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Sample records for ostracod cypris subglobosa

  1. Anatomy of the fully formed chondrocranium of Emydura subglobosa (Chelidae): a pleurodiran turtle.

    PubMed

    Daniel J, Paluh; Christopher A, Sheil

    2013-01-01

    The chondrocranium is a cartilaginous structure that forms around and protects the brain and sensory organs of the head. Through ontogeny, this skeletal structure may become more elaborate, remodeled and reabsorbed, and/or ossified. Though considerable attention has been given to the formation of the chondrocranium and a great amount of data has been gathered on the development of this structure among many craniates, the anatomy of this structure in turtles often is neglected. We describe the mature chondrocranium of the pleurodiran turtle, Emydura subglobosa (Chelidae) based on hatchling specimens. Though formation and ossification of bony elements has been studied previously in this species, a detailed description of the chondrocranium of this pleurodiran turtle has not been presented. Anatomy of the chondrocranium was described for E. subglobosa by examination of cleared and double-stained specimens. The orbitotemporal region of E. subglobosa is dramatically different from that of other described turtles (e.g., Apalone spinifera, Pelodiscus sinensis, Chelydra serpentina, Macrochelys temminckii, Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, and Eretmochelys imbricata) in that a prominent taenia marginalis spans the space between the planum supraseptale and otic capsules, and the pila antotica (which becomes modified and ossified through ontogeny to form the processus clinoideus) is greatly reduced and essentially absent in hatchling specimens. The morphology seen in E. subglobosa is similar to that of Caretta caretta, particularly as it relates to the taenia marginalis. Variation in the orbitotemporal region is briefly discussed in the context of the taenia marginalis, taenia medialis, pila metoptica, and pila antotica.

  2. Trace elements in marine ostracodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Gary S.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Baker, Paul A.

    Extending the work of Cadot, Kaesler, De Deckker, Chivas, and Corrège, we have measured the elemental chemistry of shells of marine ostracodes to evaluate the usefulness of ostracode shell chemistry as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Our work has focused primarily on Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, and Na/Ca ratios of two common genera: deep-sea genus Krithe and shallow marine/estuarine genus Loxoconcha. We evaluated in vivo effects including genus, species, gender, ontogeny, shell size, intra-shell heterogeneity (Mg), water temperature, and salinity, and postmortem diagenetic effects including partial dissolution, recrystallization, and shell surface contamination. Analysis of modern (core-top), fossil, and laboratory-raised specimens across a wide range of temperature and salinity conditions confirms earlier work indicating that Krithe and Loxoconcha Mg/Ca ratios are dominantly controlled by water temperature. Sr/Ca and Na/Ca ratios co-vary with temperature in core-top Krithe, but not in cultured Loxoconcha suggesting that the Krithe Sr/Ca and Na/Ca correlation with temperature may be related to another variable that broadly co-varies with temperature. Phylogenetic and ontogenetic effects are also indicated, including different Mg-thermodependence and intra-shell Mg distribution between Krithe and Loxoconcha. Inter-specific effects are suggested for two species of Krithe. Magnesium uptake in eldest juvenile shells seems to be identical to that of adult shells, thus greatly increasing the amount of shell material available for paleoenvironmental studies. No salinity effects were observed. Shell Na/Ca ratios showed a dramatic decrease with increasing dissolution (natural and artificial) in waters that are undersaturated with respect to calcite, whereas Mg/Ca ratios displayed a minor decrease and Sr/Ca ratios showed no change. Of the ratios studied, Mg/Ca offers the most promise for Quaternary marine studies as a paleothermometer. Further calibration studies are needed to better

  3. Bromeliad treefrogs as phoretic hosts of ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabagh, Leandro T.; Rocha, Carlos F. D.

    2014-06-01

    Aquatic organisms can use many methods of dispersal among discrete freshwater habitats, and phoresy is an important but poorly understood mechanism. Tank bromeliads are small and unconnected habitats used by many animals, and some of them use phoresy for dispersal. Ostracods living in bromeliads used treefrogs as phoretic hosts for dispersal. We investigated the distribution of phoretic ostracods among body parts of treefrogs ( Scinax littoreus and Scinax perpusillus), the prevalence and intensity of ostracods ( Elpidium sp.) between Scinax species, and the prevalence and mean intensity of ostracods among the frogs in wet vs. dry seasons in two inselbergs areas at Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil). There were significant differences among the body parts occupied by ostracods and between the Scinax species. Seasonal differences were found only for S. littoreus showing greater abundance during the wet season. Additionally, we record Scinax cuspidatus and Thoropa miliaris as new phoretic hosts for Elpidium sp. to use phoresy.

  4. Occurrence of hemocyanin in ostracod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Marxen, Julia C; Pick, Christian; Oakley, Todd H; Burmester, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    Hemocyanin is a copper-containing protein that transports O2 in the hemolymph of many arthropod species. Within the crustaceans, hemocyanin appeared to be restricted to Malacostraca but has recently been identified in Remipedia. Here, we report the occurrence of hemocyanin in ostracods, indicating that this respiratory protein is more widespread within crustaceans than previously thought. By analyses of expressed sequence tags and by RT-PCR, we obtained four full length and nine partial hemocyanin sequences from six of ten investigated ostracod species. Hemocyanin was identified in Myodocopida (Actinoseta jonesi, Cypridininae sp., Euphilomedes morini, Skogsbergia lerneri, Vargula tsujii) and Platycopida (Cytherelloidea californica) but not in Podocopida. We found no evidence for the presence of hemoglobin in any of these ostracod species. Like in other arthropods, we identified multiple hemocyanin subunits (up to six) to occur in a single ostracod species. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses showed that ostracod hemocyanin subunit diversity evolved independently from that of other crustaceans. Ostracod hemocyanin subunits were found paraphyletic, with myodocopid and platycopid subunits forming distinct clades within those of the crustaceans. This pattern suggests that ostracod hemocyanins originated from distinct subunits in the pancrustacean stemline.

  5. Cypris morphology in the barnacles Ibla and Paralepas (Crustacea: Cirripedia Thoracica) implications for cirripede evolution.

    PubMed

    Høeg, Jens T; Achituv, Yair; Chan, Benny K K; Chan, Karen; Jensen, Peter Gram; Pérez-Losada, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to describe cypris morphology in species of the barnacles Ibla and Paralepas, both of which are pivotal in understanding cirripede evolution. In Ibla, we also studied late naupliar stages with video and SEM. Special emphasis was put on the lattice organs, the antennules and the thorax and telson. In Paralepas we had settled specimens only and could therefore only investigate the carapace with the lattice organs. Cyprids of Ibla quadrivalvis and Paralepas dannevigi have five sets of lattice organs, grouped as two anterior and three posterior pairs. The organs are of the pore-field type and the terminal pore is situated anteriorly in the first pair, just as in the Rhizocephala and the Thoracica. In Ibla the armament of antennular sensilla resembles that found in the Thoracica but differs from the Rhizocephala. The absence of setules on the A and B setae sited terminally on the fourth antennular segment is a similarity with the Acrothoracica. The attachment disc is angled rather than facing distally and is encircled by a low cuticular velum. The thoracopods have two-segmented endopods and exopods as in the Thoracica, but the number, shape, and position of thoracopodal setae differ somewhat from other species of that superorder. Both Ibla and Paralepas cyprids have a deeply cleaved telson, but no independent abdominal part. In cypris morphology, Ibla and Paralepas show several synapomorphies with the clade comprising Rhizocephala and Thoracica and there are no specific apomorphies with either the Acrothoracica, the Rhizocephala or any particular subgroup within the Thoracica. This is in agreement with recent molecular evidence that Ibla (Ibliformes) is the sister taxon to all other Thoracica and the ibliforms therefore become the outgroup of choice for studying character evolution within the superorder. Paralepas, and other pedunculated barnacles without shell plates, are apparently not primitive but are secondarily evolved

  6. Biogeography of marine podocopid ostracodes in Micronesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weissleader, L.S.; Gilinsky, N.L.; Ross, R.M.; Cronin, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    Bottom lagoonal sediment samples from 12 islands and atolls yielded >70 species representing >32 ostracode genera. All or most samples from a particular lagoon generally form distinct subgroups (Jaccard =0.45-0.50). At lower levels, 5 groups delineate faunal regions within Micronesia: the Gilbert Islands (Onotoa) in the SE part of the region, the N Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Rongelap, Bikini), the SE Marshall Islands (Kwajalein, Jaluit, Majuro, Arno), the Marianas and Caroline Islands (Guam, Truk, Pohnpei) and Pingelap. Pingelap, Kwajalein and Onotoa have the highest species richness (S=32-42) and Shannon-Wiener diversity values (H(S)=2.62-3.02) in the study area. Enewetak, Jaluit, Majuro and Arno show lower values (S=23-27, H(S)=2.29-2.70). Of the ostracode species living in Micronesia, 64.3% have Indo-West Pacific affinities, 7.1% are circumtropical, 5.7% have East Pacific-Caribbean affinities, 11.4% are endemic to Micronesia, and 11.4% have unknown affinities. If the SE Asian region is a primary species-source, results show that each Micronesian lagoon is equally likely to be colonized by dispersal from the source region, despite differences in distance from a hypothetical source. However, each lagoon has a distinct ostracode assemblage, probably the result of unique history of random colonization events, local extinctions and environmental disturbances. -from Authors

  7. Ostracode distribution in Late Pennsylvanian Finis Shale cyclothem

    SciTech Connect

    Boller, K.A.

    1985-02-01

    Four successive intergrading ostracode biofacies characterize the Finis Shale cyclothem (Cisco Group, Virgilian) near Jacksboro, Texas. Composition of the ostracode biofacies parallels the distinct megafaunal assemblages ascribed by Boardman et al (1983) to changing oxygen concentrations, water depths, and salinity. Black, organic-rich, noncalcareous, fissile shales occur near the base of the Finis. This lithofacies is barren of ostracodes and megafauna, and is interpreted to represent a deeper water, anoxic environment. The overlying dark-gray, phosphatic shales contain a diminutive pyritic molluscan fauna with abundant ammonoids and a low-diversity ostracode assemblage dominated by Healdia, indicating a dysaerobic environment. The overlying lithofacies is a medium-gray, clay-rich, calcareous shale. The Megafauna is dominated by a brachiopod-bryzoan assemblage, and a diverse Ampissites-Kirkbya ostracode association occurs. This fauna represents a shallow depth, aerobic environment. The Amphissites-Kirkbya biofacies is overlain by a dark-gray calcareous shale with abundant megafossils of the fusulind-bryozoan facies of Boardman et al. This interval is dominated by a Bairdia-Amphissites-Kelletina ostracode assemblage, indicating a shallower aerobic environment. The shale is interrupted by the Jacksboro Limestone Member, an algal limestone deposited at or near wave base, which is covered by a thin intertidal sandstone. The cyclothem is capped by noncalcareous, brown silty shale. It contains a low-diversity ostracode assemblage dominated by Cavellina and a megafaunal assemblage characterized by Myalina, which represents a shallow, brackish water environment.

  8. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry, Part 1: Variations of environmental parameters in ostracod (micro-)habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The variations of environmental conditions ( T°, pH, δ 13C DIC, [DIC], δ 18O, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca) of ostracod habitats were examined to determine the controls of environmental parameters on the chemical and isotopic composition of ostracod valves. Results of a one-year monitoring of environmental parameters at five sites, with depths of between 2 and 70 m, in Lake Geneva indicate that in littoral to sub-littoral zones (2, 5, and 13 m), the chemical composition of bottom water varies seasonally in concert with changes in temperature and photosynthetic activity. An increase of temperature and photosynthetic activity leads to an increase in δ 13C values of DIC and to precipitation of authigenic calcite, which results in a concomitant increase of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of water. In deeper sites (33 and 70 m), the composition of bottom water remains constant throughout the year and isotopic values and trace element contents are similar to those of deep water within the lake. The chemical composition of interstitial pore water also does not reflect seasonal variations but is controlled by calcite dissolution, aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration with reduction of sulphate and/or nitrate, and methanogenesis that may occur in the sediment pores. Relative influence of each of these factors on the pore water geochemistry depends on sediment thickness and texture, oxygen content in bottom as well as pore water. Variations of chemical compositions of the ostracod valves of this study vary according to the specific ecology of the ostracod species analysed, that is its life-cycle and its (micro-)habitat. Littoral species have compositions that are related to the seasonal variations of temperature, δ 13C values of DIC, and of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of water. In contrast, the compositions of profundal species are largely controlled by variations of pore fluids along sediment depth profiles according to the specific depth preference of the species. The control on the

  9. Estimating past precipitation and temperature from fossil ostracodes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.J.; Forester, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    The fossil records of certain aquatic organisms provide a way of obtaining meaningful estimates of past temperature and precipitation. These estimates of past environmental conditions are derived from multivariate statistical methods that are in turn based on the modern biogeographic distributions and environmental tolerances of the biota of interest. These estimates are helpful in conducting slimate studies as part of the Yucca Mountain site characterization. Ostracodes are microscopic crustaceans that produce bivalved calcite shells which are easily fossilized in the sediments of the lakes and wetlands in which the animals lived. The modern biogeographic distribution and environmental conditions of living ostracodes are the basis for the interpretation of the past environmental conditions of the fossil ostracodes. The major assumption in this method of interpretation is that the environmental tolerances of ostracodes have not changed substantially over thousands of years. Two methods using these modern analogs to determine past environmental conditions are the modern analog method and the range method. The range method also considers the information provided by fossil ostracode assemblages that have no modern analog in today`s world.

  10. Ostracod Body Size Change Across Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, L.; Llarena, L. A.; Saux, J.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many factors drive evolution, although it is not always clear which factors are more influential. Miller et al. (2009) found that there is a change in geographic disparity in diversity in marine biotas over time. We tested if there was also geographic disparity in body size during different epochs. We used marine ostracods, which are tiny crustaceans, as a study group for this analysis. We also studied which factor is more influential in body size change: distance or time. We compared the mean body size from different geologic time intervals as well as the mean body size from different locations for each epoch. We grouped ostracod occurrences from the Paleobiology Database into 10º x 10º grid cells on a paleogeographic map. Then we calculated the difference in mean size and the distance between the grid cells containing specimens. Our size data came from the Ellis & Messina"Catalogue of Ostracod" as well as the"Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology". Sizes were calculated by applying the formula for the volume of an ellipsoid to three linear dimensions of the ostracod carapace (anteroposterior, dorsoventral, and right-left lengths). Throughout this analysis we have come to the realization that there is a trend in ostracods towards smaller size over time. Therefore there is also a trend through time of decreasing difference in size between occurrences in different grid cells. However, if time is not taken into account, there is no correlation between size and geographic distance. This may be attributed to the fact that one might not expect a big size difference between locations that are far apart but still at a similar latitude (for example, at the equator). This analysis suggests that distance alone is not the main factor in driving changes in ostracod size over time.

  11. Mg/Ca of Continental Ostracode Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.; Marco-Barba, J.; Mezquita, F.

    2007-12-01

    Marine ionic chemistry is thought to remain constant. This, together with the belief that marine calcifiers partition Mg/Ca in a systematic manner as functions of temperature (and Mg/Ca) of water forms the basis of the Mg/Ca thermometer. In continental settings both of these assumptions are usually not true. Continental waters contain a wide variety of solutes in absolute and relative ion concentrations. Hence, waters with identical Mg/Ca may have very different concentrations of Mg and Ca and very different anions. Here we use two examples to focus on the effects of ion chemistry on Mg/Ca partitioning in continental ostracode shells and we ignore the complexities of solute evolution, which can change Mg/Ca over timescales of minutes to millennia. Palacios-Fest and Dettman (2001) conducted a monthly study of ,Cypridopsis vidua at El Yeso Lake in Sonora, Mexico. They established a relation between temperature and average shell Mg/Ca using regression analyses on averaged data. When their Mg/Ca-temperature relation is applied to monthly ,C. vidua data from Page Pond near Cleveland, Ohio, water temperatures of -8 to -1°C are obtained. The observed Mg/Ca ranges for El Yeso Lake (0.31 to 0.46) and Page Pond (0.33 to 0.46) are similar, as are their specific conductivities (700 to 850μS for El Yeso Lake; 400 to 600μS for Page Pond). However, [Ca] is 140-260 mg/L for El Yeso, but only 70-90 mg/L for Page Pond. Page Pond data, in fact, shows a good temperature shell Mg/Ca relation for .C. vidua, but the relation is different from that at El Yeso. Hence, shell Mg/Ca is a multi-valued, family of curves function of temperature and Mg/Ca of water that depends on the [Mg] and [Ca] values in water and perhaps other factors. Our second example comes from sites near Valencia, Spain and involves shell data for ,Cyprideis torosa, an estuarine ostracode that is tolerant of a wide range of salinity and can live in continental waters as long as the carbonate alkalinity to Ca ratio is

  12. Seasonal occurrences of ostracodes in lakes and streams of the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, C.

    1991-09-01

    Fresh-water ostracodes from eight different sites on the San Francisco Peninsula were sampled periodically between May 1989 and May 1990. Seasonal variations in the relative abundances of ostracode species were observed. Those changes are believed to have been due, at least in part, to seasonal changes in water and sediment temperatures. Ostracodes are bivalved crustaceans with calcite carapaces that live in most aquatic environments, from the oceans to ditches and seeps. Each environment has its own set of physical and chemical parameters and hosts its own characteristic species of ostracodes because ostracodes are sensitive to these parameters. Ostracodes can be used as environmental indicators. Fresh-water ostracodes are good indicators of water chemistry and thus of the local climate. Although ostracode biology is poorly known, it is known that ostracode life cycles are temperature dependent and that therefore ostracode populations exhibit seasonal fluctuations. This study is an effort to document and quantify the seasonal fluctuations in a few California ostracode populations in terms of the relative abundances of the individual species comprising the total population. 3 refs., 24 figs.

  13. On the morphology of antennular sensory and attachment organs in cypris larvae of the deep-sea vent/seep barnacles, Ashinkailepas and Neoverruca.

    PubMed

    Yorisue, Takefumi; Chan, Benny K K; Kado, Ryusuke; Watanabe, Hiromi; Inoue, Koji; Kojima, Shigeaki; Høeg, Jens T

    2016-05-01

    Barnacle cypris larvae show high morphological variation in the organs used in search of and attaching to a substratum. This variation may represent adaptation to the habitat of the species. Here, we studied SEM level morphologies of cypris antennular sensory and attachment organs in a deep-sea vent endemic species (Neoverruca sp.) and a vent/seep inhabiting species (Ashinkailepas seepiophila). We compare them with three species from other environments. The antennular morphologies of Neoverruca sp. and A. seepiophila were similar, which is consistent with recent molecular studies showing a close relationship of the two species. The setation pattern of the antennules was very conservative among species from various environments. In contrast, striking differences were observed in the structure of the attachment organ (the third antennular segment). Neoverruca sp. and A. seepiophila had no velum or a skirt surrounding the attachment disc on the third segment, while other cirripede cyprids almost always have either of these structures. In addition, both cyprids of A. seepiophila and Neoverruca sp. had the attachment disc angled toward the substratum, whereas it faces distally in cyprids from hard bottom inhabiting barnacles. We suggest that both velum/skirt and the angle of the attachment disc play an important role, when the antennules are contacting the substratum during surface exploration. Differences in attachment organ structures may be highly adaptive, enabling cirripede species to enter new habitats during evolution. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Vertical distribution of living ostracods in deep-sea sediments, North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöst, Anna B.; Yasuhara, Moriaki; Okahashi, Hisayo; Ostmann, Alexandra; Arbizu, Pedro Martínez; Brix, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    The depth distribution of living specimens of deep-sea benthic ostracods (small crustaceans with calcareous shells that are preserved as microfossils) in sediments is poorly understood, despite the importance of this aspect of basic ostracod biology for paleoecologic and paleoceanographic interpretations. Here, we investigated living benthic ostracod specimens from deep-sea multiple core samples, to reveal their depths distributions within sediment cores. The results showed shallow distribution and low population density of living deep-sea benthic ostracods (which are mostly composed of Podocopa). The living specimens are concentrated in the top 1 cm of the sediment, hence deep-sea benthic ostracods are either epifauna or shallow infauna. This observation is consistent with the information from shallow-water species. We also confirmed shallow infaunal (0.5-2 cm) and very shallow infaunal (0-1 cm) habitats of the deep-sea ostracod genera Krithe and Argilloecia, respectively.

  15. Modern benthic ostracodes from Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica: paleoceanographic, paleobiogeographic, and evolutionary significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Kato, Masako; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Seto, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Seventy-three ostracode species from 38 genera were recovered from the 55 surface sediment samples in Lützow-Holm Bay, northeastern Antarctica. We investigated bathymetric and geographic distributions of modern benthic ostracode species in the bay and compared this fauna with published modern and fossil ostracode data of Antarctic and southern South American regions. The results show: (1) Four biotopes and three sub-biotopes are recognized based on Q-mode cluster analysis, which suggest distributions of modern ostracodes are mainly controlled by water-mass structure, ice scouring, and light availability. (2) Comparison between the Lützow-Holm Bay fauna and other ostracode faunas from Antarctica and southern South America shows high endemism and homogeneity of Antarctic ostracode fauna, suggesting in situ evolution of most extant Antarctic species. (3) Most species are endemic to the Antarctica, a few species also inhabit South American waters.

  16. Middle Pleistocene ostracod assemblages from Lake Trasimeno, Perugia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchegiano, Marta; Gliozzi, Elsa; Buratti, Nicoletta; Ariztegui, Daniel; Cirilli, Simonetta

    2014-05-01

    Lake Trasimeno is a meso-eutrophic, shallow (<6 m deep) and large lake (~120km2) located in central Italy, at 259 m above sea level. A preliminary age model based on pollen data for a core retrieved along the present southern shore of the lake (north of the Panicarola town) suggests that the record may be as old as Middle Pleistocene. An ongoing multidisciplinary study of a 175 m long sedimentary core includes magnetic properties, sedimentary microfacies, paleontology, palynology and bulk elemental geochemistry. This contribution focus on the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the topmost 30 m of the core using ostracods. A total of 245 samples have been taken at a 13 cm sampling interval. On the whole, 13 species referable to 10 genera were collected (Ilyocypris gibba, Candona neglecta, Candona angulata, Cypridopsis vidua, Heterocypris salina, Limnocythere sp.1, Limnocythere stationis, Darwinula stevensoni, Cyprideis sp., Leptocythere spp., Fabaeformiscandona fabaeformis, Cyclocypris ovum). Abrupt changes in the abundance of the assemblages were found along the studied core alternating sections with very abundant ostracod remains with others with scant (or even null) individuals. Moreover, the changes observed in the composition of the ostracod assemblages are interpreted as recording environmental variations. In particular, two intervals are significant for the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of this sedimentary succession: 1) the section from 25.60 m to 23.50 m is characterized by a rich ostracod fauna (dominated by Cyprideis sp., Candona angulata and Leptocythere spp.). These assemblages possibly indicate an increase in salinity or alkalinity of the water body; 2) the interval from 21.05 m to 17.60 m contains Ilyocypris gibba, Candona neglecta, Cypridopsis vidua, Heterocypris salina, Limnocythere sp. 1, Limnocythere stationis and Darwinula stevensoni. Limnocythere stationis is a central European species, until now in Italy only described in the Holocene of

  17. Ostracod provincialism and migration as a response to movements of Earth's plates: Cretaceous-Paleogene ostracods of West Africa, North Africa and the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elewa, Ashraf M. T.

    2017-10-01

    This paper documents the Cretaceous -Paleogene ostracods response as the continental plates tend to show divergence. For example, in the intervals from the Early to Late Cretaceous when the South American plate tended to exhibit divergent movement westward from the African plate, the migration of ostracods show westward trend from Northeast Africa to West Africa; whereas, the divergence of the Indian and the Australian plates as well as the Antarctic plate from the African and the Eurasian plates, and Arabia is accompanied with ostracod migration southward. Another example from the Maastrichtian-Eocene ostracods of West Africa, where ostracods exhibit east-west migration (despite the migration of epineritic ostracods in both directions; east-west and vice-versa) towards the North American and South American plates. These trends of migration towards the deep oceans (Atlantic and Indian oceans of present time) indicate the tendency of ostracods of these geologic times towards endemism in the deep oceans resulted from seafloor spreading during the divergence of the continental plates. On the other hand, the paleoenvironmental changes should also have significant effect on these trends of migration.

  18. Size Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod Size through Probabilistic Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body size of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of size evolution in these marine organisms. The body size of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod size. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned sizes based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod size to compare with the observed data. New sizes were chosen via a normal distribution, and the neutral model selected new sizes differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the distribution on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod size down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of size decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant size. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of size evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining size evolution in ostracods.

  19. Testing for Bergmann's Rule in the Evolution of Ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascon, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    Bergmann's Rule predicts that body sizes of species in cold regions are larger than body sizes of species in warm regions. Using Bergmann's Rule, we have used data on Ostracods (microscopic crustaceans) that includes their stratigraphic ranges and body size to create graphs to help us identify whether this hypothesis is true. We started by plotting the mean size throughout geologic time, from the Cambrian period to the Holocene. We also plotted the temperature changes within this time range. Both mean size and temperature gradually decreased through time. When we compare size and temperature directly, we notice a positive correlation of the mean body size versus the average temperature of the Earth over the past 540 million years; however, this graph contradicts Bergmann's Rule. Evidently, as environmental temperature decreased over time, the mean size of Ostracods also decreased. Lastly, we created our last plot on volume and paleolatitude. The latitude is used as a proxy for temperature because it is difficult to decipher an exact degree of temperature throughout time. Our results demonstrated that as latitude increased, the volume decreased. We discovered a weak, but significant relationship between volume and latitude with a correlation coefficient of -0.144 (p-value << 0.001). This proves that a genus that occurs in multiple locations or time intervals has the same size in our data due to the limitation that we only have one measurement per genus. In conclusion, using stratigraphic range data, our project exemplified a correlation with the mean size and mean global sea surface temperatures since the Cambrian. This relationship, though, is not as obvious when you look at size vs. paleolatitude. We have found that Bergmann's Rule, which was initially described for mammals, does not apply to Ostracods. This is likely due to distinct physiological consequences of environmental temperature for endotherms and ectotherms.

  20. The relative magnitude of the effects of biological and physical settlement cues for cypris larvae of the acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides L.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Gabrielle S; Zurn, Constanze M; Bers, A Valeria; Head, Ritchie M; Hansson, Lars J; Thomason, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    Barnacle cypris larvae respond to many cues when selecting a settlement site. The settlement of over a million larvae on tiles of different textures, orientations and densities of incumbent settlers was measured on the rocky intertidal at Great Cumbrae, Scotland. Half of the tiles were replaced every tide whereas the others simultaneously accumulated settlers. Factor effects varied on each tide, and converged in the accumulating deployment. Increasing incumbent density led to net loss of settlement, which was less probable on the textures on which fastest settlment occurred ('very fine'), and more probable on those on which settlement was slowest ('smooth'). More settlement occurred on down-facing orientations during daylight and vice versa. Cue ranks were non-linear, so a path analysis model quantified the relative influence of each factor. Gregariousness was the most influential cue measured, although unmeasured factors had greater effects, highlighting the complexity of settlement influences in this species.

  1. Lower and Middle Devonian Malvinokaffric ostracods from the Precordillera Basin of San Juan, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, María J.; Rustán, Juan J.; Sterren, Andrea F.

    2013-08-01

    Ostracod from the upper Lower to Middle Devonian rocks of the Argentine Precordillera Basin (Talacasto and Punta Negra formations) are studied. One new genus Pircawayra nov. gen., and five species (including three new: Pircawayra gigantea nov. gen. and sp., Lapazites trinodis nov. sp. and Keslingiella? teresae nov. sp.) are defined. The recorded ostracod fauna closely resembles that coeval from Bolivia and South Africa, exhibiting a remarkable endemism, not only at the genus level, but also at the species level. In addition to its low-diversity, the Malvinokaffric ostracod association is also characterized by having large, thick, coarsely ornamented and swollen valves. The similar ostracod composition from the Andean and South African basins suggests faunal exchange between these two areas. Based on the ostracod faunas, the Malvinokaffric Realm is clearly recognizable at least up to the Middle Devonian.

  2. Exceptionally preserved 450-million-year-old ordovician ostracods with brood care.

    PubMed

    Siveter, David J; Tanaka, Gengo; Farrell, Una C; Martin, Markus J; Siveter, Derek J; Briggs, Derek E G

    2014-03-31

    Ostracod crustaceans are the most abundant fossil arthropods and are characterized by a long stratigraphic range. However, their soft parts are very rarely preserved, and the presence of ostracods in rocks older than the Silurian period [1-5] was hitherto based on the occurrence of their supposed shells. Pyritized ostracods that preserve limbs and in situ embryos, including an egg within an ovary and possible hatched individuals, are here described from rocks of the Upper Ordovician Katian Stage Lorraine Group of New York State, including examples from the famous Beecher's Trilobite Bed [6, 7]. This discovery extends our knowledge of the paleobiology of ostracods by some 25 million years and provides the first unequivocal demonstration of ostracods in the Ordovician period, including the oldest known myodocope, Luprisca incuba gen. et sp. nov. It also provides conclusive evidence of a developmental brood-care strategy conserved within Ostracoda for at least 450 million years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An exceptionally preserved myodocopid ostracod from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Siveter, David J; Briggs, Derek E G; Siveter, Derek J; Sutton, Mark D

    2010-05-22

    An exceptionally preserved new ostracod crustacean from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK, represents only the third fully documented Palaeozoic ostracod with soft-part preservation. Appendages, gills, gut system, lateral compound eyes and even a medial eye with a Bellonci organ are preserved, allowing assignment of the fossil to a new genus and species of cylindroleberidid myodocope (Myodocopida, Cylindroleberididae). The Bellonci organ is recorded for the first time in fossil ostracods. The find also represents a rare occurrence of gills in fossil ostracods and confirms the earliest direct evidence of a respiratory-cum-circulatory system in the group. The species demonstrates remarkably conserved morphology within myodocopes over a period of 425 Myr. Its shell morphology more closely resembles several families of myodocopes other than the Cylindroleberididae, especially the Cypridinidae and Sarsiellidae, thus questioning the utility of the carapace alone in establishing the affinity of fossil ostracods.

  4. An exceptionally preserved myodocopid ostracod from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK

    PubMed Central

    Siveter, David J.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Siveter, Derek J.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    An exceptionally preserved new ostracod crustacean from the Silurian of Herefordshire, UK, represents only the third fully documented Palaeozoic ostracod with soft-part preservation. Appendages, gills, gut system, lateral compound eyes and even a medial eye with a Bellonci organ are preserved, allowing assignment of the fossil to a new genus and species of cylindroleberidid myodocope (Myodocopida, Cylindroleberididae). The Bellonci organ is recorded for the first time in fossil ostracods. The find also represents a rare occurrence of gills in fossil ostracods and confirms the earliest direct evidence of a respiratory-cum-circulatory system in the group. The species demonstrates remarkably conserved morphology within myodocopes over a period of 425 Myr. Its shell morphology more closely resembles several families of myodocopes other than the Cylindroleberididae, especially the Cypridinidae and Sarsiellidae, thus questioning the utility of the carapace alone in establishing the affinity of fossil ostracods. PMID:20106847

  5. Paleochemistry of Lakes Agassiz and Manitoba based on ostracodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon

    1997-01-01

    The ionic composition and salinity of Lake Manitoba and its late-glacial precursor, Lake Agassiz, changed significantly over the past 11 000 years. The paleochemical record reported here is based on modern analog environments of ostracodes identified in a new 14.5 m core from southern Lake Manitoba. The ionic composition of Lake Manitoba today is dominated by Na+, Cl-, and HCO3-, with much less Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+. Evaporative concentration of modern Lake Manitoba water would lead to greater salinity and the near depletion of Ca2+ due to continued precipitation of calcite. During periods of highest salinity in the Holocene, however, Lake Manitoba supported Limnocythere staplini. Today this species inhabits waters in which [Ca2+] > [HCO3-], including springs associated with groundwater in Paleozoic bedrock discharging into Lake Winnipegosis (and eventually, after much dilution, into Lake Manitoba). Further complicating the Holocene record are intervals containing Limnocythere friabilis that suggest periodic influxes of dilute water, probably from the Assiniboine River, which bypasses Lake Manitoba today. The variations in Holocene paleochemistry indicated by the ostracode record imply changes in the proportion of overland flow plus precipitation relative to groundwater inputs to Lake Manitoba, independent of changes in evaporation relative to precipitation.

  6. Paleoecology and paleobiogeography of Paleocene ostracods in Dineigil area, South Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed; Ismail, Abdelmoneim; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset

    2017-07-01

    Seventy three rock samples were extracted from the Paleocene interval (fourty three meter) in the Dineigil area, South Western Desert, Egypt. The ostracod assemblages in these samples were qualitatively studied. The ostracods are well preserved which allowed us to recognize thirty two species belonging to eighteen genera and nine families. The recorded ostracods could be differentiated into two assemblages. The first assemblage comprises an overlapping combination of the Esna Type and Garra Type and indicates an inner-middle shelf environment (50-70 m depth). The second one comprises a combination of the Tethyan Type and Esna Type, indicating a transitional environment from the middle shelf to the outer shelf (deep infraneritic). The paleobiogeographic distribution of the investigated ostracods shows a strong resemblance to those in many areas of North Africa and Middle East, and a slight affinity to those in West Africa and the South Atlantic.

  7. Pleistocene Deep Sea ostracods from the Bering Sea (IODP expedition 323)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Zarikian, Carlos A.

    2016-03-01

    The study presents the first Pleistocene (0-1.9 Ma) record of Deep Sea ostracods from the Bering Sea, derived primarily from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 323, Site U1344 (59°3.0‧N, 179°12.2‧W, 3171 m of water depth). Deep Sea ostracod abundances in the Bering Sea sediments are some of the lowest that have been recorded in bathyal and abyssal marine environments (<1 specimen per sediment gram). In comparison, benthic foraminifera are several orders of magnitude more abundant in the same samples. The humble ostracod assemblage at Site U1344 is predominantly composed of deep water species Krithe sawanensis, Fallacihowella sp. A, Cytheropteron spp., Eucytherura sp., Argilloecia toyamaensis, and Bradleya mesembrina. Less abundant taxa include Munseyella melzeri, Munseyella ristveti, Cluthia sp., Robertsonites hanaii, and Microcythere mediostriata. Some of these taxa (e.g. Fallacihowella sp. A, Bradleya mesembrina, Microcythere mediostriata) are reported for the first time in the North Pacific. The predominance of the genera Krithe, Fallacihowella, Cytheropteron and Argilloecia indicates cold, ventilated bottom waters. The deep Bering Sea ostracod assemblage shares many common and closely related species with continental slope faunas from the Gulf of Alaska, the Okhotsk Sea, the Arctic Ocean, and even the subpolar North Atlantic. A few continental shelf ostracods, such as species of Munseyella and Robertsonites, are present at Sites U1344 and U1343, in the northern slope of the Aleutian Basin. The presence of shallow water ostracods at the Bering Sea slope sites is possibly explained by sea ice rafting. Exceptionally low ostracod abundance in the U1344 record did not permit evaluating links between ostracod faunas and paleoceanographic conditions; however, an increase in ostracod occurrences throughout the middle Pleistocene at Site U1344 appears to correlate with general sea ice expansion in the Bering Sea. High primary surface productivity, high

  8. Cretaceous ostracods of the Barreirinhas Basin: Taxonomy, biostratigraphic considerations and paleoenvironmental inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos Filho, M. A. B.; Fauth, G.; Piovesan, E. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ostracods are microcrustaceans that inhabit different aquatic environments and are frequently used in paleoecological interpretations and biostratigraphic studies. The Barreirinhas Basin, Northern of Brazil, contains a well-preserved ostracod assemblage in its sedimentary rocks of early and late Cretaceous age, which have been so far poorly studied. This paper contains the first taxonomic identification of the ostracod assemblages, as well as the elaboration of paleoenvironmental and biostratigraphic inferences, for the Cretaceous of the Barreirinhas Basin. The studied material consists of 147 samples from the wells 1-MAS-1A, 1-MAS-3A, 1-MAS-4A and 1-MAS-14A. 495 specimens were recovered, distributed between 40 species, 16 genera and 9 families, including three new species. Based on previously established biozones for the Sergipe basin, two biozones were identified: the Nigeroloxoconcha aff. Nigeroloxoconcha sp. GA A 22 Range Zone, of lower Cenomanian age; and the Brachycythere sapucariensis Interval Zone, of Turonian to middle Coniacian age. Finally, three distinct ostracod assemblages were defined: Assemblage 1, dominated by Conchoecia? species; Assemblage 2, well diversified but with low abundance; and Assemblage 3, with cold water ostracods such as Krithe. Based on the ostracod assemblages identified, a middle neritic, platformal paleoenvironment was inferred for the studied interval.

  9. Upper Carboniferous ostracode assemblages from a shale basin and their relationship to depositional environments

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, L.W.; King, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A sequence of more than 800 feet of mostly shale and silty shale of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian age is exposed about 10 miles northeast of Ardmore, Oklahoma, in the Ardmore Basin. The sequence is considered to represent rather continuous sedimentation in a narrow structural basin located in the northern part of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Bulk sampling of some 140 feet of shale above a single thin coal within the sequence has yielded two different ostracode assemblages. The assemblage located within 15 feet above the coal is characterized by moderate diversity and relatively great abundance of ostracodes. Dominant genera are Healdia, Bairdia, Pseudobythocypris, Amphissites, Hollinella, and Fabalicypris. Both the stratigraphic position (just above the coal) and comparison with other North American and European ostracode assemblages suggest a marine near-shore transitional to off-shore environment for this assemblage. Above this assemblage occurs a larger stratigraphic interval yielding a lower diversity ostracode assemblage consisting of numerous specimens of Healdia and Pseudobythocypris, as well as fewer numbers of Cavellina, Baridia, and Fabalicypris. This latter assemblage likely represents a marine off-shore environment. Ostracodes are valuable for determination of depositional realms in these shales for at least two reason: (1) macrofossils are virtually absent in the shales and cannot be utilized for paleoecological interpretation; and (2) ostracodes allow discrimination of different depositional realms between shales that are lithologically indistinguishable.

  10. Relationship Between the Surface Area to Volume Ratio and Temperature across Geologic Time in Ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Zaroff, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 1877 Joseph Allen proposed that endothermic terrestrial organisms would have lower surface area to volume ratios (SAVR) in colder climates and higher SAVRs in warmer climates. With a smaller surface area compared to volume, organisms can retain more heat in cold climates. We tested to see if this principle applied to ostracods, a type of ectothermic marine invertebrate. We hypothesised that Allen's rule applies to ostracods, as Allen's rule has been demonstrated in frogs (Alho 2011), which are also ectotherms . We used the linear dimensions of the three major carapace axes of ostracod holotypes to estimate the SAVR. We compared ostracod SAVRs with paleotemperatures from Royer et al. (2004). We found that there was a correlation between surface area and temperature; it is a small, but statistically significant correlation (adj. R2=0.0167). This means that as temperature increased, the SAVR also increased. We also found a negative correlation between ostracod SAVR to geologic time(adj. R2=0.0114), which shows us that as time has gone on, ostracod SAVR has decreased. We then plotted the correlation coefficient of SAVR to temperature over geologic time to explore trends in the strength of Allen's rule. For most of time there was no relationship but during the Devonian, Allen's Rule did explain the trend. In short, temperature does explain some of the correlation between the SAVR and temperature, but it is likely there were other environmental factors affecting this relationship.

  11. Resource Limitation, Controphic Ostracod Density and Larval Mosquito Development

    PubMed Central

    Rowbottom, Raylea; Carver, Scott; Barmuta, Leon A.; Weinstein, Philip; Foo, Dahlia; Allen, Geoff R.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic environments can be restricted with the amount of available food resources especially with changes to both abiotic and biotic conditions. Mosquito larvae, in particular, are sensitive to changes in food resources. Resource limitation through inter-, and intra-specific competition among mosquitoes are known to affect both their development and survival. However, much less is understood about the effects of non-culicid controphic competitors (species that share the same trophic level). To address this knowledge gap, we investigated and compared mosquito larval development, survival and adult size in two experiments, one with different densities of non-culicid controphic conditions and the other with altered resource conditions. We used Aedes camptorhynchus, a salt marsh breeding mosquito and a prominent vector for Ross River virus in Australia. Aedes camptorhynchus usually has few competitors due to its halo-tolerance and distribution in salt marshes. However, sympatric ostracod micro-crustaceans often co-occur within these salt marshes and can be found in dense populations, with field evidence suggesting exploitative competition for resources. Our experiments demonstrate resource limiting conditions caused significant increases in mosquito developmental times, decreased adult survival and decreased adult size. Overall, non-culicid exploitation experiments showed little effect on larval development and survival, but similar effects on adult size. We suggest that the alterations of adult traits owing to non-culicid controphic competition has potential to extend to vector-borne disease transmission. PMID:26558896

  12. Toxicity of Metals to a Freshwater Ostracod: Stenocypris major.

    PubMed

    Shuhaimi-Othman, Mohammad; Yakub, Nadzifah; Ramle, Nur-Amalina; Abas, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Adults of freshwater ostracod Stenocypris major (Crustacea, Candonidae) were exposed for a four-day period in laboratory conditions to a range of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), aluminium (Al), and manganese (Mn) concentrations. Mortality was assessed, and median lethal times (LT(50)) and concentrations (LC(50)) were calculated. LT(50) and LC(50) increased with the decrease in mean exposure concentrations and times, respectively, for all metals. LC(50)s for 96 hours for Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Ni, Fe, Al, and Mn were 25.2, 13.1, 1189.8, 526.2, 19743.7, 278.9, 3101.9, and 510.2 μg/L, respectively. Metals bioconcentration in S. major increases with exposure to increasing concentrations, and Cd was the most toxic to S. major, followed by Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Al, and Ni (Cd>Cu>Fe>Mn>Pb>Zn>Al>Ni). Comparison of LC(50) values for metals for this species with those for other freshwater crustacean reveals that S. major is equally or more sensitive to metals than most other tested crustacean.

  13. Ostracode Mg/Ca Paleothermometry: Applications and Complications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G. S.

    2007-12-01

    Ostracode (bivalved Crustacea) shell Mg/Ca paleothermometry has wide applicability in Cenozoic paleoclimatology over 101 to 107 year timescales because they are commonly fossilized, live in freshwater, shallow- and deep-marine habitats, and grow by molting, which minimizes Mg/Ca variability due to ontogenetic variability. Two empirically derived Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations based on core top and culturing include one for the shallow marine, estuarine genus Loxoconcha (5 to 30°C) and another for deep-sea genus Krithe (<1 to 14°C). The former produced a temperature history for Chesapeake Bay for the last millennium, which has been intensively analyzed in the context of the hockey stick temperature curve. The latter produced evidence for decreased deep-sea temperature during glacial intervals and the first Atlantic-wide reconstruction of deep-sea temperature during the warm mid-Pliocene. In addition to temperature, however, factors such as host-water magnesium concentrations, salinity, intra-shell, intra-population, and interspecific variabilility, seasonality, biological factors (shell secretion rate), and post-mortem dissolution can contribute to scatter in calibration datasets and uncertainty in paleotemperature estimates. We will review these processes, present a new 2000 year Chesapeake temperature record, and discuss its relation to twentieth century climate change.

  14. A 600-ka Arctic sea-ice record from Mendeleev Ridge based on ostracodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Thomas M.; Polyak, L.V.; Reed, D.; Kandiano, E. S.; Marzen, R. E.; Council, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Arctic paleoceanography and sea-ice history were reconstructed from epipelagic and benthic ostracodes from a sediment core (HLY0503-06JPC, 800 m water depth) located on the Mendeleev Ridge, Western Arctic Ocean. The calcareous microfaunal record (ostracodes and foraminifers) covers several glacial/interglacial cycles back to estimated Marine Isotope Stage 13 (MIS 13, ∼500 ka) with an average sedimentation rate of ∼0.5 cm/ka for most of the stratigraphy (MIS 5–13). Results based on ostracode assemblages and an unusual planktic foraminiferal assemblage in MIS 11 dominated by a temperate-water species Turborotalita egelida show that extreme interglacial warmth, high surface ocean productivity, and possibly open ocean convection characterized MIS 11 and MIS 13 (∼400 and 500 ka, respectively). A major shift in western Arctic Ocean environments toward perennial sea ice occurred after MIS 11 based on the distribution of an ice-dwelling ostracode Acetabulastoma arcticum. Spectral analyses of the ostracode assemblages indicate sea ice and mid-depth ocean circulation in western Arctic Ocean varied primarily at precessional (∼22 ka) and obliquity (∼40 ka) frequencies.

  15. Lake Michigan's late Quaternary limnological and climate history from ostracode, oxygen isotope, and magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, Richard M.; Colman, Steven M.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Keigwin, Loyd D.

    1994-01-01

    The limnology of Lake Michigan has changed dramatically since the late Pleistocene in response to the expansion and contraction of continental glaciers, to differential isostatic rebound, and to climate change. The lake sediment's stratigraphic trends, magnetic susceptibility, δ18O, and ostracode species abundance ratios provide criteria to identify the lake's response to glacial ice and to differential isostatic rebound. The latter phenomena dominate the lake's late Pleistocene and early Holocene history. The lake's hydrological budget provides the primary linkage between the lake and climate, particularly effective moisture. Dissolved salts were stored in the lake's water column when the lake's output shifted toward evaporation, but were flushed when output shifted toward outflow. The lake's salt storage history may be interpreted from some ostracode, δ18O, and magnetic susceptibility records found in sediment cores. Climate change influenced the entire lake's limnological history, but became the primary limnological driver from about the middle-Holocene to the present. The complex limnological history of Lake Michigan resulted in substantial changes in the ostracode species assemblages; from about 12,000 ka to about 5,500 ka, five ostracode intervals can be identified. These ostracode intervals provide a within-lake biostratigraphy and a stratigraphic reference for reconstruction of the paleoenvironmental dynamics of the lake.

