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Sample records for osteoinductive material collosse

  1. Fat Layer from Medullary Canal Reamer Aspirate for Potential Use as a Supplemental Osteoinductive Bone Graft Material.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Sarina S Kay; Horton, C Olsen; Jeray, Kyle J; Tanner, Stephanie L; Burgl, Karen J L

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of therapeutic interest to clinicians and researchers, as they have been shown to augment the osteogenic properties of bone grafts. MSCs are known to be prevalent in bone marrow, but are still limited in numbers. Hence, additional sources of MSCs are beneficial to increasing grafting potential. Aspirate material collected using the Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator (RIA) device (Synthes; Paoli, PA) during reaming of the femoral shaft consists of three main components: bone fragments, liquid flow-through, and a fat layer. Currently, only the bone and liquid layers have been examined for osteoinductive elements, and the bone fragments are exclusively used as autologous bone graft. In the present study, a method to promote cellular outgrowth, tapping proliferative capacity from the previously discarded fatty layer of RIA aspirate, is described. Proliferating cells were successfully isolated from the bone and fatty layers of a consenting patient and found to be viable after liquid nitrogen storage. The osteogenic differentiation potential of the cells isolated from the fat and bone layers was assessed. Cells from both layers of the aspirate expressed statistically significant levels (p < 0.05) of the bone cell marker alkaline phosphatase compared to the control cells, suggesting differentiation along the osteoblastic pathway. Results from this pilot study indicate that the traditionally discarded fatty element of RIA aspirate may be a source of MSCs with bone-forming capabilities and the described isolation technique is effective. Combining the aspirate fatty and bony elements may enhance the clinical success of the RIA autograft.

  2. A new biphasic osteoinductive calcium composite material with a negative Zeta potential for bone augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Kolk, Andreas; Gerressen, Marcus; Driemel, Oliver; Maciejewski, Oliver; Hermanns-Sachweh, Benita; Riediger, Dieter; Stein, Jamal M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the osteogenic potential of a biphasic calcium composite material (BCC) with a negative surface charge for maxillary sinus floor augmentation. In a 61 year old patient, the BCC material was used in a bilateral sinus floor augmentation procedure. Six months postoperative, a bone sample was taken from the augmented regions before two titanium implants were inserted at each side. We analyzed bone neoformation by histology, bone density by computed tomography, and measured the activity of voltage-activated calcium currents of osteoblasts and surface charge effects. Control orthopantomograms were carried out five months after implant insertion. The BCC was biocompatible and replaced by new mineralized bone after being resorbed completely. The material demonstrated a negative surface charge (negative Zeta potential) which was found to be favorable for bone regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:19523239

  3. In vitro osteoinduction of demineralized bone.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, P; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R

    1998-05-01

    Among numerous available materials for osseous repair and reconstruction, those presenting osteoinductive characteristics and promoting bone regeneration are preferable. Fresh autologous bone is one of the most effective, but it has some disadvantages and risks. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is considered to be a valid alternative, because it seems to show osteogenic potential, ascribed to the presence of bone morphogenetic proteins. In addition it can be prepared without difficulty and preserved without losing osteoinductive properties. The aim of the study was to evaluate the osteoinductive ability of xenogenic DBM, by testing DBM powder obtained from rabbit long bones, in cell culture of murine fibroblasts, alone or associated with electromagnetic field (EMF), that are known to exhibit biologic effects on cells: in particular they are used in orthopedics to improve bone formation. At the end of experiment, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium levels and cell proliferation and morphology were evaluated. A statistically significant stimulation of ALP activity and cell proliferation and a morphological change of fibroblasts were found. The results obtained show how DBM and EMF have different effects on cells, and that together they have synergic action toward bone induction.

  4. DNA sequences encoding osteoinductive products

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.A.; Wozney, J.M.; Rosen, V.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes an isolated DNA sequence encoding an osteoinductive protein the DNA sequence comprising a coding sequence. It comprises: nucleotide No.1 through nucleotide No.387, nucleotide No.356 through nucleotide No.1543, nucleotide $402 through nucleotide No.1626, naturally occurring allelic sequences and equivalent degenerative codon sequences and sequences which hybridize to any of sequences under stringent hybridization conditions; and encode a protein characterized by the ability to induce the formation of bone and/or cartilage.

  5. Osteoinductive porous titanium implants: effect of sodium removal by dilute HCl treatment.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Neo, Masashi; Suzuki, Jun; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-05-01

    In a previous study, we observed that chemically and thermally treated plasma-sprayed porous titanium possesses intrinsic osteoinductivity and that bone formation occurs after 12 months in the muscles of beagle dogs. The aim of this study was to optimize the surface treatment and to accelerate the osteoinductivity. Previous studies have reported that sodium removal converts the sodium titanate layer on the surface of an alkali-treated titanium plate into a more bioactive titania layer. In this study, we developed a dilute hydrochloric acid (HCl) treatment for porous titanium, which removed sodium from the complexly shaped porous structure more effectively than conventional hot water treatment. Three types of surface treatments were applied: (a) alkali and heat treatment (AH treatment); (b) alkali, hot water, and heat treatment (Water-AH treatment); and (c) alkali, dilute HCl, hot water, and heat treatment (HCl-AH treatment). The osteoinductivity of the materials implanted in the back muscles of adult beagle dogs was examined at 3, 6, and 12 months. The HCl-AH-treated porous bioactive titanium implant had the highest osteoinductivity, with induction of a large amount of bone formation within 3 months. The dilute HCl treatment was considered to give both chemical (titania formation and sodium removal) and topographic (etching) effects on the titanium surface, although we cannot determine which is the predominant factor. Nevertheless, adding the dilute HCl treatment to the conventional chemical and thermal treatments is a promising candidate for advanced surface treatment of porous titanium implants.

  6. The effect of Emdogain and platelet-derived growth factor on the osteoinductive potential of hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chan, R C; Marino, V; Bartold, P M

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hydroxyapatite β-tricalcium phosphate (HA-TCP) either alone or coated with Emdogain (EMD) or recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) becomes osteoinductive in the murine thigh muscle model for osteoinduction. Twenty CD1 adult male mice had gelatin capsules implanted into the thigh muscle of both hind limbs. The capsules were either empty or contained one of the following: uncoated particulate HA-TCP, EMD-coated HA-TCP or rhPDGF-BB-coated HA-TCP. The implant sites were assessed histologically at 4 and 8 weeks. A semi-quantitative histological examination was performed to assess the inflammatory changes, reparative processes and osteoinduction within the graft site. At both 4 and 8 weeks, histological analysis failed to demonstrate any osteoinductive activity in any of the specimens from the experimental groups. A minimal chronic inflammatory response and foreign body reaction around the implanted materials was seen which reduced over time. The HA-TCP particles were embedded within fibrous connective tissue and were encapsulated by a dense cellular layer consisting of active fibroblasts and occasional macrophages with the thickness of this layer decreasing over time. The results of this study suggest that the use of commercially available HA-TCP alone or in combination with EMD or rhPDGF-BB is biocompatible but not osteoinductive in the murine thigh muscle model of osteoinduction. Coating HA-TCP with EMD or rhPDGF-BB does not enhance its osteoinductive potential.

  7. A review of osteoinductive testing methods and sterilization processes for demineralized bone.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Allogeneic demineralized bone has been used extensively as a clinical graft material because it has osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. Concerns over processing and terminal sterilization procedures that may reduce performance have led clinicians to call for assurances of product potency. There is extensive experience on effects of demineralized bone in animal and cell culture models with the possibility for future evidence-based standards for release of products. Evaluation of the current state of knowledge leads to the fact that we cannot conclude that performance of different lots of demineralized bone allografts in in vivo or in vitro test systems can be used as a measure of clinical performance. It may be possible to adopt an osteoinductivity standard for release-to-market, but it should be followed by clinical monitoring and further research.

  8. Osteoconduction and osteoinduction of low-temperature 3D printed bioceramic implants.

    PubMed

    Habibovic, Pamela; Gbureck, Uwe; Doillon, Charles J; Bassett, David C; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Barralet, Jake E

    2008-03-01

    Rapid prototyping is a valuable implant production tool that enables the investigation of individual geometric parameters, such as shape, porosity, pore size and permeability, on the biological performance of synthetic bone graft substitutes. In the present study, we have employed low-temperature direct 3D printing to produce brushite and monetite implants with different geometries. Blocks predominantly consisting of brushite with channels either open or closed to the exterior were implanted on the decorticated lumbar transverse processes of goats for 12 weeks. In addition, similar blocks with closed channel geometry, consisting of either brushite or monetite were implanted intramuscularly. The design of the channels allowed investigation of the effect of macropore geometry (open and closed pores) and osteoinduction on bone formation orthotopically. Intramuscular implantation resulted in bone formation within the channels of both monetite and brushite, indicating osteoinductivity of these resorbable materials. Inside the blocks mounted on the transverse processes, initial channel shape did not seem to significantly influence the final amount of formed bone and osteoinduction was suggested to contribute to bone formation.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of a novel carbon fiber-reinforced calcium phosphate silicate bone cement with potential osteo-inductivity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiangjiang; Xiao, Yu; Gong, Tianxing; Zhou, Shuxin; Troczynski, Tom; Yang, Quanzu; Bao, Chongyun; Xu, Xiaoming

    2015-12-23

    The repair of bone defects is still a pressing challenge in clinics. Injectable bone cement is regarded as a promising material to solve this problem because of its special self-setting property. Unfortunately, its poor mechanical conformability, unfavorable osteo-genesis ability and insufficient osteo-inductivity seriously limit its clinical application. In this study, novel experimental calcium phosphate silicate bone cement reinforced by carbon fibers (CCPSC) was fabricated and characterized. First, a compressive strength test and cell culture study were carried out. Then, the material was implanted into the femoral epiphysis of beagle dogs to further assess its osteo-conductivity using a micro-computed tomography scan and histological analysis. In addition, we implanted CCPSC into the beagles' intramuscular pouches to perform an elementary investigation of its osteo-inductivity. The results showed that incorporation of carbon fibers significantly improved its mechanical properties. Meanwhile, CCPSC had better biocompatibility to activate cell adhesion as well as proliferation than poly-methyl methacrylate bone cement based on the cell culture study. Moreover, pronounced biodegradability and improved osteo-conductivity of CCPSC could be observed through the in vivo animal study. Finally, a small amount of osteoid was found at the heterotopic site one month after implantation which indicated potential osteo-inductivity of CCPSC. In conclusion, the novel CCPSC shows promise as a bioactive bone substitute in certain load-bearing circumstances.

  10. Demineralized bone matrix as an osteoinductive biomaterial and in vitro predictors of its biological potential.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jordan M; Nataraj, Chandra; Jaw, Rebecca; Deigl, Elizabeth; Bursac, Predrag

    2009-04-01

    The osteoinductivity of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) varies from donor to donor as a result of varying levels of multiple growth factors, matrix integrity, and artifacts from material processing. Many in vitro assays are currently used for screening the osteoinductivity of DBM. The objectives of this study were to determine the correlation of specific growth factors and in vitro mitotic stimulation to in vivo ectopic bone formation capacity with a large number of DBM samples. Samples were assayed using ELISA methods for BMP-2/4 and TGF-beta1 (n = 304) and cell proliferation using SAOS-2 osteoblasts (n = 239). All samples were then implanted intramuscularly in the abdomen of nude rats. All in vitro assays showed significant variability for any particular level of ostoinductivity determined by in vivo model. A significant, but only very weak, positive correlation to in vivo results was found for TGF-beta1 (r(2) = 0.016), BMP 2/4 (r(2) = 0.065), and SAOS-2 cell proliferation (r(2) = 0.053). The results of this study amplify the notion that a multitude of factors and their relative interplay, rather than a single factor are likely to determine the potency of any particular lot of DBM.

  11. Scaffold-Free Fabrication of Osteoinductive Cellular Constructs Using Mouse Gingiva-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Hiroko; Kayashima, Hiroki; Sasaki, Jun-Ichi; Miura, Jiro; Kamano, Yuya; Kosaka, Yukihiro; Imazato, Satoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell constructs are expected to provide osteoinductive materials to develop cell-based therapies for bone regeneration. The proliferation and spontaneous aggregation capability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) thus prompted us to fabricate a scaffold-free iPSC construct as a transplantation vehicle. Embryoid bodies of mouse gingival fibroblast-derived iPSCs (GF-iPSCs) were seeded in a cell chamber with a round-bottom well made of a thermoresponsive hydrogel. Collected ball-like cell constructs were cultured in osteogenic induction medium for 30 days with gentle shaking, resulting in significant upregulation of osteogenic marker genes. The constructs consisted of an inner region of unstructured cell mass and an outer osseous tissue region that was surrounded by osteoblast progenitor-like cells. The outer osseous tissue was robustly calcified with elemental calcium and phosphorous as well as hydroxyapatite. Subcutaneous transplantation of the GF-iPSC constructs into immunodeficient mice contributed to extensive ectopic bone formation surrounded by teratoma tissue. These results suggest that mouse GF-iPSCs could facilitate the fabrication of osteoinductive scaffold-free 3D cell constructs, in which the calcified regions and surrounding osteoblasts may function as scaffolds and drivers of osteoinduction, respectively. With incorporation of technologies to inhibit teratoma formation, this system could provide a promising strategy for bone regenerative therapies. PMID:27110251

  12. BMP2-coprecipitated calcium phosphate granules enhance osteoinductivity of deproteinized bovine bone, and bone formation during critical-sized bone defect healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tie; Zheng, Yuanna; Wu, Gang; Wismeijer, Daniel; Pathak, Janak L; Liu, Yuelian

    2017-01-31

    Most materials used clinically for filling critical-sized bone defects (CSBD), such as deproteinized bovine bone (DBB), lack osteoinductivity so that their therapeutic effects are far from satisfactory. The effect of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2)-coprecipitated biomimetic calcium phosphate granules (BMP2-cop.BioCaP) on osteoinduction of DBB graft(s) during CSBD healing is still unknown. We investigated whether BMP2-cop.BioCaP affects the osteoinductivity of DBB, bone formation, and foreign body reaction during CSBD healing. DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP, DBB, DBB + BMP2, DBB + BioCaP, and autologous bone grafts were implanted in the CSBD of sheep. Bone formation, DBB/BioCaP degradability, foreign body reaction, and osteoinductivity of DBB were analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically at week 4 and 8. Combination of BMP2-cop.BioCaP and DBB healed CSBD as effectively as autologous bone grafts. About 95% of the BMP2-cop.BioCaP had been degraded and replaced by new bone at week 8 in the DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP-group. Foreign body reaction was reduced in the DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP-group compared to the other groups. The independent use of the BMP2-cop.BioCaP did not achieve a satisfactory bone repair. In conclusion, the BMP2-cop.BioCaP showed good degradability and biocompatibility, and enhanced osteoinductivity of DBB during CSBD healing in sheep, suggesting BMP2-cop.BioCaP as a potential osteoinducer to enhance the therapeutic effects of the graft materials in clinic.

  13. BMP2-coprecipitated calcium phosphate granules enhance osteoinductivity of deproteinized bovine bone, and bone formation during critical-sized bone defect healing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tie; Zheng, Yuanna; Wu, Gang; Wismeijer, Daniel; Pathak, Janak L.; Liu, Yuelian

    2017-01-01

    Most materials used clinically for filling critical-sized bone defects (CSBD), such as deproteinized bovine bone (DBB), lack osteoinductivity so that their therapeutic effects are far from satisfactory. The effect of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2)-coprecipitated biomimetic calcium phosphate granules (BMP2-cop.BioCaP) on osteoinduction of DBB graft(s) during CSBD healing is still unknown. We investigated whether BMP2-cop.BioCaP affects the osteoinductivity of DBB, bone formation, and foreign body reaction during CSBD healing. DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP, DBB, DBB + BMP2, DBB + BioCaP, and autologous bone grafts were implanted in the CSBD of sheep. Bone formation, DBB/BioCaP degradability, foreign body reaction, and osteoinductivity of DBB were analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically at week 4 and 8. Combination of BMP2-cop.BioCaP and DBB healed CSBD as effectively as autologous bone grafts. About 95% of the BMP2-cop.BioCaP had been degraded and replaced by new bone at week 8 in the DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP-group. Foreign body reaction was reduced in the DBB + BMP2-cop.BioCaP-group compared to the other groups. The independent use of the BMP2-cop.BioCaP did not achieve a satisfactory bone repair. In conclusion, the BMP2-cop.BioCaP showed good degradability and biocompatibility, and enhanced osteoinductivity of DBB during CSBD healing in sheep, suggesting BMP2-cop.BioCaP as a potential osteoinducer to enhance the therapeutic effects of the graft materials in clinic. PMID:28139726

  14. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite coating on the osteoinductivity of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics exhibit good biocompatibility and bone conduction but are not inherently osteoinductive. To overcome this disadvantage, we coated conventional porous BCP ceramics with nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). nHA was chosen as a coating material due to its high osteoinductive potential. Methods We used a hydrothermal deposition method to coat conventional porous BCP ceramics with nHA and assessed the effects of the coating on the physical and mechanical properties of the underlying BCP. Next, its effects on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment, proliferation, viability, and osteogenic differentiation were investigated. Results nHA formed a deposited layer on the BCP surface, and synthesized nHA had a rod-like shape with lengths ranging from ~50–200 nm and diameters from ~15–30 mm. The nHA coating did not significantly affect the density, porosity, flexural strength, or compressive strength of the underlying BCP (P > 0.1). Scanning electron microscopy showed MSC attachment to the scaffolds, with a healthy morphology and anchorage to nHA crystals via cytoplasmic processes. The densities of MSCs attached on BCP and nHA-coated BCP scaffolds were 62 ± 26 cells/mm2 and 63 ± 27 cells/mm2 (P > 0.1), respectively, after 1 day and 415 ± 62 cells/mm2 and 541 ± 35 cells/mm2 (P < 0.05) respectively, after 14 days. According to an MTT assay, MSC viability was higher on nHA-coated BCP scaffolds than on BCP scaffolds (P < 0.05). In addition, MSCs on nHA-coated BCP scaffolds produced more alkaline phosphatase, collagen type I, and osteocalcin than MSCs on BCP scaffolds (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that BCP scaffolds coated with nHA were more conducive for MSC adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation than conventional, uncoated BCP scaffolds, indicating that nHA coating can enhance the osteoinductive potential of BCP ceramics, making this material more

  15. Osteoinduction of porous Ti implants with a channel structure fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Matsushita, T; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that certain biomaterials with specific porous structures can induce bone formation in non-osseous sites without the need for osteoinductive biomolecules, however, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (intrinsic osteoinduction of biomaterials) remain unclear. In particular, to our knowledge the type of pore structure suitable for osteoinduction has not been reported in detail. In the present study we investigated the effects of interconnective pore size on osteoinductivity and the bone formation processes during osteoinduction. Selective laser melting was employed to fabricate porous Ti implants (diameter 3.3mm, length 15 mm) with a channel structure comprising four longitudinal square channels, representing pores, of different diagonal widths, 500, 600, 900, and 1200 μm (termed p500, p600, p900, and p1200, respectively). These were then subjected to chemical and heat treatments to induce bioactivity. Significant osteoinduction was observed in p500 and p600, with the highest observed osteoinduction occurring at 5mm from the end of the implants. A distance of 5mm probably provides a favorable balance between blood circulation and fluid movement. Thus, the simple architecture of the implants allowed effective investigation of the influence of the interconnective pore size on osteoinduction, as well as the relationship between bone quantity and its location for different pore sizes.

  16. Osteoinductive PolyHIPE Foams as Injectable Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer L.; McEnery, Madison A.P.; Pearce, Hannah; Whitely, Michael E.; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J.; Hahn, Mariah S.; Li, Huinan; Sears, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently fabricated biodegradable polyHIPEs as injectable bone grafts and characterized the mechanical properties, pore architecture, and cure rates. In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles were incorporated into injectable polyHIPE foams to promote osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Upon incorporation of each type of particle, stable monoliths were formed with compressive properties comparable to control polyHIPEs. Pore size quantification indicated a negligible effect of all particles on emulsion stability and resulting pore architecture. Alizarin red calcium staining illustrated the incorporation of calcium phosphate particles at the pore surface, while picrosirius red collagen staining illustrated collagen-rich DBM particles within the monoliths. Osteoinductive particles had a negligible effect on the compressive modulus (∼30 MPa), which remained comparable to human cancellous bone values. All polyHIPE compositions promoted human MSC viability (∼90%) through 2 weeks. Furthermore, gene expression analysis indicated the ability of all polyHIPE compositions to promote osteogenic differentiation through the upregulation of bone-specific markers compared to a time zero control. These findings illustrate the potential for these osteoinductive polyHIPEs to promote osteogenesis and validate future in vivo evaluation. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability to incorporate a range of bioactive components into propylene fumarate dimethacrylate-based injectable polyHIPEs to increase cellular interactions and direct specific behavior without compromising scaffold architecture and resulting properties for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26739120

  17. Osteoinduction of calcium phosphate biomaterials in small animals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lijia; Shi, Yujun; Ye, Feng; Bu, Hong

    2013-04-01

    Although osteoinduction mechanism of calcium phosphate (CP) ceramics is still unclear, several essential properties have been reported, such as chemical composition, pore size and porosity, etc. In this study, calcium phosphate powder (Ca3(PO4)2, CaP, group 1), biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic powder (BCP, group 2), and intact BCP rods (group 3) were implanted into leg muscles of mice and dorsal muscles of rabbits. One month and three months after implantation, samples were harvested for biological and histological analysis. New bone tissues were observed in 10/10 samples in group 1, 3/10 samples in group 2, and 9/10 samples in group 3 at 3rd month in mice, but not in rabbits. In vitro, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured with trace CaP and BCP powder, and osteogenic differentiation was observed at day 7. Our results suggested that chemical composition is the prerequisite in osteoinduction, and pore structure would contribute to more bone formation.

  18. Osteoinductive PolyHIPE Foams as Injectable Bone Grafts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; McEnery, Madison A P; Pearce, Hannah; Whitely, Michael E; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Hahn, Mariah S; Li, Huinan; Sears, Nicholas A; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    We have recently fabricated biodegradable polyHIPEs as injectable bone grafts and characterized the mechanical properties, pore architecture, and cure rates. In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles were incorporated into injectable polyHIPE foams to promote osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Upon incorporation of each type of particle, stable monoliths were formed with compressive properties comparable to control polyHIPEs. Pore size quantification indicated a negligible effect of all particles on emulsion stability and resulting pore architecture. Alizarin red calcium staining illustrated the incorporation of calcium phosphate particles at the pore surface, while picrosirius red collagen staining illustrated collagen-rich DBM particles within the monoliths. Osteoinductive particles had a negligible effect on the compressive modulus (∼30 MPa), which remained comparable to human cancellous bone values. All polyHIPE compositions promoted human MSC viability (∼90%) through 2 weeks. Furthermore, gene expression analysis indicated the ability of all polyHIPE compositions to promote osteogenic differentiation through the upregulation of bone-specific markers compared to a time zero control. These findings illustrate the potential for these osteoinductive polyHIPEs to promote osteogenesis and validate future in vivo evaluation. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability to incorporate a range of bioactive components into propylene fumarate dimethacrylate-based injectable polyHIPEs to increase cellular interactions and direct specific behavior without compromising scaffold architecture and resulting properties for various tissue engineering applications.

  19. Encapsulated boron as an osteoinductive agent for bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Tunçay, Ekin Ö; Kaynak, Gökçe; Demirtaş, Tolga T; Aydın, Seda Tığlı; Hakkı, Sema S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop boron (B)-releasing polymeric scaffold to promote regeneration of bone tissue. Boric acid-doped chitosan nanoparticles with a diameter of approx. 175 nm were produced by tripolyphosphate (TPP)-initiated ionic gelation process. The nanoparticles strongly attached via electrostatic interactions into chitosan scaffolds produced by freeze-drying with approx. 100 μm pore diameter. According to the ICP-OES results, following first 5h initial burst release, fast release of B from scaffolds was observed for 24h incubation period in conditioned medium. Then, slow release of B was performed over 120 h. The results of the cell culture studies proved that the encapsulated boron within the scaffolds can be used as an osteoinductive agent by showing its positive effects on the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells.

  20. The osteoinductive capacity of differently HCl-decalcified bone alloimplants.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Hebrant, A; Munting, E; Piret, L; Coutelier, L

    1985-08-01

    Three procedures to obtain bone inductive implants were tested heterotopically in 3-month-old allogeneic rats: 1) antigen-extracted HCl-decalcified at 4 degrees C, autolysed implant (AAA bone); 2) HCl-decalcified implant at 4 degrees C; 3) HCl-decalcified implant at room temperature. Each type of implant was either deep-frozen at -35 degrees C for at least 2 months or immediately freeze-dried. The bone inductive capacity of the differently HCl-decalcified cortical bone implant was evaluated at 2 months by isotopic strontium incorporation and by ash-weight measurements. Bone HCl-decalcification alone, either at 4 degrees C or at room temperature, gave a higher new bone yield than the freeze-dried AAA bone. The type or short-term preservation technique had no effect on the osteoinductive capacity of either of the differently treated implants, AAA bone expected.

  1. Targeted delivery as key for the success of small osteoinductive molecules.

    PubMed

    Balmayor, Elizabeth R

    2015-11-01

    Molecules such as growth factors, peptides and small molecules can guide cellular behavior and are thus important for tissue engineering. They are rapidly emerging as promising compounds for the regeneration of tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Growth factors have disadvantages such as high cost, short half-life, supraphysiological amounts needed, etc. Therefore, small molecules may be an alternative. These molecules have been discovered using high throughput screening. Small osteoinductive molecules exhibit several advantages over growth factors owing to their small sizes, such as high stability and non-immunogenicity. These molecules may stimulate directly signaling pathways that are important for osteogenesis. However, systemic application doesn't induce osteogenesis in most cases. Therefore, local administration is needed. This may be achieved by using a bone graft material providing additional osteoconductive properties. These graft materials can also act by themselves as a delivery matrix for targeted and local delivery. Furthermore, vascularization is necessary in the process of osteogenesis. Many of the small molecules are also capable of promoting vascularization of the tissue to be regenerated. Thus, in this review, special attention is given to molecules that are capable of inducing both angiogenesis and osteogenesis simultaneously. Finally, more recent preclinical and clinical uses in bone regeneration of those molecules are described, highlighting the needs for the clinical translation of these promising compounds.

  2. The antimicrobial and osteoinductive properties of silver nanoparticle/poly (DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-coated stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zheng, Zhong; Zara, Janette N; Hsu, Chingyun; Soofer, Donnalisa E; Lee, Kevin S; Siu, Ronald K; Miller, Lloyd S; Zhang, Xinli; Carpenter, Doug; Wang, Chunling; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2012-12-01

    Implant-associated bacterial infections are one of the most serious complications in orthopedic surgery. Treatment of these infections often requires multiple operations, device removal, long-term systemic antibiotics, and extended rehabilitation, and is frequently ineffective, leading to worse clinical outcomes and increased financial costs. In this study, we evaluated silver nanoparticle/poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-coated stainless steel alloy(SNPSA) as a potential antimicrobial implant material. We found that SNPSA exhibited strong antibacterial activity in vitro and ex vivo, and promoted MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts proliferation and maturation in vitro. Furthermore, SNPSA implants induced osteogenesis while suppressing bacterial survival in contaminated rat femoral canals. Our results indicate that SNPSA has simultaneous antimicrobial and osteoinductive properties that make it a promising therapeutic material in orthopedic surgery.

  3. Influence of polymer molecular weight in osteoinductive composites for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Davide; Yuan, Huipin; Luo, Xiaoman; Farè, Silvia; Grijpma, Dirk W; de Bruijn, Joost D

    2013-12-01

    In bone tissue regeneration, certain polymer and calcium-phosphate-based composites have been reported to enhance some biological surface phenomena, facilitating osteoinduction. Although the crucial role of inorganic fillers in heterotopic bone formation by such materials has been shown, no reports have been published on the potential effects the polymer phase may have. The present work starts from the assumption that the polymer molecular weight regulates the fluid uptake, which determines the hydrolysis rate and the occurrence of biological surface processes. Here, two composites were prepared by extruding two different molecular weight L/D,L-lactide copolymers with calcium phosphate apatite. The lower molecular weight copolymer allowed larger fluid uptake in the composite thereof, which was correlated with a higher capacity to adsorb proteins in vitro. Further, the large fluid absorption led to a quicker composite degradation that generated rougher surfaces and enhanced ion release. Following intramuscular implantation in sheep, only the composite with the lower molecular weight polymer could induce heterotopic bone formation. Besides influencing the biological potential of composites, the molecular weight also regulated their viscoelastic behaviour under cyclic stresses. The results lead to the conclusion that designing biomaterials with appropriate physico-chemical characteristics is crucial for bone tissue regeneration in mechanical load-bearing sites.

  4. Biological Strategies for Improved Osseointegration and Osteoinduction of Porous Metal Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Riester, Scott M.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant–bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:25348836

  5. Ethylene oxide does not extinguish the osteoinductive capacity of demineralized bone. A reappraisal in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Cornu, O; Delloye, C

    1997-04-01

    We examined the influence of ethylene oxide (EO) and gamma irradiation on the osteoinductive capacity of demineralized bone. Demineralized bone powder prepared from Wistar rats was exposed to EO (55 degrees C or 40 degrees C) or gamma irradiation (25 KGy) or was preserved in ethanol. Sterilely-prepared bones served as controls. The powder was packed in a gelatin capsule and implanted for 6 weeks in muscles of 6-week-old female rats. Exposure of demineralized bone particles to EO 55 degrees C resulted in an almost complete loss of osteoinductivity. Irradiated bones lost about 40% of their osteoinductive capacity, while sterilization with EO at 40 degrees C resulted in only a slight alteration of the osteoinductivity, as assessed by the recovered weight ratio, calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity measurements and histomorphometry. Ethanol treatment had no influence on the new bone yield when compared to controls. As EO exposure at 40 degrees C is a true sterilization procedure, it can be recommended in a clinical setting for its small effect on osteoinductive capacity as assessed experimentally in rats.

  6. L51P - A BMP2 variant with osteoinductive activity via inhibition of Noggin.

    PubMed

    Albers, Christoph E; Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Sebald, Hans-Jörg; Sebald, Walter; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Klenke, Frank M

    2012-09-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) have to be applied at high concentrations to stimulate bone healing. The limited therapeutic efficacy may be due to the local presence of BMP antagonists such as Noggin. Thus, inhibiting BMP antagonists is an attractive therapeutic option. We hypothesized that the engineered BMP2 variant L51P stimulates osteoinduction by antagonizing Noggin-mediated inhibition of BMP2. Primary murine osteoblasts (OB) were treated with L51P, BMP2, and Noggin. OB proliferation and differentiation were quantified with XTT and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assays. BMP receptor dependent intracellular signaling in OB was evaluated with Smad and p38 MAPK phosphorylation assays. BMP2, Noggin, BMP receptor Ia/Ib/II, osteocalcin, and ALP mRNA expressions were analyzed with real-time PCR. L51P stimulated OB differentiation by blocking Noggin mediated inhibition of BMP2. L51P did not induce OB differentiation directly and did not activate BMP receptor dependent intracellular signaling via the Smad pathway. Treatment of OB cultures with BMP2 but not with L51P resulted in an increased expression of ALP, BMP2, and Noggin mRNA. By inhibiting the BMP antagonist Noggin, L51P enhances BMP2 activity and stimulates osteoinduction without exhibiting direct osteoinductive function. Indirect osteoinduction with L51P seems to be advantageous to osteoinduction with BMP2 as BMP2 stimulates the expression of Noggin thereby self-limiting its own osteoinductive activity. Treatment with L51P is the first protein-based approach available to augment BMP2 induced bone regeneration through inhibition of BMP antagonists. The described strategy may help to decrease the amounts of exogenous BMPs currently required to stimulate bone healing.

  7. Muscle as an osteoinductive niche for local bone formation with the use of a biphasic calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Raina, D. B.; Gupta, A.; Petersen, M. M.; Hettwer, W.; McNally, M.; Tägil, M.; Zheng, M-H.; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We have observed clinical cases where bone is formed in the overlaying muscle covering surgically created bone defects treated with a hydroxyapatite/calcium sulphate biomaterial. Our objective was to investigate the osteoinductive potential of the biomaterial and to determine if growth factors secreted from local bone cells induce osteoblastic differentiation of muscle cells. Materials and Methods We seeded mouse skeletal muscle cells C2C12 on the hydroxyapatite/calcium sulphate biomaterial and the phenotype of the cells was analysed. To mimic surgical conditions with leakage of extra cellular matrix (ECM) proteins and growth factors, we cultured rat bone cells ROS 17/2.8 in a bioreactor and harvested the secreted proteins. The secretome was added to rat muscle cells L6. The phenotype of the muscle cells after treatment with the media was assessed using immunostaining and light microscopy. Results C2C12 cells differentiated into osteoblast-like cells expressing prominent bone markers after seeding on the biomaterial. The conditioned media of the ROS 17/2.8 contained bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 8.4 ng/mg, standard deviation (sd) 0.8) and BMP-7 (50.6 ng/mg, sd 2.2). In vitro, this secretome induced differentiation of skeletal muscle cells L6 towards an osteogenic lineage. Conclusion Extra cellular matrix proteins and growth factors leaking from a bone cavity, along with a ceramic biomaterial, can synergistically enhance the process of ectopic ossification. The overlaying muscle acts as an osteoinductive niche, and provides the required cells for bone formation. Cite this article: D. B. Raina, A. Gupta, M. M. Petersen, W. Hettwer, M. McNally, M. Tägil, M-H. Zheng, A. Kumar, L. Lidgren. Muscle as an osteoinductive niche for local bone formation with the use of a biphasic calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite biomaterial. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:500–511. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.510.BJR-2016-0133.R1. PMID:27784668

  8. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eyckmans, J.; Roberts, S.J.; Bolander, J.; Schrooten, J.; Chen, C.S.; Luyten, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 hours after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved. PMID:23537666

  9. Biomaterials with Antibacterial and Osteoinductive Properties to Repair Infected Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haiping; Liu, Yi; Guo, Jing; Wu, Huiling; Wang, Jingxiao; Wu, Gang

    2016-03-03

    The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity. Infected bone defects are conventionally treated by a systemic/local administration of antibiotics to control infection and a subsequent implantation of bone grafts, such as autografts and allografts. However, these treatment options are time-consuming and usually yield less optimal efficacy. To approach these problems, novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties have been developed. The antibacterial property can be conferred by antibiotics and other novel antibacterial biomaterials, such as silver nanoparticles. Bone morphogenetic proteins are used to functionalize the biomaterials with a potent osteoinductive property. By manipulating the carrying modes and release kinetics, these biomaterials are optimized to maximize their antibacterial and osteoinductive functions with minimized cytotoxicity. The findings, in the past decade, have shown a very promising application potential of the novel biomaterials with the dual functions in treating infected bone defects. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties.

