unclear. To determine whether CD147 is involved in osteoclastogenesis, we studied its expression in mouse osteoclasts and its role in osteoclast differentiation and function. CD147 expression was markedly upregulated during osteoclast differentiation. To investigate the role of CD147 in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity, osteoclast precursor cells were transfected with CD147 siRNA. Decreased CD147 expression inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption, inhibited RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 and decreased the expression of the d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase Vo domain and cathepsin K. Therefore, CD147 plays a critical role in the differentiation and function of osteoclasts by upregulating NFATc1 through the autoamplification of its expression in osteoclastogenesis.

  11. Bone substitute material composition and morphology differentially modulate calcium and phosphate release through osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Konermann, A; Staubwasser, M; Dirk, C; Keilig, L; Bourauel, C; Götz, W; Jäger, A; Reichert, C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the material composition and cell-mediated remodelling of different calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes. Osteoclasts were cultivated on bone substitutes (Cerabone, Maxresorb, and NanoBone) for up to 5 days. Bafilomycin A1 addition served as the control. To determine cellular activity, the supernatant content of calcium and phosphate was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Cells were visualized on the materials by scanning electron microscopy. Material composition and surface characteristics were assessed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Osteoclast-induced calcium and phosphate release was material-specific. Maxresorb exhibited the highest ion release to the medium (P = 0.034; calcium 40.25mg/l day 5, phosphate 102.08 mg/l day 5) and NanoBone the lowest (P = 0.021; calcium 8.43 mg/l day 5, phosphate 15.15 mg/l day 5); Cerabone was intermediate (P = 0.034; calcium 16.34 mg/l day 5, phosphate 30.6 mg/l day 5). All investigated materials showed unique resorption behaviours. The presented methodology provides a new perspective on the investigation of bone substitute biodegradation, maintaining the material-specific micro- and macrostructure. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Eldecalcitol, a second-generation vitamin D analog, drives bone minimodeling and reduces osteoclastic number in trabecular bone of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Paulo Henrique Luiz; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Takeda, Satoshi; Sasaki, Muneteru; Tabata, Chihiro; Oda, Kimimitsu; Li, Minqi; Saito, Hitoshi; Amizuka, Norio

    2011-09-01

    To elucidate the histological events that follow administration of eldecalcitol, a second-generation of vitamin D analog currently awaiting approval as a drug for treatment of osteoporosis, we employed the ovariectomy (OVX) rat model. OVX rats received vehicle or 30ng/kg of eldecalcitol, and sham-operated animals received vehicle only. Rats were sacrificed after 12weeks and had their femora and tibiae removed and processed for histochemical and histomorphometrical analyses. When compared with OVX group, osteoclastic number and bone resorption parameters were significantly reduced in eldecalcitol-treated rats, accompanied by decreased bone formation parameters. The preosteoblastic layer, with which osteoclastic precursors interact for mutual differentiation, was poorly developed in the eldecalcitol group, indicating less cell-to-cell contact between preosteoblasts and osteoclast precursors. Interestingly, eldecalcitol did promote a type of focal bone formation that is independent of bone resorption, a process known as bone minimodeling. While the number of ED-1-positive macrophages was higher in the bone marrow of treated rats, though osteoclastic number was deceased. Taken together, our findings suggest that eldecalcitol stimulates preosteoblastic differentiation rather than their proliferation, which in turn may prevent or diminish cell-to-cell contact between preosteoblasts and osteoclastic precursors, and therefore, lead to lower osteoclast numbers and decreased bone resorption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  14. Effects of 1α,25-(OH)2D3 on the formation and activity of osteoclasts in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianhong; Tong, Xi-Shuai; Chen, Guo-Hong; Wang, Dong; Chen, Yang; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Bian, Jian-Chun; Liu, Zong-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The hormonally active form of vitamin D3, 1α,25-(OH)2D3, has an important role in bone metabolism. This study examined the effects of 1α,25-(OH)2D3 on the ability of two cytokines, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), to induce RAW 264.7 cells to form osteoclasts. A TRAP histochemical staining assay and bone resorption analysis were used to identify the rate of formation and activity of osteoclasts. The numbers of osteoclasts formed, and their bone resorption activity, was enhanced by the addition of 1α,25-(OH)2D3. The expression levels of osteoclast-specific proteins that are essential for bone resorption, integrin β3, V-ATPase, CAII, CTSK, TRAP and MMP-9, were detected by western blotting. During 48 h, the expression levels of all these proteins significantly increased. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression levels of the transcription factors, c-Fos and NFATcl. The expression levels of c-Fos and NFATc1 also increased 24h after treatment with 1α,25-(OH)2D3. These results suggest that 1α,25-(OH)2D3 can regulate bone metabolism by directly enhancing the formation and maturation of osteoclasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of gravitational sensitivity of osteogenic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Buravkova, L B; Gershovich, P M; Gershovich, J G; Grigor'ev, A I

    2010-04-01

    This report is a detailed review of the current data on the mechanic and gravitational sensitivity of osteoblasts and osteogenic precursor cells in vitro. It summarizes the numerous responses of cells with an osteoblastic phenotype and osteogenic precursor cells and especially their responses to the alteration of their mechanic or gravitational surroundings. The review also discusses the osteogenic cell's pathways of signal transduction and the mechanisms of gravitational sensitivity. It was shown that the earliest multipotent stromal precursor cells of an adult organism's bone marrow can sense changes of intensity in a gravitational or mechanic field in model conditions, which may play a certain role in the development of osteopenia in microgravity.

  16. A primitive cell origin for B-cell precursor ALL?

    PubMed

    Cox, C V; Blair, A

    2005-01-01

    A stem cell origin has been described for both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias. In contrast, childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is thought to arise in committed B-lineage cells. Recently described in vitro and in vivo model systems that support the proliferation and expansion of ALL cells have provided new tools to investigate the cellular targets for the origin of this malignancy. Evidence suggests that some subtypes of childhood ALL have a primitive cell origin and share many immunophenotypic characteristics with normal progenitor cells. These leukemic stem cells may be resistant to current therapeutic strategies designed to kill the bulk ALL cell population and subsequent relapses may arise from this population. More precise definition of these ALL stem cells through combined analyses of antigen expression, genetic lesions, and functionality is essential for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  17. Stability analysis of a Komarova type model for the interactions of osteoblast and osteoclast cells during bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jerez, S; Chen, B

    2015-06-01

    In order to analyze theoretically the dynamics of osteoblast and osteoclast cells in the bone remodeling process we first consider a simplified Komarova model. The existence of periodic solutions, which is consistent with the biophysical phenomenon, has been observed only numerically for the general model. By a stability analysis of the simplified model we provide sufficient conditions to obtain existence and uniqueness of positive periodic solutions. Considering recent biological evidence about the participation of another cells like osteocytes in the regulation of bone remodeling, we incorporate to the simplified model a new term as a way to model the signaling of external agents in the remodeling process. Finally, we demonstrate that this new model has stable positive non-periodic solutions. All the theoretical results are accompanied by computational simulations.

  18. Doublecortin in Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jenna J.; Messier, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein.Oligodendrocyte precursor cells express doublecortin, but at a lower level of expression than in neuronal precursor.Doublecortin is not associated with a potential immature neuronal phenotype in Oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are glial cells that differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes during embryogenesis and early stages of post-natal life. OPCs continue to divide throughout adulthood and some eventually differentiate into oligodendrocytes in response to demyelinating lesions. There is growing evidence that OPCs are also involved in activity-driven de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons and myelin remodeling in adulthood. Considering these roles in the adult brain, OPCs are likely mobile cells that can migrate on some distances before they differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. A number of studies have noted that OPCs express doublecortin (DCX), a microtubule-associated protein expressed in neural precursor cells and in migrating immature neurons. Here we describe the distribution of DCX in OPCs. We found that almost all OPCs express DCX, but the level of expression appears to be much lower than what is found in neural precursor. We found that DCX is downregulated when OPCs start expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and is absent in myelinating oligodendrocytes. DCX does not appear to signal an immature neuronal phenotype in OPCs in the adult mouse brain. Rather, it could be involved either in cell migration, or as a marker of an immature oligodendroglial cell phenotype. PMID:28400715

  19. Osteoclasts and CD8 T cells form a negative feedback loop that contributes to homeostasis of both the skeletal and immune systems.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Zachary S; Aurora, Rajeev

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of dynamic regulatory loops that maintain homeostasis of the immune and skeletal systems. In this review, we highlight a number of these regulatory interactions that contribute to maintaining homeostasis. In addition, we review data on a negative regulatory feedback loop between osteoclasts and CD8 T cells that contributes to homeostasis of both the skeletal and immune systems.

  20. Commercial Honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) Tea Extract Inhibits Osteoclast Formation and Bone Resorption in RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages—An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Amcois; Kasonga, Abe; Deepak, Vishwa; Moosa, Shaakirah; Marais, Sumari; Kruger, Marlena C.; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Honeybush tea, a sweet tasting caffeine-free tea that is indigenous to South Africa, is rich in bioactive compounds that may have beneficial health effects. Bone remodeling is a physiological process that involves the synthesis of bone matrix by osteoblasts and resorption of bone by osteoclasts. When resorption exceeds formation, bone remodeling can be disrupted resulting in bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells derived from hematopoietic precursors of monocytic lineage. These precursors fuse and differentiate into mature osteoclasts in the presence of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL), produced by osteoblasts. In this study, the in vitro effects of an aqueous extract of fermented honeybush tea were examined on osteoclast formation and bone resorption in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We found that commercial honeybush tea extract inhibited osteoclast formation and TRAP activity which was accompanied by reduced bone resorption and disruption of characteristic cytoskeletal elements of mature osteoclasts without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, honeybush tea extract decreased expression of key osteoclast specific genes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K. This study demonstrates for the first time that honeybush tea may have potential anti-osteoclastogenic effects and therefore should be further explored for its beneficial effects on bone. PMID:26516894

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor type 1 (LPA1) plays a functional role in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption activity.

    PubMed

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Lopez Vales, Rùben; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-03-07

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1-6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1(-/-) mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1(-/-) mice but not in Lpar2(-/-) and Lpar3(-/-) animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1(-/-) osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP(+) osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss.

  2. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Plays a Functional Role in Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption Activity*

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Vales, Rùben Lopez; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1−/− mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1−/− mice but not in Lpar2−/− and Lpar3−/− animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1−/− osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP+ osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss. PMID:24429286

  3. Human embryonic epidermis contains a diverse Langerhans cell precursor pool.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Mairhofer, Mario; Bauer, Wolfgang; Fiala, Christian; Prior, Marion; Eppel, Wolfgang; Kolbus, Andrea; Tschachler, Erwin; Stingl, Georg; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2014-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the exact phenotype of the epidermal Langerhans cell (LC) precursors during human ontogeny has not been determined yet. These elusive precursors are believed to migrate into the embryonic skin and to express primitive surface markers, including CD36, but not typical LC markers such as CD1a, CD1c and CD207. The aim of this study was to further characterize the phenotype of LC precursors in human embryonic epidermis and to compare it with that of LCs in healthy adult skin. We found that epidermal leukocytes in first trimester human skin are negative for CD34 and heterogeneous with regard to the expression of CD1c, CD14 and CD36, thus contrasting the phenotypic uniformity of epidermal LCs in adult skin. These data indicate that LC precursors colonize the developing epidermis in an undifferentiated state, where they acquire the definitive LC marker profile with time. Using a human three-dimensional full-thickness skin model to mimic in vivo LC development, we found that FACS-sorted, CD207(-) cord blood-derived haematopoietic precursor cells resembling foetal LC precursors but not CD14(+)CD16(-) blood monocytes integrate into skin equivalents, and without additional exogenous cytokines give rise to cells that morphologically and phenotypically resemble LCs. Overall, it appears that CD14(-) haematopoietic precursors possess a much higher differentiation potential than CD14(+) precursor cells.

  4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells: a rare case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shambhu K; Li, Ying; Li, Yongmei

    2015-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas with osteoclast-like giant cells (UCPOGC) is an extremely rare non-endocrine pancreatic tumor. To date, some cases have been reported, however, histogenesis and biologic behavior of UCPOGC remain controversial. We report a case of an UCPOGC in a 54-year-old female, who presented with a three-month history of recurrent abdominal pain without any incentive. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a large cystic mass of 10.5 × 9.3 cm in the body and tail of the pancreas compressing the adjacent bowel loop and stomach. The preliminary diagnosis was considered as a malignant tumor of body and tail of the pancreas. The patient had open distal pancreatic mass resection with splenectomy and according to the results of histopathological and immunohistochemical studies, the diagnosis of an UCPOGC was established.

  5. Nanocrystalline spherical hydroxyapatite granules for bone repair: in vitro evaluation with osteoblast-like cells and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, A; Dittrich, R; Lode, A; Despang, F; Gelinsky, M

    2013-07-01

    Conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite-based materials for bone repair show poor resorbability due to the loss of nanocrystallinity. The present study describes a method to establish nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite granules. The material was prepared by ionotropic gelation of an alginate sol containing hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. Subsequent thermal elimination of alginate at 650 °C yielded non-sintered, but unexpectedly stable hydroxyapatite granules. By adding stearic acid as an organic filler to the alginate/HA suspension, the granules exhibited macropores after thermal treatment. A third type of material was achieved by additional coating of the granules with silica particles. Microstructure and specific surface area of the different materials were characterized in comparison to the already established granular calcium phosphate material Cerasorb M(®). Cytocompatibility and potential for bone regeneration of the materials was evaluated by in vitro examinations with osteosarcoma cells and osteoclasts. Osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells proliferated on all examined materials and showed the typical increase of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity during cultivation. Expression of bone-related genes coding for ALP, osteonectin, osteopontin, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein II on the materials was proven by RT-PCR. Human monocytes were seeded onto the different granules and osteoclastogenesis was examined by activity measurement of tartrate-specific acid phosphatase (TRAP). Gene expression analysis after 23 days of cultivation revealed an increased expression of osteoclast-related genes TRAP, vitronectin receptor and cathepsin K, which was on the same level for all examined materials. These results indicate, that the nanocrystalline granular materials are of clinical interest, especially for bone regeneration.

  6. Pulsed electromagnetic field inhibits RANKL-dependent osteoclastic differentiation in RAW264.7 cells through the Ca(2+)-calcineurin-NFATc1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Xu, Haixia; Han, Zhongyu; Chen, Ping; Yu, Qiang; Lei, Yutian; Li, Zongze; Zhao, Ming; Tian, Jing

    2017-01-08

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been reported to improve bone healing in osteoporosis patients. However, the precise mechanism has remained largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PEMF on nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-dependent osteoclastic differentiation and the Ca(2+)-calcineurin-NFATc1 signaling pathway in RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Treating RAW264.7 cells with RANKL for 4 days induced osteoclastic differentiation in vitro, and the formation of multinucleated osteoclasts, bone resorption-pit formation, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and the protein levels of cathepsin K, TRAP, Nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were significantly decreased. The mRNA levels of specific genes related to osteoclastogenesis (TRAP, NFATc1, CTSK and MMP-9) were also reduced. Moreover, the oscillations of intracellular Ca(2+) in RANKL-dependent RAW264.7 cells were suppressed by PEMF, as well as by inhibitors of membrane and store-operated Ca(2+) channels. Meanwhile, calcineurin activity was increased, although its protein level was not changed. PEMF increased phospho-NFATc1 in the cytosol while suppressing the nuclear translocation of NFATc1, thus inhibiting osteoclastic differentiation by suppressing the Ca(2+)-calcineurin-NFATc1 signaling pathway. Although many questions remain unresolved, to our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that PEMF is beneficial against RANKL-dependent osteoclastic differentiation in RAW264.7 cells in vitro via inhibiting the Ca(2+)-calcineurin-NFATc1 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of neural precursor cells in promoting repair following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dibajnia, Pooya; Morshead, Cindi M

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of stroke have received considerable attention. Two broad approaches to stem cell-based therapies have been taken: the transplantation of exogenous stem cells, and the activation of endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (together termed neural precursors). Studies examining the transplantation of exogenous cells have demonstrated that neural stem and progenitor cells lead to the most clinically promising results. Endogenous activation of neural precursors has also been explored based on the fact that resident precursor cells have the inherent capacity to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature neurons in the uninjured adult brain. Studies have revealed that these neural precursor cell behaviours can be activated following stroke, whereby neural precursors will expand in number, migrate to the infarct site and differentiate into neurons. However, this innate response is insufficient to lead to functional recovery, making it necessary to enhance the activation of endogenous precursors to promote tissue repair and functional recovery. Herein we will discuss the current state of the stem cell-based approaches with a focus on endogenous repair to treat the stroke injured brain. PMID:23064725

  8. Vitamin D endocrine system and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoyuki; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Udagawa, Naoyuki; Suda, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D was discovered as an anti-rachitic agent preventing a failure in bone mineralization, but it is now established that the active form of vitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) induces bone resorption. Discovery of the receptor activator of nuclear factor -κB ligand (RANKL) uncovered the molecular mechanism by which 1α,25(OH)2D3 stimulates bone resorption. Treating osteoblastic cells with 1α,25(OH)2D3 stimulates RANKL expression, which in turn induces osteoclastogenesis. Nevertheless, active vitamin D compounds such as calcitriol (1α,25(OH)2D3), alfacalcidol (1α(OH)D3) and eldecalcitol (1α,25-dihydroxy-2β-(3-hydroxypropoxy) vitamin D3) have been used as therapeutic drugs for osteoporosis, as they increase bone mineral density (BMD) in osteoporotic patients. Paradoxically, the increase in BMD is caused by the suppression of bone resorption. Several studies have been performed to elucidate the mechanism by which active vitamin D compounds suppress bone resorption in vivo. Our study showed that daily administration of eldecalcitol to mice suppressed neither the number of osteoclast precursors in the bone marrow nor the number of osteoclasts formed in ex vivo cultures. Eldecalcitol administration suppressed RANKL expression in osteoblasts. This review discusses how the difference between in vitro and in vivo effects of active vitamin D compounds on bone resorption is induced.

  9. Endostatin inhibits VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sipola, Annina; Nelo, Katri; Hautala, Timo; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Background Endostatin is a C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII which is a component of basement membranes with the structural properties of both collagens and proteoglycans. Endostatin has a major role in angiogenesis which is intimately associated with bone development and remodeling. Signaling between the endothelial cells and the bone cells, for example, may have a role in recruitment of osteoclastic precursor cells. Our study aims at exploring a possibility that endostatin, either as a part of basement membrane or as a soluble molecule, may control osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro. Methods Rat pit formation assay was employed in order to examine the effect of endostatin alone or in combination with vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) on bone resorption in vitro. Effect of these agents on osteoclast differentiation in vitro was also tested. Osteoclastogenesis and the number of osteoclasts were followed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) staining and resorption was evaluated by measuring the area of excavated pits. Results Endostatin inhibited the VEGF-A stimulated osteoclastic bone resorption, whereas endostatin alone had no effect on the basal resorption level in the absence of VEGF-A. In addition, endostatin could inhibit osteoclast differentiation in vitro independent of VEGF-A. Conclusion Our in vitro data indicate that collagen XVIII/endostatin can suppress VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption to the basal level. Osteoclastogenesis is also inhibited by endostatin. The regulatory effect of endostatin, however, is not critical since endostatin alone does not modify the basal bone resorption. PMID:16839420

  10. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  11. DMSO regulates osteoclast development in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Justin M.; Wu, Gary; Morgan, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is routinely used in the laboratory as a solvent and vehicle for organic molecules. Although it has been used in previous studies involving myeloid cells and macrophages, we are unaware of data demonstrating the effects of DMSO alone on osteoclast development. Recently, we were using DMSO as a vehicle and included a non-vehicle control. Surprisingly, we observed a marked change in osteoclast development, and therefore designed this study to examine the effects of DMSO on osteoclast development. Osteoclasts were generated from two sources: bone marrow macrophages and an osteoclast progenitor cell line. Cells were cultured with DMSO for various durations and at differing concentrations and mature, multinucleated (>3 nuclei) TRAP+ cells were assessed in terms of cell number, cell surface area, and number of nuclei/cell. Osteoclast surface area increased in 5 μM DMSO to a mean of 156,422 pixels from a mean of 38,510 pixels in control culture, and subsequently decreased in 10 μM DMSO to a mean of 18,994 pixels. With serial addition of DMSO over 5 d, a significant increase in mean surface area, and number of nuclei/cell was also observed, while the opposite was true when DMSO was serially removed from culture. These findings show that DMSO exerts a marked effect on osteoclast differentiation. Since many investigators use DMSO to solubilize compounds for treatment of osteoclasts, caution is warranted as altering DMSO concentrations may have a profound effect on the final data, especially if osteoclast differentiation is being assessed. PMID:21359822

  12. Dopamine depletion impairs precursor cell proliferation in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Günter U; Rizk, Pamela; Muriel, Marie P; Duyckaerts, Charles; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Caille, Isabelle; Hirsch, Etienne C

    2004-07-01

    Cerebral dopamine depletion is the hallmark of Parkinson disease. Because dopamine modulates ontogenetic neurogenesis, depletion of dopamine might affect neural precursors in the subependymal zone and subgranular zone of the adult brain. Here we provide ultrastructural evidence showing that highly proliferative precursors in the adult subependymal zone express dopamine receptors and receive dopaminergic afferents. Experimental depletion of dopamine in rodents decreases precursor cell proliferation in both the subependymal zone and the subgranular zone. Proliferation is restored completely by a selective agonist of D2-like (D2L) receptors. Experiments with neural precursors from the adult subependymal zone grown as neurosphere cultures confirm that activation of D2L receptors directly increases the proliferation of these precursors. Consistently, the numbers of proliferating cells in the subependymal zone and neural precursor cells in the subgranular zone and olfactory bulb are reduced in postmortem brains of individuals with Parkinson disease. These observations suggest that the generation of neural precursor cells is impaired in Parkinson disease as a consequence of dopaminergic denervation.

  13. Biocorrosion and uptake of titanium by human osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Al-Mushaiqri, Mohamed S; Gautschi, Oliver P; Meagher, James; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2010-12-15

    All metals in contact with a biological system undergo corrosion through an electrochemical redox reaction. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on titanium and aluminum, and directly corrode the metals leading to the release of corresponding metal ions, which are believed to cause inflammatory reactions and activate osteoclastic differentiation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures on the surface of titanium and aluminum foils. Atomic emission spectrometry investigations showed significantly increased levels of aluminum in the supernatant of OC cultured on aluminum; however, all measurements in the supernatants of cell cultures on titanium were below detection limits. Despite this, confocal microscopy analysis with Newport Green DCF diacetate ester staining depicted intense fluorescence throughout the cytoplasm and nucleolus of OC cultured on titanium foils. Comparable fluorescence intensities were not observed in monocytes and control cells cultured on glass. The present study demonstrated that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate toward mature OC on titanium and aluminum. Furthermore, it established that the mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and take up corresponding metal ions, which subsequently may be released and thereby induce the formation of osteolytic lesions in the periprosthetic bone, contributing to the loosening of the implant. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. NFkappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides ameliorates osteoporosis through inhibition of activation and differentiation of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Nakagami, H; Tsukamoto, I; Morita, S; Kunugiza, Y; Tomita, T; Yoshikawa, H; Kaneda, Y; Ogihara, T; Morishita, R

    2006-06-01

    The transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkappaB), is believed to play a pivotal role in osteoclast formation. In this study, we focused on NFkappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) as a new therapeutic strategy to attenuate osteoporosis. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear osteoclasts formed in mononuclear cells including osteoclast precursors from neonatal rabbit bone marrow were increased in the presence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, whereas transfection of NFkappaB decoy ODN decreased the number of TRAP-positive cells and attenuated RANKL and M-CSF-induced osteoclast formation. NFkappaB decoy ODN also inhibited the activity of osteoclasts, as assessed by pit formation. In rat ovariectomized model of estrogen deficiency, continuous administration of NFkappaB decoy ODN attenuated the increase of TRAP activity, accompanied by a significant increase in calcium concentration in tibia and femur and decrease in urinary deoxypyridinoline. In additional osteoporosis model using vitamin C-deficient rat, inhibition of NFkappaB by decoy ODN dramatically improved the bone length, weight, density as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Overall, inhibition of NFkappaB by decoy strategy prevented osteoporosis through the inhibition of bone resorption. Targeting of NFkappaB might be potential therapy in various bone metabolic diseases.

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Gracilaria verrucosa Extracts on Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Jin; Lee, Yong-Jin; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Yee, Sung-Tae; Son, Young-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Bone remodeling, a physiological process characterized by bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, is important for the maintenance of healthy bone in adult humans. Osteoclasts play a critical role in bone erosion and osteoporosis and are bone-specific multinucleated cells generated through differentiation of monocyte/macrophage lineage precursors. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) has been reported to induce osteoclast differentiation. In this study, we explored whether Gracilaria verrucosa extracts (GE) could affect RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. GE significantly inhibited RANKL-activated osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting protein expression of c-fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), vital factors in RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis. In addition, GE attenuated ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. In summary, GE can prevent osteoclastogenesis and hormone-related bone loss via blockage of c-fos-NFATc1 signaling. Our results suggest that GE may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:28335442

  16. Rab27A Regulates Transport of Cell Surface Receptors Modulating Multinucleation and Lysosome-Related Organelles in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimada-Sugawara, Megumi; Sakai, Eiko; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Izumi, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Noriaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Rab27A regulates transport of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and release of secretory granules in various types of cells. Here, we identified up-regulation of Rab27A during differentiation of osteoclasts (OCLs) from bone-marrow macrophages (BMMs), by DNA microarray analysis. Rab27A deficiency in OCLs, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown in RAW-D cell line or BMMs derived from ashen mice, which display genetic defects in Rab27A expression, induced multinucleated and giant cells. Upon stimulation with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), essential cytokines for OCL differentiation, phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src), and p-38 were slightly enhanced in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs. The cell surface level of c-fms, an M-CSF receptor, was slightly higher in ashen BMMs than in wild-type BMMs, and down-regulation of RANK, a RANKL receptor, was delayed. In addition to receptors, OCLs derived from ashen mice exhibited aberrant actin ring formation, abnormal subcellular localization of lysosome-associated membrane protein (LAMP2) and cathepsin K (CTSK), and marked reduction in resorbing activity. Thus, these findings suggest that Rab27A regulates normal transport of cell surface receptors modulating multinucleation and LROs in OCLs. PMID:25882854

  17. Impact of the microgravity environment in a 3-dimensional clinostat on osteoblast- and osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Makihira, Seicho; Kawahara, Yumi; Yuge, Louis; Mine, Yuichi; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2008-09-01

    Mechanical unloading conditions result in decreases in bone mineral density and quantity, which may be partly attributed to an imbalance in bone formation and resorption. To investigate the effect of mechanical unloading on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, and the expression of RANKL and OPG genes in osteoblasts, we used a three-dimensional (3D) clinostat system simulating microgravity to culture MC3T3-E1 and RAW264.7 cells. Long-term exposure (7 days) of MC3T3-E1 cells to microgravity in the 3D clinostat inhibited the expression of Runx2, Osterix, type I collagen alphaI chain, RANKL and OPG genes. Similarly, 3D clinostat exposure inhibited the enhancement of beta3-integrin gene expression, which normally induced by sRANKL stimulation in RAW264.7 cells. These results, taken together, demonstrate that long-term 3D clinostat exposure inhibits the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells together with suppression of RANKL and OPG gene expression, as well as the RANKL-dependent cellular fusion of RAW264.7 cells, suggesting that long-term mechanical unloading suppresses bone formation and resorption.