  16. A 600-ka Arctic sea-ice record from Mendeleev Ridge based on ostracodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; Polyak, L.; Reed, D.; Kandiano, E. S.; Marzen, R. E.; Council, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    Arctic paleoceanography and sea-ice history were reconstructed from epipelagic and benthic ostracodes from a sediment core (HLY0503-06JPC, 800 m water depth) located on the Mendeleev Ridge, Western Arctic Ocean. The calcareous microfaunal record (ostracodes and foraminifers) covers several glacial/interglacial cycles back to estimated Marine Isotope Stage 13 (MIS 13, ˜500 ka) with an average sedimentation rate of ˜0.5 cm/ka for most of the stratigraphy (MIS 5-13). Results based on ostracode assemblages and an unusual planktic foraminiferal assemblage in MIS 11 dominated by a temperate-water species Turborotalita egelida show that extreme interglacial warmth, high surface ocean productivity, and possibly open ocean convection characterized MIS 11 and MIS 13 (˜400 and 500 ka, respectively). A major shift in western Arctic Ocean environments toward perennial sea ice occurred after MIS 11 based on the distribution of an ice-dwelling ostracode Acetabulastoma arcticum. Spectral analyses of the ostracode assemblages indicate sea ice and mid-depth ocean circulation in western Arctic Ocean varied primarily at precessional (˜22 ka) and obliquity (˜40 ka) frequencies.

  17. Wisconsinan and Sangamonian climate interpreted from fossil ostracodes and vegetation in south-central Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, B.B. ); Forester, R.M. ); Zhu, Hong; Baker, R.G. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The interpretation of paleoclimate during the late Illinoian, Sangamonian, and Wisconsinan Ages in the region of present south-central Illinois has been based on plant macrofossil, pollen, and vertebrate records. The ostracode records identify periods of flow across the basins and perhaps characteristics of groundwater discharge or recharge. Basins with the largest lake-to-catchment-area ratio were most sensitive to changes in effective moisture and hydrochemistry. The Sangamonian included three intervals during which the winters were warmer than those of historical record. These intervals are represented by sediment containing relatively abundant arboreal pollen, notably bald cypress and sweet gum, and the ostracode Heterocypris punctata, which lives in subtropical to tropical lakes and estuaries. H. punctata occurs with other ostracodes that require low salinity; their association indicates that precipitation typically exceeded evaporation and that the basin was affected by throughflow. The Sangamonian ended with two warm, wet episodes that sandwich an interval implying prairie lake conditions. Warmth-loving species are abundantly represented in upper Sangamonian sediments. Such warm, wet episodes are not known to have occurred in the Midcontinent during the Holocene. The top of the Sangamonian in all except the Pittsburgh Basin is capped by a layer of reworked sediment containing fluvial ostracodes and exotic mixtures of pollen, including both spruce and sweet gum but dominated by chenopods. The reworked layer is overlain by Wisconsinan sediment containing abundant pollen of boreal taxa and ostracodes that indicate basin throughflow.

  18. Latest Mississippian (Namurian A) nonmarine ostracodes from West Virginia and Virginia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    Nonmarine ostracodes occur as partly exfoliated carapaces and internal molds at the base of the Bramwell Member of the Bluestone Formation, which represents the uppermost Mississippian (Namurian A), stratigraphic subdivision in West Virginia and Virginia. These specimens are important in that they permit the determination of a variety of adductor-muscle-attachment scars. The adductor-muscle-attachment scar patterns illustrated herein for the first time are the oldest recorded in North America for nonmarine ostracodes. The new family Carbonitidae and superfamily Carbonitacea are established on the basis of the pattern of adductor-muscle-attachment scars. The following nonmarine genera in this unit are illustrated in open nomenclature: Carbonita Strand, 1928; Whipplella? Holland, 1934; Gutschickia Scott, 1944; Pruvostina? Scott and Summerson, 1943; Darwinula Brady and Robertson, 1885; and two steinkerns of geisinid ostracodes, 'Pseudo-ornamentation' on molds is illustrated.-Author

  19. Comparison of aquatic and dietary exposure of heavy metals Cd, Cu, and Zn to benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Janice Beltran; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Kasuga, Ikuro

    2014-07-01

    The benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens is becoming an important tool for the ecotoxicological assessment of contaminated sediments. However, no study has yet explored solid-phase (dietary) exposure to ostracod. The present study examined the effects of metals on H. incongruens through aquatic and dietary exposures. The algal food Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to different concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn), and subcellular distributions of these metals in algal cells were determined. Parallel experiments were also performed to determine the toxic effects of dissolved metals on ostracod through aqueous exposure. Significant toxic effects on mortality were observed when ostracod were fed with Cd-contaminated (47-100%) and Cu-contaminated algae (55-100%). With increasing accumulated Zn in the algal cell, ostracod mortality also increased (20-83%). Aquatic exposure of ostracod to different concentrations of dissolved Cd (3.2-339 µg Cd/L) and Cu (260-2600 µg Cu/L) resulted in high observed mortalities (57-100% and 95-100%, respectively). Based on the results of aqueous and dietary exposure tests, it can be concluded that both exposure routes are important in evaluating the toxic effect of Cd on ostracod. Similar results were observed in tests using other metals (i.e., using Cu and Zn), thus emphasizing the importance of considering not only aquatic but also dietary exposure routes when evaluating metal toxicity to ostracod.

  20. Environmental Factors Controlling Ostracod Distribution on the Tibetan Plateau and Adjacent Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, N.; Pröttel, R.; Glodniok, S.; Söndgerath, D.; Naumann, K.; Frenzel, P.; Mischke, S.; Schwalb, A.

    2014-12-01

    Non-marine ostracods represent a reliable tool to reconstruct past climate conditions. The investigation of environmental tolerances of modern ostracod species is therefore vital to estimate past climate conditions based on fossil assemblages. To determine the climate range of individual ostracod species their modern geographical distribution is combined with climate data sets. The overlap of modern ecological tolerances of ostracod species found in a fossil assemblage yield information about past air temperatures [1]. In our study we establish ecological tolerances of species from the Tibetan Plateau and adjacent areas and indicate which environmental parameter is most important for species distribution. Therefore the point biserial correlation coefficient is applied on the species distribution of 34 taxa from 364 locations based on the presence/absence of species. We use a 0.93 km gridded climate database that pairs climate parameters with modern collection sites. In total we investigated the influence of 20 different environmental parameters, such as annual temperature amplitude, July and January temperatures, precipitation, salinity and altitude. The yearly temperature range is the most important factor defining the distribution for Candona candida and Fabaeformiscandona gyirongensis. The distribution of Eucypris mareotica is also influenced by the yearly temperature range, but in addition is restricted by low salinities. Species showing no correlation to temperature variations in their distribution were also identified. The distribution of Limnocythere inopinata and Heterocypris salina is restricted by the amount of precipitation, especially during winter months, and low salinities. On the other hand, Candona neglectaseems to be unaffected by any of the studied parameters and probably only is limited by extremely high salinities. The calculated mutual climate ranges of the investigated ostracod species will be applied to ostracod assemblage data from a long

  1. Ostracod Body Size: Locality in Accordance with Cope's and Bergmann's Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, T.; Tolosa, R.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of climates exists on planet Earth, and the different kinds of life inhabiting each area vary greatly in accordance with its topography and weather conditions. The nature of each climate is in part determined by its latitude—latitudes closer to 90º suggest a colder climate while latitudes closer to 0º suggest a warmer, more tropical climate. The evolution of organisms is expected to differ in different parts of the world because environment plays such a significant role in it. In our study, we focus on the relationship between location and the extent to which the evolution of ostracod body size follows Cope's Rule (i.e., the tendency for body size to increase over time) and Bergmann's Rule (i.e., body size decreases with temperature) from the Ordovician to the Holocene. Using body sizes of ostracod occurrences, we explored the relationships among size, latitude and time. Modern ecosystems near the poles are more sensitive to environmental and climate change than those near the equator, we hypothesized that ostracods with latitudes closer to the poles will follow Cope's Rule more closely. To test this hypothesis, we compared body size and latitude as well as trends of body size evolution over time in tropical, temperate and polar regions. The graphs produced showed that over different latitudes, there was a decreasing trend in the mean size of ostracods over time. This means that the evolution of ostracod body size does not follow Cope's Rule any more in polar and temperate regions than it does in tropical regions. In fact, our data suggests that ostracods do not necessarily follow Cope's Rule or Bergmann's Rule at all, which concurs with a notion that has been previously brought up—the possibility that ectothermic marine organisms are exceptions to Bergmann's Rule.

  2. Chester (Mississippian) ostracodes from Bangor Formation of Black Warrior basin, northern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Devery, H.; Dewey, C.

    1986-05-01

    A previously unreported ostracode fauna is described from the Bangor Limestone in Franklin, Lawrence, and Colbert Counties, Alabama. The Bangor formation is a Chesterian (Mississippian) platformal carbonate sequence. The predominant carbonates are bioclastic and oolitic grainstones to wackestones with less abundant micritic claystones. Intercalated fine clastics are common in the upper and lower parts of the sequence. This study focuses on the bioclastic limestones with interbedded shales of the lower Bangor. The megafaunal associations include crinoid and blastoid pelmatozoans, orthotetid, and spiriferid brachiopids, and both fenestrate and nonfenestrate bryozoans. Solitary rugose corals and trilobites may be locally abundant. Gastropods and bivalves form a consistent but accessory part of the fauna, which indicates a shallow, nearshore shelf environment. A diverse ostracode fauna of variable abundance has been collected from the shaly units and friable limestones. The ostracode fauna indicates shallow, open-marine conditions and is dominated by bairdiaceans, including Bairdia spp. Rectobairdia and Bairdiacypris. Several species of Cavellina, healdia, and Seminolites are also abundant. Palaeocopids present include Coryellina, Kirkbya, and Polytylites. Kloedenellaceans include Beyrichiopsis, Glyptopleura, Glypotpleurina, and .Hypotetragona. Paraparchitaceans are notably more scarce, but specimens of Shishaella have been found. Some sample have a high valve to carapace ratio, suggesting postmortem transport. Although diversity is high, numerical abundances can be low. Initial studies suggest the ostracodes have a Mid-Continent affinity, which may indicate that the Appalachians were acting as a barrier to migration of European forms.

  3. Systematic paleontology of Quaternary ostracode assemblages from the Gulf of Alaska; Part 3, Family Cytheruridae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouwers, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-six species of podocopid ostracodes, most belonging to the Family Cytheruridae, are reported from Quaternary continental-shelf sediments of the Gulf of Alaska. Descriptions and illustrations are provided for 27 new species, 11 previously described species, and 8 species retained in open nomenclature. This report is based on 198 bottom grab samples collected during 1975, 1979, and 1980.

  4. Abyssal ostracods from the South and Equatorial Atlantic Ocean: Biological and paleoceanographic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, T. M.; Martinez, Arbizu P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the distribution of ostracods from ???5000 m depth from the Southeast and Equatorial Atlantic Ocean recovered from the uppermost 10 cm of minimally disturbed sediments taken by multiple-corer during the R/V Meteor DIVA2 expedition M63.2. Five cores yielded the following major deep-sea genera: Krithe, Henryhowella, Poseidonamicus, Legitimocythere, Pseudobosquetina, and Pennyella. All genera are widely distributed in abyssal depths in the world's oceans and common in Cenozoic deep-sea sediments. The total number of ostracod specimens is higher and ostracod shell preservation is better near the sediment-water interface, especially at the 0-1 cm core depths. Core slices from ???5 to 10 cm were barren or yielded a few poorly preserved specimens. The DIVA2 cores show that deep-sea ostracod species inhabit corrosive bottom water near the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) even though their calcareous valves are rarely preserved as fossils in sediment cores due to postmortem dissolution. Their occurrence at great water depths may partially explain the well-known global distributions of major deep-sea taxa in the world's oceans, although further expeditions using minimal-disturbance sampling devices are needed to fill geographic gaps. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of stable isotope data with pollen and ostracod faunal data in paleoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Karel L.

    Sediments from 2300 m elevation in south-central Colorado and dating from 2.6-0.6 Ma have been recovered from surface outcrops and by core drilling. Three types of data (biogenic and inorganic stable isotope, pollen, and ostracod faunal) contributing to the two million year climatic record from this locality are compared against one another. Vadose zone carbonate δ13C values are used to infer July minimum temperatures from percent of grasses using the C4 photosynthetic pathway. The inferred temperatures are consistent with the occurrence of Limnocythere bradburyi, an ostracod that lives today only south of the frostline in North America. Biogenic carbonate δ13C data are interpreted as a measure of surface runoff, and δ18O data as a measure of evaporation/precipitation. Stable isotope data are significantly different between temperature sensitive species of ostracods, and less significant between salinity-sensitive species of ostracods. Biogenic isotope data are most negative when the abundance of Picea, Pinus, and Artemisia pollen indicates glaciation. The climate reconstruction derived from the combined interpretations of the Hansen Bluff data is in agreement with details of marine and terrestrial climatic records. Two major shifts in climate are apparent, one to more evaporative conditions at about 1.6 Ma and another toward cold, wet, glacial conditions starting at about 0.90 Ma.

  6. Palaeobiogeographical patterns reveal the origins of a pelagic lifestyle in ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Vincent; Mark, Williams; Siveter David, J.; Robert, Goodall; Elena, Mikhailova; Anna, Tarasenko; Firuza, Salimova

    2016-04-01

    Coupled with evidence from depositional setting, faunal associates and functional morphology, the palaeogeographical distribution patterns of ancient marine organisms can be used as a test of lifestyle. Thus, fossil organisms that are interpreted to have been planktonic throughout their lifecycle (e.g. graptolites), and those with a long-lived planktonic larval stage (e.g. the planula larvae of corals) typically have wide intercontinental distribution, whilst those that have a demersal and short-lived larval stage (e.g. brachiopods), and those that are exclusively benthic (e.g. podocope ostracods) generally have a more restricted biogeographical distribution. Here we develop an independent test of fossil ostracod autoecology using modern distribution patterns to visualize 'geographical domains' for pelagic and benthic lifestyles. These data are statistically filtered in order to match the ranges of geography and bathymetry between Silurian and modern forms. Our analysis decisively identifies Silurian myodocopes with ranges overlapping with modern pelagic ostracods. Though predicated on ostracods, our approach is potentially applicable to analyzing the patterns of any putative arthropod zooplankton in the fossil record where the ecology of modern representatives can be readily determined. Furthermore it may also form a guide to identify fossil zooplanktonic arthropods (like some Ordovician trilobites) that have no modern representatives.

  7. A counter-reductionist argument for the influence of solute composition on ostracode distribution: Implications for paleoecology

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.C.; Howard, K.W.F. )

    1992-01-01

    The utility of fossil ostracodes for tracking climatically-driven Holocene physicochemical changes of lakes has been a recurrent theme in paleoenvironmental research. Recent studies, aimed at improving the precision of ostracode-mediated environmental reconstructions, have attempted to decipher this robust, ostracode-climate, couplet, and strong correlational evidence concerning the influence of solute composition on ostracode distribution has emerged. By drawing on two examples, namely the response of ostracodes to (1) Holocene hydrocompositional changes in a lake from Russell, Manitoba, and (2) the anthropogenic contamination of groundwater along an urban-rural transect in south-central Ontario, a hypothesis is generated to explain this apparent association. Contrary to the reductionist opinions (i.e. that hydrochemistry operates on ostracode distribution through the direct imposition of physiological barriers), solute composition is viewed as a surrogate variable through which to evaluate cumulative, immeasurable effects of climate, geology, hydrology and the biosphere (including humans). By virtue of their short life-cycles, it is suggested that ostracodes would overcome evolutionary barriers imposed by gradual changes in solute composition if it uniquely controlled their occurrence. Solving this problem would enhance the resolving power of paleoenvironmental reconstructions and, if the proposed argument is valid, it may lend credibility to uniformitarian principles operative in Quaternary paleoecology. The replacement of one group of species by another better adapted to an environment in its totality, seems more likely to hold up in ecological time, than adaptation to a single, specific, overriding hydrochemical parameter.

  8. Ostracods and facies of the Early and Middle Frasnian at Devils Gate in Nevada: Relationship to the Alamo Event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casier, J.-G.; Berra, I.; Olempska, Ewa; Sandberg, C.; Preat, A.

    2006-01-01

    In order to document the Alamo Event and to investigate its influence on shallow-marine environments, we undertook a study of ostracods, conodonts, and analysis of the sedimentology of the lower member of the type Devils Gate Limestone, Six major carbonate microfacies (MF1-MF6) ranging from open-marine environments below storm wave base to pre-evaporitic supratidal lagoons were recognized. The sedimentological study detected no important sedimentological changes during the Alamo Event; only an influx of detrital material and lithoclasts indicate that an unusual event had occurred. Ostracods are generally rare or absent in the lower member of the Devils Gate Limestone, and only 2,000 carapaces, valves and fragments were extracted; from these some 26 taxa were identified. Two new species, Voronina? eureka and Serenida dorsoplicata are proposed. The ostracods belong to the Eifelian Mega-Assemblage and their distribution was influenced by strong salinity variations. Because of the rarity and low diversity of ostracods and conodonts in samples collected from the lower part of the lower member of the Devils Gate Limestone it is not adequate to demonstrate conclusively an extinction event close to the Alamo Event Bed. Nevertheless the greater abundance and diversity of ostracods above this bed seems to indicate that the Alamo Event did not result in significant extinction of ostracod taxa in this shallow water setting. The ostracod fauna present in the lower member of the Devils Gate Limestone suggests faunal exchanges between Nevada and the Russian Platform via the Western Canadian platform.

  9. Deep-sea ostracode species diversity: Response to late Quaternary climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; DeMartino, D.M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Late Quaternary ostracode assemblages from the North Atlantic Ocean were studied to establish the effect of climatic changes of the past 210,000 yr (marine oxygen isotope stages 7-1) on deep-sea benthic biodiversity and faunal composition. Two-hundred and twenty five samples from the Chain 82-24 Core 4PC (41??43'N, 32??51'W, 3427 m water depth) on the western Mid-Atlantic Ridge revealed high amplitude fluctuations in ostracode abundance and diversity coincident with orbital and suborbital scale climate oscillations measured by several paleoceanographic proxy records. During the past 210,000 yr, ostracode biodiversity as measured by species number (S) and the Shannon-Weaver index, H(S), oscillated from H(S) = 0.4 during glacial periods (marine isotope stages 6, 5d, 5b, 4, and 2) to H(S) = 1.1 during interglacial and interstadial periods (stages 7, 5e, 5c, 5a, 3 and 1). A total of 23 diversity peaks could be recognized. Eleven of these signify major periods of high diversity [H(S) > 0.8, S = 10-21] occurring every 15-20 ka. Twelve were minor peaks which may represent millennial-scale diversity oscillations. The composition of ostracode assemblages varies with Krithe-dominated assemblages characterizing glacial intervals, and Argilloecia-Cytheropteron characterizing deglacials, and trachyleberid genera (Poseidonamicus, Echinocythereis, Henryhowella, Oxycythereis) abundant during interglacials. Diversity and faunal composition changes can be matched to independent deep-sea paleoceanographic tracers such as benthic foraminiferal carbon isotopes, Krithe trace elements (Mg/Ca ratios), and to North Atlantic region climate records such as Greenland ice cores. When interpreted in light of ostracode species' ecology, these faunal and diversity patterns provide evidence that deep-sea benthic ecosystems experience significant reorganization in response to climate changes over orbital to millennial timescales.

  10. Toxicity evaluation of road dust in the runoff process using a benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruna; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Kasuga, Ikuro; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2011-05-15

    Road dust is considered an important source of sediment contamination; however, there are few studies on the toxicity of road dust on benthic organisms. This study evaluates the toxicity of road dust on the benthic ostracod, Heterocypris incongruens, through a 6-day direct exposure experiment. All six road dust samples collected in heavy traffic areas caused high mortality of the ostracod, whereas the road dust collected in a residential area did not show toxicity to the ostracod. After maintaining the mixture of road dust and water for 24 h, the toxicity of the road dust decreased significantly for three of the six samples in the heavy traffic areas, suggesting these road dust samples become less toxic in the surface runoff process. In addition, we conducted the same toxicity test on manipulated road dust using different solid/liquid ratios and holding times to evaluate the change in toxicity caused by the runoff process. Wet road dust that had been separated from a dust-water mixture after a holding time of 1 h or 24 h did not show lethal toxicity, while the water-soluble fraction of the mixture caused high mortality of the ostracod at a solid/liquid ratio of 1:2 and 1:4. However, after a 7-day holding time of the dust-water mixture, the wet road dust and the water-soluble fraction showed lethal toxicity to the ostracod. These results suggest that toxicants of road dust seemed to exist mainly in water soluble fraction eluted off by rain water; however, particle-bound fraction again showed lethal toxicity after 7 days of incubation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ostracode trace metal geochemistry from Lake Tanganyika, Africa: Towards the development of a lacustrine paleothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, J.; Cohen, A. S.; Reiners, P. W.; Dettman, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The development of quantitative lacustrine paleotemperature records is critical to understanding how past climate changes influenced the ecology and hydrology of lakes. Whereas paleoecological transfer functions, TEX-86 and clumped isotopes are all widely applied methods, all have their limitations. We aim to further the development of an alternative method with wider applications: ostracode trace metal geochemistry. Trace element compositions of ostracode valves reflect discriminatory element uptake that in turn reflect ambient environmental conditions and have previously shown promise for quantitative paleotemperature determination. Understanding the specific environmental controls on element concentrations and ratios is an area of active research with much attention focusing on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios and their relationships with temperature and salinity. Here, HR-ICP-MS geochemical analyses of ostracode valves are compared to an existing TEX-86 temperature record as well as gastropod stable isotopes from Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Two ostracode species (M. opaca and R. ampla) were chosen for analyses from core LT-98-58 (1759 +/- 133 AD-modern). Molar Mg/Ca ratios for M. opaca range from .04 to .16, and a trend towards increased Mg/Ca begins around 1880 AD. Molar Mg/Ca ratios for R. ampla range from .05 to .2, and no trend is discernable. Sr/Ca ratios in both species range from .003-.006 and remain relatively stable, indicating that changes in Mg/Ca are the result of temperature rather than salinity. The M. opaca Mg/Ca record closely resembles the existing TEX-86 paleotemperature record of Tierney et al. (2010) for the past ~240 yr. We intend these preliminary results to facilitate the future research and use of ostracode trace metal geochemistry in a wide range of lakes for paleotemperature reconstruction.

  12. Late Miocene/Pliocene Ostracod Biostratigraphy from South Carpathian Foredeep, Romania (Badislava-Topolog Area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floroiu, Alina; Stoica, Marius; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    The Paratethys epicontinental sea has been an essential paleogeographic feature defining the Eurasian interior since Oligocene. By the end of the Miocene, ongoing tectonic activity in the region determined severe restrictions of the connection of the large former Paratethys sea resulting in the formation of several smaller subbasins: the Pannonian basin, the Dacian basin, the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. In the western part of the Dacian Basin, the thick and continuous Mio-Pliocene sedimentary successions of the Getic Depression of Romania provide an exceptional opportunity to study the paleoecological changes in the Eastern Paratethys during the time when the Mediterranean and Black Sea experienced important sea level changes related to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. These sedimentary successions were the basis of high-resolution magnetobiostratigraphic studies that allow a detailed correlation to the Geological Time Scale. Here, we present the main characteristics of the ostracod assemblages of the Late Miocene/Pliocene sedimentary succession from Badislava-Topolog section covering the Eastern Paratethys regional Maeotian and Pontian, stages that are, at moment, under ongoing formal stratigraphic definition process. The Mio-Pliocene is exposed in the central part of the Getic Depression, especially Topolog-Arges area, where it riches up to 500 m in thickness being incorporated into a large monocline structure with 15o-20o plungeto the south. The Upper Maeotian deposits from the area have developed mainly in fluviatile-deltaic facies with frequent continental intercalations. The ostracod assemblage is represented by rare fresh water ostracods of Candona, Pseudocandona and Ilyocypris genera, capable to populate unstable environments like flood-plains, lakes and rivers with temporary existence. The scarce Maeotian ostracod fauna from this marginal section differs essentially from the more diversified one of the same age recorded in areas that evolved in basinal

  13. Reconstructing monsoon dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau using ostracod shell chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, N.; De Baere, B.; Yang, Q.; Francois, R. H. G. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Frenzel, P.; Schwalb, A.

    2014-12-01

    Ostracod shells have widely been used as source material for geochemical analysis of stable isotope and trace element composition in paleolimnological reconstruction of lake hydrochemistry and climate as they provide insight into past water balance and solute evolution of lakes. During five fieldtrips to the Tibetan Plateau, taking place between 2008 and 2012, we collected live and sub-recent ostracods from 333 sites. Hydrochemical parameters, such as temperature, electrical conductivity, pH as well as major and minor ion concentrations were measured at each site and show high variability between sites. Adult intact individuals from the most common ostracod taxa were selected and their shell chemistry analyzed. The trace elemental data for the living ostracods compared to the hydrological data provides a calibration dataset for further hydrological and thus climatological reconstruction. Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios in ostracod shells provide information about past water temperature and salinity resulting from changes in precipitation vs. evaporation ratios and monsoon activity. Furthermore, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca and U/Ca ratios are being explored as redox indicators to reconstruct oxygenation cycles. To reconstruct the monsoon dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau, sediment cores from different lakes on an east-west transect were taken: two long sediment cores from lakes Nam Co and Tangra Yumco, covering the past 20,000 years, and a short core from Lake Taro Co. The lakes feature an alkaline environment but show significant differences in their electrical conductivity ranging from 0.99 mS/cm (Taro Co) and 1.8 mS/cm (Nam Co) to 12 mS/cm (Tangra Yumco). The chemical composition of valves of the most common ostracod species in these lakes, Leucocytherella sinensis, was analyzed using laser ablation ICP-MS. The reconstruction provides a more extensive insight in past precipitation - evaporation balance and lake level change and provides clues about the interaction between the

  14. Deep-sea ostracode shell chemistry (Mg:Ca ratios) and late Quaternary Arctic Ocean history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Briggs, W.M.; ,

    1996-01-01

    The magnesium:calcium (Mg:Ca) and strontium:calcium (Sr:Ca) ratios were investigated in shells of the benthic ostracode genus Krithe obtained from 64 core-tops from water depths of 73 to 4411 m in the Arctic Ocean and Nordic seas to determine the potential of ostracode shell chemistry for paleoceanographic study. Shells from the abyssal plain and ridges of the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins and the Norwegian and Greenland seas had a wide scatter of Mg:Ca ratios ranging from 0.007 to 0.012 that may signify post-mortem chemical alteration of the shells from Arctic deep-sea environments below about 1000 m water depth. There is a positive correlation (r2=0.59) between Mg:Ca ratios and bottom-water temperature in Krithe shells from water depths <900 m.

  15. Ostracode turnover and sea-level changes associated with the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speijer, Robert P.; Morsi, Abdel-Mohsen M.

    2002-01-01

    The ostracode response to oceanographic changes during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ca. 55 Ma) is largely unknown. The Gebel Duwi section (Egypt) provides a detailed ostracode record across the PETM in a middle neritic setting. Quantitative analysis of this record reveals two significant results. (1) The PETM is marked by a sharp faunal turnover, as indicated by abundance changes, local extinctions, and immigrations. This turnover punctuated a gradual basin-wide faunal transition. (2) During the ˜60 k.y. period prior to the PETM, relative sea level fell rapidly by ˜15 m. This sea-level fall was followed by an ˜20 m sea-level rise during the PETM. A possible eustatic control on these fluctuations suggests the presence of a cryosphere and variations in its size during this time of global warmth.

  16. Ostracode Paleoecology and Trace Element Shell Chemistry: A case study from Laguna Salada, Baja California, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Mayen, V.; Bernal, J.; Palacios-Fest, M.; Carreno, A.

    2007-05-01

    The Laguna Salada Basin in northeastern Baja California constitutes the southwestern limit of the Salton Trough and provides insights into the evolution of marine and non-marine sedimentary basins during the latest Neogene at the head of the Gulf of California. A 43 m long core (LS04-1) recovered from the Basin consisted of alternating clay, silt and sand beds with gypsum lenses. Three radiocarbon dates provided the age control: 41,520±790 cal years BP at 30.21 m, 25,590±320 cal years BP at 26.60 m and 15,150±70 cal years BP at 7.50 m. A total of 103 samples were analyzed for taxonomy, taphonomy and geochemistry. Eighteen marine and brackish- water ostracode species and nine benthic foraminifera species were identified. Faunal changes suggest variations in the water source with the opening of the basin to the Gulf of California. The Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of valves of two ostracode species (Limnocythere staplini and Cyprideis castus) were measured using ICPMS. Based on the Mg/Ca ratios, water paleotemperatures were estimated using a regression model. Shell chemistry shows mixed results. Some intervals fit an acceptable range, whereas other are unrealistic. Analysis of Sr/Ca ratios ostracode valves from the conflicting horizons show evidence of diagenetic effects. The fossil assemblages indicate two dry periods: prior to the 41,520 cal years BP and after the 15 ,150 cal years BP, with the maximum highstand of the basin between 25,590 and 15,150 cal years BP. Given the diagenetic effects at Laguna Salada, ostracode shell chemistry paleotemperature estimates may not be warranted in attempting to determine this parameter from the dry periods shown by faunal assemblages.

  17. On the Evolutionary Biology of Elpidium Ostracods (Limnocytheridae, Timiriaseviinae): A Proposal for Pluridisciplinary Studies

    PubMed Central

    Danielopol, Dan L.; Pinto, Ricardo L.; Gross, Martin; Da Silva Pereira, Julia; Riedl, Nicoletta

    2017-01-01

    The present essay reviews the history of the research on Elpidium ostracods (Timiriaseviinae), a group exclusively known to live in micro-aquaria of phytotelmata from Neotropical bromeliaceans. A new species, E. martensi n. sp., is described and aspects dealing with functional morphology and taxonomy of the genus are presented. Related to these topics an evolutionary hypothesis and a programme of pluridisciplinary research are proposed. This should allow further improvement of our knowledge on the origin and evolution of the subfamily Timiriaseviinae, one of the most diverse cytheroid ostracod groups in inland waters since the beginning of the Mesozoic. Specifically, the following aspects are treated in-depth in the essay: (1) morphologic traits of the valves, useful for characterisation of Timiriaseviinae taxa; (2) the reversal of the valve overlap and hinge elements; (3) the diverse development of the posterior half of the female carapace, a quasi-independent morphological trait; (4) the morphological shapes of the male copulatory process; (5) the functional significance of the antero-ventral segment of the valve selvage for the life of Elpidium ostracods in the micro-aquaria of the bromeliaceans; (6) the necessary improvement of comparative descriptions of the limbs-chaetotaxy for Timiriaseviinae. PMID:28090173

  18. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of marginal marine environments from combined paleoecological and geochemical analyses on ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anadón, P.; Gliozzi, E.; Mazzini, I.

    Marginal marine environments are complex systems, which show physico-chemical instability due to seawater/fresh water interactions. During the Quaternary these features have been more complicated by the global climatic and sea level variations. Consequently, the use of ostracod shell chemistry (trace elements, δ13C, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr) to decode the paleohydrochemical characters often is not enough to understand the paleoenvironmental changes. But, if geochemistry is coupled with the classic taxonomical/paleoecological analyses, it may provide a more unambiguous reconstruction. Combined geochemical and paleoecological analyses on ostracods were applied to two boreholes drilled in Quaternary sequences in central Italy. At Migliara (Latium), the inferred salinity deduced from ecology and geochemical data on Cyprideis shells suggests a simple mixing between marine and fresh water, mainly caused by sea-level oscillations. The lack of correlation between ostracod ecology and geochemical data in the Albinia core (Tuscany) can be explained by the mixing of waters from at least three different sources

  19. An annotated checklist of the Recent non-marine ostracods (Ostracoda: Crustacea) from Italy.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Valentina; Martens, Koen; Meisch, Claude; Rossetti, Giampaolo

    2015-02-17

    We present an updated checklist of non-marine ostracods from Italy. Data were obtained from the published literature up to April 2013 and new collections carried out in 18 out of 20 Italian regions. Altogether, 1665 ostracod samples were collected from 1241 new sites visited between 1981 and 2013. Sites were selected to encompass the most widespread types of freshwater aquatic habitats (i.e., pools, ponds, peat bogs, springs and streams, etc.). This field study led to the identification of 89 ostracod species. Five additional taxa remained at the generic level because only few (juvenile) individuals were available or the material was damaged. Of particular interest is the occurrence of four species new to Italy: Candonocypris novaezelandiae, Eucypris elongata, Ilyocypris getica and I. hartmanni. In addition, three putative new species (Pseudolimnocythere sp., Candona sp.1 and Eucypris sp.1) are left in open nomenclature. After synonymising several species and removing invalid taxa reported in the literature, the updated checklist now includes 152 species and 5 taxa identified at supraspecific level, belonging to 57 genera and 12 families (Candonidae, Cyprididae, Cytherideidae, Darwinulidae, Ilyocyprididae, Notodromadidae, Limnocytheridae, Leptocytheridae, Loxochonchidae, Hemicytheridae, Xestoleberididae and Entocytheridae). For each species, its distribution in Italy and its bibliographic records (including synonyms) for Italy are provided.

  20. Modern and Interglacial Marine Ostracode Species Diversity Patterns off Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, W. T. R.; Yasuhara, M.; Cronin, T. M.; Hunt, G.; Gemery, L.

    2016-02-01

    Latitudinal species diversity gradients (LSDGs) are a major feature of various marine groups. However, the detailed shape of LSDG in each marine taxonomic group and the causes of the diversity patterns, notably climatic factors, are still controversial due to limited sampling of many taxa in the world's oceans. We analyzed benthic podocopid ostracode faunal assemblages on the continental shelf regions from Arctic to tropical regions off eastern North America to determine biodiversity patterns and their relationships to oceanographic conditions (temperature, productivity, etc). Our database consists of 200 ostracode species from more than 100 bottom sediment samples. Preliminary results suggest that biodiversity, as measured using simple diversity (S), rarefaction, Shannon and α-Fisher indices, show strong latitudinal diversity gradients in which diversity is 2 to 3 times higher in tropical and subtropical regions that in northern high latitude areas. These modern ostracode diversity patterns will be compared with those from past interglacial periods of global warmth during the Pliocene and Pleistocene to assess the impact of warmer-than- present climate conditions on diversity.

  1. DURATION OF LIFE-CYCLE TOXICITY TESTS WITH THE OSTRACOD, HETEROCYPRIS INCONGRUENS.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Kyoshiro; Tobino, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Tsukahara, Kenta

    2017-07-29

    An acute sediment toxicity test using the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens is user friendly and has high sensitivity; however, a life-cycle test using this species has not been developed. The most challenging problem when developing a life-cycle test is that the egg development time varies greatly and is sometimes too long (>150 days) to monitor. It is desirable to shorten the duration of life-cycle toxicity tests including the observation period of egg development while preserving the ecological relevance of the net reproductive rate (R0), an endpoint in the life-cycle test. Therefore, in this study, we suggest a practical test duration for R0 using population growth rate (λ) as a measure of ecological relevance. We collected a range of life history characteristics of the ostracod by combining data from the literature and experimental results, constructed population matrix models, and calculated λ for 20 life history patterns. The results demonstrated that a longer test period (>150 days) did not increase the correlation coefficients between R0 and λ. Rather, a shorter test duration resulted in R0 being highly correlated with λ. Our results suggest that a life-cycle toxicity test using the ostracod can provide an ecologically relevant toxicity endpoint, even if the test is abandoned after about 50 days and unhatched eggs remain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Subcellular preservation in giant ostracod sperm from an early Miocene cave deposit in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Matzke-Karasz, Renate; Neil, John V.; Smith, Robin J.; Symonová, Radka; Mořkovský, Libor; Archer, Michael; Hand, Suzanne J.; Cloetens, Peter; Tafforeau, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cypridoidean ostracods are one of a number of animal taxa that reproduce with giant sperm, up to 10 000 µm in length, but they are the only group to have aflagellate, filamentous giant sperm. The evolution and function of this highly unusual feature of reproduction with giant sperm are currently unknown. The hypothesis of long-term evolutionary persistence of this kind of reproduction has never been tested. We here report giant sperm discovered by propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron micro- and nanotomography, preserved in five Miocene ostracod specimens from Queensland, Australia. The specimens belong to the species Heterocypris collaris Matzke-Karasz et al. 2013 (one male and three females) and Newnhamia mckenziana Matzke-Karasz et al. 2013 (one female). The sperm are not only the oldest petrified gametes on record, but include three-dimensional subcellular preservation. We provide direct evidence that giant sperm have been a feature of this taxon for at least 16 Myr and provide an additional criterion (i.e. longevity) to test hypotheses relating to origin and function of giant sperm in the animal kingdom. We further argue that the highly resistant, most probably chitinous coats of giant ostracod sperm may play a role in delaying decay processes, favouring early mineralization of soft tissue. PMID:24827442

  3. Marine Ostracod Provinciality in the Late Ordovician of Palaeocontinental Laurentia and Its Environmental and Geographical Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mohibullah, Mohibullah; Williams, Mark; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Sabbe, Koen; Zalasiewicz, Jan A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We examine the environmental, climatic and geographical controls on tropical ostracod distribution in the marine Ordovician of North America. Methodology/Principal Findings Analysis of the inter-regional distribution patterns of Ordovician Laurentian ostracods, focussing particularly on the diverse Late Ordovician Sandbian (ca 461 to 456 Ma) faunas, demonstrates strong endemicity at the species-level. Local endemism is very pronounced, ranging from 25% (e.g. Foxe basin) to 75% (e.g. Michigan basin) in each basin, a pattern that is also reflected in other benthic faunas such as brachiopods. Multivariate (ordination) analyses of the ostracod faunas allow demarcation of a Midcontinent Province and a southern Marginal Province in Laurentia. While these are most clearly differentiated at the stratigraphical level of the bicornis graptolite biozone, analyses of the entire dataset suggest that these provinces remain distinct throughout the Sandbian interval. Differences in species composition between the provinces appear to have been controlled by changes in physical parameters (e.g. temperature and salinity) related to water depth and latitude and a possible regional geographic barrier, and these differences persist into the Katian and possibly the Hirnantian. Local environmental parameters, perhaps operating at the microhabitat scale, may have been significant in driving local speciation events from ancestor species in each region. Conclusions/Significance Our work establishes a refined methodology for assessing marine benthic arthropod micro-benthos provinciality for the Early Palaeozoic. PMID:22900000

  4. Pliocene-climate history of the western united states derived from lacustrine ostracodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Pliocene sediments from several sites in western North America contain ostracodes indicating deposition in lacustrine and wetland settings. The ostracodes offer a means of reconstructing the aquatic paleoenvironment. Because water temperature, chemistry, and lake volume are coupled to climate, reconstruction of these parameters provides a direct insight into Pliocene climate. The site ages were determined from tephrochronology, paleomagnetics, and associated mammals. The morphology of many ostracode species also provides direct information about the paleoenvironment in which they lived. During the Pliocene (about 3.5-2.5 Ma) some species have unusually ornate carapace morphology indicative of large geologically stable lakes, which must have required a stable climate to sustain them. North American Pliocene climate changed from a modern-like state 4.5-3.5 Ma to a period with greater precipitation and less evaporation than today, 3.5-2.5 Ma. This wetter period, inferred from the large geologically long-lived lakes, implies a stable atmospheric circulation pattern. The stable circulation pattern collapsed around 2.5 Ma and climate returned to a modern-like situation. ?? 1991.

  5. Comparison of oxygen isotope values from bulk lake sediment and ostracod valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Blisniuk, P.

    2012-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of the water in a lake is largely controlled by the isotopic composition of precipitation in the lake's catchment area, which is, in turn, controlled by a variety of geographic and climatic factors. Accordingly, the potential to reconstruct past isotopic compositions of lake water using authigenic minerals formed in isotopic equilibrium with the lake water makes lake sediments a promising target for paleoclimate reconstructions. Several different materials can be utilized to reconstruct the oxygen isotope composition of paleo-lake water. These include biogenic carbonates, such as shells of macrofossils (e.g., clams and snails), microfossils, (e.g., ostracods) and chemically precipitated carbonates in bulk lake sediment. To evaluate the suitability of different materials for the reconstruction of oxygen isotope values of past precipitation, we compared the oxygen isotope values of bulk lake sediments and ostracod microfossils that were extracted from an 800 meters thick sequence of sediments in the Zada Basin, southwestern Tibet. The sediment was wet-sieved for grain size separation, and the <63 um size fraction was used for the analysis of the bulk lake sediment. The ostracod microfossils were typically separated from the 125-500 um size fraction. Ostracod valves were cleaned using deionized water and ultrasound. When this did not successfully clean them, we used a brush under a microscope. Preliminary results of our work yielded oxygen isotope values of -2 to -22 permil for bulk lake sediment and a narrower range of -4 to -15 permil for ostracod valves (relative to PDB). In some stratigraphic levels, the oxygen isotope values differed by as much as 10 permil. These differences are significantly higher than offsets of several permil which are commonly observed as the result of species specific vital effects during biogenic calcite precipitation. A plausible explanation for this is that the lake sediment contains a significant portion

  6. Fossil ostracodes of continental shelf cores at IODP Site U1354 (Expedition 317)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunoki, S.; Ohi, T.; Kawagata, S.; Ishida, K.; Shipboard Scientific Party, E.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 317 was devoted to understanding the relative importance of global sea level (eustasy) versus local tectonic and sedimentary processes in controlling continental margin sedimentary cycles. The expedition recovered sediments from the Eocene to recent period, with a particular focus on the sequence stratigraphy of the late Miocene to recent, when global sea level change was dominated by glacioeustasy. Drilling in the Canterbury Basin, on the eastern margin of the South Island of New Zealand took advantage of high rates of Neogene sediment supply, which preserved a high-frequency (0.1-0.5 m.y.) record of depositional cyclicity. Ostracodes are crustaceans that widely inhabit marine, brackish, and non-marine environments. Shallow marine species have more restricted habitat and respond sensitively to environmental changes. Therefore they are a useful tool for high-resolution analyses of paleoenvironmental changes. We study samples older than ~1.0 Ma from Site U1354, which is in an intermediate position within the three shelf sites transect of Expedition 317. Quaternary to early Pliocene (~4.5 Ma) sediments were cored in this site with best core recovery (81%) among the shelf sites. The period from the Pliocene to Pleistocene is known for distinct paleoclimatic changes, from the intensive warming at around 3.5 Ma, to the cooling stage starting from 2.75 Ma. We expect that high-resolution analyses of fossil ostracode assemblages reveal detailed sea level and paleoceanographic changes on the continental shelf of the Canterbury Basin caused by global climate changes. Samples were examined at 1.5 m depth intervals. Samples of ~20 cc were freeze-dried and washed through a 63 µm opening sieve. The residues were dried and then divided into aliquot parts containing around 200 specimens using a sample splitter. All individual ostracodes were picked from residues coarser than 125 µm. Valves and carapaces were counted as one

  7. Holocene environmental fluctuations of Lake Bosten (Xinjiang, China) inferred from ostracods and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischke, S.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Bosten is an oligohaline lake in an intermontane basin of the Tianshan Mountains in northwestern China. The open-basin lake receives water from a large catchment area (56,000 km2) with the Kaidu River as its main tributary. A core of 9.25 m length was drilled at 6.25 m water depth in the southwestern part of the lake near the Kaidu river inflow. Sediments of the core contain authigenic carbonate materials, including calcitic shells of ostracods, charophyte-oogonia and stem incrustations. Five AMS-dating results provided the base to establish the chronology of the core which extends back to about 8.4 cal. ka BP. The majority of the ostracod taxa from the core may be classified into two different groups comprising littoral taxa (Cyclocypris ovum, Cypridopsis vidua, Darwinula stevensoni, Fabaeformiscandona hyalina, Herpetocypris chevreuxi, Heterocypris salina) and taxa reflecting profundal conditions (Candona neglecta, Cytherissa lacustris and Fabaeformiscandona caudata). Among these taxa, C. neglecta and D. stevensoni were the most abundant ostracod species providing more than 50 % of the fossil shells in most core samples. Where C. neglecta peaks D. stevensoni often shows minima abundances and vice versa. Stable isotope data derived from ostracod calcite display large variations throughout the core. d18O and d13C values vary over a range of 10 ‰ and 6.7 ‰ respectively. These large ranges may reflect that Lake Bosten responded like a semi-closed lake at least. Low lake levels inferred from species assemblages correspond to lowest d18O values thus indicating the influence of isotopically light river water at the core site and a low residence time and salinity. High d18O values correspond to higher abundances of Candona neglecta and low abundances of littoral taxa pointing towards deeper conditions, a higher distance of the core site from the river inflow, a higher residence time and corresponding salinity of the lake water. On the base of ostracod and stable

  8. Ostracod calcite records the 18O/16O ratio of the bicarbonate and carbonate ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriendt, Laurent S.; McGregor, Helen V.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2017-10-01

    The δ18O of ostracod valves is widely used to infer water δ18O and temperature. However, ostracod δ18O appears sensitive to other environmental variables. In addition, there is species-dependent ostracod calcite 18O enrichment, relative to slowly precipitated inorganic calcite under the same conditions. Together these uncertainties complicate ostracod paleoclimate reconstructions. This study presents a new understanding of the causes of ostracod δ18O variations based on a global database of published ostracod δ18O values in lake, marine and coastal environments, and from culture experiments. The database includes associated field/experiment host water parameters including temperature (-1 to 32 °C), water δ18O (-13.2‰ to 4.3‰ VSMOW), pH (6.9-10.4), salinity (0-72 g/kg), calcite saturation states (0.6-26), and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration [DIC] (0.9-54.3 mmol/kg). The data show that: (1) the δ18O of marine and non-marine ostracods reflects the 18O/16O of the sum of host water CO32- and HCO3- ions. For example, at a given temperature, the δ18O of non-marine ostracods decreases by 4‰ to 6‰ as [CO32-]/[DIC] reaches 70%, depending on the ostracod species. In low [CO32-]/[DIC] settings (i.e. high HCO3-/CO32-), ostracod 18O/16O is close to the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions, which explains why on average ostracod δ18O is higher than the δ18O of inorganic calcite precipitated slowly under the same conditions. (2) Taxonomic offsets in ostracod δ18O vary with the host water [CO32-]/[DIC]. In environments where HCO3- ≫ CO32- (i.e. most freshwater lakes), the 18O/16O of Candonids is indistinguishable from the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions (difference of 0.10 ± 0.16‰) while the 18O/16O of Cyprids is lower than the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions by -0.77‰ to -0.32‰, Cytherids by -0.88 ± 0.29‰, and Limnocytherids by -1.12 ± 0.05‰. (3) The sensitivity of ostracod δ18O to [CO32-]/[DIC] also varies with taxonomy. For each percent increase in [CO32-]/[DIC

  9. Ostracods (Crustacea) and their palaeoenvironmental implication for the Solimões Formation (Late Miocene; Western Amazonia/Brazil).