  10. The influence of genetic factors on the osteoinductive potential of calcium phosphate ceramics in mice.

    PubMed

    Barradas, Ana M C; Yuan, Huipin; van der Stok, Johan; Le Quang, Bach; Fernandes, Hugo; Chaterjea, Anindita; Hogenes, Marieke C H; Shultz, Kathy; Donahue, Leah Rae; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics in healing large bone defects is, in general, not as high as that of autologous bone grafting. Recently, we reported that CaP ceramics with osteoinductive properties were as efficient in healing an ilium defect of a sheep as autologous bone graft was, which makes this subclass of CaP ceramics a powerful alternative for bone regeneration. Although osteoinduction by CaP ceramics has been shown in several large animal models it is sporadically reported in mice. Because the lack of a robust mouse model has delayed understanding of the mechanism, we screened mice from 11 different inbred mouse strains for their responsiveness to subcutaneous implantation of osteoinductive tricalcium phosphate (TCP). In only two strains (FVB and 129S2) the ceramic induced bone formation, and in particularly, in FVB mice, bone was found in all the tested mice. We also demonstrated that other CaP ceramics induced bone formation at the same magnitude as that observed in other animal models. Furthermore, VEGF did not significantly increase TCP induced bone formation. The mouse model here described can accelerate research of osteoinductive mechanisms triggered by CaP ceramics and potentially the development of therapies for bone regeneration.

  11. Biomaterials with Antibacterial and Osteoinductive Properties to Repair Infected Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiping; Liu, Yi; Guo, Jing; Wu, Huiling; Wang, Jingxiao; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The repair of infected bone defects is still challenging in the fields of orthopedics, oral implantology and maxillofacial surgery. In these cases, the self-healing capacity of bone tissue can be significantly compromised by the large size of bone defects and the potential/active bacterial activity. Infected bone defects are conventionally treated by a systemic/local administration of antibiotics to control infection and a subsequent implantation of bone grafts, such as autografts and allografts. However, these treatment options are time-consuming and usually yield less optimal efficacy. To approach these problems, novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties have been developed. The antibacterial property can be conferred by antibiotics and other novel antibacterial biomaterials, such as silver nanoparticles. Bone morphogenetic proteins are used to functionalize the biomaterials with a potent osteoinductive property. By manipulating the carrying modes and release kinetics, these biomaterials are optimized to maximize their antibacterial and osteoinductive functions with minimized cytotoxicity. The findings, in the past decade, have shown a very promising application potential of the novel biomaterials with the dual functions in treating infected bone defects. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of novel biomaterials with both antibacterial and osteoinductive properties. PMID:26950123

  12. Effect of nanostructure on osteoinduction of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Liao, Xiaoling; Zheng, Li; Zhu, Xiangdong; Wang, Zhe; Fan, Hongsong; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-10-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of the nanostructure of calcium phosphate ceramics on osteoinductive potential, porous biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics with a nano- or submicron structure were prepared via microwave sintering and compared to conventional BCP ceramics. The selective protein adsorption of bovine serum albumin and lysozyme (LSZ) and the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro was investigated. Porous BCP nanoceramics showed higher ability to adsorb proteins, especially low molecular weight protein of LSZ, than conventional BCP ceramics, and the BCP nanoceramics promoted bone sialoprotein expression more than conventional BCP did. Further in vivo study to investigate ectopic bone formation and bone repair efficiency proved the highly osteoinductive potential of nanostructured BCP ceramics. The results suggest that nanostructured BCP ceramics have the potential to become a new generation of bioceramics for bone tissue engineering grafts.

  13. Osteoinductive Effects of Free and Immobilized Bone Forming Peptide-1 on Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianghui; Ge, Yanjun; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yunsong; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Most synthetic polymeric materials currently used for bone tissue engineering lack specific signals through which cells can identify and interact with the surface, resulting in incompatibility and compromised osteogenic activity. Soluble inductive factors also have issues including a short half-live in vivo. Bone forming peptide-1 is a truncated peptide from the immature form of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) that displays higher osteogenic activity than full-length, mature BMP-7. In this study, we used a mussel-inspired immobilization strategy mediated by polymerization of dopamine to introduce recently discovered stimulators of bone forming peptide-1 (BFP-1) onto the surface of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) substrate to form a biomaterial that overcomes these challenges. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs), being abundant and easy accessible, were used to test the osteogenic activity of BFP-1 and the novel biomaterial. Under osteoinductive conditions, cells treated with both BFP-1 alone and BFP-1-coated biomaterials displayed elevated expression of the osteogenic markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OC), and RUNX2. Furthermore, hASCs associated with poly-dopamine-assisted BFP-1-immobilized PLGA (pDA-BFP-1-PLGA) scaffolds promoted in vivo bone formation in nude mice. Our novel materials may hold great promise for future bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26930062

  14. Fabrication of silver nanoparticle-doped hydroxyapatite coatings with oriented block arrays for enhancing bactericidal effect and osteoinductivity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Chen, Wei; Yu, Degang; Lei, Yong; Ke, Qinfei; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Zhenan

    2016-08-01

    Implant-associated infection is a common postoperative complication and remains a serious problem in orthopedic surgery. This work describes the synthesis of silver nanoparticle-doped hydroxyapatite coatings with oriented block arrays (AgNP-BHAC). The resulting nanostructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. AgNP-BHAC exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity toward gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus owing to the antibacterial effects of the silver nanoparticles. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) culture revealed that the AgNP-BHAC exhibited better biocompatibility, and permitted improved cell proliferation, attachment, and osteoinductivity than uncoated Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy, the favored material for biomedical applications. In summary, this study presents a convenient and effective method for the incorporation of silver into HA coatings with block morphology. This method can be utilized to modify a variety of metallic implant surfaces to improve their antimicrobial effects and reduce potential long-term cytotoxicity.

  15. Myo-conductive and osteo-inductive free-standing polysaccharide membranes

    PubMed Central

    Caridade, Sofia G.; Monge, Claire; Almodóvar, Jorge; Guillot, Raphael; Lavaud, Jonathan; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Mano, João F.; Picart, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Free-standing (FS) membranes have increasing applications in the biomedical field as drug delivery systems for wound healing and tissue engineering. Here, we studied the potential of free-standing membranes made by the layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan and alginate to be used as a simple biomimetic system of the periosteum. The design of a periosteum-like membrane implies the elaboration of a thick membrane suitable for both muscle and bone formation. Our aim was to produce well defined ~50 μm thick polysaccharide membranes that could be easily manipulated, be mechanically resistant, and enable both myogenesis and osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The membranes were chemically crosslinked to improve their mechanical properties. Crosslinking chemistry was followed via FTIR and the mechanical properties of the membranes were assessed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The loading and release of the potent osteoinductive growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) inside and outside of the FS membrane was followed by fluorescence spectroscopy in a physiological buffer over one month. The myogenic and osteogenic potential of the membranes in vitro was assessed using BMP-2 responsive skeletal myoblasts. Finally, their osteoinductive properties in vivo were studied in a preliminary experiment using a mouse ectopic model. Our results showed that the more crosslinked FS membranes enabled a more efficient myoblast differentiation in myotubes. In addition, we showed that a tunable amount of BMP-2 can be loaded in and subsequently released from the membranes depending on the crosslinking degree and BMP-2 initial concentration in solution. Only the more crosslinked membranes were found to be osteoinductive in vivo. These polysaccharide-based membranes have strong potential as a periosteum-mimetic scaffold for bone tissue regeneration. PMID:25575853

  16. Mechanical strain promotes osteoblast ECM formation and improves its osteoinductive potential

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a supportive microenvironment for cells, which is suitable as a tissue engineering scaffold. Mechanical stimulus plays a significant role in the fate of osteoblast, suggesting that it regulates ECM formation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of mechanical stimulus on ECM formation and bioactivity. Methods Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in cell culture dishes and stimulated with mechanical tensile strain. After removing the cells, the ECMs coated on dishes were prepared. The ECM protein and calcium were assayed and MC3T3-E1 cells were re-seeded on the ECM-coated dishes to assess osteoinductive potential of the ECM. Results The cyclic tensile strain increased collagen, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), BMP-4, and calcium levels in the ECM. Compared with the ECM produced by unstrained osteoblasts, those of mechanically stimulated osteoblasts promoted alkaline phosphatase activity, elevated BMP-2 and osteopontin levels and mRNA levels of runt-related transcriptional factor 2 (Runx2) and osteocalcin (OCN), and increased secreted calcium of the re-seeded MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusion Mechanical strain promoted ECM production of osteoblasts in vitro, increased BMP-2/4 levels, and improved osteoinductive potential of the ECM. This study provided a novel method to enhance bioactivity of bone ECM in vitro via mechanical strain to osteoblasts. PMID:23098360

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway.

  18. A clinically relevant model of osteoinduction: a process requiring calcium phosphate and BMP/Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Eyckmans, J; Roberts, S J; Schrooten, J; Luyten, F P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated a clinically relevant model of in vivo ectopic bone formation utilizing human periosteum derived cells (HPDCs) seeded in a Collagraft™ carrier and explored the mechanisms by which this process is driven. Bone formation occurred after eight weeks when a minimum of one million HPDCs was loaded on Collagraft™ carriers and implanted subcutaneously in NMRI nu/nu mice. De novo bone matrix, mainly secreted by the HPDCs, was found juxta-proximal of the calcium phosphate (CaP) granules suggesting that CaP may have triggered the ‘osteoinductive program’. Indeed, removal of the CaP granules by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decalcification prior to cell seeding and implantation resulted in loss of bone formation. In addition, inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt signalling by overexpression of the secreted antagonists Noggin and Frzb, respectively, also abrogated osteoinduction. Proliferation of the engrafted HPDCs was strongly reduced in the decalcified scaffolds or when seeded with adenovirus-Noggin/Frzb transduced HPDCs indicating that cell division of the engrafted HPDCs is required for the direct bone formation cascade. These data suggest that this model of bone formation is similar to that observed during physiological intramembranous bone development and may be of importance when investigating tissue engineering strategies. PMID:19538476

  19. Evaluation of osteoinduction properties of the demineralized bovine foetal growth plate powder as a new xenogenic biomaterial in rat.

    PubMed

    Bigham, A S; Shadkhast, M; Bigham Sadegh, A; Shafiei, Z; Lakzian, A; Khalegi, M R

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was evaluation of osteoinductive properties of demineralized bovine foetal growth plate in submuscular transplantation (ectopic osteoinduction) as a new xenogenic biomaterial in rat model. Demineralized bovine foetal growth plate was ectopically implanted in 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats. In 18 of the animals under aseptic conditions two submuscular pouches were created between external and internal oblique abdominal muscles in the two flanks: the right was left empty (sham) and the left was filled with 20mg of demineralized bovine foetal growth plate powder. Radiographs were taken in 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the surgery, then six animals were pharmacologically euthanized after 2, 4 and 6 weeks for histopathological evaluation. Results showed: (1) osteoinductivity of xenogenic demineralized bovine foetal growth plate powder, and (2) earlier mineralization of ectopically implanted demineralized bovine foetal growth plate in the submuscular implanted area. Our results show that submuscular implantation of xenogenic demineralized bovine foetal growth plate has osteoinductive properties in a rat model.

  20. Production of an osteoinductive demineralised bone matrix powder without the use of organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Eagle, M J; Rooney, P; Kearney, J N

    2015-09-01

    Demineralised bone matrix (DBM) is produced by grinding cortical bone into a powder, sieving the powder to obtain a desired size range and then demineralising the powder using acid. Protocols for the production of DBM powder have been published since 1965 and the powder can be used in lyophilised form or it can be mixed with a carrier to produce a paste or putty. The powder is generally produced from cortical bone which has been processed to remove blood, bone marrow and bone marrow components, including fat. Removal of fat is accomplished by incorporating incubation in an organic solvent, often chloroform, chloroform/methanol or acetone. The use of organic solvents in a clean room environment in a human tissue bank is problematic and involves operator exposure and the potential for the solvent to be trapped in air filters or recirculated throughout the clean room suite. Consequently, in this study, we have developed a cortical bone washing step which removes fat/lipid without the use of an organic solvent. Bone was prepared from six femoral shafts from three donors by dissecting soft tissue and bisecting the shaft, the shafts were then cut into ~9-10 cm lengths. These struts were then taken through a series of hot water washes at 56-59 °C, centrifugation and decontamination steps. Washed cortical struts were then lyophilised before being ground with a compressed air milling machine. The ground bone was sieved, demineralised, freeze-dried and terminally sterilised with a target dose of 25 kGy gamma irradiation. The DBM powder was evaluated for residual calcium content, in vitro cytotoxicity and osteoinductivity by implantation into the muscle of an athymic mouse. Data indicated that in addition to removing in excess of 97% DNA and extractable soluble protein, the washing protocol reduced lipid 10,000-fold. The processed bone was easily ground without clogging the grinder; the sterilised DBM powder was not cytotoxic but was osteoinductive in the animal model

  1. Evaluation of the osteoinductive potential of a bio-inspired scaffold mimicking the osteogenic niche for bone augmentation.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Sandri, Monica; Van Eps, Jeffrey; Cabrera, Fernando J; Weiner, Bradley K; Tampieri, Anna; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-09-01

    Augmentation of regenerative osteogenesis represents a premier clinical need, as hundreds of thousands of patients are left with insufficient healing of bony defects related to a host of insults ranging from congenital abnormalities to traumatic injury to surgically-induced deficits. A synthetic material that closely mimics the composition and structure of the human osteogenic niche represents great potential to successfully address this high demand. In this study, a magnesium-doped hydroxyapatite/type I collagen scaffold was fabricated through a biologically-inspired mineralization process and designed to mimic human trabecular bone. The composition of the scaffold was fully characterized by XRD, FTIR, ICP and TGA, and compared to human bone. Also, the scaffold microstructure was evaluated by SEM, while its nano-structure and nano-mechanical properties were evaluated by AFM. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were used to test the in vitro capability of the scaffold to promote osteogenic differentiation. The cell/scaffold constructs were cultured up to 7 days and the adhesion, organization and proliferation of the cells were evaluated. The ability of the scaffold to induce osteogenic differentiation of the cells was assessed over 3 weeks and the correlate gene expression for classic genes of osteogenesis was assessed. Finally, when tested in an ectopic model in rabbit, the scaffold produced a large volume of trabecular bone in only two weeks, that subsequently underwent maturation over time as expected, with increased mature cortical bone formation, supporting its ability to promote bone regeneration in clinically-relevant scenarios. Altogether, these results confirm a high level of structural mimicry by the scaffold to the composition and structure of human osteogenic niche that translated to faster and more efficient osteoinduction in vivo--features that suggest such a biomaterial may have great utility in future clinical applications where bone

  2. Biocompatibility of Modified Osteoinductive Calcium-Phosphate Coatings of Metal Implants.

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, T S; Puz', A V; Sinebryukhov, S L; Gnedenkov, S V; Smolina, T P; Besednova, N N

    2017-01-01

    The cellular and molecular aspects of immunological compatibility of modified osteoinductive calcium-phosphate coatings formed on technically pure titanium VT1-0 by the plasma electrolytic oxidation technology are studied. The technique of coating modified the process of human peripheral blood leukocyte activation in vitro. The most pronounced functional changes were observed in neutrophil population during whole blood contact with titanium sample without coating and with coating formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation on titanium alloy. Sealing of the oxidation layer pores by ultradispersed polytetrafluoroethylene leads to reduction of cell activation. Composite coatings with ultradispersed polytetrafluoroethylene applied by the electrophoretic method are characterized by the best biocompatibility. The data demonstrate the possibility of modifying biomaterial surfaces for inflammatory response control.

  3. Biphasic peptide amphiphile nanomatrix embedded with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for stimulated osteoinductive response.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel M; Patterson, Jessica L; Vines, Jeremy B; Javed, Amjad; Gilbert, Shawn R; Jun, Ho-Wook

    2011-12-27

    Formation of the native bone extracellular matrix (ECM) provides an attractive template for bone tissue engineering. The structural support and biological complexity of bone ECM are provided within a composite microenvironment that consists of an organic fibrous network reinforced by inorganic hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. Recreating this biphasic assembly, a bone ECM analogous scaffold comprising self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers and interspersed HA nanoparticles was investigated. PAs were endowed with biomolecular ligand signaling using a synthetically inscribed peptide sequence (i.e., RGDS) and integrated with HA nanoparticles to form a biphasic nanomatrix hydrogel. It was hypothesized the biphasic hydrogel would induce osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and improve bone healing as mediated by RGDS ligand signaling within PA nanofibers and embedded HA mineralization source. Viscoelastic stability of the biphasic PA hydrogels was evaluated with different weight concentrations of HA for improved gelation. After demonstrating initial viability, long-term cellularity and osteoinduction of encapsulated hMSCs in different PA hydrogels were studied in vitro. Temporal progression of osteogenic maturation was assessed by gene expression of key markers. A preliminary animal study demonstrated bone healing capacity of the biphasic PA nanomatrix under physiological conditions using a critical size femoral defect rat model. The combination of RGDS ligand signaling and HA nanoparticles within the biphasic PA nanomatrix hydrogel demonstrated the most effective osteoinduction and comparative bone healing response. Therefore, the biphasic PA nanomatrix establishes a well-organized scaffold with increased similarity to natural bone ECM with the prospect for improved bone tissue regeneration.

  4. HUBBLE VIEWS COLLOSSAL POLAR CYCLONE ON MARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [left]: The discovery image of the Martian polar storm as seen in blue light (410 nm). The storm is located near 65 deg. N latitude and 85 deg. W longitude, and is more than 1000 miles (1600 km) across. The residual north polar water ice cap is at top. A belt of clouds like that seen in previous telescopic observations during this Martian season can also be seen in the planet's equatorial regions and northern mid-latitudes, as well as in the southern polar regions. The volcano Ascraeus Mons can be seen as a dark spot poking above the cloud deck near the western (morning) limb; this extinct volcano towers nearly 16 miles (25 km) above the surrounding plains, and is about 250 miles (400 km) across. [upper right]: Color polar view of the north polar region, showing the location of the storm relative to the classical bright and dark features in this area. The color composite data (410, 502, and 673 nm) indicate that the storm is fairly dust-free and therefore likely composed mostly of water ice clouds. The bright surface region beneath the eye of the storm can be seen clearly. This map covers the region north of 45 degrees latitude, and is oriented with 0 degrees longitude at the bottom. [lower right]: Enhanced orthographic view of the storm centered on 65 deg. N latitude, 85 deg. W longitude. The image has been processed to bring out additional detail in the storm's spiral cloud structures. The pictures were taken on April 27, 1999, with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credit: Jim Bell (Cornell U.), Steve Lee (U. Colorado), Mike Wolff (SSI), and NASA

  5. Hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold-enhanced osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia; Hao, Wei; Li, Yuzhuo; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianjun; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-04-01

    A novel hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold was prepared and investigated for its potential to enhance both osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro. Approx. 12.4 ± 0.06 % (w/w) hydroxyapatite was deposited onto the scaffold, and cell viability and DNA content were significantly increased (18.5 ± 0.6 and 33 ± 1.2 %, respectively) compared with the hydroxyapatite scaffold after 14 days. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase activity in the novel scaffold increased 41 ± 2.5 % after 14 days compared with the hydroxyapatite scaffold. The data indicate that this novel hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold has a positive effect on osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity, and may be useful for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Incorporation of sol-gel bioactive glass into PLGA improves mechanical properties and bioactivity of composite scaffolds and results in their osteoinductive properties.

    PubMed

    Filipowska, J; Pawlik, J; Cholewa-Kowalska, K; Tylko, G; Pamula, E; Niedzwiedzki, L; Szuta, M; Laczka, M; Osyczka, A M

    2014-10-20

    In this study, 3D porous bioactive composite scaffolds were produced and evaluated for their physico-chemical and biological properties. Polymer poly-L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) matrix scaffolds were modified with sol-gel-derived bioactive glasses (SBGs) of CaO-SiO2-P2O5 systems. We hypothesized that SBG incorporation into PLGA matrix would improve the chemical and biological activity of composite materials as well as their mechanical properties. We applied two bioactive glasses, designated as S2 or A2, differing in the content of SiO2 and CaO (i.e. 80 mol% SiO2, 16 mol% CaO for S2 and 40 mol% SiO2, 52 mol% CaO for A2). The composites were characterized for their porosity, bioactivity, microstructure and mechanical properties. The osteoinductive properties of these composites were evaluated in human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) cultures grown in either standard growth medium or treated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) or dexamethasone (Dex). After incubation in simulated body fluid, calcium phosphate precipitates formed inside the pores of both A2-PLGA and S2-PLGA scaffolds. The compressive strength of the latter was increased slightly compared to PLGA. Both composites promoted superior hBMSC attachment to the material surface and stimulated the expression of several osteogenic markers in hBMSC compared to cells grown on unmodified PLGA. There were also marked differences in the response of hBMSC to composite scaffolds, depending on chemical compositions of the scaffolds and culture treatments. Compared to silica-rich S2-PLGA, hBMSC grown on calcium-rich A2-PLGA were overall less responsive to rhBMP-2 or Dex and the osteoinductive properties of these A2-PLGA scaffolds seemed partially dependent on their ability to induce BMP signaling in untreated hBMSC. Thus, beyond the ability of currently studied composites to enhance hBMSC osteogenesis, it may become possible to modulate the osteogenic response of hBMSC, depending on the

  7. Study on the anticorrosion, biocompatibility, and osteoinductivity of tantalum decorated with tantalum oxide nanotube array films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Jinshu; Chen, Su; Ma, Yuanping; Zhang, Zhenting

    2012-09-26

    With its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility, tantalum, as a promising endosseous implant or implant coating, is attracting more and more attention. For improving physicochemical property and biocompatibility, the research of tantalum surface modification has increased. Tantalum oxide (Ta(2)O(5)) nanotube films can be produced on tantalum by controlling the conditions of anodization and annealing. The objective of our present study was to investigate the influence of Ta(2)O(5) nanotube films on pure tantalum properties related with anticorrosion, protein adsorption, and biological function of rabbit bone mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). The polarization curve was measured, the adsorption of bovine serum albumin and fibronectin to Ta(2)O(5) nanotubes was detected, and the morphology and actin cytoskeletons of the rBMSCs were observed via fluorescence microscopy, and the adhesion and proliferation of the rBMSCs, as well as the osteogenic differentiation potential on tantalum specimens, were examined quantificationally by MTT and real-time PCR technology. The results showed that Ta(2)O(5) nanotube films have high anticorrosion capability and can increase the protein adsorption to tantalum and promote the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of rBMSCs, as well as the mRNA expression of osteogenic gene such as Osterix, ALP, Collagen-I, and Osteocalcin on tantalum. This study suggests that Ta(2)O(5) nanotube films can improve the anticorrosion, biocompatibility, and osteoinduction of pure tantalum, which provides the theoretical elaboration for development of tantalum endosseous implant or implant coating to a certain extent.

  8. BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres exhibit enhanced osteoinduction and osteogenicity in large bone defects.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Long; Zeng, Jianhua; Yao, Aihua; Tu, Qiquan; Li, Jingtang; Yan, Liang; Tang, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects is an osteoinductive, osteoconductive, and osteogenic process that often requires a bone graft for support. Limitations associated with naturally autogenic or allogenic bone grafts have demonstrated the need for synthetic substitutes. The present study investigates the feasibility of using novel hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres as an osteoconductive matrix and a carrier for controlled local delivery of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), a potent osteogenic inducer of bone regeneration. Hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres (100±25 μm) with a core (60±18 μm) and a mesoporous shell (180±42 m(2)/g surface area) were prepared by a glass conversion technique and loaded with recombinant human BMP2 (1 μg/mg). There was a gentle burst release of BMP2 from microspheres into the surrounding phosphate-buffered saline in vitro within the initial 48 hours, and continued at a low rate for over 40 days. In comparison with hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres without BMP2 or soluble BMP2 without a carrier, BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres had a significantly enhanced capacity to reconstitute radial bone defects in rabbit, as shown by increased serum alkaline phosphatase; quick and complete new bone formation within 12 weeks; and great biomechanical flexural strength. These results indicate that BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres could be a potential new option for bone graft substitutes in bone regeneration.

  9. Osteoinductive nanohydroxyapatite bone substitute prepared via in situ hydrothermal transformation of cuttlefish bone.

    PubMed

    Hongmin, Li; Wei, Zhou; Xingrong, Yan; Jing, Wei; Wenxin, Geng; Jihong, Cui; Xin, Xie; Fulin, Chen

    2015-05-01

    The capacity to induce a rapid and controlled healing of bone defects is critical for a bone substitute. Previous studies have reported hydrothermal transformation (HT) of aragonite from cuttlebone (CB) to cuttlebone hydroxyapatite (CBHA). However, the biocompatibility and in vivo characteristic of CBHA have not been fully investigated. We fabricated CBHA via the in situ HT of aragonite from CB. This CBHA exhibited a highly porous structure and nanoscaled surface morphology with a significantly higher protein adsorption rate than CB. Marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded and cultured on the CBHA and CB to evaluate their influence on cell proliferation and differentiation. According to scanning electronic microscopy observation and MTT assay, the MSCs adhered and proliferated well on both the CBHA and CB. Compared with the cells on the CB, the MSCs on CBHA exhibited enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin levels after 13 days of culture. In vivo testing revealed that CBHA could induce ectopic bone formation after implantation, while no bone formation being observed in the CB. These findings demonstrated that a nanoscaled and osteoinductive bone substitute could be produced by hydrothermally transforming an aragonite of CB into a hydroxyapatite.

  10. Osteoinductive silk fibroin/titanium dioxide/hydroxyapatite hybrid scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the fabrication that incorporation of titanium isopropoxide (TiO2) and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles into the silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds. In this process, we prepared TiO2 nanoparticles using sol-gel synthesis and the porous structure was developed by salt-leaching process. Homogeneous distribution of TiO2 and HA nanoparticles were confirmed by images of VP-FE-SEM and those equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Structural characteristics of the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold were also determined using FTIR analysis and X-ray diffractometer. In this study, the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold showed similar porosity, enhanced mechanical property, but decreased water binding abilities, compared with the porous SF scaffold. For evaluation of the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene expression were employed. Our results revealed that the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold had improved osteoinductivity compared with the porous SF scaffold. These results suggest that the osteogenic property as well as mechanical property of the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold could be better than the porous SF scaffold. Therefore, the porous SF/TiO2/HA hybrid scaffold may be a good promising biomaterial for bone tissue engineering application.

  11. BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres exhibit enhanced osteoinduction and osteogenicity in large bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Long; Zeng, Jianhua; Yao, Aihua; Tu, Qiquan; Li, Jingtang; Yan, Liang; Tang, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration of large bone defects is an osteoinductive, osteoconductive, and osteogenic process that often requires a bone graft for support. Limitations associated with naturally autogenic or allogenic bone grafts have demonstrated the need for synthetic substitutes. The present study investigates the feasibility of using novel hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres as an osteoconductive matrix and a carrier for controlled local delivery of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), a potent osteogenic inducer of bone regeneration. Hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres (100±25 μm) with a core (60±18 μm) and a mesoporous shell (180±42 m2/g surface area) were prepared by a glass conversion technique and loaded with recombinant human BMP2 (1 μg/mg). There was a gentle burst release of BMP2 from microspheres into the surrounding phosphate-buffered saline in vitro within the initial 48 hours, and continued at a low rate for over 40 days. In comparison with hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres without BMP2 or soluble BMP2 without a carrier, BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres had a significantly enhanced capacity to reconstitute radial bone defects in rabbit, as shown by increased serum alkaline phosphatase; quick and complete new bone formation within 12 weeks; and great biomechanical flexural strength. These results indicate that BMP2-loaded hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres could be a potential new option for bone graft substitutes in bone regeneration. PMID:25609957

  12. Extracellular calcium and CaSR drive osteoinduction in mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    González-Vázquez, Arlyng; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2014-06-01

    Bone is the main store of calcium and progenitor cells in the body. During the resorption process, the local calcium concentration reaches 8-40mM, and the surrounding cells are exposed to these fluctuations in calcium. This stimulus is a signal that is detected through the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), which modulates chemotactic and proliferative G protein-dependent signaling pathways. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the roles of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) and the CaSR in osteoinduction. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs) were stimulated with 10mM of Ca(2+). Several experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effect of [Ca(2+)]o on chemotaxis, proliferation and differentiation on the osteoblastic lineage. It was found that [Ca(2+)]o induces rBMSCs to migrate and proliferate in a concentration-dependent manner. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence also revealed that 10mM Ca(2+) stimulates overexpression of osteogenic markers in rBMSCs, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein, collagen Ia1 and osteocalcin. Functional assays determining ALP activity and mineralization tests both corroborate the increased expression of these markers in rBMSCs stimulated with Ca(2+). Moreover, CaSR blockage inhibited the cellular response to stimulation with high concentrations of [Ca(2+)]o, revealing that the CaSR is a key modulator of these cellular responses.

  13. Constitutive and inducible co-expression systems for non-viral osteoinductive gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, G A; Hacobian, A; Hofmann, A T; Wassermann, K; Zimmermann, A; van Griensven, M; Redl, H

    2014-02-19

    Tissue regenerative gene therapy requires expression strategies that deliver therapeutic effective amounts of transgenes. As physiological expression patterns are more complex than high-level expression of a singular therapeutic gene, we aimed at constitutive or inducible co-expression of 2 transgenes simultaneously. Co-expression of human bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 (BMP2/7) from constitutively expressing and doxycycline inducible plasmids was evaluated in vitro in C2C12 cells with osteocalcin reporter gene assays and standard assays for osteogenic differentiation. The constitutive systems were additionally tested in an in vivo pilot for ectopic bone formation after repeated naked DNA injection to murine muscle tissue. Inductor controlled differentiation was demonstrated in vitro for inducible co-expression. Both co-expression systems, inducible and constitutive, achieved significantly better osteogenic differentiation than single factor expression. The potency of the constitutive co-expression systems was dependent on relative expression cassette topology. In vivo, ectopic bone formation was demonstrated in 6/13 animals (46% bone formation efficacy) at days 14 and 28 in hind limb muscles as proven by in vivo µCT and histological evaluation. In vitro findings demonstrated that the devised single vector BMP2/7 co-expression strategy mediates superior osteoinduction, can be applied in an inductor controlled fashion and that its efficiency is dependent on expression cassette topology. In vivo results indicatethatco-expression of BMP2/7 applied by non-viral naked DNA gene transfer effectively mediates bone formation without the application of biomaterials, cells or recombinant growth factors, offering a promising alternative to current treatment strategies with potential for clinical translation in the future.

  14. The effect of nicotine on osteoinduction by recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Tamura, K; Togo, Y; Kaihara, S; Hussain, A; Takahashi, K; Bessho, K

    2014-08-01

    Nicotine, one of the constituents of tobacco, is known to have an adverse effect on human health. We sought to clarify the interaction between nicotine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) in terms of osteogenesis in vitro and osteoinduction in vivo. Nicotine did not inhibit or stimulate alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity or the amount of osteocalcin in C2C12 cells in the presence of rhBMP-2 in vitro. Ectopic bone formation using a collagen sponge containing rhBMP-2 was evaluated with and without nicotine after 21 days using radiographic, histological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical analyses. ALP activity in the medium-dose group (2.2±0.9IU/mg protein; P=0.047) and the high-dose group (2.0±0.1IU/mg protein; P=0.03) was significantly lower than in the control group. The calcium content in the medium-dose group (35.4±12.9μg/mg tissue; P=0.0099) and high-dose group (34.8±10.5μg/mg tissue; P=0.006) was significantly lower than in the control group. The number of vascular endothelial growth factor-positive cells in the high-dose group (671.9±57.3cells/mm(2); P=0.03) was significantly lower than in the control group. Results showed that nicotine did not inhibit the stimulatory effect of rhBMP-2 in vitro, but a high dose of nicotine inhibited bone formation in vivo by adversely affecting vascularization.

  15. Silver nanoparticles and growth factors incorporated hydroxyapatite coatings on metallic implant surfaces for enhancement of osteoinductivity and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao-Ming; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Ke-Feng; Meng, Fan-Zhi; Jiang, Ou; Zhang, Hong-Ping; Zhi, Wei; Fang, Li-Ming

    2014-06-11

    Research on incorporation of both growth factors and silver (Ag) into hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on metallic implant surfaces for enhancing osteoinductivity and antibacterial properties is a challenging work. Generally, Ag nanoparticles are easy to agglomerate and lead to a large increase in local Ag concentration, which could potentially affect cell activity. On the other hand, growth factors immobilization requires mild processing conditions so as to maintain their activities. In this study, bone morphology protein-2 (BMP-2) and Ag nanoparticle contained HA coatings were prepared on Ti surfaces by combining electrochemical deposition (ED) of Ag and electrostatic immobilization of BMP-2. During the ED process, chitosan (CS) was selected as the stabilizing agent to chelate Ag ions and generate Ag nanoparticles that are uniformly distributed in the coatings. CS also reduces Ag toxicity while retaining its antibacterial activity. Afterwards, a BMP/heparin solution was absorbed on the CS/Ag/HA coatings. Consequently, BMP-2 was immobilized on the coatings by the electrostatic attraction between CS, heparin, and BMP-2. Sustained release of BMP-2 and Ag ions from HA coatings was successfully demonstrated for a long period. Results of antibacterial tests indicate that the CS/Ag/HA coatings have high antibacterial properties against both Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. Osteoblasts (OB) culture reveals that the CS/Ag/HA coatings exhibit good biocompatibility. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) culture indicates that the BMP/CS/Ag/HA coatings have good osteoinductivity and promote the differentiation of BMSCs. Ti bars with BMP/CS/Ag/HA coatings were implanted into the femur of rabbits to evaluate the osteoinductivity of the coatings. Results indicate that BMP/CS/Ag/HA coatings favor bone formation in vivo. In summary, this study presents a convenient and effective method for the incorporation of growth factors and antibacterial agents into HA coatings. This

  16. Ovariectomized Rats with Established Osteopenia have Diminished Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow and Impaired Homing, Osteoinduction and Bone Regeneration at the Fracture Site.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Deepshikha; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Sagar, Nitin; China, Shyamsundar P; Singh, Atul K; Kheruka, Subhash C; Barai, Sukanta; Tewari, Mahesh C; Nagar, Geet K; Vishwakarma, Achchhe L; Ogechukwu, Omeje E; Bellare, Jayesh R; Gambhir, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-04-01

    We investigated deleterious changes that take place in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and its fracture healing competence in ovariectomy (Ovx)-induced osteopenia. MSC from bone marrow (BM) of ovary intact (control) and Ovx rats was isolated. (99m)Tc-HMPAO (Technitium hexamethylpropylene amine oxime) labeled MSC was systemically transplanted to rats and fracture tropism assessed by SPECT/CT. PKH26 labeled MSC (PKH26-MSC) was bound in scaffold and applied to fracture site (drill-hole in femur metaphysis). Osteoinduction was quantified by calcein binding and microcomputed tomography. Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, fulvestrant was used to determine ER dependence of osteo-induction by MSC. BM-MSC number was strikingly reduced and doubling time increased in Ovx rats compared to control. SPECT/CT showed reduced localization of (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled MSC to the fracture site, 3 h post-transplantation in Ovx rats as compared with controls. Post-transplantation, Ovx MSC labeled with PKH26 (Ovx PKH26-MSC) localized less to fracture site than control PKH26-MSC. Transplantation of either control or Ovx MSC enhanced calcein binding and bone volume at the callus of control rats over placebo group however Ovx MSC had lower efficacy than control MSC. Fulvestrant blocked osteoinduction by control MSC. When scaffold bound MSC was applied to fracture, osteoinduction by Ovx PKH26-MSC was less than control PKH26-MSC. In Ovx rats, control MSC/E2 treatment but not Ovx MSC showed osteoinduction. Regenerated bone was irregularly deposited in Ovx MSC group. In conclusion, Ovx is associated with diminished BM-MSC number and its growth, and Ovx MSC displays impaired engraftment to fracture and osteoinduction besides disordered bone regeneration.