  18. The collection of NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast includes numerous genes non-essential to physiologic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Julia F.; Coury, Fabienne; Sulyanto, Rosalyn; Sitara, Despina; Wu, Jing; Brady, Nicholas; Tsang, Kelly; Sigrist, Kirsten; Tollefsen, Douglas M.; He, Li; Storm, Daniel; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are specialized secretory cells of the myeloid lineage important for normal skeletal homeostasis as well as pathologic conditions of bone including osteoporosis, inflammatory arthritis and cancer metastasis. Differentiation of these multinucleated giant cells from precursors is controlled by the cytokine RANKL, which through its receptor RANK initiates a signaling cascade culminating in the activation of transcriptional regulators which induce the expression of the bone degradation machinery. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) is the master regulator of this process and in its absence osteoclast differentiation is aborted both in vitro and in vivo. Differential mRNA expression analysis by microarray is used to identify genes of potential physiologic relevance across nearly all biologic systems. We compared the gene expression profile of murine wild-type and NFATc1-deficient osteoclast precursors stimulated with RANKL and identified that the majority of the known genes important for osteoclastic bone resorption require NFATc1 for induction. Here, five novel RANKL-induced, NFATc1-dependent transcripts in the osteoclast are described: Nhedc2, Rhoc, Serpind1, Adcy3 and Rab38. Despite reasonable hypotheses for the importance of these molecules in the bone resorption pathway and their dramatic induction during differentiation, the analysis of mice with mutations in these genes failed to reveal a function in osteoclast biology. Compared to littermate controls, none of these mutants demonstrated a skeletal phenotype in vivo or alterations in osteoclast differentiation or function in vitro. These data highlight the need for rigorous validation studies to complement expression profiling results before functional importance can be assigned to highly regulated genes in any biologic process. PMID:22985540

  19. Osteoblasts of calvaria induce higher numbers of osteoclasts than osteoblasts from long bone.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qilong; Schoenmaker, Ton; Jansen, Ineke D C; Bian, Zhuan; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the existence of functional differences between osteoclasts harbored in different bones. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of such a heterogeneity are not yet understood. Since cells of the osteoblast lineage play a critical role in osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast heterogeneity may be due to osteoblasts that differ at the different bone sites. In the present study we evaluated possible differences in the capacity of calvaria and long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclastogenesis. Osteoblasts were isolated from calvaria and long bone of mice and co-cultured with osteoclast precursors obtained from bone marrow of both types of bone, spleen and peripheral blood. Irrespective of the source of the precursors, a significantly higher number of TRACP-positive multinucleated cells were formed with calvaria osteoblasts. The expression of osteoclastogenesis related genes was analyzed by qPCR. OPG was significantly higher expressed by long bone osteoblasts. The RANKL/OPG ratio and TNF-α gene expression were significantly higher in calvaria osteoblast cultures. OPG added to the culture system inhibited osteoclastogenesis in both groups. Blocking TNF-α had no effect on osteoclastogenesis. Calvaria and long bone osteoblasts were pre-stimulated with VitD3 for 5days. Subsequently, osteoclast precursors were added to these cultures. After a co-culture of 6days, it was shown that VitD3 pre-stimulation of long bone osteoblasts strongly improved their capacity to induce osteoclast formation. This coincided with an increased ratio of RANKL/OPG. Taken together, the data demonstrated differences in the capacity of calvaria and long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclastogenesis. This appeared to be due to differences in the expression of RANKL and OPG. VitD3 pre-stimulation improved the ability of long bone osteoblasts to induce osteoclast formation. Our findings demonstrate bone-site specific differences in osteoblast-mediated formation of

  20. Deletion of Orai1 alters expression of multiple genes during osteoclast and osteoblast maturation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung-Yong; Foley, Julie; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Petranka, John G; Bird, Gary S; Putney, James W

    2012-12-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a major Ca(2+) influx pathway in most non-excitable cell types and Orai1 was recently identified as an essential pore-subunit of SOCE channels. Here we investigate the physiological role of Orai1 in bone homeostasis using Orai1-deficient mice (Orai1(-/-)). Orai1(-/-) mice developed osteopenia with decreased bone mineral density and trabecular bone volume. To identify the nature and origin of the bone defect, bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts from Orai1(-/-) mice were examined. Orai1-mediated SOCE was completely abolished in Orai1(-/-) osteoclast precursor cells and osteoclastogenesis in vitro from Orai1(-/-) mice was impaired due to a defect in cell fusion of pre-osteoclasts. Also, resorption activity in vitro was comparable but the size of pits formed by Orai1(-/-) osteoclasts was smaller. We next assessed the role of Orai1 in osteoblast differentiation and function by using a pre-osteoblast cell line, as well as primary osteoblasts from wild-type and Orai1(-/-) mice. SOCE in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells was inactivated by lentiviral overexpression of a pore-dead Orai1 mutant. Lack of SOCE in MC3T3-E1 had no effect on alkaline phosphatase staining and expression but substantially inhibited mineralized nodule formation. Consistent with this finding, Orai1-mediated SOCE was markedly reduced in Orai1(-/-) osteoblast precursor cells and osteoblastogenesis in vitro from Orai1(-/-) stromal cells showed impaired mineral deposition but no change in differentiation. This indicates that Orai1 is involved in the function but not in the differentiation of osteoblasts. Together, these results suggest that Orai1 plays a critical role in bone homeostasis by regulating both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  1. Deletion of Orai1 Alters Expression of Multiple Genes during Osteoclast and Osteoblast Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung-Yong; Foley, Julie; Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Petranka, John G.; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is a major Ca2+ influx pathway in most non-excitable cell types and Orai1 was recently identified as an essential pore-subunit of SOCE channels. Here we investigate the physiological role of Orai1 in bone homeostasis using Orai1-deficient mice (Orai1−/−). Orai1−/− mice developed osteopenia with decreased bone mineral density and trabecular bone volume. To identify the nature and origin of the bone defect, bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts from Orai1−/− mice were examined. Orai1-mediated SOCE was completely abolished in Orai1−/− osteoclast precursor cells and osteoclastogenesis in vitro from Orai1−/− mice was impaired due to a defect in cell fusion of pre-osteoclasts. Also, resorption activity in vitro was comparable but the size of pits formed by Orai1−/− osteoclasts was smaller. We next assessed the role of Orai1 in osteoblast differentiation and function by using a pre-osteoblast cell line, as well as primary osteoblasts from wild-type and Orai1−/− mice. SOCE in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells was inactivated by lentiviral overexpression of a pore-dead Orai1 mutant. Lack of SOCE in MC3T3-E1 had no effect on alkaline phosphatase staining and expression but substantially inhibited mineralized nodule formation. Consistent with this finding, Orai1-mediated SOCE was markedly reduced in Orai1−/− osteoblast precursor cells and osteoblastogenesis in vitro from Orai1−/− stromal cells showed impaired mineral deposition but no change in differentiation. This indicates that Orai1 is involved in the function but not in the differentiation of osteoblasts. Together, these results suggest that Orai1 plays a critical role in bone homeostasis by regulating both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:23122304

  2. An advanced tri-culture model to evaluate the dynamic interplay among osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Stefania; Torricelli, Paola; Veronesi, Francesca; Salamanna, Francesca; Cepollaro, Simona; Fini, Milena

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic metabolism and the numerous roles of bone tissue necessitate a suitable in vitro model to represent them. In order to investigate the interaction among the several cell types composing bone microenvironment, we studied a tri-culture model including human osteoblasts (OBs), osteoclasts (OCs), and endothelial cells (HUVEC). While OBs are essential for bone deposition and OCs for bone resorption, the vasculature is necessary to provide growth factors, nutrients, and oxygen in the mature tissue. The results of this study showed a strong mutual influence between OBs, OCs, and HUVEC in term of proliferation, viability, and activity (release of ALP, Coll I, OPG, RANKL, VEGF, CTSK, TGFβ, and IL-6). The behavior of the single cultures demonstrated to be different compared to the bi- or tri-cultures and depending on the cell types involved: the coexistence of OBs and OCs stimulated the synthetic activity of both cell types, while the presence of HUVEC induced a stimulating role for OBs but mainly an inhibitory effect for OC. In addition, evidence of the effects of OBs and OCs on HUVEC is highlighted by their morphology: regular and able to "sketch" little vessels in presence of OBs, more disorganized and heterogeneous in presence of OCs. Taken together, these observations well characterize an advanced cellular model to be used as starting point for mimicking bone microenvironment in vivo, thus reducing the use of animals in the preclinical phase and offering a more reliable tool to test new and innovative biomaterials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Osteoclast radicals.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S

    1994-11-01

    In biological research, new ideas arise and quickly spread to encompass the entire field. Thus, the evolution of molecular biology has significantly changed our methods of approaching our research. A similar far-reaching finding has been the advent of radical reactions into biology. Although radical chemistry has been utilized for many technological advances that affect our daily lives, the appreciation of this same process within our cells has opened an unexplored arena for research enquiry. As cellular messengers, radical molecules seem whimsically designed: they are evanescent, rapidly and apparently indiscriminately reactive, and barely detectable by most biological methods. Yet, our initial probing of these reactive agents in cells and organisms has led us to postulate a virtually undescribed system of communication within and among cells which may have significant effects in multiple organs. In bone, radical reactants have been attributed with an important role in the control of bone resorption.

  4. Cryopreservation of GABAergic Neuronal Precursors for Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are essential for stem cells storage in order to apply them in the clinic. Here we describe a new standardized cryopreservation protocol for GABAergic neural precursors derived from the medial glanglionic eminence (MGE), a promising source of GABAergic neuronal progenitors for cell therapy against interneuron-related pathologies. We used 10% Me2SO as cryoprotectant and assessed the effects of cell culture amplification and cellular organization, as in toto explants, neurospheres, or individualized cells, on post-thaw cell viability and retrieval. We confirmed that in toto cryopreservation of MGE explants is an optimal preservation system to keep intact the interneuron precursor properties for cell transplantation, together with a high cell viability (>80%) and yield (>70%). Post-thaw proliferation and self-renewal of the cryopreserved precursors were tested in vitro. In addition, their migration capacity, acquisition of mature neuronal morphology, and potency to differentiate into multiple interneuron subtypes were also confirmed in vivo after transplantation. The results show that the cryopreserved precursor features remained intact and were similar to those immediately transplanted after their dissection from the MGE. We hope this protocol will facilitate the generation of biobanks to obtain a permanent and reliable source of GABAergic precursors for clinical application in cell-based therapies against interneuronopathies. PMID:28122047

  5. Noncanonical Wnt signaling promotes osteoclast differentiation and is facilitated by the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, Francisco; Oguma, Junya; Brown, Anthony M.C.; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First demonstration of direct role for noncanonical Wnt in osteoclast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of Ryk as a Wnt5a/b receptor in inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modulation of noncanonical Wnt signaling by a clinically important drug, ritonavir. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establishes a mechanism for an important clinical problem: HIV-associated bone loss. -- Abstract: Wnt proteins that signal via the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway directly regulate osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, most studies of Wnt-related effects on osteoclasts involve indirect changes. While investigating bone mineral density loss in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its treatment with the protease inhibitor ritonavir (RTV), we observed that RTV decreased nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin, critical to canonical Wnt signaling, in primary human and murine osteoclast precursors. This occurred in parallel with upregulation of Wnt5a and Wnt5b transcripts. These Wnts typically stimulate noncanonical Wnt signaling, and this can antagonize the canonical Wnt pathway in many cell types, dependent upon Wnt receptor usage. We now document RTV-mediated upregulation of Wnt5a/b protein in osteoclast precursors. Recombinant Wnt5b and retrovirus-mediated expression of Wnt5a enhanced osteoclast differentiation from human and murine monocytic precursors, processes facilitated by RTV. In contrast, canonical Wnt signaling mediated by Wnt3a suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Both RTV and Wnt5b inhibited canonical, {beta}-catenin/T cell factor-based Wnt reporter activation in osteoclast precursors. RTV- and Wnt5-induced osteoclast differentiation were dependent upon the receptor-like tyrosine kinase Ryk, suggesting that Ryk may act as a Wnt5a/b receptor in this context. This is the first demonstration of a direct role for Wnt signaling pathways and Ryk in

  6. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells Reverse Osteoporosis in NOD/SCID Mice by Altering Osteoblastic and Osteoclastic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Reeva; Lu, Jingwei; Kanji, Suman; Joseph, Matthew; Das, Manjusri; Noble, Garrett J.; McMichael, Brooke K.; Agarwal, Sudha; Hart, Richard T.; Sun, Zongyang; Lee, Beth S.; Rosol, Thomas J.; Jackson, Rebecca; Mao, Hai-Quan; Pompili, Vincent J.; Das, Hiranmoy

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a bone disorder associated with loss of bone mineral density and micro architecture. A balance of osteoblasts and osteoclasts activities maintains bone homeostasis. Increased bone loss due to increased osteoclast and decreased osteoblast activities is considered as an underlying cause of osteoporosis. Methods and Findings The cures for osteoporosis are limited, consequently the potential of CD34+ cell therapies is currently being considered. We developed a nanofiber-based expansion technology to obtain adequate numbers of CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood, for therapeutic applications. Herein, we show that CD34+ cells could be differentiated into osteoblastic lineage, in vitro. Systemically delivered CD34+ cells home to the bone marrow and significantly improve bone deposition, bone mineral density and bone micro-architecture in osteoporotic mice. The elevated levels of osteocalcin, IL-10, GM-CSF, and decreased levels of MCP-1 in serum parallel the improvements in bone micro-architecture. Furthermore, CD34+ cells improved osteoblast activity and concurrently impaired osteoclast differentiation, maturation and functionality. Conclusions These findings demonstrate a novel approach utilizing nanofiber-expanded CD34+ cells as a therapeutic application for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:22724005

  7. Scopoletin and scopolin isolated from Artemisia iwayomogi suppress differentiation of osteoclastic macrophage RAW 264.7 cells by scavenging reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Ding, Yan; Yan, Xi Tao; Kim, Young-Ho; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2013-04-26

    Artemisia iwayomogi has been used as a folk medicine for treating various diseases including inflammatory and immune-related diseases. Scopoletin (1) and scopolin (2) were isolated from this species. Scopoletin (1) showed more potent peroxyl radical-scavenging capacity, reducing capacity, and cellular antioxidant capacity compared to scopolin (2). The inhibitory effect of 1 on the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand-induced osteoclastic differentiation of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells was also more potent than that of 2. The production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions during differentiation of preosteoclastic RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts was attenuated by compounds 1 and 2. These findings indicate that the suppressive effects of 1 and 2 on the differentiation of preosteoclastic RAW 264.7 cells is partially due to their intracellular antioxidant capacity, as they can scavenge ROS and play an important signaling role in the differentiation process.

  8. TRPV1 deletion impaired fracture healing and inhibited osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    He, Lin-Hai; Liu, Meng; He, Yang; Xiao, E; Zhao, Lu; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Hua-Qian; Zhang, Yi

    2017-02-22

    Fracture healing, in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts play important roles, has drawn much clinical attention. Osteoclast deficiency or decreased osteoblast activity will impair fracture healing. TRPV1 is a member of the Ca(2+) permeable cation channel subfamily, and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss, which makes TRPV1 a potential target for osteoporosis. However, whether long term TRPV1 inhibition or TRPV1 deletion will affect the fracture healing process is unclear. In this study, we found that the wild-type mice showed a well-remodeled fracture callus, whereas TRPV1 knockout mice still had an obvious fracture gap with unresorbed soft-callus 4 weeks post-fracture. The number of osteoclasts was reduced in the TRPV1 knockout fracture callus, and osteoclast formation and resorption activity were also impaired in vitro. TRPV1 deletion decreased the calcium oscillation frequency and peak cytoplasmic concentration in osteoclast precursors, subsequently reducing the expression and nuclear translocation of NFATc1 and downregulating DC-stamp, cathepsin K, and ATP6V. In addition, TRPV1 deletion caused reduced mRNA and protein expression of Runx2 and ALP in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and reduced calcium deposition in vitro. Our results suggest that TRPV1 deletion impairs fracture healing, and inhibited osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis.

  9. TRPV1 deletion impaired fracture healing and inhibited osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin-Hai; Liu, Meng; He, Yang; Xiao, E.; Zhao, Lu; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Hua-Qian; Zhang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Fracture healing, in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts play important roles, has drawn much clinical attention. Osteoclast deficiency or decreased osteoblast activity will impair fracture healing. TRPV1 is a member of the Ca2+ permeable cation channel subfamily, and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 prevents ovariectomy-induced bone loss, which makes TRPV1 a potential target for osteoporosis. However, whether long term TRPV1 inhibition or TRPV1 deletion will affect the fracture healing process is unclear. In this study, we found that the wild-type mice showed a well-remodeled fracture callus, whereas TRPV1 knockout mice still had an obvious fracture gap with unresorbed soft-callus 4 weeks post-fracture. The number of osteoclasts was reduced in the TRPV1 knockout fracture callus, and osteoclast formation and resorption activity were also impaired in vitro. TRPV1 deletion decreased the calcium oscillation frequency and peak cytoplasmic concentration in osteoclast precursors, subsequently reducing the expression and nuclear translocation of NFATc1 and downregulating DC-stamp, cathepsin K, and ATP6V. In addition, TRPV1 deletion caused reduced mRNA and protein expression of Runx2 and ALP in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and reduced calcium deposition in vitro. Our results suggest that TRPV1 deletion impairs fracture healing, and inhibited osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis. PMID:28225019

  10. High throughput, quantitative analysis of human osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Nowell, Cameron J; Rueda, Patricia; Henriksen, Kim; Pierce, Tracie; Cook, Anna E; Pastoureau, Philippe; Sabatini, Massimo; Charman, William N; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J; Sexton, Patrick M; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-15

    Osteoclasts are multinuclear cells that degrade bone under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Osteoclasts are therefore a major target of osteoporosis therapeutics aimed at preserving bone. Consequently, analytical methods for osteoclast activity are useful for the development of novel biomarkers and/or pharmacological agents for the treatment of osteoporosis. The nucleation state of an osteoclast is indicative of its maturation and activity. To date, activity is routinely measured at the population level with only approximate consideration of the nucleation state (an 'osteoclast population' is typically defined as cells with ≥3 nuclei). Using a fluorescent substrate for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), a routinely used marker of osteoclast activity, we developed a multi-labelled imaging method for quantitative measurement of osteoclast TRAP activity at the single cell level. Automated image analysis enables interrogation of large osteoclast populations in a high throughput manner using open source software. Using this methodology, we investigated the effects of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) on osteoclast maturation and activity and demonstrated that TRAP activity directly correlates with osteoclast maturity (i.e. nuclei number). This method can be applied to high throughput screening of osteoclast-targeting compounds to determine changes in maturation and activity.

  11. Inhibition of differentiation and function of osteoclasts by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunxi; Madhu, Vedavathi; Thomas, Candace; Yang, Xinlin; Du, Xeujun; Dighe, Abhijit S; Cui, Quanjun

    2015-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an FDA-approved organosulfur solvent that is reported to have therapeutic value in osteoarthritis and osteopenia. DMSO is used as a cryoprotectant for the cryopreservation of bone grafts and mesenchymal stem cells which are later used for bone repair. It is also used as a solvent in the preparation of various scaffolds used for bone tissue engineering purposes. DMSO has been reported to inhibit osteoclast formation in vitro but the mechanism involved has remained elusive. We investigated the effect of DMSO on osteoclast differentiation and function using a conventional model system of RAW 264.7 cells. The differentiation of RAW 264.7 cells was induced by adding 50 ng/ml RANKL and the effect of DMSO (0.01 and 1% v/v) on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis was investigated. Addition of 1% DMSO significantly inhibited RANKL-induced formation of TRAP+, multinucleated, mature osteoclasts and osteoclast late-stage precursors (c-Kit(-) c-Fms(+) Mac-1(+) RANK(+)). While DMSO did not inhibit proliferation per se, it did inhibit the effect of RANKL on proliferation of RAW 264.7 cells. Key genes related to osteoclast function (TRAP, Integrin αVβ3, Cathepsin K and MMP9) were significantly down-regulated by DMSO. RANKL-induced expression of RANK gene was significantly reduced in the presence of DMSO. Our data, and reports from other investigators, that DMSO enhances osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and also prevents bone loss in ovarietcomized rats, suggest that DMSO has tremendous potential in the treatment of osteoporosis and bone diseases arising from uncontrolled activities of the osteoclasts.

  12. Improved Single-Source Precursors for Solar-Cell Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Improved single-source precursor compounds have been invented for use in spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) of chalcopyrite semiconductor absorber layers of thin-film cells. A "single-source precursor compound" is a single molecular compound that contains all the required elements, which when used under the spray CVD conditions, thermally decomposes to form CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)S(y)Se(2-y).

  13. Ly49Q, an ITIM-bearing NK receptor, positively regulates osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mikihito; Nakashima, Tomoki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2010-03-12

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated cells that resorb bone, play a key role in bone remodeling. Although immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signaling is critical for osteoclast differentiation, the significance of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) has not been well understood. Here we report the function of Ly49Q, an Ly49 family member possessing an ITIM motif, in osteoclastogenesis. Ly49Q is selectively induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) ligand (RANKL) stimulation in bone marrow-derived monocyte/macrophage precursor cells (BMMs) among the Ly49 family of NK receptors. The knockdown of Ly49Q resulted in a significant reduction in the RANKL-induced formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells, accompanied by a decreased expression of osteoclast-specific genes such as Nfatc1, Tm7sf4, Oscar, Ctsk, and Acp5. Osteoclastogenesis was also significantly impaired in Ly49Q-deficient cells in vitro. The inhibitory effect of Ly49Q-deficiency may be explained by the finding that Ly49Q competed for the association of Src-homology domain-2 phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) with paired immunoglobulin-like receptor-B (PIR-B), an ITIM-bearing receptor which negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation. Unexpectedly, Ly49Q deficiency did not lead to impaired osteoclast formation in vivo, suggesting the existence of a compensatory mechanism. This study provides an example in which an ITIM-bearing receptor functions as a positive regulator of osteoclast differentiation.

  14. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  15. Focus Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Characterization of Osteoclastic Resorption of Calcium Phosphate Substrates.

    PubMed

    Diez-Escudero, Anna; Espanol, Montserrat; Montufar, Edgar B; Di Pompo, Gemma; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Baldini, Nicola; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the application of dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging for preclinical testing of calcium phosphates with osteoclast precursor cells and how this high-resolution imaging technique is able to reveal microstructural changes at a level of detail previously not possible. Calcium phosphate substrates, having similar compositions but different microstructures, were produced using low- and high-temperature processes (biomimetic calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite [CDHA] and stoichiometric sintered hydroxyapatite, respectively). Human osteoclast precursor cells were cultured for 21 days before evaluating their resorptive potential on varying microstructural features. Alternative to classical morphological evaluation of osteoclasts (OC), FIB-SEM was used to observe the subjacent microstructure by transversally sectioning cells and observing both the cells and the substrates. Resorption pits, indicating OC activity, were visible on the smoother surface of high-temperature sintered hydroxyapatite. FIB-SEM analysis revealed signs of acidic degradation on the grain surface under the cells, as well as intergranular dissolution. No resorption pits were evident on the surface of the rough CDHA substrates. However, whereas no degradation was detected by FIB sections in the material underlying some of the cells, early stages of OC-mediated acidic degradation were observed under cells with more spread morphology. Collectively, these results highlight the potential of FIB to evaluate the resorptive activity of OC, even in rough, irregular, or coarse surfaces where degradation pits are otherwise difficult to visualize.

  16. Evidence that activation of ASIC1a by acidosis increases osteoclast migration and adhesion by modulating integrin/Pyk2/Src signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Ye, J-X; Xu, M-H; Zhao, M-D; Yuan, F-L

    2017-07-01

    Activated acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is involved in acid-induced osteoclastogenesis by regulating activation of the transcription factor NFATc1. These results indicated that ASIC1a activation by extracellular acid may cause osteoclast migration and adhesion through Ca(2+)-dependent integrin/Pyk2/Src signaling pathway. Osteoclast adhesion and migration are responsible for osteoporotic bone loss. Acidic conditions promote osteoclastogenesis. ASIC1a in osteoclasts is associated with acid-induced osteoclastogenesis through modulating transcription factor NFATc1 activation. However, the influence and the detailed mechanism of ASIC1a in regulating osteoclast adhesion and migration, in response to extracellular acid, are not well characterized. In this study, knockdown of ASIC1a was achieved in bone marrow macrophage cells using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The adhesion and migration abilities of osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts were determined by adhesion and migration assays, in vitro. Bone resorption was performed to measure osteoclast function. Cytoskeletal changes were assessed by F-actin ring formation. αvβ3 integrin expression in osteoclasts was measured by flow cytometry. Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation were performed to measure alterations in integrin/Pyk2/Src signaling pathway. Our results showed that blockade of ASIC1a using ASIC1a-siRNA inhibited acid-induced osteoclast precursor migration and adhesion, as well as osteoclast adhesion and bone resorption; we also demonstrated that inhibition of ASIC1a decreased the cell surface αvβ3 integrin and β3 protein expression. Moreover, blocking of ASIC1a inhibited acidosis-induced actin ring formation and reduced Pyk2 and Src phosphorylation in osteoclasts and also inhibited the acid-induced association of the αvβ3 integrin/Src/Pyk2. Together, these results highlight a key functional role of ASIC1a/αvβ3 integrin/Pyk2/Src signaling pathway in migration and adhesion of osteoclasts.

  17. Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Domann, F.; Niiro, G.K.; LeBuis, D.A.

    1988-09-01

    We report here our initial observations on the growth and morphology, and developmental radiosensitivity of giant, multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells (MN-OS) generated through in vitro cultivation of hematopoietic progenitor-enriched canine bone marrow samples. Maximum cell densities of 5.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(3) MN-OS per cm2 of growth area were achieved following 10 to 14 days of culture at 37 degrees C. Acute gamma irradiation of the initial marrow inocula resulted in significant, dose-dependent perturbations of MN-OS formation, growth, and development. Attempts to estimate radiosensitivity of MN-OS progenitors from canine marrow yielded a range of Do values from a low of 212 cGy measured at six days of culture to higher values of 405 to 542 cGy following 10 to 22 days of culture. At the intermediate times of culture (10 to 14 days), the radiation-induced responses were clearly biphasic, reflecting either (a) the presence of multiple subpopulations of MN-OS progenitors with varying degrees of radiosensitivity or (b) the inherent biphasic nature of MN-OS development involving early progenitor cell proliferation followed by maturation and subsequent fusion. Morphologically, MN-OS generated from irradiated marrow inocula appeared only marginally altered, with alterations expressed largely in a biphasic, dose-dependent fashion in terms of smaller cell size, reduced number of nuclei, increased expression of both surface microprojections, and a unique set of crystalloid cytoplasmic inclusions. Functionally, MN-OS appeared to be impaired by irradiation of marrow progenitors, as evidenced by failure to initiate resorptive attachments to devitalized bone spicules in vitro.