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines; Caporaletti, Marco; Piller, Werner E

    2013-03-01

    Western Amazonia's landscape and biota were shaped by an enormous wetland during the Miocene epoch. Among the most discussed topics of this ecosystem range the question on the transitory influx of marine waters. Inter alia the occurrence of typically brackish water associated ostracods is repeatedly consulted to infer elevated salinities or even marine ingressions. The taxonomical investigation of ostracod faunas derived from the upper part of the Solimões Formation (Eirunepé; W-Brazil) documents a moderately diverse assemblage (19 species). A wealth of freshwater ostracods (mainly Cytheridella, Penthesilenula) was found co-occurring with taxa (chiefly Cyprideis) usually related to marginal marine settings today. The observed faunal compositions as well as constantly very light δ(18)O- and δ(13)C-values obtained by measuring both, the freshwater and brackish water ostracod group, refer to entirely freshwater conditions. These results corroborate with previous sedimentological and palaeontological observations, which proposed a fluvial depositional system for this part of western Amazonia during the Late Miocene. We demonstrate that some endemic, "brackish" water ostracods (i.e., Cyprideis) have been effectively adapted to freshwater conditions. Thus, their occurrence is no univocal evidence for the influence of brackish or marine waters in western Amazonia during the Miocene.

  10. Ostracods (Crustacea) and their palaeoenvironmental implication for the Solimões Formation (Late Miocene; Western Amazonia/Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines; Caporaletti, Marco; Piller, Werner E.

    2013-01-01

    Western Amazonia's landscape and biota were shaped by an enormous wetland during the Miocene epoch. Among the most discussed topics of this ecosystem range the question on the transitory influx of marine waters. Inter alia the occurrence of typically brackish water associated ostracods is repeatedly consulted to infer elevated salinities or even marine ingressions. The taxonomical investigation of ostracod faunas derived from the upper part of the Solimões Formation (Eirunepé; W-Brazil) documents a moderately diverse assemblage (19 species). A wealth of freshwater ostracods (mainly Cytheridella, Penthesilenula) was found co-occurring with taxa (chiefly Cyprideis) usually related to marginal marine settings today. The observed faunal compositions as well as constantly very light δ18O- and δ13C-values obtained by measuring both, the freshwater and brackish water ostracod group, refer to entirely freshwater conditions. These results corroborate with previous sedimentological and palaeontological observations, which proposed a fluvial depositional system for this part of western Amazonia during the Late Miocene. We demonstrate that some endemic, “brackish” water ostracods (i.e., Cyprideis) have been effectively adapted to freshwater conditions. Thus, their occurrence is no univocal evidence for the influence of brackish or marine waters in western Amazonia during the Miocene. PMID:26523090

  11. Evasion of predators contributes to the maintenance of male eyes in sexually dimorphic Euphilomedes ostracods (Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Speiser, Daniel I; Lampe, Rebecca I; Lovdahl, Valerie R; Carrillo-Zazueta, Brenna; Rivera, Ajna S; Oakley, Todd H

    2013-07-01

    Sexual dimorphisms have long drawn the attention of evolutionary biologists. However, we still have much to learn about the evolutionary, genetic, and developmental drivers of sexual dimorphisms. Here, we introduce ostracods of the genus Euphilomedes (Myodocopida, Ostracoda, and Crustacea) as a promising new system in which to investigate why and how sexual dimorphisms evolve. First, we ask whether male-skewed selective pressure from pelagic predators may help explain a dramatic sexual dimorphism in which male Euphilomedes have compound eyes, but females do not. Manipulative experiments demonstrate that blindfolding reduces the survival rate of male Euphilomedes when they are exposed to predatory fish. Blindfolding of the female rudimentary eyes (rudiments) does not, however, similarly influence the survival rate of brooding females. Further, numerical estimates of sighting distances, based on reasonable extrapolations from Euphilomedes's eye morphology, suggest that the eyes of male Euphilomedes are useful for detecting objects roughly the size of certain pelagic predators, but not conspecifics. We conclude that eyes do not mediate direct interactions between male and female Euphilomedes, but that differences in predation pressure-perhaps associated with different reproductive behaviors-contribute to maintaining the sexually dimorphic eyes of these ostracods. Second, through transcriptome sequencing, we examined potential gene regulatory networks that could underlie sexual dimorphism in Euphilomedes' eyes. From the transcriptome of juvenile male Euphilomedes' eyes, we identified phototransduction genes and components of eye-related developmental networks that are well characterized in Drosophila and other species. The presence of suites of eye regulatory genes in our Euphilomedes juvenile male transcriptome will allow us, in future studies, to test how ostracods regulate the development of their sexually dimorphic eyes.

  12. Quaternary ostracode and foraminiferal biostratigraphy and paleoceanography in the western Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Thomas M.; DeNinno, Lauren H.; Polyak, L.V.; Caverly, Emma K.; Poore, Richard; Brenner, Alec R.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Marzen, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    The stratigraphic distributions of ostracodes and selected calcareous benthic and planktic foraminiferal species were studied in sediment cores from ~ 700 to 2700 m water depth on the Northwind, Mendeleev, and Lomonosov Ridges in the western Arctic Ocean. Microfaunal records in most cores cover mid- to late Quaternary sediments deposited in the last ~ 600 ka, with one record covering the last ~ 1.5 Ma. Results show a progressive faunal turnover during the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT, ~ 1.2 to 0.7 Ma) and around the mid-Brunhes event (MBE, ~ 0.4 Ma) reflecting major changes in Arctic Ocean temperature, circulation and sea-ice cover. The observed MPT shift is characterized by the extinction of species that today inhabit the sea-ice free subpolar North Atlantic and/or seasonally sea-ice free Nordic Seas (Echinocythereis sp., Rockalliacf. enigmatica, Krithe cf. aquilonia, Pterygocythereis vannieuwenhuisei). After a very warm interglacial during marine isotope stage (MIS) 11 dominated by the temperate planktic foraminifer Turborotalita egelida, the MBE experienced a shift to polar assemblages characteristic of predominantly perennial Arctic sea-ice cover during the interglacial and interstadial periods of the last 300 ka. These include the planktic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, the sea-ice dwelling ostracodeAcetabulastoma arcticum and associated benthic taxa Pseudocythere caudata,Pedicythere neofluitans, and Polycope spp. Several species can be used as biostratigraphic markers of specific intervals such as ostracodes Rabilimis mirabilis — MIS 5 and P. vannieuwenhuisei extinction after MIS 11, and foraminiferal abundance zones Bulimina aculeata — late MIS 5 and Bolivina arctica — MIS 5-11.

  13. Identification, Discrimination, and Discovery of Species of Marine Planktonic Ostracods Using DNA Barcodes.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Lisa M; Angel, Martin V; Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Hopcroft, Russell R; Bucklin, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Ostracoda (Crustacea; Class Ostracoda) is a diverse, frequently abundant, and ecologically important component of the marine zooplankton assemblage. There are more than 200 described species of marine planktonic ostracods, many of which (especially conspecific species) can be identified only by microscopic examination and dissection of fragile morphological characters. Given the complexity of species identification and increasing lack of expert taxonomists, DNA barcodes (short DNA sequences for species discrimination and identification) are particularly useful and necessary. Results are reported from analysis of 210 specimens of 78 species of marine planktonic ostracods, including two novel species, and 51 species for which barcodes have not been previously published. Specimens were collected during 2006 to 2008 from the Atlantic, Indian, and Southern Oceans, Greenland Sea and Gulf of Alaska. Samples were collected from surface to 5,000 m using various collection devices. DNA sequence variation was analyzed for a 598 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Kimura-2-Parameter (K2P) genetic distances within described species (mean = 0.010 ± 0.017 SD) were significantly smaller than between species (0.260 + 0.080), excluding eight taxa hypothesized to comprise cryptic species due to morphological variation (especially different size forms) and/or collection from different geographic regions. These taxa showed similar K2P distance values within (0.014 + 0.026) and between (0.221 ± 0.068) species. All K2P distances > 0.1 resulted from comparisons between identified or cryptic species, with no overlap between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. A Neighbor Joining tree resolved nearly all described species analyzed, with multiple sequences forming monophyletic clusters with high bootstrap values (typically 99%). Based on taxonomically and geographically extensive sampling and analysis (albeit with small sample sizes

  14. Identification, Discrimination, and Discovery of Species of Marine Planktonic Ostracods Using DNA Barcodes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Ostracoda (Crustacea; Class Ostracoda) is a diverse, frequently abundant, and ecologically important component of the marine zooplankton assemblage. There are more than 200 described species of marine planktonic ostracods, many of which (especially conspecific species) can be identified only by microscopic examination and dissection of fragile morphological characters. Given the complexity of species identification and increasing lack of expert taxonomists, DNA barcodes (short DNA sequences for species discrimination and identification) are particularly useful and necessary. Results are reported from analysis of 210 specimens of 78 species of marine planktonic ostracods, including two novel species, and 51 species for which barcodes have not been previously published. Specimens were collected during 2006 to 2008 from the Atlantic, Indian, and Southern Oceans, Greenland Sea and Gulf of Alaska. Samples were collected from surface to 5,000 m using various collection devices. DNA sequence variation was analyzed for a 598 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Kimura-2-Parameter (K2P) genetic distances within described species (mean = 0.010 ± 0.017 SD) were significantly smaller than between species (0.260 + 0.080), excluding eight taxa hypothesized to comprise cryptic species due to morphological variation (especially different size forms) and/or collection from different geographic regions. These taxa showed similar K2P distance values within (0.014 + 0.026) and between (0.221 ± 0.068) species. All K2P distances > 0.1 resulted from comparisons between identified or cryptic species, with no overlap between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. A Neighbor Joining tree resolved nearly all described species analyzed, with multiple sequences forming monophyletic clusters with high bootstrap values (typically 99%). Based on taxonomically and geographically extensive sampling and analysis (albeit with small sample sizes

  15. Climate change, body size evolution, and Cope's Rule in deep-sea ostracodes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Gene; Roy, Kaustuv

    2006-01-01

    Causes of macroevolutionary trends in body size, such as Cope's Rule, the tendency of body size to increase over time, remain poorly understood. We used size measurements from Cenozoic populations of the ostracode genus Poseidonamicus, in conjunction with phylogeny and paleotemperature estimates, to show that climatic cooling leads to significant increases in body size, both overall and within individual lineages. The magnitude of size increase due to Cenozoic cooling is consistent with temperature-size relationships in geographically separated modern populations (Bergmann's Rule). Thus population-level phenotypic evolution in response to climate change can be an important determinant of macroevolutionary trends in body size. PMID:16432187

  16. Late Maastrichtian and Danian ostracode faunas from northern Alaska: reconstructions of environment and paleogeography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouwers, E.M.; De Deckker, P.

    1993-01-01

    A 300-m sequence of well-exposed fossiliferous outcrops in bluffs along the Colville River, northern Aslaska, has yielded diverse, well-preserved Maastrichtian and Danian ostracode assemblages. The Maastrichtian strata are nonmarine flood-plain deposits and contain diverse terrestrial and aquatic fossils. The Danian strata are predominantly marginal-marine and shallow-marine and include an abundant and diverse invertebrate fauna. During the Maastrichtian and early Palaeocene, polar terrestrial and marine assemblages consisted predominantly of endemic organisms that were adapted to the cool temperatures, seasonal low light conditions, and geographic isolation characteristic of northern high-latitude environments. -from Authors

  17. Paleoclimatic implications of Late Pleistocene marine ostracodes from the St. Lawrence lowlands.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1981-01-01

    Using modern zoogeographic data and inferred temperature ranges for Champlain Sea ostracode species, bottom water paleotemperatures were estimated for three phases of deposition of this inland sea. The temporal distribution of these and other environmentally diagnostic species in Champlain Sea deposits reveals a significant local climatic change in the Champlain Valley from frigid/subfrigid to cold-temperate marine conditions about 11 000 to 10 600 yr BP. Oceanographic changes in the Champlain Sea are correlated with major deglaciation events recorded in the North Atlantic.-from Author

  18. A Silurian myodocope with preserved soft-parts: cautioning the interpretation of the shell-based ostracod record

    PubMed Central

    Siveter, David J.; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Siveter, Derek J.; Sutton, Mark D.; Joomun, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Ostracod crustaceans are the most abundant fossil arthropods. The Silurian Pauline avibella gen. et sp. nov., from the Herefordshire Lagerstätte, UK, is an extremely rare Palaeozoic example with soft-part preservation. Based on its soft-part morphology, especially the exceptionally preserved limbs and presence of lateral eyes, it is assigned to the myodocopid myodocopes. The ostracod is very large, with an epipod on the fifth limb pair, as well as gills implying the presence of a heart and an integrated respiratory–circulatory system as in living cylindroleberidid myodocopids. Features of its shell morphology, however, recall halocyprid myodocopes and palaeocopes, encouraging caution in classifying ostracods based on the carapace alone and querying the interpretation of their shell-based fossil record, especially for the Palaeozoic, where some 500 genera are presently assigned to the Palaeocopida. PMID:23235709

  19. Ostracod-inferred conductivity transfer function and its utility in palaeo-conductivity reconstruction in Tibetan Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, P.; Zhu, L.; Guo, Y.; Wang, J.; Fürstenberg, S.; Ju, J.; Wang, Y.; Frenzel, P.

    2016-12-01

    Ostracod, was used as a sensitive monitor in palaeo-environmental change research. Ostracod transfer function was developing as a quantitate indicator in palaeo-limnology research. Plenty of lakes scattered on the Tibetan Plateau supplied sediments for analyzing indexes of environment in past climate change research. This application was research on samples of sub-fossil ostracod and its habitat condition, including water sample and water parameters, to produce a database for a forward transfer function based on gradient analyses. This transfer function was used for environment reconstruction of Tibetan lakes to preview past climate changes. In our research, twelve species belonging to ten genus were documented from 114 studied samples in 34 lakes. This research illustrated a specific conductivity gradient gradually increased by L.sinensis-L.dorsotuberosa-C.xizangensis, L.dorsotuberosa-L.inopinata and L.inopinata to indicate fresh-lightly brackish, brackish, brine water condition, respectively. Gradient analysis revealed that specific conductivity was the most important variable drove the distribution of sub-fossil Ostracods. A specific conductivity transfer function using a weighted averaging partial least squares (WA-PLS) model was set up to reconstruct palaeo-specific conductivity. The model presented a good correlation of measured and estimated specific conductivity (R2=0.67), a relative low root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP=0.47). Multi-proxies, including ostracod assemblages, ostracod-inferred lake level and specific conductivity, mean grain size, total organic carbon and total inorganic carbon of sediment from core of Tibetan Lakes, inferred the palaeo-climate change history of the research area. The environmental change probably was an adaption to the weakening activities of India monsoon since mid-Holocene inferred from the comparable climatic change records from the Tibetan Plateau and relative monsoonal areas.

  20. Exceptionally preserved lacustrine ostracods from the Middle Miocene of Antarctica: implications for high-latitude palaeoenvironment at 77 degrees south.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark; Siveter, David J; Ashworth, Allan C; Wilby, Philip R; Horne, David J; Lewis, Adam R; Marchant, David R

    2008-11-07

    A newly discovered Konservat-Lagerstätte from the Middle Miocene of the western Olympus Range, Dry Valleys, Antarctica, yields cypridoidean ostracods complete with preserved body and appendages. This is the first record of three-dimensionally fossilized animal soft tissues from the continent. The ostracods are preserved in goethite, secondary after pyrite, representing a novel mode of exceptional preservation. They signal a high-latitude (greater than 77 degrees south) lake setting (Palaeolake Boreas) viable for benthic animal colonization prior to 14 Myr ago. Their presence supports the notion of warmer, tundra-like environmental conditions persisting in the Dry Valleys until the Middle Miocene.

  1. Barcoding of ancient lake ostracods (crustacea) reveals cryptic speciation with extremely low distances.

    PubMed

    Karanovic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Ostracods are drastically reduced crustaceans, with never more than eight appendages enclosed between two valves, leaving only a limited number of morphological characters for species delineation. Conservative morphology of characters used to define genera, along with high variability of characters used to define species are creating problems in applying a morphospecies concept. A high intraspecific variability in a Lake Biwa (Japan) endemic, Physocypria biwaensis (Okubo, 1990), has been observed previously but was never studied in detail. Two sympatric forms, differing in pigmentation and size, suggest a presence of reproductive isolation. The aim of this study is to employ molecular and morphometric tools to aid in species delineation within P. biwaensis complex and reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships. A fragment of the mtCOI gene was amplified from 30 specimens, and an additional 37 specimens were studied for morphological characters. Resulting phylogenies showed that each morphologically distinct form is associated with a distinct phylogenetic group based on mtDNA. The average pairwise distance is very low (5%), indicating a recent divergence time. I speculate that there is a possibility that one of them originated in the lake, while the other probably colonized it afterwards. This seems to be supported with an apparent niche partitioning at different depths. In spite of the fact that traditionally used sexual characters are highly variable in these two species, the morphometric analysis of shell and soft part related characters clearly delineates them and suggests that such characters may be useful for future detection of seemingly cryptic ostracod species.

  2. Climatic significance of the ostracode fauna from the Pliocene Kap Kobenhavn Formation, north Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouwers, E.M.; Jorgensen, N.O.; Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Kap Kobenhavn Formation crops out in Greenland at 80??N latitude and marks the most northerly onshore Pliocene locality known. The sands and silts that comprise the formation were deposited in marginal marine and shallow marine environments. An abundant and diverse vertebrate and invertebrate fauna and plant megafossil flora provide age and paleoclimatic constraints. The age estimated for the Kap Kobenhavn ranges from 2.0 to 3.0 million years old. Winter and summer bottom water paleotemperatures were estimated on the basis of the ostracode assemblages. The marine ostracode fauna in units B1 and B2 indicate a subfrigid to frigid marine climate, with estimated minimum sea bottom temperatures (SBT) of -2??C and estimated maximum SBT of 6-8??C. Sediments assigned to unit B2 at locality 72 contain a higher proportion of warm water genera, and the maximum SBT is estimated at 9-10??C. The marginal marine fauna in the uppermost unit B3 (locality 68) indicates a cold temperate to subfrigid marine climate, with an estimated minimum SBT of -2??C and an estimated maximum SBT ranging as high as 12-14??C. These temperatures indicated that, on the average, the Kap Kobenhavn winters in the late Pliocene were similar to or perhaps 1-2??C warmer than winters today and that summer temperatures were 7-8??C warmer than today. -from Authors

  3. The Genome Sizes of Ostracod Crustaceans Correlate with Body Size and Evolutionary History, but not Environment.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nicholas W; Ellis, Emily A; Oakley, Todd H; Gregory, T Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Within animals, a positive correlation between genome size and body size has been detected in several taxa but not in others, such that it remains unknown how pervasive this pattern may be. Here, we provide another example of a positive relationship in a group of crustaceans whose genome sizes have not previously been investigated. We analyze genome size estimates for 46 species across the 2 most diverse orders of Class Ostracoda, commonly known as seed shrimps, including 29 new estimates made using Feulgen image analysis densitometry and flow cytometry. Genome sizes in this group range ~80-fold, a level of variability that is otherwise not seen in crustaceans with the exception of some malacostracan orders. We find a strong positive correlation between genome size and body size across all species, including after phylogenetic correction. We additionally detect evidence of XX/XO sex determination in 3 species of marine ostracods where male and female genome sizes were estimated. On average, genome sizes are larger but less variable in Order Myodocopida than in Order Podocopida, and marine ostracods have larger genomes than freshwater species, but this appears to be explained by phylogenetic inertia. The relationship between phylogeny, genome size, body size, and habitat is complex in this system and provides a baseline for future studies examining the interactions of these biological traits. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. An early to mid-Pleistocene deep Arctic Ocean ostracode fauna with North Atlantic affinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeNinno, Lauren H.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Rodriquez-Lazaro, J.; Brenner, Alec R.

    2015-01-01

    An early to middle Pleistocene ostracode fauna was discovered in sediment core P1-93-AR-23 (P23, 76.95°N, 155.07°W) from 951 meter water depth from the Northwind Ridge, western Arctic Ocean. Piston core P23 yielded more than 30,000 specimens and a total of about 30 species. Several early to mid-Pleistocene species in the genera Krithe,Echinocythereis, Pterygocythereis, and Arcacythere are now extinct in the Arctic and show taxonomic affinities to North Atlantic Ocean species. Our results suggest that there was a major ostracode faunal turnover during the global climate transitions known as the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT, ~ 1.2 to 0.7 Ma) and the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE, ~ 400 ka) reflecting the development of perennial sea ice during interglacial periods and large ice shelves during glacial periods over the last 400,000 years.

  5. Application of the flow-through time-resolved analysis technique to trace element determination in ostracod shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Nicole; De Baere, Bart; Francois, Roger; Frenzel, Peter; Schwalb, Antje

    2014-05-01

    Trace element analyses of ostracod shells are a vital tool for paleoenvironmental reconstructions from lake sediments (Börner et al., 2013). Conventional batch dissolution ICP-MS is the most common way for analyzing trace elements in ostracod shells. However, due to dissolution or secondary overgrowth the primary signal may be masked. Resulting variations in trace element composition have been identified to be in the order of a magnitude range. Therefore, the application of the newly developed flow-through technique will be assessed. The flow-through time-resolved analysis technique allows to chemically separate mineral phases of different solubility such as, in particular, original shell calcite from overgrowth calcite, and thus to correct the measurements for the biogenic signal. During a flow-through experiment, eluent is continuously pumped through a sample column, typically a filter in which the ostracod valves are loaded. The gradual dissolution of the substrate is controlled by a combination of eluent type, eluent temperature and eluent flow rate. The dissolved sample then flows directly to a mass spectrometer. The resulting data is a chromatogram, featuring different mineral phases dissolving as time progresses. Hence, the flow-through technique provides a detailed geochemical fingerprint of the substrate and therefore additional data relative to conventional methods. To calibrate this technique for the application to ostracods we use ostracod shells from Southern Tibetan Plateau lakes, which feature an alkaline environment but show highly diverse hydrochemistry. Cleaned as well as uncleaned ostracod shells show similarity in their trace element signals, allowing measurements without prior cleaning of the shells, and thus more time-efficient sample throughput. Measurements of unclean shells are corrected for the biogenic signal using an equation from Klinkhammer et al. (2004). Another advantage is that the measurements can be carried out on single ostracod

  6. Deep-sea ostracods from the South Atlantic sector of the Southern ocean during the Last 370,000 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, T. M.; Hunt, G.; Hodell, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    We report changes of deep-sea ostracod fauna during the last 370,000 yr from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 704A in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. The results show that faunal changes are coincident with glacial/interglacial-scale deep-water circulation changes, even though our dataset is relatively small and the waters are barren of ostracods until mid-MIS (Marine Isotope Stage) 5. Krithe and Poseidonamicus were dominant during the Holocene interglacial period and the latter part of MIS 5, when this site was under the influence of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Conversely, Henryhowella and Legitimocythere were dominant during glacial periods, when this site was in the path of Circumpolar Deep Water (CPDW). Three new species (Aversovalva brandaoae, Poseidonamicus hisayoae, and Krithe mazziniae) are described herein. This is the first report of Quaternary glacial/interglacial scale deep-sea ostracod faunal changes in the Southern and South Atlantic Oceans, a key region for understanding Quaternary climate and deep-water circulation, although the paucity of Quaternary ostracods in this region necessitates further research. ?? 2009 The Paleontological Society.

  7. A temporary pond in the Early Cretaceous of southern England: palaeoclimatic implications of nonmarine "Purbeck-Wealden" ostracod faunas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Excavation of the partial skeleton of an Iguanodon from the Upper Weald Clay (Barremian, Early Cretaceous) at Smokejacks Brickworks near Ockley, Surrey, UK included detailed sampling for micropalaeontological and palynological and studies (Nye et al., 2008). Rich and well-preserved non-marine assemblages of pollen and spores include early angiosperms as well as freshwater green algae. Taphonomic analyses show the ostracod assemblages to be autochthonous thanatocoenoses, indicative of local environment at the time of deposition. Using a palaeobiological approach, the ostracods and palynomorphs demonstrate temporary / ephemeral freshwater conditions at the time when the Iguanodon died and the carcase was buried. Ostracod "faunicycles" in "Purbeck-Wealden" deposits may represent salinity variations in non-marine water-bodies, influenced by the balance between precipitation and evaporation, and/or the relative abundance of permanent and temporary waterbodies in the landscape; many assemblages resulted from post-mortem mixing, perhaps during flood events (Horne, 2002). Faunal alternations may therefore reflect shifts of the boundary between warm temperate and paratropical climate in the Early Cretaceous of NW Europe. The previously rejected suggestion that such assemblage variations record Milankovitch cyclicity deserves to be reconsidered, as does the possibility that they reflect changes on sub-Milankovitch timescales. Climate variability may have influenced the differential evolutionary success of sexual, mixed and parthenogenetic reproductive strategies in nonmarine ostracods. Latitudinally restricted distribution patterns and wind dispersal of resting eggs offer potential for inferring global climate patterns from ostracod palaeobiogeography, although dispersal by large animals (e.g., crocodiles, pterosaurs) is likely to have confused any aeolian transport patterns. References Horne, D. J. 2002. Ostracod biostratigraphy and palaeoecology of the Purbeck Limestone

  8. A first calibration of nonmarine ostracod species for the quantitative estimation of Pleistocene climate change in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, D. J.; Martens, K.

    2009-04-01

    Although qualitative statements have been made about general climatic conditions in southern Africa during the Pleistocene, there are few quantifiable palaeoclimatic data based on field evidence, especially regarding whether the area was wetter or drier during the Last Glacial Maximum. Such information is critical in validating models of climate change, both in spatial and temporal dimensions. As an essential preliminary step towards palaeoclimate reconstructions using fossil ostracods from cored lake sediment sequences, we have calibrated a training set of living ostracod species' distributions against a modern climate dataset and other available environmental data. The modern ostracod dataset is based on the collections in the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, which constitutes the most diverse and comprehensive collection of southern African nonmarine ostracods available anywhere in the world. To date, c. 150 nominal species have been described from southern Africa (Martens, 2001) out of c. 450 species in the total Afrotropical area (Martens et al., 2008). Here we discuss the potential value and limitations of the training set for the estimation of past climatic parameters including air temperature (July and January means, maxima and minima, Mean Annual Air Temperature), precipitation, water conductivity and pH. The next step will be to apply the Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range method (Horne, 2007; Horne & Mezquita, 2008) to the palaeoclimatic analysis of fossil ostracod assemblages from sequences recording the Last Glacial Maximum in southern Africa. Ultimately this work will contribute to the development of a glacier-climate modelling project based on evidence of former niche glaciation of the Drakensberg Escarpment. Horne, D. J. 2007. A Mutual Temperature Range method for Quaternary palaeoclimatic analysis using European nonmarine Ostracoda. Quaternary Science Reviews, 26, 1398-1415. Horne, D. J. & Mezquita, F. 2008. Palaeoclimatic

  9. Calibrating a new proxy for Pleistocene climate change in southern Africa: the Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David; Martens, Koen

    2010-05-01

    The Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range (MOTR) method has so far been applied only in the European Pleistocene, where it is proving effective in producing past air temperature range estimates that compare well with those obtained by other proxy methods (Horne, 2007; Horne & Mezquita, 2008; Holmes et al., in press). As an essential preliminary step towards applying the method in southern Africa, we have calibrated a training set of living ostracod species' distributions against a modern climate dataset and other available environmental data. The modern ostracod dataset is based on material held by the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, which constitutes the most diverse and comprehensive collection of southern African nonmarine ostracods available anywhere in the world. To date, c. 150 nominal species have been described from southern Africa (Martens, 2001) out of c. 450 species in the total Afrotropical area (Martens et al., 2008). We used an edited dataset comprising a total of 2,118 records of ostracod species from 748 localities in southern Africa, ranging in latitude from approximately 17 degrees S to 35 degrees S. We have explored the potential value and limitations of this training set for the estimation of past climatic parameters including mean July, January and annual air temperatures, precipitation, water conductivity and pH. Holmes, J. A., Atkinson, T., Darbyshire, D. P. F., Horne, D. J., Joordens, J., Roberts, M. B., Sinka, K. J. & Whittaker, J. E. (accepted, in press). Middle Pleistocene climate and hydrological environment at the Boxgrove hominin site (West Sussex, UK) from ostracod records. Quaternary Science Reviews, doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.02.024, 1-13. Horne, D. J. 2007. A Mutual Temperature Range method for Quaternary palaeoclimatic analysis using European nonmarine Ostracoda. Quaternary Science Reviews, 26, 1398-1415. Horne, D. J. & Mezquita, F. 2008. Palaeoclimatic applications of large databases: developing and testing

  10. Late glacial climate estimates for southern Nevada: The ostracode fossil record

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, R.M.; Smith, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    Climate change plays an important role in determining as possible long term hydrological performance of the potential high level nuclear waste repository within Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Present-day global circulation results in this region having an arid to semi-arid climate characterized by hot and relatively dry summers. Global circulation during the late glacial (about 14 to 20 ka) was very different from the present-day. Preliminary study of late-glacial fossil ostracodes from {open_quotes}marsh deposits{close_quotes} in the upper Las Vegas Valley suggests mean annual precipitation may have been four times higher, while mean annual temperature may have been about 10{degrees}C cooler than today. A major difference between present-day and late-glacial climate was likely the existence of cooler, cloudier, and wetter summers in the past.

  11. Episodes of low dissolved oxygen indicated by ostracodes and sediment geochemistry at Crystal Lake, Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Filippelli, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen during the summer and early fall controls profundal continental ostracode distribution in Crystal Lake (McHenry County), Illinois, favoring Cypria ophthalmica and Physocypria globula at water depths from 6 to 13 m. These species also thrived in the lake's profundal zone from 14,165 to 9600 calendar year before present (cal yr b.p.) during the late Boiling, Allerod, and Younger Dryas chronozones, and early Holocene. Characterized by sand, cemented tubules, large aquatic gastropod shells, and littoral ostracode valves, thin (1-6 cm) tempestite deposits punctuate thicker deposits of organic gyttja from 16,080 to 11,900 cal yr b.p. The succeeding 2300 yr (11,900-9600 cal yr b.p.) lack tempestites, and reconstructed water depths were at their maximum. Deposition of marl under relatively well-oxygenated conditions occurred during the remainder of the Holocene until the arrival of Europeans, when the lake returned to a pattern of seasonally low dissolved oxygen. Such conditions are also indicated in the lake sediment by the speciation of phosphorus, high concentrations of organic carbon, and abundant iron and manganese occluded to mineral grains. Initial low dissolved oxygen was probably caused by the delivery of dissolved P and Fe in shallow groundwater, the chemistry of which was influenced by Spodosol pedogenesis under a spruce forest. The triggering may have been regionally warm and wet conditions associated with retreat of the Lake Michigan lobe (south-central Laurentide Ice Sheet). ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Inc.

  12. Five Sarsiellidae ostracods (Crustacea: Myodocopida) from the South Coast of Korea (East China Sea).

    PubMed

    Karanovic, Ivana; Soh, Ho-Young

    2015-04-17

    The East China Sea is part of the Warm Temperate Northwest Pacific zoogeographic province and, as such, has a high biodiversity and many tropical and subtropical biotic elements. Nevertheless, many invertebrate groups from this area remain poorly studied. Ostracods are one of them, especially those belonging to the subclass Myodocopa. In this paper we provide the first data on a diverse myodocopid family, Sarsiellidae, not only for the East China Sea, but also for Korea. Five species are reported in this paper from three Korean islands (Jeju, Chuja, and Maemul), and they are only a part of the ostracods collected during this study, indicating a high diversity of the group in this region. Three new species, Eurypylus koreanus sp. nov., Eusarsiella hanguk sp. nov., and Sarsiella nereis sp. nov., clearly stand apart from their respective congeners, mostly by prominent shell characters but also by details of the soft part morphology. Their affinity though clearly indicates a close connection of the region with the more southern zoogeographical realms, especially Central Indo Pacific and partly Temperate Australasia. Two species previously known from Japan (north part of the Sea of Japan and southeastern part of the Pacific Coast of Japan), Sarsiella japonica Hiruta, 1977 and S. misakiensis Kajiyama, 1912, are redescribed. Based on 11 newly obtained COI sequences we construct a preliminary phylogenetic tree, which supports previous hypotheses based on the morphological data, that Eusarsiella Cohen & Kornicker, 1975 is a polyphyletic taxon. With the maps of species distribution provided for each of the three genera, we give an overview of their current zoogeography, and clearly indicate areas that have no data, mostly due to the lack of investigation.

  13. Climatic influences on deep-sea ostracode (Crustacea) diversity for the last three million years.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Ostracodes are small, bivalved crustaceans with the finest-scale fossil resolution of any metazoan, rivaled only by the fossil record of the protistan Foraminifera. This article presents a synthesis of the patterns and possible causes of alpha species diversity variation in benthic deep-sea ostracodes at drilling sites in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. Taken together, these sites represent a period of great climatic variability covering the past three million years. Sediment cores taken from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show a positive correlation between warm temperatures and high species diversity. These Mid-Atlantic Ridge cores, at the same latitude as northern Spain, show the same positive correlation during the last two glacial-interglacial cycles (200-0 ka [thousands of years ago]) as they do during the pre-glacial Pliocene 2.85-2.4 Ma (millions of years ago). This positive correlation is also found in Pliocene cores from the Rockall Plateau, at the same latitude as Ireland. During the last 200 thousand years, however, this correlation is reversed in cores taken from both the Rockall and Iceland Plateaus. The discovery of high diversity during colder periods in recent high-latitude Rockall and Iceland cores seems to be explained by spikes in diversity caused by ice-rafting events, which would not affect the lower-latitude Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The Heinrich ice-rafting events reduce North Atlantic surface temperatures and salinity every approximately 6-12 ka, dramatically decreasing surface productivity. This increase in diversity during Heinrich events may be explained either by a negative correlation between surface productivity and benthic diversity or by increase in diversity caused by moderate disturbance when ice rafted debris fall to the bottom of the ocean.

  14. Atrazine reduces the transmission of an amphibian trematode by altering snail and ostracod host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kyle D; Belden, Jason B; Bolek, Matthew G

    2016-04-01

    Trematodes are ubiquitous members of aquatic environments, have many functional roles in ecosystems, and can cause diseases in humans, livestock, and wild animals. Despite their importance and reports of parasite population declines, few studies have concurrently assessed the effects of aquatic contaminants on multiple hosts, multiple parasite life cycle stages, and on transmission-related host-parasite interactions. Here, we test the effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of the herbicide atrazine (0, 3, 30 μg/L) on the establishment and development of an amphibian trematode (Halipegus eccentricus) in a first-intermediate snail host (Physa acuta) and in a second-intermediate ostracod host (Cypridopsis sp.). Additionally, we test the interactive effects of atrazine and parasitism on snail and ostracod survival. Our results indicate that atrazine negatively affects trematode transmission by altering snail and ostracod host-parasite interactions. Although atrazine did not affect the survival of uninfected snails alone, atrazine acted synergistically with parasitism to reduce the longevity of infected snails. As a result, the number of cercariae (i.e., larval trematodes) produced by snails was 50.7 % (3 μg/L) and 14.9 % (30 μg/L) relative to controls. Atrazine exhibited direct negative effects on ostracod survival at 30 μg/L. However, when ostracods were also exposed to trematodes, the negative effects of atrazine on survival were diminished. Although infected ostracod survival remained high, trematode development was significantly reduced, resulting in reduced infectivity of metacercariae (i.e., nongravid adult cysts infective to definite host) to 32.2 % (3 μg/L) and 28.6 % (30 μg/L) relative to the controls. The combination of reduced cercaria production and reduced metacercarial infectivity in the 3 and 30 μg/L atrazine treatment groups reduced the net number of infective worms produced to 16.4 and 4.3 % (respectively) relative to the control

  15. Late Quaternary ostracode-based paleoenvironmental reconstructions from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala and Lake Chalco, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, L.; Lozano, S.; Caballero, M.; Brenner, M.; Schwalb, A.

    2013-05-01

    Modern and fossil ostracodes in lakes from central Mexico (Chalco) to lowland Guatemala (Petén Itzá) were used to infer paleoenvironmental conditions during the last 45 ka. Ostracode-based paleoenvironmental reconstruction from sediment cores in Lake Petén Itzá was based on a modern calibration data set from 63 water bodies in Guatemala, Mexico (Yucatán Peninsula) which provided information on the modern ecological preferences of 29 ostracode species. Statistical analysis indicated that lake water conductivity and chemical composition determine ostracode distributions on the Yucatán Peninsula and that lake level is a strong determinant of species distribution in Lake Petén Itzá. Transfer functions were applied to fossil species assemblages in long sediment cores from Lake Petén Itzá to infer past conductivity and lake level. Over the past 45 ka, ostracodes in Lake Petén Itzá were sensitive to fluctuations in lake water chemical composition and lake stage. Relative abundances of ostracode taxa and stable isotope values in their shells indicate large environmental changes from the LGM to deglaciation, and into the Holocene. The LGM was characterized by low species richness (n=4), dominance of benthic taxa, cold conditions and moderate to high lake levels. The deglaciation displayed higher species richness (n=6), dominance of nektobenthic taxa, and alternating dry and wet conditions, with low to relatively high lake levels. The Holocene was dominated by the deep-water ostracode Physocypria globula, indicating warmer temperatures and higher lake levels. Preliminary results from Lake Chalco sediment cores indicate ostracodes were scarce during the LGM and deglacial, but displayed higher abundances in older deposits. Ostracodes identified in the sediment record include Limnocythere sp., Candona patzcuaro and Darwinula stevensoni. The only species in common with the Lake Petén Itzá record is D. stevensoni. Deglacial species richness in Chalco (n=3) was lower

  16. The sediment-contact test using the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens: Effect of fine sediments and determination of toxicity thresholds.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martinez, M Carmen; Burga-Pérez, Karen F; Bebon, Rebecca; Férard, Jean-François; Vermeirssen, Etienne L M; Werner, Inge

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity test using freshwater ostracods of the species Heterocypris incongruens is a sub-chronic static test that exposes individuals to whole sediments over a period of 6 d, the endpoints being mortality and growth. We tested the hypothesis that endpoints of the sediment bioassay using Heterocypris incongruens are affected by the presence of fine sediment particles by testing control sediment supplied with the commercial test kit with increasing proportions of kaolin clay as a proxy for fines. While mortality was not affected, the results showed that increasing the presence of clay reduced ostracod growth. Based on the variability in growth, a sublethal toxicity threshold of 35% is proposed to distinguish effects due to sediment properties from those due to toxicity. The relevance of this threshold was verified using data from toxicity tests of ambient sediment samples with low levels of contamination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Late Pliocene paleoeco­logic reconstructions based on ostracode assemblages from the Sagavanirktok and Gubik formations, Alaskan North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brouwers, Elisabeth M.

    1994-01-01

    Shallow-marine ostracode assemblages from upper Pliocene sediments of the upper part of the Sagavanirktok Formation and lower part of the Gubik Formation record the last warm period that occurred before the onset of significant cooling of the Arctic Ocean and the initiation of Northern Hemisphere continental glaciation. The informally named Colvillian and Bigbendian transgressions represent the oldest deposits of the Gubik Formation and are dated, based on various lines of evidence, between 2.48 and 3 Ma. Ostracode faunas from the lower part of the Gubik Formation indicate a cold-temperate to subfrigid marine climate with summer bottom temperatures 1-4 C warmer than today. Deposits of the upper part of the Sagavanirktok Formation at Manning Point and Barter Island are older than Colvillian sediments but are believed to be late Pliocene in age and contain an ostracode fauna that has many species in common with the lower part of the Gubik Formation. The Sagavanirktok ostracode faunas indicate a cold-temperature to subfrigid marine climate, similar to that inferred for the lower part of the Gubik Formation, with summer bottom temperatures 1-3 C warmer than today. The opening of Bering Strait at about 3 Ma altered Arctic Ocean assemblage composition as Pacific species migrated into the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. The admixture of evolutionarily distinct faunas from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans identifies Colvillian (and younger) faunas and provides a convenient reference horizon in the Alaskan fossil record. The marine climatic deterioration that followed the Bigbendian appears to have been abrupt and is documented by biotic turnover, with large numbers of species extinctions and first appearances of new species. The change in species composition can be attributed to the cooling of the Arctic Ocean during the late Pliocene.

  18. Characterization of toxicants in urban road dust by Toxicity Identification Evaluation using ostracod Heterocypris incongruens direct contact test.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Rajendra; Furumai, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Fumiyuki

    2015-10-15

    The current study involves characterization of organic compounds, heavy metals, and ammonia as potential toxicants in one arterial road (St. 3) and two highway (St. 7 and 8) urban road dust (URD) collected in Tokyo, Japan. URD toxicity was evaluated by Toxicity Identification Evaluation using the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens direct contact test. URDs were treated with resins (10% XAD-4, 20% SIR-300 and 20% SIR-600) to determine the reduction in mortality after treatment. The mortality of ostracods exposed to St. 3 URD (baseline 80%) was significantly (p<0.05) reduced to 0% and 47% after XAD-4 and SIR-300 treatment respectively. This reduction led us to suspect hydrophobic organic compounds and heavy metals as potential toxicants. Subsequent elution of the recovered XAD-4 with polar (methanol, acetone) and non-polar (dichloromethane) solvents confirmed the dominance of relatively polar hydrophobic organic toxicants. The dissolved concentration of Cu and Zn after SIR-300 treatment exceeded the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) for ostracods, which led us to suspect Cu and Zn as other probable toxicants. The concentration of Zn in a SIR-300 acidic elutriate, recovered after the termination of toxicity test, confirmed Zn as one of the toxicants in St. 3. The baseline mortality (100%) of St. 7 was significantly reduced (23%) by SIR-300 treatment. This indicated the presence of heavy metals as the probable toxicant. However, the concentration of dissolved heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the overlying water was below previously reported LC50 values for each metal in St. 7. Recovery of Zn concentrations exceeding the LC50 in the St. 7 SIR-300 elutriate led us to suspect a dietary exposure route of Zn to the ostracod during the direct contact test. The overall results indicate that the toxicant types can vary widely depending on the road sampled.

  19. Tertiary ostracods of Gebel Withr, southwestern Sinai, Egypt: pal˦ontology, biostratigraphy and pal˦obiogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, A.

    2000-08-01

    The exposed Early Eocene-Early Miocene interval in the study area yields considerable amounts of ostracods. A detailed investigation of the ostracod content has led to the recognition of 79 species and subspecies, five of which are reported as new species. They are Semicytherura bassiounii, Semicytherura gammudii, Pterygocythere withrensis, Paracosta reymenti and Cativella bulgi. An attempt to reconstruct a local ostracod biozonation has led to the recognition of six biostratigraphical zones. These biozones are arranged from the youngest to the oldest as follows: Leguminocythereis bopaensis-Leguminocythereis bicostata Assemblage Zone; Reticulina saitoi-Trachyleberis nodosus Assemblage Zone; Asymmetricythere yousefi-Cytherella piacabucuensis Assemblage Zone; Leguminocythereis africana-Buntonia faresi Assenblage Zone; and Grinioneis haidingeri-Pokornyella deformis minor Assemblage Zone. The palaeobathymetric estimates for these assemblages reveals a great deal from the inner neritic to the upper bathyal environments. The cosmopolitan distribution of the recorded species proved to be useful for pal˦obiogeographic reconstruction. This reveals that there was a direct connection throughout the Tethyan realm and a connection between the Tethyan North Africa and West Africa via the Trans-Saharan Seaway, at least until the end of the Palaeocene, through which the migration of benthic organisms had occurred.

  20. Limnocythere bradburyi n.sp.: a modern ostracode from central Mexico and a possible Quaternary paleoclimatic indicator.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Limnocythere bradburyi is a new species of nonmarine ostracode that is living in several lakes in the central Mexican Plateau. These lakes are shallow, turbid, and pan-shaped, having relatively unstable and fluid substrates. Water levels of these lakes are high in the summer and low or dry in the winter. These lakes usually contain fresh to slightly saline water during the rainy season (summer-fall) and slightly saline water during the dry season (winter-spring), and have solute composition that is dominated by Na+, HCO3--CO32-, Cl- ions. The regional climate is characterized as humid temperate with mild equitable temperatures throughout the year. Winter temperatures are usually above 0oC, whereas summer temperatures are commonly below 30oC. The water temperature of the lakes containing L. bradburyi generally reflects atmospheric temperatures. The ostracode's life cycle coincides with the climatic wet cycle and is therefore completed during the warmest period of the year, which is in marked contrast to ostracodes living in lakes in the US and Canada that usually begin their life cycle with the spring rain and snow melt in cold water and complete their life cycle in warm water. This contrasting climatic life-cycle pattern between central Mexico and the US may be sufficient to explain why L. bradburyi occurs commonly in many Quaternary deposits in the southwestern US, but has not been found living in the US.-Author

  1. Preliminary study on the L ate Cretaceous ostracods from continental scientific drilling SK1 in the Songliao Basin, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Dangpeng; Qu, Haiying; Shi, Zhongye; Wan, Xiaoqiao

    2017-04-01

    Songliao Basin is one of the biggest lacustrine systems in Asia during Cretaceous age. Widespread deposits in the basin are mainly composed of clastic sediments which contain abundant fossils including gastropod, bivalves, ostracods, vertebrates and others. These well preserved ostracod fossils provide us valuable information about past climate changes and biotic responses in a greenhouse environment.The Cretaceous Continental Scientific Drilling in the Songliao Basin (SK1) offers a rare opportunity to study Late Cretaceous non-marine ostracod. The SK1 was drilled separately in two boreholes: the lower 959.55-meter-thick south core (SK1(s)), and the upper 1636.72-meter-thick north core (SK1 (n)), containing the Upper Quantou, Qingshankou, Yaojia, Nenjiang Formation, Sifangtai, Mingshui and lower Taikang formations. Here we establish high-resolution non-marine ostracod biostratigraphy based on SK1. 80 species belonging to 12 genera in the SK1(S) and 45 species assigned to 20 genera in the SK1(n) have been recovered. Nineteen ostracod assemblage zones have been recognized: 1. Mongolocypris longicaudata-Cypridea Assemblage Zone, 2.Triangulicypris torsuosus-Triangulicypris torsuosus. nota Assemblage Zone, 3. Cypridea dekhoinensis-Cypridea gibbosa Assemblage Zone, 4.Cypridea nota-Sunliavia tumida Assemblage Zone, 5.Cypridea edentula-Lycopterocypris grandis Assemblage Zone, 6.Cypridea fuyuensis-Triangulicypris symmetrica Assemblage Zone, 7.Triangulicypris vestilus-Triangulicypris fusiformis-Triangulicypris pumilis Assemblage Zone, 8.Cypridea panda-Mongolocypris obscura Assemblage Zone, 9. Cypridea exornata-Cypridea dongfangensis Assemblage Zone, 10.Cypridea favosa-Mongolocypris tabulata Assemblage Zone, 11.Cypridea formosa-Cypridea sunghuajiangensis Assemblage Zone, 12. Cypridea anonyma-Candona fabiforma Assemblage Zone, 13.Cypridea gracila-Cypridea gunsulinensis Assemblage Zone, 14.Mongolocypris magna-Mongolocypris heiluntszianensis Assemblage Zone, 15.Cypridea

  2. Late Pliocene and early Pleistocene sea-level timing and amplitudes derived from fossil ostracod assemblages: Canterbury Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Kusunoki, S.; Yamada, K.; Hoyanagi, K.