  17. In vivo osteoinductive effect and in vitro isolation and cultivation bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Redzić, Amira; Smajilagić, Amer; Aljicević, Mufida; Berberović, Ljubomir

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow contains cell type termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), first recognized in bone marrow by a German pathologist, Julius Cohnheim in 1867. That MSCs have potential to differentiate in vitro in to the various cells lines as osteoblast, chondroblast, myoblast and adipoblast cells lines. Aims of our study were to show in vivo capacity of bone marrow MSC to produce bone in surgically created non critical size mandible defects New Zeland Rabbits, and then in second part of study to isolate in vitro MSC from bone marrow, as potential cell transplantation model in bone regeneration. In vivo study showed new bone detected on 3D CT reconstruction day 30, on all 3 animals non critical size defects, treated with bone marrow MSC exposed to the human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (rhBMP-7). Average values of bone mineral density (BMD), was 530 mg/cm3, on MSC treated animals, and 553 mg/cm3 on control group of 3 animals where non critical size defects were treated with iliac crest autologue bone graft. Activity of the Alkaline Phosphatase enzyme were measurement on 0.5, 14, 21, 30 day and increased activity were detected day 14 on animals treated with bone marrow MSCs compared with day 30 on iliac crest treated animals. That results indicates strong osteoinduction activity of the experimental bone marrow MSCs models exposed to the rhBMP-7 factor Comparing ALP activity, that model showed superiorly results than control group. That result initiates us in opinion that MSCs alone should be alternative for the autolologue bone transplantation and in vitro study we isolated singles MSCs from the bone marrow of rat's tibia and femora and cultivated according to the method of Maniatopoulos et all. The small initial colonies of fibroblast like cells were photo-documented after 2 days of primary culture. Such isolated and cultivated MSCs in future studies will be exposed to the growth factors to differentiate in osteoblast and indicate their clinically potential as alternative

  18. BMP2-induced inflammation can be suppressed by the osteoinductive growth factor NELL-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W; Zara, Janette N; Asatrian, Greg; Khadarian, Kevork; Zhang, James B; Ho, Stephanie; Kim, Hyun Ju; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2013-11-01

    Bone-morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved osteoinductive growth factor used in clinical settings for bone regeneration and repair. However, the use of BMP2 is encumbered by numerous clinical complications, including postoperative inflammation and life-threatening cervical swelling. Thus, methods to prevent BMP2-induced inflammation would have far-reaching clinical implications toward improving current BMP2-based methods for bone regeneration. For the first time, we investigate the potential role of the growth factor Nel-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) in inhibiting BMP2-induced inflammation. Adult rats underwent a femoral bone onlay procedure, treated with either BMP2 protein (4 mg/mL), NELL-1 protein (4 mg/mL), or both proteins combined. Animals were evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 days postoperatively by histology, histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR for markers of inflammation (TNFα, IL6). The relative levels of TNFα and IL6 in serum were also detected by ELISA. The mechanism for NELL-1's anti-inflammatory effect was further assessed through examining inflammatory markers and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH3T3 cells. BMP2 significantly induced local inflammation, including an early and pronounced polymorphonuclear cell infiltration accompanied by increased expression of TNFα and IL6. Treatment with NELL-1 alone elicited no significant inflammatory response. However, NELL-1 significantly attenuated BMP2-induced inflammation by all markers and at all timepoints. These local findings were also confirmed using systemic serum inflammatory biomarkers (TNFα, IL6). In each case, NELL-1 fully reversed BMP2-induced systemic inflammation. Lastly, our findings were recapitulated in vitro, where NELL-1 suppressed BMP2 induced expression of inflammatory markers, as well as NF-κB transcriptional activity and generation of ROS. BMP2-induced inflammation is a

  19. The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields and dehydroepiandrosterone on viability and osteo-induction of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kaivosoja, Emilia; Sariola, Veikko; Chen, Yan; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this work was that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are regulated by pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and by intracrine conversion of an adrenal prohormone to dihydrotestosterone. The effect of PEMF and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on viability and osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs and on the viability of osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells was evaluated. It was found that PEMF promoted the viability rate of both cell types, whereas DHEA decreased the viability rate in a concentration-dependent manner. PEMF did not have major effects on osteo-induction at this low seeding density level (3000 cells/cm(2) ). Instead, DHEA, after MSC-mediated and 5α-reductase-dependent conversion to dihydrotestosterone, clearly promoted the osteo-induction of MSCs induced with β-glyserophosphate, ascorbate and dexamethasone. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), SMAD1, RUNX2, osteopontin (OP) and osteocalcin (OC) RNA levels were increased and alizarin red S- and hydroxyapatite-specific OsteoImage(TM) stainings disclosed a promoted mineralization process. In addition, DHEA increased OP and OC mRNA levels of non-induced MSCs. A sequential use of mitogenic PEMF early during the fracture healing, followed by later administration of DHEA with osteogenic differentiating effect, might be worth subjecting to a randomized clinical trial.

  20. [New bioplastic materials for reconstructive surgery].

    PubMed

    Lekishvili, M V; Panasiuk, A F

    2008-01-01

    Results of creation and clinical application of bioplastic materials using specimens from the tissue bank of the Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics are presented. The use of materials of the new generation, such as perfoost, alomatrix-implant, and osteomatrix, is illustrated by examples of the treatment of various bone diseases. High biocompatibility and efficiency, osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties of these materials are reported. Technical developments in modern bioimplantology are analysed with reference to their status in the Institute's tissue bank.

  1. Potential Osteoinductive Effects of Calcitriol on the m-RNA of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Alveolar Periosteum

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Hong, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized alveolar periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells (P-MSCs) and examined the hypothesis that 1,25-(OH)2D3 (calcitriol) exerts osteoinductive effects on P-MSCs. The mRNA expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), core-binding factor alpha-1 (CBFA1), collagen-1 (Col-1), osteocalcin (OCN), and vitamin D3 receptor (VDR) were assessed after incubation with calcitriol for 2 weeks. Vitamin C as positive control (Vit. C-p) increased ALP and CBFA1 mRNA expression at both 1 and 2 weeks and increased BSP and Col-1 mRNA expression only at the first week. A concentration of 10−8 M calcitriol enhanced ALP, CBFA1, Col-1, and OCN mRNA expression at both weeks and BSP mRNA expression at the first week. Furthermore, 10−7 M calcitriol increased the mRNA expressions of all compounds at both weeks, except that of CBFA1 at the first week. 10−8 M calcitriol and Vit. C-p enhanced ALP activity at the second and third weeks. The results revealed that 10−9, 10−8, and 10−7 M calcitriol induced osteoinduction in alveolar P-MSCs by increasing ALP, CBFA1, Col-1, and OCN mRNA expression. A 10−7 M calcitriol yielded a higher mRNA expression than Vit. Cp on VDR and OCN mRNA expression at both weeks and on Col-1 mRNA at the second week. PMID:28105418

  2. Tissue engineering scaffold material of porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Lu, Hongyan; Zhang, Jingchao; Lu, Guoyu; Deng, Zhennan; Mo, Anchun

    2010-05-13

    The aim of the study was to investigate a porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) scaffold material that was implanted into muscle and tibiae of 16 New Zealand white rabbits to evaluate the biocompatibility and osteogenesis and osteoinductivity of the materials in vivo. The samples were harvested at 2, 4, 12 and 26 weeks respectively, and subjected to histological analysis. At 2 weeks, the experiment showed that osteogenesis was detected in porous n-HA/PA66 composite and the density of new bone formation was similar to the surrounding host bone at 12 weeks. The study indicated that three-dimensional pore structures could facilitate cell adhesion, differentiation and proliferation, and help with fibrovascular and nerve colonization. In conclusion, porous n-HA/PA66 scaffold material could be a good candidate as a bone substitute material used in clinics due to its excellent histocompatibility, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity.

  3. Heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge pretreatment of a titanium alloy: evidence [corrected] for enhanced osteoinductive properties.

    PubMed

    Rapuano, Bruce E; Singh, Herman; Boskey, Adele L; Doty, Stephen B; MacDonald, Daniel E

    2013-08-01

    It is believed that orthopedic and implant longevity can be improved by optimizing fixation, or direct bone-implant contact, through the stimulation of new bone formation around the implant. The purpose of this study was to determine whether heat (600°C) or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) pretreatment of Ti6Al4V stimulated calcium-phosphate mineral formation in cultures of attached MC3T3 osteoprogenitor cells with or without a fibronectin coating. Calcium-phosphate mineral was analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/electron dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). RFGD and heat pretreatments produced a general pattern of increased total soluble calcium levels, although the effect of heat pretreatment was greater than that of RFGD. SEM/EDAX showed the presence of calcium-and phosphorus-containing particles on untreated and treated disks that were more numerous on fibronectin-coated disks. These particles were observed earliest (1 week) on RFGD-pretreated surfaces. FTIR analyses showed that the heat pretreatment produced a general pattern of increased levels of apatite mineral at 2-4 weeks; a greater effect was observed for fibronectin-coated disks compared to uncoated disks. The observed findings suggest that heat pretreatment of Ti6Al4V increased the total mass of the mineral formed in MC3T3 osteoprogenitor cell cultures more than RFGD while the latter pretreatment hastened the early deposition of mineral. These findings help to support the hypothesis that the pretreatments enhance the osteoinductive properties of the alloy.

  4. Enhanced bone tissue regeneration by antibacterial and osteoinductive silica-HACC-zein composite scaffolds loaded with rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Panyu; Xia, Yan; Cheng, Xiaosong; Wang, Panfeng; Xie, Yang; Xu, Shuogui

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation orthopedic implants with both osteoinductivity and antibacterial ability are greatly needed. In the present study, biodegradable rhBMP-2 loaded zein-based scaffolds with a macroporous structure were synthesized, and SBA-15 nanoparticles and hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan (HACC) were incorporated into the scaffolds to produce an anti-infective composite scaffold for delivery of osteogenic factors that facilitate the functional repair of bone defects. The silica/HACC/zein scaffolds developed here showed bioactivity, biocompatibility, and effective antibacterial activity. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to quantitatively measure the bactericidal efficacy with respect to bacterial adhesion. Results showed that the sample zein-HACC-S20 exhibited long-lasting antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus up to 5 d. At a low dosage of rhBMP-2 (ca. 80 μg), the scaffolds released rhBMP-2 protein efficiently at a relatively slow rate, even after 27 d. An ALP activity and ECM mineralization assay showed that the zein-HACC-S20 scaffolds exhibited significant early osteogenic differentiation by generating enhanced ALP product on day 14 and ECM mineralization on day 21. In a mouse model of thigh muscle pouches, zein-S20 and zein-HACC-S20 groups resulted in obvious bone formation and gave more extensive mineralization to the implants than silica free groups, indicating effective bone induction in vivo. In a rabbit model of critical-sized radius bone defects (20 mm in length and 5 mm in diameter), the bone defects were almost fully repaired and bone marrow cavity recanalization was detectable by 3D micro-CT technique and histological analysis after 12 weeks. In this way, the zein-HACC-S20 scaffolds were proven to significantly promote the bone repair. They also demonstrated considerable promise for tissue engineering. Silica/HACC/zein scaffolds with both antibacterial activity and the ability to

  5. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  6. Vesicular Galectin-3 levels decrease with donor age and contribute to the reduced osteo-inductive potential of human plasma derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Weilner, Sylvia; Keider, Verena; Winter, Melanie; Harreither, Eva; Salzer, Benjamin; Weiss, Florian; Schraml, Elisabeth; Messner, Paul; Pietschmann, Peter; Hildner, Florian; Gabriel, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Grillari, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a decline of physiological functions and in reduced repair capacities, in part due to impaired regenerative power of stem cells, influenced by the systemic environment. In particular osteogenic differentiation capacity (ODC) of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to decrease with age, thereby contributing to reduced bone formation and an increased fracture risk. Searching for systemic factors that might contribute to this age related decline of regenerative capacity led us to investigate plasma-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs of the elderly were found to inhibit osteogenesis compared to those of young individuals. By analyzing the differences in the vesicular content Galectin-3 was shown to be reduced in elderly-derived vesicles. While overexpression of Galectin-3 resulted in an enhanced ODC of MSCs, siRNA against Galectin-3 reduced osteogenesis. Modulation of intravesicular Galectin-3 levels correlated with an altered osteo-inductive potential indicating that vesicular Galectin-3 contributes to the biological response of MSCs to EVs. By site-directed mutagenesis we identified a phosphorylation-site on Galectin-3 mediating this effect. Finally, we showed that cell penetrating peptides comprising this phosphorylation-site are sufficient to increase ODC in MSCs. Therefore, we suggest that decrease of Galectin-3 in the plasma of elderly contributes to the age-related loss of ODC.

  7. Posterolateral Arthrodesis in Lumbar Spine Surgery Using Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma and Cancellous Bone Substitute: An Osteoinductive and Osteoconductive Effect

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Roberto; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Mancarella, Cristina; Rullo, Marika; Ferrazza, Giancarlo; Barrella, Gianna; Martini, Sergio; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Objectives To analyze the effectiveness and practicality of using cancellous bone substitute with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in posterolateral arthrodesis. Methods Twenty consecutive patients underwent posterolateral arthrodesis with implantation of cancellous bone substitute soaked with PRP obtained directly in the operating theater on the right hemifield and cancellous bone substitute soaked with saline solution on the right. Results Computed tomography scans at 6 and 12 months after surgery were performed in all patients. Bone density was investigated by comparative analysis of region of interest. The data were analyzed with repeated-measures variance analyses with value of density after 6 months and value of density after 12 months, using age, levels of arthrodesis, and platelet count as covariates. The data demonstrated increased bone density using PRP and heterologous cancellous block resulting in an enhanced fusion rate during the first 6 months after surgery. Conclusions PRP used with cancellous bone substitute increases the rate of fusion and bone density joining osteoinductive and osteoconductive effect. PMID:25083353

  8. Fabrication of poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel micropatterns with osteoinductive growth factors and evaluation of the effects on osteoblast activity and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramani, K.; Birch, M. A.

    2006-09-01

    orthopaedic applications using osteoinductive PEG hydrogel micropatterns.

  9. Osteoinductive LIM Mineralization Protein-1 Suppresses Activation of NF-κB and Selectively Regulates MAPK Pathways in Pre-osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Bargouti, Maggie; Zughaier, Susu; Zheng, Zhaomin; Liu, Yunshan; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Boden, Scott D.; Titus, Louisa

    2009-01-01

    LIM Mineralization Protein-1 (LMP-1) is an intracellular regulator of bone formation and has been shown to be osteoinductive in vitro and in vivo. The effect of LMP-1 on other aspects of bone homeostasis has not been previously studied. In a pilot study we observed that LMP-1 decreased nitric oxide (NO) production in pre-osteoclasts. Here we report a new anti-inflammatory effect of LMP-1 and define its mechanism of action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 pre-osteoclasts. We found that LMP-1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO production. LMP-1 also effectively inhibited the expression of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), potently suppressed the transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and prevented the phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB). Interestingly, LMP-1 had no effect on Receptor-Activator of Nuclear Factor B Ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, LMP-1 had no effect on the LPS-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), whereas it did attenuate the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) while enhancing phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK). These results suggest that LMP-1 has an anti-inflammatory effect, and this effect is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of NO production by the suppression of NF-κB activation and selective regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. PMID:19931434

  10. Osteoinductive LIM mineralization protein-1 suppresses activation of NF-kappaB and selectively regulates MAPK pathways in pre-osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Bargouti, Maggie; Zughaier, Susu; Zheng, Zhaomin; Liu, Yunshan; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Boden, Scott D; Titus, Louisa

    2010-05-01

    LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) is an intracellular regulator of bone formation and has been shown to be osteoinductive in vitro and in vivo. The effect of LMP-1 on other aspects of bone homeostasis has not been previously studied. In a pilot study we observed that LMP-1 decreased nitric oxide (NO) production in pre-osteoclasts. Here we report a new anti-inflammatory effect of LMP-1 and define its mechanism of action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 pre-osteoclasts. We found that LMP-1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO production. LMP-1 also effectively inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), potently suppressed the transcriptional activity and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), and prevented the phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B (IkappaB). Interestingly, LMP-1 had no effect on Receptor-Activator of Nuclear Factor B Ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, LMP-1 had no effect on the LPS-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), whereas it did attenuate the phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) while enhancing phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK). These results suggest that LMP-1 has an anti-inflammatory effect, and this effect is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of NO production by the suppression of NF-kappaB activation and selective regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways.

  11. Increased osteoinductivity and mineralization by minimal concentration of bone morphogenetic protein-2 loaded onto biphasic calcium phosphate in a rabbit sinus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a minimal concentration of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in terms of quantitative and qualitative analyses of newly formed bone in a rabbit maxillary sinus model. Methods In 7 rabbits, sinus windows were prepared bilaterally. Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) loaded with 0.05 mg/mL BMP-2 was grafted into one sinus (the BMP group) and saline-soaked BCP was placed into the other (the control group) in each animal. The animals were allowed an 8-week healing period before being sacrificed. Specimens including the augmented area and surrounding tissues were then removed and evaluated both radiographically and histologically. Results There was a difference in the mineralization of new bone between the groups. In the BMP group, the greater part of the new bone consisted of mature lamellar bone with an evident trabecular pattern, whereas the control group showed mostly woven bone, consisting only partially of lamellar bone. Histometrically, the area of new bone was significantly greater (4.55±1.35 mm2 vs. 2.99±0.86 mm2) in the BMP group than in the control group (P<0.05); however, the total augmentation volumes were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be suggested that a minimal concentration of BMP-2 (0.05 mg/mL) had an osteoinductive effect with accelerated mineralization in a rabbit sinus model using a BCP carrier. PMID:27800217

  12. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  13. Harnessing Wharton's jelly stem cell differentiation into bone-like nodule on calcium phosphate substrate without osteoinductive factors.

    PubMed

    Mechiche Alami, S; Rammal, H; Boulagnon-Rombi, C; Velard, F; Lazar, F; Drevet, R; Laurent Maquin, D; Gangloff, S C; Hemmerlé, J; Voegel, J C; Francius, G; Schaaf, P; Boulmedais, F; Kerdjoudj, H

    2017-02-01

    An important aim of bone regenerative medicine is to design biomaterials with controlled chemical and topographical features to guide stem cell fate towards osteoblasts without addition of specific osteogenic factors. Herein, we find that sprayed bioactive and biocompatible calcium phosphate substrates (CaP) with controlled topography induce, in a well-orchestrated manner, Wharton's jelly stem cells (WJ-SCs) differentiation into osteoblastic lineage without any osteogenic supplements. The resulting WJ-SCs commitment exhibits features of native bone, through the formation of three-dimensional bone-like nodule with osteocyte-like cells embedded into a mineralized type I collagen. To our knowledge, these results present the first observation of a whole differentiation process from stem cell to osteocytes-like on a synthetic material. This suggests a great potential of sprayed CaP and WJ-SCs in bone tissue engineering. These unique features may facilitate the transition from bench to bedside and the development of successful engineered bone.

  14. Fabrication of electrospun silica-titania nanofibers with different silica content and evaluation of the morphology and osteoinductive properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaokun; Zhu, Jingxian; Yin, Ling; Liu, Shize; Zhang, Xin; Ao, Yingfang; Chen, Haifeng

    2012-12-01

    Ceramic-derived materials have shown enhanced osteogenic potential for bone tissue engineering applications. Silica is the major component of bioglass, and titania, the oxide complex of titanium, has been found to enhance osteoblast differentiation. In this study, three groups of sol-gel-derived silica-titania fibrous meshes with precursor ratios of Ti:Si = 7:3, 1:1, 3:7 were fabricated by electrospinning. The effects of silica content on the crystal phase and morphology of silica-titania hybrid nanofiber meshes were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and laser confocal microscopy. The osteogenic potential of the silica-titania meshes was evaluated by seeding mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on each mesh and determining cell number, osteodifferentiation markers, and osteopontin production over time. Our results show that cells proliferated throughout the mesh surfaces with similar morphology in all groups. Decreased cell proliferation was observed with the fiber meshes compared with glass controls, whereas cell differentiation toward osteoblast was enhanced on the mesh groups, especially on the Ti:Si = 7:3 group. These findings suggest that higher fiber diameter, degree of crystallization, and titania content of nanofibers can enhance osteodifferentiation of MSCs.

  15. Biological rationale for the intramedullary canal as a source of autograft material.

    PubMed

    Hak, David J; Pittman, Jason L

    2010-01-01

    Bone harvested by intramedullary reaming offers a minimally invasive alternative to harvesting bone from the iliac crest, which has long been considered the gold standard for autogenous bone grafting. The biologic potential of intramedullary reaming material has been studied both in vitro and in vivo. The material provides osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive properties that are comparable to the material harvested from the iliac crest. In addition to the ability to obtain a large volume of bone, the graft harvested by the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator has been shown to be rich in growth factors, including BMP-2, TGF-beta1, IGF-I, FGFa, and PDGFbb.

  16. Current trends and future perspectives of bone substitute materials - from space holders to innovative biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Handschel, Jörg; Drescher, Wolf; Rothamel, Daniel; Kloss, Frank; Blessmann, Marco; Heiland, Max; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Smeets, Ralf

    2012-12-01

    An autologous bone graft is still the ideal material for the repair of craniofacial defects, but its availability is limited and harvesting can be associated with complications. Bone replacement materials as an alternative have a long history of success. With increasing technological advances the spectrum of grafting materials has broadened to allografts, xenografts, and synthetic materials, providing material specific advantages. A large number of bone-graft substitutes are available including allograft bone preparations such as demineralized bone matrix and calcium-based materials. More and more replacement materials consist of one or more components: an osteoconductive matrix, which supports the ingrowth of new bone; and osteoinductive proteins, which sustain mitogenesis of undifferentiated cells; and osteogenic cells (osteoblasts or osteoblast precursors), which are capable of forming bone in the proper environment. All substitutes can either replace autologous bone or expand an existing amount of autologous bone graft. Because an understanding of the properties of each material enables individual treatment concepts this review presents an overview of the principles of bone replacement, the types of graft materials available, and considers future perspectives. Bone substitutes are undergoing a change from a simple replacement material to an individually created composite biomaterial with osteoinductive properties to enable enhanced defect bridging.

  17. Tuning cellular responses to BMP-2 with material surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Picart, Catherine; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) has been known for decades as a strong osteoinductive factor and for clinical applications is combined solely with collagen as carrier material. The growing concerns regarding side effects and the importance of BMP-2 in several developmental and physiological processes have raised the need to improve the design of materials by controlling BMP-2 presentation. Inspired by the natural cell environment, new material surfaces have been engineered and tailored to provide both physical and chemical cues that regulate BMP-2 activity. Here we describe surfaces designed to present BMP-2 to cells in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. This is achieved by trapping BMP-2 using physicochemical interactions, either covalently grafted or combined with other extracellular matrix components. In the near future, we anticipate that material science and biology will integrate and further develop tools for in vitro studies and potentially bring some of them toward in vivo applications. PMID:26704296

  18. Tof-Sims Application for Evaluating the Atomic Structure of New Bone Substitute Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteri, G.; Pisanom, M.; Cicciù, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this experimental study is to evaluate, in vitro, the chemical composition and the micromorphological structure of a bone substitute material surface. This material is based on calcium triphosphate and hydroxyapatite microgranules. Some results of a preliminary surface study of the above mentioned bioceramic materials are reported. The study has been carried out by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), complemented by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) measurements. Whereas XPS data supplies the average surface composition of the system, TOF-SIMS supplies laterally and depth resolved information on the sample. This preliminary study confirms the properties of osteoconduction and scaffold features of the material. Moreover, a possible osteoinductive capability could be due to the presence of surface micropores, which could help in the attraction of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), thus promoting the osteogenesis.

  19. Synchrotron X-ray bio-imaging of natural and synthetic bone-graft materials in an aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Gun; Bark, Chung Wung

    2014-11-01

    Bone-graft materials in dentistry have osteoinductive and osteoconductive abilities, which depend on their microstructural characteristics, such as their porosity, particle size, micro channels, and absorption. These characteristics have been observed using various imaging techniques, such as optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, most techniques cannot provide images in water, even though graft materials in vivo are invariably in contact with different water-based fluids. Synchrotron X-ray imaging allows sample microenvironments to be controlled as X-ray beams easily penetrate air and water. In this report, we used the synchrotron X-ray imaging technique to provide in-situ images of various bone-graft materials in aqueous environments. We observed internal microstructural images of bone-graft materials in real-time in 0.9% saline solution and interactions between bone-graft materials and saline, that is, hydration patterns and bone-graft expansion.

  20. Osteoinductive activity of ErhBMP-2 after anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion with a ß-TCP interbody cage in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Zhang, Fan; Lv, Feizhou; Jiang, Jianyuan; Liu, Dayong; Xia, Xinlei

    2014-02-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 induces bone and cartilage tissue formation. Large amounts of BMP-2 are difficult to purify or to produce in vitro using eukaryotic cells. The goal of the present study was to assess the clinical use of Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human BMP-2 (ErhBMP-2) on bone fusion after cervical and lumbar spine surgery in a goat model, compared with the standard autogenous iliac bone grafting. Thirty-six goats were randomized to 3 groups: (A) autogenous iliac bone grafting, (B) cervical interbody fusion cage containing ß-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP), or (C) cervical interbody fusion cage containing ß-TCP+ErhBMP-2 (2.5 mg). Cervical bone repair was evaluated using radiographs and computed tomography scans at 0, 3, and 6 months. Histological analyses were performed on cervical samples. Two goats died from infection. The differences in intervertebral height among the groups were not significant 3 months postoperatively but became significant after 6 months between groups A vs B and C (P=.04); there was no difference between groups B and C at 6 months. Adding ErhBMP-2 significantly increased cervical fusion at 6 months (P=.04). Histological examinations showed that ß-TCP+ErhBMP-2 increased new bone area, material degradation rate, and depth of tissue penetration and decreased residual material area, all in a time-dependent manner. Escherichia coli-derived rhBMP-2 combined with an enhanced fusion cage containing ß-TCP induced bone formation in a goat model. Furthermore, its ability to promote bone fusion was similar to autogenous iliac bone grafting.

  1. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshchenko, V. P. Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  2. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, V. P.; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M.

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  3. Is Graphene a Promising Nano-Material for Promoting Surface Modification of Implants or Scaffold Materials in Bone Tissue Engineering?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24447041

  4. Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Anorganic Bovine Bone Graft Utilizing a Polyglutamate-Modified BMP2 Peptide with Improved Binding to Calcium-Containing Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jennifer L.; Bonvallet, Paul P.; Abou-Arraj, Ramzi V.; Schupbach, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autogenous bone is the gold standard material for bone grafting in craniofacial and orthopedic regenerative medicine. However, due to complications associated with harvesting donor bone, clinicians often use commercial graft materials that may lose their osteoinductivity due to processing. This study was aimed to functionalize one of these materials, anorganic bovine bone (ABB), with osteoinductive peptides to enhance regenerative capacity. Two peptides known to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated: (1) DGEA, an amino acid motif within collagen I and (2) a biomimetic peptide derived from bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2pep). To achieve directed coupling of the peptides to the graft surface, the peptides were engineered with a heptaglutamate domain (E7), which confers specific binding to calcium moieties within bone mineral. Peptides with the E7 domain exhibited greater anchoring to ABB than unmodified peptides, and E7 peptides were retained on ABB for at least 8 weeks in vivo. To assess the osteoinductive potential of the peptide-conjugated ABB, ectopic bone formation was evaluated utilizing a rat subcutaneous pouch model. ABB conjugated with full-length recombinant BMP2 (rBMP2) was also implanted as a model for current clinical treatments utilizing rBMP2 passively adsorbed to carriers. These studies showed that E7BMP2pep/ABB samples induced more new bone formation than all other peptides, and an equivalent amount of new bone as compared with rBMP2/ABB. A mandibular defect model was also used to examine intrabony healing of peptide-conjugated ABB. Bone healing was monitored at varying time points by positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-NaF, and it was found that the E7BMP2pep/ABB group had greater bone metabolic activity than all other groups, including rBMP2/ABB. Importantly, animals implanted with rBMP2/ABB exhibited complications, including inflammation and formation of cataract-like lesions in the eye, whereas no

  5. New Coll-HA/BT composite materials for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zanfir, Andrei Vlad; Voicu, Georgeta; Busuioc, Cristina; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Iordache, Florin

    2016-05-01

    The integration of ceramic powders in composite materials for bone scaffolds can improve the osseointegration process. This work was aimed to the synthesis and characterization of new collagen-hydroxyapatite/barium titanate (Coll-HA/BT) composite materials starting from barium titanate (BT) nanopowder, hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder and collagen (Coll) gel. BT nanopowder was produced by combining two wet-chemical approaches, sol-gel and hydrothermal methods. The resulting materials were characterized in terms of phase composition and microstructure by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the biocompatibility and bioactivity of the composite materials were assessed by in vitro tests. The synthesized BT particles exhibit an average size of around 35 nm and a spherical morphology, with a pseudo-cubic or tetragonal symmetry. The diffraction spectra of Coll-HA and Coll-HA/BT composite materials indicate a pronounced interaction between Col and the mineral phases, meaning a good mineralization of Col fibres. As well, the in vitro tests highlight excellent osteoinductive properties for all biological samples, especially for Coll-HA/BT composite materials, fact that can be attributed to the ferromagnetic properties of BT.

  6. Properties of the "Orgamax" osteoplastic material made of a demineralized allograft bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podorognaya, V. T.; Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Uvarkin, P. V.; Zhelezny, P. A.; Zheleznaya, A. P.; Akimova, S. E.; Novoselov, V. P.; Tupikova, L. N.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated properties of the "Orgamax" osteoplastic material, which was produced from a demineralized bone, in the treatment of extensive caries, in particular chronic pulpitis of the permanent teeth with unformed roots in children. The "Orgamax" osteoplastic material consists of demineralized bone chips, a collagen additive, and antibiotics. The surface morphology of the "Orgamax" osteoplastic material is macroporous, with the maximum pore size of 250 µm, whereas the surface morphology of the major component of "Orgamax", demineralized bone chips, is microporous, with a pore size of 10-20 µm. Material "Orgamax" is used in the treatment of complicated caries, particularly chronic pulpitis of permanent teeth with unformed roots in children. "Orgamax" filling a formed cavity exhibits antimicrobial properties, eliminates inflammation in the dental pulp, and, due to its osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, undergoes gradual resorption, stimulates regeneration, and provides replacement of the defect with newly formed tissue. The dental pulp viability is completely restored, which ensures the complete formation of tooth roots with root apex closure in the long-term period.

  7. Ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite as a bone graft material: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S R; Passi, D; Singh, P; Bhuibhar, A

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of dental, craniofacial and orthopedic defects with bone graft substitutes has shown promising result achieving almost complete bone regeneration depending on product resorption similar to human bone's physicochemical and crystallographic characteristics. Among these, non-ceramic and ceramic hydroxyapatite being the main inorganic salt of bone is the most studied calcium phosphate material in clinical practices ever since 1970s and non-ceramic since 1985. Its "chemical similarity" with the mineralized phase of biologic bone makes it unique. Hydroxyapatite as an excellent carrier of osteoinductive growth factors and osteogenic cell populations is also useful as drug delivery vehicle regardless of its density. Porous ceramic and non-ceramic hydroxyapatite is osteoconductive, biocompatible and very inert. The need for bone graft material keeps on increasing with increased age of the population and the increased conditions of trauma. Recent advances in genetic engineering and doping techniques have made it possible to use non-ceramic hydroxyapatite in larger non-ceramic crystals and cluster forms as a successful bone graft substitute to treat various types of bone defects. In this paper we have mentioned some recently studied properties of hydroxyapatite and its various uses through a brief review of the literatures available to date.

  8. The novel material: Organosilanes crosslinked gelatin its characteristics and potentials for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Bosun

    A typical tissue engineering approach involves combining three elements: a tissue scaffold, living cells, and cell signaling molecules, to regenerate a damaged tissue or organ. Tissue scaffold is the emerging key technology for tissue engineering applications. In this study, silane (glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane, GPMS) containing an epoxide group has been employed to crosslink gelatin and improve its deficient properties. However, GPMS modified gelatin has lower elasticity and hydrophobic structure due to its dense structure. These drawbacks were solved with the use of fructose as a spacer and another silane containing amine groups (aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APES) for the formation of longer bridge between two silanes. Furthermore, an "optimum" 2D or 3D silane-crosslinked system showed more wettable IPN structure due to many organic functional groups on its surface which can support cell attachment, migration and proliferation and allow interactions with biomolecules such as growth factors, providing lower toxicity. When silane modified gelatin(GS) was introduced to hydroxyapatite(HA) as a coating material, it yielded greater compressive strength and optimized the release of growth factors and stimulated osteogenic differentiation in vivo and in vitro. Also, GS, working as a DBM carrier, significantly enhanced the characteristics of DBM with adjustable load resistance, while maintaining the innate osteogenic properties of DBM. GS revealed to be a good candidate for osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone grafts, when combined with biomimetic material.

  9. Understanding Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Almost everything people have ever done has involved materials. Historical evidence indicates that "engineered materials" have been available and utilized for the benefit of humankind since the Neolithic period, beginning about 10,000 BC. Some of these materials have been in existence for thousands of years. At first, materials consisted of wood,…

  10. Medical applications of organic-inorganic hybrid materials within the field of silica-based bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Colilla, Montserrat; González, Blanca

    2011-02-01

    Research on bioceramics has evolved from the use of inert materials for mere substitution of living tissues towards the development of third-generation bioceramics aimed at inducing bone tissue regeneration. Within this context hybrid bioceramics have remarkable features resulting from the synergistic combination of both inorganic and organic components that make them suitable for a wide range of medical applications. Certain bioceramics, such as ordered mesoporous silicas, can exhibit different kind of interaction with organic molecules to develop different functions. The weak interaction of these host matrixes with drug molecules confined in the mesoporous channels allows these hybrid systems to be used as controlled delivery devices. Moreover, mesoporous silicas can be used to fabricate three (3D)-dimensional scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. In this last case, different osteoinductive agents (peptides, hormones and growth factors) can be strongly grafted to the bioceramic matrix to act as attracting signals for bone cells to promote bone regeneration process. Finally, recent research examples of organic-inorganic hybrid bioceramics, such as stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems and nanosystems for targeting of cancer cells and gene transfection, are also tackled in this tutorial review (64 references).