  18. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M; Mayer, Marcia P A

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP(+) cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP(+) cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP(+) cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis.

  19. Alteration of Homeostasis in Pre-osteoclasts Induced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CDT

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; DiRienzo, Joseph M.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The dysbiotic microbiota associated with aggressive periodontitis includes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, the only oral species known to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (AaCDT). Give that CDT alters the cytokine profile in monocytic cells, we aimed to test the hypothesis that CDT plays a role in bone homeostasis by affecting the differentiation of precursor cells into osteoclasts. Recombinant AaCDT was added to murine bone marrow monocytes (BMMC) in the presence or absence of RANKL and the cell viability and cytokine profile of osteoclast precursor cells were determined. Multinucleated TRAP+ cell numbers, and relative transcription of genes related to osteoclastogenesis were also evaluated. The addition of AaCDT did not lead to loss in cell viability but promoted an increase in the average number of TRAP+ cells with 1-2 nuclei in the absence or presence of RANKL (Tukey, p < 0.05). This increase was also observed for TRAP+ cells with ≥3nuclei, although this difference was not significant. Levels of TGF-β, TNF-α, and IL-6, in the supernatant fraction of cells, were higher when in AaCDT exposed cells, whereas levels of IL-1β and IL-10 were lower than controls under the same conditions. After interaction with AaCDT, transcription of the rank (encoding the receptor RANK), nfatc1 (transcription factor), and ctpK (encoding cathepsin K) genes was downregulated in pre-osteoclastic cells. The data indicated that despite the presence of RANKL and M-CSF, AaCDT may inhibit osteoclast differentiation by altering cytokine profiles and repressing transcription of genes involved in osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, the CDT may impair host defense mechanisms in periodontitis. PMID:27064424

  20. Silicate modulates the cross-talk between osteoblasts (SaOS-2) and osteoclasts (RAW 264.7 cells): inhibition of osteoclast growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H C; Wang, X H; Wiens, M; Diehl-Seifert, B; Kropf, K; Schloßmacher, U; Müller, W E G

    2012-10-01

    It has been shown that inorganic monomeric and polymeric silica/silicate, in the presence of the biomineralization cocktail, increases the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) in osteogenic SaOS-2 sarcoma cells in vitro. In contrast, silicate does not affect the steady-state gene expression level of the osteoclastogenic ligand receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). In turn it can be expected that the concentration ratio of the mediators OPG/RANKL increases in the presence of silicate. In addition, silicate enhances the growth potential of SaOS-2 cells in vitro, while it causes no effect on RAW 264.7 cells within a concentration range of 10-100 µM. Applying a co-cultivation assay system, using SaOS-2 cells and RAW 264.7 cells, it is shown that in the presence of 10 µM silicate the number of RAW 264.7 cells in general, and the number of TRAP(+) RAW 264.7 cells in particular markedly decreases. The SaOS-2 cells retain their capacity of differential gene expression of OPG and RANKL in favor of OPG after exposure to silicate. It is concluded that after exposure of the cells to silicate a factor(s) is released from SaOS-2 cells that causes a significant inhibition of osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7 cells. It is assumed that it is an increased secretion of the cytokine OPG that is primarily involved in the reduction of the osteoclastogenesis of the RAW 264.7 cells. It is proposed that silicate might have the potential to stimulate osteogenesis in vivo and perhaps to ameliorate osteoporotic disorders. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Altered Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein in Cells Undergoing Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Tina; Kirouac, Lisa; Padmanabhan, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    Altered proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein is an important determinant of pathology development in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we describe the detection of two novel fragments of amyloid precursor protein in H4 neuroglioma cells undergoing apoptosis. Immunoreactivity of these 25–35 kDa fragments to two different amyloid precursor protein antibodies suggests that they contain the amyloid-β region and an epitope near the C-terminus of amyloid precursor protein. Generation of these fragments is associated with cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-7, suggesting activation of these caspases. Studies in neurons undergoing DNA damage-induced apoptosis also showed similar results. Inclusion of caspase inhibitors prevented the generation of these novel fragments, suggesting that they are generated by a caspase-dependent mechanism. Molecular weight prediction and immunoreactivity of the fragments generated suggested that such fragments could not be generated by cleavage at any previously identified caspase, secretase, or calpain site on amyloid precursor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the amino acid sequence of amyloid precursor protein revealed that fragments fitting the observed size and immunoreactivity could be generated by either cleavage at a novel, hitherto unidentified, caspase site or at a previously identified matrix metalloproteinase site in the extracellular domain. Proteolytic cleavage at any of these sites leads to a decrease in the generation of α-secretase cleaved secreted APP, which has both anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective properties, and thus may contribute to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23469123

  2. Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Synthesize Neuromodulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sakry, Dominik; Yigit, Hatice; Dimou, Leda; Trotter, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NG2 protein-expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) are a persisting and major glial cell population in the adult mammalian brain. Direct synaptic innervation of OPC by neurons throughout the brain together with their ability to sense neuronal network activity raises the question of additional physiological roles of OPC, supplementary to generating myelinating oligodendrocytes. In this study we investigated whether OPC express neuromodulatory factors, typically synthesized by other CNS cell types. Our results show that OPC express two well-characterized neuromodulatory proteins: Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) and neuronal Pentraxin 2 (Nptx2/Narp). Expression levels of the enzyme PTGDS are influenced in cultured OPC by the NG2 intracellular region which can be released by cleavage and localizes to glial nuclei upon transfection. Furthermore PTGDS mRNA levels are reduced in OPC from NG2-KO mouse brain compared to WT cells after isolation by cell sorting and direct analysis. These results show that OPC can contribute to the expression of these proteins within the CNS and suggest PTGDS expression as a downstream target of NG2 signaling. PMID:25966014

  3. Pressure regulates osteoclast formation and MCSF expression in marrow culture.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Biskobing, D; Fan, X; Rubin, C; McLeod, K; Taylor, W R

    1997-01-01

    One of the forces generated during skeletal loading is hydrostatic pressure. In the work presented here, the ability of increased pressure to influence recruitment of osteoclasts was evaluated. Murine marrow cultures, with pO2 and pCO2 kept constant, were subjected to either control (1.0 atm) or elevated (1.37 or 2.0 atm) hydrostatic pressure. As compared to control, cultures pressurized for 6 days at 1.37 atm formed less osteoclast-like cells (OCLC) (71 +/- 6% of control, P < 0.0001). A similar degree of inhibition occurred in cultures exposed to pressure during days 2-4 only (62 +/- 6%), while treatment during days 5-7 failed to inhibit the OCLC number relative to control (99 +/- 5%). Delivery of 2.0 atm pressure on days 2-4 generated 52 +/- 4% OCLC compared to control. Since macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSF)-dependent proliferation of osteoclast precursors occurs during the pressure-sensitive period, semiquantitative RT-PCR for MCSF mRNA was performed after 3 days in 1.37 atm (days 2-4). As compared to controls, pressure caused a decrease in mRNA coding for the membrane bound form of MCSF (71.2 +/- 4% (n = 25, P < or = 0.05), while the MCSF RT-PCR product representing the secreted form showed no consistent change. This lack of response of the soluble MCSF RT-PCR product was expected, as levels of bioassayable MCSF were not altered by pressure. Extrapolating these data to in vivo conditions suggests that load-bearing will inhibit the formation of osteoclasts.

  4. Microgravity Induces Pelvic Bone Loss through Osteoclastic Activity, Osteocytic Osteolysis, and Osteoblastic Cell Cycle Inhibition by CDKN1a/p21

    PubMed Central

    Blaber, Elizabeth A.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Lee, Chialing; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yousuf, Rukhsana; Pianetta, Piero; Globus, Ruth K.; Burns, Brendan P.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamically remodeled tissue that requires gravity-mediated mechanical stimulation for maintenance of mineral content and structure. Homeostasis in bone occurs through a balance in the activities and signaling of osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, as well as proliferation and differentiation of their stem cell progenitors. Microgravity and unloading are known to cause osteoclast-mediated bone resorption; however, we hypothesize that osteocytic osteolysis, and cell cycle arrest during osteogenesis may also contribute to bone loss in space. To test this possibility, we exposed 16-week-old female C57BL/6J mice (n = 8) to microgravity for 15-days on the STS-131 space shuttle mission. Analysis of the pelvis by µCT shows decreases in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) of 6.29%, and bone thickness of 11.91%. TRAP-positive osteoclast-covered trabecular bone surfaces also increased in microgravity by 170% (p = 0.004), indicating osteoclastic bone degeneration. High-resolution X-ray nanoCT studies revealed signs of lacunar osteolysis, including increases in cross-sectional area (+17%, p = 0.022), perimeter (+14%, p = 0.008), and canalicular diameter (+6%, p = 0.037). Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 3, and 10 in bone, as measured by RT-qPCR, was also up-regulated in microgravity (+12.94, +2.98 and +16.85 fold respectively, p<0.01), with MMP10 localized to osteocytes, and consistent with induction of osteocytic osteolysis. Furthermore, expression of CDKN1a/p21 in bone increased 3.31 fold (p<0.01), and was localized to osteoblasts, possibly inhibiting the cell cycle during tissue regeneration as well as conferring apoptosis resistance to these cells. Finally the apoptosis inducer Trp53 was down-regulated by −1.54 fold (p<0.01), possibly associated with the quiescent survival-promoting function of CDKN1a/p21. In conclusion, our findings identify the pelvic and femoral region of the mouse skeleton as an active site of rapid bone

  5. Whole-cell fungal transformation of precursors into dyes.

    PubMed

    Polak, Jolanta; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2010-07-05

    Chemical methods of producing dyes involve extreme temperatures and unsafe toxic compounds. Application of oxidizing enzymes obtained from fungal species, for example laccase, is an alternative to chemical synthesis of dyes. Laccase can be replaced by fungal biomass acting as a whole-cell biocatalyst with properties comparable to the isolated form of the enzyme. The application of the whole-cell system simplifies the transformation process and reduces the time required for its completion. In the present work, four fungal strains with a well-known ability to produce laccase were tested for oxidation of 17 phenolic and non-phenolic precursors into stable and non-toxic dyes. An agar-plate screening test of the organic precursors was carried out using four fungal strains: Trametes versicolor, Fomes fomentarius, Abortiporus biennis, and Cerrena unicolor. Out of 17 precursors, nine were transformed into coloured substances in the presence of actively growing fungal mycelium. The immobilized fungal biomass catalyzed the transformation of 1 mM benzene and naphthalene derivatives in liquid cultures yielding stable and non-toxic products with good dyeing properties. The type of fungal strain had a large influence on the absorbance of the coloured products obtained after 48-hour transformation of the selected precursors, and the most effective was Fomes fomentarius (FF25). Whole-cell transformation of AHBS (3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid) into a phenoxazinone dye was carried out in four different systems: in aqueous media comprising low amounts of carbon and nitrogen source, in buffer, and in distilled water. This study demonstrated the ability of four fungal strains belonging to the ecological type of white rot fungi to transform precursors into dyes. This paper highlights the potential of fungal biomass for replacing isolated enzymes as a cheaper industrial-grade biocatalyst for the synthesis of dyes and other commercially important products. The use of immobilized

  6. Immature dendritic cells in multiple myeloma are prone to osteoclast-like differentiation through interleukin-17A stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Marco; Stucci, Stefania; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ciavarella, Sabino; Cafforio, Paola; Dammacco, Franco; Silvestris, Franco

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL17A), a cytokine involved in allergy, inflammation and osteoclastogenesis, was investigated in multiple myeloma (MM) to assess its role in the osteoclast (OC)-like activity of marrow immature dendritic cells (iDCs). Comparing nine MM patients with control subjects affected by monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, we found high IL17A expression in the marrow plasma of MM patients in parallel with its deposits within the stromal matrix. Increased expression of the IL17A receptor (IL17RA) was also found in primary myeloma iDCs, which underwent OC-like transdifferentiation after IL17A stimulation. To assess the role of IL17A, we measured the activity of the IL17/IL17RA pathway in IL17A-transdifferentiated iDCs and the expression of functional OC genes by Western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. These cells showed increased RNA transcription of genes enrolled in the maturation of OCs, while NFATC1 and FOS were induced by IL17A, independently of NFKB1 phosphorylation. Moreover, the concurrent phosphorylation of the Lip isoform of CEBPB and the down-regulation of MAFB supported the activation of IL17RA pathway in OC-like transdifferentiated iDCs that was apparently unrelated to TNFRSF11A signalling. These data emphasize the involvement of iDCs in MM hyperactive osteoclastogenesis and suggest that their bone resorption activity is also regulated, at least in vitro, by IL17RA. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Imatinib mesylate suppresses bone metastases of breast cancer by inhibiting osteoclasts through the blockade of c-Fms signals.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Toru; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (imatinib) is a potent and selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases, Bcr-Abl, c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRs). Recently, it has been reported that imatinib also targets the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor c-Fms. M-CSF signals are essential for the differentiation of osteoclasts. Bone metastases of breast cancer are frequently associated with osteoclastic bone destruction. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that osteoclasts play central roles in the development and progression of bone metastases. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of imatinib on bone metastases of breast cancer. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that imatinib inhibited the M-CSF-induced phosphorylation of c-Fms in osteoclast precursor cells as well as the PDGF-induced PDGFR phosphorylation in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Imatinib also markedly reduced osteoclast formation in vitro. In contrast, those concentrations of imatinib did not affect osteoblast differentiation. We then examined the effects of imatinib on bone metastases of MDA-MB-231 cells in a nude mouse model. Radiographic and histomorphometric analyses demonstrated that imatinib significantly decreased bone metastases associated with the reduced number of osteoclasts. In support of the notion that the inhibition of c-Fms acts to suppress the development of bone metastases, we found that a specific inhibitor of c-Fms Ki20227 also decreased bone metastases. In conclusion, these results collectively suggest that imatinib reduced bone metastases, at least in part, by inhibiting osteoclastic bone destruction through the blockade of c-Fms signals. Our results also suggest that imatinib may have a protective effect against cancer treatment-induced bone loss.

  8. Differential intensity-dependent effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on RANKL-induced osteoclast formation, apoptosis, and bone resorbing ability in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Liu, Juan; Yang, Yuefan; Zhai, Mingming; Shao, Xi; Yan, Zedong; Zhang, Xuhui; Wu, Yan; Cao, Lu; Sui, Bingdong; Luo, Erping; Jing, Da

    2017-07-24

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been proven to be effective for promoting bone mass and regulating bone turnover both experimentally and clinically. However, the exact mechanisms for the regulation of PEMF on osteoclastogenesis as well as optical exposure parameters of PEMF on inhibiting osteoclastic activities and functions remain unclear, representing significant limitations for extensive scientific application of PEMF in clinics. In this study, RAW264.7 cells incubated with RANKL were exposed to 15 Hz PEMF (2 h/day) at various intensities (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT) for 7 days. We demonstrate that bone resorbing capacity was significantly decreased by 0.5 mT PEMF mainly by inhibiting osteoclast formation and maturation, but enhanced at 3 mT by promoting osteoclast apoptosis. Moreover, gene expression of RANK, NFATc1, TRAP, CTSK, BAX, and BAX/BCL-2 was significantly decreased by 0.5 mT PEMF, but increased by 3 mT. Our findings reveal a significant intensity window for low-intensity PEMF in regulating bone resorption with diverse nature for modulating osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. This study not only enriches our basic knowledge for the regulation of PEMF in osteoclastogenesis, but also may lead to more efficient and scientific clinical application of PEMF in regulating bone turnover and inhibiting osteopenia/osteoporosis. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nicotine Affects Bone Resorption and Suppresses the Expression of Cathepsin K, MMP-9 and Vacuolar-Type H+-ATPase d2 and Actin Organization in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hideki; Tanabe, Natsuko; Kawato, Takayuki; Nakai, Kumiko; Kariya, Taro; Matsumoto, Sakurako; Zhao, Ning; Motohashi, Masafumi; Maeno, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is an important risk factor for the development of several cancers, osteoporosis, and inflammatory diseases such as periodontitis. Nicotine is one of the major components of tobacco. In previous study, we showed that nicotine inhibits mineralized nodule formation by osteoblasts, and the culture medium from osteoblasts containing nicotine and lipopolysaccharide increases osteoclast differentiation. However, the direct effect of nicotine on the differentiation and function of osteoclasts is poorly understood. Thus, we examined the direct effects of nicotine on the expression of nicotine receptors and bone resorption-related enzymes, mineral resorption, actin organization, and bone resorption using RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow cells as osteoclast precursors. Cells were cultured with 10−5, 10−4, or 10−3 M nicotine and/or 50 µM α-bungarotoxin (btx), an 7 nicotine receptor antagonist, in differentiation medium containing the soluble RANKL for up 7 days. 1–5, 7, 9, and 10 nicotine receptors were expressed on RAW264.7 cells. The expression of 7 nicotine receptor was increased by the addition of nicotine. Nicotine suppressed the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinuclear osteoclasts with large nuclei(≥10 nuclei), and decreased the planar area of each cell. Nicotine decreased expression of cathepsin K, MMP-9, and V-ATPase d2. Btx inhibited nicotine effects. Nicotine increased CA II expression although decreased the expression of V-ATPase d2 and the distribution of F-actin. Nicotine suppressed the planar area of resorption pit by osteoclasts, but did not affect mineral resorption. These results suggest that nicotine increased the number of osteoclasts with small nuclei, but suppressed the number of osteoclasts with large nuclei. Moreover, nicotine reduced the planar area of resorption pit by suppressing the number of osteoclasts with large nuclei, V-ATPase d2, cathepsin K and MMP-9 expression and actin organization. PMID

  10. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  11. Using Osteoclast Differentiation as a Model for Gene Discovery in an Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Mark J.; Picco, Jenna; Clements, Meghan; Witwicka, Hanna; Yang, Meiheng; Hoey, Margaret T.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of molecular/cell biology/biotechnology is to identify essential genes in virtually every physiological process to uncover basic mechanisms of cell function and to establish potential targets of drug therapy combating human disease. This article describes a semester-long, project-oriented molecular/cellular/biotechnology laboratory…

  12. Relationship between fluoride exposure and osteoclast markers during RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Junrui, Pei; Bingyun, Li; Yanhui, Gao; Xu, Jiaxun; Darko, Gottfried M; Dianjun, Sun

    2016-09-01

    Skeletal fluorosis is a metabolic bone disease caused by excessive accumulation of fluoride. Although the cause of this disease is known, the mechanism by which fluoride accumulates on the bone has not been clearly defined, thus there are no markers that can be used for screening skeletal fluorosis in epidemiology. In this study, osteoclasts were formed from bone marrow cells of C57BL/6 mice-treated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand. The mRNA expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR), calcitonin receptor (CTR), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and cathepsin K (CK) were detected using real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Results showed that fluoride between 0.5 and 8mg/l had no effect on osteoclast formation. However fluoride at 0.5mg/l level significantly decreased the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Fluoride concentration was negatively correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. On day 5 of osteoclast differentiation maturity, MMP9 and CK mRNA expression were not only negatively correlated with fluoride concentration, but directly correlated with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR mRNA expression were positively correlated with the number of osteoclast and they had no correlation with the activity of osteoclast bone resorption. Thus, it can be seen that MMP9 and CK may reflect the change of activity of bone resorption as well the degree of fluoride exposure. TRAP5b, CTR and OSCAR can represent the change of number of osteoclast formed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Constitutive expression of osteoclast-stimulating activity by normal clonal osteoblast-like cells: effects of parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Collin, P; Guenther, H L; Fleisch, H

    1992-09-01

    Osteoblasts are known to produce osteoclast-stimulating activity (OSA). The aim of the current study was to relate the expression of OSA to the osteoblastic phenotype and examine its regulation by calciotropic hormones. The study was performed with the normal osteoblastic cell clone CRP 10/30 and the preosteoblastic clone CRP 4/7. OSA was determined with the well described isolated osteoclast pit assay, using sperm whale dentine as substrate. In contrast to previous studies, the assay was carried out at pH 7.36, rather than at pH 6.4 or 6.9. The results indicate that over 24 h, CRP 10/30 cells produce constitutively OSA, which compared to controls corresponds to an about 7-fold increase in resorption pits. There was considerably less activity expressed by either CRP 4/7 cells or fibroblasts. OSA proved to be heat labile, and its mol wt was estimated to be over 10 kilodaltons. While PTH-(1-34) did not influence the synthesis of OSA, the number of pits formed by osteoclasts incubated with medium conditioned by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3]-treated CRP 10/30 cells was increased 3-fold above baseline values. A similar increase was obtained with 1.25-(OH)2D3 added directly to CRP 10/30-conditioned medium. These results could not be duplicated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 added to either control medium or medium conditioned by CRP 4/7 cells or fibroblasts. The present study shows that normal clonal bone cells synthesize constitutively OSA, which is not regulated by PTH or 1,25-(OH)2D3. Furthermore, the results suggest that the synthesis of bone cell-derived OSA is limited to cells expressing the mature osteoblastic phenotype. Finally, CRP 10/30-conditioned medium appears to permit 1,25-(OH)2D3 to function on osteoclasts.

  14. Undifferentiated Carcinoma with Osteoclastic Giant Cells of the Pancreas: Clinicopathological Analysis of 38 Cases Highlights A More Protracted Clinical Course than Currently Appreciated

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Takashi; Reid, Michelle D.; Basturk, Olca; Jang, Kee-Taek; Bedolla, Gabriela; Bagci, Pelin; Mittal, Pardeep; Memis, Bahar; Katabi, Nora; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Klimstra, David S.; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated carcinomas with osteoclastic giant cells of the pancreas (OGC) are rare tumors. The current impression in the literature is that they are highly aggressive tumors similar in prognosis to ductal adenocarcinomas. In this study, the clinicopathologic characteristics of 38 resected OGCs were investigated and contrasted with 725 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas without osteoclastic cells (PDCs). The frequency among systematically reviewed pancreatic cancers was 1.4%. OGCs showed a slight female predominance (62.9%, vs 51.4% in PDCs). The mean age was 57.9 years (vs 65.0). The mean size of invasive cancer was 5.3 cm (vs 3.2). They were characterized by nodular, pushing-border growth, and 8 arose in tumoral intraepithelial neoplasms [4 in mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN), 4 in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) type lesions] and 23 (61%) also showed prominent intraductal/intracystic growth. Twenty nine (76%) had an invasive ductal/tubular adenocarcinoma component. Osteoid was seen in 12. Despite of their larger size, perineural invasion and nodal metastasis were uncommon (31.6 and 22.6%, vs 85.5 and 64.0% respectively). Immunohistochemistry performed on 24 cases revealed that osteoclastic cells expressed the histiocytic marker CD68, and background spindle cells and pleomorphic/giant carcinoma cells often showed p53 and often lacked cytokeratin. Survival of OGCs was significantly better than that of PDCs (5-year, 59.1 vs 15.7%, respectively, p=0.0009). In conclusion, pancreatic OGCs present with larger tumor size and in slightly younger patients than PDC, 21% arise in MCN/IPMN, and 61% show intraductal/intracystic polypoid growth. OGCs have a significantly better prognosis than is currently believed in the literature. PMID:27508975

  15. Arctigenin suppresses receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Ram; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Lee, Jeong Min; Choi, Jung Ho; Kim, Se Na; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Mun, Se Hwan; Kim, Jie Wan; Jeon, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young Mi; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2012-05-05

    Osteoclasts, multinucleated bone-resorbing cells, are closely associated with bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Osteoclasts are derived from hematopoietic precursor cells, and their differentiation is mediated by two cytokines, including macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Previous studies have shown that arctigenin exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of arctigenin on osteoclast differentiation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that arctigenin inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed RANKL-mediated bone resorption. Additionally, the expression of typical marker proteins, such as NFATc1, c-Fos, TRAF6, c-Src, and cathepsin K, were significantly inhibited. Arctigenin inhibited the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, but not p38 and JNK, in a dose-dependent manner. Arctigenin also dramatically suppressed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated costimulatory signaling molecules, including Syk and PLCγ2, and Gab2. Notably, arctigenin inhibited the activation of Syk through RANKL stimulation. Furthermore, arctigenin prevented osteoclast differentiation in the calvarial bone of mice following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Our results show that arctigenin inhibits osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, arctigenin may be useful for treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MHC class II transactivator is an in vivo regulator of osteoclast differentiation and bone homeostasis co-opted from adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Benasciutti, Elisa; Mariani, Elisabetta; Oliva, Laura; Scolari, Maria; Perilli, Egon; Barras, Emmanuele; Milan, Enrico; Orfanelli, Ugo; Fazzalari, Nicola L; Campana, Lara; Capobianco, Annalisa; Otten, Luc; Particelli, Francesca; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Faccio, Roberta; Sitia, Roberto; Reith, Walter; Cenci, Simone

    2014-02-01

    The molecular networks controlling bone homeostasis are not fully understood. The common evolution of bone and adaptive immunity encourages the investigation of shared regulatory circuits. MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) is a master transcriptional co-activator believed to be exclusively dedicated for antigen presentation. CIITA is expressed in osteoclast precursors, and its expression is accentuated in osteoporotic mice. We thus asked whether CIITA plays a role in bone biology. To this aim, we fully characterized the bone phenotype of two mouse models of CIITA overexpression, respectively systemic and restricted to the monocyte-osteoclast lineage. Both CIITA-overexpressing mouse models revealed severe spontaneous osteoporosis, as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry, associated with increased osteoclast numbers and enhanced in vivo bone resorption, whereas osteoblast numbers and in vivo bone-forming activity were unaffected. To understand the underlying cellular and molecular bases, we investigated ex vivo the differentiation of mutant bone marrow monocytes into osteoclasts and immune effectors, as well as osteoclastogenic signaling pathways. CIITA-overexpressing monocytes differentiated normally into effector macrophages or dendritic cells but showed enhanced osteoclastogenesis, whereas CIITA ablation suppressed osteoclast differentiation. Increased c-fms and receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling underlay enhanced osteoclast differentiation from CIITA-overexpressing precursors. Moreover, by extending selected phenotypic and cellular analyses to additional genetic mouse models, namely MHC Class II deficient mice and a transgenic mouse line lacking a specific CIITA promoter and re-expressing CIITA in the thymus, we excluded MHC Class II expression and T cells from contributing to the observed skeletal phenotype. Altogether, our study provides compelling genetic evidence that CIITA, the molecular switch of antigen presentation

  17. Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma with osteoclast-like giant cells of the female breast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe a case of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma of the breast occurring in a 50-year-old woman who presented with a palpable mass in her right breast. She first noticed the mass one month previously. Core needle biopsy showed connective tissue including epithelioid and spindle cells. The patient underwent total mastectomy without axillary lymph node dissection. Based on examination of the excised tumor, the initial pathologic diagnosis was atypical spindle-shaped and ovoid cells with uncertain malignant potential. Histological findings with immunomarkers led to the final diagnosis of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. This case highlights a rare and interesting variant of primary breast sarcoma and the important role of immunohistochemistry in defining histological type and differential diagnosis. Hence, undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma has been a diagnosis of exclusion performed through sampling and critical use of ancillary diagnostic techniques. PMID:23351285

  18. Extracellular phosphates enhance activities of voltage-gated proton channels and production of reactive oxygen species in murine osteoclast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshuai; Miura, Katsuyuki; Kuno, Miyuki

    2017-02-01

    Osteoclasts are highly differentiated bone-resorbing cells and play a significant role in bone remodelling. In the resorption pit, inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations increase because of degradation of hydroxyapatite. We studied effects of extracellular Pi on voltage-gated H(+) channels in osteoclast-like cells derived from a macrophage cell line (RAW264). Extracellular Pi (1.25-20 mM) increased the H(+) channel currents dose dependently and reversibly. The Pi-induced increases were attenuated by removal of extracellular Na(+) and by phosphonoformic acid, a blocker of Na(+)-dependent Pi transporters. Pi increased the maximal conductance, decreased activation time constant, increased deactivation time constant, and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more negative voltages. The most marked change was enhanced gating which was mainly caused by elevation of intracellular Pi levels. The Pi-induced enhanced gating was partially inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, GF109203X and staurosporine, indicating that PKC-mediated phosphorylation was involved in part. The increase in the maximal conductance was mainly due to accompanying decrease in intracellular pH. These effects of Pi were not affected by intracellular Mg(2+), bafilomycin A1 (V-ATPase inhibitor) and removal of intracellular ATP. Extracellular Pi also upregulated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, decreased ROS production and partially attenuated the enhanced gating. In the cells during later passages where osteoclastogenesis declined, H(+) channel activities and ROS production were both modest. These results suggest that, in osteoclasts, ambient Pi is a common enhancer for H(+) channels and ROS production and that potentiation of H(+) channels may help ROS production.