    2013-12-01

    IODP Expedition 317 cruise drilled cores at three shelf sites (U1353, U1354 and U1351) and one slope site (U1352), in water depths between 85 and 344 m, to understand relationships between sea-level change and sequence stratigraphy. The shelf sites are well suited to reconstruction of high-resolution sea-level fluctuations because of high sedimentation rates from the uplifting Southern Alps. We examined fossil ostracod assemblages from the shelf sites to reconstruct paleo-water depth fluctuations and their amplitudes. We identified 178 ostracod species and 70 genera from more than 160 samples. Q-mode factor analysis was performed on ostracod taxa with abundances of >3.5 % in each sample containing >50 specimens. Six varimax factors were explained 70.8% of the total variance. Paleo-water depths in each factor were calibrated with reference to recent ostracodes occurring around the sites as follows: first factor, middle shelf (50-80 m); second factor, middle to outer shelf (60-130 m); third factor, middle to outer shelf (55-115 m); fourth factor, lagoon, estuary and inner shelf (0-50 m); fifth factor, middle to outer shelf (80-200 m); sixth factor, outer shelf (130-200 m). Factor analysis of ostracod assemblages reveal at least, eight transgressive- and regressive-cycles at Site U1353, seventeen at Site U1354 and two at Site U1351. These cycles probably correspond to a subset of MIS stages between MIS M2 and MIS 40. Furthermore, amplitudes of these paleo-water-depth cycles are expected to equate to eustatic amplitudes because shelf sedimentation has been continuous and minimal subsidence can have occurred during the short time period involved. We therefore estimate that eustatic amplitudes were: 10 - 30 m from 3.1 to 2.8 Ma, ca. 100 m from 2.8 to 2.6 Ma, and 30 - 115 m from 1.8 to1.2 Ma. These amplitudes, together with the timing of the increase in amplitudes (~2.7 Ma), agree with estimates derived from oxygen isotopic records (Raymo et al., 2005), suggesting that

  3. Ostracode Mg/Ca Ratios from Quaternary Sediments of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Caverly, E. K.; Cronin, T. M.; Polyak, L. V.; DeNinno, L.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) ratios from adult, calcitic shells of the deep-sea ostracode Krithe from the Northwind and Mendeleev Ridges, Arctic Ocean, to reconstruct orbital-scale Quaternary bottom-water temperature history. Results show an early Pleistocene (~1.5 Ma to 500 ka) Mg/CaKrithe pattern with low-amplitude, possibly orbitally controlled, oscillations between 10.5 and 12.5 mmol/mol followed by a progressive trend towards higher ratios (> 17 mmol/mol) during the last 500 ka. This shift coincides with the mid-Pleistocene Transition and mid-Brunhes Event (~ 300-500 ka) recognized in microfaunal proxy records in the Arctic Ocean. Analyses of Mg/CaKrithe from intervals representing marine isotope stage 11 (MIS 11) in 5 cores from water depths from 700 to 1470 m show Mg/Ca ratios ranging from 10.5 to 14 mmol/mol. A 2 mmol/mol excursion in Mg/CaKrithe within MIS 11 seen in all cores likely corresponds to a brief stadial event recognized also in planktic and benthic microfaunas. We will discuss the implications of Mg/Ca paleothermometry for deep Arctic Ocean circulation and the evolution of Arctic sea ice during major Quaternary climatic transitions as well as possible factors other than water temperature that may influence Mg/Ca ratios in Krithe shells from Quaternary sediments from the Arctic Ocean.

  4. An ostracode based paleolimnologic and paleohydrologic history of Death Valley: 200 to 0 ka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.; Lowenstein, T.K.; Spencer, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Death Valley, a complex tectonic and hydrologic basin, was cored from its lowest surface elevation to a depth of 186 m. The sediments range from bedded primary halite to black muds. Continental ostracodes found in the black muds indicate that those sediments were deposited in a variety of hydrologic settings ranging from deep, relatively fresh water to shallow saline lakes to spring discharge supported wetlands. The alkaline-enriched, calcium-depleted paleolake waters indicate extrabasinal streamflow and basin-margin spring discharge. The alkaline-depleted, calcium-enriched paleowetland waters indicate intrabasinal spring discharge. During Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6, ca. 180-140 ka) the hydrologic settings were highly variable, implying that complex relations existed between climate and basin hydrology. Termination II (MIS 6 to MIS 5E) was a complex multicyclic sequence of paleoenvironments, implying that climates oscillated between high and low effective moisture. MIS 4 (ca. 73-61 ka) was a spring discharge supported wetland complex. During MIS 2 (ca. 20-12 ka) the hydrologic settings were variable, although they are not fully understood because some black muds deposited during that time were lost during coring. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  5. Cloning and expression of cDNA for the luciferase from the marine ostracod Vargula hilgendorfii.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E M; Nagata, S; Tsuji, F I

    1989-01-01

    The marine ostracod Vargula hilgendorfii ejects luciferin and luciferase into seawater to produce a bright luminous cloud. The light is due to the oxidation of luciferin, an imidazopyrazine compound, by molecular oxygen, catalyzed by luciferase. The mechanism of the reaction has been studied extensively and the 60 kcal/mol required for the blue emission have been shown to be derived from the oxidation of luciferin via a dioxetanone intermediate, in which the excited state oxyluciferin bound to luciferase is the emitter. However, only limited information is available regarding the properties of the enzyme. This paper reports the cloning and sequence analysis of the cDNA for Vargula luciferase and the expression of the cDNA in a mammalian cell system. The primary structure, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, consists of 555 amino acid residues in a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 62,171. Two regions of the enzyme show significant amino acid sequence homology with an N-terminal segment of the photoprotein aequorin. The Vargula luciferase gene, which contains a signal sequence for secretion, should be well suited as a reporter in studies of gene expression. Images PMID:2771943

  6. On three new species of non-marine ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Savatenalinton, Sukonthip

    2015-01-28

    Three new species of non-marine ostracods, Strandesia martensi n. sp., Strandesia pholpunthini n. sp. and Oncocypris rostrata n. sp., are here described from the Northeastern part of Thailand. Strandesia martensi n. sp. is similar to Strandesia perakensis Victor & Fernando, 1981 and to Strandesia sanoamuangae Savatenalinton & Martens, 2010. It can be distinguished from these two species by the presence of a large dorsal hump on both valves, large anterior overlapping, the general shape of valve, the ornamentation of valve surface and the markedly long proximal seta of caudal ramus. The main distinguishing characters of Strandesia pholpunthini n. sp. are the compression on the right valve at the posterior extremity and the fact that left valve overlaps right valve anteriorly, while right valve overlaps left valve posteriorly. This results in unequal anterior and posterior extremities, which can be seen clearly in the dorsal view. Oncocypris rostrata n. sp. is the first record of this genus in Thailand. It obviously differs from others in the beak-like anterior extremity in dorsal view, the valve structure in interior view, the valve ornamentation comprising of large pustules and large pits and the morphology of male reproductive organ, especially the first segment of the right prehensile-palp bearing a long apical spine and a large protrusion on the distal margin toward the second segment. A note on morphology, chorology and a key to the species of Oncocypris are given.

  7. Taxonomy of quaternary deep-sea ostracods from the Western North Atlantic ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Okahashi, H.; Cronin, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    Late Quaternary sediments from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1055B, Carolina Slope, western North Atlantic (32??47.041??? N, 76??17.179??? W; 1798m water depth) were examined for deep-sea ostracod taxonomy. A total of 13933 specimens were picked from 207 samples and c. 120 species were identified. Among them, 87 species were included and illustrated in this paper. Twenty-eight new species are described. The new species are: Ambocythere sturgio, Argilloecia abba, Argilloecia caju, Argilloecia keigwini, Argilloecia robinwhatleyi, Aversovalva carolinensis, Bythoceratina willemvandenboldi, Bythocythere eugeneschornikovi, Chejudocythere tenuis, Cytheropteron aielloi, Cytheropteron demenocali, Cytheropteron didieae, Cytheropteron richarddinglei, Cytheropteron fugu, Cytheropteron guerneti, Cytheropteron richardbensoni, Eucytherura hazeli, Eucytherura mayressi, Eucytherura namericana, Eucytherura spinicorona, Posacythere hunti, Paracytherois bondi, Pedicythere atroposopetasi, Pedicythere kennettopetasi, Pedicythere klothopetasi, Pedicythere lachesisopetasi, Ruggieriella mcmanusi and Xestoleberis oppoae. Taxonomic revisions of several common species were made to reduce taxonomic uncertainty in the literature. This study provides a robust taxonomic baseline for application to palaeoceanographical reconstruction and biodiversity analyses in the deep and intermediate-depth environments of the North Atlantic Ocean. ?? The Palaeontological Association, 2009.

  8. Pliocene shallow water paleoceanography of the North Atlantic ocean based on marine ostracodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    Middle Pliocene marine ostracodes from coastal and shelf deposits of North and Central America and Iceland were studied to reconstruct paleotemperatures of shelf waters bordering portions of the Western Boundary Current System (including the Gulf Loop Current, Florida Current, Gulf Stream and North Atlantic Drift). Factor analytic transfer functions provided Pliocene August and February bottom-water temperatures of eight regions from the tropics to the subfrigid. The results indicate: (1) meridional temperature gradients in the western North Atlantic were less steep during the Pliocene than either today or during Late Pleistocene Isotope Stage 5e; (2) tropical and subtropical shelf waters during the Middle Pliocene were as warm as, or slightly cooler than today; (3) slightly cooler water was on the outer shelf off the southeastern and mid-Atlantic coast of the U.S., possibly due to summer upwelling of Gulf Stream water; (4) the shelf north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina may have been influenced by warm water incursions from the western edge of the Gulf Stream, especially in summer; (5) the northeast branch of the North Atlantic Drift brought warm water to northern Iceland between 4 and 3 Ma; evidence from the Iceland record indicates that cold East Greenland Current water did not affect coastal Iceland between 4 and 3 Ma; (6) Middle Pliocene North Atlantic circulation may have been intensified, transporting more heat from the tropics to the Arctic than it does today. ?? 1991.

  9. Oxygen isotope ratios of chironomids, aquatic macrophytes and ostracods for lake-water isotopic reconstructions - Results of a calibration study in Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, Christoph; Laprida, Cecilia; Lücke, Andreas; Martín, Rodrigo S.; Massaferro, Julieta; Ramón-Mercau, Josefina; Wissel, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Oxygen stable isotopes (δ18O) of biogenic sedimentary components from lake sediment archives, such as ostracod valves, are frequently used for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. However, the effects of host water isotope changes, temperature-dependent fractionations, and vital effects on the isotopic ratios of such biogenic proxies often cannot be disentangled. Here, δ18O values of ostracod valves, head capsules of chironomid larvae and aquatic macrophyte cellulose from various lake and stream sites in southern Patagonia (41-52°S) are compared with δ18O values of their host waters. The best correlation between δ18O values of bioproxy and host water was obtained for aquatic cellulose exhibiting a slope of the regression of almost unity. Chironomid head capsules showed a strong correlation, but the data set was rather small (seven sites). The δ18O values of ostracod valves showed strong inter-specific vital effects. Strong offsets of ostracod values from isotopic equilibrium are possibly explained by re-working of subfossil valves, seasonality effects or different chemical composition of host waters. A weak, but significant temperature dependency of oxygen isotope fractionation was observed for cellulose of one aquatic taxon (Myriophyllum) and for ostracod calcite, but not for chironomids and aquatic moss cellulose. The present dataset suggests that δ18O values of aquatic cellulose are the most reliable proxy for host water isotope reconstructions, but clearly more investigations are needed to substantiate this finding.

  10. Hydrochemical effects on the life cycle, shell size, thickness, and chemistry of ostracode Cyprideis torosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco-Barba, J.; Ito, E.; Mezquita, F.; Carbonell, E.

    2006-12-01

    Cyprideis torosa is a species of ostracode that inhabits and reproduces in wide range of ionic concentrations as long as (carbonate alkalinity)/Ca ratio is low. It is found in inland springs, lakes, estuaries, wetlands and seawater evaporation ponds as long as its Alk/Ca requirement is met. We collected C. torosa from 20 sites near Valencia, Spain in early spring 2004. Main environmental variables were analyzed in situ or in the lab, including temperature and concentration of major ions and oxygen isotopes. Several (2-20) live individuals were sorted out, their growth instar, sex and size measured and their shell chemistry (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and oxygen isotopes) analyzed. Three of these 20 sites were sampled monthly for an entire year, and its population structure, juvenile and adult shell chemistry (between 20 and 40 shells) analyzed. The chemistry of the single-visit sites varied widely with TDS from 9 to 2200 meq/L. Generally, Cl was the most dominant anion, with an averaged value of 76% (16% - 94%). CO3 plus HCO3 varied between 0.4 and 64% and SO4 between 4 and 26%. Principal Components Analysis showed that all waters follow a similar solute evolution trend of increasing Cl and SO4 and decreasing carbonate alkalinity with increasing TDS. Water δ18O also increase with TDS suggesting evaporation is the dominant driver of solute evolution. Among the sites sampled monthly, U1 is a HCO3>Ca>Mg>SO4 spring with the TDS of 9 meq/L. Sites P5 and P7 are part of a coastal wetland system of Cl>Na>Mg~SO4>Ca>HCO3 composition with TDS of 1700meq/L and 270meq/L, respectively. Water temperature varies from 12 to 30°C in P5, 13 to 33°C in P7 and 16 to 30°C in U1. At all 3 sites, the highest temperature occurred in July. The longest animals have the highest shell Ca content, and size is related to water chemistry. Both males and females are smaller in high TDS waters, and in particular, in high SO4 waters. The shell-water oxygen isotope fractionation decreases drastically at higher

  11. Quaternary ostracodes and molluscs from the Rukwa Basin (Tanzania) and their evolutionary and paleobiogeographic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Andrew S.; Van Bocxlaer, Bert; Todd, Jonathan A.; McGlue, Michael; Michel, Ellinor; Nkotagu, Hudson H.; Grove, A.T.; Delvaux, Damien

    2013-01-01

    Much of the spectacular biodiversity of the African Great Lakes is endemic to single lake basins so that the margins of these basins or their lakes coincide with biogeographic boundaries. Longstanding debate surrounds the evolution of these endemic species, the stability of bioprovinces, and the exchange of faunas between them over geologic time as the rift developed. Because these debates are currently unsettled, we are uncertain of how much existing distribution patterns are determined by modern hydrological barriers versus reflecting past history. This study reports on late Quaternary fossils from the Rukwa Basin and integrates geological and paleoecological data to explore faunal exchange between freshwater bioprovinces, in particular with Lake Tanganyika. Lake Rukwa's water level showed large fluctuations over the last 25 ky, and for most of this period the lake contained large habitat diversity, with different species assemblages and taphonomic controls along its northern and southern shores. Comparison of fossil and modern invertebrate assemblages suggests faunal persistence through the Last Glacial Maximum, but with an extirpation event that occurred in the last 5 ky. Some of the molluscs and ostracodes studied here are closely related to taxa (or part of clades) that are currently endemic to Lake Tanganyika, but others testify to wider and perhaps older faunal exchanges between the Rukwa bioprovince and those of Lake Malawi and the Upper Congo (in particular Lake Mweru). The Rukwa Basin has a long history of rifting and lacustrine conditions and, at least temporarily, its ecosystems appear to have functioned as satellites to Lake Tanganyika in which intralacustrine speciation occurred. Paleontological studies of the Rukwa faunas are particularly relevant because of the basin's important role in the late Cenozoic biogeography of tropical Africa, and because many of the molecular traces potentially revealing this history would have been erased in the late

  12. Trends in ostracod distribution and water chemistry in subarctic Canada: Churchill (Manitoba) lakes and ponds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehberg, F. A.; Côté, G.; Pienitz, R.

    2009-04-01

    Ecosystems change in response to factors such as climate variability, invasions, and natural hazards over a short period of time (IPCC 2007). The individual organism has to react to complete its life cycle and eventually to reproduce successfully. Under extreme conditions the survival of the total population depends thoroughly on the genetic diversity/potential and thus the ability to expand its biogeographical range or to run extinct. The knowledge of the specific plasticity in time is essential to interpret signals of biological proxies in palaeo records. We investigated 13 lakes/ponds in the surrounding of the Churchill Northern Studies Centre (CNSC; 58° 43.989'N, 93° 49.219'W), Churchill, Canada in 1997. 9 years later we revisited the same localities in 2006. In addition, faunistic data of microcrustaceans in the local study area is available from the late 80's (Havel et al 1990 a, b). and further instrumental climate records from Churchill (Manitoba, Canada) are daily filed since 1943 by Environment Canada. Thus we were able to pinpoint local warming trends and changes in the water chemistry from our short term records in the subarctic study area. The microcrustacean fauna change consecutively. e.g., freshwater ostracods adopted to short open water periods during the summer, strong variations of water temperatures in the shallow waters and mostly low ionic contents of the host waters are not present in the current record. References: Havel, J.E., Hebert, P.D.N. and Delorme, L.D., 1990a. Genetics of sexual Ostracoda from a low Arctic site. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 3: 65-84. Havel, J.E., Hebert, P.D.N. and Delorme, L.D., 1990b. Genotypic diversity of asexual Ostracoda from a low Arctic site. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 3: 391-410.

  13. East Asian Summer Monsoon Variations in the Last 1,700 Years Inferred from δ18o of Ostracode Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Sakai, S.; Seto, K.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios of ostracode shells (δ18Oostracode) from the central part of Lake Nakaumi, southwest Japan were examined to clarify intensity of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) in the last 1700 years. Adult whole shell of Bicornucythere bisanensis, which grow into adulthood from April to August in the present Nakaumi, was used for δ18O measurements. Long-term trend in δ18Oostracode correspond with salinity changes in Lake Nakaumi caused by regional geographic events based on analysis of fossil ostracode assemblages. Five short-term increases in δ18Oostracode were recognized in 500, 900, 1350, 1650 and 1850 AD, which correspond with weak periods of the EASM intensity based on δ18O of stalagmite in Wanxiang cave. Intensity of EASM is representative of precipitation around the Japan. For recent ostracodes, δ18Oostracode positively correlated with bottom water salinity, which related negatively to precipitation and positively to δ18O of lake water in the recent Nakaumi. Thus, it might be interpreted that the short-term fluctuations in δ18Oostracode were caused by intensity change of EASM, since δ18Oostracode will increase due to low precipitation during weak periods of EASM. Further, the compiled data demonstrate that at least five EASM weakening periods, in 500, 900, 1350, 1650 and 1850 AD, occurred between 30° and 40° N in East Asia in the last 1700 years. These timings accord with data from sites, which suggests that oscillations of the EASM have been synchronous across the region.

  14. A minute ostracod (Crustacea: Cytheromatidae) from the Miocene Solimões Formation (western Amazonia, Brazil): evidence for marine incursions?

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F; Piller, Werner E

    2016-07-02

    A huge wetland (the 'Pebas system') covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine ostracod species (Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov.) in the upper middle Miocene Solimões Formation initiated a taxonomic, ecological and biogeographical review of the genus Pellucistoma. We demonstrate that this marine (sublittoral, euhaline), subtropical-tropical taxon is biogeographically confined to the Americas. The biogeographical distribution of Pellucistoma largely depends on geographical, thermal and osmotic barriers (e.g. land bridges, deep and/or cold waters, sea currents, salinity). We assume an Oligocene/early Miocene, Caribbean origin for Pellucistoma and outline the dispersal of hitherto known species up to the Holocene. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. is dwarfed in comparison to all other species of this genus and extremely thin-shelled. This is probably related to poorly oxygenated waters and, in particular, to strongly reduced salinity. The associated ostracod fauna (dominated by the eurypotent Cyprideis and a few, also stunted ostracods of possibly marine ancestry) supports this claim. Geochemical analyses (δ(18)O, δ(13)C) on co-occurring ostracod valves (Cyprideis spp.) yielded very light values, indicative of a freshwater setting. These observations point to a successful adaptation of P. curupira sp. nov. to freshwater conditions and therefore do not signify the presence of marine water. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. shows closest affinities to Caribbean species. We hypothesize that Pellucistoma reached northern South America (Llanos Basin) during marine incursions in the early Miocene. While larger animals of marine origin (e.g. fishes, dolphins, manatees) migrated actively into the Pebas

  15. Holocene relative sea-level change in Hiroshima Bay, Japan: A semi-quantitative reconstruction based on ostracodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Seto, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Holocene relative sea-level changes in Hiroshima Bay were reconstructed from fossil ostracodes from a core, using a semi-quantitative method. In Hiroshima Bay, relative sea level rose rapidly (about 25 m) between ca. 9000 cal yr BP and ca. 5800 cal yr BP, after which it gradually fell (about 5 m) to its present level. The peak in relative sea level occurred at ca. 5800 cal yr BP. The sea-level curve for Hiroshima Bay is similar to curves for tectonically stable areas of Japan (e.g., Osaka Bay). ?? by the Palaeontological Society of Japan.

  16. A minute ostracod (Crustacea: Cytheromatidae) from the Miocene Solimões Formation (western Amazonia, Brazil): evidence for marine incursions?

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F.; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-01-01

    A huge wetland (the ‘Pebas system’) covered western Amazonia during the Miocene, hosting a highly diverse and endemic aquatic fauna. One of the most contentious issues concerns the existence, potential pathways and effects of marine incursions on this ecosystem. Palaeontological evidences (body fossils) are rare. The finding of a new, presumably marine ostracod species (Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov.) in the upper middle Miocene Solimões Formation initiated a taxonomic, ecological and biogeographical review of the genus Pellucistoma. We demonstrate that this marine (sublittoral, euhaline), subtropical–tropical taxon is biogeographically confined to the Americas. The biogeographical distribution of Pellucistoma largely depends on geographical, thermal and osmotic barriers (e.g. land bridges, deep and/or cold waters, sea currents, salinity). We assume an Oligocene/early Miocene, Caribbean origin for Pellucistoma and outline the dispersal of hitherto known species up to the Holocene. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. is dwarfed in comparison to all other species of this genus and extremely thin-shelled. This is probably related to poorly oxygenated waters and, in particular, to strongly reduced salinity. The associated ostracod fauna (dominated by the eurypotent Cyprideis and a few, also stunted ostracods of possibly marine ancestry) supports this claim. Geochemical analyses (δ18O, δ13C) on co-occurring ostracod valves (Cyprideis spp.) yielded very light values, indicative of a freshwater setting. These observations point to a successful adaptation of P. curupira sp. nov. to freshwater conditions and therefore do not signify the presence of marine water. Pellucistoma curupira sp. nov. shows closest affinities to Caribbean species. We hypothesize that Pellucistoma reached northern South America (Llanos Basin) during marine incursions in the early Miocene. While larger animals of marine origin (e.g. fishes, dolphins, manatees) migrated actively into the Pebas

  17. Live/Dead Comparisons of Ostracodes in Temperate Lakes Reveal Evidence of Human Impact and Provides a Tool to Measure the Progress of Remediation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, J.; Kimball, K. C.; Fitzpatrick, S. A.; Michelson, A. V.; Leonard-Pingel, J.

    2015-12-01

    Lake ecosystems face a multitude of environmental threats including: eutrophication, overfishing, and heavy metal pollution. Tools to identify lakes impacted by human activity and quantify that impact are needed to combat their environmental degradation. One such promising tool has been the comparison between living communities and associated time-averaged death assemblages of mollusks in marine environments. Here we extend the reach of such live/dead comparisons using ostracodes in temperate lakes. We sampled six lakes in Wisconsin for living communities and associated death assemblages of ostracodes: two lakes impacted by human activity, two relatively "pristine" lakes, and two remediated lakes. We took sixteen grab samples of the upper centimeter of sediment in each lake, capturing simultaneously living benthic ostracodes and discarded valves of dead ostracodes. We found that impacted lakes had lower live/dead fidelity in taxonomic composition and rank-order abundance distributions and greater within-lake variation in death assemblages than "pristine" lakes. Additionally, the living communities in the impacted lakes tended to be lower in species richness and have lower evenness than "pristine" lakes. Remediated lakes displayed similar live/dead fidelity in taxonomic composition and rank-abundance distributions to "pristine" lakes and had lower within-lake variation in death assemblages than impacted lakes. Remediated lakes also contained living communities that tended to be richer and more even than impacted lakes. The lower live/dead fidelity of ostracodes in impacted lakes indicate live/dead ostracode comparisons can provide a tool to identify lake ecosystems impacted by humans. The similar results of remediated and "pristine" lakes indicate remediation efforts in these lakes have been successful in alleviating environmental impact detrimental to ostracode communities. This result indicates live/dead comparisons of ostracodes can be a useful tool to monitor

  18. Exceptionally preserved lacustrine ostracods from the Middle Miocene of Antarctica: implications for high-latitude palaeoenvironment at 77° south

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark; Siveter, David J; Ashworth, Allan C; Wilby, Philip R; Horne, David J; Lewis, Adam R; Marchant, David R

    2008-01-01

    A newly discovered Konservat-Lagerstätte from the Middle Miocene of the western Olympus Range, Dry Valleys, Antarctica, yields cypridoidean ostracods complete with preserved body and appendages. This is the first record of three-dimensionally fossilized animal soft tissues from the continent. The ostracods are preserved in goethite, secondary after pyrite, representing a novel mode of exceptional preservation. They signal a high-latitude (greater than 77° south) lake setting (Palaeolake Boreas) viable for benthic animal colonization prior to 14 Myr ago. Their presence supports the notion of warmer, tundra-like environmental conditions persisting in the Dry Valleys until the Middle Miocene. PMID:18647723

  19. 5,000 years of water level changes infered from ostracod assemblages in a lowland lake in Romania (Central Eastern Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iepure, Sanda; Hutchinson, Simon; Namiotko, Tadeusz; Feurdean, Angelica

    2014-05-01

    Oscillations of lake levels in Central Eastern Europe during the Holocene are crucial records of past regional climatic conditions reflecting the balance between evaporation and precipitation in their catchment. Lake Stiucii (38 ha, 10 m depth) is located in Transylvanian Plain (NW Romania) at 296 m asl. A recently extracted sediment core from the central part of the lake provides the first ostracod sediment record of the lake water level fluctuations in this region covering the last 5000 cal years BP. The sediment sequence yielded approximately 1600 valves of 18 freshwater and halophile ostracod species of 11 genera. The most abundant and frequent in the entire record were Heterocypris salina (Brady 1868), Limnocythere inopinata (Baird 1843) and Plesiocypridopsis newtoni (Brady & Robertson 1870) (abundance range between 16-25%). The ostracod assemblages also show a marked variability in diversity and abundance over the past 5000 years, which appear to closely follow water level oscillations. The assemblages indicate three periods of low diversity and density of ostracods primarily represented by Candonidae between (i) 3800 and 3150 cal yr BP, (ii) 2900 and 2400 cal yr BP and (iii) 1600 and 1200 cal yr BP and probably reflect a response to low lake water levels. This inference is supported by the deposition of gyttja and low Zr concentrations. The dominance of Cyclocypris ovum (Jurine, 1820) and Candoninae in a ostracod community of otherwise poor density and diversity between 2200 and 1800 cal yr BP probably reflects littoral environments in the central, deepest part of the present lake. The ostracod assemblages diversified (up to 10 species) between 1100 and 250 cal yr BP and are dominated by co-occurrences of halophile species e.g. Heterocypris salina and Plesiocypridopsis newtoni until 700 cal yr BP, suggesting increased supply of salty water into the lake by salt springs. Thereafter Limnocythere inopinata, a typical shallow water species (<10 m) is dominant

  20. Pliocene (3.2-2.4 Ma) ostracode faunal cycles and deep ocean circulation, North Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Raymo, M.E.; Kyle, K.P.

    1996-01-01

    Ostracode assemblages from Deep Sea Drilling Project Sites 607 (western Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and 610 (southeast Rockall Plateau) show rapid, systematic shifts during late Pliocene glacial-interglacial cycles that reflect deep-sea environmental change. Progressive decreases in North Atlantic deep-water taxa and increases in Southern Ocean taxa occur from 3.4 to 2.4 Ma, and high-amplitude faunal cycles begin near 2.8 Ma. Four ostracode assemblages, each with a characteristic phase relative to 41 k.y. obliquity glacial-interglacial ??18O cycles, characterize the benthic faunal record at Site 607. Cross-spectral analysis shows that the Site 607 glacial assemblage has a 41 k.y. periodicity significant at the 95% level; other assemblages show a less significant, but still obvious, concentration of variance at 41 k.y. Faunal patterns suggest climatically controlled reorganization of deep-sea benthic communities during glacial-interglacial cycles due to oscillating deep-sea environments.

  1. Ostracode δ18O and δ13C evidence of Holocene environmental changes in the sediments of two Minnesota lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwalb, Antje; Locke, Sharon M.; Dean, Walter E.

    1995-01-01

    Stable oxygen and carbon isotope geochemistry of ostracode valves, abundance and assemblages of ostracode species, and sedimentological parameters from cores taken in Williams and Shingobee Lakes in north-central Minnesota show changes in climatic and hydrologic history during the Holocene. Isotopic records are consistent with the following scenario: Before 9800 yr B.P. the two lakes were connected. Increasing evaporation through the jack/red pine period (9800-7700 yr B.P.) led to lower lake levels, leaving small separated basins. The prairie period (7700-4000 yr B.P.) reflects high aridity, and lake levels reached low stands shortly before 6500 yr B.P. Low lake levels are associated with groundwater discharge between 6500 and 6000 yr B.P. The hardwood period (4000-3200 yr B.P.) corresponds to long cold winters and warm to cool summers with lower evaporation rates and slower sedimentation. During the white pine period (<3200 yr B.P.) evaporation increased and/or precipitation shifted to the summer months. These changes can be related to shifting atmospheric circulation patterns. Zonal flow was probably dominant during the early Holocene until the end of the prairie period (c. 4000 yr B.P.). During the hardwood period a combination of zonal and meridional flow patterns caused long and cold winters and wetter summers. During the white pine period wintners were shorter and the meridional flow pattern more significant. Today meridional flow dominates the circulation pattern. ?? 1995 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  2. Stable isotope values (δ18O & δ13C) of multiple ostracode species in a large Neotropical lake as indicators of past changes in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Liseth; Curtis, Jason; Brenner, Mark; Hodell, David; Escobar, Jaime; Lozano, Socorro; Schwalb, Antje

    2013-04-01

    Modern lake hydrodynamics, ostracode species autecology, stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) of multiple ostracode species, ostracode taphonomy and sediment geochemistry were studied to improve interpretation of the late Pleistocene-early Holocene (˜24-10 ka) stable isotope record of ostracodes in sediment core PI-6 from Lago Petén Itzá, northern Guatemala. Oxygen and carbon stable isotopes in modern and fossil species assemblages of Lago Petén Itzá were used as indicators of changes in the balance between evaporation and precipitation, past lake level and carbon source. Ostracode taphonomy was used to detect past periods of strong currents, high-energy environments, and possible partial or full mixing of the lake. The modern lake water isotopic composition displays clear seasonal differences that are independent of lake level fluctuations. Modern benthic species displayed lower δ18O and δ13C values than nektobenthic species, with differences of 3.0‰ and 5.3‰, respectively. Valves of nektobenthic species display higher values of δ13C because these ostracodes live in shallower environments among abundant algae and aquatic plants, where productivity is high. The benthic species Limnocythere opesta Brehm, 1939 displayed the smallest average offset from δ18O water (+0.3‰) and the largest offset from δ13CDIC values (-4.1‰) among studied ostracode species. Nektobenthic species Heterocypris punctata Keyser, 1975 displayed the smallest difference relative to the δ13CDIC values (-0.1‰). Late Pleistocene-early Holocene climate conditions and water levels in Lago Petén Itzá can be summarized as follows: 1) high lake levels and cold conditions (Last Glacial Maximum [LGM], ˜24-19 ka), 2) fluctuating lake levels and cold conditions (Heinrich Stadial 1 [HS1], ˜19-15 ka), 3) high lake levels and warm and wetter conditions (Bølling-Allerød [BA], ˜15-13 ka), 4) low lake levels and dry conditions (Younger Dryas [YD], ˜13-11.5 ka) and 5) high lake levels and

  3. Unusual carbon and oxygen isotropic ratios of ostracodal calcite from last interglacial (Sangamon episode) lacustrine sediment in Raymond Basin, Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Anderson, T.F.; Lohmann, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotopic records of ostracode valves deposited during the last interglaciation in Raymond Basin, Illinois, have ??13C and ??18O values as high as +16.5??? and +9.2??? respectively, the highest values yet reported from continental ostracodal calcite. Located in south-central Illinois, Raymond, Pittsburgh, Bald Knob, and Hopwood Farm basins collectively have yielded important long pollen and ostracode records that date from about 130 000 years ago to the present. Although fossils from the present-day interglaciation are not well preserved, these records constitute the only described, conformable, fossiliferous successions of this age from the interior of glaciated North America. The high ??13C values from Raymond Basin are attributed to the residual effects of methane loss either by ebullition or by emission through the stems of senescent emergent aquatic vegetation. A mass balance model suggests that an increase in ??13C of dissolved inorganic carbon on the order of +15??? is possible within a few hours given modest rates of methanogenesis of about 0.02 mol m-2 d-1. The ??13C records from other studies of ostracode valves have values approaching, but not exceeding about +14??? suggesting a limiting value to ???13C enrichment due to simultaneous inputs and outputs of dissolved inorganic carbon. Values of ??18O in ostracodal calcite are quite variable (-4 to +9???) in sediment from the late Sangamon subepisode. A model of isotopic enrichment in a desiccating water body implies that a reduction in reservoir volume of 20% could produce this range of isotopic values. High humidity and evaporation probably account for most of the ??18O variability.

  4. Volcanisme, activité anthropique et circulation des masses océaniques : leur influence respective sur la distribution des populations d'ostracodes dans la baie de Kagoshima (île de Kyushu, Japon)Impact of volcanism, human activities, and water mass circulation on the distribution of ostracod populations in Kagoshima Bay (Kyushu Island, southern Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodergat, Anne-Marie; Oki, Kimihiko; Ishizaki, Kunihiro; Rio, Michel

    2002-11-01

    The distribution of ostracod populations in Kagoshima Bay (Japan) is analysed with reference to different environmental parameters. The bay is an area of volcanic activity of Sakurajima volcano under the influence of the Kuroshio Current. Most of the Head environment is occupied by an acidic water mass. Numbers of individual and species decrease from the Mouth of the bay towards the Basin and Head environments. In this latter, acidic water mass has a drastic effect on ostracod populations, whereas volcanic ashes and domestic inputs are not hostile. Ostracod distribution is influenced by the quality and structure of water masses. To cite this article: A.-M. Bodergat et al., C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 1053-1059.

  5. Quaternary Sea-ice history in the Arctic Ocean based on a new Ostracode sea-ice proxy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Gemery, L.; Briggs, W.M.; Jakobsson, M.; Polyak, L.; Brouwers, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Paleo-sea-ice history in the Arctic Ocean was reconstructed using the sea-ice dwelling ostracode Acetabulastoma arcticum from late Quaternary sediments from the Mendeleyev, Lomonosov, and Gakkel Ridges, the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau. Results suggest intermittently high levels of perennial sea ice in the central Arctic Ocean during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 (25-45 ka), minimal sea ice during the last deglacial (16-11 ka) and early Holocene thermal maximum (11-5 ka) and increasing sea ice during the mid-to-late Holocene (5-0 ka). Sediment core records from the Iceland and Rockall Plateaus show that perennial sea ice existed in these regions only during glacial intervals MIS 2, 4, and 6. These results show that sea ice exhibits complex temporal and spatial variability during different climatic regimes and that the development of modern perennial sea ice may be a relatively recent phenomenon. ?? 2010.

  6. Combined in-situ Trace Element, Pb, Sr Isotope Analysis and U-Th Dating of Speleothems and Ostracods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochum, K. P.; Scholz, D.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Gleixner, G.; Guenther, F.; Schwalb, A.; Kuzmin, D.; Stoll, B.; Weis, U.; Izmer, A. V.; Andreae, M. O.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial and marine calcium carbonate deposits, such as speleothems and corals, can be used as high-resolution paleoclimate archives. A promising new application is the investigation of ostracod shells. We have developed a LA-ICP-MS technique for combined in-situ trace element, isotope (208Pb/206Pb, 207Pb/206Pb, 87Sr/86Sr) and 230Th-232Th-234U-238U analysis in carbonates. High spatial resolution is obtained by using small spot sizes of 12 - 100 µm. The technique has been applied to a stalagmite from Hüttenbläserschachthöhle, western Germany, and ostracod shells found in lake sediments from Lake Nam Co, Tibet. We focused on a 4 mm long section of the stalagmite that grew continuously for 400 years at 106,000 years B.P. The section includes a transition from aragonite to calcite. Spatial resolution of the trace element analyses is 12 µm corresponding to a temporal resolution of about 1 year. The speleothem calcite is characterized by high Mg (~ 2,000 µg g-1), low Sr (~ 30 µg g-1), Ba (~ 4 µg g-1) and U (~0.04 µg g-1), whereas aragonite has low Mg (~10 µg g-1), high Sr (~ 700 µg g-1), Ba (~ 50 µg g-1) and U (~ 8 µg g-1). Thorium and REE abundances are very low in the ng g-1 range. Calcitic sections probably reflect periods of high recharge, whereas aragonitic sections correspond to dry climate. Remarkable in this context is the steady increase of U, Ba, Sr, Y, Pb, Cd and 208Pb/206Pb in aragonite towards the transition. This may reflect progressively more humid conditions, finally leading to precipitation of calcite. In the U-rich section of the stalagmite, in-situ U-Th-dating by LA-ICP-MS was performed, however, with significantly larger uncertainties of the activity ratios (ca. 3 %) compared to high-precision MC-ICP-MS data (ca. 0.2 %). We also analyzed very small (ca. 0.5 - 1 mm) and thin (about 0.05 mm) ostracod shells from eight levels of a Holocene lake sediment core. 34 major and trace element concentrations could be determined by EPMA and LA

  7. Benthic ostracode δ13C as sensor for early Holocene establishment of modern circulation patterns in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalb, Antje; Dean, Walter; Güde, Hans; Hanisch, Sabine; Sobek, Sebastian; Wessels, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Shells from adult specimen of the benthic ostracodes Limnocytherina sanctipatricii and Leucocythere mirabilis selected from a 8.7 m long piston core provide continuous stable oxygen and carbon records for the past approximately 16 ka. Oxygen isotopes from both species show identical values and track the general North Atlantic and European temperature history since deglaciation in great detail. Values of ostracode δ18O values suggest that about 16 cal ka the average annual air temperatures were about 11 °C colder than today. Carbon isotopic values from both species of ostracodes are similar during the Lateglacial and early Holocene, and show an overall decrease from -4‰ to -7‰ that is probably related to an increase in photosynthetic productivity in the water column, as suggested by an increase in organic carbon, delivering 13C-depleted organic matter to the bottom waters (carbon pump). About 9 cal ka only L. mirabilis δ13C values decreased about -2.5‰ within 300 years. Higher δ13C variability and ecological evidence suggests that L. mirabilis represents a summer signal, whereas L. sanctipatricii displays a more subdued annual average. After about 7 cal ka another -1.5% decrease for both species, accompanied by an increase in magnetic susceptibility, a decrease in carbonate content, and more positive bulk carbonate isotope values followed, suggesting higher detrital-clastic input into the lake. In order to provide a possible mechanism explaining the negative L. mirabilis δ13C-values, sediment pore water profiles of O2 and CH4 in short cores collected from sites distal to proximal to the Alpine Rhine River delta, were inspected. Sediments in cores from more proximal sites to the Rhine delta become anoxic at shallower sediment depth due to the decay of high allochthonous organic carbon input to the sediment, which greatly increases concentrations of methane in pore waters closer to the Rhine inflow. When methane is oxidized close to the sediment

  8. Molecular Phylogeny of Cypridoid Freshwater Ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda), Inferred from 18S and 28S rDNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Shimpei F; Kobayashi, Norio; Katoh, Toru; Kajihara, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    With the aim of exploring phylogenetic relationships within Cypridoidea, the most species-rich superfamily among the podocopidan ostracods, we sequenced nearly the entire 18S rRNA gene (18S) and part of the 28S rRNA gene (28S) for 22 species in the order Podocopida, with representatives from all the major cypridoid families. We conducted phylogenetic analyses using the methods of maximum likelihood, minimum evolution, and Bayesian analysis. Our analyses showed monophyly for Cyprididae, one of the four families currently recognized in Cypridoidea. Candonidae turned out to be paraphyletic, and included three clades corresponding to the subfamilies Candoninae, Paracypridinae, and Cyclocypridinae. We propose restricting the name Candonidae s. str. to comprise what is now Candoninae, and raising Paracypridinae and Cyclocyprininae to family rank within the superfamily Cypridoidea.

  9. A 4500-year ostracod record from Lake Shkodra (Albania): palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic reconstruction using a multi proxy approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Ilaria; Gliozzi, Elsa; Koci, Rexhep; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Baneschi, Ilaria; Sadori, Laura; Giardini, Marco; Van Welden, Aurelien; Bushati, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    During September 2003 several cores were retrieved from the Albanian side of Lake Shkodra. Among them, a 7,8 m long composite core (SK13) has been selected for multidisciplinary analysis: ostracods, characeae, pollen, CaCO3 content and stable isotopes. The chronological framework of SK13 was established through the recognition of four well-dated tephra layers and four 14C accelerator mass spectrometry measurements; the sedimentation rate has been calculated as an average of 0.2 cm a -1(Sulpizio et al 2010, Van Welden et al. 2008). Ostracods have been recovered from 337 samples of 2cm3 in volume, collected almost continuously along the cores. Each sample corresponds to ca. 10 years. Ostracods are abundant and well preserved in all samples, represented by adults and juveniles. On the whole, 13 species have been recovered with different frequencies. Among them, some are endemic of the lake (Candona montenigrina, and Limnocythere scutariense), others are known from other Balcanic lakes and are recorded for the first time in Shkodra (Paralimnocythere georgevitschi in Lake Ohrid, Candona paionica and Candona "angulata" meridionalis in Lake Dorjan). The remaining taxa (Darwinula stevensoni, Pseudocandona marchica, Cypria ophtalmica, Ilyocypris gibba, Cypridopsis vidua, and Metacypris cordata, Cyclocypris sp. and Zonocypris sp.) are widely distributed in central and southern Europe, but signalled for the first time in Albania. The faunal composition is quite homogeneous, with the percentages of the different species varying along the sediment core. The main change occurs at about 1200 cal a BP, where 8 ostracod species disappear and the frequency of the remaining 5 species dramatically increases. This major change reflects the CaCO3 trend with its major peak around 1200 cal a BP. On the contrary, the Characeae display an opposite behaviour, occurring continuously from the base of the core until about 1200 cal a BP, when they as well disappear. The δ18Oc record shows

  10. Biotic Response of Deep-Ocean Ostracodes to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: An Assessment of Past, Present, and Future studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, S. A.; Landau, E. A.

    2007-12-01

    Ostracodes are the only commonly preserved deep-ocean metazoans and provide an important perspective on benthic conditions through the global carbon cycle perturbation known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The classic global Cenozoic study of >250 micron size-fraction ostracode faunas from 1,000+ samples drawn from 150+ DSDP sites by Benson et al. (1984) revealed marked transient declines in abundance, richness, and Shannon diversity in the late Paleocene, but these data are discretized within relatively coarse one-Myr averaged bins and may have little direct temporal or causal relationship with the much shorter PETM. Following the "discovery" of the PETM by Kennett and Stott in the early 1990s, Steineck and Thomas (1994) examined the >150 micron size-fraction ostracode faunas through the PETM at upper bathyal Site 689B on Maud Rise, and argued for a marked relative increase in small, thin walled "opportunistic" taxa capitalizing upon transient conditions of increased food, decreased dissolved oxygen, and decreased carbonate saturation. However, our subsequent cm-scale bulk carbonate carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy for Site 689 confirms that only two of these faunal samples are located within the carbon-isotope excursion of the PETM. Recent high-resolution geochemical analyses of ODP PETM sections in the Southern Ocean are producing a new benchmark for integrative approaches to understanding the PETM. Cast within these environmental frameworks, our recent >63 micron size-fraction ostracode faunal analyses at Maud Rise (690B) and Kerguelen Plateau (738C) reveal marked declines in ostracode accumulation rates and resampled (abundance- corrected) generic richness coincident with the CIE onset and varying rates of recovery following the CIE minimum. Cluster and ordination analyses support major faunal perturbations through the CIE and subsequent recovery towards pre-CIE faunal composition and structure following the CIE. The relatively rapid recovery

  11. Climate variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age based on ostracod faunas and shell geochemistry from Biscayne Bay, Florida: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, Thomas M.; Wingard, Georgiana L.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Swart, Peter K.; Willard, Debra A.; Albietz, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    An 800-year-long environmental history of Biscayne Bay, Florida, is reconstructed from ostracod faunal and shell geochemical (oxygen, carbon isotopes, Mg/Ca ratios) studies of sediment cores from three mudbanks in the central and southern parts of the bay. Using calibrations derived from analyses of modern Biscayne and Florida Bay ostracods, palaeosalinity oscillations associated with changes in precipitation were identified. These oscillations reflect multidecadal- and centennial-scale climate variability associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation during the late Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). Evidence suggests wetter regional climate during the MCA and drier conditions during the LIA. In addition, twentieth century anthropogenic modifications to Everglades hydrology influenced bay circulation and/or processes controlling carbon isotopic composition.