  11. Improvement of β-TCP/PLLA biodegradable material by surface modification with stearic acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fengcang; Chen, Sai; Liu, Ping; Geng, Fang; Li, Wei; Liu, Xinkuan; He, Daihua; Pan, Deng

    2016-05-01

    Poly-L-lactide (PLLA) is a biodegradable polymer and used widely. Incorporation of beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) into PLLA can enhance its osteoinductive properties. But the interfacial layer between β-TCP particles with PLLA matrix is easy to be destroyed due to inferior interfacial compatibility of the organic/inorganic material. In this work, a method of β-TCP surface modification with stearic acid was investigated to improve the β-TCP/PLLA biomaterial. The effects of surface modification on the β-TCP were investigated by FTIR, XPS, TGA and CA. It was found that the stearic acid reacted with β-TCP and oxhydryl was formed during the surface modification. Hydrophilicity of untreated or modified β-TCP/PLLA composite was increased by the addition of 10 wt.% β-TCP, but it decreased as the addition amount increased from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. Two models were suggested to describe the effect of β-TCP concentration on CA of the composites. Mechanical properties of β-TCP/PLLA composites were tested by bending and tensile tests. Fractures of the composites after mechanical test were observed by SEM. It was found that surface modification with stearic acid improved bending and tensile strengths of the β-TCP/PLLA composites obviously. The SEM results indicated that surface modification decreased the probability of interface debonding between fillers and matrix under load.

  12. Analytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Graeme W.

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90° rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  13. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  14. Analytic materials.

    PubMed

    Milton, Graeme W

    2016-11-01

    The theory of inhomogeneous analytic materials is developed. These are materials where the coefficients entering the equations involve analytic functions. Three types of analytic materials are identified. The first two types involve an integer p. If p takes its maximum value, then we have a complete analytic material. Otherwise, it is incomplete analytic material of rank p. For two-dimensional materials, further progress can be made in the identification of analytic materials by using the well-known fact that a 90(°) rotation applied to a divergence-free field in a simply connected domain yields a curl-free field, and this can then be expressed as the gradient of a potential. Other exact results for the fields in inhomogeneous media are reviewed. Also reviewed is the subject of metamaterials, as these materials provide a way of realizing desirable coefficients in the equations.

  15. Nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2001-03-01

    Nanostructured materials may be defined as those materials whose structural elements - clusters, crystallites or molecules - have dimensions in the 1 to 100 nm range. The explosion in both academic and industrial interest in these materials over the past decade arises from the remarkable variations in fundamental electrical, optical and magnetic properties that occur as one progresses from an `infinitely extended' solid to a particle of material consisting of a countable number of atoms. This review details recent advances in the synthesis and investigation of functional nanostructured materials, focusing on the novel size-dependent physics and chemistry that results when electrons are confined within nanoscale semiconductor and metal clusters and colloids. Carbon-based nanomaterials and nanostructures including fullerenes and nanotubes play an increasingly pervasive role in nanoscale science and technology and are thus described in some depth. Current nanodevice fabrication methods and the future prospects for nanostructured materials and nanodevices are discussed.

  16. An Osteoinductive Polymer Composite for Cranial and Maxillofacial Bone Repair,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    1971. 5. Cutright, D.E. and Hunsuck, E.E. The repair of Fractures of the orbital Floor using biodegradable polylactic acid. Oral Surg. 33:28, 1972...S. Cutright, D.E., Perez, B., Beasley, J.D., Larson, W.L., and Posey, W.R. Degradation rates of polymers and copolymers of polylactic and polyglycolic...Surg. 40:623, 1982. 16. Kulkarni, R.K., Pani, K.C., Neuman, C., and Leonard, F. Polylactic acid for surgical implants. Arch. Burg. 93:839, 1966. 17

  17. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  18. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  19. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  20. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  1. Nano Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Nano Materials Henne van Heeren enablingMNT Drakensteynlaan 34 3319 RG Dordrecht The Netherlands Henne@enablingMNT.com Introduction... micro sized particles. Nanotubes From a Mancef patent investigation it was learned that carbon nanotechnology (mainly nanotubes, but also...for high purity nanotubes. RTO-EN-AVT-129bis 3 - 1 van Heeren, H. (2007) Nano Materials. In Nanotechnology Aerospace Applications

  2. Materials Repurposed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Orvil L.; Townsend, J. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Few teachers find themselves with the support to purchase all of the materials they ideally need to supply their classrooms. Buying one or two simple, ready-made items can put a serious strain on anyone's budget. However, materials for science in the classroom need not be prefabricated or expensive. By looking at the function and purpose of any…

  3. Bioresponsive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yue; Aimetti, Alex A.; Langer, Robert; Gu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    'Smart' bioresponsive materials that are sensitive to biological signals or to pathological abnormalities, and interact with or are actuated by them, are appealing therapeutic platforms for the development of next-generation precision medications. Armed with a better understanding of various biologically responsive mechanisms, researchers have made innovations in the areas of materials chemistry, biomolecular engineering, pharmaceutical science, and micro- and nanofabrication to develop bioresponsive materials for a range of applications, including controlled drug delivery, diagnostics, tissue engineering and biomedical devices. This Review highlights recent advances in the design of smart materials capable of responding to the physiological environment, to biomarkers and to biological particulates. Key design principles, challenges and future directions, including clinical translation, of bioresponsive materials are also discussed.

  4. Composite material

    DOEpatents

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  5. Periodontal materials.

    PubMed

    Darby, I

    2011-06-01

    Periodontics is more associated with debridement of periodontal pockets and not generally thought of as using dental materials in the treatment of patients. However, the last 30 years have seen the development of materials used in regeneration of the periodontal tissues following periodontal disease, guided tissue regeneration, and the use of these materials in bone regeneration more recently, guided bone regeneration. The materials used include bone grafts and membranes, but also growth factors and cells-based therapies. This review provides an overview of the materials currently used and looks at contemporary research with a view to what may be used in the future. It also looks at the clinical effectiveness of these regenerative therapies with an emphasis on what is available in Australia.

  6. The effect of plasma surface treatment on the bioactivity of titanium implant materials (in vitro)

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahim, Ramy A.; Badr, Nadia A.; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surface of an implantable biomaterial plays a very important role in determining the biocompatibility, osteoinduction, and osteointegration of implants because it is in intimate contact with the host bone and soft tissues. Objective: This study was aimed to assess the effect of plasma surface treatment on the bioactivity of titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V). Materials and Methods: Fifteen titanium alloy samples were used in this study. The samples were divided into three groups (with five samples in each group). Five samples were kept untreated and served as control (group A). Another five plasma samples were sprayed for nitrogen ion implantation on their surfaces (group B) and the last five samples were pre-etched with acid before plasma treatment (group C). All the investigated samples were immersed for 7 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) which was used as a simulating body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4 and 37°C. HBSS was renewed every 3 days. The different surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXA), and Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Results: Nitriding of Ti-alloy samples via plasma nitrogen ion implantation increased the bioactivity of titanium. Moreover, the surface topography affected the chemical structure of the formed apatite. Increasing the surface roughness enhanced the bioactivity of the implant material. Conclusions: Nitridation can be exploited as an effective way to promote the formation of bone-like material on the implant surface. PMID:27011927

  7. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Manufactured by Hitco Materials Division of Armco, Inc. a ceramic fiber insulation material known as Refrasil has been used extensively as a heat-absorbing ablative reinforcement for such space systems as rocket motor nozzles, combustion chambers, and re-entry shields. Refrasil fibers are highly porous and do not melt or vaporize until fibers exceed 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit. Due to these and other properties, Refrasil has found utility in a number of industrial high temperature applications where glass, asbestos and other materials fail. Hitco used this insulation to assist Richardson Co., Inc. in the manufacturing of hard rubber and plastic molded battery cases.

  8. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Cooper, Valentino

    2016-07-12

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  9. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... or other medical conditions history of asthma and hay fever history of heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, thyroid ... materials if: you have a history of asthma, hay fever, or other allergies, which will increase your risk ...

  10. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... for words like: Acid Alkali Carcinogenic Caution Corrosive Danger Explosive Flammable Irritant Radioactive Unstable Warning A label ... leak occurs What to do if there is danger from the material mixing with other substances How ...

  11. CURRICULUM MATERIALS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton.

    MATERIALS ARE LISTED BY 36 TOPICS ARRANGED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER. TOPICS INCLUDE APPRENTICE TRAINING, BAKING, DRAFTING, ENGLISH, GLASSBLOWING, HOME ECONOMICS, INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY, MACHINE SHOP, NEEDLE TRADES, REFRIGERATION, AND UPHOLSTERY. PRICES ARE GIVEN FOR EACH ITEM. (EL)

  12. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  13. Parachute materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.W.; Johnson, D.W.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present guidelines for the use of Kevlar and nylon materials in modern parachute systems. Nylon has been used in parachutes for many years, so this discussion will place emphasis upon Kevlar material properties and their application to parachute design and construction. Kevlar-29 is an aramid fiber manufactured by DuPont and is being used on parachute systems requiring high strength-to-weight ratios or sustained strength at high temperatures. Tests of parachutes using Kevlar webbing, braided cords, ribbons, and thread have demonstrated that these Kevlar materials can be used successfully in ribbon parachutes with no detrimental effects on performance. A few changes must be made in the design of a ribbon parachute to accommodate Kevlar's high modulus. Examples of parachutes that use Kevlar suspension lines, radials, ribbons, reefing lines, bridles, and skirt bands are presented to show that they are much lighter and more resistant to aerodynamic heating than all-nylon parachutes. Nylon continues to be an important material for high-performance parachute systems, however. New nylon weaves have resulted in lighter weight, stronger ribbon materials with excellent sewability characteristics.

  14. Hardfacing material

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J [Iona, ID

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  15. THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Preparation of materials: Multiple oxides: Additions of TiO2, ZrO2 , CeO2 and SnO2 to YCrO3 were prepared. X-ray diffrac ion data established the...La2O3 and Nb2O5 to CeO2; CdO, Bi2O3, Sb2O5, MoO3 and WO3 to PbNb2O6 or Pb2N6207. Percentage compositions and ceramic properties of the materials are

  16. Squishy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habdas, Piotr; Weeks, Eric R.; Lynn, David G.

    2006-05-01

    Most people do not realize that many substances they use in the kitchen and the bathroom are not simple liquids or solids. Everyone is familiar with three states of matter: solids, liquids, and gases. However, creams, shampoo, toothpaste, and ketchup all have properties of both liquids and solids. This paper describes demonstrations and laboratory exercises1 that show intriguing properties of squishy substances, defined as materials that are not unambiguously solid, liquid, or gas. Unlike some areas of physics, the concepts behind squishy materials are understandable even by beginning students. Squishy physics can be used to show physics questions arising from everyday life and to convey the excitement of current research.

  17. Audiovisual Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH/Closer Look Resource Center.

    The fact sheet presents a suggested evaluation framework for use in previewing audiovisual materials, a list of selected resources, and an annotated list of films which were shown at the AHSSPPE '83 Media Fair as part of the national conference of the Association on Handicapped Student Service Programs in Postsecondary Education. Evaluation…

  18. BIOBASED MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biobased materials refer to products that mainly consist of a substance (or substances) derived from living matter (biomass) and either occur naturally or are synthesized, or it may refer to products made by processes that use biomass. Following a strict definition, many common m...

  19. Strategic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    to meet their obligations. Competition requires maintaining a lean cost structure, managing raw material requirements, improving the quality of products and...competitive reputations in the market through the quality of products and the ability to meet defense ballistic performance specifications and delivery

  20. Superconducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    After working with Lewis Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Superconducting Technologies, Inc. (STI) adapted NASA requirements and refined its own standard production recipe. STI uses high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials in its basic products: high quality thin films, circuits and components. Applications include microwave circuits for radar to reduce interference.

  1. Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Science Program is structured so that NASA s headquarters is responsible for the program content and selection, through the Enterprise Scientist, and MSFC provides for implementation of ground and flight programs with a Discipline Scientist and Discipline Manager. The Discipline Working Group of eminent scientists from outside of NASA acts in an advisory capacity and writes the Discipline Document from which the NRA content is derived. The program is reviewed approximately every three years by groups such as the Committee on Microgravity Research, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the OBPR Maximization and Prioritization (ReMaP) Task Force. The flight program has had as many as twenty-six principal investigators (PIs) in flight or flight definition stage, with the numbers of PIs in the future dependent on the results of the ReMaP Task Force and internal reviews. Each project has a NASA-appointed Project Scientist, considered a half-time job, who assists the PI in understanding and preparing for internal reviews such as the Science Concept Review and Requirements Definition Review. The Project Scientist also insures that the PI gets the maximum science support from MSFC, represents the PI to the MSFC community, and collaborates with the Project Manager to insure the project is well-supported and remains vital. Currently available flight equipment includes the Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) and Microgravity Science Glovebox. Ground based projects fall into one or more of several categories. Intellectual Underpinning of Flight Program projects include theoretical studies backed by modeling and computer simulations; bring to maturity new research, often by young researchers, and may include preliminary short duration low gravity experiments in the KC-135 aircraft or drop tube; enable characterization of data sets from previous flights; and provide thermophysical property determinations to aid PIs. Radiation Shielding and preliminary In

  2. Strategic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    temperature superconductors may one day open the door to magnetic levitation vehicles. And, medical technology is expected to increase the use of...telemedicine, telemaintenance, new internet-based music formats and unified messaging will demand the additional bandwidth that only fiber optic cables...controllers that create new functionality, such as vibration control and health monitoring. One approach used to develop smart materials is to “create

  3. Magnetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    Defense supported the development of microwave ferrites , and today 85 percent of that market is still military. Magnetostrictive sensors for sonar...or hard ferrite , Although both cobalt and samarium are expensive and the production process is difficult v4,*-°’. because of the strong tendency of...plentiful materials supply and low magnet cost. This calls for automated mass-production methods for ferrites and, perhaps, Nd-Fe-based REPMs. But for

  4. Ceramic Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-02

    A ceramic material which is (1) ceramics based on monoclinic BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2; (2) ceramics based on monoclinic SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2; or (3) ceramics based on monoclinic solid solution of BaO.Al2O3.2SiO2 and SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2.

  5. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, James Carden uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to moved planks around his home. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  6. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photograph, Amputee Amie Bradly uses a NASA-developed prosthesis to paint her fingernails. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  7. Prosthesis Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In this photograph, Sandra Rossi user her NASA-developed prosthesis for the first time. Derived from foam insulation technology used to protect the Space Shuttle External Tank from excessive heat, FAB/CAD, a subsidiary of the Harshberger Prosthetic and Orthotic Center, utilized the technology to replace the heavy, fragile plaster they used to produce master molds for prosthetics. The new material was lighter, cheaper and easier to manufacture than plaster, resulting in lower costs to the customer.

  8. Strategic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Sears, US Navy Lt Col Mark Williams, US Air Force Dr. Sylvia Babus , Faculty Dr. Maureen Crandall, Faculty Mr. Bill Jones, Faculty Strategic...graying rapidly, populated predominantly with baby- boomers over 40 years of age. Aggravating this demographic shift, the number of workforce S&E...Transnational Environment. [Student Essay from Strategic Materials Industry Study 2005, available from Dr. Sylvia Babus , Industrial College of the Armed

  9. Fullerene materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malhotra, R.; Ruoff, R.S.; Lorents, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    Fullerenes are all-carbon cage molecules. The most celebrated fullerene is the soccer-ball shaped C{sub 60}, which is composed of twenty hexagons and twelve pentagons. Because its structure is reminiscent of the geodesic domes of architect R. Buckminster Fuller, C{sub 60} is called buckminsterfullerene, and all the materials in the family are designated fullerenes. Huffman and Kraetschmer`s discovery unleashed activity around the world as scientists explored production methods, properties, and potential uses of fullerenes. Within a short period, methods for their production in electric arcs, plasmas, and flames were discovered, and several companies began selling fullerenes to the research market. What is remarkable is that in all these methods, carbon atoms assemble themselves into cage structures. The capability for self-assembly points to some inherent stability of these structures that allows their formation. The unusual structure naturally leads to unusual properties. Among them are ready solubility in solvents and a relatively high vapor pressure for a pure carbon material. The young fullerene field has already produced a surprising array of structures for the development of carbon-base materials having completely new and different properties from any that were previously possible.

  10. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  11. Construction material

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Antink, Allison L.

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  12. Casting materials

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  13. Materializing superghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, V.; Krotov, D.; Losev, A.; Lysov, V.

    2007-12-01

    The off-shell Batalin-Vilkovysky (BV) realization has been constructed for N = 1, d = 10 super-Yang-Mills theory with seven auxiliary fields. This becomes possible due to the materialized ghost phenomenon. Namely, supersymmetry ghosts are coordinates on a manifold B of ten-dimensional spinors with the pure spinors cut out. Auxiliary fields are sections of a bundle over B, and supersymmetry transformations are nonlinear in ghosts. By integrating out the auxiliary fields, we obtain an on-shell supersymmetric BV action with quadratic terms in the antifields. Exactly this on-shell BV action was obtained in our previous paper after integration out of auxiliary fields in the framework of a pure spinor superfield formalism.

  14. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and

  15. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  16. Biointegrating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amédée, J.; Bordenave, L.; Durrieu, M.-C.; Fricain, J.-C.; Pothuaud, L.

    The extraordinary increase in human longevity explains the growing need for replacement organs. The remarkable successes of conventional transplants (associated with the development of effective antirejection drugs and improved control of their administration) are also accompanied by certain drawbacks. First on the list is an inadequate supply of replacement organs: the number of candidates for transplants grows larger, opposition to the removal of organs increases, and the number of transplants has reached a ceiling. Furthermore, it has come to light over the past few years that organ transplants carry a significant risk of transmitting pathogens. Finally, the main drawback lies in the need to pursue an immunosuppression treatment. Scientists and doctors have long been in search of alternatives to human organ transplants. According to the definition drawn up in Chester in 1986 at the Consensus Conference organised under the aegis of the European Society for Biomaterials, biomaterials are non-viable materials used in a medical device and destined to interact with biological systems, whether they contribute to the constitution of a diagnostic device, a tissue or organ substitute, or a device designed to provide functional assistance or replacement.

  17. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Alex King

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  18. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex King

    2013-01-09

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  19. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  20. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  1. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  2. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  3. Composite material dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  4. Revolutionizing orthopaedic biomaterials: The potential of biodegradable and bioresorbable magnesium-based materials for functional tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farraro, Kathryn F; Kim, Kwang E; Woo, Savio L-Y; Flowers, Jonquil R; McCullough, Matthew B

    2014-06-27

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in magnesium (Mg) and its alloys as biomaterials for orthopaedic applications, as they possess desirable mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Also shown to be osteoinductive, Mg-based materials could be particularly advantageous in functional tissue engineering to improve healing and serve as scaffolds for delivery of drugs, cells, and cytokines. In this paper, we will present two examples of Mg-based orthopaedic devices: an interference screw to accelerate ACL graft healing and a ring to aid in the healing of an injured ACL. In vitro tests using a robotic/UFS testing system showed that both devices could restore function of the goat stifle joint. Under a 67-N anterior tibial load, both the ACL graft fixed with the Mg-based interference screw and the Mg-based ring-repaired ACL could restore anterior tibial translation (ATT) to within 2mm and 5mm, respectively, of the intact joint at 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. In-situ forces in the replacement graft and Mg-based ring-repaired ACL were also similar to those of the intact ACL. Further, early in vivo data using the Mg-based interference screw showed that after 12 weeks, it was non-toxic and the joint stability and graft function reached similar levels as published data. Following these positive results, we will move forward in incorporating bioactive molecules and ECM bioscaffolds to these Mg-based biomaterials to test their potential for functional tissue engineering of musculoskeletal and other tissues.

  5. Revolutionizing orthopaedic biomaterials: The potential of biodegradable and bioresorbable magnesium-based materials for functional tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farraro, Kathryn F.; Kim, Kwang E.; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Flowers, Jonquil R.; McCullough, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in magnesium (Mg) and its alloys as biomaterials for orthopaedic applications, as they possess desirable mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Also shown to be osteoinductive, Mg-based materials could be particularly advantageous in functional tissue engineering to improve healing and serve as scaffolds for delivery of drugs, cells, and cytokines. In this paper, we will present two examples of Mg-based orthopaedic devices: an interference screw to accelerate ACL graft healing and a ring to aid in the healing of an injured ACL. In vitro tests using a robotic/UFS testing system showed that both devices could restore function of the goat stifle joint. Under a 67-N anterior tibial load, both the ACL graft fixed with the Mg-based interference screw and the Mg-based ring-repaired ACL could restore anterior tibial translation (ATT) to within 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, of the intact joint at 301, 601, and 901 of flexion. In-situ forces in the replacement graft and Mg-based ring-repaired ACL were also similar to those of the intact ACL. Further, early in vivo data using the Mg-based interference screw showed that after 12 weeks, it was non-toxic and the joint stability and graft function reached similar levels as published data. Following these positive results, we will move forward in incorporating bioactive molecules and ECM bioscaffolds to these Mg-based biomaterials to test their potential for functional tissue engineering of musculoskeletal and other tissues. PMID:24373510

  6. Method for forming materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Miller, Karen S.

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  7. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie; Rader, Jeffrey A.; Saunders, Timothy W.

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  8. Coated electroactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Abouimrane, Ali

    2016-08-30

    A process includes suspending an electroactive material in a solvent, suspending or dissolving a carbon precursor in the solvent; and depositing the carbon precursor on the electroactive material to form a carbon-coated electroactive material. Compositions include a graphene-coated electroactive material prepared from a solution phase mixture or suspension of an electroactive material and graphene, graphene oxide, or a mixture thereof.

  9. Introductory Materials Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, John E., Jr.

    Described is an introductory materials science laboratory program which emphasizes crystal structure both on the atomistic and microscopic scale and the dependence of materials properties on structure. The content of this program is classified into four major areas: (1) materials science, (2) mechanical behavior of materials, (3) materials testing…

  10. Materials Informatics: Statistical Modeling in Material Science.

    PubMed

    Yosipof, Abraham; Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2016-12-01

    Material informatics is engaged with the application of informatic principles to materials science in order to assist in the discovery and development of new materials. Central to the field is the application of data mining techniques and in particular machine learning approaches, often referred to as Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) modeling, to derive predictive models for a variety of materials-related "activities". Such models can accelerate the development of new materials with favorable properties and provide insight into the factors governing these properties. Here we provide a comparison between medicinal chemistry/drug design and materials-related QSAR modeling and highlight the importance of developing new, materials-specific descriptors. We survey some of the most recent QSAR models developed in materials science with focus on energetic materials and on solar cells. Finally we present new examples of material-informatic analyses of solar cells libraries produced from metal oxides using combinatorial material synthesis. Different analyses lead to interesting physical insights as well as to the design of new cells with potentially improved photovoltaic parameters.

  11. Material efficiency: providing material services with less material production

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, Julian M.; Ashby, Michael F.; Gutowski, Timothy G.; Worrell, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Material efficiency, as discussed in this Meeting Issue, entails the pursuit of the technical strategies, business models, consumer preferences and policy instruments that would lead to a substantial reduction in the production of high-volume energy-intensive materials required to deliver human well-being. This paper, which introduces a Discussion Meeting Issue on the topic of material efficiency, aims to give an overview of current thinking on the topic, spanning environmental, engineering, economics, sociology and policy issues. The motivations for material efficiency include reducing energy demand, reducing the emissions and other environmental impacts of industry, and increasing national resource security. There are many technical strategies that might bring it about, and these could mainly be implemented today if preferred by customers or producers. However, current economic structures favour the substitution of material for labour, and consumer preferences for material consumption appear to continue even beyond the point at which increased consumption provides any increase in well-being. Therefore, policy will be required to stimulate material efficiency. A theoretically ideal policy measure, such as a carbon price, would internalize the externality of emissions associated with material production, and thus motivate change directly. However, implementation of such a measure has proved elusive, and instead the adjustment of existing government purchasing policies or existing regulations— for instance to do with building design, planning or vehicle standards—is likely to have a more immediate effect. PMID:23359746

  12. Material efficiency: providing material services with less material production.

    PubMed

    Allwood, Julian M; Ashby, Michael F; Gutowski, Timothy G; Worrell, Ernst

    2013-03-13

    Material efficiency, as discussed in this Meeting Issue, entails the pursuit of the technical strategies, business models, consumer preferences and policy instruments that would lead to a substantial reduction in the production of high-volume energy-intensive materials required to deliver human well-being. This paper, which introduces a Discussion Meeting Issue on the topic of material efficiency, aims to give an overview of current thinking on the topic, spanning environmental, engineering, economics, sociology and policy issues. The motivations for material efficiency include reducing energy demand, reducing the emissions and other environmental impacts of industry, and increasing national resource security. There are many technical strategies that might bring it about, and these could mainly be implemented today if preferred by customers or producers. However, current economic structures favour the substitution of material for labour, and consumer preferences for material consumption appear to continue even beyond the point at which increased consumption provides any increase in well-being. Therefore, policy will be required to stimulate material efficiency. A theoretically ideal policy measure, such as a carbon price, would internalize the externality of emissions associated with material production, and thus motivate change directly. However, implementation of such a measure has proved elusive, and instead the adjustment of existing government purchasing policies or existing regulations-- for instance to do with building design, planning or vehicle standards--is likely to have a more immediate effect.

  13. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons and methods for making such materials. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  14. Thermoelectric materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Talcott, Noel A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    New thermoelectric materials comprise highly [111]-oriented twinned group IV alloys on the basal plane of trigonal substrates, which exhibit a high thermoelectric figure of merit and good material performance, and devices made with these materials.

  15. Closed cellular materials for smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    New methods to fabricate a metallic closed cellular material for smart materials using an isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering (SPS) method and penetrating method are introduced. Powder particles of polymer or ceramics coated with a metal layer using electro-less plating were pressed into pellets and sintered at high temperatures by sintering at high temperature. Also these powder particles were sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. Also a many kinds of closed cellular materials with different materials of cell walls and different materials inside of the cell were tried to fabricate. The physical, mechanical and thermal properties of this material were measured. The results of the compressive tests show that this material has the different stress-strain curves among the specimens that have different thickness of the cell walls and the sintering temperatures of the specimens affect the compressive strength of each specimen. Also, the results of the compressive tests show that this material has high-energy absorption and Young's modulus of this material depends on the thickness of the cell walls and sintering conditions. The internal friction of this material was measured and the results show that this internal friction is same as that of pure aluminum.

  16. Nonmetallic materials handbook. Volume 1: Epoxy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podlaseck, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Thermochemical and other properties data is presented for the following types of epoxy materials: adhesives, coatings finishes, inks, electrical insulation, encapsulants, sealants, composite laminates, tapes, and thermal insulators.

  17. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-04-07

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  18. Advanced Ceramic Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-11

    materials, toughened alumina, fiber -reinforced glass matrix composites, and multilayer-gradient materials for ballistic testing. Fabrication and...material systems: Multilayer advanced armor materials consisting of a hard ceramic faceplate bonded to a graphite fiber -reinforced glass matrix...toughened alumina, and fiber - applied studies of advanced reinforced ceramic matrix glass and glass -ceramic composites for ballistic testing. technologies

  19. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  20. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOEpatents

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  1. Materials Analysis and Modeling of Underfill Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, Nicholas B; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-01

    The thermal-mechanical properties of three potential underfill candidate materials for PBGA applications are characterized and reported. Two of the materials are a formulations developed at Sandia for underfill applications while the third is a commercial product that utilizes a snap-cure chemistry to drastically reduce cure time. Viscoelastic models were calibrated and fit using the property data collected for one of the Sandia formulated materials. Along with the thermal-mechanical analyses performed, a series of simple bi-material strip tests were conducted to comparatively analyze the relative effects of cure and thermal shrinkage amongst the materials under consideration. Finally, current knowledge gaps as well as questions arising from the present study are identified and a path forward presented.

  2. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  3. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  4. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  5. Orbital foamed material extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a process for producing foamed material in space comprising the steps of: rotating the material to simulate the force of gravity; heating the rotating material until it is molten; extruding the rotating, molten material; injecting gas into the extruded, rotating, molten material to produce molten foamed material; allowing the molten foamed material to cool to below melting temperature to produce the foamed material. The surface of the extruded foam may be heated to above melting temperature and allowed to cool to below melting temperature. The extruded foam may also be cut to predetermined length. The starting material may be metal or glass. Heating may be accomplished by electrical heating elements or by solar heating.

  6. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  7. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  8. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.

    1997-02-01

    During FY-96, work within the Materials Science and Engineering Thrust Area was focused on material modeling. Our motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as material processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, in support of many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These studies are described in (1) Strength and Fracture Toughness of Material Interfaces; (2) Damage Evolution in Fiber Composite Materials; (3) Flashlamp Envelope Optical Properties and Failure Analysis; (4) Synthesis and Processing of Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite; and (5) Room Temperature Creep Compliance of Bulk Kel-E.

  9. Comprehensive Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Dr. Rudy J. M.; Allen, Todd R.; Stoller, Roger E; Yamanaka, Prof. Shinsuke

    2012-01-01

    This book encompasses a rich seam of current information on the vast and multidisciplinary field of nuclear materials employed in fission and prototype fusion systems. Discussion includes both historical and contemporary international research in nuclear materials, from Actinides to Zirconium alloys, from the worlds leading scientists and engineers. Synthesizes pertinent current science to support the selection, assessment, validation and engineering of materials in extreme nuclear environments. The work discusses the major classes of materials suitable for usage in nuclear fission, fusion reactors and high power accelerators, and for diverse functions in fuels, cladding, moderator and control materials, structural, functional, and waste materials.

  10. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Johnson, John A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  11. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  12. Materials Discovery: Informatic Strategies for Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2007-01-15

    Information-based materials discovery offers a structured method to evolve materials signatures based upon their physical properties, and to direct searches using performance-based criteria. In this current paper, we focus on the crystal structure aspects of an optical material and construct an information-based model to determine the proclivity of a particular AB composition to exhibit multiple crystal system behavior. Exploratory data methods used both supervised (support-vector machines) and unsupervised (disorder-reduction and principal-component) classification methods for structural signature development; revealing complementary valid signatures. Examination of the relative contributions of the materials chemistry descriptors within these signatures indicates a strong role for Mendeleev number chemistry which must be balanced against the cationic/anionic radius ratio and electronegativity differences of constituents within the unit cell.

  13. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D R

    1998-01-01

    During FY-97, work within the Materials Science and Engineering thrust area was focused on material modeling. Their motivation for this work is to develop the capability to study the structural response of materials as well as materials processing. These capabilities have been applied to a broad range of problems, which support many programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Recent examples of structural response problems studied include material fracture (such as interface failure), damage in laser optics, the response of weapons components (such as high explosives) and the failure of composite materials. For materials processing, typical problems studied include metal forming, laser processing, casting, and heat treating. To improve our ability to model material behavior, much of the work involves developing new material models and failure models, as well as applying the codes to new problems. Most investigations involve experimental studies to gather basic information on material response and to validate codes or material models. Projects are inherently multi-disciplinary, involving several investigators with expertise in materials and mechanics. The thrust area studies for FY-97 are described in the following three articles: (1) Evolution of Anisotropic Yield Behavior; (2) Modeling of She Localization in Materials; and (3) Modeling of Casting Microstructures and Defects.

  14. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  15. Renewable smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Mun, Seongcheol; Ko, Hyun-U.; Zhai, Lindong; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-07-01

    The use of renewable materials is essential in future technologies to harmonize with our living environment. Renewable materials can maintain our resources from the environment so as to overcome degradation of natural environmental services and diminished productivity. This paper reviews recent advancement of renewable materials for smart material applications, including wood, cellulose, chitin, lignin, and their sensors, actuators and energy storage applications. To further improve functionality of renewable materials, hybrid composites of inorganic functional materials are introduced by incorporating carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide and tin oxide conducting polymers and ionic liquids. Since renewable materials have many advantages of biocompatible, sustainable, biodegradable, high mechanical strength and versatile modification behaviors, more research efforts need to be focused on the development of renewable smart materials.

  16. FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS. RAW MATERIAL SELECTION INFLUENCES POLARIZATION BUT IS NOT A SINGLE CONTROLLING FACTOR. AVAILABLE...DATA INDICATES THAT AN INTERRELATIONSHIP OF POROSITY, AVERAGE PORE VOLUME, AND PERMEABILITY CONTRIBUTES TO ELECTRODE FUEL CELL BEHAVIOR.

  17. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  18. Sustainable Materials Management

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To introduce businesses, NGOs, and government officials to the concept of Sustainable Materials Management (SMM). To provide tools to allow stakeholders to take a lifecycle approach managing their materials, & to encourage them to join a SMM challenge.

  19. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  20. Ultrasonic material property determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabian, S.

    1986-01-01

    The use and potential offered by ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to determine and/or monitor material properties is explored. The basis for such unique measurements along with examples of materials from a variety of industries are presented.

  1. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  2. Structural materials and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    High density structural (blocking) materials composed of a polyimide filled with glass microballoons. Structural components such as panels which have integral edgings and/or other parts made of the high density materials.

  3. Materials modelling in London

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciudad, David

    2016-04-01

    Angelos Michaelides, Professor in Theoretical Chemistry at University College London (UCL) and co-director of the Thomas Young Centre (TYC), explains to Nature Materials the challenges in materials modelling and the objectives of the TYC.

  4. Improvisation: Teaching Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzmich, John A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The past, present and future of music improvisation is discussed. Resources for piano, guitar, elementary general music materials, and electronic music materials are included, along with addresses of publishers. The emphasis is on jazz. (KC)

  5. Silicone azide fireproof material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Finely powdered titanium oxide was added to silicone azide as the sintering agent to produce a nonflammable material. Mixing proportions, physical properties, and chemical composition of the fireproofing material are included.

  6. Supplements to Textbook Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Ken

    1994-01-01

    Describes the many kinds of materials that English teachers can draw upon to enrich and expand students' experiences with literature. Outlines ancillary materials used to supplement the study of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." (HB)

  7. Impact tolerant material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A material is protected from acoustic shock waves generated by impacting projectiles by means of a backing. The backing has an acoustic impedance that efficiently couples the acoustic energy out of the material.

  8. Bibliography of AV Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedstein, Harriet, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Lists commercially available audiovisual materials by subject area. Includes title, producer (addresses given), catalog number, format (film, filmstrip, cassette, slides), and prices. Subject areas include: elements; equilibrium; gases; laboratory techniques and experiments; general chemistry; introductory materials (including mathematics); and…

  9. Lightweight Materials & Structures

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lightweight Materials and Structures (LMS) project will mature high-payoff structures and materials technologies that have direct application to NASA’s future space exploration needs.One of the...

  10. Smart materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Embedded optical fibers allow not only the cure-monitoring and in-service lifetime measurements of composite materials, but the NDE of material damage and degradation with aging. The capabilities of such damage-detection systems have been extended to allow the quantitative determination of 2D strain in materials by several different methods, including the interferometric and the numerical. It remains to be seen, what effect the embedded fibers have on the strength of the 'smart' materials created through their incorporation.