  19. [Separation of osteoclasts by lectin affinity chromatography].

    PubMed

    Itokazu, M; Tan, A; Tanaka, S

    1991-09-01

    Newborn rat calvaria bone cells obtained by digestion were fractionated on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) sepharose 6MB for osteoclast isolation. The initial nonspecific binding cells which were passed through the WGA sepharose column by a buffer acquired a high enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, but not that of acid phosphatase. However, elution of cells using a buffer with the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in a high acid phosphatase activity but no alkaline phosphatase activity. The former WGA binding negative fraction enriched osteoblasts averaging 30 microns in size. The latter WGA binding positive fraction enriched osteoclasts ranging from 20 microns to 60 microns in size. The electron-microscope clearly demonstrated the cellular details of osteoclasts. Isolated cell counts showed a ratio of six to four. These results indicate that our method of osteoclast isolation is simple and useful in lectin affinity chromatography because all cells have sugar moieties on their surface and the binding of osteoclasts can be reversed by the addition of specific lectin-binding sugars to the eluting buffer.

  20. Dissolution of the inorganic phase of bone leading to release of calcium regulates osteoclast survival.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rasmus H; Karsdal, Morten A; Sørensen, Mette G; Dziegiel, Morten H; Henriksen, Kim

    2007-09-07

    Osteoclasts are the sole cells possessing the ability to resorb calcified bone matrix. This occurs via secretion of hydrochloric acid mediated by the V-ATPase and the chloride channel ClC-7. Loss of acidification leads to osteopetrosis characterized by ablation of bone resorption and increased osteoclast numbers, indicating increased life span of the osteoclasts. To investigate the role of the inorganic phase of bone with respect to osteoclast life span, we used the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the calcium uptake antagonist ryanodine on human osteoclasts cultured on calcified and decalcified bone slices. Bafilomycin inhibited bone resorption and increased osteoclast survival on calcified but not decalcified bones. Ryanodine attenuated calcium uptake and thereby augmented osteoclast survival on calcified bones. In summary, we found that acidification leading to calcium release from bone during resorption controls osteoclast survival, potentially explaining the increased numbers of osteoclasts in patients with osteopetrosis.

  1. RIP140 in monocytes/macrophages regulates osteoclast differentiation and bone homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bomi; Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.; Lin, Yi-Wei; Clarke, Bart L.; Gingery, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Osteolytic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, are characterized by diminished bone quality and increased fracture risk. The therapeutic challenge remains to maintain bone homeostasis with a balance between osteoclast-mediated resorption and osteoblast-mediated formation. Osteoclasts are formed by the fusion of monocyte/macrophage-derived precursors. Here we report, to our knowledge for the first time, that receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) expression in osteoclast precursors and its protein regulation are crucial for osteoclast differentiation, activity, and coupled bone formation. In mice, monocyte/macrophage–specific knockdown of RIP140 (mϕRIP140KD) resulted in a cancellous osteopenic phenotype with significantly increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Osteoclast precursors isolated from mϕRIP140KD mice had significantly increased differentiation potential. Furthermore, conditioned media from mϕRIP140KD primary osteoclast cultures significantly suppressed osteoblast differentiation. This suppressive activity was effectively and rapidly terminated by specific Syk-stimulated RIP140 protein degradation. Mechanistic analysis revealed that RIP140 functions primarily by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation through forming a transcription-suppressor complex with testicular receptor 4 (TR4) to repress osteoclastogenic genes. These data reveal that monocyte/macrophage RIP140/TR4 complexes may serve as a critical transcription regulatory complex maintaining homeostasis of osteoclast differentiation, activity, and coupling with osteoblast formation. Accordingly, we propose a potentially novel therapeutic strategy, specifically targeting osteoclast precursor RIP140 protein in osteolytic bone diseases. PMID:28405613

  2. Whole-cell fungal transformation of precursors into dyes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemical methods of producing dyes involve extreme temperatures and unsafe toxic compounds. Application of oxidizing enzymes obtained from fungal species, for example laccase, is an alternative to chemical synthesis of dyes. Laccase can be replaced by fungal biomass acting as a whole-cell biocatalyst with properties comparable to the isolated form of the enzyme. The application of the whole-cell system simplifies the transformation process and reduces the time required for its completion. In the present work, four fungal strains with a well-known ability to produce laccase were tested for oxidation of 17 phenolic and non-phenolic precursors into stable and non-toxic dyes. Results An agar-plate screening test of the organic precursors was carried out using four fungal strains: Trametes versicolor, Fomes fomentarius, Abortiporus biennis, and Cerrena unicolor. Out of 17 precursors, nine were transformed into coloured substances in the presence of actively growing fungal mycelium. The immobilized fungal biomass catalyzed the transformation of 1 mM benzene and naphthalene derivatives in liquid cultures yielding stable and non-toxic products with good dyeing properties. The type of fungal strain had a large influence on the absorbance of the coloured products obtained after 48-hour transformation of the selected precursors, and the most effective was Fomes fomentarius (FF25). Whole-cell transformation of AHBS (3-amino-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid) into a phenoxazinone dye was carried out in four different systems: in aqueous media comprising low amounts of carbon and nitrogen source, in buffer, and in distilled water. Conclusions This study demonstrated the ability of four fungal strains belonging to the ecological type of white rot fungi to transform precursors into dyes. This paper highlights the potential of fungal biomass for replacing isolated enzymes as a cheaper industrial-grade biocatalyst for the synthesis of dyes and other commercially important

  3. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand expression by human myeloma cells mediates osteoclast formation in vitro and correlates with bone destruction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Amanda N; Atkins, Gerald J; To, L Bik; Pan, Beiqing; Horvath, Noemi; Kostakis, Panagiota; Findlay, David M; Bardy, Peter; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2003-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-cell malignancy able to mediate massive destruction of the axial skeleton. The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the tumor necrosis factor-ligand family member, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL), and its naturally occurring antagonist, osteoprotegerin (OPG), in MM biology. Using flow cytometry and two independent anti-RANKL antibodies, we demonstrate RANKL expression in CD38(+++)CD45(+) and CD38(+++)CD45(-) myeloma plasma cell (MPC) subpopulations derived from patients with osteolytic MM. In addition, highly purified subpopulations of MPC express mRNA for both transmembrane and soluble RANKL isoforms but lack expression of OPG mRNA and protein. We also show that RANKL expressed by MPC is functional as in vitro coculture of CD38(+++)CD45(+) and CD38(+++)CD45(-) MPC subpopulations with peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the formation of multinucleate, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts-like cells capable of forming typical resorption pits. Furthermore, high expression of membrane-associated RANKL by CD38(+++) MPC correlated with the presence of multiple radiological bone lesions in individuals with MM. Together, our data strongly suggest that RANKL expression by MPC confers on them the ability to participate directly in the formation of osteoclast in vivo and extends our knowledge of the involvement of RANKL and OPG in the osteolysis characteristic of this disease.

  4. Diagnostic value of H3F3A mutations in giant cell tumour of bone compared to osteoclast-rich mimics.

    PubMed

    Presneau, Nadège; Baumhoer, Daniel; Behjati, Sam; Pillay, Nischalan; Tarpey, Patrick; Campbell, Peter J; Jundt, Gernot; Hamoudi, Rifat; Wedge, David C; Loo, Peter Van; Hassan, A Bassim; Khatri, Bhavisha; Ye, Hongtao; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2015-04-01

    Driver mutations in the two histone 3.3 (H3.3) genes, H3F3A and H3F3B, were recently identified by whole genome sequencing in 95% of chondroblastoma (CB) and by targeted gene sequencing in 92% of giant cell tumour of bone (GCT). Given the high prevalence of these driver mutations, it may be possible to utilise these alterations as diagnostic adjuncts in clinical practice. Here, we explored the spectrum of H3.3 mutations in a wide range and large number of bone tumours (n = 412) to determine if these alterations could be used to distinguish GCT from other osteoclast-rich tumours such as aneurysmal bone cyst, nonossifying fibroma, giant cell granuloma, and osteoclast-rich malignant bone tumours and others. In addition, we explored the driver landscape of GCT through whole genome, exome and targeted sequencing (14 gene panel). We found that H3.3 mutations, namely mutations of glycine 34 in H3F3A, occur in 96% of GCT. We did not find additional driver mutations in GCT, including mutations in IDH1, IDH2, USP6, TP53. The genomes of GCT exhibited few somatic mutations, akin to the picture seen in CB. Overall our observations suggest that the presence of H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations does not entirely exclude malignancy in osteoclast-rich tumours. However, H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations appear to be an almost essential feature of GCT that will aid pathological evaluation of bone tumours, especially when confronted with small needle core biopsies. In the absence of H3F3A p.Gly34 mutations, a diagnosis of GCT should be made with caution.

  5. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  6. Formation and specification of a Drosophila dopaminergic precursor cell.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joseph D; Crews, Stephen T

    2012-09-01

    Dopaminergic neurons play important roles in animal behavior, including motivation, reward and locomotion. The Drosophila dopaminergic H-cell interneuron is an attractive system for studying the genetics of neural development because analysis is focused on a single neuronal cell type. Here we provide a mechanistic understanding of how MP3, the precursor to the H-cell, forms and acquires its identity. We show that the gooseberry/gooseberry-neuro (gsb/gsb-n) transcription factor genes act to specify MP3 cell fate. It is proposed that single-minded commits neuroectodermal cells to a midline fate, followed by a series of signaling events that result in the formation of a single gsb(+)/gsb-n(+) MP3 cell per segment. The wingless signaling pathway establishes a midline anterior domain by activating expression of the forkhead transcription factors sloppy paired 1 and sloppy paired 2. This is followed by hedgehog signaling that activates gsb/gsb-n expression in a subgroup of anterior cells. Finally, Notch signaling results in the selection of a single MP3, with the remaining cells becoming midline glia. In MP3, gsb/gsb-n direct H-cell development, in large part by activating expression of the lethal of scute and tailup H-cell regulatory genes. Thus, a series of signaling and transcriptional events result in the specification of a unique dopaminergic precursor cell. Additional genetic experiments indicate that the molecular mechanisms that govern MP3/H-cell development might also direct the development of non-midline dopaminergic neurons.

  7. Formation and specification of a Drosophila dopaminergic precursor cell

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joseph D.; Crews, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons play important roles in animal behavior, including motivation, reward and locomotion. The Drosophila dopaminergic H-cell interneuron is an attractive system for studying the genetics of neural development because analysis is focused on a single neuronal cell type. Here we provide a mechanistic understanding of how MP3, the precursor to the H-cell, forms and acquires its identity. We show that the gooseberry/gooseberry-neuro (gsb/gsb-n) transcription factor genes act to specify MP3 cell fate. It is proposed that single-minded commits neuroectodermal cells to a midline fate, followed by a series of signaling events that result in the formation of a single gsb+/gsb-n+ MP3 cell per segment. The wingless signaling pathway establishes a midline anterior domain by activating expression of the forkhead transcription factors sloppy paired 1 and sloppy paired 2. This is followed by hedgehog signaling that activates gsb/gsb-n expression in a subgroup of anterior cells. Finally, Notch signaling results in the selection of a single MP3, with the remaining cells becoming midline glia. In MP3, gsb/gsb-n direct H-cell development, in large part by activating expression of the lethal of scute and tailup H-cell regulatory genes. Thus, a series of signaling and transcriptional events result in the specification of a unique dopaminergic precursor cell. Additional genetic experiments indicate that the molecular mechanisms that govern MP3/H-cell development might also direct the development of non-midline dopaminergic neurons. PMID:22874915

  8. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  9. Follicular Dendritic Cells Emerge from Ubiquitous Perivascular Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Krautler, Nike Julia; Kana, Veronika; Kranich, Jan; Tian, Yinghua; Perera, Dushan; Lemm, Doreen; Schwarz, Petra; Armulik, Annika; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Tallquist, Michelle; Buch, Thorsten; Oliveira-Martins, José B.; Zhu, Caihong; Hermann, Mario; Wagner, Ulrich; Brink, Robert; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Summary The differentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) is essential to the remarkable microanatomic plasticity of lymphoid follicles. Here we show that FDC arise from ubiquitous perivascular precursors (preFDC) expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRβ-Cre-driven reporter gene recombination resulted in FDC labeling, whereas conditional ablation of PDGFRβ+-derived cells abolished FDC, indicating that FDC originate from PDGFRβ+ cells. Lymphotoxin-α-overexpressing prion protein (PrP)+ kidneys developed PrP+ FDC after transplantation into PrP mice, confirming that preFDC exist outside lymphoid organs. Adipose tissue-derived PDGFRβ+ stromal-vascular cells responded to FDC maturation factors and, when transplanted into lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) kidney capsules, differentiated into Mfge8+CD21/35+ FcγRIIβ+PrP+ FDC capable of trapping immune complexes and recruiting B cells. Spleens of lymphocyte-deficient mice contained perivascular PDGFRβ+ FDC precursors whose expansion required both lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and lymphotoxin. The ubiquity of preFDC and their strategic location at blood vessels may explain the de novo generation of organized lymphoid tissue at sites of lymphocytic inflammation. PMID:22770220

  10. Vascular expression of the chemokine CX3CL1 promotes osteoclast recruitment and exacerbates bone resorption in an irradiated murine model.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki Hoon; Ryu, Jae Won; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Lee, Soo-Han; Kim, Yuna; Hwang, Chang Sun; Choi, Je-Yong; Han, Ki Ok

    2014-04-01

    Circulating osteoclast precursor cells highly express CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1), which is the only receptor for the unique CX3C membrane-anchored chemokine, fractalkine (CX3CL1). An irradiated murine model was used to evaluate the role of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis in osteoclast recruitment and osteoclastogenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) promoted the migration of circulating CD11b+ cells to irradiated bones and dose-dependently increased the number of differentiated osteoclasts in irradiated bones. Notably, CX3CL1 was dramatically upregulated in the vascular endothelium after IR. IR-induced production of CX3CL1 by skeletal vascular endothelium promoted chemoattraction of circulating CX3CR1+/CD11b+ cells and triggered homing of these osteoclast precursor cells toward the bone remodeling surface, a specific site for osteoclast differentiation. CX3CL1 also increased the endothelium-derived expression of other chemokines including stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (CXCL2) by activating the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α pathway. These effects may further enhance osteoclastogenesis. A series of in vivo experiments confirmed that knockout of CX3CR1 in bone marrow-derived cells and functional inhibition of CX3CL1 using a specific neutralizing antibody significantly ameliorated osteoclastogenesis and prevented bone loss after IR. These results demonstrate that the de novo CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis plays a pivotal role in osteoclast recruitment and subsequent bone resorption, and verify its therapeutic potential as a new target for anti-resorptive treatment.

  11. Titanium induced production of chemokines CCL17/TARC and CCL22/MDC in human osteoclasts and osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Gautschi, Oliver P; Chan, Erwin; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that titanium (Ti(IV)) ions are released from orthopedic implants and play a role in aseptic loosening. This study aimed to investigate whether titanium induces expression of chemokines and cytokines that are important in osteoclastogenesis in human osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Incubation of those cells with 1 muM Ti(IV) significantly upregulated expression of CCL17/TARC and CCL22/MDC, RANK-L, M-CSF and pro-inflammatory cytokines as determined by quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA assays. Additionally, flow cytometry was used to show Ti(IV) related increased expression of CCR4, the cognate receptor for CCL17 and CCL22 in challenged osteoclast precursors. These results strongly suggest that Ti(IV) ions play a role in the recruitment of osteoclast precursors to the bone-implant interface by increasing CCL17 and CCL22 expression and by upregulating their cognate receptor. Moreover the increased expression of RANK-L and M-CSF by osteoblasts together with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines may enhance osteoclast differentiation and activity, and subsequently contribute to the pathomechanism of aseptic loosening.

  12. ERK5 Activation Is Essential for Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Shigeru; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Fukui, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    The MEK/ERK pathways are critical for controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we show that the MEK5/ERK5 pathway participates in osteoclast differentiation. ERK5 was activated by M-CSF, which is one of the essential factors in osteoclast differentiation. Inhibition of MEK5 by BIX02189 or inhibition of ERK5 by XMD 8-92 blocked osteoclast differentiation. MEK5 knockdown inhibited osteoclast differentiation. RAW264.7D clone cells, which are monocytic cells, differentiate into osteoclasts after stimulation with sRANKL. ERK5 was activated without any stimulation in these cells. Inhibition of the MEK5/ERK5 pathway by the inhibitors also blocked the differentiation of RAW264.7D cells into osteoclasts. Moreover, expression of the transcription factor c-Fos, which is indispensable for osteoclast differentiation, was inhibited by treatment with MEK5 or ERK5 inhibitors. Therefore, activation of ERK5 is required for the induction of c-Fos. These events were confirmed in experiments using M-CSF-dependent bone marrow macrophages. Taken together, the present results show that activation of the MEK5/ERK5 pathway with M-CSF is required for osteoclast differentiation, which may induce differentiation through the induction of c-Fos. PMID:25885811

  13. Suiciding of lymphocytic precursor cells by tritiated nucleosides, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uyeki, E M; Nishimura, T; Bisel, T U

    1978-02-01

    Differences in suiciding by various tritiated nucleosides were observed between two functional assays for in vitro lymphocytic precursor cell development, the hemolysin plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay and the B lymphocytic colony-forming cell (CFC-L) assay, using BDF1 mouse spleen cells. PFC growth was markedly reduced by an early (days 0-1) pulse of tritiated deoxyadenosine ([3H]dAdo), but relatively unaffected by a pulse of tritiated thymidine ([3H]dThd) during the same interval. In contrast, CFC-L formation significantly dropped after an early (day 0) [3H]dThd pulse, as well as after pulses of [3H]dAdo and the corresponding tritiated ribosides, uridine and adenosine. This implied a cycling state in an early lymphocytic precursor cell, as opposed to the PFC insensitivity to an early [3H]dThd pulse. The response pattern of colonies and clusters to [3H]dThd supported our notion of a delayed suiciding of CFC contributing to the increase in cluster numbers.

  14. Effects and mechanisms of 8-prenylnaringenin on osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and osteoclast-like cells RAW264.7

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Kang, Lumei; Ma, Yuhui; Chen, Hongping; Kuang, Haibin; Huang, Qiren; He, Ming; Peng, Weijie

    2014-01-01

    8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is a phytoestrogen with the highest estrogenic activity. The objective of the present study was to confirm the superiority of 8-PN on bone metabolisms and the estrogen receptor (ER) subtype mediating effects of 8-PN. The osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and osteoclast-like cell line RAW264.7 were treated with 17β-estradiol (10−8 mol/L), genistein (10−5 mol/L), daidzein (10−5 mol/L), 8-PN (10−5 mol/L) alone or in the presence of ERα antagonist MPP (10−7 mol/L) and ERβ antagonist PTHPP (1.5 × 10−7 mol/L). It has been found that 8-PN did not affect osteoblast proliferation, and that 8-PN increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OCN) concentrations, and the mineralized nodules. 8-PN inhibited RAW264.7 differentiating into osteoclasts and reduced the pit area of bone resorption. 8-PN could also inhibit the protein and mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteoblasts, and conversely promote the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG). These effects of 8-PN were mainly inhibited not by PTHPP but by MPP and they were weaker than estrogen's effects but stronger than those of genistein and daidzein. In conclusion, the effects of 8-PN on promoting osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption were mediated by ERα instead of ERβ and the efficacy was more potent than that of the two classic phytoestrogens: genistein and daidzein. PMID:25473491

  15. Role of myeloid early endothelial progenitor cells in bone formation and osteoclast differentiation in tissue construct based on hydroxyapatite poly(ester-urethane) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Wang, Fanlu; Tiwari, Sanjay; Yesilbas, Meran; Steubesand, Nadine; Weitkamp, Jan-Tobias; Klüter, Tim; Lippross, Sebastian; Eglin, David; Seekamp, Andreas; Fuchs, Sabine

    2016-11-01

    Engineering of a vascularized bone construct is a highly challenging task which needs to take into account the impact of different components on the bone regeneration process. Bone repair influencing factors in such constructs range from the material properties and scaffold design, to the interaction of different cell types contributing to bone formation and remodeling or neovascularization, respectively. In this context, early endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), mononuclear cells isolated from the peripheral blood, express the endothelial marker CD31 but also a series of myeloid markers and have been shown to support the formation of vessel-like structures. These cells are also characterized by a highly adaptable phenotype influenced by other cells creating an instructive niche. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of EPC on bone formation or remodeling using a co-culture system of outgrowth endothelial cells, mature endothelial cells isolated from the peripheral blood cell cultures, and mesenchymal stem cells grown on hydroxyapatite poly(ester-urethane) scaffolds. The formation of vessel-like structures in these constructs was shown by CLSM and immunohistochemistry and further evaluated by real time RT-PCR. Osteogenic differentiation in these constructs was investigated by von Kossa, Alizarin Red, and real time PCR. Data indicated that osteogenic differentiation occurred within the constructs after 14 days of culture but without a direct influence by EPC in this process. Finally, although we observed a series of osteoclast related makers in the constructs when EPC were included, no indications for an increased osteoclast-like activity, which might lead to increased bone resorption, were observed. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1922-1932, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva-related Activated Activin-like Kinase Signaling Enhances Osteoclast Formation during Heterotopic Ossification in Muscle Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masato; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okumoto, Katsumi; Tamura, Yukinori; Okada, Kiyotaka; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is characterized by extensive ossification within muscle tissues, and its molecular pathogenesis is responsible for the constitutively activating mutation (R206H) of the bone morphogenetic protein type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2). In this study, we investigated the effects of implanting ALK2 (R206H)-transfected myoblastic C2C12 cells into nude mice on osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle and subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells with BMP-2 in nude mice induced robust heterotopic ossification with an increase in the formation of osteoclasts in muscle tissues but not in subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells in muscle induced heterotopic ossification more effectively than that of empty vector-transfected cells. A co-culture of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells as well as the conditioned medium from ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells enhanced osteoclast formation in Raw264.7 cells more effectively than those with empty vector-transfected cells. The transfection of ALK2 (R206H) into C2C12 cells elevated the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, whereas the inhibition of TGF-β signaling suppressed the enhanced formation of osteoclasts in the co-culture with ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells and their conditioned medium. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the causal mutation transfection of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in myoblasts enhanced the formation of osteoclasts from its precursor through TGF-β in muscle tissues. PMID:24798338

  17. Osteoclastic resorption of biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburgh, S; Layrolle, P; Barrère, F; de Bruijn, J; Schoonman, J; van Blitterswijk, C A; de Groot, K

    2001-08-01

    A new biomimetic method for coating metal implants enables the fast formation of dense and homogeneous calcium phosphate coatings. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were coated with a thin, carbonated, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) by immersion in a saturated solution of calcium, phosphate, magnesium, and carbonate. The ACP-coated disks then were processed further by incubation in calcium phosphate solutions to produce either crystalline carbonated apatite (CA) or octacalcium phosphate (OCP). The resorption behavior of these three biomimetic coatings was studied using osteoclast-enriched mouse bone-marrow cell cultures for 7 days. Cell-mediated degradation was observed for both carbonated apatite and octacalcium phosphate coatings. Numerous resorption lacunae characteristic of osteoclastic resorption were found on carbonated apatite after cell culture. The results showed that carbonated apatite coatings are resorbed by osteoclasts in a manner consistent with normal osteoclastic resorption. Osteoclasts also degraded the octacalcium phosphate coatings but not by classical pit formation.

  18. Chlorogenic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption by down-regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-induced nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sung Chul; Lee, Cheol; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Hyun Mee; So, Hong-Seob; Lee, Myeung Su; Rho, Mun Chual; Oh, Jaemin

    2013-01-01

    Excessive osteoclastic bone resorption plays a critical role in inflammation-induced bone loss such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal bone erosion. Therefore, identification of osteoclast targeted-agents may be a therapeutic approach to the treatment of pathological bone loss. In this study, we isolated chlorogenic acid (CGA) from fructus of Gardenia jasminoides to discover anti-bone resorptive agents. CGA is a polyphenol with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities, however, its effects on osteoclast differentiation is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effect of CGA in receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and RANKL signaling. CGA dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation in bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) without any evidence of cytotoxicity. CGA inhibited the phosphorylation of p38, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B (IκB), and IκB degradation by RANKL treatment. CGA suppressed the mRNA expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1), TRAP and OSCAR in RANKL-treated bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Also, overexpression of NFATc1 in BMMs blocked the inhibitory effect of CGA on RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, to evaluate the effects of CGA in vivo, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone erosion study was carried out. CGA remarkably attenuated LPS-induced bone loss based on micro-computed tomography and histologic analysis of femurs. Taken together, our findings suggest that CGA may be a potential treatment option for osteoclast-related diseases with inflammatory bone destruction.