  12. Ostracod stable isotope ratios indicate marine incursions in the Dacian Basin during the Upper Miocene and Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floroiu, Alina; Vasiliev, Iuliana; Stoica, Marius; van Baak, Christiaan; de Leeuw, Arjan; Krijgsman, Wout; Mulch, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The Dacian Basin (Romania) was part of the former Paratethys Sea that stretched over Eurasia during the Miocene to Pliocene. During that time connection of the Paratethys to the open ocean was highly variable which hampers the correlation of regional and global climatic and biotic events. Additionally, the high degree of endemism typically limits the possibility for oxygen and carbon isotope comparisons on foraminifera. Here, we present the first stable ostracod isotope (δ18O and δ13C) data of the Dacian Basin covering the latest Miocene to Pliocene. Next to mollusks, ostracods currently provide the only continuous biogenic carbonate record in the Dacian Basin. The high-resolution ostracod δ18O and δ13C data were obtained from the well-dated, thick Slanicul de Buzau section (e.g. van Baak, et al., 2015) and compared to the strontium isotope data from the same section (Grothe et al., 2016). To minimize the effects of species-dependent biosynthetic fractionation on the δ18O and δ13C values we target single specimen measurements, preferentially on Cyprideis sp.,and Tyrrhenocythere sp. Collectively, these data provide a first-order reconstruction of the most significant changes affecting the basin during the 6.3 to 3.3 Ma time interval. The δ18O and δ13C records from Slanicul de Buzau show both very large variations attaining up to 13‰ (from around -11‰ to 2) over the sampled 3 Myr interval. Such large changes cannot be explained only by interspecies dependent variations in the biosynthetic fractionation. More likely, they indicate important changes in δ18O of Dacian Basin water and carbon cycling. In particular, two intervals have much higher δ18O values (attaining up to 0 and +2 ) when compared to the rest of the record. The first occurs at ˜5.4 Ma and coincides with the 'Bosphorian Flood', an interval that is also marked by elevated 87Sr/86Sr values close to those recorded in the oceanic waters at that time (Grothe et al., 2016). We interpret this

  13. Systematic paleontology of Quaternary ostracode assemblages from the Gulf of Alaska, Part 1: Families Cytherellidae, Bairdiidae, Cytheridae, Leptocytheridae, Limnocytheridae, Eucytheridae, Krithidae, Cushmanideidae

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwers, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-two species of podocopid ostracodes are reported from Quaternary sediments of the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. Fifteen new species are described (Neonesidea sitkagi, Cytheromorpha eskerensis, C. grandwashensis, C. molniai, Munseyella melzeri, M. ristveti, Pectocythere janae, P. kiklukhensis, P. marincovichi, P. tsiuensis, Cluthia foresteri, Krithe burkholderi, K. adelspergi, Pontocythere dahlgrenensis, P. jefferiesensis), twelve previously described species are illustrated, and five species are placed in open nomenclature.

  14. Givetian ostracods of the Candás Formation (Asturias, North-western Spain): taxonomy, stratigraphy, palaeoecology, relationship to global events and palaeogeographical implications.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Sebastien; Milhau, Bruno; Vreulx, Michel; Posada, Luis-Carlos Sánchez De

    2016-01-27

    Asturian ostracods of the Givetian carbonate Candás Formation are documented for the first time from the Peran-Perlora and Carranques reference sections. More than 1,200 specimens were extracted from 44 samples by means of the hot acetolysis method. In all, 75 taxa are described herein, of which 21 are formally described and one, Evlanella peranensis Maillet n. sp., is new. All the taxa are marine benthic and belong to the Eifelian Mega-Assemblage. The assemblages recognized are representative of semi-restricted to shallow open-marine palaeoenvironments above the storm wave base. The stratigraphical distribution of the taxa shows a strong faunal renewal in the top of the Candás Formation. Long-ranging taxa found at the base of the formation, of which many are known from the base of the Middle Devonian, disappear within the base of the member C and are replaced above, around the Middle/Upper Givetian boundary, by more cosmopolitan taxa characteristic of the Frasnian. The lower half of the member C is also characterized both by unstable environments and occurrence of some short-ranging opportunistic ostracod taxa. This renewal within shallow water ostracod communities is probably a consequence of the global Taghanic Biocrisis, leading world-widely to extinctions in several faunal groups. Faunal affinities with Givetian ostracod taxa reported in other areas of the world reflect the commonly accepted palaeogeographical patterns. Close relations between the Cantabrian Zone (NW-Spain), the Armorican Massif (W-France), the Mouthoumet Massif (S-France) and North Africa (Morocco and Algeria) suggest a narrow oceanic space between the western European terranes and the northern Gondwanan margin that involves an advanced phase of closure of the Medio-European Ocean.

  15. Organic carbon cycling in deep-sea benthic ecosystem across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: Implication from ostracodes at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 401, North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Norris, R. D.; Bornemann, A.

    2011-12-01

    An ecological function of marine benthos is to change contents of oxygen and organic matters in sediments. There has been much interest in how global environmental changes affect ecological functions of marine communities and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) that has been held up as a past analog to future environmental change. During the PETM, deep-sea benthic foraminifers decreased their body-size and increased their productivity, metabolic rates, and food consumption in response to abruptly increasing temperature and surface water productivity. This implies an increased organic carbon flux between foraminifera and sediments during the event. Here we find that marine ostracodes, multicellular benthos, experienced a reduction in species diversity and individual longevity in response to PETM warming. However, our results, based upon ostracode communities from the upper Paleocene to the lower Eocene sediments at DSDP Site 401, outer Bay of Biscay, show that reduced valve-sizes were probably caused by rapid growth due to higher bottom water temperature. Estimates of body volume, temperature, valve abundances, and sedimentation rates suggest a decline in lifetime metabolic rate, respiration, food consumption, and biomass flux in the ostracode community during and after the PETM. These declines suggest that changes in the benthic ecosystem structure such as food-web and reduction of organic carbon flux between the community and the sediment during the PETM and its afterward. The reduced ostracode carbon flux contrasts the benthic foraminiferal signal. The latter shows an increase in the organic carbon flux between sediment and benthic foraminifer and they switched their community composition towards lower oxygen contents or higher organic matter supply.

  16. Impact of relative sea level and extreme climate events on the Southern Skhira coastline (Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia) during Holocene times: Ostracodes and foraminifera associations' response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaïbi, Chahira; Kamoun, Fekri; Viehberg, Finn; Carbonel, Pierre; Jedoui, Younes; Abida, Habib; Fontugny, Michel

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the evolution of the Skhira coast (Southeastern Tunisia) during Holocene times, by analyzing ostracodes, foraminifera and mollusk associations in subsurface sediments of both sebkhas of Dreîaa and El Guettiate. Nine biofacies represented by (1) five categories of lagoon namely widely opened, opened, brackish estuarine, closed and emerged; (2) the maximum of closure of environment revealed by continental and sebkha biofacies; (3) a peculiar two biofacies, formed by coarse sands or shelly clays and dominated by mollusk fragments and showing a mixture of lagoonal, marine and brackish taxa of mollusk, ostracods and foraminifera which provide evidence of high energy events (storms). The lower Holocene continental sediments are overlain by two transgressive categories of biofacies. The first one corresponds to a widely opened lagoon biofacies, related to the first Holocene marine transgression, around 7.46 ka cal BP. The second one, more important, consists of an opened lagoon biofacies between 6.67 and 5.91 ka cal BP. Sudden changes, during Holocene time, in the numerical distribution of foraminifera and ostracods species up cores are used to infer the change from widely opened lagoon, subjected to estuarine influences, to sebkha by passing by a close lagoonal environment. The enrichment of the sediment in quartz grains coupled with the action of the current drift authorized the build-up of sandy spits in front of the estuaries and the genesis of lagoon that preserve a rich assemblage of euryhaline foraminifera, ostracods and mollusks species. This process was interrupted by two distinct high-energy events. The break of sand spits induced the introduction of washover clay deposits at 5.418 ka cal BP and washover coarse sands at 644 a cal BP rich in mixture of brackish and marine macrofauna and microfauna.

  17. Benthic Biotic Response to Climate Changes over the Last 700,000 Years, the Sea of Japan: Ostracode Assemblages from Site U1427, IODP Expedition 346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. H. M.; Yasuhara, M.; Iwatani, H.; Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Bassetti, M. A.; Sagawa, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Sea of Japan is a marginal sea, semi-enclosed by the Eurasian Continent, Korean Peninsula, Japanese Islands, and shallow straits (water depth < 130 m). Marginal seas are ideal natural laboratories to study biotic responses to large-scale paleoclimate-ocean mechanisms as they are typically sensitive to glacial/interglacial and stadial/interstadial cycles. The modern oceanographic setting in the Sea of Japan is characterized by the influx of the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC) from the East China Sea, and this setting was formed 1.7 My ago by tectonic subsidence of the Tsushima Strait. The Sea of Japan, therefore, is an interesting research subject for studying the biotic response to orbital-scale climate changes and benthic faunal development under the influence of TWC. Here we present 700,000-year record of benthic biotic response to the paleoceanographic changes in the southern Sea of Japan based on ostracode assemblage reconstruction at IODP Site U1427. Five local extinction events were caused by extreme bottom conditions (mainly oxygen depletion) during the Ice Age Terminations I, II, IV, V, and VII. Primary and secondary ostracode assemblages were revealed by Q-mode k-means clustering, CABFAC factor analysis, and non-metric multidimensional scaling. The primary ostracode components, characterized by Krithe sawanensis and Cytheropteron hyalinosa, broadly reflect glacial/interglacial and high-latitude insolation cycles. In contrast, a faunal shift determined by the secondary faunal components was driven by the TWC enhancement at 300 ka.

  18. Biostratigraphic analysis based on palynomorphs and ostracods from core 2-JNS-01PE, Lower Cretaceous, Jatobá Basin, northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Luiz R. D. S. L.; Tomé, Maria E. T. R.; Barreto, Alcina M. F.; Holanda de Oliveira, David; Neumann, Virgínio H. M. L.

    2017-07-01

    This manuscript presents a biostratigraphic analysis based on non-marine palynomorphs and ostracods during the interval corresponding to the Aptian - lower Albian (local Alagoas stage) in the Jatobá Basin, northeastern Brazil. The data used for the analysis were from 179 samples collected in core 2-JSN-01-PE, which was drilled in the locality of Serra Negra, municipality of Ibimirim, Pernambuco. Of the 179 samples collected and prepared, only 23 presented ostracods, whereas 64 levels were carriers of organic waste, which aided in the biostratigraphic correlation of the studied core. From the palynological data, it was possible to identify the upper limit of the Inaperturopollenites turbatus (P-260) palynozone and the Sergipea variverrucata (P-270) palynozone and the lower limit of the Complicatisaccus cearensis (P-280) palynozone in the core 2-JSN-01-PE. Among the palynozones, the upper limit of P-260, whose record is difficult to track in northeastern Brazil and has been identified only in the Sergipe/Alagoas basin, and the limit of P-270 and P-280 in the Jatobá Basin, which had not yet been identified, can be highlighted. From the data based on non-marine ostracods, it was possible identify the ;Cytheridea;? spp. ex. Group 201/218 Biozone (herein designated Damonella grandiensis), code 011. Such record in the Jatobá Basin is represented for a diverse fauna when compared with the record of monospecific fauna initially proposed in the Sergipe/Alagoas Basin.

  19. A checklist of Recent non-marine ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from Thailand, including descriptions of two new species.

    PubMed

    Savatenalinton, Sukonthip; Suttajit, Maitree

    2016-01-20

    A checklist covering a total of 67 Recent non-marine ostracod species from Thailand, belonging to 33 genera and seven families (Cyprididae, Candonidae, Ilyocyprididae, Notodromadidae, Darwinulidae, Limnocytheridae, Loxoconchidae), is presented. Twenty-five of these are considered endemic to the Oriental region, 17 of which are Thai endemics. Two        species (Hemicypris exiqua Broodbakker, 1983, and Notodromas sinensis Neal & Zhao, 1991) are new records for the Oriental region, and four species (Cypretta seurati Gauthier, 1929, Chrissia ceylonica (Daday, 1898), Chrissia formosa (Klie, 1938), and Dolerocypris fasciata (O.F. Müller, 1776)) are new record for Thailand. The most diverse subfamily in Thailand is the Cypricercinae, with 22 species. The most diverse genera are Strandesia Stuhlmann, 1888 (eight species), followed by Pseudostrandesia Savatenalinton & Martens, 2009 (seven species) and Stenocypris Sars, 1889 (five species). Other enigmatic groups and new taxa occur in the checklist, but these need to be described elsewhere in the future. For example, several species of Cypridopsinae Kaufmann, 1900, Cyclocypridinae Kaufmann, 1900, Candoninae Kaufmann, 1900 and other groups await description. Considering regional distributions based on frequency of occurrences, rare      species constitute a large fraction, whereas very common species are minor elements. Most of the records were reported from the Northern and Northeastern parts of Thailand. Sampled habitat types ranged from ponds, (oxbow) lakes, swamps, reservoirs, springs, canals, rivers, rice fields, waterfalls, and damp leaf litter. Most of the Thai ostracod fauna exists in a wide range of habitats. A brief discussion on the distribution of described species is included with the list.       Additionally, in the present contribution, we describe two new species, Dolerocypris sisaketensis n. sp. and           Hungarocypris suranareeae n. sp., from the Northeastern part of

  20. Leperditicopid ostracodes from Ordovician rocks of Kentucky and nearby states and characteristic features of the order Leperditicopida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berdan, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Leperditicopid ostracodes from the Ordovician formations of Kentucky occur in micritic to fine-grained carbonate rocks believed to represent shallow-water facies. They are found at widely separated horizons in the Middle Ordovician High Bridge Group, the Middle and Upper Ordovician Lexington Limestone, and the Upper Ordovician Ashlock, Bull Fork, and Drakes Formations. In this sequence, the leperditicopes are represented by two genera of leperditiids, Eoleperditia Swartz, 1949 and Bivia Berdan, 1976, and six isochilinid genera, Isochilina Jones, 1858, Teichochilina Swartz, 1949, Ceratoleperditia Harris, 1960, Parabriartina n. gen., Kenodontochilina n. gen., and Saffordellina Bassler and Kellett, 1934; the type species of the hitherto poorly known genus Saffordellina, S. muralis (Ulrich and Bassler, 1923), is redescribed and refigured. In all, 18 taxa, of which 2 are in open nomenclature, are described and illustrated. In addition, the family Isochilinidae Swartz, 1949 is redefined to include genera without marginal brims and with straight ventral contact margins. The morphological characteristics of leperditicopid genera are discussed, and a table listing described genera and their diagnostic features is included.

  1. Evaluation of elevated ploidy and asexual reproduction as alternative explanations for geographic parthenogenesis in Eucypris virens ostracods.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Sofia; Michalakis, Yannis; Paczesniak, Dorota; Bode, Saskia N S; Butlin, Roger K; Lamatsch, Dunja K; Martins, Maria J F; Schmit, Olivier; Vandekerkhove, Jochen; Jokela, Jukka

    2010-04-01

    Transitions from sexual to asexual reproduction are often coupled with elevations in ploidy. As a consequence, the importance of ploidy per se for the maintenance and spread of asexual populations is unclear. To examine the effects of ploidy and asexual reproduction as independent determinants of the success of asexual lineages, we sampled diploid sexual, diploid asexual, and triploid asexual Eucypris virens ostracods across a European wide range. Applying nuclear and mitochondrial markers, we found that E. virens consists of genetically highly differentiated diploid sexual populations, to the extent that these sexual clades could be considered as cryptic species. All sexual populations were found in southern Europe and North Africa and we found that both diploid asexual and triploid asexual lineages have originated multiple times from several sexual lineages. Therefore, the asexual lineages show a wide variety of genetic backgrounds and very strong population genetic structure across the wide geographic range. Finally, we found that triploid, but not diploid, asexual clones dominate habitats in northern Europe. The limited distribution of diploid asexual lineages, despite their shared ancestry with triploid asexual lineages, strongly suggests that the wider geographic distribution of triploids is due to elevated ploidy rather than to asexuality.

  2. New data on stratigraphy (palynomorphs, ostracods, paleomagnetism) of Cenozoic continental deposits of the Ishim plain, Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmina, O. B.; Gnibidenko, Z. N.; Khazin, L. B.; Khazina, I. V.

    2017-05-01

    New micropaleontological and paleomagnetic data were obtained by studying core samples of Cenozoic continental deposits from two boreholes drilled in the south of Tyumen oblast (Western Siberia). Palynological assemblages in deposits of the Tavda (upper part), Novomikhailovka, Turtas, Abrosimovka, Tobolsk, Smirnovka, and Suzgun formations were described. Deposits of these formations are enriched in spore-pollen assemblages, which can be correlated with assemblages of regional palynozones of the West Siberian Plain. Ostracods were described in Quaternary deposits. On the basis of biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data, the Late Eocene (Priabonian)-Holocene age of deposits was substantiated. For the first time, beds with dinocysts of genus Pseudokomewuia were identified in deposits of the Turtas Formation (Upper Oligocene) of the Ishim lithofacial area. In total, nine regional magnetozones were distinguished in the paleomagnetic section. On the basis of palynological and paleomagnetic data, sections of two boreholes were correlated, and hiatuses in sedimentation were revealed. A large hiatus is at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (Western Siberia): the Lower Oligocene Atlym Horizon and Miocene-Pliocene and Eopleistocene sediments are missing. The Oligocene interval of the section is represented in a reduced volume.

  3. The role of watercourse versus overland dispersal and niche effects on ostracod distribution in Mediterranean streams (eastern Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Escrivà, Andreu; Rueda, Juan; Zamora, Laia; Hernández, Ramón; Moral, Mónica del; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc

    2016-05-01

    The processes behind the heterogeneous distribution of species involve a combination of environmental and spatial effects. In the spatial context, stream networks constitute appropriate systems to compare the relative importance of two dispersal modes in aquatic organisms: overland and watercourse dispersal. In the present study, we analyzed the distribution of ostracod species in a river network in the eastern Iberian Peninsula, with variation partitioning between environmental and spatial factors, using Moran and Asymmetric Eigenvector Maps (MEMs, AEMs) as spatial variables. Our aims were to determine the relative importance of environmental and spatial control and to compare the importance of overland and watercourse dispersal for species distribution of passively-dispersing aquatic organisms. Our results suggest that watercourse was the most important dispersal mode, favoring mass-effects. The role of species sorting was significant and related to temperature, stream width and water quality, measured as a biotic index (IBMWP). These results stress the major importance of connectivity, besides niche-related factors, in structuring riverine communities of passively-dispersing aquatic organisms.

  4. Molluscs and ostracods of the Pleistocene loess deposits in the Halych site (Western Ukraine) and their significance for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrowicz, Witold Paweł; Łanczont, Maria; Boguckyj, Andriy B.; Kulesza, Piotr; Dmytruk, Roman

    2014-12-01

    Middle and Late Pleistocene loess-palaeosol sequence (MIS 12-MIS 2) from the Halych site has been divided into four loess beds, which represent different glacial periods and contain four interglacial pedocomplexes, as well as numerous interstadial and interphase palaeosols. Long-term interdisciplinary research, which has been conducted in this site, enables the detailed description of deposit lithology and precise determination of stratigraphic position of individual layers. Rich and diverse malacofauna occurs in loess deposits representing cold stages - MIS 12, MIS 8 and MIS 4-2. Seven molluscan assemblages of diverse composition and structure have been distinguished. Additionally ostracod fauna from the deposits representing MIS 8 is described. Faunal investigations enable the reconstruction of environmental changes during deposition of the studied sequence. The obtained results indicate that the Halych site may be considered as very important not only for the reconstruction of the Pleistocene geological history in western Ukraine but also for the studies of environmental conditions during the Middle and Late Pleistocene in the whole of Central and Eastern Europe.

  5. The early life history of tissue oxygenation in crustaceans: the strategy of the myodocopid ostracod Cylindroleberis mariae.

    PubMed

    Corbari, Laure; Carbonel, Pierre; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2005-02-01

    We studied basic principles of respiratory physiology in Cylindroleberididae, Cylindroleberis mariae Baird 1850, which are millimetre-sized crustaceans (myodocop ostracod) having a fossil record dating back to about 425 millions years ago. Facing experimental changes of O2 partial pressures in the range 2-40 kPa (normoxia is 21 kPa), C. mariae lack any regulatory mechanism to adapt their ventilatory and circulatory activity. Thus, the oxygenation status of their internal milieu must follow, as a dependent variable, the ambient oxygenation. Freely behaving C. mariae exhibit a marked diurnal activity rhythm. They are actively swimming in the water column during night, where they inspire in normoxic-normocapnic water. They are resting in self-made nests during daytime, where they are rebreathing in a confined and hypoxic environment. By analogy to extensive previous literature data, we suggest that these changes of respiratory gas content, and the associated tissue gas status, participate to the shaping of their metabolic activity and behaviour. To conclude, as Cylindroleberididae are early crustaceans exhibiting a remarkable stasis since the Palaeozoic, present data illustrates how principles of tissue oxygenation strategy can cover an impressive time scale.

  6. Marine ostracod turnover tracks orbitally forced palaeoenvironmental changes at the Lower-Middle Pleistocene transition: the case study of the Valle di Manche section (Calabria, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Veronica; Scarponi, Daniele; Capraro, Luca; Ferretti, Patrizia; Macrì, Patrizia

    2017-04-01

    Ostracods, small crustaceans living in almost every aquatic depositional setting, are widely used in palaeoenvironmental reconstructions due to their well-known ecological sensitivity. A close connection between the composition of ostracod fauna and the Milankovitch climate-eustatic variability has been documented in several Plio-Pleistocene marine sections of the Central Mediterranean area. The Valle di Manche section (VdM; Calabria, southern Italy), one of the suitable candidates to host the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) of the Ionian Stage-Middle Pleistocene, represents an ideal venue where to investigate ostracod turnover in relation to orbitally forced palaeoenvironmental changes, being firmly constrained in time and well documented by a number of independent climatic proxy. A high-resolution, quantitative analysis of the ostracod fauna has been undertaken on the middle part of the VdM, ca. 30 m-thick and showing two T-R cycles developed at the Lower-Middle Pleistocene transition (late MIS 21 to early MIS 18). Within each cycle, a relatively thin, fining-upward transgressive muddy unit is overlain by gradually coarsening upward and more expanded regressive silty to sand packages. A total of 40 samples have been selected to characterise the whole spectrum of lithofacies and detect high-frequency palaeoenvironmental variations especially within homogeneous clayey stratigraphic intervals. Taxa typical of circalittoral (>70/100 m) depths (e.g., Bosquetina dentata, Cytherella vulgatella, Cytheropteron monoceros, Pterygocythereis ceratoptera and Krithe species), commonly accompanied by the lower circalittoral-bathyal species Henryhowella sarsii, occur within the fine-grained units developed during the full interglacials of MIS 21 and MIS 19. Furthermore, ostracod assemblages document that the oxygen availability at the sea floor changed during MIS 19. In contrast, a less-diversified ostracod fauna dominated by Aurila convexa, a species preferring

  7. Sedimentology, conodonts and ostracods of the Devonian - Carboniferous strata of the Anseremme railway bridge section, Dinant Basin, Belgium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casier, J.-G.; Mamet, B.; Preat, A.; Sandberg, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    as Late praesulcata Zone, with the Early and Middle praesulcata Zones unrepresented because of an hiatus or unconformity. Sparse conodont faunas suggest that only the two next-to-oldest Carboniferous duplicata and sandbergi Zones are represented in the higher part of the Hastie??re Formation. The oldest Carboniferous sulcata Zone and possibly part ofthe duplicata Zone are unrepresented because of an hiatus or unconformity above bed 159. Ostracods are abundant and diversified at most levels in the Anseremme railway bridge section and sixty taxa, the majority in open nomenclature, have been identified and nearly all of them are figured. The ostracod fauna is indicative of shallow-marine environments between fair-weather and storm wave bases in the Etroeungt Formation, and to shallower water conditions periodically subjected to minor salinity variations in the base of the Hastie??re Formation. The upper part of the Hastie??re Formation is marked by a sea-level rise associated with a moderate decrease of the oxygenation of bottom waters. The intra-Devonian hiatus at the Etroeungt-Hastie??re boundary shows no abnormal extinctions and no appearance of new taxa. Thus, the Hangenberg Event is not recognizable in the studied section. Neither the sedimentological analysis nor the palaeontological study of the Bocahut quarry in the Avesnois and of the Anseremme railway bridge section confirm the hypothesis of a highstand for the Hastie??re Formation.

  8. Orbital and suborbital variability in North Atlantic bottom water temperature obtained from deep-sea ostracod Mg/Ca ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; DeMartino, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) ratios were measured in the deep-sea ostracod (Crustacea) genus Krithe from Chain core 82-24-4PC from the western mid-Atlantic Ridge (3427 m) in order to estimate ocean circulation and bottom water temperature (BWT) variability over the past 200,000 years. Mg/Ca ratios have been used as a paleothermometer because the ratios are controlled primarily by ambient water temperatures at the time the organism secretes its adult carapace. Over the past two glacial-interglacial cycles, Mg/Ca values oscillated between about 7 mmol/mol and 12 mmol/mol, equivalent to a BWT range of 0 to > 3.5??C. The lowest values were obtained on specimens from glacial marine isotope stages (MISs) 2, 4 and 6; the highest values were obtained from specimens from the early part of the Holocene interglacial (MIS 1), and also from MISs 5 and 7. These trends suggest that BWTs in the North Atlantic Ocean fluctuate over orbital time scales. Suborbital variability in Mg/Ca ratios and BWT was also observed for the past 100,000 years. Ratios rose from ~8 mmol/mol to ~10 mmol/mol (implying a BWT increase of ~1 to 3??C) during 14 Mg/Ca excursions. The highest ratios were found in Krithe dated at approximately 32, 36-38, 43, 48, 73, 85 and 93 ka. Although the age model for the Chain 82-24-4PC and temporal resolution do not allow precise correlation, some of these deep-sea bottom temperature excursions appear to correspond to Heinrich events recorded in other regions of the North Atlantic and perhaps Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadial events recorded in Greenland ice cores. If confirmed, this would support the hypothesis that millennial-scale oscillations of climate in the North Atlantic are capable of affecting global climate via thermohaline circulation changes. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Palaeoenvironmental Fluctuations Identified by Diatoms, Ostracode, Geochemistry and Sedimentary Facies from a Tropical Crater Lake on Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Vazquez, G.; Ortega, B.; Lozano, M.; Vilaclara, G.

    2007-05-01

    A ca. 2500 cal. yr record from Santa Maria del Oro (SMO) was studied for its diatoms, ostracodes, magnetic mineralogy, geochemestry, organic matter and carbonate content to document climatic and limnological trends over western Mexico, a site sensitive to the intensity of monsoon circulation and to any latitudinal shifts of the high pressure subtropical cells as it is currently located on a transition zone between the temperate climates of central Mexico highlands and the arid climates of northern Mexico. The sediment sequence (8.8 m) has a chronology is based on 7 AMS dates. The sequence shows an irregular sequence of four distinctive facies (laminations). Data derived from the analysis of easch facies and of modern sediments supports the interpretation that sand and peaty layers are mostly alloctonous in origin while the silty layers (ochre, brown and greenish silt) are mostly autigenic. Ochre layers represent times of anoxic bottom lake conditions favoured by a warmer environment. Long term trends are also present along the sequence. Warm and relatively humid conditions change to a drier climate by ca. AD 600, with the driest and warmest stage recorded at AD 990. This dry period is consistent with records of arid phases at other sites in Mesoamerica. From AD 990 to AD 1260 there is evidence of a sudden transition to warm-humid conditions and dilution of lake water coeval with the Medieval Warm Period. From AD 1260 to AD 1480 climatic conditions were unstable and afterwards the onset of drier climates is recorded until the present. Due to its geographical position, moisture availability fluctuations are responding to atmospheric circulation changes such as latitudinal shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and Subtropical High- Pressure Cells resulting in the strengthening or weakening of the summer monsoon, which is the main moisture source for western Mexico. This sequence records environmental and climatic variability for western central Mexico and

  10. How a low tissue O2 strategy could be conserved in early crustaceans: the example of the podocopid ostracods.

    PubMed

    Corbari, Laure; Carbonel, Pierre; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2004-12-01

    An adaptation strategy whereby O(2) partial pressure, P(O(2)), in the tissues is maintained within a low, narrow range of 1-3 kPa, largely independent of the inspired P(O(2)), has been reported in water- and air-breathing poikilotherms and in homeotherms. Based on the postulate that this basic cellular mechanism has been established since the early stages of evolution, it has been hypothesized that it could be the consequence of an early adaptation strategy to maintain cellular oxygenation within the same low and primitive range. To test this hypothesis we studied the basic mechanisms of oxygen regulation in podocopid ostracods, minute crustaceans that have existed on earth for at least 500 million years. Podocopids lack any regulatory mechanism for adapting their ventilation to cope with changes in water oxygenation, and instead adjust their tissue oxygenation status by migrating through the O(2) gradient to sediment layers where the P(O(2)) of the water is 3-5 kPa. Experimental manipulation of the O(2) profile induced their vertical migration to follow this precise water P(O(2)) and demonstrates the existence of a regulation strategy. This strategy must be associated with the lower P(O(2)) values within the animal's carapace valves, showing that podocopids can actively regulate their tissue P(O(2)) at constant but even lower values than the water. In conclusion, the low tissue P(O(2)) strategy could have existed in early crustaceans and, by extension, in early animals.

  11. Population ecology and shell chemistry of a phytal ostracode species (Loxoconcha matagordensis) in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vann, C.D.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    Population ecology and shell chemistry were studied in the phytal ostracode Loxoconcha matagordensis (Swain 1955) collected from Zostera marina seagrass beds in the Chesapeake Bay to provide seasonal constraints on shell secretion time for paleothermometry. Population density and age structure were defined by two main breeding cycles that occurred between 01 to 15 June and 02 to 16 August 2001. The time interval between breeding cycles was ???2 months and total juvenile standing crop increased almost three-fold between the first and second breeding cycles. Dark brown over-wintered adults comprised the majority of the population between March and April 2001, while newly secreted translucent adults were predominant between June and September. Seasonal shell Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were positively correlated with water temperature at both sites, with the strongest correlations occurring between June and September from newly secreted shells at Dameron Marsh. Old, dark brown shells contained 10% to 23% and 1% to 6% less Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, respectively, than new shells. Because a fossil assemblage of L. matagordensis will contain ???30% old shells (dark-brown), these results suggest that fossil Mg/Ca ratios yield an integrated late spring to summer temperature signal. Shell Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of specimens of L. matagordensis collected from living Zostera were positively correlated, suggesting that temperature may influence both elemental ratios. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of fossil shells of the related species Loxoconcha sp. A obtained from four sediment cores were also studied and exhibited a weaker correlation between the two elemental ratios. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. North Atlantic Climate Changes During the Last 100 ky as Reflected in Deep Sea Ostracod Assemblages at IODP Site U1314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Stepanova, A. Y.

    2006-12-01

    Changes in the North Atlantic climate have influenced surface water productivity and deep-sea bottom water circulation patterns, thus affecting deep sea benthic assemblages. This study examines the ostracod assemblage composition over the last 100 ky in sediments drilled at IODP Site U1314 to establish the effects of climate change from the Late Pleistocene to Holocene. Site U1314 is located on the southern Gardar Drift at a water depth of 2820 m. At present, the location of the drill site lies under the influence of the lower portion of the relatively warm, highly saline and well oxygenated North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), whereas during glacial times this water mass may have been replaced by the northward flowing nutrient-rich and low oxygen Southern Ocean Water [1]. The age model for the studied interval is based on an existent benthic oxygen isotope-based stratigraphy from Site 983 ODP Leg 162 in the northern Gardar Drift [2] and derived from the correlation of reflectance and magnetic susceptibility data from ODP Site 983 and IODP Site U1314 [3]. High amplitude fluctuations in ostracod abundance and diversity were observed at Site U1314. Krithe is the dominant genus in both glacial and interglacial assemblages (40-90 %), but exhibits slightly lower abundance during glacial intervals. Other common genera, such as Oxycythereis and Echinocythereis, display their highest relative abundances during interglacial times, whereas Rockallia and Cytheropteron seem to have their highest relative abundances during glacial and cooling conditions. Besides dominant taxa typical for colder climate, some other glacial-indicative genera (Nannocythere, ?Rhombobythere, Pseudocythere and Polycope) are usually present, although their relative abundances are low. The transition from Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3) to MIS 2 and the subsequent deglaciation are characterized by the highest ostracod abundance and diversity, although most of the species present exhibit very low abundance

  13. Molluscan and ostracod successions from Dierden's Pit, Swanscombe: insights into the fluvial history, sea-level record and human occupation of the Hoxnian Thames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Tom S.; Preece, Richard C.; Whittaker, John E.

    2013-06-01

    Swanscombe, Kent, is an internationally renowned hominin site located on the south bank of the River Thames, east of London. The Swanscombe sequence has been reconstructed from exposures at several localities from which important archaeological and palaeontological assemblages have been recovered. The most important of these is Barnfield Pit, where two stone-tool industries (Clactonian and Acheulian) have been recorded in superposition, together with three refitting pieces of a hominin skull associated with the Acheulian. Dierden's Pit (=Ingress Vale), ˜0.5 km to the north of Barnfield Pit, has also yielded Palaeolithic artefacts but is best known as a source of abundant non-marine molluscs and as the type locality for the water vole Arvicola cantiana. This paper describes the molluscan and ostracod successions through the Dierden's Pit sequence, which shed light on important aspects of the fluvial, sea-level and archaeological histories of the Thames during MIS 11. A dramatic change occurs in the molluscan record at Swanscombe, marked by the appearance of the ‘Rhenish suite’ of freshwater molluscs, which has previously been used to suggest confluence of the Thames and Rhine systems. The ‘Rhenish suite’ occurs in the Middle Gravels at Barnfield Pit and throughout the Shell bed at Dierden's Pit, where the component species did not appear simultaneously but colonized the Thames in an ordered sequence. The occurrence of the ‘Rhenish suite’ provides a secure basis for correlation of important archaeological horizons at Swanscombe, which have previously been mis-correlated on the basis of artefact typology. Moreover, it enables correlation with other MIS 11 sequences, some of which (Clacton and East Hyde) can be directly linked to the pollen stratigraphy of the Hoxnian. The ostracod succession at Dierden's Pit provides the first clear evidence of increasing brackish influence at Swanscombe and has formed the basis for palaeoclimatic reconstructions using

  14. Effects of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) on DDT degradation in soil and its toxicity to collembola and ostracods.

    PubMed

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Joner, Erik J

    2013-06-01

    Nano-sized zero valent iron (nZVI) has been studied for in situ remediation of contaminated soil and ground water. However, little is known about its effects on organisms in soil and aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the effect of nZVI on degradation of DDT and its ecotoxicological effects on collembola (Folsomia candida) and ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens) were investigated. Two soils were used in suspension incubation experiments lasting for 7 and 30 d; a spiked (20 mg DDT kg(-1)) sandy soil and an aged (>50 years) DDT-polluted soil (24 mg DDT kg(-1)). These were incubated with 1 or 10 g nZVI kg(-1), and residual toxicity in soil and the aqueous phase tested using ecotoxicological tests with collembola or ostracods. Generally, addition of either concentration of nZVI to soil led to about 50% degradation of DDT in spiked soil at the end of 7 and 30 d incubation, while the degradation of DDT was less in aged DDT-polluted soil (24%). Severe negative effects of nZVI were observed on both test organisms after 7 d incubation, but prolonged incubation led to oxidation of nZVI which reduced its toxic effects on the tested organisms. On the other hand, DDT had significant negative effects on collembolan reproduction and ostracod development. We conclude that 1 g nZVI kg(-1) was efficient for significant DDT degradation in spiked soil, while a higher concentration was necessary for treating aged pollutants in soil. The adverse effects of nZVI on tested organisms seem temporary and reduced after oxidation.

  15. Ostracods and sediment geochemistry as indicators of hydrologic and climatic variability in the central part of the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert over the last 27 ka cal BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez Lara, C. M.; Roy, P. D.; Lozano Santa Cruz, R.; López Balbiaux, N.

    2013-12-01

    The paleolake Santiaguillo (Durango State) is located in the central part of the Chihuahuan Desert (Mexico). The lacustrine basin covers an area of approximately 1,964 km2 and is surrounded by mountains up to ca. 2,700 masl. This basin was formed by tectonic processes and the basement is formed by volcanic felsic rocks of Tertiary age. Four sediment cores were obtained from central and western part of the basin to reconstruct hydrologic and climate variability during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. In this work, we present paleo-ecology of ostracods and sedimentary geochemistry from two sediment cores (300 cm and 200 cm long) collected from the western basin margin. The age model was constructed from 8 AMS radiocarbon dates and the longest profile represents the last 27 cal ka BP. The ostracode faunal content consists of 4 different species: Limnocythere bradburyi, Cadona patzcuaro, Cypridopsis vidua and Limnocythere ceriotuberosa (listed from highest to lowest abundance) and total abundance varies between 0 and 125 valves/g. Paleo-environmental conditions were reconstructed from the Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC), Carbon/Nitrogen ratios (C/N), Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) and concentrations of Ti, Ca, Si and Al. The results were divided into two zones for interpretation. Zone 1 covers ca. 27-17 cal ka BP (300-191 cm) and is characterized by higher Ti concentrations and above average CIA values. This suggests greater interaction between water and sediment, lower evaporation and relatively higher lake level in the basin. During this interval of higher lakestand, the deposited organic matter was autochthonous (lacustrine origin) and ostracodes suggest presence of a warm and dilute water column (>13 °C and >100 ppm). Sediments of the last 17 cal ka BP (191-0 cm) (Zone 2) are characterized by below average water-sediment interaction, higher carbonate precipitation and deposition of allochthonous organic matter (terrestrial origin

  16. Exceptionally well-preserved giant spermatozoa in male and female specimens of an ostracod Cypria ophtalmica (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from Late Glacial lacustrine sediments of Southern Carpathians, Romania.

    PubMed

    Iepure, Sanda; Namiotko, Tadeusz; Valdecasas, Antonio G; Magyari, Enikö K

    2012-07-01

    Exceptionally well-preserved giant spermatozoa observed between abundant decalcified carapace valves of ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda) were found in Late Glacial to Holocene (14,400 to 10,000 cal years BP) lacustrine sediments in the southern Romanian Carpathians. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed good preservation of the appendages enabling specific identification as Cypria ophtalmica (Candonidae) and indication of the presence of both female and male specimens based on the sexual dimorphism of the second antenna. This record represents the oldest and richest direct evidence of virtually morphologically unaltered animal spermatozoa preserved in females after mating.

  17. Exceptionally well-preserved giant spermatozoa in male and female specimens of an ostracod Cypria ophtalmica (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from Late Glacial lacustrine sediments of Southern Carpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iepure, Sanda; Namiotko, Tadeusz; Valdecasas, Antonio G.; Magyari, Enikö K.

    2012-07-01

    Exceptionally well-preserved giant spermatozoa observed between abundant decalcified carapace valves of ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda) were found in Late Glacial to Holocene (14,400 to 10,000 cal years bp) lacustrine sediments in the southern Romanian Carpathians. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed good preservation of the appendages enabling specific identification as Cypria ophtalmica (Candonidae) and indication of the presence of both female and male specimens based on the sexual dimorphism of the second antenna. This record represents the oldest and richest direct evidence of virtually morphologically unaltered animal spermatozoa preserved in females after mating.

  18. A New Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Species of Ostracoda (Crustacea) from the Western Pacific: Implications for Adaptation, Endemism, and Dispersal of Ostracodes in Chemosynthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hayato; Yasuhara, Moriaki

    2016-10-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are among the most extreme habitats on Earth. Major research interests in these ecosystems have focused on the anomalous macrofauna, which are nourished by chemoautotrophic bacterial endosymbionts. In contrast, the meiofauna is largely overlooked in this chemosynthetic environment. The present study describes a new species, Thomontocypris shimanagai sp. nov. (Crustacea: Ostracoda), which was collected from the surface of colonies of neoverrucid barnacles and paralvinellid worms on the chimneys at the Myojin-sho submarine caldera. This is the first discovery of an ostracode from deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments in the western Pacific region. In addition to the species description, we discuss three aspects: 1) adaptation, 2) endemism, and 3) dispersal strategy of the hydrothermal vent ostracodes. Regarding these aspects, we conclude the following: 1) the new species may feed on sloughed-off tissues, mucus secretions, or fecal pellets of sessile organisms, rather than depend on chemoautotrophic bacteria as symbionts for energy; 2) as has been pointed out by other studies, Thomontocypris does not likely represent a vent-specific genus; however, this new species is considered to be endemic at the species level, as it has not been found outside of the type locality; and 3) this new species may have migrated from adjacent deep-sea chemosynthesis-based habitats, such as hydrothermal vents, with wood falls potentially having acted as stepping stones.

  19. Taxonomy and bathymetric distribution of the outer neritic/upper bathyal ostracodes (Crustacea: Ostracoda) from the southernmost Brazilian continental margin.

    PubMed

    Bergue, Cristianini Trescastro; Coimbra, João Carlos; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-02-10

    Sixty-five ostracode species belonging to 41 genera and 17 families were recorded in the outer shelf and upper slope off Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina states, southernmost Brazil, between 100 and 586 m water depth interval. The ostracode occurrences are hypothesized to be influenced by both, the coastal waters and the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). The taxonomy of some species of Bradleya Hornibrook, 1952, Legitimocythere Coles & Whatley, 1989 and Henryhowella Puri, 1957 previously described in the same study area is revised. Bradleya gaucha sp. nov., Legitimocythere megapotamica sp. nov., Apatihowella acelos sp. nov., Apatihowella capitulum sp. nov., Apatihowella besnardi sp. nov., Apatihowella convexa sp. nov., and Aversovalva tomcronini sp. nov. are herein proposed. Trachyleberis aorata Bergue & Coimbra, 2008 is reassigned to the genus Legitimocythere and Bradleya pseudonormani Ramos et al., 2009 has its diagnosis emended. Bythocypris praerenis Brandão, 2008 is considered a junior synonym of Bythocypris kyamos Whatley et al., 1998a. Apatihowella Jellinek & Swanson, 2003 and Legitimocythere species have well-defined bathymetric distributions and are potential paleoceanographic markers for the Quaternary in the Southern Brazilian Margin.

  20. Morphométrie des hemicytherinae (ostracodes) par modélisation mathématique du profil latéral externe. application systématique et phylogénétique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnou, Ali; Carbonnel, Gilles; Bouab, Badia

    1999-02-01

    Mathematical modelling is a suitable morphological descriptor which allows a rigorous quantification of the outline of ostracodes. Its application to the morphometric analysis of Hemicytherinae reveals its interest in (1) the characterization of the contour (2) the quantification of morphological similarities and differences between taxa and their interpretation in evolutionary terms.

  1. Ostracod assemblages as a tool for documenting dynamics in marginal semi-closed marine environments: a case study from Late Quaternary sediments of Saronikos Gulf (Attica, central Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daioglou, Konstantinos; Tsourou, Theodora; Drinia, Hara; Antonarakou, Assimina; Anastasakis, George

    2017-04-01

    The Saronikos Gulf is a semi-enclosed embayment situated in the west-central region of the Aegean Sea in the eastern Mediterranean, and covers a total surface area of 1,117 km2. It is a neotectonic basin, divided by a very shallow north-south-oriented platform into a western and an eastern part. The western basin has depths exceeding 400 m, the eastern basin depths around 100 and 200 m. Furthermore, Elefsis Bay, situated to the north, is separated from the gulf by two shallow sills. This complex bottom morphology greatly influences the regional water circulation pattern. The Saronikos Gulf draws the attention of marine science because it constitutes the natural marine gateway of the city of Athens and the Piraeus harbor and receives the treated wastes of ˜4 million people. A sedimentary record spanning more than 16935+50 calyr BP was recovered at N 37.52'23.38" E 23.15'40", water depth 140 m, in the western basin of the gulf. A total of 50 samples from a 260 cm core were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed for micropalaeontological study in order to reconstruct palaeoenvironmental conditions. In the framework of this study, ostracod assemblages were used to trace changes in the depositional environment of the investigated core. Two main ostracod assemblages alternate along the core, indicating a gradual transition from a shallow marine infralittoral to an outer infralittoral-inner -circalittoral environment. A mesohaline shallow marine assemblage, mainly with Leptocythere lagunae, Leptocythere rara, and Callistocythere sp., is dominant for the largest part of the core (from 260 to about 50cm). At the upper part a deeper marine assemblage prevails, mainly with Callistocythere crispata, Acanthocythereis hystrix, Pterygocythereis jonesii and Bairdia sp. The pattern of the environmental change that took place in Saronikos Gulf during Late Quaternary is comparable with the one established by Tsourou et al. (2015) for Southern Evoikos Gulf, suggesting that similar

  2. Assessment of impact of geochemical and environmental properties on the meiofauna (benthic foraminifer, ostracod, mollusc) assemblages: A case study in The Late Quaternary Sediments In The Gulf Of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yümün, Zeki Ü.