  11. Materials Genome Initiative Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA is committed to developing new materials and manufacturing methods that can enable new missions with ever increasing mission demands. Typically, the development and certification of new materials and manufacturing methods in the aerospace industry has required more than 20 years of development time with a costly testing and certification program. To reduce the cost and time to mature these emerging technologies, NASA is developing computational materials tools to improve understanding of the material and guide the certification process.

  12. Electronics materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The electronic materials and is aimed at the establishment of quantitative relationships underlying crystal growth parameters, materials properties, electronic characteristics and device applications. The overall program evolves about the following main thrust areas: (1) crystal growth novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor materials; (2) investigation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro and microscale; (3) surface properties and surface interactions with the bulk and ambients; (4) electronic properties controlling device applications and device performance.

  13. Optimal Super Dielectric Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    electrically insulating materials filled to the point of incipient wetness (paste consistency) with liquids containing dissolved ions. This work...109. This strongly supports the fundamental hypothesis of SDM: In the presence of an electric field any electrically insulating, porous material...ABSTRACT The results of this study establish that powder-based super dielectric materials (SDM) are a large family of porous electrically

  14. Bibliography of Citizenship Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 CASAS "Bibliography of Citizenship Materials" lists available instructional resources for citizenship education. It focuses on materials appropriate for preparing people for the naturalization process and the standardized citizenship examination. Resources include textbooks, audio materials, software and Videos/DVDs. The bibliography also…

  15. Portuguese Language Teaching Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Henry W.

    This annotated bibliography is a selective list of the most useful reference and teaching materials for Portuguese language study. The listing includes both traditional materials and the few items available which reflect the current advances of linguistic theory. Commercially prepared materials known to be out of print have not been included.…

  16. Materials Flow and Sustainability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sznopek, John L.; Brown, William M.

    1998-01-01

    Materials extracted from the Earth are necessary to produce our most fundamental needs – food, clothing, and shelter. Materials are needed to maintain and improve our standard of living. Understanding the whole system of materials flow, from source to ultimate disposition, can help us better manage the use of natural resources and protect the environment.

  17. Paramagnetic and Diamagnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials are now generally known as the "Cinderella" materials of the magnetic world. However, susceptibility measurements made on these materials in the past have revealed many details about the molecular bonding and the atomic structure of the so-called "transition" elements. Indeed, the magnetic moment of neodymium…

  18. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  19. Energy Education Materials Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    This is an annotated bibliography of selected energy education materials. The materials included in this document are indexed according to grade level and according to whether they are background materials or classroom activities. Each of the 100 items listed were evaluated and included into either the "A" list or the "B" list.…

  20. Advanced Materials Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P. (Compiler); Teichman, L. A. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Composites, polymer science, metallic materials (aluminum, titanium, and superalloys), materials processing technology, materials durability in the aerospace environment, ceramics, fatigue and fracture mechanics, tribology, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) are discussed. Research and development activities are introduced to the nonaerospace industry. In order to provide a convenient means to help transfer aerospace technology to the commercial mainstream in a systematic manner.

  1. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  2. Fingerprinting Of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Collection of three reports surveys emerging technology of chemical fingerprinting, which can be defined, loosely, as systematic application of modern methods of analysis to determine elemental or molecular compositions of materials, measure relative amounts of constituents of materials, and/or measure other relevant properties of materials.

  3. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  4. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  5. Survival Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert M.; Barnes, Marcia M.

    This booklet is designed to provide some starter ideas for teachers to use in developing their own packet of learning materials. The procedures suggested and the examples included are literally starters. "Introduction to Survival Learning Materials" presents some procedures to help teachers get started in developing materials. "Following…

  6. Fusion reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  7. Materials for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Topics include a lab overview, testing and processing equipment, hemochromic hydrogen sensors, antimicrobial materials, wire system materials, CNT ink formulations, CNT ink dust screens, CNT ink printed circuitry, cryogenic materials development, fire and polymers, the importance of lighting, electric lighting systems, LED for plant growth, and carbon nanotube fiber filaments.

  8. [Refugee Materials Center Bibliography].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Kansas City, MO. Regional Office 7.

    The citations in this bibliography include textbooks, other instructional materials, and resource materials that can be used in teaching refugees in the United States. The title entries are grouped in series consisting of: (1) textbooks, workbooks, and other instuctional materials on teaching English to non-English speakers; (2) curricular and…

  9. Safer Aviation Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of thermally stable polymer samples were tested. These materials are called low heat release materials and are designed for aircraft interior decorative materials. The materials are designed to give off a minimum amount of noxious gases when heated, which increases the possibility that people can escape from a burning aircraft. New cabin materials have suitably low heat release so that fire does not spread, toxic chemicals are not given off, and the fire-emergency escape time for crew and passengers is lengthened. These low heat-release materials have a variety of advantages and applications: interiors for ground-based facilities, interiors of space vehicles, and many commercial fire-protection environments. A microscale combustion calorimeter at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Center tested NASA Langley Research Center materials samples. The calorimeter is shown. A sharp, quantitative, and reproducible heat-release-rate peak is obtained in the microscale heat-release-rate test. The newly tested NASA materials significantly reduced the heat release capacity and total heat release. The thermal stability and flammability behavior of the samples was very good. The new materials demonstrated a factor of 4 reduction in total heat release over ULTEM (a currently used material). This information is provided in the following barchart. In other tests, the materials showed greater than a factor 9 reduction in heat-release capacity over ULTEM. The newly tested materials were developed for low dielectric constant, low color, and good solubility. A scale up of the material samples is needed to determine the repeatability of the performance in larger samples. Larger panels composed of the best candidate materials will be tested in a larger scale FAA Technical Center fire facility. The NASA Glenn Research Center, Langley (Jeff Hinkley), and the FAA Technical Center (Richard Lyon) cooperatively tested these materials for the Accident Mitigation

  10. Tailored Porous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  11. Self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Hager, Martin D; Greil, Peter; Leyens, Christoph; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2010-12-14

    Self-healing materials are able to partially or completely heal damage inflicted on them, e.g., crack formation; it is anticipated that the original functionality can be restored. This article covers the design and generic principles of self-healing materials through a wide range of different material classes including metals, ceramics, concrete, and polymers. Recent key developments and future challenges in the field of self-healing materials are summarised, and generic, fundamental material-independent principles and mechanism are discussed and evaluated.

  12. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Paul S.; Stuart, Brent C.; Komashko, Aleksey M.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Perry, Michael D.

    2000-05-01

    The use of femtosecond lasers allows materials processing of practically any material with extremely high precision and minimal collateral damage. Advantages over conventional laser machining (using pulses longer than a few tens of picoseconds) are realized by depositing the laser energy into the electrons of the material on a time scale short compared to the transfer time of this energy to the bulk of the material, resulting in increased ablation efficiency and negligible shock or thermal stress. The improvement in the morphology by using femtosecond pulses rather than nanosecond pulses has been studied in numerous materials from biological materials to dielectrics to metals. During the drilling process, we have observed the onset of small channels which drill faster than the surrounding material.

  13. Femtosecond Laser Materials Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Komashko, A.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    2000-03-06

    The use of femtosecond lasers allows materials processing of practically any material with extremely high precision and minimal collateral damage. Advantages over conventional laser machining (using pulses longer than a few tens of picoseconds) are realized by depositing the laser energy into the electrons of the material on a time scale short compared to the transfer time of this energy to the bulk of the material, resulting in increased ablation efficiency and negligible shock or thermal stress. The improvement in the morphology by using femtosecond pulses rather than nanosecond pulses has been studied in numerous materials from biologic materials to dielectrics to metals. During the drilling process, we have observed the onset of small channels which drill faster than the surrounding material.

  14. Materials processing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, R. D.; Criswell, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-refining of raw materials from extraterrestrial sources is detailed for a space materials handling facility. The discussion is constrained to those steps necessary to separate desired components from raw or altered input ores, semi-purified feedstocks, or process scrap and convert the material into elements, alloys, and consumables. The materials are regarded as originating from dead satellites and boosters, lunar materials, and asteroids. Strong attention will be given to recycling reagent substances to avoid the necessity of transporting replacements. It is assumed that since no aqueous processes exist on the moon, the distribution of minerals will be homogeneous. The processing-refining scenario will include hydrochemical, pyrochemical, electrochemical, and physical techniques selected for the output mass rate/unit plant mass ratio. Flow charts of the various materials processing operations which could be performed with lunar materials are provided, noting the necessity of delivering several alloying elements from the earth due to scarcities on the moon.

  15. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Yang, Shengbing; Dai, Pengyi; Li, Wuyin; Yue, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC), has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio), CSC-10S (10% mass ratio), and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio), respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing mass ratio of SBA-15. The adsorption of BMP-2 increased and released at a relatively slow rate; the release rate of BMP-2 in CSC-20S was the slowest, and presented characteristics of low doses of release. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the physical properties of pure CSC incorporated with SBA-15 could be improved significantly, which made the CSC/SBA-15 composite more suitable for bone repair

  16. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  17. Materials and structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Langenbeck, Sharon L.; Al-Jamily, Ghanim; Arnold, Joe; Barbee, Troy; Coulter, Dan; Dolgin, Ben; Fichter, Buck; George, Patricia; Gorenstein, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Materials and structures technology covers a wide range of technical areas. Some of the most pertinent issues for the Astrotech 21 missions include dimensionally stable structural materials, advanced composites, dielectric coatings, optical metallic coatings for low scattered light applications, low scattered light surfaces, deployable and inflatable structures (including optical), support structures in 0-g and 1-g environments, cryogenic optics, optical blacks, contamination hardened surfaces, radiation hardened glasses and crystals, mono-metallic telescopes and instruments, and materials characterization. Some specific examples include low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) structures (0.01 ppm/K), lightweight thermally stable mirror materials, thermally stable optical assemblies, high reliability/accuracy (1 micron) deployable structures, and characterization of nanometer level behavior of materials/structures for interferometry concepts. Large filled-aperture concepts will require materials with CTE's of 10(exp 9) at 80 K, anti-contamination coatings, deployable and erectable structures, composite materials with CTE's less than 0.01 ppm/K and thermal hysteresis, 0.001 ppm/K. Gravitational detection systems such as LAGOS will require rigid/deployable structures, dimensionally stable components, lightweight materials with low conductivity, and high stability optics. The Materials and Structures panel addressed these issues and the relevance of the Astrotech 21 mission requirements by dividing materials and structures technology into five categories. These categories, the necessary development, and applicable mission/program development phasing are summarized. For each of these areas, technology assessments were made and development plans were defined.

  18. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  19. Material behavior and materials problems in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dylla, H. F.; Ulrickson, M. A.; Owens, D. K.; Heifetz, D. B.; Mills, B. E.; Pontau, A. E.; Wampler, W. R.; Doyle, B. L.; Lee, S. R.; Watson, R. D.; Croessmann, C. D.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reviews the experience with first-wall materials in TFTR over a 20 month period of operatiori during 1985-1987. Experience with the axisymmetric inner wall limiter, constructed of graphite tiles, is described, including the necessary conditioning procedures needed for impurity and particle control of high power (≤ 20 MW) neutral injection experiments. The thermal effects in disruptions have been quantified and no significant damage to the bumper limiter has occurred as a result of disruptions. Carbon and metal impurity redeposition effects have been quantified through surface analysis of wall samples. Estimates of the tritium retention in the graphite limiter tiles and redeposited carbon films have been made, based on analysis of deuterium retention in removed graphite tiles and wall samples. New limiter structures have been designed using a 2D carbon/carbon ( {C}/{C}) composite material for RF antenna protection. Laboratory tests of the important thermal, mechanical, and vacuum properties of {C}/{C} materials are described. Finally, the last series of experiments in TFTR with in-situ {Zr}/{Al} surface pumps are discussed. Problems with {Zr}/{Al} embrittlement have led to the removal of the getter material from the in-torus environment.

  20. Geothermal materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among the most pressing problems constraining the development of geothermal energy is the lack of satisfactory component and system reliability. This is due to the unavailability, on a commercial scale, of cost-effective materials that can function in a wide range of geothermal environments and to the unavailability of a comprehensive body of directly relevant test data or materials selection experience. Suitable materials are needed for service in geothermal wells and in process plant equipment. For both situations, this requires materials that can withstand high-temperature, highly-corrosive, and scale-forming geothermal fluids. In addition to requiring a high degree of chemical and thermal resistance, the downhole environment places demands on the physical/mechanical properties of materials for components utilized in well drilling, completion, pumping, and logging. Technical and managerial assistance provided by Brookhaven in the program for studying these materials problems is described.

  1. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  2. NUCLEAR FUEL MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Goeddel, W.V.

    1962-06-26

    An improved method is given for making the carbides of nuclear fuel material. The metal of the fuel material, which may be a fissile and/or fertile material, is transformed into a silicide, after which the silicide is comminuted to the desired particle size. This silicide is then carburized at an elevated temperature, either above or below the melting point of the silicide, to produce an intimate mixture of the carbide of the fuel material and the carbide of silicon. This mixture of the fuel material carbide and the silicon carbide is relatively stable in the presence of moisture and does not exhibit the highly reactive surface condition which is observed with fuel material carbides made by most other known methods. (AEC)

  3. Benzimidazole Based Aerogel Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhine, Wendell E. (Inventor); Mihalcik, David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides aerogel materials based on imidazoles and polyimidazoles. The polyimidazole based aerogel materials can be thermally stable up to 500 C or more, and can be carbonized to produce a carbon aerogel having a char yield of 60% or more, specifically 70% or more. The present invention also provides methods of producing polyimidazole based aerogel materials by reacting at least one monomer in a suitable solvent to form a polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution, casting the polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution into a fiber reinforcement phase, allowing the at least one gel precursor in the precursor solution to transition into a gel material, and drying the gel materials to remove at least a portion of the solvent, to obtain an polybenzimidazole-based aerogel material.

  4. Characterization of Nanophase Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2000-01-01

    Engineering of nanophase materials and devices is of vital interest in electronics, semiconductors and optics, catalysis, ceramics and magnetism. Research associated with nanoparticles has widely spread and diffused into every field of scientific research, forming a trend of nanocrystal engineered materials. The unique properties of nanophase materials are entirely determined by their atomic scale structures, particularly the structures of interfaces and surfaces. Development of nanotechnology involves several steps, of which characterization of nanoparticles is indespensable to understand the behavior and properties of nanoparticles, aiming at implementing nanotechnolgy, controlling their behavior and designing new nanomaterials systems with super performance. The book will focus on structural and property characterization of nanocrystals and their assemblies, with an emphasis on basic physical approach, detailed techniques, data interpretation and applications. Intended readers of this comprehensive reference work are advanced graduate students and researchers in the field, who are specialized in materials chemistry, materials physics and materials science.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B

    1998-08-05

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area. Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to precision cuts in composites are possible by using this technology. For material removal at reasonable rates, we have developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  8. Material for Fast Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, A.

    1986-01-01

    New material for cutting tools increases productivity of machining processes. Material, called Iscanite (or equivalent), based on silicon nitride contains more than 90 percent silicon. Combines impact resistance close to that of coated carbides with heat and wear resistance close to those of aluminum oxide ceramics. Material used for cutting on old or new machine tools and makes it possible to exploit fully power and speed of machine.

  9. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  10. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  11. Femtosecond laser materials processing

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B. C., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    Femtosecond lasers enable materials processing of most any material with extremely high precision and negligible shock or thermal loading to the surrounding area Applications ranging from drilling teeth to cutting explosives to making high-aspect ratio cuts in metals with no heat-affected zone are made possible by this technology For material removal at reasonable rates, we developed a fully computer-controlled 15-Watt average power, 100-fs laser machining system.

  12. ANS materials databook

    SciTech Connect

    Marchbanks, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Technical development in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project is dynamic, and a continuously updated information source is necessary to provide readily usable materials data to the designer, analyst, and materials engineer. The Advanced Neutron Source Materials Databook (AMBK) is being developed as a part of the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Information System (AMIS). Its purpose is to provide urgently needed data on a quick-turnaround support basis for those design applications whose schedules demand immediate estimates of material properties. In addition to the need for quick materials information, there is a need for consistent application of data throughout the ANS Program, especially where only limited data exist. The AMBK is being developed to fill this need as well. It is the forerunner to the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Handbook (AMHB). The AMHB, as reviewed and approved by the ANS review process, will serve as a common authoritative source of materials data in support of the ANS Project. It will furnish documented evidence of the materials data used in the design and construction of the ANS system and will serve as a quality record during any review process whose objective is to establish the safety level of the ANS complex. The information in the AMBK and AMHB is also provided in electronic form in a dial-up computer database known as the ANS Materials Database (AMDB). A single consensus source of materials information prepared and used by all national program participants has several advantages. Overlapping requirements and data needs of various sub-projects and subcontractors can be met by a single document which is continuously revised. Preliminary and final safety analysis reports, stress analysis reports, equipment specifications, materials service reports, and many other project-related documents can be substantially reduced in size and scope by appropriate reference to a single data source.

  13. Wear of engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Nearly 60 papers discuss fundamental and applied research in the areas of wear, erosion and wear-corrosion of materials. Focus is on ceramics, ceramic and polymer-matrix composites, and coatings; the effect of sliding wear and wear-corrosion of materials in manufacturing processes, automobiles and bearings; and wear and erosion of materials used in fossil-fuel power plants, minerals processing and heavy manufacturing.

  14. Materials for Slack Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puschmann, Traute

    1940-01-01

    This report deals with systematic experiments carried out on five diaphragm materials with different pretreatment, for the purpose of ascertaining the suitability of such materials for slack diaphragms. The relationship of deflection and load, temperature and moisture, was recorded. Of the explored materials, synthetic leather, balloon cloth, goldbeaters skin, Igelit and Buna, synthetic leather treated with castor oil is the most suitable material for the small pressure range required. Balloon cloth is nearly as good, while goldbeaters skin, Igelit and Buna were found to be below the required standards.

  15. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.; Dumitru, Earl T.

    1990-02-13

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  16. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOEpatents

    Lagow, Richard J.; Dumitru, Earl T.

    1986-11-04

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  17. Material for radioactive protection

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  18. Ceramic breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Kummerer, K.R.; Roth, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramic materials are under investigation as potential breeder material in fusion reactors. This paper will review candidate materials with respect to fabrication routes and characterization, properties in as-fabricated and irradiated condition, and experimental results from laboratory and inpile investigations on tritium transport and release. Also discussed are the resources of beryllium, which is being considered as a neutron multiplier. The comparison of ceramic properties that is attempted here aims at the identification of the most-promising material for use in a tritium breeding blanket. 82 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Materials Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Dionne

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) provides science and engineering services to NASA and Contractor customers at KSC, including those working for the Space Shuttle. International Space Station. and Launch Services Programs. These services include: (1) Independent/unbiased failure analysis (2) Support to Accident/Mishap Investigation Boards (3) Materials testing and evaluation (4) Materials and Processes (M&P) engineering consultation (5) Metrology (6) Chemical analysis (including ID of unknown materials) (7) Mechanical design and fabrication We provide unique solutions to unusual and urgent problems associated with aerospace flight hardware, ground support equipment and related facilities.

  20. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOEpatents

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  1. The Materials Genome Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aourag, H.

    2008-09-01

    In the past, the search for new and improved materials was characterized mostly by the use of empirical, trial- and-error methods. This picture of materials science has been changing as the knowledge and understanding of fundamental processes governing a material's properties and performance (namely, composition, structure, history, and environment) have increased. In a number of cases, it is now possible to predict a material's properties before it has even been manufactured thus greatly reducing the time spent on testing and development. The objective of modern materials science is to tailor a material (starting with its chemical composition, constituent phases, and microstructure) in order to obtain a desired set of properties suitable for a given application. In the short term, the traditional "empirical" methods for developing new materials will be complemented to a greater degree by theoretical predictions. In some areas, computer simulation is already used by industry to weed out costly or improbable synthesis routes. Can novel materials with optimized properties be designed by computers? Advances in modelling methods at the atomic level coupled with rapid increases in computer capabilities over the last decade have led scientists to answer this question with a resounding "yes'. The ability to design new materials from quantum mechanical principles with computers is currently one of the fastest growing and most exciting areas of theoretical research in the world. The methods allow scientists to evaluate and prescreen new materials "in silico" (in vitro), rather than through time consuming experimentation. The Materials Genome Project is to pursue the theory of large scale modeling as well as powerful methods to construct new materials, with optimized properties. Indeed, it is the intimate synergy between our ability to predict accurately from quantum theory how atoms can be assembled to form new materials and our capacity to synthesize novel materials atom

  2. Mechanics of materials model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    The Mechanics of Materials Model (MOMM) is a three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis code for use as an early design stage tool for hot section components. MOMM is a stiffness method finite element code that uses a network of beams to characterize component behavior. The MOMM contains three material models to account for inelastic material behavior. These include the simplified material model, which assumes a bilinear stress-strain response; the state-of-the-art model, which utilizes the classical elastic-plastic-creep strain decomposition; and Walker's viscoplastic model, which accounts for the interaction between creep and plasticity that occurs under cyclic loading conditions.

  3. Innovative Solar Optical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1984-02-01

    A variety of optical coatings are discussed in the context of solar energy utilization. Well-known coatings such as transparent conductors (heat mirrors), selective absorbers, and reflective films are surveyed briefly. Emphasis is placed on the materials' limitations and on use of lesser-known optical coatings and materials. Physical and optical properties are detailed for protective antireflection films, cold mirrors, fluorescent concentrator materials, radiative cooling surfaces, and optical switching films including electrochromic, thermochromic, photochromic, and liquid crystal types. For many of these materials, research has only recently been considered, so various design and durability issues need to be addressed.

  4. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  5. LDEF materials overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Bland A.

    1993-01-01

    The flight and retrieval of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) provided an opportunity for the study of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment and long-duration space environmental effects (SEE) on materials that is unparalleled in the history of the U.S. Space Program. The 5-year, 9-month flight of LDEF greatly enhanced the potential value of all materials on LDEF to the international SEE community, compared to that of the original 1-year flight plan. The remarkable flight attitude stability of LDEF enables specific analyses of individual and combined effects of LEO environmental parameters on identical materials on the same space vehicle. NASA recognized this potential by forming the LDEF Space Environmental Effects on Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) to address the greatly expanded materials and LEO space environment analysis opportunities available in the LDEF structure, experiment trays, and corollary measurements so that the combined value of all LDEF materials data to current and future space missions will be addressed and documented. An overview of the interim LDEF materials findings of the principal investigators and the Materials Special Investigation Group is provided. These revelations are based on observations of LEO environmental effects on materials made in space during LDEF retrieval and during LDEF tray deintegration at the Kennedy Space Center, and on findings of approximately 1.5 years of laboratory analyses of LDEF materials by the LDEF materials scientists. These findings were extensively reviewed and discussed at the MSIG-sponsored LDEF Materials Workshop '91. The results are presented in a format that categorizes the revelations as 'clear findings' or 'obscure preliminary findings' (and progress toward their resolution), plus resultant needs for new space materials developments and ground simulation testing/analytical modeling, in seven categories: materials

  6. Nanoprobes, nanostructured materials and solid state materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Houping

    2005-07-01

    Novel templates have been developed to prepare nanostructured porous materials through nonsurfactant templated pathway. And new applications of these materials, such as drug delivery and molecular imprinting, have been explored. The relationship between template content and pore structure has been investigated. The composition and pore structures were studied in detail using IR, TGA, SEM, TEM, BET and XRD. The obtained mesoporous materials have tunable diameters in the range of 2--12 nm. Due to the many advantages of this nonsurfactant templated pathway, such as environment friendly and biocompatibility, controlled release of antibiotics in the nanoporous materials were studied. The in vitro release properties were found to depend on the silica structures which were well tuned by varying the template content. A controlled long-term release pattern of vancomycin was achieved when the template content was 30 wt% or lower. Nanoscale electrochemical probes with dimensions as small as 50 nm in diameter and 1--2 mum in length were fabricated using electron beam deposition on the apex of conventional micron size electrodes. The electroactive region was limited to the extreme tip of the nanoprobe by coating with an insulating polymer and re-opening of the coating at the extreme tip. The novel nanoelectrodes thus prepared were employed to probe neurons in mouse brain slice and the results suggest that the nanoprobes were capable of recording neuronal excitatory postsynaptic potential signals. Interesting solid state chemistry was found in oxygenated iron phthalocyanine. Their Mossbauer spectra show the formation of four oxygenated species apart from the unoxygenated parent compound. The oxygen-bridged compounds formed in the solid matrix bear no resemblance to the one formed by solution chemistry. Tentative assignment of species has been made with the help of Mossbauer and IR spectroscopy. An effort to modify aniline trimer for potential nanoelectronics applications and to

  7. Materials characterization on efforts for ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytula, Thomas P.; Schad, Kristin C.; Swann, Myles H.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental efforts to develop a new procedure to measure char depth in carbon phenolic nozzle material are described. Using a Shor Type D Durometer, hardness profiles were mapped across post fired sample blocks and specimens from a fired rocket nozzle. Linear regression was used to estimate the char depth. Results are compared to those obtained from computed tomography in a comparative experiment. There was no significant difference in the depth estimates obtained by the two methods.

  8. 75 FR 30863 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of opening of additional materials. SUMMARY: This notice announces the opening of additional Nixon Presidential Historical Materials by the Richard...

  9. 76 FR 62856 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of opening of additional materials. SUMMARY: This notice announces the opening of Nixon Presidential Historical Materials by the Richard Nixon...

  10. 76 FR 35918 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials; Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... Materials; Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of Opening of Additional Materials. SUMMARY: This notice announces the opening of additional Nixon Presidential Historical Materials by the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, a division of...

  11. Materials Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piippo, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a materials science and technology course for high school students, which combines chemistry, physics, engineering, math, technology education, and crafts to introduce students to the atomic make-up and physical properties of materials and to apply this knowledge in creative activities. (SK)

  12. Social character of materialism.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A; Hunt, J M; Kernan, J B

    2000-06-01

    Scores for 170 undergraduates on Richins and Dawson's Materialism scale were correlated with scores on Kassarjian's Social Preference Scale, designed to measure individuals' character structure. A correlation of .26 between materialism and other-directed social character suggested that an externally oriented reference system guides materialists' perceptions, judgments, acquisitions, and possessions.

  13. Material Writer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Patricia, Ed.

    This guide is a collection of essays on the writing of English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) textbooks and other instructional materials. Articles include: "Writing and Publishing Textbooks (Patricia Byrd); "The Craft of Materials Writing" (Fraida Dubin); "Considering Culture: Guidelines for ESL/EFL Textbook Writers" (Gayle Nelson); "Issues in the…

  14. Gravitation in Material Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium…

  15. Marine Education Materials System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammisch, Sue; Gray, Kevin

    1980-01-01

    Described is a marine education materials clearinghouse, the Marine Education Materials System (MEMS). MEMS classifies marine education documents and reproduces them on microfiche for distribution. There are 25 distribution centers, each of which has a collection of documents and provides assistance on a request basis to teachers. (Author/DS)

  16. Packaging Your Training Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Pamela

    1977-01-01

    The types of packaging and packaging materials to use for training materials should be determined during the planning of the training programs, according to the packaging market. Five steps to follow in shopping for packaging are presented, along with a list of packaging manufacturers. (MF)

  17. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  18. Carbon Materials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-14

    behavior, interfacial energies, and surface molecular orientation (surface anchoring states) for mesophase pitch on carbon fibers and other...Mochida (2) extended it to the production of mesophase pitch by dramatically raising Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution...involved i.e. it is a very insoluble material. Mochida, however, recognized that this material was liquid-crystalline mesophase pitch , which was

  19. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Various topics relating to composite structural materials for use in aircraft structures are discussed. The mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers, carbon fiber-epoxy interface bonds, composite fractures, residual stress in high modulus and high strength carbon fibers, fatigue in composite materials, and the mechanical properties of polymeric matrix composite laminates are among the topics discussed.

  20. NBS: Materials measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement of materials properties and thermophysical properties is described. The topics discussed are: surface tensions and their variations with temperature and impurities; convection during unidirectional solidification: measurement of high temperature thermophysical properties of tungsten liquid and solid; thermodynamic properties of refractory materials at high temperatures; and experimental and theoretical studies in wetting and multilayer adsorption.

  1. Strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO₂ and Fe₃O₄, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials.

  2. Hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method

    DOEpatents

    Brecher, Lee E.; Mones, Charles G.; Guffey, Frank D.

    2015-06-02

    A hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method may involve a novel combination of heating, vaporizing and chemically reacting hydrocarbonaceous feedstock that is substantially unpumpable at pipeline conditions, and condensation of vapors yielded thereby, in order to upgrade that feedstock to a hydrocarbonaceous material condensate that meets crude oil pipeline specification.

  3. MATERIAL TRACKING USING LANMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, F.

    2010-06-07

    LANMAS is a transaction-based nuclear material accountability software product developed to replace outdated and legacy accountability systems throughout the DOE. The core underlying purpose of LANMAS is to track nuclear materials inventory and report transactions (movement, mixing, splitting, decay, etc.) to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). While LANMAS performs those functions well, there are many additional functions provided by the software product. As a material is received onto a site or created at a site, its entire lifecycle can be tracked in LANMAS complete to its termination of safeguards. There are separate functions to track material movements between and within material balance areas (MBAs). The level of detail for movements within a MBA is configurable by each site and can be as high as a site designation or as detailed as building/room/rack/row/position. Functionality exists to track the processing of materials, either as individual items or by modeling a bulk process as an individual item to track inputs and outputs from the process. In cases where sites have specialized needs, the system is designed to be flexible so that site specific functionality can be integrated into the product. This paper will demonstrate how the software can be used to input material into an account and track it to its termination of safeguards.

  4. Selection of Music Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luttmann, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The conscientious selection of music materials requires an understanding of the needs of the public being served at least as much as it requires subject competence on the part of the selector. Online and print resources are available to aid in the selection of music materials in all formats, the most important of which are books, scores, audio and…

  5. Materials Science and Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Five papers are included: processing/characterization of laminated metal composites, casting process modeling, characterizing the failure of composite materials, fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for cure monitoring of advanced polymer composites, and modeling superplastic materials. The papers are processed separately for the data base.

  6. Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal protection materials and systems (TPS) are required to protect a vehicle returning from space or entering an atmosphere. The selection of the material depends on the heat flux, heat load, pressure, and shear and other mechanical loads imposed on the material, which are in turn determined by the vehicle configuration and size, location on the vehicle, speed, a trajectory, and the atmosphere. In all cases the goal is to use a material that is both reliable and efficient for the application. Reliable materials are well understood and have sufficient test data under the appropriate conditions to provide confidence in their performance. Efficiency relates to the behavior of a material under the specific conditions that it encounters TPS that performs very well at high heat fluxes may not be efficient at lower heat fluxes. Mass of the TPS is a critical element of efficiency. This talk will review the major classes of TPS, reusable or insulating materials and ablators. Ultra high temperature ceramics for sharp leading edges will also be reviewed. The talk will focus on the properties and behavior of these materials.

  7. Materials inventory management manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This NASA Materials Inventory Management Manual (NHB 4100.1) is issued pursuant to Section 203(c)(1) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (42 USC 2473). It sets forth policy, performance standards, and procedures governing the acquisition, management and use of materials. This Manual is effective upon receipt.

  8. Impacted material placement plans

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-29

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

  9. MATERIALS FOR MODERNIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JACKSON, R. GRAHAM

    CHOICES AND ISSUES IN SELECTING MATERIALS FOR MODERNIZATION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS ARE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT. BACKGROUND INFORMATION IS INTRODUCED IN TERMS OF REASONS FOR ABANDONMENT, THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF SCHOOL BUILDING OBSOLESCENCE, AND PROBLEMS IN THE MODERNIZATION PROCESS. INTERIOR PARTITIONS ARE DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF BUILDING MATERIALS,…

  10. Millwright Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laborn J.; Pierce, Greg

    This manual contains instructional materials for use in training millwrights working in industrial and commercial construction sites. Intended as an innovative complement to on-the-job training in construction, the material is written in terms of student performance using behavioral objectives and measured by criterion-referenced evaluation…

  11. Supramolecular biofunctional materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Li, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2017-06-01

    This review discusses supramolecular biofunctional materials, a novel class of biomaterials formed by small molecules that are held together via noncovalent interactions. The complexity of biology and relevant biomedical problems not only inspire, but also demand effective molecular design for functional materials. Supramolecular biofunctional materials offer (almost) unlimited possibilities and opportunities to address challenging biomedical problems. Rational molecular design of supramolecular biofunctional materials exploit powerful and versatile noncovalent interactions, which offer many advantages, such as responsiveness, reversibility, tunability, biomimicry, modularity, predictability, and, most importantly, adaptiveness. In this review, besides elaborating on the merits of supramolecular biofunctional materials (mainly in the form of hydrogels and/or nanoscale assemblies) resulting from noncovalent interactions, we also discuss the advantages of small peptides as a prevalent molecular platform to generate a wide range of supramolecular biofunctional materials for the applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering, immunology, cancer therapy, fluorescent imaging, and stem cell regulation. This review aims to provide a brief synopsis of recent achievements at the intersection of supramolecular chemistry and biomedical science in hope of contributing to the multidisciplinary research on supramolecular biofunctional materials for a wide range of applications. We envision that supramolecular biofunctional materials will contribute to the development of new therapies that will ultimately lead to a paradigm shift for developing next generation biomaterials for medicine.

  12. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of the RPI composites program is to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, reliability and life prediction. Concommitant goals are to educate engineers to design and use composite materials as normal or conventional materials. A multifaceted program was instituted to achieve these objectives.

  13. Environmental materials and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    A workshop that explored materials and interfaces research needs relevant to national environmental concerns was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purposes of the workshop were to refine the scientific research directions being planned for the Materials and Interface Program in the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) and further define the research and user equipment to the included as part of the proposed Environmental and Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL). Three plenary information sessions served to outline the background, objectives, and status of the MSRC and EMSL initiatives; selected specific areas with environmentally related materials; and the status of capabilities and facilities planned for the EMSL. Attention was directed to four areas where materials and interface science can have a significant impact on prevention and remediation of environmental problems: in situ detection and characterization of hazardous wastes (sensors), minimization of hazardous waste (separation membranes, ion exchange materials, catalysts), waste containment (encapsulation and barrier materials), and fundamental understanding of contaminant transport mechanisms. During all other sessions, the participants were divided into three working groups for detailed discussion and the preparation of a written report. The working groups focused on the areas of interface structure and chemistry, materials and interface stability, and materials synthesis. These recommendations and suggestions for needed research will be useful for other researchers in proposing projects and for suggesting collaborative work with MSRC researchers. 1 fig.