  19. Retinoid X receptors orchestrate osteoclast differentiation and postnatal bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-Gutiérrez, María P.; Rőszer, Tamás; Fuentes, Lucía; Núñez, Vanessa; Escolano, Amelia; Redondo, Juan Miguel; De Clerck, Nora; Metzger, Daniel; Valledor, Annabel F.; Ricote, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are important for maintenance of bone remodeling and mineral homeostasis. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation and activity is important for the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases associated with bone loss. Here, we demonstrate that retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are key elements of the transcriptional program of differentiating osteoclasts. Loss of RXR function in hematopoietic cells resulted in formation of giant, nonresorbing osteoclasts and increased bone mass in male mice and protected female mice from bone loss following ovariectomy, which induces osteoporosis in WT females. The increase in bone mass associated with RXR deficiency was due to lack of expression of the RXR-dependent transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family, protein B (MAFB) in osteoclast progenitors. Evaluation of osteoclast progenitor cells revealed that RXR homodimers directly target and bind to the Mafb promoter, and this interaction is required for proper osteoclast proliferation, differentiation, and activity. Pharmacological activation of RXRs inhibited osteoclast differentiation due to the formation of RXR/liver X receptor (LXR) heterodimers, which induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), resulting in indirect MAFB upregulation. Our study reveals that RXR signaling mediates bone homeostasis and suggests that RXRs have potential as targets for the treatment of bone pathologies such as osteoporosis. PMID:25574839

  20. Epigenetic mechanisms regulating differentiation of neural stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Adefuin, Aliya Mari D; Kimura, Ayaka; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Kinichi; Namihira, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of neural stem/precursor cells (NS/PCs) into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes during mammalian brain development is a carefully controlled and timed event. Increasing evidences suggest that epigenetic regulation is necessary to drive this. Here, we provide an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the developing mammalian embryonic forebrain. Histone methylation is a key factor but other epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and noncoding RNAs also partake during fate determination. As numerous epigenetic modifications have been identified, future studies on timing and regional specificity of these modifications will further deepen our understanding of how intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms participate together to precisely control brain development.

  1. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells generate pituicytes in vivo during neurohypophysis development.

    PubMed

    Virard, Isabelle; Coquillat, Delphine; Bancila, Mircea; Kaing, Sovann; Durbec, Pascale

    2006-02-01

    In the vertebrate brain, much remains to be understood concerning the origin of glial cell diversity and the potential lineage relationships between the various types of glia. Besides astrocytes and myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, other macroglial cell populations are found in discrete areas of the central nervous system (CNS). They share functional features with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes but also display specific characteristics. Such specialized cells, called pituicytes, are located in the neurohypophysis (NH). Our work focuses on the lineage of the pituicytes during rodent development. First, we show that cells identified with a combination of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) markers are present in the developing rat NH. In culture, neonatal NH progenitors also share major functional characteristics with OPCs, being both migratory and bipotential, i.e. able to give rise to type 2 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. We then observe that, either in vitro or after transplantation into myelin-deficient Shiverer brain, pieces of NH generate myelinating oligodendrocytes, confirming the oligodendrogenic potentiality of NH cells. However, no mature oligodendrocyte can be found in the NH. This led us to hypothesize that the OPCs present in the developing NH might be generating other glial cells, especially the pituicytes. Consistent with this hypothesis, the OPCs appear during NH development before pituicytes differentiate. Finally, we establish a lineage relationship between olig1+ cells, most likely OPCs, and the pituicytes by fate-mapping experiments using genetically engineered mice. This constitutes the first demonstration that OPCs generate glial cells other than oligodendrocytes in vivo.

  2. Osteoblast protects osteoclast devoid of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters from oxidative cytotoxicity of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Kambe, Yuki; Sahara, Koichi; Kurokawa, Shintaro; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2007-12-01

    The view that ascorbic acid indirectly benefits osteoclastogenesis through expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL) by osteoblasts is prevailing. In this study, we have examined the direct effect of ascorbic acid on osteoclastogenesis in cultured mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow precursors. The absence of alkaline phosphatase and osteoblastic marker genes validated the usefulness of isolation procedures. Sustained exposure to ascorbic acid, but not to dehydroascorbic acid, significantly reduced the number of multinucleated cells positive to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. In cultured osteoclasts, mRNA expression was seen for glucose transporter-1 involved in membrane transport of dehydroascorbic acid, but not for sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters-1 and -2 that are both responsible for the transport of ascorbic acid. The inhibition by ascorbic acid was completely prevented by catalase, while ascorbic acid or hydrogen peroxide drastically increased the number of cells stained with propidium iodide and the generation of reactive oxygen species, in addition to inducing mitochondrial membrane depolarization in cultured osteoclasts. In pre-osteoclastic cell line RAW264.7 cells, ascorbic acid similarly inhibited the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells, with a significant decrease in RANKL-induced NF-kappaB transactivation. Moreover, co-culture with osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells significantly prevented the ascorbic acid-induced decrease in the number of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that ascorbic acid may play a dual repulsive role in osteoclastogenesis toward bone remodeling through the direct cytotoxicity mediated by oxidative stress to osteoclasts, in addition to the indirect trophism mediated by RANKL from osteoblasts.

  3. Single Source Precursors for Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Harris, Jerry D.; Cowen, Jonathan; Buhro, William E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2002-01-01

    The development of thin film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provides an attractive cost solution to fabricating solar arrays with high specific power, (W/kg). The use of a polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer for thin film solar cells is considered as the next generation photovoltaic devices. At NASA GRC we have focused on the development of new single source precursors (SSP) and their utility to deposit the chalcopyrite semi-conducting layer (CIS) onto flexible substrates for solar cell fabrication. The syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering is described. Thin-film fabrication studies demonstrate the SSPs can be used in a spray CVD (chemical vapor deposition) process, for depositing CIS at reduced temperatures, which display good electrical properties, suitable for PV (photovoltaic) devices.

  4. Inflammatory Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Nevius, Erin; Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Pereira, João P

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that primarily affects the joints. Self-reactive B and T lymphocytes cooperate to promote antibody responses against self proteins and are major drivers of disease. T lymphocytes also promote RA independently of B lymphocytes mainly through the production of key inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, that promote pathology. While the innate signals that initiate self-reactive adaptive immune responses are poorly understood, the disease is predominantly caused by inflammatory cellular infiltration and accumulation in articular tissues, and by bone erosions driven by bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are giant multinucleated cells formed by the fusion of multiple myeloid cells that require short-range signals, such as the cytokines MCSF and RANKL, for undergoing differentiation. The recruitment and positioning of osteoclast precursors to sites of osteoclast differentiation by chemoattractants is an important point of control for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Recently, the GPCR EBI2 and its oxysterol ligand 7a, 25 dihydroxycholesterol, were identified as important regulators of osteoclast precursor positioning in proximity to bone surfaces and of osteoclast differentiation under homeostasis. In chronic inflammatory diseases like RA, osteoclast differentiation is also driven by inflammatory cytokines such as TNFa and IL-1, and can occur independently of RANKL. Finally, there is growing evidence that the chemotactic signals guiding osteoclast precursors to inflamed articular sites contribute to disease and are of great interest. Furthering our understanding of the complex osteoimmune cell interactions should provide new avenues of therapeutic intervention for RA.

  5. Cytoskeletal dysfunction dominates in DAP12-deficient osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Craft, Clarissa S.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.; Teitelbaum, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite evidence that DAP12 regulates osteoclasts, mice lacking the ITAM-bearing protein exhibit only mild osteopetrosis. Alternatively, Dap12−/− mice, also lacking FcRγ, are severely osteopetrotic, suggesting that FcRγ compensates for DAP12 deficiency in the bone-resorbing polykaryons. Controversy exists, however, as to whether these co-stimulatory molecules regulate differentiation of osteoclasts or the capacity of the mature cell to degrade bone. We find that Dap12−/− osteoclasts differentiate normally when generated on osteoblasts but have a dysfunctional cytoskeleton, impairing their ability to transmigrate through the osteoblast layer and resorb bone. To determine whether the FcRγ co-receptor, OSCAR mediates osteoclast function in the absence of DAP12, we overexpressed OSCAR fused to FLAG (OSCAR-FLAG), in Dap12−/− osteoclasts. OSCAR-FLAG partially rescues the abnormal cytoskeleton of Dap12−/− osteoclasts grown on bone, but not those grown on osteoblasts. Thus, cytoskeletal dysfunction, and not arrested differentiation, is the dominant consequence of DAP12 deficiency in osteoclasts. The failure of osteoblasts to normalize Dap12−/− osteoclasts indicates that functionally relevant quantities of OSCAR ligand do not reside in bone-forming cells. PMID:20720152

  6. Notch signaling acts before cell division to promote asymmetric cleavage and cell fate of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-10-21

    Asymmetric cell divisions in the central nervous system generate neurons of diverse fates. In Drosophila melanogaster, the protein Numb localizes asymmetrically to dividing neural precursor cells such that only one daughter cell inherits Numb. Numb inhibits Notch signaling in this daughter cell, resulting in a different cell fate from the Notch-induced fate in the other-Numb-negative-daughter cell. Precursor cells undergo asymmetric cytokinesis generating daughter cells of different sizes. I found that inactivation of Notch in fly embryonic neural precursor cells disrupted the asymmetric positioning of the cleavage furrow and produced daughter cells of the same size and fate. Moreover, inactivation of Notch at different times altered the degree of asymmetric Numb localization, such that earlier inactivation of Notch caused symmetric distribution of Numb and later inactivation produced incomplete asymmetric localization of Numb. The extent of asymmetrically localized Numb positively correlated with the degree of asymmetric cytokinesis and the size disparity in daughter cells. Loss of Numb or expression of constitutively active Notch led to premature specification of the precursor cells into the fate of one of the daughter cells. Thus, in addition to its role in the specification of daughter cell fate after division, Notch controls Numb localization in the precursor cells to determine the size and fate of daughter cells. Numb also inhibits Notch signaling in precursor cells to prevent Notch-induced differentiation of the precursor cell, forming an autoregulatory loop.

  7. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate inhibition of osteoclastic differentiation via NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Wang, Y.-H.; Ho, M.-L.; Hung, S.-H.; Chen, I.-S. Wang, G.-J.

    2009-02-20

    People who regularly drink tea have been found to have a higher bone mineral density (BMD) and to be at less risk of hip fractures than those who do not drink it. Green tea catechins such as (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) have been reported to increase osteogenic functioning in mesenchymal stem cells. However, its effect on osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on RANKL-activation osteoclastogenesis and NF-{kappa}B in RAW 264.7, a murine preosteoclast cell line. EGCG (10-100 {mu}M) significantly suppressed the RANKL-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and the formation of pits in murine RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). EGCG appeared to target osteoclastic differentiation at an early stage but had no cytotoxic effect on osteoclast precursors. In addition, it significantly inhibited RANKL-induced NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation. We conclude that EGCG inhibits osteoclastogenesis through its activation of NF-{kappa}B.

  8. Response of human rheumatoid arthritis osteoblasts and osteoclasts to adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, Grit; Junker, Susann; Meier, Florian M P; Rickert, Markus; Steinmeyer, Jürgen; Rehart, Stefan; Lange, Uwe; Frommer, Klaus W; Schett, Georg; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Adiponectin is an effector molecule in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, e.g. by inducing cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes in synovial fibroblasts. There is growing evidence that adiponectin affects osteoblasts and osteoclasts although the contribution to the aberrant bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis is unclear. Therefore, the adiponectin effects on rheumatoid arthritis-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts were evaluated. Adiponectin and its receptors were examined in bone tissue. Primary human osteoblasts and osteoclasts were stimulated with adiponectin and analysed using realtime polymerase chain-reaction and immunoassays. Effects on matrix-production by osteoblasts and differentiation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts were examined. Immunohistochemistry of rheumatoid arthritis bone tissue showed adiponectin expression in key cells of bone remodelling. Adiponectin altered gene expression and cytokine release in osteoblasts and increased IL-8 secretion by osteoclasts. Adiponectin inhibited osterix and induced osteoprotegerin mRNA in osteoblasts. In osteoclasts, MMP-9 and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase expression was increased. Accordingly, mineralisation capacity of osteoblasts decreased whereas resorptive activity of osteoclasts increased. The results confirm the proinflammatory potential of adiponectin and support the idea that adiponectin influences rheumatoid arthritis bone remodelling through alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast.

  9. New methodology for evaluating osteoclastic activity induced by orthodontic load

    PubMed Central

    ARAÚJO, Adriele Silveira; FERNANDES, Alline Birra Nolasco; MACIEL, José Vinicius Bolognesi; NETTO, Juliana de Noronha Santos; BOLOGNESE, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is a dynamic process of bone modeling involving osteoclast-driven resorption on the compression side. Consequently, to estimate the influence of various situations on tooth movement, experimental studies need to analyze this cell. Objectives The aim of this study was to test and validate a new method for evaluating osteoclastic activity stimulated by mechanical loading based on the fractal analysis of the periodontal ligament (PDL)-bone interface. Material and Methods The mandibular right first molars of 14 rabbits were tipped mesially by a coil spring exerting a constant force of 85 cN. To evaluate the actual influence of osteoclasts on fractal dimension of bone surface, alendronate (3 mg/Kg) was injected weekly in seven of those rabbits. After 21 days, the animals were killed and their jaws were processed for histological evaluation. Osteoclast counts and fractal analysis (by the box counting method) of the PDL-bone interface were performed in histological sections of the right and left sides of the mandible. Results An increase in the number of osteoclasts and in fractal dimension after OTM only happened when alendronate was not administered. Strong correlation was found between the number of osteoclasts and fractal dimension. Conclusions Our results suggest that osteoclastic activity leads to an increase in bone surface irregularity, which can be quantified by its fractal dimension. This makes fractal analysis by the box counting method a potential tool for the assessment of osteoclastic activity on bone surfaces in microscopic examination. PMID:25760264

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the ampulla of Vater with osteoclastic giant cells, osteoid-like matrix deposition, and aneurysmal bone cyst-like features.

    PubMed

    Candanedo-Gonzalez, Fernando; Camacho-Rebollar, Leslie; Uscanga, Candelaria Cordova; Utrilla, Alejandra Romero; Bucio, Maria Eugenia Palmerin; Rodriguez, Sandra Sanchez; Hernandez, Luis Mora

    2013-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are a heterogeneous group with a wide spectrum of histologic features. We describe the first case of 61-year-old woman who presented gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the ampulla of Vater with osteoclast-like giant cells surrounding osteoid-like material and aneurismal bone cyst-like areas. The phenotype was supported by light microscopy and corroborated by immunohistochemistry analysis. Because of the presence of osteoid-like and aneurismal bone cyst-like components, it is first necessary to make differential diagnosis with other entities such as metastatic osteosarcoma. Our case shows another form of differentiation that has not previously been reported. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunological reaction in TNF-α-mediated osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Ishida, Masahiko; Kohara, Haruka; Yoshimatsu, Masako; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ) is a cytokine produced by monocytes, macrophages, and T cells and is induced by pathogens, endotoxins, or related substances. TNF- α may play a key role in bone metabolism and is important in inflammatory bone diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cells directly involved in osteoclastogenesis include macrophages, which are osteoclast precursor cells, osteoblasts, or stromal cells. These cells express receptor activator of NF- κ B ligand (RANKL) to induce osteoclastogenesis, and T cells, which secrete RANKL, promote osteoclastogenesis during inflammation. Elucidating the detailed effects of TNF- α on bone metabolism may enable the identification of therapeutic targets that can efficiently suppress bone destruction in inflammatory bone diseases. TNF- α is considered to act by directly increasing RANK expression in macrophages and by increasing RANKL in stromal cells. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin- (IL-) 12, IL-18, and interferon- γ (IFN- γ ) strongly inhibit osteoclast formation. IL-12, IL-18, and IFN- γ induce apoptosis in bone marrow cells treated with TNF- α   in vitro, and osteoclastogenesis is inhibited by the interactions of TNF- α -induced Fas and Fas ligand induced by IL-12, IL-18, and IFN- γ . This review describes and discusses the role of cells concerned with osteoclast formation and immunological reactions in TNF- α -mediated osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

  12. GBM secretome induces transient transformation of human neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Chitra; Wang, X Simon; Manoranjan, Branavan; McFarlane, Nicole; Nolte, Sara; Li, Meredith; Murty, Naresh; Siu, K W Michael; Singh, Sheila K

    2012-09-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in humans, with a uniformly poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment is composed of both supportive cellular substrates and exogenous factors. We hypothesize that exogenous factors secreted by brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) could predispose normal neural precursor cells (NPCs) to transformation. When NPCs are grown in GBM-conditioned media, and designated as "tumor-conditioned NPCs" (tcNPCs), they become highly proliferative and exhibit increased stem cell self-renewal, or the unique ability of stem cells to asymmetrically generate another stem cell and a daughter cell. tcNPCs also show an increased transcript level of stem cell markers such as CD133 and ALDH and growth factor receptors such as VEGFR1, VEGFR2, EGFR and PDGFRα. Media analysis by ELISA of GBM-conditioned media reveals an elevated secretion of growth factors such as EGF, VEGF and PDGF-AA when compared to normal neural stem cell-conditioned media. We also demonstrate that tcNPCs require prolonged or continuous exposure to the GBM secretome in vitro to retain GBM BTIC characteristics. Our in vivo studies reveal that tcNPCs are unable to form tumors, confirming that irreversible transformation events may require sustained or prolonged presence of the GBM secretome. Analysis of GBM-conditioned media by mass spectrometry reveals the presence of secreted proteins Chitinase-3-like 1 (CHI3L1) and H2A histone family member H2AX. Collectively, our data suggest that GBM-secreted factors are capable of transiently altering normal NPCs, although for retention of the transformed phenotype, sustained or prolonged secretome exposure or additional transformation events are likely necessary.

  13. Antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation by reducing nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding and prevents in vivo bone resorption induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyon Jong; Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Man; Lee, Seung Bok; Kim, Hyun-Duck; Su Kim, Ghi; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2006-05-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and bone mineral density or osteoporosis has recently been reported. As bone loss occurring in osteoporosis and inflammatory diseases is primarily due to increases in osteoclast number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be relevant to osteoclast differentiation, which requires receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) frequently present in inflammatory conditions has a profound synergy with RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA), a strong antioxidant clinically used for some time, on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. At concentrations showing no growth inhibition, alpha-LA potently suppressed osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow-derived precursor cells driven either by a high-dose RANKL alone or by a low-dose RANKL plus TNF-alpha (RANKL/TNF-alpha). alpha-LA abolished ROS elevation by RANKL or RANKL/TNF-alpha and inhibited NF-kappaB activation in osteoclast precursor cells. Specifically, alpha-LA reduced DNA binding of NF-kappaB but did not inhibit IKK activation. Furthermore, alpha-LA greatly suppressed in vivo bone loss induced by RANKL or TNF-alpha in a calvarial remodeling model. Therefore, our data provide evidence that ROS plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation through NF-kappaB regulation and the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has a therapeutic potential for bone erosive diseases.

  14. Polarity and membrane transport in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Baron, R

    1989-01-01

    The osteoclast is a highly polarized non-epithelial cell. The apical pole of the cell is determined by the cell's attachment to the extracellular matrix. This attachment forms the sealing zone, delimiting the subosteoclastic bone resorbing compartment. The apical membrane of the cell forms the ruffled-border, which contains some specific membrane proteins and a proton pump ATPase, which acidifies the apical compartment. Newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes are vectorially transported into this apical compartment bound to mannose-6-phosphate receptors. The basolateral membrane is highly enriched in sodium pumps with beta and alpha 1 subunits. Associated with the acidification process is the carbonic anhydrase found in the cytoplasm and membrane-associated and a bicarbonate-chloride exchanger in the membrane.2 These features put the osteoclast in the same functional category as the kidney tubule intercalated cell and the gastric oxyntic cell, both of epithelial origin, which secrete acid in a polarized fashion.

  15. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haydu, J Erika; Ferrando, Adolfo A

    2013-07-01

    Early T-cell precursor (ETP) leukaemias have been recently recognized as a form of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) with a poor prognosis. The purpose of this review is to outline the most recent advances in the biology, genetics and prognostic significance of this aggressive disease. Detailed immunophenotypic analyses have defined ETP T-ALLs as a distinct group of T-ALL with a poor prognosis. Transcriptionally, ETP T-ALLs and early immature T-ALLs, a broader group of tumours characterized by very early arrest in T-cell differentiation, are most related to haematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors. Consistently, these leukaemias show lower frequencies of prototypical T-ALL lesions such as CDKN2A/B deletions and activating mutations in NOTCH1 and show a higher prevalence of mutations typically associated with the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). ETP and early immature T-ALLs are characterized by a very early differentiation arrest and show unique genetic and transcriptional features that overlap both with T-ALL and with AML. Given the unique biology and poor prognosis associated with the ETP T-ALL group, there is an urgent need of new tailored therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this disease.

  16. Precursors of executive function in infants with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Alexandra M; Telfer, Paul T; Kirkham, Fenella J; de Haan, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    Executive dysfunction occurs in sickle cell anemia, but there are few early data. Infants with sickle cell anemia (n = 14) and controls (n = 14) performed the "A-not-B" and Object Retrieval search tasks, measuring precursors of executive function at 9 and 12 months. Significant group differences were not found. However, for the A-not-B task, 7 of 11 sickle cell anemia infants scored in the lower 2 performance categories at 9 months, but only 1 at 12 months (P = .024); controls obtained scores at 12 months that were statistically comparable to the scores they had already obtained at 9 months. On the Object Retrieval task, 9- and 12-month controls showed comparable scores, whereas infants with sickle cell anemia continued to improve (P = .027); at 9 months, those with lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation passed fewer trials (R s = 0.670, P = .024) and took longer to obtain the toy (R s = -0.664, P = .013). Subtle delays in acquiring developmental skills may underlie abnormal executive function in childhood.

  17. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro. PMID:6787164

  18. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, R.L.; Weissman, I.L.

    1981-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro.

  19. α-Tocotrienol inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption by suppressing RANKL expression and signaling and bone resorbing activity.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Lee, Zang Hee

    2011-03-25

    Vitamin E, an essential nutrient with powerful antioxidant activity, is the mixture of two classes of compounds, tocopherols (TPs) and tocotrienols (TTs). Although TTs exhibit better bone protective activity than α-TP, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether α-TT and α-TP can modulate osteoclastic bone resorption. We found that α-TT but not α-TP inhibits osteoclastogenesis in coculture of osteoblasts and bone marrow cells induced by either IL-1 or combined treatment with 1α,25(OH)(2) vitamin D(3) and prostaglandin E(2). In accordance with this, only α-TT inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts. In addition, α-TT but not α-TP inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from precursors by suppression of c-Fos expression, possibly through inhibiting ERK and NF-κB activation. This anti-osteoclastogenic effect was reversed when c-Fos or an active form of NFATc1, a critical downstream of c-Fos during osteoclastogenesis, was overexpressed. Furthermore, only α-TT reduced bone resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts without affecting their survival. Overall, our results demonstrate that α-TT but not α-TP has anti-bone resorptive properties by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation, suggesting that α-TT may have therapeutic value for treating and preventing bone diseases characterized by excessive bone destruction.

  20. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tara L; Overall, Rupert W; Vogler, Steffen; Sykes, Alex M; Ruhwald, Susann; Lasse, Daniela; Ichwan, Muhammad; Fabel, Klaus; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-04-12

    Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1) is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative precursor cells suggested immune mechanisms and cytokine signaling as molecular regulators of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. In addition to LPA1 being a marker of this important stem cell population, we also show that the corresponding ligand LPA is directly involved in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis, an effect that can be attributed to LPA signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing in peripheral osteoclasts resulting in the circadian expression rhythm of osteoclast-related genes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Kondo, Hisataka; Noguchi, Toshihide; Togari, Akifumi

    2014-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are prevalent in bone metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Recently, we suggested that output signals from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are transmitted from the master circadian rhythm to peripheral osteoblasts through β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid signaling. In this study, we examined how the master circadian rhythm is transmitted to peripheral osteoclasts and the role of clock gene in osteoclast. Mice were maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods and sacrificed at Zeitgeber times 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20. mRNA was extracted from femur (cancellous bone) and analyzed for the expression of osteoclast-related genes and clock genes. Osteoclast-related genes such as cathepsin K (CTSK) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) showed circadian rhythmicity like clock genes such as period 1 (PER1), PER2 and brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1 (BMAL1). In an in vitro study, not β-agonist but glucocorticoid treatment remarkably synchronized clock and osteoclast-related genes in cultured osteoclasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed the interaction between BMAL1 proteins and promoter region of CTSK and NFATc1. To examine whether endogenous glucocorticoids influence the osteoclast circadian rhythms, mice were adrenalectomized (ADX) and maintained under 12-hour light/dark periods at least two weeks before glucocorticoid injection. A glucocorticoid injection restarted the circadian expression of CTSK and NFATc1 in ADX mice. These results suggest that glucocorticoids mediate circadian timing to peripheral osteoclasts and osteoclast clock contributes to the circadian expression of osteoclast-related genes such as CTSK and NFATc1.

  2. Enrichment of skin-derived neural precursor cells from dermal cell populations by altering culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Bayati, Vahid; Gazor, Rohoullah; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Negad Dehbashi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    As stem cells play a critical role in tissue repair, their manipulation for being applied in regenerative medicine is of great importance. Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) may be good candidates for use in cell-based therapy as the only neural stem cells which can be isolated from an accessible tissue, skin. Herein, we presented a simple protocol to enrich neural SKPs by monolayer adherent cultivation to prove the efficacy of this method. To enrich neural SKPs from dermal cell populations, we have found that a monolayer adherent cultivation helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have cultured dermal cells as monolayer under serum-supplemented (control) and serum-supplemented culture, followed by serum free cultivation (test) and compared. Finally, protein markers of SKPs were assessed and compared in both experimental groups and differentiation potential was evaluated in enriched culture. The cells of enriched culture concurrently expressed fibronectin, vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors as compared to control culture. In addition, they possessed a multipotential capacity to differentiate into neurogenic, glial, adipogenic, osteogenic and skeletal myogenic cell lineages. It was concluded that serum-free adherent culture reinforced by growth factors have been shown to be effective on proliferation of skin-derived neural precursor cells (skin-NPCs) and drive their selective and rapid expansion.

  3. Extracts of marine algae show inhibitory activity against osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that play a crucial role in bone resorption. The imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation results in osteoporosis. Therefore, substances that can suppress osteoclast formation are potential candidate materials for drug development or functional foods. There have been reports that extracts or purified compounds from marine micro- and macroalgae can suppress osteoclast differentiation. Symbioimine, isolated from the cultured dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., had suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation in osteoclast-like cells. Norzoanthamine, isolated from the colonial zoanthid Zoanthas sp., has been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice. With regard to marine extracts, the fucoxanthin-rich component from brown algae has been shown to have suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation. An extract of Sargassum fusiforme has recently been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity. This extract suppressed both osteoclast differentiation and accelerated osteoblast formation in separate in vitro experiments. It also showed antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice by regulating the balance between bone resorption and bone formation. These marine algae and their extracts may be sources of marine medicinal foods for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  4. Effects of cadmium on osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Guoying; Gu, Shuzhu; Jin, Taiyi; Shao, Chunlin

    2009-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) may have direct effects on bone metabolism and the mechanism is not fully understood. To investigate the effects of Cd on bone metabolism, effects of Cd on osteoblasts and osteoclasts in vitro were observed at cellular and molecular levels. Osteoblasts were cultured by sequential enzyme digestion from Sprague-Dawley rats calvarial bone and osteoclasts were isolated from long bones of new-born male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, and then cells were exposed to different concentrations of Cd (0-2.0 μ mol/L for osteoblasts; 0.03 μmol/L for osteoclasts). As for osteoblasts, cell viability, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralization were determined. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) were studied via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). For osteoclasts, after exposure to Cd (0.03 μmol/L) for 72 h and 120 h, number of osteoclasts and pits formation was observed. Cd inhibited the viability, ALP activity, mineralization and up-regulated RANKL mRNA expression in osteoblasts. But Cd had no obvious effect on OPG mRNA expression. For osteoclasts, cadmium (0.03 μmol/L) could increase the numbers of osteoclasts (p<0.05) and enhance pits formation (p<0.05). These results suggested that Cd could inhibit bone formation at high concentrations and enhance bone resorption at low level. OPG/RANKL may constitute an important pathway of Cd effects on bone.