    2016-04-01

    The drilling samples collected from varying depths at 1.00-13.00 m at four different localities of Karsiyaka, Bayrakli, Inciralti and Urla (Çesmealti) in the Gulf of Izmir were studied for their geochemical, sedimantological and micropaleontological properties. The purpose of this study is to describe the meiofauna of the sediments, to determine the pollution history of the gulf and to show the effect of the pollution on the foraminifera and ostracoda. Examination of the loose sediments reveals that the gulf has been affected by the sea for a long time, and it had a rich microfaunal assemblages. Both foraminiferal tests and ostracod carapaces have coloring, and morphological abnormalities have been determined in foraminiferal tests. Peneroplis pertusus (Forskal) and P. planatus (Fichtel and Moll) have blue and black colored tests, while morphological abnormalities were observed on the tests of Ammonia compacta Hofker, Elphidium complanatum (d'Orbigny), E. crispum (Linné), E. macellum (Fichtel and Moll). The ostracod carapaces are generally gray-black colored. Heavy metal (Cr, Mn, Zn, Co, Ni, Cu) analyses have been carried out on the sediments of the Gulf of Izmir. Heavy metal concentrations are high in Bayrakli, and low in Urla (Çesmealti). Cr, Mn and Zn values are the highest in Bayrakli, whereas Co, Ni and Cu values are the highest in Inciralti. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analyses were performed and no heavy metal was detected on the white and colored ostracod carapaces. When the white and colored ostracod carapaces are compared, the coloured ostracode carapace has higher Mg content, and also includes Fe, Al, N, Cl and K. Based on the results obtained, it is observed that the Bayrakli region have been more affected by the pollution than Urla (Çesmealti).

  3. Quantization test of the evolution trend of Paleocosta pervinquieri (Ostracode) during a 10-million year period (Djebel-Dyr section, Paleogene, Algeria).

    PubMed

    Braccini, E; Peypouquet, J P; Benson, R H

    1992-01-01

    Using a computerised technique that estimates differences or changes in the pattern defined by the distribution of 24 pore-canals of left valves of Paleocosta pervinquieri (Ostracode), we can speculate about the phylogenic evolution of the species ranging in age from Danian (66 My) to Ypresian (54 My) from the Djebel-Dyr section (North East of Algeria). This method is combined with traditional biometric and statistical studies and the analysis of architectural patterns of shells. Firstly, it reveals that Paleocosta pervinquieri is individualised in 6 morphs which evolve from the 'libyaenisis morph' to the 'mokkatamensis morph', between the P1 zone (66 My) to the P4 zone (56 My). During the P5 zone (55 My), we suggest that there has been a genation between the Paleocosta pervinquieri 'mokkatamensis morph' and the Reymensticosta sp. 'semi-reticulated morph'. Furthermore, the Theta-Rho method could be adapted and used for numerous paleontological and biological studies.

  4. Ostracodes on the Roof of the World: Timing the Uplift of the Tibetan Plateau Using Stable Isotope Paleoaltimetry and Clumped Isotope Paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, M.; Rowley, D. B.; Currie, B. S.; Colman, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    The timing of the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau has occupied the tectonics community for much of the past quarter century. The effort to elucidate the paleoelevation history has refined a more precise method of estimating paleoaltimetry—coupling stable isotopes (oxygen and deuterium; Rowley et al., 2001) with paleotemperatures derived from Δ47 clumped isotope paleothermometry. However, geologists using this method on the Tibetan Plateau are correctly concerned with the preservation of a primary δ18Ow signal in the thermally altered rocks commonly inherent to collisional zones. Burial by both overlying strata and tectonics can lead to thermal alteration and isotopic resetting, eliminating the possibility of constraining the elevation history using the stable isotope record. Lin et al. (2014) suggest preservation of a primary depleted oxygen signal in the 55 My carbonates of the Nianbo Fm. and argue against the previously accepted diagenetic resetting of lacustrine and paleosol carbonates found in the Linzhou (Penbo) Basin. The Lin et al. study reports recovery of seasonal isotopic variation in an ostracode using in situ analysis by NanoSIMS, which suggests the host carbonates have not reached sufficiently high temperatures for resetting of the primary δ18O signal. This result prompted further Δ47 analyses at Chicago of Penbo carbonates initially determined to have high paleotemperatures (>60°C) using older, less-refined clumped isotope techniques five years ago. Results of our clumped isotope study will examine whether or not seasonal δ18Oc variations are preserved in the Nianbo Fm. Δ47-derived paleotemperatures will reveal whether the ostracodes preserve an original oxygen signal or are thermally overprinted. The combination of paleotemperatures and δ18Ow will allow for the paleoelevation history of the Tibetan Plateau to be extended to the Eocene using the robust Δ47-derived paleotemperature proxy.

  5. A new genus and species of entocytherid ostracod (Ostracoda: Entocytheridae) from the John Day River Basin of Oregon, U.S.A., with a key to genera of the subfamily Entocytherinae.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Patricia G; Williams, Bronwyn W

    2017-06-07

    Targeted sampling efforts by the authors for the signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, from its native range in the John Day River Basin, Oregon, U.S.A. yielded entocytherid ostracods with a male copulatory complex so clearly different from other entocytherines that a new genus, Aurumcythere gen. nov. is proposed to receive them. This newly proposed, apparently nonsclerotized, genus with hook and spur-like prominences of the posteroventral end of the peniferum is the first new genus of the subfamily Entocytherinae named since Hobbs & Peters described Aphelocythere (= Waltoncythere) in 1977. Aurumcythere gen. nov. represents only the second genus of entocytherid known from the Pacific Northwest. Lack of sclerotization in Aurumcythere gen. nov. provides new insight into poorly understood mating behaviors of entocytherid ostracods.

  6. Holocene lake level fluctuations of a small alpine lake in the Qilian Mountains, NW China: a comparison of chironomid, ostracod, pollen and geochemistry data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischke, S.; Herzschuh, U.

    2003-04-01

    A core of 14 m length was drilled in a small alpine lake in the Qilian Mountains, NW China. The lake Luanhaizi has a drainage area of about 30 km2 and is situated at an altitude of 3200 m which represents the altitude of the present regional upper timberline. Due to the small size of the open-basin lake (surface area about 1 km2) and the sharply outlined catchment area the lake is regarded as a very sensitively and rapidly responding ecosystem. Analyses of ostracod shells, head capsules of larval chironomids and pollen and spores were conducted and the organic and carbonate content (LOI), element concentrations and magnetic susceptibility of core samples determined. Ostracod taxa mainly comprise Candona candida, C. neglecta, C. rawsoni, Cyclocypris ovum, Cypridopsis vidua, Fabaeformiscandona caudata, F. danielopoli, F. hyalina, Herpetocypris chevreuxi, Heterocypris salina, Ilyocypris cf. bradyi, I. echinata, I. lacustris and Limnocythere inopinata. They may be used to distinguish periods of low lake levels corresponding to a dense cover of aquatic plants at the lake bottom from stages of higher lake levels and a corresponding decrease in macrophytes at the core site. Chironomid taxa belonging to Chironomus, Cladopelma, Glyptotendipes, Micropsectra, Paratanytarsus, Polypedilum, Psectrocladius and Tanytarsus further provide information on variations in benthic oxygen availability and lake level fluctuations. Several units of the core show high abundances of pollen and spores of higher aquatic and wetland plants and fungi (Cyperaceae, Hippuris, Myriophyllum and Glomus) indicating low lake levels. In contrast, algae such as Botryococcus, Pediastrum and Tetraedron were regarded to reflect higher water levels. Typha angustifolia-type, Typha latifolia, Alisma and Potamogeton were recorded in low abundances as well. The organic content of core samples averages 6 % displaying four alternating stages of distinct minima and maxima. Lowest values of about 1 % occur at the core

  7. A continuous 250,000 yr record of oxygen and carbon isotopes in ostracode and bulk-sediment carbonate from Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bright, Jordon; Kaufman, D.S.; Forester, R.M.; Dean, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotopes from a continuous, 120-m-long, carbonate-rich core from Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho, document dramatic fluctuations in the hydrologic budget of the lake over the last 250,000 yr. Isotopic analyses of bulk sediment samples capture millennial-scale variability. Ostracode calcite was analyzed from 78 levels, mainly from the upper half of the core where valves are better preserved, to compare the isotopic value of purely endogenic carbonate with the bulk sediment, which comprises both endogenic and detrital components. The long core exhibits three relatively brief intervals with abundant endogenic aragonite (50??10%) and enriched ??18O and ??13C. These intervals are interpreted as warm/dry periods when the lake retracted into a topographically closed basin. We correlate these intervals with the interglacial periods of marine oxygen-isotope stages 1, 5e, and 7a, consistent with the presently available geochronological control. During most of the time represented by the core, the lake was fresher than the modern lake, as evidenced by depleted ??18O and ??13C in bulk-sediment carbonate. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new commensal ostracod Asterositus ohtsukai n. g., n. sp. (Paradoxostomatidae) on the sea star Sclerasterias euplecta (Fisher) (Asteriidae) and its feeding habits.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hayato; Arai, Mikihito

    2017-02-01

    A new commensal ostracod Asterositus ohtsukai n. g., n. sp. (Podocopida: Cytheroidea: Paradoxostomatidae) is described. This new taxon occurs on the ambulacral grooves and wreath of pedicellariae around superomarginal spines of the sea star Sclerasterias euplecta (Fisher) (Asteroidea: Forcipulatida: Asteriidae). Although the family Paradoxostomatidae Brady & Norman, 1889 contains four ectoparasitic or commensal genera, the association with asteroideans has never hitherto been reported. Morphological observations suggested that A. ohtsukai n. g., n. sp. is closely associated with the host sea star as it typically has distal hooks on the antenna and fifth to seventh limbs, and specialised mandibula and maxillula structures that are considered adaptations to a commensal life-style. In addition, this study discussed the feeding habits of A. ohtsukai n. g., n. sp. based on comparison with previous works. The extremely reduced palp and endites of maxillula of A. ohtsukai n. g., n. sp. imply that they have unique feeding habits that are not based on the feeding function of maxillula. From morphological comparisons with siphonostomatoid copepods, we suggest that A. ohtsukai n. g., n. sp. may feed on the body of host sea star by injuring them with styliform needle-like mandibular coxa and sucking the tissues, body fluid, or mucus with the suctorial disc on the oral cone.

  9. Development of a chronic sediment toxicity test using the benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens and their application to toxicity assessments of urban road dust.

    PubMed

    Niyommaneerat, Wilailuk; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Tobino, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    This study reports on the development and application of a chronic sediment toxicity test using the benthic ostracod Heterocypris incongruens. H. incongruens reproduction parameters such as egg production, first day of brooding, egg-laying ratio, and hatching ratio were examined in this study. The test was first validated by determining the repeatability of the test method under seven control performances. The results showed good test repeatability of most endpoints, with coefficient of variation (CV) results below 15%. However, lifetime egg production, hatching ratio, and the reproductive rate were highly variable, with CVs ranging from 29.5% to 51.9%. Next, an application example of the proposed chronic method was performed using a series of urban road dust (URD) samples diluted with a reference sediment and compared to a 6 d H. incongruens toxicity test. The results of the proposed chronic test showed a statistically significant difference in the first day of brooding at 6.25% URD which did not exhibit significant mortality and growth inhibition in 6 d toxicity test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An isotopic and trace element study of ostracods from Lake Miragoane, Haiti: A 10,500 year record of paleosalinity and paleotemperature changes in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jason H.; Hodell, David A.

    We report a high-resolution climate reconstruction for the Caribbean based on isotopic and trace element analysis of freshwater ostracod shells from Lake Miragoane, Haiti. By combining oxygen isotopes with Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios, we are able to determine qualitative changes in temperature and salinity of this small, deep lake from the very late Pleistocene (10,500 years BP) to the present. During the latter part of the Younger Dryas Chronozone from ˜10,500 to 10,000 years BP, isotopic, trace element, and pollen results suggest that climate was arid and temperature was cooler than today in the Caribbean region. Similar interpretations of lake level lowering and increased aridity have been made for African lakes during this period. During the last deglaciation (Termination 1b), from ˜10,000 to 7,000 years BP, temperature increased and salinity decreased as lake levels rose during the early Holocene. Minimum salinity conditions are recorded between 7,000 and 4,000 years BP, which coincides with the early Holocene moist period when lake levels were consistently high in the tropics. From ˜4,000 to 2,500 years BP, lake level declined and salinity increased with the onset of a dry climate that generally prevailed throughout the late Holocene. The interval from ˜2,500 to 1,500 years BP was marked by an exceptionally dry period when all parameters indicate high salinity. This severe dry period persisted until ˜1000 years BP when wetter conditions briefly returned. The last millennia has been marked by a general trend toward increased salinity and inferred drier conditions.

  11. Absolute paleobathymetry of Upper Cretaceous chalks based on ostracodes - Evidence from the Demopolis Chalk (Campanian and Maastrichtian) of the northern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, T.M. )

    1991-05-01

    The presence of abundant and diverse sighted ostracodes in chalk and marl of the Demopolis Chalk (Campanian and Maastrichtian) in Alabama and Mississippi strongly suggests that the Late Cretaceous sea floor was within the photic zone. The maximum depth of deposition is calculated from an equation based on eye morphology and efficiency and estimates of the vertical light attenuation. In this equation, K, the vertical light attenuation coefficient, is the most critical variable because it is the divisor for the rest of the equation. Rates of accumulation of coccoliths during the Cretaceous are estimated and are on the same order as those in modern areas of high phytoplankton production, suggesting similar pigment and coccolith concentrations in the water column. Values of K are known for a wide range of water masses and pigment concentrations, including areas of high phytoplankton production; thus light attenuation through the Cretaceous seas can be estimated reliably. Waters in which attenuation is due only to biogenic matter-conditions that result in deposition of relatively pure chalk-have values of K ranging between 0.2 and 0.3. Waters rich in phytoplankton and mud-conditions that result in deposition of marl-have K values as great as 0.5. Substituting these values for K results in depth range of 65 to 90 m for deposition of chalk and depth of 35 m for deposition of marl. These depth values suggest that deposition of many Cretaceous chalks and marls around the world were deposited under relatively shallow conditions.

  12. Ascosphaera subglobosa, a new species from North America associated with the solitary bee Megachile rotundata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ascosphaera is a widespread ascomycetous genus of mostly obligate associates of bees. These fungi have diversified to exploit seemingly every possible substrate available in their bee-associated habitat, occurring as pathogens of the bees, or as saprotrophs on honey, cocoons, nesting materials, poll...

  13. Excess warming in Central Europe after the 8.2 ka cold event: evidence from a varve-dated ostracod δ18O record from Mondsee (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterbach, Stefan; Andersen, Nils; Erlenkeuser, Helmut; Danielopol, Dan L.; Namiotko, Tadeusz; Hüls, Matthias; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Nantke, Carla; Meyer, Hanno; Chapligin, Bernhard; von Grafenstein, Uli; Brauer, Achim

    2017-04-01

    As evidenced by numerous palaeoclimate records worldwide, the Holocene warm period has been punctuated by several short, low-amplitude cold episodes. Among these, the so-called 8.2 ka cold event represents a particularly prominent climate anomaly. Accordingly, several proxy-based and modeling studies have addressed its causal mechanisms, absolute dating, duration, amplitude, spatio-temporal characteristics and environmental consequences so far. However, knowledge about the dynamics and causes of subsequent climate recovery is still limited although this is essential for understanding rapid climate change. Here we present a new sub-decadally resolved and precisely dated oxygen isotope (δ18O) record for the interval 7.7-8.7 ka BP derived from benthic ostracods preserved in the varved lake sediments of pre-Alpine Mondsee (Austria), providing new insights into climate development around the 8.2 ka cold event in Central Europe. The high-resolution Mondsee δ18O record reveals the occurrence of a pronounced cold spell around 8.2 ka BP, whose amplitude (˜1.0 ‰ , equivalent to a 1.5-2.0 ˚ C cooling), total duration (151 years) and absolute dating (8231-8080 varve years BP, i.e. calendar years before AD 1950) agrees well with results from other Northern Hemisphere palaeoclimate archives, e.g. the Greenland ice cores. In addition, the Mondsee data set provides evidence for a 75-year-long δ18O overshoot directly following the 8.2 ka event (between 8080 and 8005 varve years BP), which is interpreted as a period of excess warming (about 0.5-0.6 ˚ C above the pre-8.2 ka event level) in Central Europe. Though so far not been explicitly described elsewhere, this observation is consistent with evidence from other proxy records in the North Atlantic realm, therefore likely reflecting a hemispheric-scale signal rather than a local phenomenon. As a possible trigger we suggest an enhanced resumption of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), supporting

  14. Changes in North Atlantic deep-sea temperature during climatic fluctuations of the last 25,000 years based on ostracode Mg/Ca ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, Gary S.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Baker, Paul A.; Rodriguez-Lazaro, Julio

    2000-01-01

    We reconstructed three time series of last glacial-to-present deep-sea temperature from deep and intermediate water sediment cores from the western North Atlantic using Mg/Ca ratios of benthic ostracode shells. Although the Mg/Ca data show considerable variability (“scatter”) that is common to single-shell chemical analyses, comparisons between cores, between core top shells and modern bottom water temperatures (BWT), and comparison to other paleo-BWT proxies, among other factors, suggest that multiple-shell average Mg/Ca ratios provide reliable estimates of BWT history at these sites. The BWT records show not only glacial-to-interglacial variations but also indicate BWT changes during the deglacial and within the Holocene interglacial stage. At the deeper sites (4500- and 3400-m water depth), BWT decreased during the last glacial maximum (LGM), the late Holocene, and possibly during the Younger Dryas. Maximum deep-sea warming occurred during the latest deglacial and early Holocene, when BWT exceeded modern values by as much as 2.5°C. This warming was apparently most intense around 3000 m, the depth of the modern-day core of North Atlantic deep water (NADW). The BWT variations at the deeper water sites are consistent with changes in thermohaline circulation: warmer BWT signifies enhanced NADW influence relative to Antarctic bottom water (AABW). Thus maximum NADW production and associated heat flux likely occurred during the early Holocene and decreased abruptly around 6500 years B.P., a finding that is largely consistent with paleonutrient studies in the deep North Atlantic. BWT changes in intermediate waters (1000-m water depth) of the subtropical gyre roughly parallel the deep BWT variations including dramatic mid-Holocene cooling of around 4°C. Joint consideration of the Mg/Ca-based BWT estimates and benthic oxygen isotopes suggests that the cooling was accompanied by a decrease in salinity at this site. Subsequently, intermediate waters warmed to modern

  15. Ostracode-based reconstruction from 23,300 to about 20,250 cal yr BP of climate, and paleohydrology of a groundwater-fed pond near St. Louis, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B.; Delorme, D.

    2003-01-01

    The water chemistry of a groundwater-fed sinkhole-pond near St. Louis, Missouri, and its associated climate during the last glaciation are reconstructed by comparison with autecological data of modern ostracodes from about 5,500 sites in Canada. A 4.8-m succession of fossiliferous sediment yielded ostracode assemblages that collectively are generally found today in ponds in North America including the species Cyclocypris ampla, C. laevis, Cypridopsis vidua, Candona crogmaniana, C. distincta, and C. ohioensis. Fossils of Picea needles and the ostracode Cyclocypris sharpei imply that best analog sites for the succession are in central to south-central Canada. The pond formed 23,300 ?? 400 cal yr BP when a sinkhole became plugged by a clay bed about 1 m thick. By about 20,250 cal yr BP, the pond had desiccated and was buried by loess. The sediment accumulation rate was about 0.18 cm/yr, and each sample interval (6 cm) represents a time slice of ???33 years. Data from this record provides the first fairly high resolution proxy record of the glacial paleoclimate of the mid-latitude of North America. The analog data indicate the water in the hydrologically-open spring-fed pond was less than 1 m deep. The paleoclimatic reconstructions imply gradually drier conditions and uniform, cool temperatures. The shallow water depth indicates that the temperature reconstruction is robust with mean annual temperatures (MATs) that ranged between 0.8 and 3.9??C, and mean July temperatures that ranged from 16.8 and 18.1??C. Other estimated climatic parameters include mean annual precipitation (MAP; 430 to 840 mm/yr), and moisture balance (P-E; -111 to 298 mm/yr). Compared to values measured today at St. Louis, the MAP was about 400 mm less, MAT about 10??C cooler, and P-E, about the same. These values are consistent with other published reconstructions based on modern analog analysis of fossil beetles and pollen, and paleothermometry based on amino acid racemization. The total dissolved

  16. Late Quaternary Lake History of Hala Lake, Qinghai Province, China, Evidenced by Ostracod Assemblages and Sediment Properties in Multiple Sediment Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YAN, Dada; Wuennemann, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Hala Lake, a closed 65 m deep lake basin in the western Qilian Mountains, Qinghai Province, is considered a monitor of climate-driven hydrological and environmental changes during the past 24 kyr BP. The distribution patterns of ostracod assemblages, sediment-geochemical properties in four sediment records from different water depths and the unique limnological setting (green algae layer between 25 and 32 m water depth and seasonally anoxic conditions) enabled us to reconstruct four major phases of centennial-scale water depth fluctuations from the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 24 kyr BP) to the Present. Our results show that Hala Lake experienced a very shallow and small water body during the LGM and Late Glacial under cold and dry climate conditions. Rapid increase of water depth and contemporaneous lake expansion started at around 15 kyr BP (Phase I), most likely as a result of glacier melt due to the onset of climate warming. The lake reached >45 m water depth at around 13.5 kyr BP, followed by a decline (5-6 m) during the Younger Dryas spell (ca. 12 kyr BP), which may be attributed to a short-term return to cooler and drier conditions. During the early Holocene (Phase II), water depth increased again towards lake highstands close to its present level. Besides continued glacier melt supply, we assume that summer monsoon effective moisture contributed to the overall water budget, but remained relatively unstable, favoring water depth fluctuations of about 10-15 m. A pronounced lower water depth falls into the period between 9 and 8 kyr BP, perhaps the result of weak monsoon influence or its complete absence, although the warming trend continued towards its optimum at ca. 8-7 kyr BP. A distinct mass flow, most likely triggered by an earthquake, occurred during a lake lowstand between 8.1 kyr BP and 7.0 kyr BP. The mid-Holocene (Phase III) was characterized by deepened water between 7.5 and 4.5 kyr BP, interrupted by short-term declines at around 7 and 6

  17. Late Quaternary water depth changes in Hala Lake, northeastern Tibetan Plateau, derived from ostracod assemblages and sediment properties in multiple sediment records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dada; Wünnemann, Bernd

    2014-07-01

    Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate dynamics along the marginal belt of the East Asian Summer Monsoon in China and their responses to hydrological cycles in lake basins of the Tibetan Plateau are still a matter of scientific discussion. Hala Lake, a closed 65 m deep lake basin in the western Qilian Mountains, Qinghai Province, is considered a monitor of climate-driven hydrological and environmental changes during the past 24 kyr BP. The distribution patterns of ostracod assemblages, stable isotopes, sediment-geochemical properties in four sediment records from different water depths and their combination with the unique limnological setting enabled us to reconstruct four major phases of centennial-scale water depth fluctuations from the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca 24 kyr BP) to the Present. Our results show that Hala Lake experienced a very shallow and small water body during the LGM and Lateglacial under cold and dry climate conditions. Rapid increase of water depth and contemporaneous lake expansion started at around 14 kyr BP (Phase I), most likely as a result of glacier melt due to the onset of climate warming. The lake reached >45 m water depth at around 13.5 kyr BP. Reduced water depth during the Younger Dryas spell (ca 12 kyr BP) may be attributed to a short-term return to cooler and drier conditions. During the early Holocene (Phase II), water depth increased further toward lake highstands close to its present level, with a highest lake level of up to 9 m above the present lakestand at 8.0-7.8 kyr BP. Besides continued glacier melt supply, we assume that summer monsoon effective moisture contributed to the overall water budget, but remained relatively unstable, favoring water depth fluctuations. A pronounced lower water depth falls into the period between 9.2 and 8.1 kyr BP, perhaps the result of weak monsoon influence or its complete absence, although the warming trend continued toward its optimum at ca 8-7 kyr BP. A distinct mass flow, most likely

  18. Reply to Discussion: a critique of Possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the late Quaternary: evidence from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Geo-Marine Letters, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazik, Atike; Meriç, Engin; Avşar, Niyazi

    2012-06-01

    In their discussion of our 2011 paper dealing with possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the "late" Quaternary, based on data from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Yaltırak et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 32:267-274, 2012) essentially reject the idea of any links whatsoever, be they between the Marmara Sea and the lakes İznik and Sapanca, or further to the Black Sea via the valley of the Sakarya River. The evidence they provide in support of their view, however, is essentially circumstantial, in part conjectural, and also inconclusive considering the findings in favour of linkage between the Marmara Sea and the lakes at the very least, while the proposed connection with the Sakarya River valley remains speculative because of the lack of unambiguous data. On the other hand, Yaltırak et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 32:267-274, 2012) do raise valid points of concern which deserve careful future investigation, the most important being the possibility of sample contamination from dumped marine sediment used for construction purposes along some parts of the shore of Lake İznik. We agree that a concerted multidisciplinary effort is required to address the many unresolved issues in connection with the potential waterways proposed by us and others before us.

  19. Tumoral calcinosis form of hydroxyapatite deposition disease in related red-bellied short-necked turtles, Emydura subglobosa.

    PubMed

    Burns, R E; Bicknese, E J; Westropp, J L; Shiraki, R; Stalis, I H

    2013-05-01

    Ten of 12 red-bellied short-necked turtles from a single clutch presented at 9 months of age with multiple white to tan nodules on their feet. Histologically, the nodules were composed of large periarticular deposits of mineralized crystalline material that extended into the joint spaces of interphalangeal joints and was surrounded by granulomatous inflammation and fibrosis. Crystallographic analysis determined the material to be apatite (calcium phosphate hydroxide) consistent with the tumoral calcinosis form of hydroxyapatite deposition disease (HADD). HADD has previously been described in aquatic turtles and rarely lizards and must be differentiated from gout in reptiles. A cause for the tumoral calcinosis lesions in these turtles could not be determined; however, based on previous reports in this species, a species-specific predilection, in conjunction with unknown environmental factors, is suspected. The use of the terms HADD, pseudogout (calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease), and calcinosis circumscripta has been inconsistent, creating confusion in the literature.

  20. Variability of the Tsushima Warm Current during the Pleistocene and its relationship with the evolution of the East Asian Monsoon. Preliminary results from IODP Expedition 346 (Sites U1427 and U1428/29) based on benthic ostracod assemblages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetti, M. A.; Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Toucanne, S.; Yasuhara, M.; Holbourn, A. E.; Sagawa, T.; Tada, R.; Murray, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    The semi-enclosed marginal sea bordered by the Eurasian continent, the Korean peninsula and the Japanese Islands has an average depth of 1350 m and is connected with other marginal seas in the region by shallow and narrow straits. At present, the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC), a branch of the Kuroshio Current, is the only warm current flowing into the marginal sea west of Japan. The TWC carries both subtropical water originating from the North Pacific and fresher runoff water derived from East China Sea continental shelf. The northerly flow of the TWC through the shallow Tsushima Straits is ultimately controlled by relative sea level variations over time. IODP Expedition 346 Sites U1427 and U1428/29 are ideally located to record changes in (i) the intensity of the influx of the TWC, and (ii) the intermediate ventilation of the marginal sea over the last million years. The Japan Sea Intermediate Water (JSIW) corresponds to a vertical salinity minimum, found below the TWC, between 200 and 400-500 m water depth. The JSIW shows a relatively high oxygen concentration, related to the deep water convection in winter and linked to fresh water supply during winter monsoon intervals. Based on recent observations, it is thought during glacial and interglacial conditions, and millennial scale climate cycles the intensity of deep and intermediate water currents varied but the mechanisms of such variations are not fully known. Microfossil faunal proxies can be used for tracking bottom environmental conditions related to variability of the bottom water circulation intensity. Here, we present preliminary results obtained using ostracods (benthic microcrustaceans) that are abundant in the sedimentary sequences recovered at Sites U1427 and U1428/29, and are known to react sensitively to changes in water masses physico-chemical parameters. In particular, the variability of the genus Krithe through time is correlated with the sortable silt (carbonate-free, 10-63 µm sediment size

  1. Developmental process of musculoskeletal integration in ostracod antenna.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Tomonari

    2012-03-01

    The functional morphology of arthropod appendages shows remarkable diversity. Plausible functional integrations, particularly between muscles and the exoskeleton, must be achieved in these diverse morphologies. This study provides an insight into the evolutionary pathway of diversified appendages from a functional point of view. The musculoskeletal structure and development of antennae in five species of Cypridocopina were compared. The muscle and skeletal systems are integrated in several ways: The integration in Propontocypris attenuata occurs during various stages of the molting growth, whereas that in Fabaeformiscandona breuili occurs during the myogenesis. These two types of developmental processes have notable similarities, despite their occurrence during different developmental phases. From the overview of the molecular phylogeny presented by earlier studies, it is suggested that the integrated musculoskeletal system has reappeared repeatedly in cypridoid lineages as an atavism. This study demonstrates how arthropod appendages evolve without losing the integrity of the functional whole.

  2. The Ostracoda assemblage of the Eocene-Oligocene transition in northwestern Thrace: Kırklareli-Edirne area (northwestern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şafak, Ümit; Güldürek, Manolya

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the Eocene-Oligocene transition in detail in northwest Thrace (NW Turkey) with heavy reliance on ostracod fauna. The lithologies formed and the environmental changes during this time period were also studied. The study was carried out in northwest Thrace within the outcropping Koyunbaba, Soğucak, and Ceylan Formations; Mezardere, Osmancık, and Danişmen Formations of the Yenimuhacir Group; and the Taşlısekban and Pınarhisar members of the Danişmen Formation. Rich ostracod fauna indicating an Eocene and Oligocene age and environment are found within these units. The Ostracoda fauna identified were ostracods Triebelina punctata, Bairdia cymbula, Bairdia tenuis, Cyamocytheridea nova, Krithe bartonensis, Krithe angusta, Krithe rutoti, Krithe parvula, Echinocythereis isabenana, Leguminocythereis genappensis, Grinioneis triebeli, Xestoleberis subglobosa and Xestoleberis muelleriana from the Mid-Late Eocene epoch; Cytheromorpha zinndorfi, Hemicyprideis montosa, Neocyprideis williamsoniana, Cladarocythere apostolescui, Hammatocythere hebertiana, Haplocytheridea helvetica, Cytheridea pernota, Callistocythereis vitilis, Cushmanidea cf. scrobiculata, Pterygocythereis fimbriata, Pokornyella limbata, Grinioneis paijenborchiana, Cytheretta tracensis, Macrocypris wrightii and Paracypris bouldnorensis from the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene epoch; and Novocypris eocenana, Novocypris striata, Moenocypris forbesi, Candona (Pseudocandona) fertilis, Candona (Lineocypris) sp. and Cypridopsis soyeri from the Early-Late Oligocene epoch. The study was also correlated to previous research conducted on Eocene-Oligocene age ostracods around the area, in northwestern Europe, and in the Paris-Akiten Basin, in view of similar age-environment relationships determined by said studies. On the basis of evidence from the lithologic content of the beds and the micropaleontological investigation, the fossil community identified in this study indicates that the

  3. Effect of the 'Vesulian events' on the foraminifers and ostracods in the Tethyan oceanic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görög, Ágnes; Wernli, Roland; Tóth, Emőke

    2014-05-01

    In the north-western Tethys, at the Early/Late Bajocian boundary the 'Vesulian Unconformity' can be recognized as a result of carbonate crisis caused by transgression, culminating in the late Niortense -early Garantiana zones, followed by cooling and sudden regression. Later, in the Zigzag and Progracilis zones there was a regression causing also first-order crisis in the ammonite fauna. Up to know only the early Bajocian (BARBIERI, 1964; MONOSTORI, 1995; WERNLI and GöRöG, 1999, 2000) and middle - late Bathonian (GöRöG and WERNLI, 2002) microfauna of the Tethyan oceanic realm were studied and we have no information about late Bajocian -early Bathonian interval. The study of the foraminifera and ostracoda fauna from succession of Gyenespuszta, Bakony Mts, Hungary fill the gap of the records about these ages. The succession consists of ammonitico rosso type limestones, deposited on a submarine high. Despite the heavy condensation a relatively complete stratigraphic sequence (4 m) from the late Bajocian Humphresianum Zone up to late Bathonian Retrocostatum Zone could be identified based on ammonites (GALáCZ, 1970, 1980), which is unique in the Tethys. From each of the 18 beds, thin sections were made for microfauna and microfacies studies and the microfauna were extracted by pure acetic acid. In the ostracoda fauna is relative poor (13 species) consisting of smooth bairdids, Paracypris, Bythocypris, Pontocyprella and Polycope species. Several are known only from the Tethyan oceanic environment, while others occurred also in deep sublittoral - bathyal zone of the epicontinental areas. In the foraminifera fauna 55 benthic and 6 plankton protoglobigerinids (Globuligerina oxfordiana, G. bathoniana, G. aff. bathoniana, Conoglobigerina? aff. dagestanica, C.? avariformis forma alta and sphaerica) could be identified. The fauna differs from the epicontinental ones basically in the ratio of the different forms. Throughout the succession the protoglobigerinids (10-70 %), spirillinids (5-80 %) and smooth walled lenticulinids (5-35 %) dominate, the agglutinated, porcelanous and ornamented lagenids are strongly subordinated, oberhauserellids are missing. The largest faunal changes happened in the Niortense-Garantiana zones and at the end of the Zigzag Zone, which reflected in: 1. drastic decreasing (about half) of diversity of the microfauna; 2. negative correlation of the protoglobigerinids and spirillinids: in the Garantiana-early Zigzag zones spirillinids dominate, while in the other part of the succession protoglobigerinids; 3. change in the protoglobigerinids association: the characteristic large sized (up to 400 μm) thick walled (40 μm compare with 8 μm thin walled forms) specimens disappeared in the Niortense-Garantiana zones, the large forms reoccur in the late Zigzag Zone, but with thin wall. Summarizing, the microfauna changes well coincide with the 'Vesulian events': During the transgression phase the existence of the thick walled protoglobigerinids can be interpret as a cortex bearing forms, adapting to the deep water mode of life. After the cooling and the regression these forms disappeared and only the shallow water dweller smaller forms remained. From the late Zigzag Zone a continuous deepening went on indicating by the appearance of the large probably deep dweller protoglobigerinids. Thus the thick walled protoglobigerinids are known only from the late Aalenian up to the Garantiana Zone, and can be use as a good marker for this interval. The microfauna of the Gyenespuszta succession provided the first evidence of the influence of the 'Vesulian events' on the Tethyan oceanic environment.

  4. The ubiquitous ostracode Darwinula stevensoni (Brady and Robertson, 1870), redescription of the species and lectotype designation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    Darwinula stevensoni (Brady and Robertson 1870) is the type species of Darwinula, the ubiquitous living and fossil nonmarine nominate genus of the Darwinulidae and the Darwinulacea. To date, the additional families Darwinuloididae (fossil), Microdarwinulidae (living and fossil), Panxianidae (fossil), and Suchonellidae (fossil) have been referred to the Darwinulacea. A type specimen for D. stevensoni has not been previously designated. In order to stabilize the species, a lectotype is selected from the type series in the Brady collection at The Hancock Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne. The species is redescribed and reillustrated based on the study of the carapace of a paralectotype and also of valves and appendages of specimens from both England and the United States. Living species of Darwinula have a cosmopolitan distribution in fresh and brackish water. Fossil Darwinulacea, documented in the Carboniferous, serve as indicators of continental Paleozoic to Holocene deposits. - Author

  5. Morphology and distribution of pelagic ostracods of the genus Boroecia (Ostracoda: Halocyprididae) in the Central Arctic.

    PubMed

    Chavtur, Vladimir G; Keyser, Dietmar A; Bashmanov, Alexander G

    2015-09-08

    Morphologically similar Boroecia borealis and B. maxima are redescribed from the Central Arctic. Their morphological differences are minor but well defined. Their geographic and vertical distribution is studied based on an extensive body of materials collected by many expeditions in the Arctic Ocean during the period from 1929 to 1993 at the depth range of 0-4000 m. The comparison of the distribution of both species reveals that B. borealis prefers waters of subarctic structure in the Atlantic, and it inhabits waters in the relatively warm Atlantic layer in the Arctic. In contrast, B. maxima is a good indicator of cool Arctic waters. This species is also present in greater depths of the Northern Atlantic, where polar waters penetrate far towards the south.

  6. Bathyconchoeciinae, a new subfamily of deep oceanic planktonic halocyprid Ostracod (Myodocopa, Ostracoda).

    PubMed

    Angel, Martin; Graves, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Species of the genera Bathyconchoecia and Scottoecia are currently classified in the subfamily Euconchoeciinae together with species of the genus Euconchoecia. The morphological and ecological characteristics of many of the species currently attributable to these two taxa are compared with a range of Euconchoecia species and are shown to differ extensively. These differences are sufficient to separate these taxa at the subfamily level. Therefore, a new subfamily, the Bathyconchoeciinae is proposed to accommodate all the species currently classified in the genera Bathyconchoecia and Scottoecia.

  7. Relationship of two lacustrine ostracode species to solute composition and salinity: implications for paleohydrochemistry ( Limnocythere sappaensis/staplini).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Examination of the solute composition and salinities of the lakes where Limnocythere sappaensis and L. staplini live reveals that solute composition and not salinity is the most critical factor that controls their occurrence. L. sappaensis lives in water that is enriched in Na-HCO3-CO3 and depleted in Ca. L. staplini lives in water that is enriched in various combinations of Na-Mg-Ca-SO4-Cl and is depleted in HCO3. These taxa may be used as reliable paleohydrochemical indicators. -from Author

  8. LANDSCAPE INFLUENCES ON LAKE CHEMISTRY AND OSTRACOD COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF SMALL DIMICTIC LAKES IN SOUTHERN WISCONSIN DIMICTIC LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The natural land cover patterns that characterize the southern part of Wisconsin are legacies of a

    glaciated past. Land cover pattern and geomorphology control the hydrologic connections between water

    resources and the land by which ecosystems, including lakes are o...

  9. LANDSCAPE INFLUENCES ON LAKE CHEMISTRY AND OSTRACOD COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF SMALL DIMICTIC LAKES IN SOUTHERN WISCONSIN DIMICTIC LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The natural land cover patterns that characterize the southern part of Wisconsin are legacies of a

    glaciated past. Land cover pattern and geomorphology control the hydrologic connections between water

    resources and the land by which ecosystems, including lakes are o...

  10. On the Leptocytheridae Ostracods of the Long-Lived Lake Ohrid: A Reappraisal of their Taxonomic Assignment and Biogeographic Origin

    PubMed Central

    Namiotko, Tadeusz; Danielopol, Dan L.; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Gross, Martin; Von Grafenstein, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Leptocythere karamani Klie, one of few non-marine species of the family Leptocytheridae (Ostracoda), is redescribed from specimens recently collected from the long-lived Lake Ohrid on the Albanian-Macedonian border. Detailed morphologies of valves and limbs of this species were compared with those of other Ohrid-Prespa leptocytherids, of some recent marine representatives of the genera Leptocythere Sars and Callistocythere Ruggieri from the Mediterranean, Irish and Baltic seas as well as with that of fossil non-marine species from the Miocene palaeo-Lake Pannon belonging to the genera Amnicythere Devoto and Euxinocythere Stancheva. Comparison with other species of Leptocytheridae inhabiting fresh to brackish waters of the Black-Azov, Caspian and Aral seas were also carried out using descriptions provided in the literature. Based on the comparative morphological studies it is shown that L. karamani and other Ohrid leptocytherids have a number of characters distinguishing them from other members of the genus Leptocythere but demonstrating a relationship with species of the genus Amnicythere. The most reliable of these characters are: a) anterior valve vestibulum from where mostly uni-ramified pore canals start, b) the entomodont hinge type with a strong anterior anti-slip tooth, a smooth posterior anti-slip bar on the left valve, and c) the hemipenis with underdeveloped lateral lobe and reduced clasping organ. From this strong evidence, the Ohrid leptocytherid species are allocated to the genus Amnicythere. Finally, a biogeographic scenario on the origin of the Ohrid leptocytherids is proposed which matches the “Lake Pannon derivate hypothesis”. Close relationship of the Ohrid Amnicythere species with the non-marine leptocytherid taxa from the Neogene lakes of Central and Eastern Europe and with extant taxa from the Black and Caspian seas may indicate that the Ohrid Amnicythere derived from Lake Pannon species which were able to colonise lakes in Southern Europe through a stepping-stone process and subsequently to adapt to freshwater environment. PMID:28090189

  11. The toxic effects of copper on larvae of the barnacle species Chthamalus challengeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Leilei; Wang, Ying; Sha, Jingjing; Wang, You; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-03-01

    With the increased use of copper (Cu)-based antifouling (AF) paints, copper has become a potential threat to marine organisms. Experiments were performed to investigate the effects of copper on larvae of the barnacle Chthamalus challengeri. These experiments attempted to identify a more sensitive index to monitor copper pollution in marine environments. The 24 h LC50 ranged from 156.07 μg/L (nauplius II) to 817.15 μg/L (cypris) and the no observed effect concentration (NOEC) ranged from 81.75 μg/L (nauplius II) to 571.04 μg/L (cypris). The cypris settlement rate declined significantly when copper concentrations ≥135 μg/L. No cypris was found in the copper concentration of 60 and 75 μg/L treatment groups stressed for 22 d. Nauplius II moulting was not affected by exposure to copper for 24 h; however, when extended to 48 h, the percent moulted in 75 μg/L treatment group was declined to 37.12%, which was significant lower ( P <0.05) than that in the control group. The phototaxis of nauplius II decreased significantly when copper concentrations ≥45 μg/L. Despite an initial significant increase at copper concentrations of 30 μg/L, ammonia excretion rate decreased when copper concentrations ≥60 μg/L. These results suggested that: (1) nauplius II could not develop to the cypris when the copper concentration ≥60 μg/L; (2) cypris settlement is more susceptible to copper than cypris mortality rate; (3) nauplius II is the most sensitive larval stage; (4) nauplius II ammonia excretion rate is the most sensitive index to copper and might be as the indicator for copper pollution monitoring.

  12. Metamorphosis in balanomorphan, pedunculated, and parasitic barnacles: a video-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Høeg, Jens T; Maruzzo, Diego; Okano, Keiju; Glenner, Henrik; Chan, Benny K K

    2012-09-01

    Cypris metamorphosis was followed using video microscopy in four species of cirripeds representing the suspension-feeding pedunculated and sessile Thoracica and the parasitic Rhizocephala. Cirripede metamorphosis involves one or more highly complex molts that mark the change from a free cypris larva to an attached suspension feeder (Thoracica) or an endoparasite (Rhizocephala). The cyprids and juveniles are so different in morphology that they are functionally incompatible. The drastic reorganization of the body implicated in the process can therefore only commence after the cyprid has irreversibly cemented itself to a substratum. In both Megabalanus rosa and Lepas, the settled cyprid first passes through a quiescent period of tissue reorganization, in which the body is raised into a position vertical to the substratum. In Lepas, this is followed by extension of the peduncle. In both Lepas and M. rosa, the juvenile must free itself from the cypris cuticle by an active process before it can extend the cirri for suspension feeding. In M. rosa, the juvenile performs intensely pulsating movements that result in shedding of the cypris carapace ~8 h after settlement. Lepas sp. sheds the cypris cuticle ~2 days after settlement due to contractile movements of the peduncle. In Lepas anserifera, the juvenile actively breaks through the cypris carapace, which can thereafter remain for several days without impeding cirral feeding. Formation of the shell plates begins after 1-2 days under the cyprid carapace in Lepas. In M. rosa, the free juvenile retains its very thin cuticle and flexible shape for some time, and shell plates do not appear until sometime after shedding of the cypris cuticles. In Sacculina carcini, the cypris settles at the base of a seta on the host crab and remains quiescent and aligned at an angle of ~60° to the crab's cuticle. The metamorphosis involves two molts, resulting in the formation of an elongated kentrogon stage with a hollow injection stylet

  13. Metamorphosis in Balanomorphan, Pedunculated, and Parasitic Barnacles: A Video-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Høeg, Jens T.; Maruzzo, Diego; Okano, Keiju; Glenner, Henrik; Chan, Benny K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Cypris metamorphosis was followed using video microscopy in four species of cirripeds representing the suspension-feeding pedunculated and sessile Thoracica and the parasitic Rhizocephala. Cirripede metamorphosis involves one or more highly complex molts that mark the change from a free cypris larva to an attached suspension feeder (Thoracica) or an endoparasite (Rhizocephala). The cyprids and juveniles are so different in morphology that they are functionally incompatible. The drastic reorganization of the body implicated in the process can therefore only commence after the cyprid has irreversibly cemented itself to a substratum. In both Megabalanus rosa and Lepas, the settled cyprid first passes through a quiescent period of tissue reorganization, in which the body is raised into a position vertical to the substratum. In Lepas, this is followed by extension of the peduncle. In both Lepas and M. rosa, the juvenile must free itself from the cypris cuticle by an active process before it can extend the cirri for suspension feeding. In M. rosa, the juvenile performs intensely pulsating movements that result in shedding of the cypris carapace ∼8 h after settlement. Lepas sp. sheds the cypris cuticle ∼2 days after settlement due to contractile movements of the peduncle. In Lepas anserifera, the juvenile actively breaks through the cypris carapace, which can thereafter remain for several days without impeding cirral feeding. Formation of the shell plates begins after 1-2 days under the cyprid carapace in Lepas. In M. rosa, the free juvenile retains its very thin cuticle and flexible shape for some time, and shell plates do not appear until sometime after shedding of the cypris cuticles. In Sacculina carcini, the cypris settles at the base of a seta on the host crab and remains quiescent and aligned at an angle of ∼60° to the crab’s cuticle. The metamorphosis involves two molts, resulting in the formation of an elongated kentrogon stage with a hollow injection

  14. Metamorphosis in the Cirripede Crustacean Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Maruzzo, Diego; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S.; Høeg, Jens T.