  14. Smart materials in dentistry.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F; Yan, Z; Al Naimi, O T; Mahmoud, G; Rolland, S L

    2011-06-01

    Most dental materials are designed to have a relatively 'neutral' existence in the mouth. It is considered that if they are 'passive' and do not react with the oral environment they will be more stable and have a greater durability. At the same time, it is hoped that our materials will be well accepted and will cause neither harm nor injury. This is an entirely negative approach to material tolerance and biocompatibility and hides the possibility that some positive gains can be achieved by using materials which behave in a more dynamic fashion in the environment in which they are placed. An example of materials which have potential for 'dynamic' behaviour exists with structures which are partly water-based or have phases or zones with significant water content and for which the water within the material can react to changes in the ambient conditions. Such materials may even be said to have the potential for 'smart' behaviour, i.e. they can react to changes in the environment to bring about advantageous changes in properties, either within the material itself or in the material-tooth complex. The controlled movement of water or aqueous media through the material may cause changes in dimensions, may be the carrier for various dissolved species, and may influence the potential for the formation of biofilms at the surface. Some of these issues may be closely interrelated. Clearly, materials which do not have the capacity for water transport or storage do not have the potential for this sort of behaviour. Some materials which are normally resistant to the healthy oral environment can undergo controlled degradation at low pH in order to release ions which may prove beneficial or protective. It is doubtful whether such behaviour should be classified as 'smart' because the material cannot readily return to its original condition when the stimulus is removed. Other materials, such as certain alloys, having no means of transporting water through their structure, can display

  15. Fingerprinting of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L

    1992-01-01

    Recent issues emerging in our fiscal and ecological environments have promulgated that federal agencies shall promote activities which respond to the improvement of both. In response to these developments, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has undertaken an innovative approach to improve the control of materials used in all NASA manufacturing activities. In concert with this goal, NASA is requiring that its contractors and their sub-contractors perform a more intensive consolidation of technologies that can provide an accounting of materials, which includes in-coming materials, materials in process, end-products and waste materials. The purpose of this handbook is to provide guidelines to NASA and its contractor personnel for the planning and implementation of chemical fingerprinting programs and to illustrate the chemical and statistical fundamentals needed for successful use of chemical fingerprinting.

  16. Material-based Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-05-31

    A simple probability model was applied to detection sampling in a room or space in which different surface materials are present. The model assesses the overall detection capability when the sampling and analytical methods have different performance properties for the different materials. The results suggest that some common sampling strategies may not be ideal. In particular: (1) In a single room or area that includes different surface types with different detection properties, do not use a single sampling grid with a common spacing throughout. (2) If it is known or strongly suspected that one material has better detection properties than the other, place all samples on that material. (3) When it is completely unknown which material has the better detection properties, allocate the samples equally between them.

  17. Extraterrestrial materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    The first year results of a multi-year study of processing extraterrestrial materials for use in space are summarized. Theoretically, there are potential major advantages to be derived from the use of such materials for future space endeavors. The types of known or postulated starting raw materials are described including silicate-rich mixed oxides on the Moon, some asteroids and Mars; free metals in some asteroids and in small quantities in the lunar soil; and probably volatiles like water and CO2 on Mars and some asteroids. Candidate processes for space materials are likely to be significantly different from their terrestrial counterparts largely because of: absence of atmosphere; lack of of readily available working fluids; low- or micro-gravity; no carbon-based fuels; readily available solar energy; and severe constraints on manned intervention. The extraction of metals and oxygen from lunar material by magma electrolysis or by vapor/ion phase separation appears practical.

  18. Materials of Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-15

    The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

  19. Materials Research Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofan, Andrew J.

    1986-01-01

    Lewis Research Center, in partnership with U.S. industry and academia, has long been a major force in developing advanced aerospace propulsion and power systems. One key aspect that made many of these systems possible has been the availability of high-performance, reliable, and long-life materials. To assure a continuing flow of new materials and processing concepts, basic understanding to guide such innovation, and technological support for development of major NASA systems, Lewis has supported a strong in-house materials research activity. Our researchers have discovered new alloys, polymers, metallic composites, ceramics, coatings, processing techniques, etc., which are now also in use by U.S. industry. This brochure highlights selected past accomplishments of our materials research and technology staff. It also provides many examples of the facilities available with which we can conduct materials research. The nation is now beginning to consider integrating technology for high-performance supersonic/hypersonic aircraft, nuclear space power systems, a space station, and new research areas such as materials processing in space. As we proceed, I am confident that our materials research staff will continue to provide important contributions which will help our nation maintain a strong technology position in these areas of growing world competition. Lewis Research Center, in partnership with U.S. industry and academia, has long been a major force in developing advanced aerospace propulsion and power systems. One key aspect that made many of these systems possible has been the availability of high-performance, reliable, and long-life materials. To assure a continuing flow of new materials and processing concepts, basic understanding to guide such innovation, and technological support for development of major NASA systems, Lewis has supported a strong in-house materials research activity. Our researchers have discovered new alloys, polymers, metallic composites

  20. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08

  1. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, James Irvin

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  2. Bioinspired structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegst, Ulrike G. K.; Bai, Hao; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Natural structural materials are built at ambient temperature from a fairly limited selection of components. They usually comprise hard and soft phases arranged in complex hierarchical architectures, with characteristic dimensions spanning from the nanoscale to the macroscale. The resulting materials are lightweight and often display unique combinations of strength and toughness, but have proven difficult to mimic synthetically. Here, we review the common design motifs of a range of natural structural materials, and discuss the difficulties associated with the design and fabrication of synthetic structures that mimic the structural and mechanical characteristics of their natural counterparts.

  3. Bioinspired structural materials.

    PubMed

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Bai, Hao; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Natural structural materials are built at ambient temperature from a fairly limited selection of components. They usually comprise hard and soft phases arranged in complex hierarchical architectures, with characteristic dimensions spanning from the nanoscale to the macroscale. The resulting materials are lightweight and often display unique combinations of strength and toughness, but have proven difficult to mimic synthetically. Here, we review the common design motifs of a range of natural structural materials, and discuss the difficulties associated with the design and fabrication of synthetic structures that mimic the structural and mechanical characteristics of their natural counterparts.

  4. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    The science-based stockpile stewardship program emphasizes a better understanding of how complex components function through advanced computer calculations. Many of the problem areas are in the behavior of materials making up the equipment. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) can contribute to solving these problems by providing diagnostic tools to examine parts noninvasively and by providing the experimental tools to understand material behavior in terms of both the atomic structure and the microstructure. Advanced computer codes need experimental information on material behavior in response to stress, temperature, and pressure as input, and they need benchmarking experiments to test the model predictions for the finished part.

  5. ATS materials/manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.

    1997-11-01

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. On material fracture criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnev, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the nonlinear mechanics of material fracture, a model of the fracture of materials with actual (discrete) structures has been constructed. The model is supported by proofs that crack resistance K 1 c and fracture toughness G 1 c obtained from the energy conservation law without using the assumptions adopted in the linear material fracture mechanics serve as the force and energy criteria in the nonlinear fracture mechanics. It has been shown that energy criterion G 1 c in the nonlinear mechanics is much greater than G 1 c in the linear fracture mechanics.

  7. Solid breeder materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.; Clemmer, R.G.; Hollenber, G.w.

    1981-01-01

    Increased attention is being given to the consideration of lithium-containing ceramic materials for use as breeder blankets in fusion devices. These materials, e.g., Li/sub 2/O, ..gamma..-LiAlO/sub 2/, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, Li/sub 2/ZrO/sub 3/, etc., are attractive because of their inherent safety advantages. At present, there is a broad scope of laboratory and irradiation activities in force to provide the requisite data enabling selection of th prime-candidate solid breeder material.

  8. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewy, R.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    Overall emphasis is on basic long-term research in the following categories: constituent materials, composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology; and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Research in basic composition, characteristics, and processing science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to present and future problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of this comprehensive program are presented.

  9. Investigating Encrypted Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Niall; Gladyshev, Pavel; Kechadi, Tahar; Carthy, Joe

    When encrypted material is discovered during a digital investigation and the investigator cannot decrypt the material then s/he is faced with the problem of how to determine the evidential value of the material. This research is proposing a methodology of extracting probative value from the encrypted file of a hybrid cryptosystem. The methodology also incorporates a technique for locating the original plaintext file. Since child pornography (KP) images and terrorist related information (TI) are transmitted in encrypted format the digital investigator must ask the question Cui Bono? - who benefits or who is the recipient? By doing this the scope of the digital investigation can be extended to reveal the intended recipient.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  11. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Encapsulation materials for solar cells were investigated. The different phases consisted of: (1) identification and development of low cost module encapsulation materials; (2) materials reliability examination; and (3) process sensitivity and process development. It is found that outdoor photothermal aging devices (OPT) are the best accelerated aging methods, simulate worst case field conditions, evaluate formulation and module performance and have a possibility for life assessment. Outdoor metallic copper exposure should be avoided, self priming formulations have good storage stability, stabilizers enhance performance, and soil resistance treatment is still effective.

  12. Electrically conductive composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  13. Composite Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    The development and application of filamentary composite materials, is considered. Such interest is based on the possibility of using relatively brittle materials with high modulus, high strength, but low density in composites with good durability and high tolerance to damage. Fiber reinforced composite materials of this kind offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been made since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. There were only limited applied to the primary structure of operational vehicles, mainly as aircrafts.

  14. Gravity and Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, R. P.; Hovell, Daniel; Kondic, Lou; Tennakoon, Sarath; Veje, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We describe experiments that probe a number of different types of granular flow where either gravity is effectively eliminated or it is modulated in time. These experiments include the shaking of granular materials both vertically and horizontally, and the shearing of a 2D granular material. For the shaken system, we identify interesting dynamical phenomena and relate them to standard simple friction models. An interesting application of this set of experiments is to the mixing of dissimilar materials. For the sheared system we identify a new kind of dynamical phase transition.

  15. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  16. Materials research at CMAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

  17. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of filamentary composite materials, whose development may be considered as entering its second generation, continues to generate intense interest and applications activity. Fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantially improved performance and potentially lower costs for aerospace hardware. Much progress has been achieved since the initial developments in the mid 1960's. Rather limited applications to primary aircraft structure have been made, however, mainly in a material-substitution mode on military aircraft, except for a few experiments currently underway on large passenger airplanes in commercial operation. To fulfill the promise of composite materials completely requires a strong technology base. NASA and AFOSR recognize the present state of the art to be such that to fully exploit composites in sophisticated aerospace structures, the technology base must be improved. This, in turn, calls for expanding fundamental knowledge and the means by which it can be successfully applied in design and manufacture.

  18. Cookoff of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.; Schmitt, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    An overview of cookoff modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented aimed at assessing the violence of reaction following cookoff of confined energetic materials. During cookoff, the response of energetic materials is known to involve coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical processes which induce thermal damage to the energetic material prior to the onset of ignition. These damaged states enhance shock sensitivity and lead to conditions favoring self-supported accelerated combustion. Thus, the level of violence depends on the competition between pressure buildup and stress release due to the loss of confinement. To model these complex processes, finite element-based analysis capabilities are being developed which can resolve coupled heat transfer with chemistry, quasi-static structural mechanics and dynamic response. Numerical simulations that assess the level of violence demonstrate the importance of determining material damage in pre- and post-ignition cookoff events.

  19. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  20. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  1. Materials research at CMAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro

    2013-07-18

    The Centro de Micro Analisis de Materiales (CMAM) is a research centre of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid dedicated to the modification and analysis of materials using ion beam techniques. The infrastructure, based on a HVEE 5MV tandem accelerator, provided with a coaxial Cockcroft Walton charging system, is fully open to research groups of the UAM, to other public research institutions and to private enterprises. The CMAM research covers a few important lines such as advanced materials, surface science, biomedical materials, cultural heritage, materials for energy production. The Centre gives as well support to university teaching and technical training. A detail description of the research infrastructures and their use statistics will be given. Some of the main research results will be presented to show the progress of research in the Centre in the past few years and to motivate the strategic plans for the forthcoming.

  2. Unusual spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Jonathan V.

    1990-01-01

    For particularly innovative space exploration missions, unusual requirements are levied on the structural components of the spacecraft. In many cases, the preferred solution is the utilization of unusual materials. This trend is forecast to continue. Several hypothetic examples are discussed.

  3. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Wang, Tao [Columbia, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  4. Semiconductivity in Organoarsenic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    A general investigation of the macromolecule formation abilities of the hypothetical monomeric unit, RE, where R is an organic group and E either arsenic or antimony, resulted in the development of several novel crystalline materials possessing

  5. Photoconductivity in Dirac materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, J. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2015-11-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) Dirac materials including graphene and the surface of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator, and 3D Dirac materials including 3D Dirac semimetal and Weyl semimetal have attracted great attention due to their linear Dirac nodes and exotic properties. Here, we use the Fermi’s golden rule and Boltzmann equation within the relaxation time approximation to study and compare the photoconductivity of Dirac materials under different far- or mid-infrared irradiation. Theoretical results show that the photoconductivity exhibits the anisotropic property under the polarized irradiation, but the anisotropic strength is different between 2D and 3D Dirac materials. The photoconductivity depends strongly on the relaxation time for different scattering mechanism, just like the dark conductivity.

  6. Evaluation of sorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W.N.; Gomillion, S.L.; Luckenbach, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption efficiency of different types of liquid sorbent materials was determined under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Results show that the sorption capacity is affected both by the type of material and by the form of the material. Attractive alternate sorbents to ''atomic wipes'' and Oil-Dry were identified. Small pillows of shredded synthetic sorbents are an attractive alternative to Oil-Dry as a sorbent and to ''atomic wipes'' as both a sorbent and in decontamination by wiping. Synthetic sorbents in cloth form offer an attractive alternative to ''atomic wipes'' in decontamination by wiping because these materials are compatible with nitric acid and they may be more fire resistant. A larger-scale evaluation is planned with the most promising sorbents. In addition, development is planned of a sorbent that will be efficient, compatible with nitric acid and fire resistant. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of sorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, W N; Gomillion, S L; Luckenbach, R L

    1989-01-01

    The sorption efficiency of different types of liquid sorbent materials was determined under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. Results show that the sorption capacity is affected both by the type of material and by the form of the material. Attractive alternate sorbents to atomic wipes'' and Oil-Dry were identified. Small pillows of shredded synthetic sorbents are an attractive alternative to Oil-Dry as a sorbent and to atomic wipes'' as both a sorbent and in decontamination by wiping. Synthetic sorbents in cloth form offer an attractive alternative to atomic wipes'' in decontamination by wiping because theses materials are compatible with nitric acid and they may be more fire resistant. A larger-scale evaluation is planned with the most promising sorbents. In addition, development is planned of a sorbent that will be efficient, compatible with nitric acid, fire resistant. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  9. Dynamics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich variety of dynamical behavior, much of which is poorly understood. Fractal-like stress chains, convection, a variety of wave dynamics, including waves which resemble capillary waves, l/f noise, and fractional Brownian motion provide examples. Work beginning at Duke will focus on gravity driven convection, mixing and gravitational collapse. Although granular materials consist of collections of interacting particles, there are important differences between the dynamics of a collections of grains and the dynamics of a collections of molecules. In particular, the ergodic hypothesis is generally invalid for granular materials, so that ordinary statistical physics does not apply. In the absence of a steady energy input, granular materials undergo a rapid collapse which is strongly influenced by the presence of gravity. Fluctuations on laboratory scales in such quantities as the stress can be very large-as much as an order of magnitude greater than the mean.

  10. Tough Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (Compiler); Johnson, N. J. (Compiler); Teichman, L. A. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries are presented which address composite material behavior and performance improvement. Topic areas include composite fracture toughness and impact characterization, constituent properties and interrelationships, and matrix synthesis and characterization.

  11. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  12. Instrumentation for Materials Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claassen, Richard S.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses how sophisticated instrumentation techniques yield practical results in three typical materials problems: fracture analysis, joining, and compatibility. Describes techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy. (MLH)

  13. Computational Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature thermoplastic polyimide polymers are incorporated in engineering structures in the form of matrix materials in advanced fiber composites and adhesives in bonded joints. Developing analytical tools to predict long term performance and screen for final materials selection for polymers is the impetus for intensive studies at NASA and major industry based airframe developers. These fiber-reinforced polymeric composites (FRPCs) combine high strength with lightweight. In addition, they offer corrosion and fatigue resistance, a reduction in parts count, and new possibilities for control through aeroelastic tailoring and "smart" structures containing fully-integrated sensors and actuators. However, large-scale acceptance and use of polymer composites has historically been extremely slow. Reasons for this include a lack of familiarity of designers with the materials; the need for new tooling and new inspection and repair infrastructures; and high raw materials and fabrication costs.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology utilization of fiber reinforced composite materials is discussed in the areas of physical properties, and life prediction. Programs related to the Composite Aircraft Program are described in detail.

  15. Degradation of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Banks, Bruce; deGroh, Kim; Miller, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of specific space environmental threats to exterior spacecraft materials. The scope will be confined to effects on exterior spacecraft surfaces, and will not, therefore, address environmental effects on interior spacecraft systems, such as electronics. Space exposure studies and laboratory simulations of individual and combined space environemntal threats will be summarized. A significant emphasis is placed on effects of Earth orbit environments, because the majority of space missions have been flown in Earth orbits which have provided a significant amount of data on materials effects. Issues associated with interpreting materials degradation results will be discussed, and deficiencies of ground testing will be identified. Recommendations are provided on reducing or preventing space environmental degradation through appropriate materials selection.

  16. Materials engineering data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The various types of materials related data that exist at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and compiled into databases which could be accessed by all the NASA centers and by other contractors, are presented.

  17. Burn Wise - Outreach Materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  18. Holographic Recording Materials Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Schwerzel, R. E.; Perry, P. J.; Craig, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Organic photorefractive materials were evaluated for application in a reversible holographic memory system. Representative indigo and thioindigo derivatives and several stilbene derivatives were studied as well as 15, 16-dialkyldihydropyrene derivatives the following goals were achieved: (1) the successful writing of phase holograms in a thioindigo/polymer gel system, (2) the successful writing and erasing of phase holograms in a variety of indigo/polymer gel and indigo/solid polymer systems, and (3) the identification of indigoid dyes and 15, 16-dialkyldihydropyrene derivatives as materials potentially suitable for utilization in an operational system. Photochemical studies of the stilbene, indigo, thioindigo, and dialkyldihydropyrene derivatives in solution and in a variety of polymer matrix materials were conducted with the goal of optimizing the photorefractive behavior of the chemical system as a whole. The spectroscopic properties required of optimal photorefractive materials were identified, and it was shown that both the indigoid dyes and the dialkyldihydropyrenes closely match the required properties.

  19. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Wayne; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    The objectives are the following: to investigate the feasibility of the use of local lunar resources for construction of a lunar base structure; to develop a material processing method and integrate the method with design and construction of a pressurized habitation structure; to estimate specifications of the support equipment necessary for material processing and construction; and to provide parameters for systems models of lunar base constructions, supply, and operations. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: comparison of various lunar structures; guidelines for material processing methods; cast lunar regolith; examples of cast basalt components; cast regolith process; processing equipment; mechanical properties of cast basalt; material properties and structural design; and future work.

  20. Developments in carbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The following carbon-based materials are reviewed and their applications discussed: fullerenes; graphite (synthetic and manufactured); activated carbon fibers; and carbon-carbon composites. Carbon R&D activities at ORNL are emphasized.

  1. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  2. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Jitendra P.; Bosak, Andrea L.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  3. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  4. Sustainable Materials Management Basics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SMM is a systemic approach to using and reusing materials more productively over their entire lifecycles. It represents a change in how our society thinks about the use of natural resources and environmental protection

  5. Lunar material transport vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

  6. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  7. Materials inspired by mathematics.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Motoko; Ikeda, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Our world is transforming into an interacting system of the physical world and the digital world. What will be the materials science in the new era? With the rising expectations of the rapid development of computers, information science and mathematical science including statistics and probability theory, 'data-driven materials design' has become a common term. There is knowledge and experience gained in the physical world in the form of know-how and recipes for the creation of material. An important key is how we establish vocabulary and grammar to translate them into the language of the digital world. In this article, we outline how materials science develops when it encounters mathematics, showing some emerging directions.

  8. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in studies of constituent materials composite materials, generic structural elements, processing science technology, and maintaining long-term structural integrity. Topics discussed include: mechanical properties of high performance carbon fibers; fatigue in composite materials; experimental and theoretical studies of moisture and temperature effects on the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy laminates and neat resins; numerical investigations of the micromechanics of composite fracture; delamination failures of composite laminates; effect of notch size on composite laminates; improved beam theory for anisotropic materials; variation of resin properties through the thickness of cured samples; numerical analysis composite processing; heat treatment of metal matrix composites, and the RP-1 and RP2 gliders of the sailplane project.

  9. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  10. Materials inspired by mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Motoko; Ikeda, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our world is transforming into an interacting system of the physical world and the digital world. What will be the materials science in the new era? With the rising expectations of the rapid development of computers, information science and mathematical science including statistics and probability theory, ‘data-driven materials design’ has become a common term. There is knowledge and experience gained in the physical world in the form of know-how and recipes for the creation of material. An important key is how we establish vocabulary and grammar to translate them into the language of the digital world. In this article, we outline how materials science develops when it encounters mathematics, showing some emerging directions. PMID:27877877

  11. Concise polymeric materials encyclopedia

    SciTech Connect

    Salamone, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This comprehensive, accessible resource abridges the ``Polymeric Materials Encyclopedia'', presenting more than 1,100 articles and featuring contributions from more than 1,800 scientists from all over the world. The text discusses a vast array of subjects related to the: (1) synthesis, properties, and applications of polymeric materials; (2) development of modern catalysts in preparing new or modified polymers; (3) modification of existing polymers by chemical and physical processes; and (4) biologically oriented polymers.

  12. Keeping Nuclear Materials Secure

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-19

    For 50 years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been helping to keep nuclear materials secure. We do this by developing instruments and training inspectors that are deployed to other countries to make sure materials such as uranium are being used for peaceful purposes and not diverted for use in weapons. These measures are called “nuclear safeguards,” and they help make the world a safer place.

  13. Nano-composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  14. Fibre-reinforced materials.

    PubMed

    Brown, D

    2000-11-01

    This paper considers the role of fibres in the reinforcement of composite materials, and the significance of the form the fibre takes and the material from which it is made. The current dental applications of fibre reinforcement, including dental cements and splints, fibres made into structures for use in composites, denture bases and the contemporary use of fibres in fixed partial dentures, are reviewed. Their role in biomedical implants is surveyed and their future forecast.

  15. Nonmetallic Materials Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A handbook compilation of chemical and physical property tests data obtained during qualification and receiving inspection testing of nonmetallic materials for the Viking Lander is introduced. Data cover the following materials: sealants, potting compounds, lubricants, paints and finishes, inks, films, encapsulants, elastomers, structural plastics, ablatives, adhesives, and electrical and thermal insulation. Thermochemical data showing degradation as a function of temperature, from room to 500 C, are included.

  16. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  17. Materials with negative stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, Tim

    Negative stiffness, or a reversal in the usual assumed direction between causal forces and ensuing deformations, has been proposed as a pathway to materials which exceed theoretical performance bounds. Negative stiffness, as a concept, represents a relaxation of tacitly assumed material behavior, but it violates no natural laws. Negative stiffness, normally unstable without constraint, is permissible for stability under special conditions, for example a rigid boundary constraint so long as the material satisfies strong ellipticity in the parlance of elasticity. Hence, negative stiffness is not observed in materials or structures which are not constrained. If negative stiffness is allowed for inclusions of material, which are surrounded by a stabilizing positive stiffness matrix, composite theory predicts large increases in the mechanical damping and composite stiffness. The work herein explores several material systems which possess negative stiffness, and seeks to characterize the composite mechanical properties of these systems. Two metal matrix composite systems, namely Sn-VO2 and Sn-BaTIO3, were investigated. Here, negative stiffness arises from the ferroelastic phase transformations in the ceramic inclusions; stability is imparted by the tin matrix. Polycrystalline In-Tl and BaTIO 3 were also studied. Here, the entire material volume is phase transforming. Constraint is imparted on a small volume fraction of crystallites by the surrounding material. Various manifestations of negative stiffness were observed. Thermally broad damping peaks which depended upon thermal cycling were observed in the Sn-VO2 composites. Furthermore, mechanical instabilities were seen in composites intentionally designed to be unstable. Negative stiffness was indicated in the In-Tl alloy by magnification of damping peaks over those observed in single crystals, increases in damping peaks with increased cooling rates, occurrence of damping peaks before the appearance of martensite and

  18. Microwave Processing of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    of peak output power of 100 megawatts at 10 GHz. Microwave Fundamentals 11 RESONANT HELIX TWT STO KLYSTRON CTf C 0 Grid oShadow Grid PPM FOCUS SPACE C...Rather, broadband and high-temperature measurement techniques that have been used in conjunction with microwave processing of materials-specifically... Broadband Dielectric Properties Measurement Techniques. Pp. 527-539 in Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Vol. 269, Microwave Processing

  19. Optical materials research.

    PubMed

    Parsons, W F

    1972-01-01

    There are eras in research when days are filled with excitement because unique materials are being produced and researchers "think what nobody else has thought" (Albert von Szent Gyorgyi). Such were the periods when many new optical glasses emerged from the laboratories of the Eastman Kodak Company and when the hot pressing technology was applied to produce new polycrystalline materials. This paper discusses the people and accomplishments of those periods.

  20. Multifunctional Metallosupramolecular Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    Approaches to Stimuli-Responsive Materials: From Sea Cucumbers to Self-Healing Films. Oct 2010 University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA Invited Lecture...2008 Lubrizol, Wickliffe, Ohio Invited Lecture: Supramolecular Materials: From Re-healable Plastics to Sea Cucumbers Dec 2008 US-Japan Polymer...scholarships or fellowships for further studies in science, mathematics, engineering or technology fields: 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

  1. Materials Coating Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    properties of the coating layers and their interaction with the bulk material will be considered. Lectures will also cover the behaviour of coated parts...stability etc. Finally, available techniques for the analysis and non-destructive evaluation of the composition. properties and soundness of the...provide stiffness or flexibility, and to carry the applied loads without macroscopic failure. Such properties are associated with the bulk material of

  2. Beam-Material Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Cerutti, F.

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high-intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target, and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and environment in challenging current and future applications.

  3. Noise Abatement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

  4. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn , Mukkamala, Ravindranath , Chen, Oing , Hu, Hopin , Baude, Dominique

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  5. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mukkamala, Ravindranath; Chen, Qing; Hu, Hopin; Baude, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  6. Plasma Processing of Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-22

    Estimates for Producing Alu -.. a from Domestic Raw Materials. U.S. Bureau ot Mines Information Circ lar 8648. 6. Barclay, James A., arti Frank A...heating occurs via joule -type heating, whereas cleaning is believed to occur via vaporization of thin oxide films from cathodic arc spots caused by a...Research Society Symposium on Plasma Processing and Synthesis of Materials, Boston, November. 43. Frind, G., C. P. Goody, and L. E. Prescott . 1983

  7. Ceramic Laser Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  8. Food Packaging Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The photos show a few of the food products packaged in Alure, a metallized plastic material developed and manufactured by St. Regis Paper Company's Flexible Packaging Division, Dallas, Texas. The material incorporates a metallized film originally developed for space applications. Among the suppliers of the film to St. Regis is King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Ma'ssachusetts. Initially used by NASA as a signal-bouncing reflective coating for the Echo 1 communications satellite, the film was developed by a company later absorbed by King-Seeley. The metallized film was also used as insulating material for components of a number of other spacecraft. St. Regis developed Alure to meet a multiple packaging material need: good eye appeal, product protection for long periods and the ability to be used successfully on a wide variety of food packaging equipment. When the cost of aluminum foil skyrocketed, packagers sought substitute metallized materials but experiments with a number of them uncovered problems; some were too expensive, some did not adequately protect the product, some were difficult for the machinery to handle. Alure offers a solution. St. Regis created Alure by sandwiching the metallized film between layers of plastics. The resulting laminated metallized material has the superior eye appeal of foil but is less expensive and more easily machined. Alure effectively blocks out light, moisture and oxygen and therefore gives the packaged food long shelf life. A major packaging firm conducted its own tests of the material and confirmed the advantages of machinability and shelf life, adding that it runs faster on machines than materials used in the past and it decreases product waste; the net effect is increased productivity.

  9. Materials Processing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A report describes investigations of materials processing in low-gravity environment. Ultimately, research could lead to new commercially-applicable materials and processes and to an understanding of constraints imposed by gravity. NASA-supported work is carried out in 46 academic, industrial, and Government laboratories, and covers a number of areas. An overview is given of objective and current state of development for over 100 tasks.

  10. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  11. Enzymes on material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Joey N; Goddard, Julie M

    2012-05-01

    Enzyme interactions with material surfaces are of interest for industrial food and pharmaceutical transformations, biosensors, artificial cells, cell free reactions, drug and nutrition delivery technologies, and imaging. When in contact with a material surface, an enzyme may lose or appear to lose activity due to the nature of the enzyme, the nature of the material, and/or the nature of the interface between the enzyme, material, and substrate environment. The purpose of this review is to survey recent advances that have been made towards the preservation, optimization, and enhancement of enzyme activity on material surfaces within the context of well-known concepts that describe the loss of activity after immobilization. This review breaks down the immobilized enzyme system to look at the individual components of the system-namely the enzyme, the material, and the interface. For each piece, possible causes for the loss of enzyme activity are described as well as strategies that have been applied to limit the affect. At the conclusion we identify areas of future research needed to overcome limitations in the current state-of-the art for immobilized enzyme systems.

  12. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-08-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  13. LDEF materials data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  14. Superconducting materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, John S.; Karikari, Emmanuel K.; Hiamang, S. O.; Danjaji, M.; Bassey, Affiong; Morgan, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The effects of materials processing on the properties and behavior of high temperature yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) superconductors were investigated. Electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of thin films (300 nm) YBA2CU3O(delta) structures grown by pulsed laser deposition on LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 substrates were used to evaluate processing. Pole projection and thin film diffraction measurements were used to establish grain orientation and verify structural integrity of the samples. Susceptibility magnetization, and transport measurements were used to evaluate the magnetic and electrical transport properties of the samples. Our results verified that an unfortunate consequence of processing is inherent changes to the internal structure of the material. This effect translates into modifications in the properties of the materials, and undesired feature that makes it very difficult to consistently predict material behavior. The results show that processing evaluation must incorporate a comprehensive understanding of the properties of the materials. Future studies will emphasize microstructural characteristics of the materials, in particular, those microscopic properties that map macroscopic behavior.

  15. NELL-1, an osteoinductive factor, is a direct transcriptional target of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xinli; Sun, Shan; Zara, Janette N; Zou, Xuan; Chiu, Robert; Culiat, Cymbelin T; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-01-01

    NELL-1 is a novel secreted protein associated with premature fusion of cranial sutures in craniosynostosis that has been found to promote osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization. Our previous study showed that Runx2, the key transcription factor in osteoblast differentiation, transactivates the NELL-1 promoter. In this study, we evaluated the regulatory involvement and mechanisms of Osterix, an essential transcription factor of osteoblasts, in NELL-1 gene expression and function. Promoter analysis showed a cluster of potential Sp1 sites (Sp1/Osterix binding sites) within approximately 70 bp (from -71 to -142) of the 5' flanking region of the human NELL-1 transcriptional start site. Luciferase activity in our NELL-1 promoter reporter systems was significantly decreased in Saos-2 cells when Osterix was overexpressed. Mutagenesis study demonstrated that this suppression is mediated by the Sp1 sites. The binding specificity of Osterix to these Sp1 sites was confirmed in Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts by EMSA in vitro and ChIP assay in vivo. ChIP assay also showed that Osterix downregulated NELL-1 by affecting binding of RNA polymerase II to the NELL-1 promoter, but not by competing with Runx2 binding to the OSE2 sites. Moreover, NELL-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased when Osterix was overexpressed in Saos-2, U2OS, Hela and Glioma cells. Correspondingly, knockdown of Osterix increased NELL-1 transcription and osteoblastic differentiation in both Saos-2 cells and primary human osteoblasts. These results suggest that Osterix is a direct transcriptional regulator with repressive effect on NELL-1 gene expression, contributing to a delicate balance of regulatory effects on NELL-1 transcription with Runx2, and may play a crucial role in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. These findings also extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of Runx2, Osterix, and NELL-1 and demonstrate their crosstalk during osteogenesis.

  16. A Preliminary Study of the Osteogenic Potential of a Biodegradable Alloplastic-Osteoinductive Alloimplant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    was removed with a depilating agent and the area over the calvaria was scrubbed with ethyl alcohol and povidone iodine for five minutes. Before surgery...Both controls and implants were evaluated in groups at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks. When compared with the control defects, the copolymer:DFDB... compared the tissue response of PLA with that of GelfoamR and SurgicelR in healing extraction sites. 2 7 PLA was observed in % the wounds after three

  17. Osteoinductive effect of bone bank allografts on human osteoblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    de la Piedra, Concepción; Vicario, Carlos; de Acuña, Lucrecia Rodríguez; García-Moreno, Carmen; Traba, Maria Luisa; Arlandis, Santiago; Marco, Fernando; López-Durán, Luis

    2008-02-01

    Incorporation of a human bone allograft requires osteoclast activity and growth of recipient osteoblasts. The aim of this work was to study the effects produced by autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts on osteoblast proliferation and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL6), activator of bone resorption, aminoterminal propeptide of procollagen I (PINP), marker of bone matrix formation, and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inhibitor of osteoclast activity and differentiation. Allografts were obtained from human femoral heads. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence (problem group) or in the absence (control group) of allografts during 15 days. Allografts produced a decrease in osteoblast proliferation in the first week of the experiment, and an increase in IL6 mRNA, both at 3 h and 2 days, and an increase in the IL6 released to the culture medium the second day of the experiment. We found a decrease in OPG released to the culture on the 2nd and fourth days. These results suggest an increase in bone resorption and a decrease in bone formation in the first week of the experiment. In the second week, allografts produced an increase in osteoblast proliferation and PINP release to the culture medium, indicating an increase in bone formation; an increase in OPG released to the culture medium, which would indicate a decrease in bone resorption; and a decrease in IL6, indicating a decrease in bone resorption stimulation. These results demonstrate that autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts produce in bone environment changes that regulate their own incorporation to the recipient bone.

  18. [Methods to obtain platelet-rich plasma and osteoinductive therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Raquel; Gaspar Carreño, Marisa; Jiménez Torres, José; Alonso Herreros, José María; Villimar, Ana; López Sánchez, Piedad

    2015-05-01

    Introduccion: El Plasma Rico en Plaquetas (PRP) es un plasma autólogo con una cifra de plaquetas superior a la del plasma basal, por haber sido sometido a algún proceso de extracción y concentración. El empleo del PRP como osteoinductor es conflictivo dado que, no existen estudios clínicos rigurosos que permita extraer conclusiones firmes respecto a su utilidad. Objetivo: Proporcionar información sobre las técnicas de obtención del PRP, las consideraciones legales sobre su obtención y empleo, el mecanismo de acción molecular, así como la evidencia disponible sobre su seguridad y tolerancia. Resultado: El PRP se obtiene de forma manual, mediante “técnica abierta”, o mediante kits desechables con “técnica cerrada”, siendo estos últimos productos sanitarios clasificados como IIa. La Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios (AEMPS) considera el PRP como medicamento, estableciendo unos requisitos mínimos para garantizar su seguridad, trazabilidad, farmacovigiliancia e información. El PRP, por su elevado contenido en factores de crecimiento, reúne cualidades para ser un potente papel osteoinductor, capaz de acelerar la consolidación de fracturas o de osteointegrar rápida y eficientemente distintos tipos de implantes óseos. La tolerancia a la infiltración es generalmente buena, aunque hay que tener en cuenta su elevado potencial angiogénico. Conclusiones: El PRP, dadas las características de producción y aplicación, es considerado por la AEMPS como un medicamento de dispensación bajo prescripción médica restringida, por lo que los servicios de farmacia hospitalaria deberían, cuando menos, supervisar su gestión y manipulación.