  5. Attenuation of proliferation in oligodendrocyte precursor cells by activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Deanna L; Pirianov, Grisha; Holland, Samantha; McGinnity, Colm J; Norman, Adele L; Reali, Camilla; Diemel, Lara T; Gveric, Djordje; Yeung, Davy; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2010-06-01

    Activated microglia can influence the survival of neural cells through the release of cytotoxic factors. Here, we investigated the interaction between Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-activated microglia and oligodendrocytes or their precursor cells (OPC). Primary rat or N9 microglial cells were activated by exposure to TLR4-specifc lipopolysaccharide (LPS), resulting in mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, increased CD68 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, and release of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Microglial conditioned medium (MGCM) from LPS-activated microglia attenuated primary OPC proliferation without inducing cell death. The microglial-induced inhibition of OPC proliferation was reversed by stimulating group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in microglia with the agonist L-AP4. In contrast to OPC, LPS-activated MGCM enhanced the survival of mature oligodendrocytes. Further investigation suggested that TNF and IL-6 released from TLR4-activated microglia might contribute to the effect of MGCM on OPC proliferation, insofar as TNF depletion of LPS-activated MGCM reduced the inhibition of OPC proliferation, and direct addition of TNF or IL-6 attenuated or increased proliferation, respectively. OPC themselves were also found to express proteins involved in TLR4 signalling, including TLR4, MyD88, and MAL. Although LPS stimulation of OPC did not induce proinflammatory cytokine release or affect their survival, it did trigger JNK phosphorylation, suggesting that TLR4 signalling in these cells is active. These findings suggest that OPC survival may be influenced not only by factors released from endotoxin-activated microglia but also through a direct response to endotoxins. This may have consequences for myelination under conditions in which microglial activation and cerebral infection are both implicated. , Inc.

  6. Circulating Osteogenic Precursor Cells in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Manavalan, J. S.; Cremers, S.; Dempster, D. W.; Zhou, H.; Dworakowski, E.; Kode, A.; Kousteni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with an increased risk of fractures and low bone formation. However, the mechanism for the low bone formation is not well understood. Recently, circulating osteogenic precursor (COP) cells, which contribute to bone formation, have been characterized in the peripheral circulation. Objective: Our objective was to characterize the number and maturity of COP cells in T2D. Patients, Design, and Setting: Eighteen postmenopausal women with T2D and 27 controls participated in this cross-sectional study at a clinical research center. Main Outcome Measures: COP cells were characterized using flow cytometry and antibodies against osteocalcin (OCN) and early stem cell markers. Histomorphometric (n = 9) and molecular (n=14) indices of bone turnover and oxidative stress were also measured. Results: The percentage of OCN+ cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was lower in T2D (0.8 ± 0.2 vs. 1.6 ± 0.4%; P < 0.0001), whereas the percentage of OCN+ cells coexpressing the early marker CD146 was increased (OCN+/CD146+: 33.3 ± 7 vs. 12.0 ± 4%; P < 0.0001). Reduced histomorphometric indices of bone formation were observed in T2D subjects, including mineralizing surface (2.65 ± 1.9 vs. 7.58 ± 2.4%, P = 0.02), bone formation rate (0.01 ± 0.1 vs. 0.05 ±0.2 μm3/um2 · d, P = 0.02), and osteoblast surface (1.23 ±0.9 vs. 4.60 ± 2.5%, P = 0.03). T2D subjects also had reduced molecular expression of the osteoblast regulator gene Runx2 but increased expression of the oxidative stress markers p66Shc and SOD2. Conclusions: Circulating OCN+ cells were decreased in T2D, whereas OCN+/CD146+ cells were increased. Histomorphometric indices of bone formation were decreased in T2D, as was molecular expression of osteoblastic activity. Stimulation of bone formation may have beneficial therapeutic skeletal consequences in T2D. PMID:22740707

  7. Celastrol attenuates bone erosion in collagen-Induced arthritis mice and inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function in RANKL-induced RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ke; Xu, Lingxiao; Feng, Xiaoke; Zhang, Qiande; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f (TwHF) of the Celastraceae family has attracted increasing attention for its potential therapeutic application in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well accepted that TwHF exerts the antirheumatic activity and mainly depends on its potent anti-inflammatory property. To further explore the therapeutic potential of the well-defined TwHF-derived single compound - celastrol in RA, we study the therapeutic efficacy of celastrol on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and delineate its effects on osteoclast differentiation and functions in RANKL-induced osteoclast precursors RAW264.7 cell line. In CIA mice, daily injection of celastrol (beginning on day 28 after arthritis induction) markedly suppressed arthritis, and reduced bone damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone micro-computed tomography (CT). The effects were accompanied by reductions of osteoclast cells in joints, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, and expression of osteoclastic genes (Trap, Ctsk, Ctr, Mmp-9) and transcriptional factors (c-Fos, c-Jun and NFATc1). When RAW264.7 cells were treated with RANKL, celastrol inhibited the formation of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and the bone-resorbing activity in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, celastrol reduced the RANKL-induced expression of osteoclastic genes and transcriptional factors, as well as phosphorylation of NF-kB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These findings show that celastrol could directly inhibit osteoclast formation and function, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy of celastrol for managing RA, especially in preventing bone destruction.

  8. Bio-corrosion of stainless steel by osteoclasts--in vitro evidence.

    PubMed

    Cadosch, Dieter; Chan, Erwin; Gautschi, Oliver P; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Most metals in contact with biological systems undergo corrosion by an electrochemical process. This study investigated whether human osteoclasts (OC) are able to grow on stainless steel (SS) and directly corrode the metal alloy leading to the formation of corresponding metal ions, which may cause inflammatory reactions and activate the immune system. Scanning electron microscopy analysis demonstrated long-term viable OC cultures and evident resorption features on the surface of SS discs on which OC were cultured for 21 days. The findings were confirmed by atomic emission spectrometry investigations showing significantly increased levels of chromium, nickel, and manganese in the supernatant of OC cultures. Furthermore, significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, which are considered to be major mediators of osteolysis, were revealed in the same cultures by cytometric bead array analysis. Within the present study, it was shown that human osteoclast precursors are able to grow and differentiate towards mature OC on SS. The mature cells are able to directly corrode the metal surface and release corresponding metal ions, which induce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that are known to enhance osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Enhanced corrosion and the subsequently released metal ions may therefore result in enhanced osteolytic lesions in the peri-prosthetic bone, contributing to the aseptic loosening of the implant.

  9. Role of the osteoclast at the bone-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Minkin, C; Marinho, V C

    1999-06-01

    A thorough understanding of the processes of healing, repair, and remodeling of bone is critical for the establishment and maintenance of osseointegration of dental implants. In this regard, much attention has been paid to the anabolic aspects of bone remodeling, including the cell biology of the osteoblast and the various cytokines and growth factors which regulate these processes. In contrast, there is little information on the bone-resorptive activity that occurs around implants during osseointegration, and of the role of osteoclasts, macrophages, and stromal cells in those catabolic processes associated with bone remodeling. This paper reviews osteoclast cell biology, the interaction of osteoclasts and biomaterials, and the information available on osteoclasts and dental implants, and poses some questions for future research.

  10. Glial versus melanocyte cell fate choice: Schwann cell precursors as a cellular origin of melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Adameyko, Igor; Lallemend, Francois

    2010-09-01

    Melanocytes and Schwann cells are derived from the multipotent population of neural crest cells. Although both cell types were thought to be generated through completely distinct pathways and molecular processes, a recent study has revealed that these different cell types are intimately interconnected far beyond previously postulated limits in that they share a common post-neural crest progenitor, i.e. the Schwann cell precursor. This finding raises interesting questions about the lineage relationships of hitherto unrelated cell types such as melanocytes and Schwann cells, and may provide clinical insights into mechanisms of pigmentation disorders and for cancer involving Schwann cells and melanocytes.

  11. Treatment with hydrogen molecules prevents RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation associated with inhibition of ROS formation and inactivation of MAPK, AKT and NF-kappa B pathways in murine RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhu; Zhang, Qing-Xiang; Dong, Xiao-Xian; Li, Huai-Dong; Ma, Xin

    2014-09-01

    The bone protective effects of the hydrogen molecule (H2) have been demonstrated in several osteoporosis models while the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Osteoclast differentiation is an important factor related to the pathogenesis of bone-loss related diseases. In this work, we evaluated the effects of incubation with H2 on receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation. We found that treatment with H2 prevented RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells and BMMs. Treatment with H2 inhibits the ability to form resorption pits of BMMs stimulated by RANKL. Treatment with H2 reduced mRNA levels of osteoclast-specific markers including tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, metalloproteinase-9, carbonic anhydrase typeII, and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase. Treatment with H2 decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, suppressed NADPH oxidase activity, down-regulated Rac1 activity and Nox1 expression, reduced mitochondrial ROS formation, and enhanced nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 nuclear translocation and heme oxygenase-1 activity. In addition, treatment with H2 suppressed RANKL-induced expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 and c-Fos. Furthermore, treatment with H2 suppressed NF-κB activation and reduced phosphorylation of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase, and protein kinases B (AKT) stimulated with RANKL. In conclusion, hydrogen molecules prevented RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation associated with inhibition of reactive oxygen species formation and inactivation of NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT pathways.

  12. Gradient isolation of glial cells: evidence that flat epithelial cells are astroglial cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Meller, K

    1987-07-01

    Discontinuous gradients of metrizamide were used to separate the cell components of monolayers of primary cultures of embryonic rat brains. These primary cell cultures were of two types: long-term cultures (more than a year) of embryonic rat brain, which contained several glial cell types, and monolayers of cell cultures (several weeks old), which contained a complex population of cells, including neuronal elements. The gradient separation produces fractions of pure flat epithelial cells that are able to survive and proliferate. After a few days, all flat epithelial cells become confluent and show a positive reaction to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); this indicates that these cells astroglial precursor cells. Following their maintenance in vitro for several months, all cultures give rise to a pure population of astrocytes identified not only by their characteristic morphology, but also by their content of GFAP. It is proposed that the differentiation controls are dependent on cell interactions that are influenced by the composition of the cell population and/or the molecular growth and differentiation factors released by these cells into the medium.

  13. Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Slow Isoform Knockdown in MDA-MB-435 Cells Decreases RAW 264.7 Osteoclastic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alho, Irina; Costa, Luis; Bicho, Manuel; Coelho, Constança

    2016-05-01

    During the bone metastatic process, tumor cells and bone cells drive a vicious cycle stimulating growth and activity of each other. We here address how low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) could be involved in this process. We targeted LMW-PTP by siRNA and evaluated the effect of various soluble factors released to the culture medium by the MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cell line, in RAW 264.7 osteoclastogenesis. We showed that these soluble factors did not change RAW 264.7 osteoclastogenic potential. The knockdown of the LMW-PTP slow isoform decreased osteoclastogenesis of RAW 264.7, showing less active Src. The knockdown of LMW-PTP and its slow isoform decreased the release of IL-8 but not IL-6 in MDA-MB-435. The LMW-PTP slow isoform can be an important protein in bone metastatic disease, with a fundamental role in the interplay between tumor cells and osteoclasts, through the regulation of Src activity and IL-8 secretion. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Adult neurogenesis in the crayfish brain: proliferation, migration, and possible origin of precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Allodi, Silvana; Sandeman, David C; Beltz, Barbara S

    2009-06-01

    The birth of new neurons and their incorporation into functional circuits in the adult brain is a characteristic of many vertebrate and invertebrate organisms, including decapod crustaceans. Precursor cells maintaining life-long proliferation in the brains of crayfish (Procambarus clarkii, Cherax destructor) and clawed lobsters (Homarus americanus) reside within a specialized niche on the ventral surface of the brain; their daughters migrate to two proliferation zones along a stream formed by processes of the niche precursors. Here they divide again, finally producing interneurons in the olfactory pathway. The present studies in P. clarkii explore (1) differential proliferative activity among the niche precursor cells with growth and aging, (2) morphological characteristics of cells in the niche and migratory streams, and (3) aspects of the cell cycle in this lineage. Morphologically symmetrical divisions of neuronal precursor cells were observed in the niche near where the migratory streams emerge, as well as in the streams and proliferation zones. The nuclei of migrating cells elongate and undergo shape changes consistent with nucleokinetic movement. LIS1, a highly conserved dynein-binding protein, is expressed in cells in the migratory stream and neurogenic niche, implicating this protein in the translocation of crustacean brain neuronal precursor cells. Symmetrical divisions of the niche precursors and migration of both daughters raised the question of how the niche precursor pool is replenished. We present here preliminary evidence for an association between vascular cells and the niche precursors, which may relate to the life-long growth and maintenance of the crustacean neurogenic niche.

  15. Cell cycle regulation during proliferation and differentiation of mammalian muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Ciemerych, Maria A; Archacka, Karolina; Grabowska, Iwona; Przewoźniak, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of muscle precursor cells are intensively studied not only in the developing mouse embryo but also using models of skeletal muscle regeneration or analyzing in vitro cultured cells. These analyses allowed to show the universality of the cell cycle regulation and also uncovered tissue-specific interplay between major cell cycle regulators and factors crucial for the myogenic differentiation. Examination of the events accompanying proliferation and differentiation leading to the formation of functional skeletal muscle fibers allows understanding the molecular basis not only of myogenesis but also of skeletal muscle regeneration. This chapter presents the basis of the cell cycle regulation in proliferating and differentiating muscle precursor cells during development and after muscle injury. It focuses at major cell cycle regulators, myogenic factors, and extracellular environment impacting on the skeletal muscle.

  16. RANK ligand signaling modulates the matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression during osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, Kumaran; Nishimura, Riko; Senn, Joseph; Youssef, Rimon F.; London, Steven D.; Reddy, Sakamuri V. . E-mail: reddysv@musc.edu

    2007-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation is tightly regulated by receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) signaling. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a type IV collagenase is highly expressed in osteoclast cells and plays an important role in degradation of extracellular matrix; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate MMP-9 gene expression are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that RANKL signaling induces MMP-9 gene expression in osteoclast precursor cells. We further show that RANKL regulates MMP-9 gene expression through TRAF6 but not TRAF2. Interestingly, blockade of p38 MAPK activity by pharmacological inhibitor, SB203580 increases MMP-9 activity whereas ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059 decreases RANKL induced MMP-9 activity in RAW264.7 cells. These data suggest that RANKL differentially regulates MMP-9 expression through p38 and ERK signaling pathways during osteoclast differentiation. Transient expression of MMP-9 gene (+ 1 to - 1174 bp relative to ATG start codon) promoter-luciferase reporter plasmids in RAW264.7 cells and RANKL stimulation showed significant increase (20-fold) of MMP-9 gene promoter activity; however, there is no significant change with respect to + 1 bp to - 446 bp promoter region and empty vector transfected cells. These results indicated that MMP-9 promoter sequence from - 446 bp to - 1174 bp relative to start codon is responsive to RANKL stimulation. Sequence analysis of the mouse MMP-9 gene promoter region further identified the presence of binding motif (- 1123 bp to - 1153 bp) for the nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFATc1) transcription factor. Inhibition of NFATc1 using siRNA and VIVIT peptide inhibitor significantly decreased RANKL stimulation of MMP-9 activity. We further confirm by oligonucleotide pull-down assay that RANKL stimuli enhanced NFATc1 binding to MMP-9 gene promoter element. In addition, over-expression of constitutively active NFAT in RAW264.7 cells markedly increased (5-fold) MMP-9 gene promoter activity

  17. Direct microsensor measurement of nitric oxide production by the osteoclast.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S F; Adebanjo, O A; Moonga, B S; Awumey, E M; Malinski, T; Zaidi, M

    1999-05-27

    Nitric oxide (NO) triggers marked osteoclast retraction which closely resembles that due to Ca2+. The effect of Ca2+ has been attributed to a stimulated release of NO. Here, we show for the first time, by direct measurement with a microsensor, that osteoclasts do indeed produce NO and that this production is enhanced by a high Ca2+. We also show that the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, mimics the latter. Furthermore, osteoclasts on dentine produce more NO than osteoclasts on glass and NO release from dentine-plated osteoclasts is much less sensitive to stimulation by Ca2+. Finally, the microsomal Ca2+ store-depleting agent, thapsigargin, attenuates NO release only from osteoclasts on glass, suggesting that stored Ca2+ has the dominant effect in modulating NO release from non-resorbing cells. NO is a powerful inhibitor of bone resorption: a direct demonstration of its production is therefore strong evidence for a role in modulating osteoclast function. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. CD44-positive cells are candidates for astrocyte precursor cells in developing mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Okano-Uchida, Takayuki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-03-01

    Neural stem cells are generally considered to be committed to becoming precursor cells before terminally differentiating into either neurons or glial cells during neural development. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte precursor cells have been identified in several areas in the murine central nervous system. The presence of astrocyte precursor cells (APCs) is not so well understood. The present study provides several lines of evidence that CD44-positive cells are APCs in the early postnatal mouse cerebellum. In developing mouse cerebellum, CD44-positive cells, mostly located in the white matter, were positive for the markers of the astrocyte lineage, but negative for the markers of mature astrocytes. CD44-positive cells were purified from postnatal cerebellum by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and characterized in vitro. In the absence of any signaling molecule, many cells died by apoptosis. The surviving cells gradually expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for mature astrocytes, indicating that differentiation into mature astrocytes is the default program for these cells. The cells produced no neurospheres nor neurons nor oligodendrocytes under any condition examined, indicating these cells are not neural stem cells. Leukemia inhibitory factor greatly promoted astrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive cells, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) did not. Fibroblast growth factor-2 was a potent mitogen for these cells, but was insufficient for survival. BMP4 inhibited activation of caspase-3 and greatly promoted survival, suggesting a novel role for BMP4 in the control of development of astrocytes in cerebellum. We isolated and characterized only CD44 strongly positive large cells and discarded small and/or CD44 weakly positive cells in this study. Further studies are necessary to characterize these cells to help determine whether CD44 is a selective and specific marker for APCs in the developing mouse cerebellum. In conclusion, we succeeded in

  19. Long-term fate of neural precursor cells following transplantation into developing and adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Lepore, A C; Neuhuber, B; Connors, T M; Han, S S W; Liu, Y; Daniels, M P; Rao, M S; Fischer, I

    2006-05-12

    Successful strategies for transplantation of neural precursor cells for replacement of lost or dysfunctional CNS cells require long-term survival of grafted cells and integration with the host system, potentially for the life of the recipient. It is also important to demonstrate that transplants do not result in adverse outcomes. Few studies have examined the long-term properties of transplanted neural precursor cells in the CNS, particularly in non-neurogenic regions of the adult. The aim of the present study was to extensively characterize the fate of defined populations of neural precursor cells following transplantation into the developing and adult CNS (brain and spinal cord) for up to 15 months, including integration of graft-derived neurons with the host. Specifically, we employed neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors, which represent neural precursor cells with lineage restrictions for neuronal and glial fate, respectively. Transplanted cells were prepared from embryonic day-13.5 fetal spinal cord of transgenic donor rats that express the marker gene human placental alkaline phosphatase to achieve stable and reliable graft tracking. We found that in both developing and adult CNS grafted cells showed long-term survival, morphological maturation, extensive distribution and differentiation into all mature CNS cell types (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). Graft-derived neurons also formed synapses, as identified by electron microscopy, suggesting that transplanted neural precursor cells integrated with adult CNS. Furthermore, grafts did not result in any apparent deleterious outcomes. We did not detect tumor formation, cells did not localize to unwanted locations and no pronounced immune response was present at the graft sites. The long-term stability of neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors and the lack of adverse effects suggest that transplantation of lineage-restricted neural precursor cells can

  20. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  1. Bone marrow B cell precursor number after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and GVHD development.

    PubMed

    Fedoriw, Yuri; Samulski, T Danielle; Deal, Allison M; Dunphy, Cherie H; Sharf, Andrew; Shea, Thomas C; Serody, Jonathan S; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2012-06-01

    Patients without chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) have robust B cell reconstitution and are able to maintain B cell homeostasis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To determine whether B lymphopoiesis differs before cGVHD develops, we examined bone marrow (BM) biopsies for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and PAX5 immunostaining early post-HSCT at day 30 when all patients have been shown to have high B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels. We found significantly greater numbers of BM B cell precursors in patients who did not develop cGVHD compared with those who developed cGVHD (median = 44 vs 2 cells/high powered field [hpf]; respectively; P < .001). Importantly, a significant increase in precursor B cells was maintained when patients receiving high-dose steroid therapy were excluded (median = 49 vs 20 cells/hpf; P = .017). Thus, we demonstrate the association of BM B cell production capacity in human GVHD development. Increased BM precursor B cell number may serve to predict good clinical outcome after HSCT. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bone Marrow B cell Precursor Number after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation and GVHD Development

    PubMed Central

    Fedoriw, Yuri; Samulski, T. Danielle; Deal, Allison M.; Dunphy, Cherie H.; Sharf, Andrew; Shea, Thomas C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Patients without chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) have robust B cell reconstitution and are able to maintain B cell homeostasis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To determine whether B lymphopoiesis differs before cGVHD develops, we examined bone marrow (BM) biopsies for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and PAX5 immunostaining early post-HSCTat day 30 when all patients have been shown to have high B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels. We found significantly greater numbers of BM B cell precursors in patients who did not develop cGVHD compared with those who developed cGVHD (median = 44 vs 2 cells/high powered field [hpf]; respectively; P < .001). Importantly, a significant increase in precursor B cells was maintained when patients receiving high-dose steroid therapy were excluded (median = 49 vs 20 cells/hpf; P =.017). Thus, we demonstrate the association of BM B cell production capacity in human GVHD development. Increased BM precursor B cell number may serve to predict good clinical outcome after HSCT. PMID:22446015

  3. Inhibitor of DASH proteases affects expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts and reduces myeloma growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Angela; Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Aziz, Nazneen; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2009-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV activity and/or structure homologues (DASH) are serine proteases implicated in tumourigenesis. We previously found that a DASH protease, fibroblast activation protein (FAP), was involved in osteoclast-induced myeloma growth. Here we further demonstrated expression of various adhesion molecules in osteoclasts cultured alone or cocultured with myeloma cells, and tested the effects of DASH inhibitor, PT-100, on myeloma cell growth, bone disease, osteoclast differentiation and activity, and expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts. PT-100 had no direct effects on viability of myeloma cells or mature osteoclasts, but significantly reduced survival of myeloma cells cocultured with osteoclasts. Real-time PCR array for 85 adhesion molecules revealed upregulation of 17 genes in osteoclasts after coculture with myeloma cells. Treatment of myeloma/osteoclast cocultures with PT-100 significantly downregulated 18 of 85 tested genes in osteoclasts, some of which are known to play roles in tumourigenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PT-100 also inhibited osteoclast differentiation and subsequent pit formation. Resorption activity of mature osteoclasts and differentiation of osteoblasts were not affected by PT-100. In primary myelomatous severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-hu mice PT-100 reduced osteoclast activity, bone resorption and tumour burden. These data demonstrated that DASH proteases are involved in myeloma bone disease and tumour growth.

  4. [Regenerative potential of human adult precursor cells: cell therapy--an option for treating cartilage defects?].

    PubMed

    Dehne, T; Tschirschmann, M; Lauster, R; Sittinger, M

    2009-05-01

    Cell-based therapeutical approaches are already in clinical use and are attracting growing interest for the treatment of joint defects. Mesenchymal stem and precursor cells (MSC) cover a wide range of properties that are useful for the regeneration process of bone and cartilage defects. The following article is an overview of the regenerative potential of MSC and discusses how the properties of these cells can be used for the development of new strategies in regenerative medicine.

  5. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained elusive despite extensive effort. We have previously reported the identification of Notch2 as an amyloid precursor protein interacting protein in E18 rat neurons. Here, we sought to reveal the physiologic consequences of this interaction. We report a functional relationship between amyloid precursor protein and Notch1, which does not affect Delta ligand binding. First, we observed interactions between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch in mouse embryonic stem cells lacking both presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, the active proteolytic components of the gamma-secretase complex, suggesting that these two transmembrane proteins can interact in the absence of presenilin. Next, we demonstrated that the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling by using Notch-dependent luciferase assays in two cell lines, the human embryonic kidney 293 and the monkey kidney, COS7. We found that the amyloid precursor protein exerts opposing effects on Notch signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 vs. COS7 cells. Finally, we show that more Notch Intracellular Domain is found in the nucleus in the presence of exogenous amyloid precursor protein or its intracellular domain, suggesting the mechanism by which the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling in certain cells. Our results provide evidence of potentially important communications between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch.

  6. Lack of evidence for recipient precursor cells replenishing β-cells in transplanted islets.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Inada, Akari; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow and tissue precursor cells have been postulated to replenish grafts of transplanted islets. Several investigators have reported that bone marrow cells can promote the regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we investigated the potential of recipient-derived precursor cells to form new pancreatic endocrine cells in islet grafts transplanted under the kidney capsule. Mouse insulin promoter (MIP)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice, which express GFP only in β-cells, or β-actin GFP mice, which express GFP ubiquitously, were used to determine if the recipient-derived cells differentiate into β-cells or other types of endocrine cells. We transplanted MIP-GFP islets into wild-type mice, wild-type islets into MIP-GFP mice, β-actin GFP islets into wild-type mice, and wild-type islets into β-actin GFP mice. β-Actin GFP bone marrow cells were then injected into wild-type mice to evaluate the potential role of bone marrow stem cells to provide new islet cells to the graft. No β-cells with green fluorescence were seen in the graft when wild-type islets were transplanted into MIP-GFP mice. When wild-type islets were transplanted into β-actin GFP mice, no β-cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts. Similarly, no endocrine cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts after injection of β-actin GFP bone marrow cells into wild-type islet-transplanted wild-type mice. This study provides further support for the concept that recipient precursor cells do not produce new β-cells in grafts of transplanted islets.