    2012-01-01

    Stalked and acorn barnacles (Cirripedia Thoracica) have a complex life cycle that includes a free-swimming nauplius larva, a cypris larva and a permanently attached sessile juvenile and adult barnacle. The barnacle cyprid is among the most highly specialized of marine invertebrate larvae and its settlement biology has been intensively studied. By contrast, surprisingly few papers have dealt with the critical series of metamorphic events from cementation of the cyprid to the substratum until the appearance of a suspension feeding juvenile. This metamorphosis is both ontogenetically complex and critical to the survival of the barnacle. Here we use video microscopy to present a timeline and description of morphological events from settled cyprid to juvenile barnacle in the model species Balanus amphitrite, representing an important step towards both a broader understanding of the settlement ecology of this species and a platform for studying the factors that control its metamorphosis. Metamorphosis in B. amphitrite involves a complex sequence of events: cementation, epidermis separation from the cypris cuticle, degeneration of cypris musculature, rotation of the thorax inside the mantle cavity, building of the juvenile musculature, contraction of antennular muscles, raising of the body, shedding of the cypris cuticle, shell plate and basis formation and, possibly, a further moult to become a suspension feeding barnacle. We compare these events with developmental information from other barnacle species and discuss them in the framework of barnacle settlement ecology. PMID:22666355

  15. Anthropogenic impacts on meiobenthic Ostracoda (Crustacea) in the moderately polluted Kasado Bay, Seto Inland Sea, Japan, over the past 70 years.

    PubMed

    Irizuki, Toshiaki; Ito, Hisayo; Sako, Megumi; Yoshioka, Kaoru; Kawano, Shigenori; Nomura, Ritsuo; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-02-15

    Two sediment cores were obtained from Kasado Bay, a moderate-polluted enclosed bay in Japan, to examine anthropogenic impacts on Ostracoda over the past ca. 70 years. We analyzed ostracode abundance and diversity, grain size, and CHN, and used (210)Pb and (137)Cs as the dating method. The present study showed that cross-plot comparisons of ostracode abundance and each environmental factor, based on sediment core data, could be used to identify ostracode species as indicators for anthropogenic influences. Ostracode abundance reflected mainly the changes that had occurred in total organic carbon content in sediments related to eutrophication, but heavy metal concentration did not directly influence several ostracode abundance in the bay. Environmental deterioration because of eutrophication started in the 1960s. The regulations regarding the chemical oxygen demand in waters introduced in the 1980s probably influence ostracode abundance for certain species in this period. Currently, Kasado Bay is not experiencing severe degradation.

  16. Evaluation of Glider Coatings against Biofouling for Improved Flight Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    barnacle cypris larvae settlement assay. After the settlement assay, the settled barnacles are ‘grown-out’ and the growth rate of barnacles are...compared to controls to evaluate any effects the emergent coating may have on health and growth rate of the barnacles . Additionally the coatings are...use a handheld force gauge to remove barnacles in shear from the face of the panel according to ASTM 5618. The mean force necessary to remove

  17. Evaluation of Glider Coatings Against Biofouling for Improved Flight Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-17

    and used to conduct assays of survivorship with approximately 100 nauplii larvae ofArtemia sp. ( brine shrimp ). The larvae were exposed to the...1 for easy comparison. There was a significant difference in average mortality of brine shrimp in the leach assay (Kruskal Wallis p=0.0002). Post...seal (D). These coatings showed higher mortality of brine shrimp as well as 100% mortality of cypris larvae during the settlement assay which

  18. Relative tolerance of cirripede larval stages to acute thermal shock: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan; Nancharaiah; Venugopalan; Nair; Subramoniam

    2000-12-01

    (1) Meroplankters drawn into once-through cooling circuits of coastal power plants are subjected to transient thermal stress. The effect of such acute thermal shock on the development of barnacle larvae was studied in the laboratory.(2) The response of the barnacle larvae (naupliar and cyprid stages) to elevated temperature was dependent on exposure time and their stage of development.(3) Among the stages tested, N-6 larvae showed maximum tolerance. Exposure to 37 degrees C did not affect larval survival, but delayed development of N-2 larva to cypris by one day.(4) Exposure at 40 degrees C delayed, hastened or did not affect the development time of N-2 and N-4 larvae through cypris, depending on exposure time.(5) Ten mins exposure at 43 degrees C proved lethal to all larval stages with mortality ranging from 20 to 86%.(6) Development success of the surviving larvae, measured in terms of cypris yield, showed no significant difference from controls, at temperatures below 40 degrees C.(7) Settlement activity was significantly affected in only those cyprid larvae which were exposed to 43 degrees C for 10 min.(8) Results of the present study indicate that thermal stress experienced in the once-through cooling system does not have significant impact on survival and development of the barnacle larvae at temperatures of 37-40 degrees C.

  19. Predation of schistosomiasis vector snails by ostracoda (crustacea)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.; Kornicker, L.S.

    1972-01-01

    An ostracod species of Cypretta is an effective predator in laboratory experiments on 1- to 3-day-old Biomphalaria glabrata, a vector snail of the blood fluke that causes the tropical and subtropical disease schistosomiasis.

  20. Palaeohydrology, vegetation, and climate since the late Illinois Episode (~130 ka) in south-central Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Baker, R.G.

    2000-01-01

    Our interpretation of pollen and ostracode successions from four basins in south-central Illinois provides a new synthesis of palaeovegetation, palaeohydrology, and palaeoclimate for the period from the late Illinois Episode (about 130,000 years ago) to near the end of the Wisconsin Episode (about 25,000 years ago). Correlations of pollen biozones between Raymond, Pittsburg, and Bald Knob basins are the basis for identifying the late Illinois glacial, Sangamon interglacial, Wisconsin glacial, and Hudson interglacial episodes. Glacial episodes were identified primarily by the presence of Picea pollen and the ostracode Limnocythere friabilis, whereas interglacial episodes were identified by Quercus pollen and by the ostracodes Candona caudata and Heterocypris punctata. Within interglacial and glacial episodes, pollen and ostracode assemblages varied with changes in moisture balance. Local palaeohydrology was assessed primarily on the basis of environmental tolerance indices of ostracodes and the stable isotope (C,O) stratigraphy of ostracodal calcite. Regional moisture balance was assessed from multivariate analyses of the pollen successions. Three climatic regimes occurred during the Sangamon Episode. (1) One regime was characterised by precipitation exceeding evaporation that promoted basin overflow. This climate was inferred from the high percentages (generally >80%) of deciduous-forest pollen. Peaks in the abundance of Liquidambar and Fagus pollen indicate that winters may have been slightly warmer, and effective moisture slightly greater, than at present. (2) The second climatic regime was continental, similar to the present climate of Illinois in which precipitation is equal to or just less than evaporation. This climate is inferred from abundant Ambrosia pollen (40 to 60%) and abundant nektic (swimming) ostracode valves which suggest a shallow lake. These conditions probably developed in association with a 'heat-low' over the interior of North America during

  1. Neogene-quaternary Ostracoda and paleoenvironments, of the Limón basin, Costa Rica, and Bocas del Toro basin, Panama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borne, P.F.; Cronin, T. M.; Hazel, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Tropical marine ostracodes from Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the Central American Caribbean region have been the subject of biostratigraphic, ecological, taxonomic, and evolutionary studies. As part of the Panama Paleontology Project (PPP), Neogene and Quaternary ostracodes are being studied from the Central American region. The overall goal of this research is to evaluate the impact of the emergence of the Central American Isthmus as a land barrier between the Caribbean/tropical Atlantic and the Pacific oceans on marine ostracode biodiversity and the oceanic environments in which extant ostracodes evolved. Due to the ecological specificity of many living tropical ostracode species, they are ideally suited for reconstructing paleoenvironments on the basis of their occurrence in fossil assemblages, which in turn can lead to a better understanding of the tropical climatic and tectonic history of Central America. The principal aims of this chapter are: (a) to document the composition of the ostracode assemblages from the Limón Basin of Costa Rica and the Bocas del Toro Basin of Panama, two areas yielding extensive ma rine ostracode assemblages; (b) to describe the environments of deposition within these basins; and (c) to document the stratigraphic distribution of potentially agediagnostic ostracode species in the Limón and Bocas del Toro basins in order to enhance their use in Central American biostratigraphy. A secondary, but none-the-less important goal is to assemble a database on the distribution of modem ostracode species in the Caribbean and adjacent areas as a basis for comparison with fossil assemblages. Although the ecological, biostratigraphic and paleoenvironmental conclusions presented here will improve as additional material is studied, these fossil and modem ostracode databases constitute the foundation for future evolutionary and geochernical studies of tropical Caribbean and eastern Pacific Ocean ostracodes. Moreover, we present here evidence

  2. Ostracoden von Hawaii, insbesondere aus dem marinen Interstitial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, G.

    1991-03-01

    The present paper deals with ostracods collected by H. Kunz during October and November 1979 on the Hawaiian Islands (Big Island, Maui and Kauai). 26 species were found, nine species are described, two were already known to science, 15 remain in open nomenclature. Although some of the new species are represented only by a single specimen, the morphologic characters permit to distinguish them from other species of the genus. The ostracods of the Hawaiian Islands are very imperfectly known.

  3. Erratic rates of molecular evolution and incongruence of fossil and molecular divergence time estimates in Ostracoda (Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Tinn, Oive; Oakley, Todd H

    2008-07-01

    Dating evolutionary origins of taxa is essential for understanding rates and timing of evolutionary events, often inciting intense debate when molecular estimates differ from first fossil appearances. For numerous reasons, ostracods present a challenging case study of rates of evolution and congruence of fossil and molecular divergence time estimates. On the one hand, ostracods have one of the densest fossil records of any metazoan group. However, taxonomy of fossil ostracods is controversial, owing at least in part to homoplasy of carapaces, the most commonly fossilized part. In addition, rates of evolution are variable in ostracods. Here, we report evidence of extreme variation in the rate of molecular evolution in different ostracod groups. This rate is significantly elevated in Halocyprid ostracods, a widespread planktonic group, consistent with previous observations that planktonic groups show elevated rates of molecular evolution. At the same time, the rate of molecular evolution is slow in the lineage leading to Manawa staceyi, a relict species that we estimate diverged approximately 500 million years ago from its closest known living relative. We also report multiple cases of significant incongruence between fossil and molecular estimates of divergence times in Ostracoda. Although relaxed clock methods improve the congruence of fossil and molecular divergence estimates over strict clock models, incongruence is present regardless of method. We hypothesize that this observed incongruence is driven largely by problems with taxonomy of fossil Ostracoda. Our results illustrate the difficulty in consistently estimating lineage divergence times, even in the presence of a voluminous fossil record.

  4. Synchronism of naupliar development of Sacculina carcini Thompson, 1836 (Pancrustacea, Rhizocephala) revealed by precise monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trédez, Fabien; Rabet, Nicolas; Bellec, Laure; Audebert, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Sacculina carcini is member of a highly-specialized group of parasitic cirripeds (Rhizocephala) that use crabs ( Carcinus maenas) as hosts to carry out the reproductive phase of their life cycle. We describe the naupliar development of S. carcini Thompson, 1836 from a very precise monitoring of three different broods from three specimens. Nauplii were sampled every 4 h, from the release of the larvae until the cypris stage. Larval development, from naupliar instar 1 to the cypris stage, lasts 108 h at 18 °C. A rigorous sampling allowed us to describe an additional intermediate naupliar instar, not described previously. Naupliar instars are renumbered from 1 to 5. Nauplius 1 (N1) larvae hatch in the interna; N2 are released from the interna and last between 12 and 16 h; N3 appear between 12 and 16 h after release; N4 appear between 28 and 32 h; and N5 appear between 44 and 48 h. The cypris stage appears between 108 and 112 h. The redescribed morphologies allowed us to identify new characters. Antennular setation discriminates naupliar instars 3, 4 and 5. Telson and furca morphologies discriminate all naupliar instars. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the speed of larval development is similar within a single brood and between broods from different specimens, suggesting synchronization of larval development. From precise monitoring of broods every 4 h, we demonstrate that the life cycle of S. carcini includes five instars of naupliar larvae instead of four. The morphological characters of the larvae discriminate these naupliar instars and allow the identification of S. carcini from other Rhizocephala species. S. carcini larvae develop synchronously. Consequently, they might be an informative model to study larval development in crustaceans.

  5. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Ping Gong, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet ‘hydrogel’. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris. PMID:27877456

  6. Antifouling properties of hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murosaki, Takayuki; Ahmed, Nafees; Gong, Jian Ping

    2011-12-01

    Marine sessile organisms easily adhere to submerged solids such as rocks, metals and plastics, but not to seaweeds and fishes, which are covered with soft and wet 'hydrogel'. Inspired by this fact, we have studied long-term antifouling properties of hydrogels against marine sessile organisms. Hydrogels, especially those containing hydroxy group and sulfonic group, show excellent antifouling activity against barnacles both in laboratory assays and in the marine environment. The extreme low settlement on hydrogels in vitro and in vivo is mainly caused by antifouling properties against the barnacle cypris.

  7. Nature and perception of barnacle settlement pheromones.

    PubMed

    Clare, A S; Matsumura, K

    2000-01-01

    It is now almost 50 years since the gregarious settlement of barnacles and its chemical basis was first described. Although originally noted for Elminius modestus, mechanistic studies of gregariousness have focused on two species, Semibalanus balanoides and Balanus amphitrite. By virtue of its ease of study and its economic importance as a fouling organism, the latter species has assumed increasing importance in recent years. This paper will provide an overview of studies on settlement pheromones and their perception. An adult glycoprotein, arthropodin (now known as settlement-inducing protein complex or SIPC), was once thought to be the sole pheromone involved in the induction of cypris larval settlement. At least two other pheromones are now known to be involved, a waterborne cue originating from the adult and the cypris temporary adhesive. The latter is related, immunologically, to SIPC. In keeping with many other examples of chemical communication, the available evidence suggests that barnacle settlement induction involves receptor-ligand interactions and a signal transduction pathway(s) that translates into attachment and metamorphosis. Similar findings have been reported for some, but not all, marine invertebrate larvae examined thus far and the implications for antifoulant development are discussed.

  8. Population and life-stage specific sensitivities to temperature and salinity stress in barnacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrolahi, Ali; Havenhand, Jonathan; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Pansch, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Temperature and salinity shape the distribution and genetic structure of marine communities. Future warming and freshening will exert an additional stress to coastal marine systems. The extent to which organisms respond to these shifts will, however, be mediated by the tolerances of all life-stages and populations of species and their potential to adapt. We investigated nauplius and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) improvisus from the Swedish west coast with respect to temperature (12, 20, and 28 °C) and salinity (5, 15, and 30) tolerances. Warming accelerated larval development and increased overall survival and subsequent settlement success. Nauplii developed and metamorphosed best at intermediate salinity. This was also observed in cypris larvae when the preceding nauplii stages had been reared at a salinity of 30. Direct comparisons of the present findings with those on a population from the more brackish Baltic Sea demonstrate contrasting patterns. We conclude that i) B. improvisus larvae within the Baltic region will be favoured by near-future seawater warming and freshening, that ii) salinity tolerances of larvae from the two different populations reflect salinities in their native habitats, but are nonetheless suboptimal and that iii) this species is generally highly plastic with regard to salinity.

  9. The adhesive strategies of cyprids and development of barnacle-resistant marine coatings.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, approaches to the development of surfaces that perturb settlement and/or adhesion by barnacles have diversified substantially. Although, previously, coatings research focussed almost exclusively on biocidal technologies and low modulus, low surface-free-energy 'fouling-release' materials, novel strategies to control surface colonisation are now receiving significant attention. It is timely, therefore, to review the current 'state of knowledge' regarding fouling-resistant surface characteristics and their mechanisms of action against settling larvae of barnacles. The role of the barnacle in marine fouling is discussed here in the context of its life cycle and the behavioural ecology of its cypris larva. The temporary and permanent adhesion mechanisms of cyprids are covered in detail and an overview of adult barnacle adhesion is presented. Recent legislation has directed academic research firmly towards environmentally inert marine coatings, so the actions of traditional biocides on barnacles are not described here. Instead, the discussion is restricted to those surface modifications that interfere with settlement-site selection and adhesion of barnacle cypris larvae; specifically, textural engineering of surfaces, development of inert 'non-fouling' surfaces and the use of enzymes in antifouling.

  10. Population and life-stage specific sensitivities to temperature and salinity stress in barnacles

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ali; Havenhand, Jonathan; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Pansch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Temperature and salinity shape the distribution and genetic structure of marine communities. Future warming and freshening will exert an additional stress to coastal marine systems. The extent to which organisms respond to these shifts will, however, be mediated by the tolerances of all life-stages and populations of species and their potential to adapt. We investigated nauplius and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) improvisus from the Swedish west coast with respect to temperature (12, 20, and 28 °C) and salinity (5, 15, and 30) tolerances. Warming accelerated larval development and increased overall survival and subsequent settlement success. Nauplii developed and metamorphosed best at intermediate salinity. This was also observed in cypris larvae when the preceding nauplii stages had been reared at a salinity of 30. Direct comparisons of the present findings with those on a population from the more brackish Baltic Sea demonstrate contrasting patterns. We conclude that i) B. improvisus larvae within the Baltic region will be favoured by near-future seawater warming and freshening, that ii) salinity tolerances of larvae from the two different populations reflect salinities in their native habitats, but are nonetheless suboptimal and that iii) this species is generally highly plastic with regard to salinity. PMID:27582433

  11. Four Newly Recorded Amanita Species in Korea: Amanita sect. Amanita and sect. Vaginatae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Sun; Jo, Jong Won; Kwag, Young-Nam; Oh, Junsang; Shrestha, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    We collected nearly 70 specimens of Amanita species during a diversity study of Korean mushrooms conducted in 2012. In this study, we primarily investigated 23 Amanita specimens belonging to sections Amanita and Vaginatae. Based on sequence data of the internal transcribed spacers and partial large subunit of ribosomal RNA and morphological characteristics, we identified the following 15 phylogenetic species: A. alboflavescens, A. ceciliae, A. farinosa, A. fulva, A. griseofolia, A. ibotengutake, A. melleiceps, A. orientifulva, A. pantherina, A. rubrovolvata, A. sinensis, A. subglobosa, A. vaginata, A. cf. vaginata f. alba, and an undescribed Amanita species. In this study, four of the identified Amanita species (A. griseofolia, A. ibotengutake, A. orientifulva, and A. sinensis) were reported for the first time in Korea. PMID:24198667

  12. Tracing latitudinal gradient, river discharge and water masses along the subtropical South American coast using benthic Foraminifera assemblages.

    PubMed

    Eichler, P P B; Rodrigues, A R; Eichler, B B; Braga, E S; Campos, E J D

    2012-08-01

    More than 30% of Buccella peruviana (D'Orbigny), Globocassidulina crassa porrecta (Earland & Heron-Allen), Cibicides mackannai (Galloway & Wissler) and C. refulgens (Montfort) indicate the presence of cold Sub Antarctic Shelf Water in winter, from 33.5 to 38.3º S, deeper than 100 m, in the southern part of the study area. In summer, the abundance of this association decreases to less than 15% around 37.5-38.9º S where two species (Globocassidulina subglobosa (Brady), Uvigerina peregrina (Cushman) take over. G. subglobosa, U. peregrina, and Hanzawaia boueana (D'Orbigny) are found at 27-33º S in both seasons in less than 55 m deep in the northern part, and are linked with warm Subtropical Shelf Water and Tropical Water. Freshwater influence was signalized by high silicate concentration and by the presence of Pseudononion atlanticum (Cushman), Bolivina striatula (Cushman), Buliminella elegantissima (D'Orbigny), Bulimina elongata (D'Orbigny), Elphidium excavatum (Terquem), E. poeyanum (D'Orbigny), Ammobaculites exiguus (Cushman & Brönnimann), Arenoparrella mexicana (Kornfeld), Gaudryina exillis (Cushman & Brönnimann), Textularia earlandi (Parker) and thecamoebians in four sectors of the shelf. The presence of Bulimina marginata (D'Orbigny) between 34.1-32.8º S in the winter and 34.2-32.7º S in the summer indicates that the influence of the Subtropical Shelf Front on the sediment does not change seasonally, otherwise, the presence of Angulogerina angulosa (Williamson) in the winter, only in Mar del Plata (38.9º S), show that Malvinas currents are not influencing the sediment in the summer.

  13. Early Oligocene benthic foraminifera and its response to paleoceanographic changes in the eastern Equatorial Pacific (IODP Exp 320 Site U1334)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Lee, J.; Tsujimoto, A.; Nomura, R.; Khim, B.

    2012-12-01

    We report biotic response of benthic foraminifera to the paleoceanographic changes in the early part of the Early Oligocene (33.2-32.0 Ma), based on faunal analysis of fossil benthic foraminifera and geochemical analysis of bulk sediments at IODP Exp. 320 Site U1334 (the eastern equatorial Pacific). Carbonate content was slightly low from 33.0-32.2 Ma, whereas biogenic opal content was relatively high with fluctuations in this interval. Slightly high opal-MAR and basically constant carbonate-MAR from 33.0-32.2 Ma indicate that geochemical signature of bulk sediments was related to increasing biogenic opal production. The benthic foraminifera accumulation rate (BFAR) was generally constant by ~33 Ma, whereas it was highly fluctuated in the high opal-MAR period. Glogocassidulina subglobosa (moderate food supply with its some seasonality) was lower in the early part of the Early Oligocene than in the late part of the Early Oligocene. However, this species increased temporally in the high opal-MAR period. Occurrence of G. subglobosa implies that biogenic opal production was enhanced temporally with some seasonality. Nuttallides umbonifer (Southern Component Water possibly with slight carbonate corrosiveness or low food supply) was common at around 33.0 Ma, whereas Oridorsalis umbonatus (various trophic condition) occurred frequently in the 33.5-32.0 Ma. Alternation of these two species was repeated in the late part of the Early Oligocene in the abyssal eastern Equatorial Pacific (Takata et al., in review), but such pattern was obscure in the early part of the Early Oligocene. Antarctic Circumpolar Current became significant since the late Oligocene, but it was not likely strong in the Early Oligocene (Katz et al., 2011). Such paleoceanographic changes might be related to the faunal changes of benthic foraminifera in the eastern equatorial Pacific.

  14. Insect pollination and self-incompatibility in edible and/or medicinal crops in southwestern China, a global hotspot of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zong-Xin; Wang, Hong; Bernhardt, Peter; Li, De-Zhu

    2014-10-01

    An increasing global demand for food, coupled with the widespread decline of pollinator diversity, remains an international concern in agriculture and genetic conservation. In particular, there are large gaps in the study of the pollination of economically important and traditionally grown species in China. Many plant species grown in China are both edible and used medicinally. The country retains extensive written records of agricultural and apicultural practices, facilitating contemporary studies of some important taxa. Here, we focus on Yunnan in southwestern China, a mega-biodiversity hotspot for medicinal/food plants. We used plant and insect taxa as model systems to understand the patterns and consequences of pollinator deficit to crops. We identified several gaps and limitations in research on the pollination ecology and breeding systems of domesticated taxa and their wild relatives in Yunnan and asked the following questions: (1) What is known about pollination systems of edible and medicinal plants in Yunnan? (2) What are the most important pollinators of Codonopsis subglobosa (Campanulaceae)? (3) How important are native pollinator species for maximizing yield in Chinese crops compared with the introduced Apis mellifera? We found that some crops that require cross-pollination now depend exclusively on hand pollination. Three domesticated crops are dependent primarily on the native but semidomesticated Apis cerana and the introduced A. mellifera. Other species of wild pollinators often play important roles for certain specialty crops (e.g., Vespa velutina pollinates Codonopsis subglobosa). We propose a more systematic and comprehensive approach to applied research in the future. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  15. Ostracoda and foraminifera from Paleocene (Olinda well), Paraíba Basin, Brazilian Northeast.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, Enelise K; Melo, Robbyson M; Lopes, Fernando M; Fauth, Gerson; Costa, Denize S

    2017-08-07

    Paleocene ostracods and planktonic foraminifera from the Maria Farinha Formation, Paraíba Basin, are herein presented. Eleven ostracod species were identified in the genera Cytherella Jones, Cytherelloidea Alexander, Eocytheropteron Alexander, Semicytherura Wagner, Paracosta Siddiqui, Buntonia Howe, Soudanella Apostolescu, Leguminocythereis Howe and, probably, Pataviella Liebau. The planktonic foraminifera are represented by the genera Guembelitria Cushman, Parvularugoglobigerina Hofker, Woodringina Loeblich and Tappan, Heterohelix Ehrenberg, Zeauvigerina Finlay, Muricohedbergella Huber and Leckie, and Praemurica Olsson, Hemleben, Berggren and Liu. The ostracods and foraminifera analyzed indicate an inner shelf paleoenvironment for the studied section. Blooms of Guembelitria spp., which indicate either shallow environments or upwelling zones, were also recorded reinforcing previous paleoenvironmental interpretations based on other fossil groups for this basin.

  16. Testing for possible cyclicity in carbonate sediments of Middle Ordovician of east Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazizadeh, M.; Walker, K.R.

    1986-05-01

    Middle Ordovician carbonate sediments (Chickamauga Group) near Decatur, Tennessee, consist of 450 m of complex tidal-flat and subtidal sediments. Fourteen facies are recognized: (1) cherty dolostone (supratidal environment); (2) green and red silty mudstone (supratidal mud flat); (3) greenish-gray micrite-biomicrite (supratidal mud flat); (4) red silty, intrapelbiosparite-biosparite (intertidal channel); (5) green and red, loosely packed, ostracod-rich pelbiomicrite (intertidal pond); (6) stromatolitic mudstone (intertidal levee); (7) bryozoan-ostracod-brachiopod-rich pelbiomicrite (subtidal lagoon type I); (8) silty, packed pelbiomicrite-pelbiosparite (subtidal lagoon type II); (9) ostracod-gastropod-rich, bioturbated pelbiomicrite (subtidal lagoon type III); (10) bioturbated brachiopod-molluscan-rich biomicrite (subtidal lagoon type IV); (11) bioturbated green and red silty mudstone to silty sparse biomicrite (lagoon); (12) gray-tan mudstone to sparse biomicrite (quiet water, deeper subtidal lagoon); (13) intrapelbiosparite-pelbiosparite (subtidal channel); and (14) Tetradium-rich packstone (subtidal wave baffle).

  17. OAE2 and the Platycopid Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David

    2010-05-01

    More than 20 years ago the first detailed multi-proxy investigation of the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event (CTBE) in SE England revealed a distinctive pattern of changes in ostracod assemblages. Coincident with a major global positive carbon stable-isotope excursion during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2), a marked reduction in floral and faunal diversity was attributed to decreasing levels of dissolved oxygen, consequent on an intensification and expansion of the oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zone into shelf seas. As podocopid ostracod taxa became locally extinct, platycopid ostracods became dominant; from this observation was developed the "Platycopid Signal" hypothesis which claimed that dominance of platycopids in ostracod assemblages signalled dysaerobic conditions on the sea floor. Subsequently this interpretation was widely accepted and applied to the recognition of other dysaerobic intervals in the geological record. However, the modern biological and ecological support claimed for the Platycopid Signal has been challenged and found wanting. In the case of the much-studied CTBE sections in SE England this effectively removes the only remaining pillar of support for the notion of bottom-water dysaerobia in the Anglo-Paris Basin during OAE2, which has already been contradicted by macrofossil, trace fossil and geochemical evidence. A new interpretation of the Platycopid Signal as indicative of oligotrophy is supported by other palaeontological proxy evidence in the CTBE and by observations that living platycopids appear to be adapted to filter-feed on nano- and picoplankton phytodetritus which predominates in oligotrophic conditions. Brandão, S.N. & Horne, D.J., 2009. The Platycopid Signal of oxygen depletion in the ocean: a critical evaluation of the evidence from modern ostracod biology, ecology and depth distribution. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 286, 126-133. Horne, D.J., Brandão, S.N. & Slipper, I.J. The Platycopid Signal deciphered

  18. Climatic forcing of Quaternary deep-sea benthic communities in the North Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Hunt, G.; Cronin, T. M.; Hokanishi, N.; Kawahata, H.; Tsujimoto, Akira; Ishitake, M.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that changes in deep-sea benthic ecosystems are modulated by climate changes, but most evidence to date comes from the North Atlantic Ocean. Here we analyze new ostracod and published foraminiferal records for the last 250,000 years on Shatsky Rise in the North Pacific Ocean. Using linear models, we evaluate statistically the ability of environmental drivers (temperature, productivity, and seasonality of productivity) to predict changes in faunal diversity, abundance, and composition. These microfossil data show glacial-interglacial shifts in overall abundances and species diversities that are low during glacial intervals and high during interglacials. These patterns replicate those previously documented in the North Atlantic Ocean, suggesting that the climatic forcing of the deep-sea ecosystem is widespread, and possibly global in nature. However, these results also reveal differences with prior studies that probably reflect the isolated nature of Shatsky Rise as a remote oceanic plateau. Ostracod assemblages on Shatsky Rise are highly endemic but of low diversity, consistent with the limited dispersal potential of these animals. Benthic foraminifera, by contrast, have much greater dispersal ability and their assemblages at Shatsky Rise show diversities typical for deep-sea faunas in other regions. Statistical analyses also reveal ostracod-foraminferal differences in relationships between environmental drivers and biotic change. Rarefied diversity is best explained as a hump-shaped function of surface productivity in ostracods, but as having a weak and positive relationship with temperature in foraminifera. Abundance shows a positive relationship with both productivity and seasonality of productivity in foraminifera, and a hump-shaped relationship with productivity in ostracods. Finally, species composition in ostracods is influenced by both temperature and productivity, but only a temperature effect is evident in foraminifera. Though

  19. Lake level changes in Hala Lake(NW China) based on ostracodassemblages during the LGM and Post-LGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Wuennemann, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Hala Lake, located in the Qilian Mountains, Qinghai Province, China, at 4078 m a.s.l. may archive in its sediments hydrological and climate changes during the Late Quaternary time, as it is close to the area impacted by the East-Asian Summer monsoon and westerly-driven air masses. Based on the sediment core H7, which was taken in the center of the lake at 65m water depth,ostracod assemblages and stable isotopes from ostracode shells were investigated in details. Three main species were found, which are common species in high altitude saline lakes of the Tibetan Plateau: Leucocythere sp.,Limnocythereinopinata and Eucypris sp.They started to occur in deeper part of H7,indicating an early onset of favorable living conditions during the LGM and post-LGM periods. Besides, algae occurred between 25 and 32m water depth. According to the unevenly distributed amount of ostracods and oxygen isotope data, our results indicate important lake level changes during the global LGM and Lateglacial. The lake experienced lowest levels of 25-50 m below the present water line. Ostracods disappeared with the onset of the early Holocene.A stepwise refilling started already at ca. 16 kyr BP and reached -25 m level during the Bølling/Allerød warm phase at ca. 13.5 kyr BP.Latest at ca.7.6 kyr BP, the lake reached a stable highstand similar to the present level until ca.6 kyr BPas . The subsequent lake development remains unclear due to strong mismatches of the data but may indicate a general trend to deteriorating conditions and lake level lowstands at ca. 5.0-4.2, 2.0 and at around 0.5 kyr BP.; Ostracods Distribution in H2 ; Ostracods plate in Hala lake

  20. Two new benthic Euphilomedes Kornicker, 1967 (Ostracoda, Myodocopida, Philomedidae) from the Taiwan Strait (East China Sea)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyin; Chen, Ruixiang; Lin, Jinghong; Wang, Yu; Ye, Youyin

    2017-01-01

    Ostracods are small bivalved crustaceans widely distributed in aquatic environments and in total 99 species have been recorded in genus Euphilomedes Kornicker, 1967. In this study, we further describe two new species of benthic ostracods in this genus, Euphilomedes liuruiyii sp. nov. and Euphilomedes pentacanthos sp. nov., collected from the Taiwan Strait in China. These two species can be easily distinguished from their congeners by some crucial morphological characteristics, including the carapace shape, the numbers of main and secondary furcal claws, and their arrangement of furcal claws. In addition the first antenna, endopod of second antenna, frontal organ, mandible and the seventh limb also differentiate these two species from related species. PMID:28396825

  1. On a new marine podocopid genus and species (Ostracoda: Hemicytheridae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Carlos; Morais, Anderson L M DE

    2016-11-15

    Bulbocythere calida gen. et sp. nov., a benthic marine ostracode, is herein described and illustrated. The geographic and bathymetric distributions of this new taxon are based on the analysis of 923 bottom samples collected along the entire Brazilian continental shelf in a depth range of about 11 to 280 m, plus sediments of 176 samples from the Sepetiba Bay and 37 samples from the Tamandaré Bay. In the study material, this ostracode was rare, and restricted to the warm waters of the E and NE shelves and to the substrates around the reefs of the Tamandaré Bay.

  2. Brilliant iridescence of Morpho butterfly wing scales is due to both a thin film lower lamina and a multilayered upper lamina.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, M A; Stavenga, D G

    2016-05-01

    Butterflies belonging to the nymphalid subfamily, Morphinae, are famous for their brilliant blue wing coloration and iridescence. These striking optical phenomena are commonly explained as to originate from multilayer reflections by the ridges of the wing scales. Because the lower lamina of the scales of related nymphalid butterflies, the Nymphalinae, plays a dominant role in the wing coloration, by acting as a thin film reflector, we investigated single blue scales of three characteristic Morpho species: M. epistrophus, M. helenor and M. cypris. The experimental data obtained by spectrophotometry, scatterometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that also in the Morpho genus the lower lamina of both the cover and ground scales acts as an optical thin film reflector, contributing importantly to the blue structural coloration of the wings. Melanin pigment has a contrast-enhancing function in a sub-class of ground scales.

  3. Poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) network blends of amphiphilic acrylic copolymers with poly(ethylene glycol)-fluoroalkyl side chains for fouling-release coatings. II. Laboratory assays and field immersion trials.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Elisa; Sarvothaman, Mahesh K; Galli, Giancarlo; Pettitt, Michala E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Conlan, Sheelagh L; Clare, Anthony S; Sugiharto, Albert B; Davies, Cait; Williams, David

    2012-01-01

    Amphiphilic copolymers containing different amounts of poly(ethylene glycol)-fluoroalkyl acrylate and polysiloxane methacrylate units were blended with a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) matrix in different proportions to investigate the effect of both copolymer composition and loading on the biological performance of the coatings. Laboratory bioassays revealed optimal compositions for the release of sporelings of Ulva linza, and the settlement of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite. The best-performing coatings were subjected to field immersion tests. Experimental coatings containing copolymer showed significantly reduced levels of hard fouling compared to the control coatings (PDMS without copolymer), their performance being equivalent to a coating based on Intersleek 700™. XPS analysis showed that only small amounts of fluorine at the coating surface were sufficient for good antifouling/fouling-release properties. AFM analyses of coatings under immersion showed that the presence of a regular surface structure with nanosized domains correlated with biological performance.

  4. Larval development and settlement of a whale barnacle.

    PubMed

    Nogata, Yasuyuki; Matsumura, Kiyotaka

    2006-03-22

    Larval development and settlement of whale barnacles have not previously been described, unlike intertidal barnacles. Indeed, the mechanisms of the association between barnacles and whales have not been studied. Here we describe the larval development and settlement of the whale barnacle, Coronula diadema, and possible involvement of a cue from the host in inducing larval settlement. Eight-cell stage embryos were collected from C. diadema on a stranded humpback whale, incubated in filtered seawater for 7 days, and nauplius larvae hatched out. When fed with Chaetoceros gracilis, the nauplii developed to stage VI, and finally metamorphosed to the cypris stage. The larval development looked similar to that of intertidal barnacles with planktotrophic larval stages. The cyprids did not settle in normal seawater, but did settle in polystyrene Petri dishes when incubated in seawater with a small piece of skin tissue from the host whale. This strongly suggests the involvement of a chemical cue from the host whale tissue to induce larval settlement.

  5. Quantifying the exploratory behaviour of Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids.

    PubMed

    Chaw, Kuan Chun; Birch, William R

    2009-10-01

    The behavioural response of cypris larvae from A. amphitrite (=Balanus amphitrite) exploring three model glass surfaces is quantified by close-range microscopy. Step length and step duration measurements reveal a response to both surface properties and flow. Without flow, 2-day-old cyprids took larger steps with shorter step duration on hydrophilic glass surfaces (bare and NH2-treated) vs hydrophobic glass (CH3-treated). These parameters suggest a more detailed, local inspection of hydrophobic surfaces and a more extensive exploration for hydrophilic surfaces. Cyprids under flow took longer steps and exhibited shorter probing times on hydrophobic glass. On hydrophilic glass, cyprids increased their step duration under flow. This active response is attributed to drag and lift forces challenging the cyprids' temporary anchoring to the substratum. Seven-day-old cyprids showed almost no discrimination between the model surfaces. Microscopic-scale observation of cyprid exploration is expected to provide new insights into interactions between cyprids and surfaces.

  6. Field-based video observations of wild barnacle cyprid behaviour in response to textural and chemical settlement cues.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Gabrielle S; Zurn, Constanze M; Bers, A Valeria; Head, Ritchie M; Hansson, Lars J; Thomason, Jeremy C

    2008-01-01

    Many marine invertebrate larvae respond behaviourally to environmental settlement cues, yet behaviours are often only inferred from settlement patterns or are limited to laboratory studies. The behaviour of wild cypris larvae of Semibalanus balanoides L. was filmed on settlement tiles in the field. Tiles were of five different textures with a nested treatment of crude conspecific adult extract (AE). The effects of texture and AE on eleven defined behaviours were analysed. Texture affected the gross and net exploratory distances, velocity, acceleration and time spent exploring. AE attracted more cyprids during the first minute of immersion and increased the time spent on surfaces. Relatively few arrivals that either travel far and fast, or exit the surface rapidly, may indicate a lower chance of settlement. An increase in time spent on a surface may increase the probability of being in contact with the surface when the sign stimulus to settle occurs.

  7. Seasonal variation of antifouling activities of marine algae from the Brittany coast (France).

    PubMed

    Hellio, Claire; Marechal, Jean-Philippe; Véron, Benoît; Bremer, Graham; Clare, Anthony S; Le Gal, Yves

    2004-01-01

    The antifouling activity of extracts (aqueous, ethanol, and dichloromethane) of 9 marine macroalgae against bacteria, fungi, diatoms, macroalgal spores, mussel phenoloxidase activity, and barnacle cypris larvae has been investigated in relation to season in bimonthly samples from the Bay of Concarneau (France). Of the extracts tested, 48.2% were active against at least one of the fouling organisms, and of these extracts, 31.2% were seasonally active with a peak of activity in summer corresponding to maximal values for water temperature, light intensity, and fouling pressure, and 17% were active throughout the year. This seasonal activity may be adaptive as it coincides with maximal fouling pressure in the Bay of Concarneau. Dichloromethane extracts of Rhodophyceae were the most active in the antifouling assays.

  8. Resistance of polysaccharide coatings to proteins, hematopoietic cells, and marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyu; Pettit, Michala E; Conlan, Sheelagh L; Wagner, Wolfgang; Ho, Anthony D; Clare, Anthony S; Callow, James A; Callow, Maureen E; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2009-04-13

    The interaction of covalently coupled hyaluronic acid, alginic acid, and pectic acid with proteins, cells (hematopoietic KG1a and Jurkat cells), and marine organisms (algal zoospores and barnacle cypris larvae) is compared. In contrast to cells and proteins for which such polysaccharide coatings are known for their antiadhesive properties, marine algal spores and barnacle cyprids were able to colonize the surfaces. Of the three polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid showed the lowest settlement of both Ulva zoopores and barnacles. Photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the polysaccharide coatings tend to bind bivalent ions, such as calcium, from salt water. Such pretreatment with a high salinity medium significantly changes the protein and hematopoietic cell resistance of the surfaces. Complexation of bivalent ions is therefore considered as one reason for the decreased resistance of polysaccharide coatings when applied in the marine environment.

  9. Reconstruction of Caribbean climate change over the past 10,500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, David A.; Curtis, Jason H.; Higuera-Gundy, Antonia; Brenner, Mark; Jones, Glenn A.; Binford, Michael W.; Dorsey, Kathleen T.

    1991-08-01

    A high-resolution reconstruction of Caribbean climate is presented based on O-18/O-16 ratios in ostracod shells from Lake Miragoane, Haiti. The variations which are found can be largely explained by orbitally induced variations in seasonal insolation which modified the intensity of the annual cycle.

  10. Reconstruction of Caribbean climate change over the past 10,500 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodell, David A.; Curtis, Jason H.; Higuera-Gundy, Antonia; Brenner, Mark; Jones, Glenn A.; Binford, Michael W.; Dorsey, Kathleen T.

    1991-01-01

    A high-resolution reconstruction of Caribbean climate is presented based on O-18/O-16 ratios in ostracod shells from Lake Miragoane, Haiti. The variations which are found can be largely explained by orbitally induced variations in seasonal insolation which modified the intensity of the annual cycle.

  11. Water Quality Criteria for 2,4-Dinitrotoluene and 2,6-Dinitrotoluene.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    third family in the phylum Chordata (e.g, fish or amphi- - bian); d. a planktonic crustacean (e.g, cladoceran or copepod); *. e. a benthic crustacean (e.g...ostracod, isopod, or amphipod); f. an insect (e.g., mayfly, midge, stonefly); g. a family in a phylum other than Arthropoda or Chordata (e.g, r

  12. Review of Geologic Data Sources for Coastal Sediment Budgets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    corals, bryozoa , foraminifera, ostracods, and other organisms. Biogenic particles are found in most marine sediments but their volumetric importance...material but many other types of organisms such as barnacles, bryozoa , calcareous algae, coral, and echinoids often occur as well. Many particles of

  13. Preliminary report on the living non-marine Ostracoda (Crustacea) from Tunisia with the description of a new Psychrodromus species.

    PubMed

    Zaibi, Chahira; Scharf, Burkhard; Viehberg, Finn Andreas; Keyser, Dietmar; Kamoun, Fekri

    2013-01-01

    Since 1928, Henri Gauthier has been the only zoologist to describe the extant non-marine ostracod fauna of Tunisia. In 2010, new samples of living non-marine ostracods were collected from central and southern Tunisia. A complete list of the 41 non-marine ostracods of Tunisia is presented, including the species of Gauthier's work, published Holocene records, and new results from our field study. Historical faunal variations (El Melah Lagoon, Lac de Tunis, Sebkhas El- Guettiate and Dreiaa, and Lac Ichkeul) are briefly discussed and related to recent environmental changes. In 2006, El Melah Lagoon contained a freshwater, brackish, and a marine ostracod assemblage. In the future, this lagoon will probably dry up and become a sebkha. Lac de Tunis has developed from a marine bay over a lagoon connected to the Mediterranean Sea to a brackish/freshwater environment. Sebkhas El-Guettiate and Dreîaa have developed from marine bays to dry salt flats. Lac Ichkeul is eutrophied and has become brackish since the time of Gauthier. We also describe a new species, Psychrodromus tunisicus n. sp., and present a determination key for the genus. The finding of a species of the genus Psychrodromus is the first report of this genus in North Africa.

  14. Quantitative analysis of Ostracoda and water masses around Japan: Application to Pliocene and Pleistocene paleoceanography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikeya, Noriyuki; Cronin, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    An ostracode data base consisting of 273 samples from coretops and comprising 226 species was developed for the seas around the Japanese Islands to determine zoogeographic patterns and for application to Pliocene and Pleistocene paleoceanography in the area. Quantitative analyses of the 59 most common taxa between 0 and 300m water depth indicate that ostracode associations are controlled by the main oceanic water masses around Japan and that bottom water temperature is a key factor influencing species distributions. Ostracodes from the following water masses were studied: warm Kuroshio Current, Tsushima Current (Tsugaru Current and Soya Current), Japan Sea intermediate water, Japan Sea proper water and cold Oyashio Current. In order to apply the modem coretop data base to fossil ostracode assemblages, the modem analog technique (MAT) using a squared chord distance (SCD) measure of dissimilarity was tested as a means of comparing fossil and modem assemblages. SCD values of 0.25 or less adequately identify modem analogs from the coretop data set at the local ecological level (i.e. within the same modern bay), while values of 0.25-0.5 identify modem analogs at the level of the zoogeographic province. The MAT method was tested against 3 Pliocene and 11 Pleistocene formations in Japan to examine the use of the MAT in paleoceanographic reconstruction.

  15. Description of a species of Fabaeformiscandona (Ostracoda, Crustacea) from Kushiro Marsh, Hokkaido, Japan, with the nearly complete mitochondrial genomic sequence

    PubMed Central

    Hiruta, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background So far, 16 species of non-marine ostracods have been reported from Kushiro Marsh, Kushiro Shitsugen National Park, eastern Hokkaido, Japan (Hiruta and Smith 2001, Smith and Hiruta 2004). Nine of these species are in Candonidae, the second-most diverse family of non-marine ostracods. This family contains ca. 550 species, or around 25% of the total number of non-marine ostracod species (Martens et al. 2008). New information We sampled ostracods in Kushiro Marsh on 27 December 2012 and identified an undescribed species in the family Candonidae, herein described as Fabaeformiscandona kushiroensis sp. nov. This species belongs to the F. acuminata species group and is characterized by the shapes of the elongate, dorsally directed medial and outer lobes on the distal end of each hemipenis. We also determined for this species the sequence of the nearly complete mitochondrial genome, the first record from the order Podocopa. The genome (ca. 17 kbp) contains two ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA, and 13 protein-coding genes, as also found in other arthropods for which the mitochondrial genome has been sequenced. The gene arrangement is similar to the pancrustacean ground pattern, except that in the control region there is an approximately 2 kbp tandem repeat region composed of 220-bp motif sequences. We describe the genetic features of the mitochondrial genome, including nucleotide composition and the secondary structures of tRNAs and rRNAs, and compare them with the genome of Vargula hilgendorfii (Myodocopa, Ostracoda). PMID:26751633

  16. Description of a species of Fabaeformiscandona (Ostracoda, Crustacea) from Kushiro Marsh, Hokkaido, Japan, with the nearly complete mitochondrial genomic sequence.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Shimpei F; Hiruta, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    So far, 16 species of non-marine ostracods have been reported from Kushiro Marsh, Kushiro Shitsugen National Park, eastern Hokkaido, Japan (Hiruta and Smith 2001, Smith and Hiruta 2004). Nine of these species are in Candonidae, the second-most diverse family of non-marine ostracods. This family contains ca. 550 species, or around 25% of the total number of non-marine ostracod species (Martens et al. 2008). We sampled ostracods in Kushiro Marsh on 27 December 2012 and identified an undescribed species in the family Candonidae, herein described as Fabaeformiscandona kushiroensis sp. nov. This species belongs to the F. acuminata species group and is characterized by the shapes of the elongate, dorsally directed medial and outer lobes on the distal end of each hemipenis. We also determined for this species the sequence of the nearly complete mitochondrial genome, the first record from the order Podocopa. The genome (ca. 17 kbp) contains two ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA, and 13 protein-coding genes, as also found in other arthropods for which the mitochondrial genome has been sequenced. The gene arrangement is similar to the pancrustacean ground pattern, except that in the control region there is an approximately 2 kbp tandem repeat region composed of 220-bp motif sequences. We describe the genetic features of the mitochondrial genome, including nucleotide composition and the secondary structures of tRNAs and rRNAs, and compare them with the genome of Vargula hilgendorfii (Myodocopa, Ostracoda).