  19. Osteoinductive activity of insulin-functionalized cell culture surfaces obtained using diazonium chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulska, Anna; Filipowska, Joanna; Osyczka, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Polymeric surfaces suitable for cell culture (DR/Pec) were constructed from diazoresin (DR) and pectin (Pec) in a form of ultrathin films using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The surfaces were functionalized with insulin using diazonium chemistry. Such functionalized surfaces were used to culture human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. The activity of insulin immobilized on the surfaces (DR/Pec/Ins) was compared to that of insulin dissolved in the culture medium. Human MSC grown on insulin-immobilized DR/Pec surfaces displayed increased proliferation and higher osteogenic activity. The latter was determined by means of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, which increases at early stages of osteoblasts differentiation. Insulin dissolved in the culture medium did not stimulate cell proliferation and its osteogenic activity was significantly lower. Addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to the culture medium further increased ALP activity in hMSCs indicating additive osteogenic action of immobilized insulin and rhBMP-2

  20. Effect of sterilization on osteoinduction. Comparison of five methods in demineralized rat bone.

    PubMed

    Munting, E; Wilmart, J F; Wijne, A; Hennebert, P; Delloye, C

    1988-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find a safe, effective sterilization method that does not destroy the bone-inductive capacity of demineralized bone implants. Five sterilizing agents were tested in rats. Implants procured and processed under sterile conditions served as controls. New bone formation was evaluated by determining dry weight, calcium content, and Sr-85 incorporation of the induced ossicles. Glutaraldehyde solution, formaldehyde gas, and ethylene oxide destroyed almost all the bone-inductive capacity. Irradiation by 2.5 Mrads Co-60 resulted in a loss of about half of the inductive capacity. Merthiolate (0.18 per cent) was the only sterilizing agent that did not reduce the bone-inductive capacity of the demineralized implants. Because merthiolate is not sporicidal, gamma irradiation appears to be the most appropriate sterilizing agent for demineralized bone in clinical use.

  1. Ectopic Bone Matrix Mineralization: Unveiling the Osteoinductive Nature of Crab Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omokanwaye, Tiffany Suella

    Engineered nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. Numerous studies have reported toxicity of different NPs during the last years. Thus, there are growing concerns about the potential impacts to the health and environment of engineered nanoparticles (NPs). However, some methodological problems complicate the interpretation of nanotoxicity studies. On the one hand, some NPs have shown to interfere with classical toxicity assays based on colorimetric or fluorescent measurements. On the other hand, most NPs tend to aggregate in media used in toxicity tests, which complicates the interpretation of the toxicity results. The first objective of this dissertation was to evaluate a novel impedance-based and label-free real time cell analyzer (RTCA) as a high throughput method for screening the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and to validate the RTCA results using a conventional cytotoxicity test (MTT). Several inorganic NPs were tested for potential cytotoxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-). In general, there was a good correlation in cytotoxicity measurements between the two methods. Moreover, none of the NPs tested showed interference with the impedance measurements performed by the RTCA system. The results demonstrate the potential and validity of the impedance-based RTCA technique to rapidly screen for NP toxicity. The second objective of this dissertation was to assess the toxicity of different inorganic NPs to the eukaryotic cell model Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and to test the influence of NP aggregation state in their toxicity. Nanotoxicity was assessed by monitoring oxygen consumption in batch cultures and by analysis of cell membrane integrity. Mn2O3 NPs showed the highest inhibition of O2 consumption and cell membrane damage, while the other NPs caused low or no toxicity to the yeast. Most NPs showed high tendency to aggregate in the assay medium, so a non-toxic dispersant was used to improve NP stability. In contrast to aggregated CeO2 NPs, dispersed CeO 2 NPs showed toxicity to the yeast. However, dispersant supplementation decreased the inhibition caused by Mn2O3 NPs at low concentrations, which could indicate that dispersant association with the particles may have an impact on the interaction between the NPs and the cells. The proven toxicity of some NPs raises concerns about their environmental fate. Municipal and industrial wastewaters are considered primary sources of NPs to the environment. However, information on the behavior and impact of NPs on wastewater treatment processes is very limited. A third objective of this dissertation was to evaluate the fate and long-term effect of ZnO and CuO NPs during wastewater treatment in high-rate anaerobic bioreactors. Laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors were fed with synthetic wastewater containing NPs for extended periods of time (> 90 d). Extensive removal (62-82%) of ZnO and CuO NPs was observed during wastewater treatment in the UASB reactors. Scanning electron microscopy and chemical analysis confirmed that NPs were associated with the anaerobic sludge. While short-term exposure to low levels of ZnO and CuO NPs only caused minor inhibition to methanogenesis, extended exposure to NPs accumulated in the sludge bed led to a gradual and partial inhibitory response in the reactors. The inhibitory effect was also evident in the decline in the acetoclastic methanogenic activity of the biomass.

  2. Influence of irradiation on the osteoinductive potential of demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Wientroub, S; Reddi, A H

    1988-04-01

    Samples of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) were exposed to graduated doses of radiation (1-15 Megarad) (Mrad) utilizing a linear accelerator and then implanted into the thoracic region of Long-Evans rats. Subcutaneous implantation of DBM into allogenic rats induces endochondral bone. In response to matrix implantation, a cascade of events ensues; mesenchymal cell proliferation on day 3 postimplantation, chondrogenesis on day 7, calcification of the cartilagenous matrix and chondrolysis on day 9, and osteogenesis on day 11 resulting in formation of an ossicle containing active hemopoietic tissue. Bone formation was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity, the rate of mineralization was determined by measuring 45Ca incorporation to bone mineral, and 40Ca content measured the extent of mineralization; acid phosphatase activity was used as a parameter for bone resorption. The dose of radiation (2.5 Mrad) currently used by bone banks for sterilization of bone tissue did not destroy the bone induction properties of DBM. Furthermore, radiation of 3-5 Mrad even enhanced bone induction, insofar as it produced more bone at the same interval of time than was obtained from unirradiated control samples. None of the radiation doses used in these experiments abolished bone induction, although the response induced by matrix irradiated with doses higher than 5 Mrad was delayed.

  3. EDITORIAL: Materially speaking!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Malcolm G.

    1997-05-01

    We live in a highly materialistic age. This is true not only for our spiritual outlook - or lack of it - but undeniably so for the physical world in which we live. Materials, which are the feature of this special issue, provide literally the fabric on which the modern world is built. Materials science is the systematic study of the physical properties and behaviour of solids with practical applications and importance (if the utility of the material is not explicit or important we are probably in the realm of solid state physics!). Materials in this sense are the stuff of which cars and computers, jet aircraft and washing machines, tower blocks and saucepans, bridges and golf clubs are made. The science of materials therefore encompasses most of the things that form the infrastructure of modern life. But perhaps it is its very ubiquity that removes the mystique, the glamour, the 'zing' from the subject. In contrast, anything cosmological, astronomical or 'fundamental' (as in 'particle'), i.e. of little or no practical significance to our day-to-day lives, excites the curiosity of many able young people. Witness the profusion of books about galaxies and black holes, and quarks and GUTs which strain the popular science shelves of the bookshops. I'm probably being heretical, but perhaps the over-hyping of the very large and the very small has indeed attracted the able few into the serious study of physics, but because of its inherent mathematical complexity and esoteric remoteness maybe it has put off the average youngster who would nevertheless enjoy and succeed in physics-based higher education (and, not incidentally, help fill the seriously depleted lecture theatres in many university physics - and engineering - departments). Materials science on the other hand deals with an intermediate range of things which, give or take an order of magnitude or three, are person-sized as well as person useful. It is - therefore? - undoubtedly one of the less glamorous of the

  4. Tribological comparison of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Bing

    Approximately 600,000 total joint replacement surgeries are performed each year in the United States. Current artificial joint implants are mainly metal-on-plastic. The synthetic biomaterials undergo degradation through fatigue and corrosive wear from load-bearing and the aqueous ionic environment of the human body. Deposits of inorganic salts can scratch weight-bearing surfaces, making artificial joints stiff and awkward. The excessive wear debris from polyethylene leads to osteolysis and potential loosening of the prosthesis. The lifetime for well-designed artificial joints is at most 10 to 15 years. A patient can usually have two total joint replacements during her/his lifetime. Durability is limited by the body's reaction to wear debris of the artificial joints. Wear of the artificial joints should be reduced. A focus of this thesis is the tribological performance of bearing materials for Total Replacement Artificial Joints (TRAJ). An additional focus is the scaffolds for cell growth from both a tissue engineering and tribological perspective. The tribological properties of materials including Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) coated materials were tested for TRAJ implants. The DLC coatings are chemically inert, impervious to acid and saline media, and are mechanically hard. Carbon-based materials are highly biocompatible. A new alternative to total joints implantation is tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is the replacement of living tissue with tissue that is designed and constructed to meet the needs of the individual patient. Cells were cultured onto the artificial materials, including metals, ceramics, and polymers, and the frictional properties of these materials were investigated to develop a synthetic alternative to orthopedic transplants. Results showed that DLC coated materials had low friction and wear, which are desirable tribological properties for artificial joint material. Cells grew on some of the artificial matrix materials, depending on the

  5. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1991-03-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent tc the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  6. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1992-12-31

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  7. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  8. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  9. ATS materials support

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K.; Holcomb, R.S.; Rawlins, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine System Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-base gas turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. The materials manufacturing subelement was developed with input from gas turbine manufacturers, material suppliers, government laboratories and universities. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single-crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization and technology information exchange. Westinghouse Power Generation and Pratt and Whitney each have material programs to develop dependable TBCs that enable increased turbine inlet temperatures while maintaining airfoil substrate temperatures at levels to meet the ATS life goals. Howmet and PCC Airfoils each have projects to extend the capability of single-crystal complex-cored airfoil technology to larger sizes so that higher turbine inlet temperatures can be attained in land-based turbines in a cost-effective manner. Materials characterization tasks are ongoing on TBCs in support of the industrial projects. In addition, a project on long-term testing of ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites for gas turbines is being conducted in support of programs at Solar Turbines, Allison Engines, and Westinghouse Power Generation.

  10. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  11. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  12. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  13. Panel 3 - material science

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, John L; Yip, Sidney

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, NNSA's national security challenge has evolved, and the role of simulation and computation has grown dramatically. The process of certifying nuclear weapons performance has changed from one based on integrated tests to science-based certification in which underground nuclear tests have been replaced by large-scale simulations, appropriately validated with fundamental experimental data. Further, the breadth of national security challenges has expanded beyond stewardship of a nuclear deterrent to a broad range of global and asymmetric threats. Materials challenges are central to the full suite of these national security challenges. Mission requirements demand that materials perform predictably in extreme environments -- high pressure, high strain rate, and hostile irradiation and chemical conditions. Considerable advances have been made in incorporating fundamental materials physics into integrated codes used for component certification. On the other hand, significant uncertainties still remain, and materials properties, especially at the mesoscale, are key to understanding uncertainties that remain in integrated weapons performance codes and that at present are treated as empirical knobs. Further, additional national security mission challenges could be addressed more robustly with new and higher performing materials.

  14. Material bagging device

    DOEpatents

    Wach, Charles G.; Nelson, Robert E.; Brak, Stephen B.

    1984-01-01

    A bagging device for transferring material from one chamber through an opening in a wall to a second chamber includes a cylindrical housing communicating with the opening and defining a passage between the chambers. A cylindrical cartridge is slidably received within the housing. The cartridge has a substantially rigid cylindrical sleeve to which is affixed a pliable tube. The pliable tube is positioned concentrically about the sleeve and has a pleated portion capable of unfolding from the sleeve and a closed end extending over a terminal end of the sleeve. Sealing means are interposed in sealed relationship between the cartridge and the housing. Material from one chamber is inserted into the cartridge secured in the housing and received in the closed end of the tube which unfolds into the other chamber enclosing the material therein. The tube may then be sealed behind the material and then severed to form a bag-like enclosure defined by the tube's closed terminal end and the new seal. The new seal then forms a terminal end for the unsevered portion of the pliable tube into which additional material may be placed and the bagging process repeated.

  15. Astrophysics with Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, Larry R.; Ciesla, Fred

    2016-09-01

    Extraterrestrial materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust, and spacecraft-returned asteroidal and cometary samples, provide a record of the starting materials and early evolution of the Solar System. We review how laboratory analyses of these materials provide unique information, complementary to astronomical observations, about a wide variety of stellar, interstellar and protoplanetary processes. Presolar stardust grains retain the isotopic compositions of their stellar sources, mainly asymptotic giant branch stars and Type II supernovae. They serve as direct probes of nucleosynthetic and dust formation processes in stars, galactic chemical evolution, and interstellar dust processing. Extinct radioactivities suggest that the Sun's birth environment was decoupled from average galactic nucleosynthesis for some tens to hundreds of Myr but was enriched in short-lived isotopes from massive stellar winds or explosions shortly before or during formation of the Solar System. Radiometric dating of meteorite components tells us about the timing and duration over which solar nebula solids were assembled into the building blocks of the planets. Components of the most primitive meteoritical materials provide further detailed constraints on the formation, processing, and transport of material and associated timescales in the Sun's protoplanetary disk as well as in other forming planetary systems.

  16. A Material Conferring Hemocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Everett, William; Scurr, David J; Rammou, Anna; Darbyshire, Arnold; Hamilton, George; de Mel, Achala

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for biomimetic materials for use in blood-contacting devices. Blood contacting surfaces maintain their patency through physico-chemical properties of a functional endothelium. A poly(carbonate-urea) urethane (PCU) is used as a base material to examine the feasibility of L-Arginine methyl ester (L-AME) functionalized material for use in implants and coatings. The study hypothesizes that L-AME, incorporated into PCU, functions as a bioactive porogen, releasing upon contact with blood to interact with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) present in blood. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were successfully cultured on L-AME functionalized material, indicating that L-AME -increases cell viability. L-AME functionalized material potentially has broad applications in blood-contacting medical devices, as well as various other applications requiring endogenous up-regulation of nitric oxide, such as wound healing. This study presents an in-vitro investigation to demonstrate the novel anti-thrombogenic properties of L-AME, when in solution and when present within a polyurethane-based polymer. PMID:27264087

  17. Sustainable carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; White, Robin J; Brun, Nicolas; Budarin, Vitaliy L; Su, Dang Sheng; del Monte, Francisco; Clark, James H; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2015-01-07

    Carbon-based structures are the most versatile materials used in the modern field of renewable energy (i.e., in both generation and storage) and environmental science (e.g., purification/remediation). However, there is a need and indeed a desire to develop increasingly more sustainable variants of classical carbon materials (e.g., activated carbons, carbon nanotubes, carbon aerogels, etc.), particularly when the whole life cycle is considered (i.e., from precursor "cradle" to "green" manufacturing and the product end-of-life "grave"). In this regard, and perhaps mimicking in some respects the natural carbon cycles/production, utilization of natural, abundant and more renewable precursors, coupled with simpler, lower energy synthetic processes which can contribute in part to the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions or the use of toxic elements, can be considered as crucial parameters in the development of sustainable materials manufacturing. Therefore, the synthesis and application of sustainable carbon materials are receiving increasing levels of interest, particularly as application benefits in the context of future energy/chemical industry are becoming recognized. This review will introduce to the reader the most recent and important progress regarding the production of sustainable carbon materials, whilst also highlighting their application in important environmental and energy related fields.

  18. EDITORIAL: Electroactive polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Kim, Kwang J.; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Madden, John D. W.

    2007-04-01

    Imitating nature's mechanisms offers enormous potential for the improvement of our lives and the tools we use. This field of the study and imitation of, and inspiration from, nature's methods, designs and processes is known as biomimetics. Artificial muscles, i.e. electroactive polymers (EAPs), are one of the emerging technologies enabling biomimetics. Polymers that can be stimulated to change shape or size have been known for many years. The activation mechanisms of such polymers include electrical, chemical, pneumatic, optical and magnetic. Electrical excitation is one of the most attractive stimulators able to produce elastic deformation in polymers. The convenience and practicality of electrical stimulation and the continual improvement in capabilities make EAP materials some of the most attractive among activatable polymers (Bar-Cohen Y (ed) 2004 Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Actuators as Artificial Muscles—Reality, Potential and Challenges 2nd edn, vol PM136 (Bellingham, WA: SPIE Press) pp 1-765). As polymers, EAP materials offer many appealing characteristics that include low weight, fracture tolerance and pliability. Furthermore, they can be configured into almost any conceivable shape and their properties can be tailored to suit a broad range of requirements. These capabilities and the significant change of shape or size under electrical stimulation while being able to endure many cycles of actuation are inspiring many potential possibilities for EAP materials among engineers and scientists in many different disciplines. Practitioners in biomimetics are particularly excited about these materials since they can be used to mimic the movements of animals and insects. Potentially, mechanisms actuated by EAPs will enable engineers to create devices previously imaginable only in science fiction. For many years EAP materials received relatively little attention due to their poor actuation capability and the small number of available materials. In the last fifteen

  19. EDITORIAL: Computational materials science Computational materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Gerhard; Kresse, Georg

    2011-10-01

    Special issue in honour of Jürgen Hafner On 30 September 2010, Jürgen Hafner, one of the most prominent and influential members within the solid state community, retired. His remarkably broad scientific oeuvre has made him one of the founding fathers of modern computational materials science: more than 600 scientific publications, numerous contributions to books, and a highly cited monograph, which has become a standard reference in the theory of metals, witness not only the remarkable productivity of Jürgen Hafner but also his impact in theoretical solid state physics. In an effort to duly acknowledge Jürgen Hafner's lasting impact in this field, a Festsymposium was held on 27-29 September 2010 at the Universität Wien. The organizers of this symposium (and authors of this editorial) are proud to say that a large number of highly renowned scientists in theoretical condensed matter theory—co-workers, friends and students—accepted the invitation to this celebration of Hafner's jubilee. Some of these speakers also followed our invitation to submit their contribution to this Festschrift, published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, a journal which Jürgen Hafner served in 2000-2003 and 2003-2006 as a member of the Advisory Editorial Board and member of the Executive Board, respectively. In the subsequent article, Volker Heine, friend and co-worker of Jürgen Hafner over many decades, gives an account of Hafner's impact in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics. Computational materials science contents Theoretical study of structural, mechanical and spectroscopic properties of boehmite (γ-AlOOH) D Tunega, H Pašalić, M H Gerzabek and H Lischka Ethylene epoxidation catalyzed by chlorine-promoted silver oxide M O Ozbek, I Onal and R A Van Santen First-principles study of Cu2ZnSnS4 and the related band offsets for photovoltaic applicationsA Nagoya, R Asahi and G Kresse Renormalization group study of random quantum magnetsIstván A Kovács and

  20. Materials research. [research concerning materials for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerned with materials for aerospace applications. Areas reported include: electrical properties of glasses, oxides and metals; structural and high temperature properties of crystalline and amorphous materials; and physical properties, and microstructure of materials.

  1. 76 FR 27092 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of opening of additional materials. SUMMARY: This... Presidential Library and Museum, a division of the National Archives and Records Administration. Notice...

  2. 75 FR 68384 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of Opening of Additional Materials. SUMMARY: This... Presidential Library and Museum, a division of the National Archives and Records Administration. Notice...

  3. 77 FR 58179 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration ACTION: Notice of opening of additional materials SUMMARY: This notice... Presidential Library and Museum, a division of the National Archives and Records Administration. Notice...

  4. 78 FR 42805 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ] ACTION: Notice of Opening of Additional Nixon Materials. SUMMARY... Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, a division of the National Archives and Records...

  5. 77 FR 31400 - Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Nixon Presidential Historical Materials: Opening of Materials AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice of Opening of Additional Materials. SUMMARY: This... Presidential Library and Museum, a division of the National Archives and Records Administration. Notice...

  6. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  7. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  8. Material isolation enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Martell, C.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Gallimore, B.F.; Comer, B.E.; Stone, W.A.; Carlson, D.O.

    1993-04-27

    An enclosure is described, similar to a glove box, for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  9. Material isolation enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Martell, Calvin J.; Dahlby, Joel W.; Gallimore, Bradford F.; Comer, Bob E.; Stone, Water A.; Carlson, David O.

    1993-01-01

    An enclosure similar to a glovebox for isolating materials from the atmosphere, yet allowing a technician to manipulate the materials and also apparatus which is located inside the enclosure. A portion of a wall of the enclosure is comprised of at least one flexible curtain. An opening defined by a frame is provided for the technician to insert his hands and forearms into the enclosure. The frame is movable in one plane, so that the technician has access to substantially all of the working interior of the enclosure. As the frame is moved by the technician, while he accomplishes work inside the enclosure, the curtain moves such that the only opening through the enclosure wall is the frame. In a preferred embodiment, where a negative pressure is maintained inside the enclosure, the frame is comprised of airfoils so that turbulence is reduced, thereby enhancing material retention within the box.

  10. Fatigue of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of cellular materials is analyzed using dimensional arguments. When the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip fails after some cycles of loading, the macrocrack advances one cell diameter, giving the macrocrack growth rate of cellular materials. Paris law for microcrack propagation, Basquin law for high cycle fatigue and Coffin-Manson law for low cycle fatigue are employed in calculating the number of cycles to failure of the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip. It is found that fatigue of cellular materials depends on cyclic stress intensity range, cell size, relative density and the fatigue parameters of the solid from which they are made. Theoretical modelling of fatigue of foams is compared to data in polymer foams; agreement is good.

  11. Ceramic laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin

    2008-12-01

    The word 'ceramics' is derived from the Greek keramos, meaning pottery and porcelain. The opaque and translucent cement and clay often used in tableware are not appropriate for optical applications because of the high content of optical scattering sources, that is, defects. Recently, scientists have shown that by eliminating the defects, a new, refined ceramic material - polycrystalline ceramic - can be produced. This advanced ceramic material offers practical laser generation and is anticipated to be a highly attractive alternative to conventional glass and single-crystal laser technologies in the future. Here we review the history of the development of ceramic lasers, the principle of laser generation based on this material, some typical results achieved with ceramic lasers so far, and discuss the potential future outlook for the field.

  12. Porous material neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Diawara, Yacouba [Oak Ridge, TN; Kocsis, Menyhert [Venon, FR

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  13. Materials in extreme environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Hemley, R. J.; Crabtree, G. W.; Buchanan, M. V.; Materials Science Division; Geophysical Lab.; ORNL

    2009-11-01

    Nature is rich with examples of phenomena and environments we might consider extreme, at least from our familiar experience on Earth's surface: large fluxes of radiation and particles from the Sun, explosive asteroid collisions in space, volcanic eruptions that originate deep underground, extraordinary pressures and temperatures in the interiors of planets and stars, and electromagnetic discharges that occur, say, in sunspots and pulsars. We often intentionally create similar extreme environments - for example, in high-powered lasers, high-temperature turbines, internal-combustion engines, and industrial chemical plants. The response of materials to the broad range of such environments signals the materials underlying structure and dynamics, provides insight into new phenomena, exposes failure modes that limit technological possibility, and presents novel routes for making new materials.

  14. Edible packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Krochta, John M

    2010-01-01

    Research groups and the food and pharmaceutical industries recognize edible packaging as a useful alternative or addition to conventional packaging to reduce waste and to create novel applications for improving product stability, quality, safety, variety, and convenience for consumers. Recent studies have explored the ability of biopolymer-based food packaging materials to carry and control-release active compounds. As diverse edible packaging materials derived from various by-products or waste from food industry are being developed, the dry thermoplastic process is advancing rapidly as a feasible commercial edible packaging manufacturing process. The employment of nanocomposite concepts to edible packaging materials promises to improve barrier and mechanical properties and facilitate effective incorporation of bioactive ingredients and other designed functions. In addition to the need for a more fundamental understanding to enable design to desired specifications, edible packaging has to overcome challenges such as regulatory requirements, consumer acceptance, and scaling-up research concepts to commercial applications.

  15. Polymers from renewable materials.

    PubMed

    Rus, Anika Zafiah M

    2010-01-01

    With the world facing depletion of its oil reserves, attention is being focused on how the plastics industry will address shortages and price increases in its crucial raw materials. One renewable resource is that of vegetable oils and fats and about a dozen crop plants make up the main vegetable oil-seed market. The main constituents of these oils are saturated and unsaturated fatty acids that are unique to the plant in which they have been developed. Moreover, technological processes can produce more well-defined and pure oils, and the fatty acid contents in the vegetable oils can be altered with modern crop development techniques. This article describes recent advances in utilising such vegetable oils in sourcing new polymeric materials. It also gives the context for the development of polymers based on renewable materials in general.

  16. [Materials for mouth protectors].

    PubMed

    Kloeg, E F; Collys, K

    2003-01-01

    Taking into account the number of teeth which are yearly irreversible traumatised during sport activities, the general use of mouthguards would contribute positively to the prevention of dental injuries. Custom-made mouthguards are more comfortable to wear and offer better retention and protection than stock and mouth-formed mouthguards. Different kinds of materials are available on the market for the construction of mouthguards. A polyethylene-polyvinylacetate copolymer (EVA) is the most suitable material. EVA allows the inclusion of hard or soft layers within the mouthguard. The thickness of a mouthguard is important for the reduction of applied forces to teeth: energy absorption capacity increases with material thickness. Increased thickness however, is associated with a reduction of comfort. Therefore, it is important that dentists take the patients' wishes and demands on both comfort and protection into consideration. A description of the clinical and technical method for the construction of a custom made mouthguard is given.

  17. Hazardous materials dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Parallel growth of the chemical industry of emergency response capabilities in the public and private sectors has created a new need for improved communications. A new vocabulary of important terms is emerging in each of the industries that transport, store and handle hazardous materials. This dictionary, representing a compilation of words and phrases from many relevant sources, will help document and standardize the nomenclature of hazardous materials. The authors have screened the technical discourse of the chemical, transportation, petroleum and medical fields, both governmental and private, to determine the most current expressions and their uses. The lexicographic goal has been to identify key terms, ambiguous and multiple meaning words, acronyms, symbols and even slang referring to hazardous materials reactions, storing and handling procedures.

  18. A Materials Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Avery, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the Materials Exposure Facility (MEF) is to provide a test bed in space for conducting long-term (greater than one year) materials experiments which require exposure to the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. The proposed MEF is planned to be an integral part of the agency's Space Environments and Effects Research Program. The facility will provide experiment trays similar to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Each tray location is planned to have a power and data interface and robotic installation and removal provisions. Space environmental monitoring for each side of the MEF will also be provided. Since routine access to MEF for specimen retrieval is extremely important to the materials research, Space Station Freedom has been chosen as the preferred MEF carrier.

  19. Synthetic carbon precursor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    Synthetic carbon precursor systems offer advantages over natural petroleum and coal-tar pitch precursors in that they can reproducibly provide a material with a known and uniform composition. They also permit controlled modifications of the derived carbon's properties through variations in the precursor's properties and processing conditions. Extensive research efforts at Oak Ridge have been directed toward the production and characterization of synthetic carbon precursors and the correlations that exist between carbon precursor properties and the properties of the ultimate carbon. This report describes how synthetic carbon precursors can be used to tailor and develop reproducible carbon structures for advanced materials applications. The potential and capability for performing carbon material development at Oak Ridge is also described.

  20. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Paul V.; Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J.; Pierson, Bonnie E.; Gittard, Shaun D.; Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Chae, Weon-Sik; Gough, Dara V.; Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  1. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; ...

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biologicalmore » multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.« less

  2. Strong, Lightweight, Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, James C.; Fabrizio, Eve F.; Ilhan, Ulvi

    2007-01-01

    A new class of strong, lightweight, porous materials has been invented as an outgrowth of an effort to develop reinforced silica aerogels. The new material, called X-Aerogel is less hygroscopic, but no less porous and of similar density to the corresponding unmodified aerogels. However, the property that sets X-Aerogels apart is their mechanical strength, which can be as much as two and a half orders of magnitude stronger that the unmodified aerogels. X-Aerogels are envisioned to be useful for making extremely lightweight, thermally insulating, structural components, but they may also have applications as electrical insulators, components of laminates, catalyst supports, templates for electrode materials, fuel-cell components, and filter membranes.

  3. Apparatus for dispensing material

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus capable of dispensing drops of material with volumes on the order of zeptoliters is described. In some embodiments of the inventive pipette the size of the droplets so dispensed is determined by the size of a hole, or channel, through a carbon shell encapsulating a reservoir that contains material to be dispensed. The channel may be formed by irradiation with an electron beam or other high-energy beam capable of focusing to a spot size less than about 5 nanometers. In some embodiments, the dispensed droplet remains attached to the pipette by a small thread of material, an atomic scale meniscus, forming a virtually free-standing droplet. In some embodiments the droplet may wet the pipette tip and take on attributes of supported drops. Methods for fabricating and using the pipette are also described.

  4. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  5. Geothermal materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-02-01

    Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level 1 and 2 Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results transferred to industry. In FY 1990, the R D efforts were focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}- resistant lightweight cements, and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant protective liner systems have reached the final development stages, and cost-shared field tests are planned for the FY 1991--1992 time frame. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools are continuing under Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) sponsorship.

  6. Modified Composite Materials Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    The reduction or elimination of the hazard which results from accidental release of graphite fibers from composite materials was studied at a workshop. At the workshop, groups were organized to consider six topics: epoxy modifications, epoxy replacement, fiber modifications, fiber coatings and new fibers, hybrids, and fiber release testing. Because of the time required to develop a new material and acquire a design data base, most of the workers concluded that a modified composite material would require about four to five years of development and testing before it could be applied to aircraft structures. The hybrid working group considered that some hybrid composites which reduce the risk of accidental fiber release might be put into service over the near term. The fiber release testing working group recommended a coordinated effort to define a suitable laboratory test.

  7. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; Bai, Hao; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biological multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.

  8. Stirling material technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Stephens, J. R.; Scheuermann, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The Stirling engine is an external combustion engine that offers the advantage of high fuel economy, low emissions, low noise, and low vibrations compared to current internal combustion automotive engines. The most critical component from a materials viewpoint is the heater head consisting of the cylinders, heating tubes, and regenerator housing. Materials requirements for the heater head include compatibility with hydrogen, resistance to hydrogen permeation, high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance, and high temperature creep-rupture and fatigue properties. A materials research and technology program identified the wrought alloys CG-27 and 12RN72 and the cast alloys XF-818, NASAUT 4G-A1, and NASACC-1 as candidate replacements for the cobalt containing alloys used in current prototype engines. It is concluded that manufacture of the engine is feasible from low cost iron-base alloys rather than the cobalt alloys used in prototype engines. Results of research that lead to this conclusion are presented.

  9. Material Testing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts led to two commercial instruments and a new subsidiary for Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI). The FAST system, originally developed for testing the effect of space environment on materials, is now sold commercially for use in aging certification of materials intended for orbital operation. The Optical Temperature Monitor was designed for precise measurement of high temperatures on certain materials to be manufactured in space. The original research was extended to the development of a commercial instrument that measures and controls fuel gas temperatures in industrial boilers. PSI created PSI Environmental Instruments to market the system. The company also offers an Aerospace Measurement Service that has evolved from other SBIR contracts.

  10. Carbonaceous materials water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Papalos, J.G.; Sinka, J.V.

    1985-04-30

    Particulate carbonaceous materials water mixtures are prepared by adding a condensate which is a condensation product of an aldehyde having from about 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, a benzene derivative such as benzene sulfonic acid, an alkyl benzene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 20 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof, and optionally, and a naphthalene derivative such as naphthalene sulfonic acid, an alkyl naphthalene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 12 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof. The condensate is added in an amount sufficient to reduce viscosity of the water mixture of carbonaceous materials, to stabilize carbonaceous materials in the water network and to improve pumpability. An acid form of the condensate or a salt may be added.

  11. Fire Resistant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Fire hazard is greater in atmospheres containing a high percentage of oxygen under pressure. NASA intensified its fire safety research after a 1967 Apollo fire. A chemically treated fabric called Durette developed by Monsanto Company, which will not burn or produce noxious fumes, was selected as a material for Apollo astronaut garments. Monsanto sold production rights for this material to Fire Safe Products (FSP). Durette is now used for a wide range of applications such as: sheets, attendants' uniforms in hyperbaric chambers; crew's clothing, furniture and interior walls of diving chambers operated by the U.S. Navy and other oceanographic companies and research organizations. Pyrotect Safety Equipment, Minneapolis, MN produces Durette suits for auto racers, refuelers and crew chiefs from material supplied by FSP. FSP also manufactures Durette bags for filtering gases and dust from boilers, electric generators and similar systems. Durette bags are an alternative to other felted fiber capable of operating at high temperature that cost twice as much.

  12. Aerogel/polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Clayton, LaNetra M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention provides new composite materials containing aerogels blended with thermoplastic polymer materials at a weight ratio of aerogel to thermoplastic polymer of less than 20:100. The composite materials have improved thermal insulation ability. The composite materials also have better flexibility and less brittleness at low temperatures than the parent thermoplastic polymer materials.

  13. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  14. Space processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, N.

    1996-12-31

    Materials processing in space derives unique benefits from reduced levels of gravity and hydrostatic pressure. The attenuation of buoyancy-driven convection and sedimentation have led to the realization of close-to-diffusion-limited conditions for the growth of semiconductors, metals/alloys, proteins, etc., in novel crystal growth configurations. One of the aims of the conference was to bring together scientists, experiment designers/engineers, and educators in a common forum to highlight different aspects of low-gravity research. Two spotlight topics were picked for the conference: materials for detectors and electronics, and thin film technology--theory and applications. In addition, the conference focused on space hardware, low-gravity experiment design, and educational outreach programs. Presentations in materials processing included low-gravity and terrestrial experiments on the growth of mercury cadmium telluride, crystal characterization techniques, and modeling efforts. The growth of heavy metal fluoride glasses and metal alloys in low gravity was also featured in presentations. The session on thin film technology was mainly comprised of papers reporting on investigations in nonlinear optics. The growth, response, and characterization of organic and polymeric thin film materials were discussed. Microgravity experiments ranging from the diverse areas of diffusion studies and thermo-solutal convection to optical pyrometry and the behavior of granular materials in low gravity, were presented in a separate session devoted to space experiment design and implementation. Educational outreach programs for student involvement in ground-based and low-gravity research for materials processing and device fabrication were also featured in a separate conference session. Existing hardware for experiments in low gravity and future hardware concepts for the International Space Station and beyond were presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers.