  7. Osteoclast formation and function in pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard; Kashima, Takesh G; Knowles, Helen; Gibbons, C L Max H; Whitwell, Duncan; Athanasou, Nicholas A

    2011-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a synovial tumour-like lesion that frequently causes osteolysis. PVNS contains numerous macrophages and osteoclast-like giant cells. In this study, we have analysed the cytochemical and functional characteristics of mononuclear and multinucleated cells in PVNS and determined the cellular and humoral mechanisms underlying giant cell formation and resorption in PVNS. Giant cells and CD14(+) and CD14(-) mononuclear cell populations were isolated from PVNS synovial tissue and cultured alone or in the presence and absence of the osteoclastogenic factors, RANKL and M-CSF. Osteoclast formation and activity was assessed by expression of TRAP and evidence of lacunar resorption. Giant cells in PVNS expressed an osteoclast-phenotype (CD51(+) , TRAP(+) , CD14(-) , HLA-DR(-) ) and were formed only in cultures of mononuclear cells that expressed the macrophage marker CD14. Osteoclast formation required RANKL and occurred in both the presence and absence of exogenous M-CSF. CD14(-) cells in PVNS expressed RANKL. Lacunar resorption by PVNS-derived giant cells was abolished by the addition of the bisphosphonate, zoledronate. Our findings indicate that osteoclasts form by a RANKL-dependent mechanism from CD14(+) mononuclear phagocytes in PVNS. Osteoclast formation occurred even in the absence of exogenous M-CSF, a finding which is in keeping with over-expression of M-CSF playing a pathogenic role in this condition. Anti-osteoclast resorptive treatment may be useful to control osteolysis in PVNS. Copyright © 2011 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyuki; Itano, Osamu; Oshima, Go; Chiba, Naokazu; Ishikawa, Hideki; Koyama, Yasumasa; Du, Wenlin; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2011-09-08

    We report a rare male case of an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. A 59-year-old Japanese man with diabetes visited our hospital, complaining of fullness in the upper abdomen. A laboratory analysis revealed anemia (Hemoglobin; 9.7 g/dl) and elevated C-reactive protein (3.01 mg/dl). Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was 274 U/ml and Carcinoembryonic antigen was 29.6 ng/ml. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed a 14-cm cystic mass in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen that appeared to originate from the pancreatic tail. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy/total gastrectomy/cholecystectomy. The mass consisted of a multilocular cystic lesion. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by cuboidal or columnar epithelium, including mucinous epithelium. Sarcomatous mononuclear cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells were found in the stroma. Ovarian-type stroma was not seen. We made a diagnosis of osteoclast-like giant cell tumor originating in an indeterminate mucin-producing cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. All surgical margins were negative, however, two peripancreatic lymph nodes were positive. The patient recovered uneventfully. Two months after the operation, multiple metastases occurred in the liver. He died 4 months after the operation.

  9. Human iPSC Derived GABA Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0558 TITLE: Human iPSC-Derived GABA-Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ashok K...SUBTITLE Human iPSC-Derived GABA-Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0558 5c...medial ganglionic eminence (hMGE)-like precursor cells generated from the human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into the hippocampus of

  10. Muscle precursor cells invade and repopulate freeze-killed muscles.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E; Coulton, G R; Partridge, T A

    1987-10-01

    A problem with the use of muscle grafting as a therapeutic procedure is to produce a graft functionally adequate to replace a muscle of complex architecture, such as a sphincter muscle. We thought it might be possible to use dead cadaver muscles, repopulated by the patient's own muscle precursor cells (mpc), to reconstruct muscles whose anatomy would be imposed by the framework of dead muscle and whose genetic constitution would be determined by the mpc. Here we show, in the mouse, that an extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle, killed by repeated freezing and thawing, repopulated with mpc and grafted into a nu/nu or tolerant AKR host mouse, is capable of supporting muscle formation. By using the allotypic isoenzyme forms of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase as markers, we have shown that the newly regenerated muscle in such grafts is derived mainly from the implanted mpc, but also to some extent from the host mouse's own mpc. By 50-70 days after grafting, new muscle fibres were found to constitute up to 70% of the graft. Many fibres had assumed diameters in the normal range for mouse muscle, often having peripherally placed nuclei. These findings raise the possibility of the therapeutic use of such grafts. To our surprise, dead EDL muscle grafts into which no mpc had been implanted were also the site of good muscle regeneration. New-formed muscle in these grafts was shown to be derived entirely from mpc which must have migrated into the graft from the host. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon should further our knowledge of factors which regulate the proliferation and movement of dormant mpc in adult animals.

  11. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  12. Podosome organization drives osteoclast-mediated bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Georgess, Dan; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Blangy, Anne; Jurdic, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the cells responsible for physiological bone resorption. A specific organization of their most prominent cytoskeletal structures, podosomes, is crucial for the degradation of mineralized bone matrix. Each podosome is constituted of an F-actin-enriched central core surrounded by a loose F-actin network, called the podosome cloud. In addition to intrinsic actin dynamics, podosomes are defined by their adhesion to the extracellular matrix, mainly via core-linking CD44 and cloud-linking integrins. These properties allow podosomes to collectively evolve into different patterns implicated in migration and bone resorption. Indeed, to resorb bone, osteoclasts polarize, actively secrete protons, and proteases into the resorption pit where these molecules are confined by a podosome-containing sealing zone. Here, we review recent advancements on podosome structure and regulatory pathways in osteoclasts. We also discuss the distinct functions of different podosome patterns during the lifespan of a single osteoclast. PMID:24714644

  13. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  14. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  15. Bovine dentine organic matrix down-regulates osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Sriarj, Wantida; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Takagi, Yuzo; Shimokawa, Hitoyata

    2009-01-01

    Physiological root resorption is a phenomenon that normally takes place in deciduous teeth; root resorption of permanent teeth occurs only under pathological conditions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are still unclear. Our previous study showed that osteoclasts cultured on deciduous dentine exhibited a higher degree of resorption and higher levels of cathepsin K and MMP-9 mRNA than osteoclasts cultured on permanent dentine. These results could be because of different susceptibilities to acid and the different organic matrices between deciduous and permanent dentine. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dentine extracts from bovine deciduous and permanent dentine on osteoclast activity. Osteoclasts, obtained from mouse bone marrow cells co-cultured with an osteoblast-rich fraction in the presence of 1,25-(OH)(2)-vitamin D3 and PGE2, were incubated with or without 0.6 M HCl extracts from bovine deciduous or permanent dentine for 48 h. TRAP positive cell number, TRAP activity, the areas of resorption pits, and mRNA levels of TRAP, v-ATPase, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and MMP-9 were examined. The results illustrated that TRAP activity, the resorbed area, and the mRNA levels of osteoclast marker genes seemed to be suppressed by both deciduous and permanent dentine extracts. These findings indicate that some factors that suppress osteoclast activity are contained in both deciduous and permanent dentine extracts. Although there was no significant difference in osteoclast activity between deciduous and permanent dentine extracts, osteoclasts incubated with permanent dentine extracts tend to exhibit less resorption activity than those incubated with deciduous dentine extracts. However, we could not clearly explain the causes of this.

  16. Concomitant T-cell receptor alpha and delta gene rearrangements in individual T-cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Pelkonen, J; Hurwitz, J L

    1990-01-01

    A debate has recently surfaced concerning the degree of precommitment attained by alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell precursors prior to T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. It has been suggested that precursors may be precommitted to rearrange either alpha or delta genes, but not both, thus giving rise to alpha beta- and gamma delta-producing T cells, respectively. Alternatively, the precursors may be flexible with regard to potential TCR gene rearrangements. To address this controversy, the gene rearrangements among a group of T-cell hybridomas from fetal, newborn, and early postnatal mouse thymi were examined. Six probes spanning the delta and alpha loci were used in Southern blot analyses to characterize the rearrangements which occurred on homologous chromosomes in each cell. Although homologous chromosomes often rearranged in synchrony within the alpha locus, a number of hybridomas were found which had retained a delta rearrangement on one chromosome and an alpha rearrangement on the second. Results show that a precommitment by T cells to rearrange delta or alpha genes in a mutually exclusive manner is not an absolute feature of mouse thymocyte development. Images PMID:2164690

  17. Increased apoptosis in osteoclasts and decreased RANKL immunoexpression in periodontium of cimetidine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Longhini, Renata; de Oliveira, Priscila Aparecida; de Souza Faloni, Ana Paula; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2013-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that histamine interferes with the recruitment, formation and activity of osteoclasts via H(1)- and H(2)-receptors. Cimetidine is a H(2)-receptor antagonist used for treatment of gastric ulcers that seems to prevent bone resorption. In this study, a possible cimetidine interference was investigated in the number of alveolar bone osteoclasts. The incidence of osteoclast apoptosis and immunoexpression of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) was also evaluated. Adult male rats were treated with 100 mg kg(-1) of cimetidine for 50 days (CimG); the sham group (SG) received saline. Maxillary fragments containing the first molars and alveolar bone were fixed, decalcified and embedded in paraffin. The sections were stained by H&E or submitted to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) method. TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling) method and immunohistochemical reactions for detecting caspase-3 and RANKL were performed. The number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts, the frequency of apoptotic osteoclasts and the numerical density of RANKL-positive cells were obtained. Osteoclast death by apoptosis was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In CimG, TRAP-positive osteoclasts with TUNEL-positive nuclei and caspase-3-immunolabeled osteoclasts were found. A significant reduction in the number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and a high frequency of apoptotic osteoclasts were observed in CimG. Under TEM, detached osteoclasts from the bone surface showed typical features of apoptosis. Moreover, a significant reduction in the numerical density of RANKL-positive cells was observed in CimG. The significant reduction in the number of osteoclasts may be due to cimetidine-induced osteoclast apoptosis. However, RANKL immunoexpression reduction also suggests a possible interference of cimetidine treatment in the osteoclastogenesis.

  18. Gallium modulates osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro without affecting osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Verron, Elise; Masson, Martial; Khoshniat, Solmaz; Duplomb, Laurence; Wittrant, Yohann; Baud'huin, Marc; Badran, Zahi; Bujoli, Bruno; Janvier, Pascal; Scimeca, Jean-Claude; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Guicheux, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gallium (Ga) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of disorders associated with accelerated bone loss, including cancer-related hypercalcemia and Paget's disease. These clinical applications suggest that Ga could reduce bone resorption. However, few studies have studied the effects of Ga on osteoclastic resorption. Here, we have explored the effects of Ga on bone cells in vitro. Experimental approach: In different osteoclastic models [osteoclasts isolated from long bones of neonatal rabbits (RBC), murine RAW 264.7 cells and human CD14-positive cells], we have performed resorption activity tests, staining for tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, viability and apoptotic assays. We also evaluated the effect of Ga on osteoblasts in terms of proliferation, viability and activity by using an osteoblastic cell line (MC3T3-E1) and primary mouse osteoblasts. Key results: Gallium dose-dependently (0–100 µM) inhibited the in vitro resorption activity of RBC and induced a significant decrease in the expression level of transcripts coding for osteoclastic markers in RAW 264.7 cells. Ga also dramatically reduced the formation of TRAP-positive multinucleated cells. Ga down-regulated in a dose-dependant manner the expression of the transcription factor NFATc1. However, Ga did not affect the viability or activity of primary and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. Conclusions and implications: Gallium exhibits a dose-dependent anti-osteoclastic effect by reducing in vitro osteoclastic resorption, differentiation and formation without negatively affecting osteoblasts. We provide evidence that this inhibitory mechanism involves down-regulation of NFATc1 expression, a master regulator of RANK-induced osteoclastic differentiation. PMID:20397300

  19. The natural flavonoid galangin inhibits osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB in collagen-induced arthritis and bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Jung, In-Tae; Choi, Junyoung; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Dong; Park, Dong-Suk; Choi, Do-Young

    2013-01-05

    We investigated the effect of galangin, a natural flavonoid, on osteoclastic bone destruction in collagen-induced arthritis and examined the molecular mechanisms by which galangin affects osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow derived macrophages. In mice with collagen-induced arthritis, administration of galangin significantly reduced the arthritis clinical score, edema and severity of disease without toxicity. Interestingly, galangin treatment during a later stage of collagen-induced arthritis, using mice with a higher clinical arthritis score, still significantly slowed the progression of the disease. Extensive cartilage and bone erosive changes as well as synovial inflammation, synovial hyperplasia and pannus formation were dramatically inhibited in arthritic mice treated with galangin. Furthermore, galangin-treated arthritic mice showed a significant reduction in the concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-17. We found that galangin inhibited osteoclastogenic factors and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages and osteoblast co-cultured cells, and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in osteoblasts. Galangin and NF-κB siRNA suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Also, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 reduced RANKL-induced expressions of phospho-c-Jun, c-fos and NFATc1 genes during osteoclast development. In addition, galangin suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our data suggest that galangin prevented osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis in osteoclast precursors as well as in collagen-induced arthritis mice without toxicity via attenuation of RANKL-induced activation of JNK, p38 and NF-κB pathways.

  20. Perspectives on the role of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Arias, Juan C; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2016-10-01

    We recently reported that targeted deletion of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cells of the ventricular zone impairs the maintenance of these cells in healthy and stroke-injured brain. Here we frame this exciting new finding in the context of our previous studies on Pannexin 1 in neural precursors as well as the close relationship between Pannexin 1 and purinergic receptors established by other groups. Moreover, we identify important gaps in our understanding of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology in terms of the underlying molecular mechanisms and functional/behavioural outcomes.

  1. Perspectives on the role of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Arias, Juan C.; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E.; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that targeted deletion of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cells of the ventricular zone impairs the maintenance of these cells in healthy and stroke-injured brain. Here we frame this exciting new finding in the context of our previous studies on Pannexin 1 in neural precursors as well as the close relationship between Pannexin 1 and purinergic receptors established by other groups. Moreover, we identify important gaps in our understanding of Pannexin 1 in neural precursor cell biology in terms of the underlying molecular mechanisms and functional/behavioural outcomes. PMID:27904473

  2. Monocyte Heterogeneity: Consequences for Monocyte-Derived Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Sara; de Vries, Teun J; Everts, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Blood monocytes are precursors of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. They are a heterogeneous cell population with differences in size, phenotype, and function. Although monocytes maintain several tissue-specific populations of immune cells in homeostasis, their contribution to populations of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts is significantly increased in inflammation. Identification of a growing number of functionally different subsets of cells within populations of monocyte-derived immune cells has recently put monocyte heterogeneity into sharp focus. Here, we summarize recent findings in monocyte heterogeneity and their differentiation into dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. We also discuss these advances in the context of the formation of functionally different monocyte-derived subsets of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts.

  3. Diversity of Neural Precursor Cell Types in the Prenatal Macaque Cerebral Cortex Exists Largely within the Astroglial Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Christopher L.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Noctor, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    The germinal zones of the embryonic macaque neocortex comprise the ventricular zone (VZ) and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The mammalian SVZ is subdivided into an inner SVZ and an outer SVZ, with the outer SVZ being particularly large in primates. The existence of distinct precursor cell types in the neocortical proliferative zones was inferred over 100 years ago and recent evidence supports this concept. Precursor cells exhibiting diverse morphologies, patterns of transcription factor expression, and fate potential have been identified in the neocortical proliferative zones. Neurogenic precursor cells are thought to exhibit characteristics of glial cells, but the existence of neurogenic precursor cells that do not share glial specific properties has also been proposed. Therefore, one question that remains is whether neural precursor cells in the prenatal neocortex belong within the astroglial cell class, as they do in neurogenic regions of the adult neocortex, or instead include a diverse collection of precursor cells belonging to distinct cell classes. We examined the expression of astroglial markers by mitotic precursor cells in the telencephalon of prenatal macaque and human. We show that in the dorsal neocortex all mitotic cells at the surface of the ventricle, and all Pax6+ and Tbr2+ mitotic cells in the proliferative zones, express the astroglial marker GFAP. The majority of mitotic cells undergoing division away from the ventricle express GFAP, and many of the GFAP-negative mitoses express markers of cells derived from the ventral telencephalon or extracortical sites. In contrast, a markedly lower proportion of precursor cells express GFAP in the ganglionic eminence. In conclusion, we propose that the heterogeneity of neural precursor cells in the dorsal cerebral cortex develops within the GFAP+ astroglial cell class. PMID:23724007

  4. CD4+ T cell anergy prevents autoimmunity and generates regulatory T cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Kalekar, Lokesh A.; Schmiel, Shirdi E.; Nandiwada, Sarada L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Barsness, Laura O.; Zhang, Na; Stritesky, Gretta L.; Malhotra, Deepali; Pauken, Kristen E.; Linehan, Jonathan L.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Fife, Brian T.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Mueller, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The role that anergy, an acquired state of T cell functional unresponsiveness, plays in natural peripheral tolerance remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that anergy is selectively induced in fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells during pregnancy. A naturally occurring subpopulation of anergic polyclonal CD4+ T cells, enriched in self antigen-specific T cell receptors, is also observed in healthy hosts. Neuropilin-1 expression in anergic conventional CD4+ T cells is associated with thymic regulatory T cell (Treg cell)-related gene hypomethylation, and this correlates with their capacity to differentiate into Foxp3+ Treg cells that suppress immunopathology. Thus, our data suggest that not only is anergy induction important in preventing autoimmunity, but it also generates the precursors for peripheral Treg cell differentiation. PMID:26829766

  5. Auraptene induces oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in a cuprizone-induced animal model of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Shimizu, Risei; Furuta, Kohei; Sugino, Mami; Watanabe, Takashi; Aoki, Rui; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-05-15

    We investigated the effects of auraptene on mouse oligodendroglial cell lineage in an animal model of demyelination induced by cuprizone. Auraptene, a citrus coumarin, was intraperitoneally administered to mice fed the demyelinating agent cuprizone. Immunohistochemical analysis of the corpus callosum and/or Western blotting analysis of brain extracts revealed that cuprizone reduced immunoreactivity for myelin-basic protein, a marker of myelin, whereas it increased immunoreactivity to platelet derived-growth factor receptor-α, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Administration of auraptene enhanced the immunoreactivity to oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells, but had no effect on immunoreactivity to myelin-basic protein or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. These findings suggest that auraptene promotes the production of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in an animal model of demyelination and may be useful for individuals with demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tanshinone IIA inhibits osteoclast differentiation through down-regulation of c-Fos and NFATc1.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Han Bok; Yang, Daum; Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Ha Neui; Woo, Eun Ran; Lee, Seungbok; Kim, Hong Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2006-06-30

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that is regulated by the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Excessive osteoclast formation causes diseases such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Natural substances may be useful as therapeutic drugs to prevent many diseases in humans because they avoid the many side effects of treatment with chemical compounds. Here we show that tanshinone IIA isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge inhibits the receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclast differentiation of osteoclast precursors. Tanshinone IIA suppressed the expression levels of c-Fos and NFATc1 induced by RANKL. However, retrovirus-mediated overexpression of c-Fos induced the expression of NFATc1 despite the presence of tanshinone IIA and reversed the inhibitory effect of tanshinone IIA on osteoclast differentiation. Also, the introduction of osteoclast precursors with the NFATc1 retrovirus led to osteoclast differentiation in the presence of tanshinone IIA. Our results suggest that tanshinone IIA may have a role as a therapeutic drug in the treatment of bone disease such as osteoporosis.

  7. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  8. Loss of T cell precursors after spaceflight and exposure to vector-averaged gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Chris C.; Banks, Krista E.; Gruener, Raphael; DeLuca, Dominick

    2003-01-01

    Using fetal thymus organ culture (FTOC), we examined the effects of spaceflight and vector-averaged gravity on T cell development. Under both conditions, the development of T cells was significantly attenuated. Exposure to spaceflight for 16 days resulted in a loss of precursors for CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD8+ T cells in a rat/mouse xenogeneic co-culture. A significant decrease in the same precursor cells, as well as a decrease in CD4-CD8- T cell precursors, was also observed in a murine C57BL/6 FTOC after rotation in a clinostat to produce a vector-averaged microgravity-like environment. The block in T cell development appeared to occur between the pre-T cell and CD4+CD8+ T cell stage. These data indicate that gravity plays a decisive role in the development of T cells.

  9. Enhancing Osteoclastic Resorption for the Prevention and Treatment of Heterotopic Ossification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    titration of OPG for inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclast formation by RAW264.7 cells. TRAP stain (violet) for osteoclast formation. Multinuclear...caALK2 HO model (Figures 2A & B and Figures 3A & B). We have adopted a sensitive passive range-of-motion assay based on one presented by Paul Yu2...orthotopic bone), were stained for the osteoclast marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) (Figure 4

  10. Human post-thymic precursor cells in health and disease. I. Characterization of the autologous rosette-forming T cells as post-thymic precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Alarcón-Segovia, D; Llorente, L; Ruíz-Arguelles, A; Díaz-Jouanen, E

    1981-01-01

    Human autologous-rosette-forming T cells (Tar cells) have many of the characteristics of post-thymic precursor cells. Thus, they bind to sheep erythrocytes but have neither receptors for the Fc portion of IgG nor for that of IgM. They include a subpopulation that binds peanut agglutinin which suggests that they are immature and, as opposed to T cells with either receptors for the FC portion of IgM (T mu) or of IgG (T gamma), Tar cells adhere to nylon wool, another possible indicator of immaturity, as is their extreme sensitivity to hydrocortisone both in vitro and in vivo. There are more Tar cells in cord blood than in the peripheral blood of young adults and there are more Tar cells in the peripheral blood of young adults than in the peripheral blood of elderly subjects. By co-culturing T mu and B cells, or T mu, or Tar and B cells in the presence of pokeweek mitogen (PWM) we were able to determine that these cells cause feedback inhibition, a function considered characteristic of post-thymic precursors. In co-cultures in which we placed mononuclear cells (MNC) or MNC plus Tar cells, or MNC depleted of Tar cells or MNC depleted of Tar cells plus Tar cells stimulated with PWM, we determined that Tar cells play a role in the generation of suppression thereby confirming that human Tar cells are precursor cells. We also found that Tar cells proliferated and generated T gamma and T mu cells both spontaneously and in greater numbers, under the effect of serum thymic factor. PMID:6970170

  11. Defective co-activator recruitment in osteoclasts from microphthalmia-oak ridge mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudarshana M; Sif, Said; Ostrowski, Michael C; Sankar, Uma

    2009-07-01

    The three basic DNA-binding domain mutations of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf), Mitf(mi/mi), Mitf(or/or), and Mitf(wh/wh) affect osteoclast differentiation with variable penetrance while completely impairing melanocyte development. Mitf(or/or) mice exhibit osteopetrosis that improves with age and their osteoclasts form functional multinuclear osteoclasts, raising the question as to why the Mitf(or/or) mutation results in osteopetrosis. Here we show that Mitf(or/or) osteoclasts express normal levels of acid phosphatase 5 (Acp5) mRNA and significantly lower levels of Cathepsin K (Ctsk) mRNA during receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) ligand (RANKL)-mediated differentiation. Studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis indicate that low levels of Mitf(or/or) protein are recruited to the Ctsk promoter. However, enrichment of Mitf-transcriptional co-activators PU.1 and Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1) are severely impaired at the Ctsk promoter of Mitf(or/or) osteoclast precursors, indicating that defective recruitment of co-activators by the mutant Mitf(or/or) results in impaired Ctsk expression in osteoclasts. Cathepsin K may thus represent a unique class of Mitf-regulated osteoclast-specific genes that are important for osteoclast function.

  12. Hedgehog signaling establishes precursors for germline stem cell niches by regulating cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kun-Yang; Kao, Shih-Han

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells require different types of supporting cells, or niches, to control stem cell maintenance and differentiation. However, little is known about how those niches are formed. We report that in the development of the Drosophila melanogaster ovary, the Hedgehog (Hh) gradient sets differential cell affinity for somatic gonadal precursors to specify stromal intermingled cells, which contributes to both germline stem cell maintenance and differentiation niches in the adult. We also report that Traffic Jam (an orthologue of a large Maf transcription factor in mammals) is a novel transcriptional target of Hh signaling to control cell–cell adhesion by negative regulation of E-cadherin expression. Our results demonstrate the role of Hh signaling in niche establishment by segregating somatic cell lineages for differentiation. PMID:28363970

  13. Induction of cytotoxic T cell precursors in vivo. Role of T helper cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Strain AS rats respond with two populations of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to stimulation in vitro by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)- incompatible strain HL rat tumor (HL-A2T2). One is specific for MHC alloantigens present on both HL-A2T2 and normal HL targets, the other is tumor specific. The activation of these killer cells requires helper T lymphocytes. The tumor-specific helper cells depend on syngeneic radioresistant accessory cells to present the tumor antigens in an immunogenic form. The appropriate helper-accessory cell interaction results in the production of soluble factors which then induce the maturation of precursor cells into effective killer cells. Studies with a procedure for inducing negative selection of T cells in vivo showed that short-term exposure to HL-A2T2 tumor induced selection only for TH but not cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTLp). Simultaneous injection of supernatants from concanavalin A-activated spleen cell cultures, however, did produce selection of CTLp. These and other findings suggest that under normal circumstances in vivo, both signals (recognition of antigen and acceptance of maturation factors) are provided in the vicinity of an antigen presenting macrophage-like accessory cell. PMID:6222131

  14. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  15. Adult neurogenesis in the crayfish brain: proliferation, migration and possible origin of precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Allodi, S.; Sandeman, D.C.; Beltz, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    The birth of new neurons and their incorporation into functional circuits in the adult brain is a characteristic of many vertebrate and invertebrate organisms, including decapod crustaceans. Precursor cells maintaining life-long proliferation in the brains of crayfish (Procambarus clarkii, Cherax destructor) and clawed lobsters (Homarus americanus) reside within a specialized niche on the ventral surface of the brain; their daughters migrate to two proliferation zones along a stream formed by processes of the niche precursors. Here they divide again, finally producing interneurons in the olfactory pathway. The present studies in P. clarkii explore (1) differential proliferative activity among the niche precursor cells with growth and aging, (2) morphological characteristics of cells in the niche and migratory streams, and (3) aspects of the cell cycle in this lineage. Morphologically symmetrical divisions of neuronal precursor cells were observed in the niche near where the migratory streams emerge, as well as in the streams and proliferation zones. The nuclei of migrating cells elongate and undergo shape changes consistent with nucleokinetic movement. LIS1, a highly conserved dynein-binding protein, is expressed in cells in the migratory stream and neurogenic niche, implicating this protein in the translocation of crustacean brain neuronal precursor cells. Symmetrical divisions of the niche precursors and migration of both daughters raised the question of how the niche precursor pool is replenished. We present here preliminary evidence for an association between vascular cells and the niche precursors, which may relate to the life-long growth and maintenance of the crustacean neurogenic niche. PMID:19294644

  16. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals functionalized with alendronate as bioactive components for bone implant coatings to decrease osteoclastic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, Ruggero; Iafisco, Michele; Tampieri, Anna; Jansen, John A.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.

    2015-02-01

    The integration of bone implants within native bone tissue depends on periprosthetic bone quality, which is severely decreased in osteoporotic patients. In this work, we have synthesized bone-like hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHA) using an acid-base neutralization reaction and analysed their physicochemical properties. Subsequently, we have functionalized the nHA with alendronate (nHAALE), a well-known bisphosphonate drug used for the treatment of osteoporosis. An in vitro osteoclastogenesis test was carried out to evaluate the effect of nHAALE on the formation of osteoclast-like cells from monocytic precursor cells (i.e. RAW264.7 cell line) showing that nHAALE significantly promoted apoptosis of osteoclast-like cells. Subsequently, nHA and nHAALE were deposited on titanium disks using electrospray deposition (ESD), for which characterisation of the deposited coatings confirmed the presence of alendronate in nHAALE coatings with nanoscale thickness of about 700 nm. These results indicate that alendronate linked to hydroxyapatite nanocrystals has therapeutic potential and nHAALE can be considered as an appealing coating constituent material for orthopaedic and oral implants for application in osteoporotic patients.

  17. Cytokine expression in feline osteoclastic resorptive lesions.

    PubMed

    DeLaurier, A; Allen, S; deFlandre, C; Horton, M A; Price, J S

    2002-01-01

    Feline osteoclastic resorptive lesions (FORL) of the teeth are common in cats, and lead to pain, destruction of the periodontal ligament, and tooth loss. The expression of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 mRNA was higher in teeth with FORL than in normal teeth (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively), but no such differences were found between pathological and normal gingival tissue samples. There were no differences between teeth affected with FORL and normal teeth in respect of the expression of receptor activator of NF kappa B ligand (RANKL) mRNA or osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA. However, OPG mRNA expression was higher in gingival tissue associated with teeth affected with FORL than in normal gingival tissue (P<0.05), whereas the reverse was true of RANKL mRNA expression (P<0.05). OPG mRNA expression was significantly higher in teeth than in femoral and alveolar bone (P<0.001). RANKL and OPG mRNAs were detected in all tissues examined. The data suggest that the elevated expression of IL-l beta and IL-6 mRNA plays a role in the mediation of osteoclast activity in advanced FORL. In contrast, OPG and RANKL do not appear to regulate osteoclasts in advanced disease. The results also suggest that OPG and RANKL mRNA play a role in mediating inflammatory responses in gingival cells, and that OPG has an inhibiting effect on tooth resorption.

  18. Gene expression analysis of embryonic photoreceptor precursor cells using BAC-Crx-EGFP transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yuki; Sato, Shigeru; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ueno, Shinji; Koyasu, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2010-02-12

    Crx is a transcription factor which is predominantly expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells in the retina, and plays a crucial role in the terminal differentiation of both rods and cones. Crx is one of the earliest-expressed genes specifically in photoreceptor precursors, allowing us to trace photoreceptor precursor cells from embryonic stages to adult stage by visualizing Crx-expressing cells. In the current study, we generated a transgenic mouse line which expresses enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) in the retina driven by the Crx promoter using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. EGFP-positive cells were observed in the presumptive photoreceptor layer in the retina at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5), and continued to be expressed in developing and mature photoreceptor cells up to adult stage. We sorted EGFP-positive photoreceptor precursors at E17.5 using fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS), and subsequently performed microarray analysis of the FACS-sorted cells. We observed various photoreceptor genes, especially cone genes, are enriched in the EGFP-positive cells, indicating that embryonic cone photoreceptor precursors are enriched. In addition, we found that most of the EGFP-positive cells were post-mitotic cells. Thus, the transgenic line we established can serve as a useful tool to study both developing and mature photoreceptor cells, including embryonic cone precursors whose analysis has been difficult.

  19. Role of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Regulation of Osteoclastic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Matilda H.-C.; Lau, K.-H. William

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts, the primary cell type mediating bone resorption, are multinucleated, giant cells derived from hematopoietic cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. Osteoclast activity is, in a large part, regulated by protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. While information about functional roles of several protein-tyrosine kinases (PTK), including c-Src, in osteoclastic resorption has been accumulated, little is known about the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in regulation of osteoclast activity. Recent evidence implicates important regulatory roles for four PTPs (SHP-1, cyt-PTP-ε, PTP-PEST, and PTP-oc) in osteoclasts. Cyt-PTP-ε, PTP-PEST, and PTP-oc are positive regulators of osteoclast activity, while SHP-1 is a negative regulator. Of these PTPs in osteoclasts, only PTP-oc is a positive regulator of c-Src PTK through dephosphorylation of the inhibitory phosphotyrosine-527 residue. Although some information about mechanisms of action of these PTPs to regulate osteoclast activity is reviewed in this article, much additional work is required to provide more comprehensive details about their functions in osteoclasts. PMID:19189046

  20. Human iPSC-Derived GABA Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0558 TITLE: Human iPSC-Derived GABA-Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ashok K...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Human iPSC-Derived GABA-Ergic Precursor Cell Therapy for Chronic Epilepsy 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0558 5c...exhibiting chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) would: (1) greatly diminish the frequency and intensity of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS, Specific

  1. Monocytes/Macrophages Upregulate the Hyaluronidase HYAL1 and Adapt Its Subcellular Trafficking to Promote Extracellular Residency upon Differentiation into Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Emeline; Boonen, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are giant bone-resorbing cells originating from monocytes/macrophages. During their differentiation, they overexpress two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin K and TRAP, which are secreted into the resorption lacuna, an acidified sealed area in contact with bone matrix where bone degradation takes place. Here we report that the acid hydrolase HYAL1, a hyaluronidase able to degrade the glycosaminoglycans hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate, is also upregulated upon osteoclastogenesis. The mRNA expression and protein level of HYAL1 are markedly increased in osteoclasts differentiated from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages or primary mouse bone marrow monocytes compared to these precursor cells. As a result, the HYAL1-mediated HA hydrolysis ability of osteoclasts is strongly enhanced. Using subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that HYAL1 proteins are sorted to the osteoclast lysosomes even though, in contrast to cathepsin K and TRAP, HYAL1 is poorly mannose 6-phosphorylated. We reported previously that macrophages secrete HYAL1 proforms by constitutive secretion, and that these are recaptured by the cell surface mannose receptor, processed in endosomes and sorted to lysosomes. Present work highlights that osteoclasts secrete HYAL1 in two ways, through lysosomal exocytosis and constitutive secretion, and that these cells promote the extracellular residency of HYAL1 through downregulation of the mannose receptor. Interestingly, the expression of the other main hyaluronidase, HYAL2, and of lysosomal exoglycosidases involved in HA degradation, does not increase similarly to HYAL1 upon osteoclastogenesis. Taken together, these findings point out the predominant involvement of HYAL1 in bone HA metabolism and perhaps bone remodeling via the resorption lacuna. PMID:27755597

  2. Estrogens maintain bone mass by regulating expression of genes controlling function and life span in mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuuki; Youn, Ming-Young; Kondoh, Shino; Nakamura, Takashi; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Takada, Ichiro; Takaoka, Kunio; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-09-01

    Estrogens play a key role in regulation of bone mass and strength by controlling activity of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Cellular effects of estrogens are mediated predominantly by the action of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). In earlier studies, ablation of the ERalpha gene in mice did not result in osteoporotic phenotypes due to systemic endocrine disturbance and compensatory effects of elevated levels of testosterone. Despite the relatively well-established effects in osteoblasts, little is known about the direct action of estrogen in osteoclasts. Development in the last decade of more sophisticated genetic manipulation approaches opened new possibilities to explore cell-specific roles of nuclear receptors in bone tissue. Recently, we have generated osteoclast-specific ERalpha gene knockout mice and shown that in vivo estrogens directly regulate the life span of mature osteoclasts by inducing the expression of pro-apoptotic Fas ligand (FasL). Inhibitory effects of estrogens on osteoclast function were further studied in vitro. We observed sufficiently detectable ERalpha expression in osteoclasts differentiating from primary bone marrow cells or RAW264 cells, although levels of ERalpha were decreasing during progression of the differentiation into mature osteoclasts. Treatment with estrogens led to reduction in expression of osteoclast-specific genes controlling bone resorption activity. However, estrogens did not affect the size of multinucleated osteoclasts or number of nuclei in a mature osteoclast. In conclusion, in osteoclasts, estrogens function to inhibit bone resorption activity and vitality rather than differentiation.

  3. Mouse interleukin-1 receptor antagonist induced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide blocks the effects of interleukin-1 on bone resorption and osteoclast-like cell formation.

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, T; Ohsaki, Y; Ueda, N; Saito, N; Mundy, G R

    1994-01-01

    We have reported that P388D1 cell line murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans release interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitor. The IL-1 inhibitor was purified from conditioned media of P388D1 cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans LPS for 72 h to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: acetic acid extraction from conditioned media; Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration chromatography; DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography; and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 hydrophobic support. The purified IL-1 inhibitor gave a single band of protein with a molecular mass of 26 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified IL-1 inhibitor was a heat- and acid-stable protein that was inactivated by digestion with trypsin and reduction with dithiothreitol. This inhibitory factor suppressed the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes and the proliferation of IL-1-dependent cell lines, D10.G4.1 and RPMI 1788, induced by IL-1. However, this inhibitor did not affect the proliferation of IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells induced by IL-2, the proliferation of C3H/HeJ mouse thymocytes stimulated with a mitogenic dose of concanavalin A, and the proliferation of IL-6-dependent B9 cells induced by IL-6. Furthermore, the IL-1 inhibitor significantly blocked stimulation of bone resorption in organ cultures of newborn mouse calvaria and inhibited the osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse marrow cultures. A monoclonal antibody prepared against the purified IL-1 inhibitor reacted with mouse recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1ra), and a polyclonal antibody to mouse rIL-1ra reacted with the IL-1 inhibitor by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. These results indicate that the IL-1 inhibitor is an identical molecule to rIL-1ra, suggesting that the IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1ra) released by macrophages stimulated with LPS from A. actinomycetemcomitans may play an important mediative role

  4. Derivation of Neural Precursor Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for DNA Methylomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Ivan; Park, Sun Joo; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent cells with competency to differentiate into all three-germ lineages. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic and epigenetic molecular mechanisms in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency. Stem cells are under unique molecular and cellular regulations different from somatic cells. Proper regulation should be ensured to maintain their unique self-renewal and undifferentiated characteristics. Understanding key mechanisms in stem cell biology will be important for the successful application of stem cells for regenerative therapeutic medicine. More importantly practical use of stem cells will require our knowledge on how to properly direct and differentiate stem cells into the necessary type of cells. Embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells have been used as study models to unveil molecular and cellular mechanisms in various signaling pathways. They are especially beneficial to developmental studies where in vivo molecular/cellular study models are not available. We have derived neural stem cells from human embryonic stem cells as a model to study the effect of teratogen in neural development. We have tested commercial neural differentiation system and successfully derived neural precursor cells exhibiting key molecular features of neural stem cells, which will be useful for experimental application.

  5. Induction of Skin-Derived Precursor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Yoriko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Moriwaki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    The generation of full thickness human skin from dissociated cells is an attractive approach not only for treating skin diseases, but also for treating many systemic disorders. However, it is currently not possible to obtain an unlimited number of skin dermal cells. The goal of this study was to develop a procedure to produce skin dermal stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) were isolated as adult dermal precursors that could differentiate into both neural and mesodermal progenies and could reconstitute the dermis. Thus, we attempted to generate SKPs from iPSCs that could reconstitute the skin dermis. Human iPSCs were initially cultured with recombinant noggin and SB431542, an inhibitor of activin/nodal and TGFβ signaling, to induce neural crest progenitor cells. Those cells were then treated with SKP medium that included CHIR99021, a WNT signal activator. The induction efficacy from neural crest progenitor cells to SKPs was more than 97%. No other modifiers tested were able to induce those cells. Those human iPSC-derived SKPs (hiPSC-SKPs) showed a similar gene expression signature to SKPs isolated from human skin dermis. Human iPSC-SKPs differentiated into neural and mesodermal progenies, including adipocytes, skeletogenic cell types and Schwann cells. Moreover, they could be induced to follicular type keratinization when co-cultured with human epidermal keratinocytes. We here provide a new efficient protocol to create human skin dermal stem cells from hiPSCs that could contribute to the treatment of various skin disorders.

  6. Mechanical regulation of osteoclastic genes in human osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, Ludwika Liedert, Astrid; Hasni, Sofia; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2008-04-11

    Bone adaptation to mechanical load is accompanied by changes in gene expression of bone-forming cells. Less is known about mechanical effects on factors controlling bone resorption by osteoclasts. Therefore, we studied the influence of mechanical loading on several key genes modulating osteoclastogenesis. Human osteoblasts were subjected to various cell stretching protocols. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate gene expression. Cell stretching resulted in a significant up-regulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) immediate after intermittent loading (3 x 3 h, 3 x 6 h, magnitude 1%). Continuous loading, however, had no effect on RANKL expression. The expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), and osteoclast inhibitory lectin (OCIL) was not significantly altered. The data suggested that mechanical loading could influence osteoclasts recruitment by modulating RANKL expression in human osteoblasts and that the effects might be strictly dependent on the quality of loading.

  7. PTHrP produced by myeloma plasma cells regulates their survival and pro-osteoclast activity for bone disease progression.

    PubMed

    Cafforio, Paola; Savonarola, Annalisa; Stucci, Stefania; De Matteo, Monica; Tucci, Marco; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Vecchio, Vita Mariagrazia; Silvestris, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    To promote their survival and progression in the skeleton, osteotropic malignancies of breast, lung, and prostate produce parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), which induces hypercalcemia. PTHrP serum elevations have also been described in multiple myeloma (MM), although their role is not well defined. When we investigated MM cells from patients and cell lines, we found that PTHrP and its receptor (PTH-R1) are highly expressed, and that PTHrP is secreted both as a full-length molecule and as small subunits. Among these subunits, the mid-region, including the nuclear localization sequence (NLS), exerted a proliferative effect because it was accumulated in nuclei of MM cells surviving in starvation conditions. This was confirmed by increased transcription of several genes enrolled in proliferation and apoptosis control. PTHrP was also found to stimulate PTH-R1 in MM cells. PTH-R1's selective activation by the full-length PTHrP molecule or the NH2 -terminal fragment resulted in a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) influx, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) content, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Our data definitely clarify the role of PTHrP in MM. The PTHrP peptide is functionally secreted by malignant plasma cells and contributes to MM tumor biology and progression, both by intracrine maintenance of cell proliferation in stress conditions and by autocrine or paracrine stimulation of PTH-R1, which in turn reinforces the production of osteoclastogenic factors. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in mouse bone marrow: Subosteal localization of B220+ cells during postirradiation regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, K.; Tepper, J.; Osmond, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The localization of early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in the bone marrow of young mice has been studied during recovery from sublethal whole body gamma-irradiation (150 rad). Initial studies by double immunofluorescence labeling of the B-lineage-associated cell surface glycoprotein, B220, and of mu heavy chains in bone marrow cell suspensions, demonstrated a sequential wave of regeneration of early B precursor cells, pre-B cells, and B cells. Early B precursor cells expressing B220 but not mu chains were enriched at 1-3 days following irradiation. After in vivo administration of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody 14.8 to detect B220+ cells in situ, light and electron microscope radioautography of femoral bone marrow sections revealed concentrations of labeled B220+ cells located peripherally near the cortical bone at 1-3 days following irradiation, increasing in numbers in more central areas by 5-7 days. Proliferative B220+ precursor cells were found within layers of bone-lining cells and in a subosteal area characterized by a prominent electron-dense extracellular matrix, often associated with stromal reticular cells. The results demonstrate that the precursor cells that are active in the bone marrow early in the recovery of B lymphopoiesis after gamma-irradiation are located both within and near the endosteum of the surrounding bone. The distinctive extracellular matrix and stromal cell associations noted in this region may contribute to a supportive local microenvironment for early hemopoietic progenitor cells.

  9. Fas Binding to Calmodulin Regulates Apoptosis in Osteoclasts*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojun; Ahn, Eun-Young; McKenna, Margaret A.; Yeo, Hyeonju; McDonald, Jay M.

    2005-01-01

    Promotion of osteoclast apoptosis is one therapeutic approach to osteoporosis. Calmodulin, the major intracellular Ca2+ receptor, modulates both osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. The calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine, rescues bone loss in ovariectomized mice (Zhang, L., Feng, X., and McDonald, J. M. (2003) Endocrinology 144, 4536–4543). We show here that a 3-h treatment of mouse osteoclasts with either of the calmodulin antagonists, tamoxifen or trifluoperazine, induces osteoclast apoptosis dose-dependently. Tamoxifen, 10 μm, and trifluoperazine, 10 μm, induce 7.3 ± 1.8-fold and 5.3 ± 0.9-fold increases in osteoclast apoptosis, respectively. In Jurkat cells, calmodulin binds to Fas, the death receptor, and this binding is regulated during Fas-mediated apoptosis (Ahn, E. Y., Lim, S. T., Cook, W. J., and McDonald, J. M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 5661–5666). In osteoclasts, calmodulin also binds Fas. When osteoclasts are treated with 10 μm trifluoperazine, the binding between Fas and calmodulin is dramatically decreased at 15 min and gradually recovers by 60 min. A point mutation of the Fas death domain in the Lpr−cg mouse renders Fas inactive. Using glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins, the human Fas cytoplasmic domain is shown to bind calmodulin, whereas a point mutation (V254N) comparable with the Lpr−cg mutation in mice has markedly reduced calmodulin binding. Osteoclasts derived from Lpr−cg mice have diminished calmodulin/Fas binding and are more sensitive to calmodulin antagonist-induced apoptosis than those from wild-type mice. Both tamoxifen- and trifluoperazine-induced apoptosis are increased 1.6 ± 0.2-fold in Lpr−cg-derived osteoclasts compared with osteoclasts derived from wild-type mice. In summary, calmodulin antagonists induce apoptosis in osteoclasts by a mechanism involving interference with calmodulin binding to Fas. The effects of calmodulin/Fas binding on calmodulin antagonist-induced apoptosis may open a new

  10. Transcriptional Modulator Ifrd1 Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation through Enhancing the NF-κB/NFATc1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Iezaki, Takashi; Fukasawa, Kazuya; Park, Gyujin; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Kanayama, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Onishi, Yuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Yukari; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio; Nakamura, Takashi; Vacher, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the synergistic actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Here, we show that the transcriptional coactivator/repressor interferon-related developmental regulator 1 (Ifrd1) is expressed in osteoclast lineages and represents a component of the machinery that regulates bone homeostasis. Ifrd1 expression was transcriptionally regulated in preosteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) through activator protein 1. Global deletion of murine Ifrd1 increased bone formation and decreased bone resorption, leading to a higher bone mass. Deletion of Ifrd1 in osteoclast precursors prevented RANKL-induced bone loss, although no bone loss was observed under normal physiological conditions. RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis was impaired in vitro in Ifrd1-deleted bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Ifrd1 deficiency increased the acetylation of p65 at residues K122 and K123 via the inhibition of histone deacetylase-dependent deacetylation in BMMs. This repressed the NF-κB-dependent transcription of nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), an essential regulator of osteoclastogenesis. These findings suggest that an Ifrd1/NF-κB/NFATc1 axis plays a pivotal role in bone remodeling in vivo and represents a therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:27381458

  11. Anti–IL-20 monoclonal antibody inhibits the differentiation of osteoclasts and protects against osteoporotic bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chan, Chien-Hui; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Sun, Zih-Jie

    2011-01-01

    IL-20 is a proinflammatory cytokine of the IL-10 family that is involved in psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and stroke. However, little is known about the role of IL-20 in bone destruction. We explored the function of IL-20 in osteoclastogenesis and the therapeutic potential of anti–IL-20 monoclonal antibody 7E for treating osteoporosis. Higher serum IL-20 levels were detected in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis and in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. IL-20 mediates osteoclastogenesis by up-regulating the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) expression in osteoclast precursor cells and RANK ligand (RANKL) in osteoblasts. 7E treatment completely inhibited osteoclast differentiation induced by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL in vitro and protected mice from OVX-induced bone loss in vivo. Furthermore, IL-20R1–deficient mice had significantly higher bone mineral density (BMD) than did wild-type controls. IL-20R1 deficiency also abolished IL-20–induced osteoclastogenesis and increased BMD in OVX mice. We have identified a pivotal role of IL-20 in osteoclast differentiation, and we conclude that anti–IL-20 monoclonal antibody is a potential therapeutic for protecting against osteoporotic bone loss. PMID:21844205

  12. Dual Targeting of Cell Wall Precursors by Teixobactin Leads to Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Tomoyuki; Nuxoll, Austin; Gandt, Autumn Brown; Ebner, Patrick; Engels, Ina; Schneider, Tanja; Götz, Friedrich; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Teixobactin represents the first member of a newly discovered class of antibiotics that act through inhibition of cell wall synthesis. Teixobactin binds multiple bactoprenol-coupled cell wall precursors, inhibiting both peptidoglycan and teichoic acid synthesis. Here, we show that the impressive bactericidal activity of teixobactin is due to the synergistic inhibition of both targets, resulting in cell wall damage, delocalization of autolysins, and subsequent cell lysis. We also find that teixobactin does not bind mature peptidoglycan, further increasing its activity at high cell densities and against vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) isolates with thickened peptidoglycan layers. These findings add to the attractiveness of teixobactin as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of infection caused by antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:27550357

  13. Regulation of Asymmetric Cell Division in Mammalian Neural Stem and Cancer Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Daynac, Mathieu; Petritsch, Claudia K

    Stem and progenitor cells are characterized by their abilities to self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is achieved through control of cell division mode, which can be either asymmetric or symmetric. Failure to properly control cell division mode may result in premature depletion of the stem/progenitor cell pool or abnormal growth and impaired differentiation. In many tissues, including the brain, stem cells and progenitor cells undergo asymmetric cell division through the establishment of cell polarity. Cell polarity proteins are therefore potentially critical regulators of asymmetric cell division. Decrease or loss of asymmetric cell division can be associated with reduced differentiation common during aging or impaired remyelination as seen in demyelinating diseases. Progenitor-like glioma precursor cells show decreased asymmetric cell division rates and increased symmetric divisions, which suggests that asymmetric cell division suppresses brain tumor formation. Cancer stem cells, on the other hand, still undergo low rates of asymmetric cell division, which may provide them with a survival advantage during therapy. These findings led to the hypotheses that asymmetric cell divisions are not always tumor suppressive but can also be utilized to maintain a cancer stem cell population. Proper control of cell division mode is therefore not only deemed necessary to generate cellular diversity during development and to maintain adult tissue homeostasis but may also prevent disease and determine disease progression. Since brain cancer is most common in the adult and aging population, we review here the current knowledge on molecular mechanisms that regulate asymmetric cell divisions in the neural and oligodendroglial lineage during development and in the adult brain.

  14. Mesenchymal precursor cells maintain the differentiation and proliferation potentials of breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stromal-epithelial interactions play a fundamental role in tissue homeostasis, controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Not surprisingly, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to malignancies. Studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions require ex vivo experimental model systems that recapitulate the complexity of human tissue without compromising the differentiation and proliferation potentials of human primary cells. Methods We isolated and characterized human breast epithelial and mesenchymal precursors from reduction mammoplasty tissue and tagged them with lentiviral vectors. We assembled heterotypic co-cultures and compared mesenchymal and epithelial cells to cells in corresponding monocultures by analyzing growth, differentiation potentials, and gene expression profiles. Results We show that heterotypic culture of non-immortalized human primary breast epithelial and mesenchymal precursors maintains their proliferation and differentiation potentials and constrains their growth. We further describe the gene expression profiles of stromal and epithelial cells in co-cultures and monocultures and show increased expression of the tumor growth factor beta (TGFβ) family member inhibin beta A (INHBA) in mesenchymal cells grown as co-cultures compared with monocultures. Notably, overexpression of INHBA in mesenchymal cells increases colony formation potential of epithelial cells, suggesting that it contributes to the dynamic reciprocity between breast mesenchymal and epithelial cells. Conclusions The described heterotypic co-culture system will prove useful for further characterization of the molecular mechanisms mediating interactions between human normal or neoplastic breast epithelial cells and the stroma, and will provide a framework to test the relevance of the ever-increasing number of oncogenomic alterations identified in human breast cancer. PMID:24916766

  15. Mesenchymal precursor cells maintain the differentiation and proliferation potentials of breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Duss, Stephan; Brinkhaus, Heike; Britschgi, Adrian; Cabuy, Erik; Frey, Daniel M; Schaefer, Dirk J; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed

    2014-06-10

    Stromal-epithelial interactions play a fundamental role in tissue homeostasis, controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Not surprisingly, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to malignancies. Studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions require ex vivo experimental model systems that recapitulate the complexity of human tissue without compromising the differentiation and proliferation potentials of human primary cells. We isolated and characterized human breast epithelial and mesenchymal precursors from reduction mammoplasty tissue and tagged them with lentiviral vectors. We assembled heterotypic co-cultures and compared mesenchymal and epithelial cells to cells in corresponding monocultures by analyzing growth, differentiation potentials, and gene expression profiles. We show that heterotypic culture of non-immortalized human primary breast epithelial and mesenchymal precursors maintains their proliferation and differentiation potentials and constrains their growth. We further describe the gene expression profiles of stromal and epithelial cells in co-cultures and monocultures and show increased expression of the tumor growth factor beta (TGFβ) family member inhibin beta A (INHBA) in mesenchymal cells grown as co-cultures compared with monocultures. Notably, overexpression of INHBA in mesenchymal cells increases colony formation potential of epithelial cells, suggesting that it contributes to the dynamic reciprocity between breast mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The described heterotypic co-culture system will prove useful for further characterization of the molecular mechanisms mediating interactions between human normal or neoplastic breast epithelial cells and the stroma, and will provide a framework to test the relevance of the ever-increasing number of oncogenomic alterations identified in human breast cancer.

  16. Differential Effects of Isoxazole-9 on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells, Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Osumi, Noriko; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hong; Holder, Julie C.; Chuang, Tsu Tshen; McNeish, John D.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brain can be plastic after injury and disease. Therefore, boosting endogenous repair mechanisms would be a useful therapeutic approach for neurological disorders. Isoxazole-9 (Isx-9) has been reported to enhance neurogenesis from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). However, the effects of Isx-9 on other types of progenitor/precursor cells remain mostly unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of Isx-9 on the three major populations of progenitor/precursor cells in brain: NSPCs, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Cultured primary NSPCs, OPCs, or EPCs were treated with various concentrations of Isx-9 (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 μM), and their cell numbers were counted in a blinded manner. Isx-9 slightly increased the number of NSPCs and effectively induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. However, Isx-9 significantly decreased OPC number in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting cytotoxicity. Isx-9 did not affect EPC cell number. But in a matrigel assay of angiogenesis, Isx-9 significantly inhibited tube formation in outgrowth endothelial cells derived from EPCs. This potential anti-tube-formation effect of Isx-9 was confirmed in a brain endothelial cell line. Taken together, our data suggest that mechanisms and targets for promoting stem/progenitor cells in the central nervous system may significantly differ between cell types. PMID:26407349

  17. Cerebellar granule cells are predominantly generated by terminal symmetric divisions of granule cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kie; Umeshima, Hiroki; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-06-01

    Neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) are generated by symmetric and asymmetric cell division of neural stem cells and their derivative progenitor cells. Cerebellar g