  15. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  16. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1979-01-01

    A multifaceted program is described in which aeronautical, mechanical, and materials engineers interact to develop composite aircraft structures. Topics covered include: (1) the design of an advanced composite elevator and a proposed spar and rib assembly; (2) optimizing fiber orientation in the vicinity of heavily loaded joints; (3) failure mechanisms and delamination; (4) the construction of an ultralight sailplane; (5) computer-aided design; finite element analysis programs, preprocessor development, and array preprocessor for SPAR; (6) advanced analysis methods for composite structures; (7) ultrasonic nondestructive testing; (8) physical properties of epoxy resins and composites; (9) fatigue in composite materials, and (10) transverse thermal expansion of carbon/epoxy composites.

  17. Superatom Thermoelectric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-30

    147 C, NaCl Structure Becomes Fast Ion Conductor (the silver sub-lattice melts) Ag + 1.15 A (115 pm) I- 2.20 A (220 pm) Enhanced Thermoelectric...nanostructured thermoelectric materials can increase ZT>1, the materials (Bi, Te, Pb, Sb and Ag ) and processes used are not often easy to scale to practically...500 1000 1500 Raman shift / cm-1 0 5000 10000 15000 C ou nt s Raman Modes in Neutral C60 Hg(7) Ag (2) Ag (1) Hg(2) Raman Spectroscopy of ZnxC60

  18. Hazardous-Materials Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Henry W.; Edmonds, Gary O.

    1995-01-01

    Remotely controlled mobile robot used to locate, characterize, identify, and eventually mitigate incidents involving hazardous-materials spills/releases. Possesses number of innovative features, allowing it to perform mission-critical functions such as opening and unlocking doors and sensing for hazardous materials. Provides safe means for locating and identifying spills and eliminates risks of injury associated with use of manned entry teams. Current version of vehicle, called HAZBOT III, also features unique mechanical and electrical design enabling vehicle to operate safely within combustible atmosphere.

  19. European Composite Honeycomb Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschepe, Christoph; Sauerbrey, Martin; Klebor, Maximillian; Henriksen, Torben

    2014-06-01

    A European CFRP honeycomb material for high demanding structure applications like antenna reflectors and optical benches was developed in the frame of an ESA GSTP project.The composite honeycomb was designed according to requirements defined by the European space industry. A developed manufacturing technique based on prepreg moulding enables the production of homogeneous CFRP honeycomb blocks. All characteristic material properties, including compression, tension and shear strength and CTE, were determined in a comprehensive verification test campaign. Competitiveness to comparable products was further verified by a representative breadboard.

  20. Losses in Ferroelectric Materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials are the best dielectric and piezoelectric materials known today. Since the discovery of barium titanate in the 1940s, lead zirconate titanate ceramics in the 1950s and relaxor-PT single crystals (such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate and lead zinc niobate-lead titanate) in the 1980s and 1990s, perovskite ferroelectric materials have been the dominating piezoelectric materials for electromechanical devices, and are widely used in sensors, actuators and ultrasonic transducers. Energy losses (or energy dissipation) in ferroelectrics are one of the most critical issues for high power devices, such as therapeutic ultrasonic transducers, large displacement actuators, SONAR projectors, and high frequency medical imaging transducers. The losses of ferroelectric materials have three distinct types, i.e., elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric losses. People have been investigating the mechanisms of these losses and are trying hard to control and minimize them so as to reduce performance degradation in electromechanical devices. There are impressive progresses made in the past several decades on this topic, but some confusions still exist. Therefore, a systematic review to define related concepts and clear up confusions is urgently in need. With this objective in mind, we provide here a comprehensive review on the energy losses in ferroelectrics, including related mechanisms, characterization techniques and collections of published data on many ferroelectric materials to provide a useful resource for interested scientists and engineers to design electromechanical devices and to gain a global perspective on the complex physical phenomena involved. More importantly, based on the analysis of available information, we proposed a general theoretical model to describe the inherent relationships among elastic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical losses. For multi-domain ferroelectric single crystals and ceramics, intrinsic and extrinsic energy

  1. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  2. Gravitation in material media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2011-03-01

    When two gravitating bodies reside in a material medium, Newton's law of universal gravitation must be modified to account for the presence of the medium. A modified expression of Newton's law is known in the literature, but lacks a clear connection with existing gravitational theory. Newton's law in the presence of a homogeneous material medium is herein derived on the basis of classical, Newtonian gravitational theory and by a general relativistic use of Archimedes' principle. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate students and those undergraduate students having prior experience with vector analysis and potential theory.

  3. Losses in Ferroelectric Materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Wenhua; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are the best dielectric and piezoelectric materials known today. Since the discovery of barium titanate in the 1940s, lead zirconate titanate ceramics in the 1950s and relaxor-PT single crystals (such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate and lead zinc niobate-lead titanate) in the 1980s and 1990s, perovskite ferroelectric materials have been the dominating piezoelectric materials for electromechanical devices, and are widely used in sensors, actuators and ultrasonic transducers. Energy losses (or energy dissipation) in ferroelectrics are one of the most critical issues for high power devices, such as therapeutic ultrasonic transducers, large displacement actuators, SONAR projectors, and high frequency medical imaging transducers. The losses of ferroelectric materials have three distinct types, i.e., elastic, piezoelectric and dielectric losses. People have been investigating the mechanisms of these losses and are trying hard to control and minimize them so as to reduce performance degradation in electromechanical devices. There are impressive progresses made in the past several decades on this topic, but some confusions still exist. Therefore, a systematic review to define related concepts and clear up confusions is urgently in need. With this objective in mind, we provide here a comprehensive review on the energy losses in ferroelectrics, including related mechanisms, characterization techniques and collections of published data on many ferroelectric materials to provide a useful resource for interested scientists and engineers to design electromechanical devices and to gain a global perspective on the complex physical phenomena involved. More importantly, based on the analysis of available information, we proposed a general theoretical model to describe the inherent relationships among elastic, dielectric, piezoelectric and mechanical losses. For multi-domain ferroelectric single crystals and ceramics, intrinsic and extrinsic energy

  4. Skylab parasol material evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experimental work to evaluate the degradation rate of a parasol that was used as a means of alleviating thermal problems encountered soon after the launch of the Skylab 1 space vehicle are presented. Material selection criteria are discussed; the material chosen is described, and results of tests performed after environmental exposure at five facilities are given. The facilities used for exposure to ultraviolet radiation/thermal-vacuum environments and the equipment used for testing physical properties before and after exposure are described. Comparisons of ground test and flight test data are included.

  5. Terahertz Sensing of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, G.; Ghosh, S.; Kim, S.; Lv, P.-C.; Buma, T.; Weng, B.; Barner, K.; Kolodzey, J.

    2007-06-01

    Biomolecules such as DNA and proteins exhibit a wealth of modes in the Terahertz (THz) range from the rotational, vibrational and stretching modes of biomolecules. Many materials such as drywall that are opaque to human eyes are transparent to THz. Therefore, it can be used as a powerful tool for biomolecular sensing, biomedical analysis and through-the-wall imaging. Experiments were carried out to study the absorption of various materials including DNA and see-through imaging of drywall using FTIR spectrometer and Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) system.

  6. Optical limiting materials

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.; Mattes, Benjamin R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Heeger, Alan J.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Klimov, Victor I.; Cha, Myoungsik; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  7. Thermal energy storage material

    DOEpatents

    Leifer, Leslie

    1976-01-01

    A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

  8. Electron Beam Materials Irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation processing is a well established method for enhancing the properties of materials and commercial products by treating them with ionizing energy in the form of high-energy electrons, X-rays, and gamma rays. Beneficial effects include polymerizing, cross-linking, grafting and degrading plastics, sterilizing single-use medical devices, disinfecting and disinfesting fresh foods, purifying drinking water, treating wastewater and other toxic waste materials that harm the environment, and many other applications that are still being evaluated. Industrial electron accelerators of several types have been developed and are being used for these applications. More than 1800 electron accelerators are presently installed in facilities worldwide for these purposes.

  9. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  10. Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreja, Vasile V. N.

    2014-06-01

    The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes

  11. Amorphous and Ultradisperse Crystalline Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book sums up experimental and theoretical findings on amorphous and ultradisperse crystalline materials , massive and film types. Present-day... crystalline materials of metallic systems are presented. Emphasis is placed on inorganic film materials.

  12. Beneficial Use of Dredged Material

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An important goal of managing dredged material is to ensure that the material is used or disposed of in an environmentally sound manner.Most of this dredged material could be used in a beneficial manner instead.

  13. Composite materials for battery applications

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Yang, Junbing; Abouimrane, Ali; Ren, Jianguo

    2017-03-14

    A process for producing nanocomposite materials for use in batteries includes electroactive materials are incorporated within a nanosheet host material. The process may include treatment at high temperatures and doping to obtain desirable properties.

  14. MATERIALS FOR INTERMEDIATE TELUGU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KELLEY, GERALD B.

    ONE OF THE FOUR DRAVIDIAN LANGUAGES RECOGNIZED BY THE INDIAN CONSTITUTION OF 1950 AS OFFICIAL LANGUAGES OF THE COUNTRY, TELUGU IS SPOKEN BY 42 MILLION PEOPLE IN ANDHRA PRADESH. THESE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ARE DESIGNED FOR THE INTERMEDIATE STUDENT OF TELUGU AND ARE DIVIDED INTO NEWSPAPER READINGS AND DIALOGUES OF EVERYDAY CONVERSATION. SUBJECTS…

  15. Adaptability Through Modular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Several short articles describe programs utilizing laser/electro-optics technology curriculum materials developed by Technical Education Research Centers (TERC): at undergraduate and graduate levels in universities; in a city college; in continuing education; and in industry. Modules, independent units based on booklets or films, include…

  16. Instructional Materials Selection Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northampton County Area Community Coll., Bethlehem, PA.

    Through a systematic acquisition policy, the library (1) supports the objectives of the college, the course content of the curricula, and the faculty's teaching methods; (2) provides intellectual and cultural fare for faculty, students, and community; (3) instructs and encourages students in library use. It tries to supply material on all subjects…

  17. Encapsulated microenergetic material

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jeffery James; Aines, Roger D.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vandersall, Kevin S.

    2017-02-07

    Providing high energy materials that can be placed in previously created fractures and activating them in place to extend or change an existing fracture system. Also detecting the location of fractures or permeable pathways and a means to assess the extent and efficiency of proppant emplacement.

  18. Weightless Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Gravity affects everything we do. Only in very recent years have we been able to carry out experiments in orbit around the Earth and see for the first time how things behave in its absence. This has allowed us to understand fundamental processes better and to design new materials using this knowledge. (Contains 6 figures.)

  19. Microforce materials tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yusaku

    2005-06-01

    A material tester for evaluating the mechanical response of general objects against micro-Newton level impact forces has been proposed. In the tester, an inertial mass is made to collide with the material under test. The impact force acting on the material is measured as the inertial force of the mass. A pneumatic linear bearing is used to realize linear motion with small friction acting on the mass that is the moving part of the bearing. The velocity of the mass is measured highly accurately by means of an optical interferometer. The acceleration, the inertial force, and the position of the mass is numerically calculated from the velocity after the collision measurement. The other force, which is mainly consisted of the friction acting inside the bearing, is determined using the same instrumentations. Using the estimated friction inside the bearing, the measured force is corrected. The force acting on the mass from the material under test of approximately 0.1 mN is measured with the standard uncertainty of approximately 1.4μN.

  20. Pentachlorophenol-Treated Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-30

    mg/L. Because the EPA did not indicate when or to what extent they may lower the limit, closely monitor changes in the hazardous waste regulations . 2... hazardous waste regulations for the management of penta-treated materials. In those states, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit

  1. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Joseph B.

    1984-01-01

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed. The azide is combusted with a transition metal of the IIIB, IVB group, or a rare earth metal, and ignited to produce the refractory material.

  2. Mongolian. Materials Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Language/Area Reference Center.

    The materials status report for Mongolian, the official standard language of the Mongolian People's Republic, is one of a series intended to provide the nonspecialist with a picture of the availability and quality of texts for teaching various languages to English speakers. The report consists of: (1) a brief narrative description of Mongolain,…

  3. Materials Lab Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The photo shows one of the waveguide setups in the Electromaganetic Properties Measurements Lab (EPML). This setup is for measuring permittivity and permeability of the materials at the L-band frequencies (1.12-1.7 ghz). The EMPL is in the Elecromagnetics Research Branch at NASA Langley.

  4. Shakespeare Materials. Potpourri 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, N. Reed

    This publication provides a source of practical ideas for teaching Shakespeare, taken from materials in the teaching notebooks of N. Reed Mathis, a Shakespeare specialist. It contains: (1) "As You Like It"--a study guide and composition topics; (2) "Romeo and Juliet"--an objective-type final exam; (3) "Sonnets"--a way…

  5. Complex Materials and Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    Disruptive Basic Research Areas” – Metamaterials and Plasmonics – Quantum Information Science – Cognitive Neuroscience – Nanoscience and...Sayir, Fuller) Bio-Sensing of Magnetic Fields (Larkin, Bradshaw, Curcic, DeLong 2D Materials & Devices Beyond Graphene (Hwang, Pomrenke, Harrison

  6. SHS of refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismailov, M. B.; Gabayev, Zh. A.

    1993-09-01

    In the SHS production of refractory materials (concretes, coating mixtures) the basic problem is overcoming the scale factor. This is done by imparting a granular structure to the mass being synthesized. Requirements for the granular and chemical composition of the filler are obtained.

  7. Bibliography of AV Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presented is the second part of a bibliographic listing of commercially available audiovisual materials for chemistry. Information includes producer (with addresses), catalog number, format (slides, cassettes, filmstrips, films), and price for items in these categories: matter and energy, nuclear chemistry, periodic table, solids and crystals,…

  8. Uigur. Materials Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Language/Area Reference Center.

    The materials status report for Uigur, a Turkic language spoken in the Sinkiang-Uigur Autonomous Region in northwest China and in the Soviet Socialist Republics of Kazakh and Uzbek, is one of a series intended to provide the nonspecialist with a picture of the availability and quality of texts for teaching various languages to English speakers.…

  9. Tritium Storage Material

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.; Luo, Weifang; Smugeresky, John E.; Robinson, David B.; Fares, Stephen James; Ong, Markus D.; Arslan, Ilke; Tran, Kim L.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Sartor, George B.; Clift, W. Miles

    2008-09-01

    Nano-structured palladium is examined as a tritium storage material with the potential to release beta-decay-generated helium at the generation rate, thereby mitigating the aging effects produced by enlarging He bubbles. Helium retention in proposed structures is modeled by adapting the Sandia Bubble Evolution model to nano-dimensional material. The model shows that even with ligament dimensions of 6-12 nm, elevated temperatures will be required for low He retention. Two nanomaterial synthesis pathways were explored: de-alloying and surfactant templating. For de-alloying, PdAg alloys with piranha etchants appeared likely to generate the desired morphology with some additional development effort. Nano-structured 50 nm Pd particles with 2-3 nm pores were successfully produced by surfactant templating using PdCl salts and an oligo(ethylene oxide) hexadecyl ether surfactant. Tests were performed on this material to investigate processes for removing residual pore fluids and to examine the thermal stability of pores. A tritium manifold was fabricated to measure the early He release behavior of this and Pd black material and is installed in the Tritium Science Station glove box at LLNL. Pressure-composition isotherms and particle sizes of a commercial Pd black were measured.

  10. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    The successful use of outdoor mounting racks as an accelerated aging technique (these devices are called optal reactors); a beginning list of candidate pottant materials for thin-film encapsulation, which process at temperatures well below 100 C; and description of a preliminary flame retardant formulation for ethylene vinyl acetate which could function to increase module flammability ratings are presented.

  11. PLATO Esperanto Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Judith

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of types of Esperanto materials available on PLATO--a general overview section, a picture introduction, lessons that accompany a textbook, vocabulary drills, crossword puzzles, dictation drills, reading practice, and a concentration game. The general overview lesson gives a comprehensive summary of the history and…

  12. The DNA of Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq N.; Bushey, Ryan K.

    2009-01-01

    Introductory physics labs provide many challenging yet applicable experiments and concepts to the many fields of engineering. One such lab has been developed at West Virginia University that explores resistivities of several different materials and ties this concept into electrical engineering practices and standards. Many students do not realize…

  13. Rhenium material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaglow, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Tensile data were obtained from four different types of rhenium at ambient and elevated temperatures. The four types of rhenium included chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and three powder metallurgy (PM) types, i.e., rolled sheet and pressed and sintered bars, with and without hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. Results revealed a wide range of values with ultimate strengths at ambient temperatures varying from 663 MPa for CVD rhenium to 943 MPa for rolled sheet. A similar spread was also obtained for material tested at 1088 K and 1644 K. The wide variance observed with the different materials indicated that the rhenium manufacturing process, material composition and prior handling strongly dictated its properties. In addition to tensile properties, CVD, pressed and sintered material and HIP rhenium successfully completed 100 cycles of low cycle fatigue. Creep data were also obtained showing that CVD and pressed and sintered rhenium could sustain five hours of testing under a tension of 27.5 MPa at 1922 K.

  14. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Research in the basic composition, characteristics, and processng science of composite materials and their constituents is balanced against the mechanics, conceptual design, fabrication, and testing of generic structural elements typical of aerospace vehicles so as to encourage the discovery of unusual solutions to problems. Detailed descriptions of the progress achieved in the various component parts of his program are presented.

  15. [Appraisal of Audiovisual Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Steve

    This document consists of four separate handouts all related to the appraisal of audiovisual (AV) materials: "How to Work with an Appraiser of AV Media: A Convenient Check List for Clients and Their Advisors," helps a client prepare for an appraisal, explaining what is necessary before the appraisal, the appraisal process and its costs,…

  16. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed. The azide is combusted with a transition metal of the IIIB, IVB group, or a rare earth metal, and ignited to produce the refractory material.

  17. Processing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested program of material processing experiments in space described in 81 page report. For each experiment, report discusses influence of such gravitational effects as convection, buoyancy, sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressure. Report contains estimates of power and mission duration required for each experiment. Lists necessary equipment and appropriate spacecraft.

  18. Materials Sciences Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    mechanical properties , electron microscopy), b) thermodynamic properties and solubility of oxygen in vanadium and in 8-V 0 (emf of solid 9 galvanic...the electromotive force of solid electrolyte cells in controlled atmospheres is used to • 146 "" determine thermodynamic properties . Effects of...17 A. Anderson - Properties of Materials at Very Low Temperatures (NSF) ............................ 20 J. Mochel

  19. Physics of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archenhold, W. F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new high school physics option in Great Britain which uses the model of a technological approach to the study of materials. Discusses the components of the program, including the development of a student book for independent learning and six case studies. Provides a case study about turbine blades. (TW)

  20. Wear of materials - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on materials testing to determine wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included the wear of metals in a magnetic field, ceramics in advanced heat engine applications, wear tests of silicon carbides, microstructure, hardfacing alloys, sliding friction, coated systems, abrasion, erosion, test methods, tribology, stacking fault energy, and adhesion.

  1. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-08-01

    Roadmap identifying the efforts of the Materials Technical Team (MTT) to focus primarily on reducing the mass of structural systems such as the body and chassis in light-duty vehicles (including passenger cars and light trucks) which enables improved vehicle efficiency regardless of the vehicle size or propulsion system employed.

  2. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  3. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  4. Materials Selection Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulsa City-County Library System, OK.

    The emphasis of the revised Tulsa (Oklahoma) City-County Library System selection policy is on meeting needs of the community rather than balancing the collection in any one library. The policy includes the "Library Bill of Rights" and covers objectives, responsibilities, maintenance of the collection, controversial materials, gifts,…

  5. Functionalized Silk Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-10

    A genetic combination of spider dragline silk sequence (Nephila clavipes) and the silaffin derived R5 peptide of the diatom (Cylindrotheca... sequences identified by phage display into silk, new materials which incorporate mineral binding functional of the peptide while retaining the useful...strong morphological and spatial control are attractive in electronics, biosensors, microfluidic devices, and DNA microarray technology. The novelty

  6. Isotope reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the same isotopically homogeneous sample by any laboratory worldwide should yield the same isotopic composition within analytical uncertainty. International distribution of light element isotopic reference materials by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology enable laboratories to achieve this goal.

  7. Improved insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Multilayer material consisting of embossed, silver-coated Mylar, nylon net, and silk net is useful for thermal-protection systems and cryogenic containers. Embossing serves two purposes: helps separate radiation barriers and controls radiant energy diffusion. Insulation requires no maintenance after installation.

  8. Amharic. Materials Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Language/Area Reference Center.

    The materials status report for Amharic, the dominant language of Ethiopia, is one of a series intended to provide the nonspecialist with a picture of the availability and quality of texts for teaching various languages to English speakers. The report consists of: (1) a brief narrative description of Amharic, the areas where it is spoken, its…

  9. Career Education Resource Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Occupational Education Instruction.

    The learning materials identified in this resource guide are intended for teachers who are concerned with career education. A listing of the principal careers in each of the 15 occupational clusters is provided in the initial pages of the guide, based upon "An Analysis of Fifteen Occupational Clusters Identified by the U. S. Office of Education."…

  10. Flame retardant polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, M.; Atlas, S.M.; Pearce, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The flame retardation of polyolefins is the focus of this volume. Methods for reduction of smoke and experimental evaluation of flammability parameters for polymeric materials are discussed. The flammability evaluation methods for textiles and the use of mass spectrometry for analysis of polymers and their degradation products are also presented.

  11. Composite structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse properties of fiber constituents in composites, fatigue in composite materials, matrix dominated properties of high performance composites, numerical investigation of moisture effects, numerical investigation of the micromechanics of composite fracture, advanced analysis methods, compact lug design, and the RP-1 and RP-2 sailplanes projects are discussed.

  12. Catalogue of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs.

    This catalogue lists resource materials available to secondary social studies teachers using an inductive approach and multi-media techniques to create a variety of learning experiences. Seven supplemental classroom instructional programs were developed by the Center: 1) Dimensions of Citizenship; 2) Politics and Policy Making; 3) Urban Problems…

  13. Nanophotonics: materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Tsai, Chia-Ho; Nezhad, M.; Nakagawa, Wataru; Chen, C.-H.; Tetz, Kevin A.; Pang, L.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2004-07-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Furthermore, near-field optical devices facilitate miniaturization, and simultaneously enhance multifunctionality, greatly increasing the functional complexity per unit volume of the photonic system. Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology.

  14. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CATALOG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Vocational Agriculture Instructional Materials Service, Columbus.

    THE TITLE, IDENTIFICATION NUMBER, DATE OF PUBLICATION, PAGINATION, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, AND PRICE ARE GIVEN FOR EACH OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND AUDIOVISUAL AIDS INCLUDED IN THIS CATALOG. TOPICS COVERED ARE FIELD CORPS, HORTICULTURE, ANIMAL SCIENCE, SOILS, AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING, AND FARMING PROGRAMS. AN ORDER FORM IS INCLUDED. (JM)

  15. Phase change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide theory and data needed by the thermal design engineer to bridge the gap between research achievements and actual flight systems, within the limits of the current state of the art of phase change materials (PCM) technology. The relationship between PCM and more conventional thermal control techniques is described and numerous space and terrestrial applications of PCM are discussed. Material properties of the most promising PCMs are provided; the purposes and use of metallic filler materials in PCM composites are presented; and material compatibility considerations relevant to PCM design are included. The engineering considerations of PCM design are described, especially those pertaining to the thermodynamic and heat transfer phenomena peculiar to PCM design. Methods of obtaining data not currently available are presented. The special problems encountered in the space environment are described. Computational tools useful to the designer are discussed. In summary, each aspect of the PCM problem important to the design engineer is covered to the extent allowed by the scope of this effort and the state of the art.

  16. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  17. Materials and Processes Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; And Others

    This instructional resource guide is intended to assist the industrial arts (IA) teacher in implementing a comprehensive materials and Processes Technology program at the technical level in Virginia high schools. The course is designed to help students make informed educational and occupational choices and prepare them for advanced technical or…

  18. Design a Sculpting Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Artists have used a variety of materials over the years for sculpting. They have been quick to use unusual pieces of technology to make a vibrant and unique statement, just as painters have created and used a wide variety of colors and derived pigments for their canvases. In this article, the author discusses a design challenge that gives students…

  19. Child Care Resource Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Jeanne, Comp.; Pennington, Marnee, Comp.

    "Child Care Resource Materials" is an annotated bibliography of books, films, and filmstrips on various topics related to the education and development of young children. Categories include: learning activities for children; caring for children - infants through adolescents and children with special needs; parent-child relationships; day care -…

  20. Russian Resource Materials Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Viveca

    This guide provides the teacher of Russian with helpful background material and activities on the geography of the Soviet Union and the history of Russia as well as its customs, traditions, literary selections, songs, foods, and festivals. In addition to these topics, the introductory chapter outlines a philosophy for teaching and learning Russian…

  1. (Availability of isotopic materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, H.L.

    1987-10-22

    The traveler visited several installations in Belgium, Germany, and England to meet with users of the enriched stable and radioactive materials provided by the ORNL Isotope Distribution Program (IDP). The purpose of the visits was to determine their future needs for the materials and services provided by the ORNL program and to update our existing or potential future customers on the materials and services presently available from the program. In Belgium and England, extreme interest was expressed among our customers and competitors about the status of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. This related mainly to our ability to supply the radioisotopes Ir-192 and Gd-153. A number of concerns were expressed about our ability to provide various stable and radioactive materials. Particular concern was expressed about our present capability to supply enriched Kr-85. The traveler participated in an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) specialists' meeting where the chief topic of discussion was the influence of target and sample properties on nuclear data measurements. At the end of this meeting, plans were formalized for a joint IAEA/International Nuclear Target Development Society (INTDS) meeting on sample fabrication and characterization to be held in Darmstadt, Federal Republic of Germany, in 1988. as President, the traveler conducted the 1987 INTDS Board meeting at the Central Bureau of Nuclear Measurements (CBNM). The major agenda items included the recent changes in the INTDS bylaws, guidelines for future hosts of INTDS meetings, and future directions the Society should take.

  2. Multifunctional Mechatronic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    actuating structures based on the properties of the Kagome system. This final report contains the following studies: (1) Effective Properties of the Octet...truss Lattice Material, by V.S. Deshpande, N.A. Fleck, and M.F. Ashby; (2) Kagome Plate Structures for Actuation, by R.G. Hutchinson, N. Wicks, A.G

  3. Teaching Materials and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains abstracts of presented papers which deal with teaching materials and methods in physiology. Includes papers on preconceptual notions in physiology, somatosensory activity recorded in the dorsal root ganglion of the bull frog, and the use of the Apple Macintosh microcomputer in teaching human anatomy and physiology. (TW)

  4. Somali. Materials Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC. Language/Area Reference Center.

    The materials status report for Somali, the official language of Somalia, is one of a series intended to provide the nonspecialist with a picture of the availability and quality of texts for teaching various languages to English speakers. The report consists of: (1) a brief narrative description of Somali, the areas where it is spoken, its major…

  5. Rhenium material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Biaglow, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Tensile data were obtained from four different types of rhenium at ambient and elevated temperatures. The four types of rhenium included chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and three powder metallurgy (PM) types, i.e., rolled sheet and pressed and sintered bars, with and without hot isostatic pressure (HIP) treatment. Results revealed a wide range of values with ultimate strengths at ambient temperatures varying from 663 MPa for CVD rhenium to 943 MPa for rolled sheet. A similar spread was also obtained for material tested at 1088 K and 1644 K. The wide variance observed with the different materials indicated that the rhenium manufacturing process, material composition and prior handling strongly dictated its properties. In addition to tensile properties, CVD, pressed and sintered material and HIP rhenium successfully completed 100 cycles of low cycle fatigue. Creep data were also obtained showing that CVD and pressed and sintered rhenium could sustain five hours of testing under a tension of 27.5 MPa at 1922 K.

  6. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  7. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Sture, Stein

    1991-11-01

    The utilization of local resources for the construction and operation of a lunar base can significantly reduce the cost of transporting materials and supplies from Earth. The feasibility of processing lunar regolith to form construction materials and structural components is investigated. A preliminary review of potential processing methods such as sintering, hot-pressing, liquification, and cast basalt techniques, was completed. The processing method proposed is a variation on the cast basalt technique. It involves liquification of the regolith at 1200-1300 C, casting the liquid into a form, and controlled cooling. While the process temperature is higher than that for sintering or hot-pressing (1000-1100 C), this method is expected to yield a true engineering material with low variability in properties, high strength, and the potential to form large structural components. A scenario for this processing method was integrated with a design for a representative lunar base structure and potential construction techniques. The lunar shelter design is for a modular, segmented, pressurized, hemispherical dome which could serve as habitation and laboratory space. Based on this design, estimates of requirements for power, processing equipment, and construction equipment were made. This proposed combination of material processing method, structural design, and support requirements will help to establish the feasibility of lunar base construction using indigenous materials. Future work will refine the steps of the processing method. Specific areas where more information is needed are: furnace characteristics in vacuum; heat transfer during liquification; viscosity, pouring and forming behavior of molten regolith; design of high temperature forms; heat transfer during cooling; recrystallization of basalt; and refinement of estimates of elastic moduli, compressive and tensile strength, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The preliminary

  8. Indigenous lunar construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    The utilization of local resources for the construction and operation of a lunar base can significantly reduce the cost of transporting materials and supplies from Earth. The feasibility of processing lunar regolith to form construction materials and structural components is investigated. A preliminary review of potential processing methods such as sintering, hot-pressing, liquification, and cast basalt techniques, was completed. The processing method proposed is a variation on the cast basalt technique. It involves liquification of the regolith at 1200-1300 C, casting the liquid into a form, and controlled cooling. While the process temperature is higher than that for sintering or hot-pressing (1000-1100 C), this method is expected to yield a true engineering material with low variability in properties, high strength, and the potential to form large structural components. A scenario for this processing method was integrated with a design for a representative lunar base structure and potential construction techniques. The lunar shelter design is for a modular, segmented, pressurized, hemispherical dome which could serve as habitation and laboratory space. Based on this design, estimates of requirements for power, processing equipment, and construction equipment were made. This proposed combination of material processing method, structural design, and support requirements will help to establish the feasibility of lunar base construction using indigenous materials. Future work will refine the steps of the processing method. Specific areas where more information is needed are: furnace characteristics in vacuum; heat transfer during liquification; viscosity, pouring and forming behavior of molten regolith; design of high temperature forms; heat transfer during cooling; recrystallization of basalt; and refinement of estimates of elastic moduli, compressive and tensile strength, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. The preliminary

  9. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  10. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  11. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  12. Designer quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, Vanita

    Spin-based quantum information processing relies on the ability to identify and coherently manipulate quantum bits (qubits) existing in nature in the form of spin-½ particles such as electrons. The work described in this thesis is based on an alternative perspective: that these spin-½ objects, together with their interactions, can be regarded as building blocks of a variety of "designer quantum materials" with features not present for isolated single spins. Theoretical proposals are presented for two classes of spin-based designer quantum materials relevant for quantum information transport and manipulation. The first class of materials involves spin-½ networks coupled by spatially-varying exchange interactions, in which moving domain walls can produce topologically-stable "flying spin qubits," and pairs of domain walls can be used to generate and transport Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs of entangled qubits. The effective exchange between two domain-wall qubits can be tuned by adjusting the positions of the domain walls and can be ferromagnetic even when all spin-spin couplings are antiferromagnetic. The second class of designer quantum materials consists of electron spins in quantum wires with spatially-varying spin-orbit coupling. The presence of the spin-orbit interaction introduces pseudo-Zeeman couplings of the electron spins to effective magnetic fields and further enhances the building-block toolset: by periodically modulating this spin-orbit coupling in space, it is possible to create the spatial analogue of spin resonance, without the need for any real magnetic fields. The mapping of time-dependent operations onto a spatial axis suggests a new mode for quantum information processing in which gate operations are encoded into the band structure of the material.

  13. Materials management information systems.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The

  14. ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

  15. 49 CFR 178.345-2 - Material and material thickness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tempers. All shell materials shall be of H 32 or H 34 tempers except that the lower ultimate strength... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Material and material thickness. 178.345-2 Section... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS...

  16. Material efficiency in a multi-material world.

    PubMed

    Lifset, Reid; Eckelman, Matthew

    2013-03-13

    Material efficiency--using less of a material to make a product or supply a service--is gaining attention as a means for accomplishing important environmental goals. The ultimate goal of material efficiency is not to use less physical material but to reduce the impacts associated with its use. This article examines the concept and definition of material efficiency and argues that for it to be an effective strategy it must confront the challenges of operating in a multi-material world, providing guidance when materials are used together and when they compete. A series of conceptions of material efficiency are described, starting with mass-based formulations and expanding to consider multiple resources in the supply chain of a single material, and then to multiple resources in the supply chains of multiple materials used together, and further to multiple environmental impacts. The conception of material efficiency is further broadened by considering material choice, exploring the technical and economic effects both of using less material and of materials competition. Finally, this entire materials-based techno-economic system is considered with respect to the impact of complex policies and political forces. The overall goal here is to show how the concept of material efficiency when faced with more expansive--and yet directly relevant--definitional boundaries is forced to confront analytical challenges that are both familiar and difficult in life cycle assessment and product-based approaches.

  17. Investigations of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, G. M.; Fvwaraye, A. O.; Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The investigations were directed at determining the radiation history and surface chronology of lunar materials using the etched particle track technique. The major lunar materials studied are the igneous rocks and double core from Apollo 12, the breccia and soil samples from Apollo 14, and the core samples from Luna 16. In the course of this work two new and potentially important observations were made: (1) Cosmic ray-induced spallation-recoil tracks were identified. The density of such tracks, when compared with the density of tracks induced by a known flux of accelerator protons, yields the time of exposure of a sample within the top meter or two of moon's surface. (2) Natural, fine scale plastic deformation was found to have fragmented pre-existing charged particle tracks, allowing the dating of the mechanical event causing the deformation.

  18. Materialism and food security.

    PubMed

    Allen, M W; Wilson, M

    2005-12-01

    The present studies examined if materialists have an elevated concern about food availability, presumably stemming from a general survival security motivation. Study 1 found that materialists set a greater life goal of food security, and reported more food insecurity during their childhood. Materialists reported less present-day food insecurity. Study 2 revealed that materialists stored/hoarded more food at home, and that obese persons endorsed materialism more than low/normal weight persons. Study 3 found that experimentally decreasing participants' feelings of survival security (via a mortality salience manipulation) led to greater endorsement of materialism, food security as goal, and using food for emotional comfort. The results imply that materialists overcame the food insecurity of their childhood by making food security a top life goal, but that materialists' current concerns about food security may not wholly stem from genuine threats to their food supply.

  19. Materials support for HITAF

    SciTech Connect

    Breder, K.; Tennery, V.J.

    1994-09-01

    The primary objective of this work is to compare the mechanical performance of structural ceramic materials which are being proposed for use in the air heater of a coal fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) for power generation. The effort is focused on providing preliminary evaluations of key mechanical properties required of ceramic materials for this application. The critical properties studied include fast fracture strength distribution at room temperature and two elevated temperatures, any trends in slow crack growth (SCG) susceptibility at elevated temperatures, and preliminary creep behavior. In addition residual fast fracture strength of a limited number of specimens corroded in a coal ash environment will be evaluated at a later stage in the project.

  20. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.