  17. Bridging the gap: the odonate naiad as a paratenic host for Halipegus occidualis (Trematoda: Hemiuridae).

    PubMed

    Zelmer, D A; Esch, G W

    1998-02-01

    The temporal and spatial dynamics of the recruitment of Halipegus occidualis by the green frog, Rana clamitans, suggest that infections are acquired through predation on odonates, which become infected by feeding on ostracods. Discrepancies in the literature regarding the life cycle of H. occidualis prompted the investigation of the status of the odonate naiad as an obligate third intermediate host. Infected ostracods were examined at weekly intervals to follow the postcercarial development of the parasite. Four-week-old "mesocercariae" were morphologically similar to metacercariae recovered from natural odonate infections and were infective to green frogs. Passage of the parasite directly from the ostracod to the frog host did not affect the infectivity of the worms or the period of development required to reach the adult stage. Thus, development into the metacercaria takes place within the ostracod, with the odonate acting as a paratenic host. The paratenic transfer of metacercaria is a common phenomenon among hemiurid trematodes, indicating a primitive 3-host cycle for the group, with opportunities for host capture being facilitated by a generalist strategy for the metacercariae.

  18. A Review of Environmental and Engineering Studies Concerning Effects of Extended Season Navigation on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    The most abundant organism found in the bed samples were snails (Gas,.apoda) at 45%, followed by Diptera at 17%, Annelida at 17Z, and Pelecypoda at...12.4%. The most abundant in the crack samples were Diptera 71 (75%), followed by Annelida (15%), and Ostracods (10%). From the bottom sample data the

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  20. Hepoxilins and trioxilins in barnacles: an analysis of their potential roles in egg hatching and larval settlement.

    PubMed

    Vogan, Claire L; Maskrey, Ben H; Taylor, Graham W; Henry, Sheelagh; Pace-Asciak, Cecil R; Clare, Anthony S; Rowley, Andrew F

    2003-09-01

    The barnacle life cycle has two key stages at which eicosanoids are believed to be involved in cellular communication pathways, namely the hatching of nauplii and the settlement of cypris larvae. Barnacle egg-hatching activity has previously been reported to reside in a variety of eicosanoids, including 8-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid and a number of tri-hydroxylated polyunsaturated fatty acid derivatives, the trioxilins. The production of the eicosapentaenoic acid metabolite trioxilin A4 (8,11,12-trihydroxy-5,9,14,17-eicosatetraenoic acid) by the barnacles Balanus amphitrite and Elminius modestus was confirmed using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, both linked to mass spectrometry. In addition, both species also generated trioxilin A3 (8,11,12-trihydroxy-5,9,14-eicosatrienoic acid; an arachidonic acid-derived product), 8,11,12-trihydroxy-9,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid (a omega3 analogue of trioxilin A3; derived from omega3 arachidonic acid) and 10,13,14-trihydroxy-4,7,11,16,19-docosapentaenoic acid (a docosahexaenoic acid-derived product). In contrast to earlier reports, trioxilin A3 had no E. modestus egg-hatching activity at any of the concentrations tested (10(-9)-10(-6) mol l(-1)). The unstable epoxide precursor hepoxilin A3, however, caused significant levels of hatching at 10(-6) mol l(-1). Furthermore, the stable hepoxilin B3 analogue PBT-3 stimulated hatching at 10(-7) mol l(-1). Neither trioxilin A3, hepoxilin A3 or PBT-3 at 0.25-30 micromol l(-1) served as settlement cues for B. amphitrite cypris larvae.

  1. 5,6-Dichloro-1-methylgramine, a non-toxic antifoulant derived from a marine natural product.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, M; Kon-ya, K; Miki, W

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory culture of the barnacle, Balanus amphitrite has made it possible to supply cypris larvae for antifouling assays all year round. The settlement of cyprids obtained from cultured B. amphitrite was indistinguishable from cyprids reared from field-collected barnacles. In laboratory cyprid settlement assays of extracts from marine sessile organisms, antifouling activity was expressed as the 99% inhibitory concentration (IC99), and toxicity as the 30% lethal concentration (LC30). The lipophilic extract of the marine bryozoan, Zoobotryon pellucidum, which showed promising antifouling activity, yielded 2,5,6-tribromo-1-methylgramine (TBG) by bioassay-guided isolation. The inhibitory activity of TBG was 6 times as strong as that of bis-(n-butyltin)oxide (TBTO), while its toxicity to cypris larvae was one-tenth that of TBTO. A structure-activity relationship study with 155 indole derivatives led to the discovery of the non-toxic antifoulant candidates 5,6-dichlorogramine, 5-chloro-2-methylgramine, and 5,6-dichrolo-1-methylgramine (DCMG), the latter being selected as the antifouling paint ingredient for performance evaluation tests (panel tests) following the results of a preliminary safety tests. A silicone-based antifouling paint containing 5-10% of DCMG was prepared and tested in the field; the painted surfaces remained almost barnacle-free for 1.5 years similar to silicone coatings such as Biox. Since the leaching rate of DCMG from the paint surface could be controlled by the addition of an acrylic acid-styrene copolymer (ASP), the life of the antifouling performance is expected to be improved. Thus, an extremely non-toxic silicone-based antifouling paint containing DCMG is under development.

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis of Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Evidence of Roles in Larval Settlement

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S. S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  3. Investigation of the role of hydrophilic chain length in amphiphilic perfluoropolyether/poly(ethylene glycol) networks: towards high-performance antifouling coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yapei; Pitet, Louis M.; Finlay, John A.; Brewer, Lenora H.; Cone, Gemma; Betts, Douglas E.; Callow, Maureen E.; Callow, James A.; Wendt, Dean E.; Hillmyer, Marc A.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-03-07

    The facile preparation of amphiphilic network coatings having a hydrophobic dimethacryloxy-functionalized perfluoropolyether (PFPE-DMA; M{sub w} = 1500 g mol{sup -1}) crosslinked with hydrophilic monomethacryloxy functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) macromonomers (PEG-MA; M{sub w} = 300, 475, 1100 g mol{sup -1}), intended as non-toxic high-performance marine coatings exhibiting antifouling characteristics is demonstrated. The PFPE-DMA was found to be miscible with the PEG-MA. Photo-cured blends of these materials containing 10 wt% of PEG-MA oligomers did not swell significantly in water. PFPE-DMA crosslinked with the highest molecular weight PEG oligomer (ie PEG1100) deterred settlement (attachment) of algal cells and cypris larvae of barnacles compared to a PFPE control coating. Dynamic mechanical analysis of these networks revealed a flexible material. Preferential segregation of the PEG segments at the polymer/air interface resulted in enhanced antifouling performance. The cured amphiphilic PFPE/PEG films showed decreased advancing and receding contact angles with increasing PEG chain length. In particular, the PFPE/PEG1100 network had a much lower advancing contact angle than static contact angle, suggesting that the PEG1100 segments diffuse to the polymer/water interface quickly. The preferential interfacial aggregation of the larger PEG segments enables the coating surface to have a substantially enhanced resistance to settlement of spores of the green seaweed Ulva, cells of the diatom Navicula and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite as well as low adhesion of sporelings (young plants) of Ulva, adhesion being lower than to a polydimethyl elastomer, Silastic T2.

  4. Biogeography of deep-sea wood fall, cold seep and hydrothermal vent Ostracoda (Crustacea), with the description of a new family and a taxonomic key to living Cytheroidea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanovic, Ivana; Brandão, Simone Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated by finding a novel cytheroid ostracod in a piece of sunken wood retrieved from the sea-bed in the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench, we have reviewed all previously published data on ostracods from similarly ephemeral deep-sea habitats (wood falls, hydrothermal vents and cold seeps). These data are placed in the context of all data on living, deep-sea ostracods from other environments. We confirm previous authors' conclusions that faunas from these ephemeral habitats are similar at the generic level, and include elements common to shallow and deep habitats. However, at the species level, endemism varies from zero at cold seeps, to 35% in wood falls and 60% at hydrothermal vents, which is an indication of the relative longevity of these habitats. Non-endemic species occur also in oligotrophic, deep-sea sediments but not in shallow environments. This is in contradiction to previous assumptions that these ephemeral faunas share more species and with shallow habitats than genera with the oligotrophic, deep-sea sediments. We agree with previous authors that the dispersal strategy of wood fall, vent and seep ostracods includes hitchhiking and we propose that it also includes the ability to survive ingestion by larger, more motile animals. The homogeneity of the faunas from ephemeral habitats collected off the American continent is in stark contrast to the highly endemic fauna found in Northwestern Pacific. This suggests that the ostracods may have biogeographical patterns similar to those previously proposed for other groups of benthos. However, any proposal for a global biogeographical scheme for ostracod distributions will have to await far more comprehensive coverage from presently unstudied regions. Finally, we describe and name a novel species of ostracod from the wood fall collected at a depth of 5229 m in the abyss east to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench, Northwestern Pacific; erecting a new family Keysercytheridae fam. nov. and a new genus, Keysercythere gen. nov., to

  5. The stratigraphy and palaeoenvironment of the Bathonian "Great Oolite Group" of Woodeaton Quarry, Oxfordshire.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Ronald; Stukins, Stephen; Raub, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Woodeaton Quarry, Oxfordshire, represents the most continuously exposed section of the Upper Bathonian 'Great Oolite Group' in the United Kingdom. Like most of the British Bathonian, it is lacking in reliable ammonite zonation from which to define a chronostratigraphy. The sedimentology of the succession can be broken up into two broad facies types: A clay rich, brackish lagoonal environment with intermixed freshwater-influenced flora and fauna; A marginal marine calcareous succession of an oolitic nature with periodic mud-drape intervals. The marginal marine depositional setting, the completeness of the Upper Bathonian stratigraphy and lack of biostratigraphically important macrofauna has motivated this study into the micropalaeontology of Woodeaton. The primary aims of this study are to use foraminifera and ostracods to reconstruct the palaeoenvironments and to refine the biostratigraphy of the Upper Bathonian. The studied succession commences at the top of the Taynton Limestone Formation, which fines upwards into the clay-rich Rutland Formation. Several species of marine ostracods known from the Mid-Upper Bathonian are recovered from the base of the Rutland Formation, such as Praeschuleridea confossa and Angliaecytherldea calvata, as well as fragments of fish scales and elasmobranch teeth. Freshwater influence is evident further up the Rutland Formation where freshwater charophytes, nested bivalves and ostracods of the genus Bisulcocypris have been found. The progression from the Rutland Formation's marine base into the freshwater influenced clays is clear from the varied micropalaeontological fauna. A return to marine conditions in the overlying White Limestone Formation can be observed through the increasing number of benthic foraminiferal taxa - with Spirillina and Lenticulina the most abundant - compared to the Rutland Formation. Within the Shipton and Ardley Members there are also indicative marine ostracod taxa present (including Acanthocythere

  6. Ostracoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea) in a Miocene oxygen minimum zone, Trinidad, West Indies: A test of the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent; Coimbra, João C.; Hayek, Lee-Ann C.

    2014-10-01

    Studies of Recent ostracodes around the area of South America shed little light on the paleoenvironmental interpretation of Miocene assemblages. Consequently, interpretations of the Miocene ostracode assemblages must be supplemented using evidence from better documented taxa. Benthic foraminifera in samples from the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation at Brasso Village, Trinidad, have previously been used to distinguish three sample groupings (Beneath, Within and Above) around an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), this being a layer of water within which dissolved oxygen concentrations can be as low as 0.1-1.0 mL/L. Using these same samples and the foraminiferal assemblage demarcations relative to the OMZ, this paper examines the associated and rich ostracode fauna of the Brasso Formation. The mean recovery of ostracode valves per sample was approximately three times greater in the Within OMZ sample group than in either of the Beneath OMZ or Above OMZ groups, perhaps reflecting the exclusion of macro-predators from within the OMZ. Individual rarefaction of species richness S to N = 300 valves was conducted for each sample group. This showed that S did not differ between the sample groups, ranging from 22.4 to 24.8. We used all ostracode species to model group separation. Based upon the Mahalanobis' criterion, we obtained significant group separation using a model with four taxa: Munseyella ex gr. minuta, Argilloecia posterotruncata, Munseyella sp. and Xestoleberis sp., while a fifth, Argilloecia spp., provided a significant but minor increase in separation probabilities over all groups. The two most abundant species (Bradleya sp., Gangamocytheridea reticulata) were thus not the best species for detecting the OMZ. Platycopid ostracodes of the genus Cytherella were found throughout the section, rather than concentrated within the OMZ, which contradicts the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis that OMZs are characterized by platycopid dominance. The total distribution and

  7. Empirical calibration of shell chemistry of Cyprideis torosa (Jones, 1850) (Crustacea: Ostracoda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco-Barba, J.; Ito, E.; Carbonell, E.; Mesquita-Joanes, F.

    2012-09-01

    Cyprideis torosa is a species of ostracode that inhabits a wide range of aquatic habitats in which its low Alk/Ca requirement is met. Its fossil remains are widely used in palaeoecological studies of coastal environments and inland salt lakes. We collected C. torosa from 20 water bodies near Valencia, Spain. Temperature, chlorophyll a concentration, electrical conductivity, and the concentration of major ions and oxygen isotopes were measured at each site. Between 2 and 20 live individuals of C. torosa were collected per site, their instar stage and sex determined and their shell chemistry (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and carbon and oxygen isotope composition) analyzed. Three of these sites were sampled monthly for one year, and ostracode population structure and shell chemistry (20-40 shells) were analyzed. The water chemistry varied widely between sites. TDS (total dissolved solids) ranged from 0.5 to 71.8 g/L but chloride was always the dominant anion. There is a significant positive relationship between ostracode and water δ18O except at high TDS (>20 g/L) when shell δ18O values are lower than expected. No effect of either temperature or water Mg/Ca is observed on the Mg/Ca in the ostracode calcite in waters with Mg/Ca < 6 (molar ratio). Ostracode shell Sr/Ca is strongly and significantly related to water Sr/Ca. δ13C values in C. torosa shells are ˜2‰ lower than observed δ13CDIC. These results provide new and more accurate quantification tools to reconstruct past hydrochemistry from C. torosa shells.

  8. Southern Polar Front macroecological and biogeographical insights gained from benthic Ostracoda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Simone N.; Vital, Helenice; Brandt, Angelika

    2014-10-01

    The Southern Ocean is one of the least known marine ecosystems on Earth, but the importance of understanding its biological and geochemical characteristics are urgent, because of the fast changing climate. Primary productivity is a key factor in ecosystem functioning, since this is the only process (except for the rare chemosynthesis) transforming solar energy into organic material, which can later be processed by all other living beings. Herein we investigate how primary productivity in the euphotic zone influences the biodiversity on the sea bed at abyssal depths, using Ostracoda (Crustacea) as a model. We also discuss the biogeographical pattern of the ostracod fauna. Samples collected from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean close to the Southern Polar Front (i.e. ~51°S) during the SYSTCO II expedition are the basis for our analyses. For the statistical tests, we used samples collected with an epibenthic sledge, which has the advantages of sampling a far larger area than traditional gears (i.e. grabs and corers), and also collect Myodocopida and Halocyprida rarely recorded in ostracod studies. However, because of its large mesh size (i.e. 300 and 500 μm) the epibenthic sledge fails to recover small sized ostracods. Most benthic and benthopelagic ostracod species inhabiting the Southern Polar Front region are either endemic to the Southern Ocean or occur close to it. We conclude that ostracod assemblages living below areas of high primary productivity seem to be different to those below low productivity zones, but that assemblages living west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are not significantly distinct from the ones living to the east of this putative barrier.

  9. Influence of light in acute toxicity bioassays of imidacloprid and zinc pyrithione to zooplankton crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Kouichi

    2006-06-30

    The acute toxicity of imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, and zinc pyrithione (Zpt), a biocide used in anti-dandruff shampoos and protective antifouling paints, to three species of ostracods and two waterfleas, including Daphnia magna, was determined and compared under light and dark conditions. Under normal laboratory conditions, UV light had no significant influence on the outcome of toxicity bioassays, although in the case of imidacloprid both EC(50) and LC(50) calculated values were twice as high under the light as in the dark. No influence of UV light was observed on bioassays conducted with Zpt, in spite of the fast aqueous photolysis exhibited by this compound. Imidacloprid 48-h LC(50) for cladocerans (65-133mg/L) were two orders of magnitude higher than for ostracods (301-715microg/L); values of EC(50) for cladocerans and ostracods were 2-6mg/L and 3-16microg/L, respectively. Toxicity of Zpt to both ostracod and cladoceran species appears to be similar, with 48-h LC(50) in the range 137-524 and 75-197microg/L for ostracods and cladocerans, respectively, and similar values for EC(50)s. The mortality endpoint (LC(50)), however, is not a reliable predictor of the effects of imidacloprid under field situations (e.g. rice paddies), because the paralysis effect induced by this insecticide takes place at much lower concentrations than those required to cause the death of the animals: regardless of the taxa, differences as large as 100- or 600-fold were observed between the EC(50) and LC(50) for the same exposures. As a consequence, immobilization tests and EC(50) values are recommended for this class of compounds, while caution should be exercised in environmental risk assessments of this and possibly other related neonicotinoid insecticides with similar activity.

  10. Environmental impact assessment of sediment dumping in the southern Baltic Sea using meiofaunal indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, Peter; Borrmann, Corinna; Lauenburg, Beate; Bohling, Björn; Bartholdy, Jan

    2009-02-01

    An experimental sediment dumping was carried out in the southern part of the Mecklenburg Bight in June 2001. Foraminiferans and ostracods from superficial sandy sediment were studied in a time series from before dumping until March 2004 in order to assess changes in associations and recolonization patterns of both groups. Additionally, an area sampling covering the dumping site and its surroundings from 15.5 to 20.7 m water depth made it possible to compare associations inside and outside the dumping area as well as the water depth dependent distribution of foraminiferans and ostracods. Salinity values vary within the high alpha-mesohaline and low polyhaline range. The dominating species are Ammotium cassis (Foraminifera) and Sarsicytheridea bradii (Ostracoda). The diversity is low (Fisher alpha index from 0.4 to 3.2 for foraminiferans and 1.0 to 2.5 for ostracods), but higher within the dumping site samples. These higher values are explainable by input of allochthonous tests and valves representing additional species. After the sediment dumping it took two and a half years to re-establish the total foraminiferan association and the total foraminifer/ostracod ratio within the dumping site. Total foraminiferan abundance increases remarkably with water depth (mean 83 tests in 100 ml) driven by higher nutrient availability and more suitable salinity and temperature values within the zone of the oscillating halocline. The distribution of shallow water species such as Cribroelphidium excavatum, Eucythere argus and Hirschmannia viridis, within the transient water layer A. cassis, Nodulina dentaliniformis, S. bradii and Palmoconcha laevata and below Eggerella scabra indicate the depth position of the halocline. Water depth and sediment dumping influence are the main driving factors for the distribution of foraminifer and ostracod associations within the study area. However, a significant sedimentological difference between samples inside and outside the dumping area is

  11. Paleoclimatic record of the late Quaternary from a gravity core sediment of Lake Hovsgol in northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, D.; Kim, B.

    2007-12-01

    Gravity core sediment (HS 7) from Lake Hovsgol(Mongolia) is divided into three sedimentary units on the basis of sediments texture, water contents, occurrence of fossils and sediment color. Unit 1(27¢¦128§¯) is generally massive and is crudely stratified. Ostracods are well preserved over the all interval of Unit1, but diatoms are not well preserved. At Unit2(9¢¦27§¯), mud content is slightly low and lamination is well developed. It is dark greenish gray in the upper part, and dark greenish gray is alternating with light brownish gray in the lower part. Diatom contents increase towards the top and ostracods fragments disappear at the top of Unit 2. Unit3(0¢¦9§¯) is laminated mud in olive gray color. Diatom contents are high but ostracods are not observed in this unit. According to 14C age dating results, we assumed that Unit1 is Pleistocene sediment, Unit2 is sediment of a transitional stage and Unit 3 is Holocene sediment. Chemical composition of trace elements from ostracods show variations through Unit1, especially showing a distinct change at 95¢¦100§¯ interval. It matches to the distribution of ostracod at this interval. Contents of ostracod decrease at the interval and contents of Cytherissa lacustris decrease, but Limnocythere inopinata increase. It was interpreted that warm air was supplied to Lake Hovsgol after LGM(Last Glacial Maximum), causing ice melting. Consequently the bottom environment of Lake Hovsgol experienced some changes as the lake level increased little bit. At the top of Unit 1 appear a lots of pyrite which are arranged in line, and diatoms occure but ostracods are not observed toward the top of Unit 2, and lamination is developed in Unit 2. It means the bottom environment of Lake Hovsgol changed to anoxic condition. At that time, plenty of water was supplied into the lake, resulting in water stratification and cutting off oxygen supply to the bottom of Lake Hovsgol. It made the lake level rise higher, so that the bottom

  12. Paleoclimatic investigations during the late Quaternary using gravity core sediments of Lake Hovsgol in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Daekyo; Shin, Seungwon; Park, Yong-Hee; Nam, Seung Il

    2010-05-01

    The Lake Hovsgol is located in northeast Eurasia which is a tectonic lake formed by rifting, and its thick bottom sediments record climatic change of the past. The lake is a suitable site to study a rapid Quaternary climate change. This study includes analysis of smear slides, particle size analysis, data of spectrophotometer and magnetic susceptibility, trace element analysis using XRF core scanner for HS-3, 5 gravity core sediments from the middle southern Lake Hovsgol. HS-3 core sediments were measured for TOC, and HS-5 core was scrutinized for species analysis of ostracods. HS-3 core was obtained at 160 m water depth, and is divided into three sedimentary units. Unit A of HS-3 is characterized by distinct lamination, high sand contents considerably decreasing towards the upper part, and the ostracods are rarely discovered at the upper part of Unit A. Unit B is characterized by weakly lamination, and some ostracods are observed in the lower part, but diatoms are observed in the upper part of Unit B. Also grain size is getting smaller toward the upper part. Unit C consists of fine diatomaceous ooze and contains abundant diatoms. Overall organic contents are high, and lamination with black-colored organic layer is observed in the lower part of Unit C. HS-5 core was obtained at 210 m water depth and is divided into two sedimentary units with faint boundary. Unit A of HS-5 is characterized by lamination and contains abundant diatoms and ostracods. At Unit B, grain size is getting smaller toward the upper part, and occurrence change of ostracods is observed in the upper part. Framboidal pyrite were formed during the diagenesis. Four species of ostracods are observed in the core sediments, i.e. Cytherissa lacustris, Limnocythere inopinate dominate in the lower part, and Candona lepnevae, Leucocythere sp dominates in the upper part. Carbon age dating results show that sediment unit B of HS-5 and unit C of HS-3 containing rare ostracods are similar in age. The reason of

  13. Holocene paleoclimate inferred from salinity histories of adjacent lakes in southwestern Sicily (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Brandon; Henne, Paul D.; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marrone, Federico; Pieri, Valentina; La Mantia, Tommaso; Calò, Camilla; Tinner, Willy

    2016-10-01

    Marked uncertainties persist regarding the climatic evolution of the Mediterranean region during the Holocene. For instance, whether moisture availability gradually decreased, remained relatively constant, or increased during the last 7000 years remains a matter of debate. To assess Holocene limnology, hydrology and moisture dynamics, the coastal lakes Lago Preola and Gorgo Basso, located in southwestern Sicily, were investigated through several stratigraphic analyses of ostracodes, including multivariate analyses of assemblages, transfer functions of salinity, and biochemical analyses of valves (Sr/Ca, δ18O and δ13C). During the early Holocene, the Gorgo Basso and Lago Preola ostracode records are similar. After an initial period of moderate salinity (1690-6100 mg/l from ca. 10,000-8190 cal yr BP), syndepositional or diagenetic dissolution of ostracode valves suggests that salinity declined to <250 mg/L from ca. 8190 to 7000 cal yr BP at both sites. After ca. 6250 cal yr BP, the ostracode records are strikingly different. Lago Preola became much more saline, with paleosalinity values that ranged from 2270 to about 24,420 mg/L. We suggest that Lago Preola's change from a freshwater to mesosaline lake at about 6250 cal yr BP was related to sea level rise and resulting intrusion of seawater-influenced groundwater. In contrast, Gorgo Basso remained a freshwater lake. The salinity of Gorgo Basso declined somewhat after 6250 cal yr BP, in comparison to the early Holocene, ranging from about 550 to 1680 mg/L. Cypria ophtalmica, a species capable of rapid swimming and flourishing in waters with low dissolved oxygen levels, became dominant at approximately the time when Greek civilization took root in Sicily (2600 cal yr BP), and it completely dominates the record during Roman occupation (roughly 2100 to 1700 cal yr BP). These freshwater conditions at Gorgo Basso suggest high effective moisture when evergreen olive-oak forests collapsed in response to increased Greco

  14. Holocene oceanographic and climatic variability of the Vega Drift deduced through foraminiferal interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szymcek, Phillip; Ishman, Scott E.; Domack, Eugene W.; Leventer, Amy

    2007-01-01

    fusiformis assemblages. Most agglutinated forms tend to decrease downcore, and comparisons to modern analogues imply post-depositional disintegration, while calcareous taxa indicate non-corrosive bottom waters. The lower to middle Holocene Vega Drift sediments are characterized by the calcareous S. fusiformis assemblage and glacial plume sediments. This assemblage is characterized by calcareous forms including Globocassidulina biora, G. subglobosa, and Nonionella iridea. The planktic species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma is associated with the S. fusiformis assemblage. The S. fusiformis assemblage is faunally similar to assemblages described in fjords of the western Antarctic Peninsula and indicates non-corrosive bottom water. Sediments of the mid to upper Holocene interval are characterized by the T. wiesneri and M. arenacea assemblages and indicate the presence of Hyper Saline Shelf Water. These assemblages are similar to modern assemblages directly to the south in the Prince Gustav Channel. The upper Holocene is marked by several small intervals with taxonomic characteristics similar to the S. fusiformis assemblage, indicating periodic introduction of non-corrosive bottom water to the Vega Drift

  15. Divergent palate morphology in turtles and birds correlates with differences in proliferation and BMP2 expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, John; Leung, Kelvin Jia-Mien; Richman, Joy Marion

    2014-02-01

    During embryonic development, amniotes typically form outgrowths from the medial sides of the maxillary prominences called palatal shelves or palatine processes. In mammals the shelves fuse in the midline and form a bony hard palate that completely separates the nasal and oral cavities. In birds and lizards, palatine processes develop but remain unfused, leaving a natural cleft. Adult turtles do not possess palatine processes and unlike other amniotes, the internal nares open into the oral cavity. Here we investigate craniofacial ontogeny in the turtle, Emydura subglobosa to determine whether vestigial palatine processes develop and subsequently regress, or whether development fails entirely. We found that the primary palate in turtles develops similarly to other amniotes, but secondary palate ontogeny diverges. Using histology, cellular dynamics and in situ hybridization we found no evidence of palatine process development at any time during ontogeny of the face in the turtle. Furthermore, detailed comparisons with chicken embryos (the model organism most closely related to turtles from a molecular phylogeny perspective), we identified differences in proliferation and gene expression patterns that correlate with the differences in palate morphology. We propose that, in turtles, palatine process outgrowth is never initiated due to a lack of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) expression in the maxillary mesenchyme, which in turn fails to induce the relatively higher cellular proliferation required for medial tissue outgrowth. It is likely that these differences between turtles and birds arose after the divergence of the lineage leading to modern turtles.

  16. Comparative analysis of pleurodiran and cryptodiran turtle embryos depicts the molecular ground pattern of the turtle carapacial ridge.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Anaya, Juan; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Sato, Iori; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The turtle shell is a wonderful example of a genuine morphological novelty, since it has no counterpart in any other extant vertebrate lineages. The evolutionary origin of the shell is a question that has fascinated evolutionary biologists for over two centuries and it still remains a mystery. One of the turtle innovations associated with the shell is the carapacial ridge (CR), a bulge that appears at both sides of the dorsal lateral trunk of the turtle embryo and that probably controls the formation of the carapace, the dorsal moiety of the shell. Although from the beginning of this century modern genetic techniques have been applied to resolve the evolutionary developmental origin of the CR, the use of different models with, in principle, dissimilar results has hampered the establishment of a common mechanism for the origin of the shell. Although modern turtles are divided into two major groups, Cryptodira (or hidden-necked turtles) and Pleurodira (or side-necked turtles), molecular developmental studies have been carried out mostly using cryptodiran models. In this study, we revisit the past data obtained from cryptodiran turtles in order to reconcile the different results. We also analyze the histological anatomy and the expression pattern of main CR factors in a pleurodiran turtle, the red-bellied short-necked turtle Emydura subglobosa. We suggest that the turtle shell probably originated concomitantly with the co-option of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway into the CR in the last common ancestor of the turtle.

  17. Pelvic girdle mobility of cryptodire and pleurodire turtles during walking and swimming.

    PubMed

    Mayerl, Christopher J; Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Blob, Richard W

    2016-09-01

    Movements of the pelvic girdle facilitate terrestrial locomotor performance in a wide range of vertebrates by increasing hind limb excursion and stride length. The extent to which pelvic movements contribute to limb excursion in turtles is unclear because the bony shell surrounding the body presents a major obstacle to their visualization. In the Cryptodira, which are one of the two major lineages of turtles, pelvic anatomy indicates the potential for rotation inside the shell. However, in the Pleurodira, the other major suborder, the pelvis shows a derived fusion to the shell, preventing pelvic motion. In addition, most turtles use their hind limbs for propulsion during swimming as well as walking, and the different locomotor demands between water and land could lead to differences in the contributions of pelvic rotation to limb excursion in each habitat. To test these possibilities, we used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM) to compare pelvic mobility and femoral motion during walking and swimming between representative species of cryptodire (Pseudemys concinna) and pleurodire (Emydura subglobosa) turtles. We found that the pelvis yawed substantially in cryptodires during walking and, to a lesser extent, during swimming. These movements contributed to greater femoral protraction during both walking and swimming in cryptodires when compared with pleurodires. Although factors related to the origin of pelvic-shell fusion in pleurodires are debated, its implications for their locomotor function may contribute to the restriction of this group to primarily aquatic habits. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The ontogeny of the shell in side-necked turtles, with emphasis on the homologies of costal and neural bones.

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Brüllmann, Benjamin; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2008-08-01

    Although we are starting to understand the molecular basis of shell development based on the study of cryptodires, basic comparative ontogenetic data for the other major clade of living turtle, the pleurodires, are largely missing. Herein, the developmental and phylogenetic relation between the bony shell and endoskeleton of Pleurodira are examined by studying histological serial sections of nine specimens of three different species, including an ontogenetic series of Emydura subglobosa. Emphasis is given to the portion of the carapace in which ribs and vertebral spinous processes become part of the carapace. Central questions are how neurals and costals are formed in pleurodiran turtles, whether costals and neurals are of endoskeletal or exoskeletal origin, and what ontogenetic factors relate to neural reduction of some Pleurodira. The neurals and costals do not develop as independent ossification centers, but they are initial outgrowths of the periosteal collar of endoskeletal ribs and neural arches. Slightly later in development, the ossification of both shell elements continues without a distinct periosteum but by metaplastically ossifying precondensed soft-tissue integumentary structures. Through ontogeny, ribs of the turtles studied are closely associated with the hypaxial intercostalis musculature while epaxial interspinalis musculature connects the neural arches. We here propose an alternative structural hypothesis for the neural reduction and, ultimately, the complete loss of the neural series. The complete reduction of neurals in Emydura spp. may be linked to heterochrony, accompanied by a restricted influence of epaxial musculature and epidermal-dermal interaction in shell bone formation. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Divergent Palate Morphology in Turtles and Birds Correlates With Differences in Proliferation and BMP2 Expression During Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    ABRAMYAN, JOHN; JIA-MIEN LEUNG, KELVIN; RICHMAN, JOY MARION

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, amniotes typically form outgrowths from the medial sides of the maxillary prominences called palatal shelves or palatine processes. In mammals the shelves fuse in the midline and form a bony hard palate that completely separates the nasal and oral cavities. In birds and lizards, palatine processes develop but remain unfused, leaving a natural cleft. Adult turtles do not possess palatine processes and unlike other amniotes, the internal nares open into the oral cavity. Here we investigate craniofacial ontogeny in the turtle, Emydura subglobosa to determine whether vestigial palatine processes develop and subsequently regress, or whether development fails entirely. We found that the primary palate in turtles develops similarly to other amniotes, but secondary palate ontogeny diverges. Using histology, cellular dynamics and in situ hybridization we found no evidence of palatine process development at any time during ontogeny of the face in the turtle. Furthermore, detailed comparisons with chicken embryos (the model organism most closely related to turtles from a molecular phylogeny perspective), we identified differences in proliferation and gene expression patterns that correlate with the differences in palate morphology. We propose that, in turtles, palatine process outgrowth is never initiated due to a lack of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) expression in the maxillary mesenchyme, which in turn fails to induce the relatively higher cellular proliferation required for medial tissue outgrowth. It is likely that these differences between turtles and birds arose after the divergence of the lineage leading to modern turtles. PMID:24323766

  20. Pronounced climatic variations in Alaska during the last two millennia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feng Sheng; Ito, Emi; Brown, Thomas A.; Curry, B. Brandon; Engstrom, Daniel R.

    2001-01-01

    Paired oxygen-isotopic analyses of abiotic carbonate and benthic-ostracode shells from lake sediments provide a continuous quantitative record of growing-season temperature for the past 2000 years in the northwestern foothills of the Alaska Range. This record reveals three time intervals of comparable warmth: anno Domini (A.D.) 0–300, 850-1200, and post-1800, the latter two of which correspond to the Medieval Climatic Anomaly and climatic amelioration after the end of the Little Ice Age. The Little Ice Age culminated at A.D. 1700, when the climate was ≈1.7°C colder than at present. A marked climatic cooling also occurred around A.D. 600, coinciding with extensive glacial advances in Alaska. Comparisons of this temperature record with ostracode trace-element ratios (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) further suggest that colder periods were wetter and vice versa during the past 2000 years. PMID:11517320

  1. Biological Analysis of Three Ponds at Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs CO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    14.3 0.0 0.0 Metriocnemus knobi (insect larva) 14.6 12.8 0.0 Chironomus te5Wa (insect larva) 0.0 0.0 5.5 Macrocyclop-TBrus ( crustacean ) 2.3 2.9 6.6...Pleuroxus aduncus ( crustacean ) 0.0 0.0 43.1 Musculium sp. (bivalve) 1.2 3.2 0.0 Candona sp. (ostracod) 6.9 10.3 0.0 Planaria sp. (flatworm) 4.0 11.1...insect larva) 0.0 0.0 11.5 Macrocyclops albidus ( crustacean ) 0.0 0.0 4.1 Musculium sp. (bivalve) 2.7 3.2 0.0 Candona sp. (ostracod) 3.6 2.9 0.0 la1naria sp

  2. Selective silicification of fossils by syntaxial overgrowths on quartz sand, Oriskany Sandstone (Lower Devonian), New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliva, Robert G.

    1992-07-01

    Some fossil fragments in the Oriskany Sandstone (Lower Devonian) of New York were partially replaced by syntaxial quartz overgrowths. These replacive overgrowths are significant in that they provide insights into the mechanism and controls of quartz replacement of calcite. The susceptibility of the different calcite types of quartz replacement was governed by their microstructural complexity. Fossil fragments with finely crystalline microstructures, such as brachiopods, ostracods, and bryozoans, were partially replaced by quartz, whereas echinoderm ossicles, which consist of single large calcite crystals, were not replaced. Calcite cement was also immune to replacement. Brachiopod, bryozoan, and ostracod bioclasts (with minor exceptions) underwent partial replacement by quartz (with its concomitant shell calcite dissolution) only where the shell fragments were in contact with detrital quartz grains. Proximity to authigenic crystal nucleation sites (i.e., quartz sand grains) was thus the prime control over whether host mineral dissolution occurred, which is a situation unique to the force of crystallization-driven replacement mechanism.

  3. The effect of long-term spatiotemporal variations in urbanization-induced eutrophication on a benthic ecosystem, Osaka Bay, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Yamazaki, Hideo; Tsujimoto, Akira; Hirose, K.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed spatiotemporal patterns of the influence of urbanization-induced eutrophication on a metazoan benthic community in Osaka Bay were determined using sediment cores and fossil ostracode assemblages from the last 200 yr. Results suggest that total abundance of ostracodes increased in the middle part of the bay as a result of the increase of food supply by eutrophication. Conversely, abundance decreased in the inner bay, likely because of bottom-water hypoxia by eutrophication. The variation in species composition among sites within the bay may have decreased because of the effect of eutrophication, i.e., the dominance of species that prefer food-rich environments throughout all sites. These eutrophication-induced changes occurred around 1900 as a result of Japan's industrial revolution and around 1960 as a result of rapid urbanization, depending upon location. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  4. Autopsie d'une extinction biologique. Un exemple: la crise de la limite frasnien-famennien (364 ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lethiers, Francis; Casier, Jean-Georges

    1999-09-01

    Without studying the causes of the F/F boundary mass extinction, the precise analysis of ostracod species shows evolutionary process only discernable at the global scale. About 75% of all neritic species disappeared in the Uppermost Frasnian in all studied regions of the world. Others survived, with some geographic changes, owing to littoral refuges (Lazarus eflect). Deep benthic ostracods seem almost untouched by this event. We show that new post-event species resulted from allopatric speciations by migration between neritic provinces or along continental slopes towards deeper environments. During the event surviving lineages show a continuous gradation from unscathed species to chronocline species, to phyletic subspeciations or speciations (= pseudo extinctions) and even to new genera. The durability of lineages is controlled by the migration of populations.

  5. The relationship between extrinsic and intrinsic events in the evolution of Mesozoic non-marine Ostracoda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whatley, Robin

    The Cypridacea first entered non-marine environments in a sustained invasion in the Upper Bathonian. They were, until the late Tithonian, subordinate to the only other Mesozoic non-marine ostracods, the Darwinulacea and the Limnocytheridae. In the late Tithonian and Neocomian, however, they became pandemic in their distribution and totally dominated the other two groups. The great rapidity of their dispersal is attributed to their having evolved, late in the Jurassic, the ability to reproduce parthenogenetically and to lay desiccation and freezing resistant eggs. The great increase in their diversity at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary is thought in part to be due to their ability to swim, a facility denied their competitors. It is suggested that the late Jurassic non-marine Cypridacea constitute an excellent example of Hopeful Monsters. The possible passive dispersal of ostracods by Mesozoic vertebrates is discussed.

  6. OBSERVATIONS ON THE VARIATIONS IN SIZE OF THE A REGION OF ARTHROPOD MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, John

    1963-01-01

    The muscles of three different arthropods, a mite, a fly, and an ostracod, show variations in the length of the A region within a given individual. There is no indication that the observed differences in A band length are related to the functional state of the muscle since little, if any, decrease in the length of the A bands was noted when sarcomeres shortened. The length of the A region was determined by polarized light microscopy and in the case of the mite and the ostracod this measurement was made on intact muscles. It is concluded that the size of the A filaments in an individual can vary in a manner unrelated to immediate functional changes. The I filaments may vary in size, but this could not be clearly demonstrated. PMID:14086762

  7. Results of the Field Study of the Surficial Geology and Paleontologic Resources of the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site, Las Animas County, Colorado

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Fossils Wood Leaves Stromatolites Ostracodes Dinosaur Tracks Dinosaurs Terrestrial Reptiles Freshwater Clams Freshwater Snails X X X X X X X...Merest The Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site contains a large number of fossils and fossil localities, ranging from dinosaur and plant beds to shell beds...logs that accumulated as log jams the bottom of deep valleys. Nowhere else in the western United States are logs of this age known. Dinosaur bones

  8. Composite Environmental Statement for Operations and Maintenance of Four Projects in the Mermentau Basin, Louisiana.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    as the arba and nassa. Various groups such as amphipods, nemerteans, ostracods, and mantis shrimp are also represented. Since the channel is dredged...Operation of the two water control structures has resulted in reduced habitat for shrimp , crabs, and other arine organisms, resulting in adverse impacts to...Structure has been operated since 1976 to permit ingress of juvenile shrimp and crabs when it was determined by the New Orleans District Office

  9. San Agustin Plains, New Mexico: Age and paleoenvironmental potential reassessed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markgraf, Vera; Bradbury, J. Platt; Forester, R. M.; Singh, G.; Sternberg, R. S.

    1984-11-01

    Paleomagnetic analysis of samples from the original 600-m-long core from the San Agustin Plains, New Mexico, showed an unquestionable reversal stratigraphy dating the record back to at least 1.6 my. Analysis of pollen, ostracodes, and algae of a duplicate sample section in the vicinity of the original coring site and spanning the last 18,000 yr B.P. shows a much higher resolution than the earlier results.

  10. Stratigraphic and microfossil evidence for hydroclimate changes over the middle to late Holocene in the northern Bahamas from an inland saline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hengstum, P. J.; Maale, G. E.; Donnelly, J. P.; Onac, B. P.; Sullivan, R.; Winkler, T. S.; Albury, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    No Man's Land is one of the largest inland lakes on the Little Bahama Bank in the northern Bahamas, so its paleoenvironmental history may provide insight into how the regional hydroclimate developed over the Holocene. In its modern state, the site is shallow (<3 m), brackish (20.6 psu), 170 m in diameter, and located 700 m from the coastline. Prior to 6400 Cal yrs BP, the accumulation of peat deposits and no aquatic invertebrates (e.g., ostracodes, foraminifera, aquatic mollusks) indicate that the site was a terrestrial ecosystem. However, the site transitioned into a subaqueous freshwater environment at 6400 Cal yrs BP, and the site became a palustrine-lacustrine setting thereafter until 4200 Cal yrs BP. During this time, widespread palustrine-lacustrine carbonate deposition and the appearance of freshwater to low mesohaline microfossils indicates that the lake's salinity was likely oligohaline (charophytes, ostracodes: Candona annae, Cypridopsis vidua, foraminifera: Helenina davescottensis, mollusks: Planorbis, Hydrobia). A salinity increase at 4200 Cal yrs BP is inferred from the appearance of the ostracode Cyprideis americana that typically prefers salinities exceeding 10 psu, and deposition of laminated microbial mats. Thereafter, an organic- rich, algal sapropel unit accumulated that was devoid of any microfossils or mollusks. This unit suggests that the lake hosted a stratified water column, where surface waters supported phytoplankton primary productivity and corrosive or anoxic bottom water conditions either hampered microfossil growth or precluded their preservation. The transition to the modern environment ( 20 psu) at 2600 cal yrs BP is characterized by diversification of brackish ostracodes (Aurila floridana, Dolerocypria inopinata, and Hemicyprideis setipunctata), foraminifera (Elphidium spp., Ammonia beccarii, Triloculina oblonga) and mollusks (Anomalocardia, Cerithidea). Over the middle to late Holocene, it appears that the stratigraphic development

  11. Distribution of sexual and asexual Ostracoda (Crustacea) from different altitudinal ranges in the Ordu region of Turkey: testing the Rapoport Rule.

    PubMed

    Külköylüoğlu, Okan; Sari, Necmettin; Akdemir, Derya; Yavuzatmaca, Mehmet; Altinbağ, Ceren

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated Rapoport's rule which states a negative correlation between species richness and altitude. To understand the relationship between altitude and reproductive modes (a/sexual) of non-marine ostracods, 166 aquatic bodies in Ordu region, Turkey were randomly sampled from July 11 to July 16, 2010. A total of 26 species of ostracods were found from 133 out of 166 sites. Except for one species (Heterocypris incongruens), the other 25 species were new reports for the region. Candona improvisa was also a new report for Turkish ostracod fauna. Three species (Psychrodromus olivaceus, H. incongruens, and C. neglecta) occurred most frequently as 43, 46, and 76 times, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses exhibited two variables [Habitat type (p=0.014; F=2.171) and water temperature (p=0.018; F=2.248)] as having the most effect on species. Correlation of species' reproductive modes to those of environmental variables measured was not significant. UPGMA dendrogram displayed 15 most frequently occurring species into four clusters where most species (11) were asexual. Although a small group (asexual species without swimming setae) showed a tendency to habitat type and electrical conductivity, such variables are believed to play secondary role on species distribution. Highest species diversity (13 species) was observed at the range of 1200 and 1400 m (a.s.l.), where numbers of stations sampled was not the highest (22). Numbers of asexual species (19) were higher than the sexual (11) but there were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the frequencies of their occurrences at different altitudinal ranges. Accordingly, our findings do not support the Rapoport Rule. Results yield that reproductive modes of species (sexual and asexual) was not directly correlated to altitude or any environmental variables measured during this study. A better explanation of ostracod diversity appears to be suitability of habitats.

  12. Late Neogene marine Ostracoda from Tjornes, Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    On the western side of the Tjornes Peninsula in northern Iceland exposures of fossiliferous marine sediments, basalts, and glacial tills record the climatic history of this region of the North Atlantic Ocean. Seventy-five marine ostracode species were recovered from the Pliocene Tjornes sediments and Quaternary sediments known as the Breidavik beds. New species Bensonocythere eirikssoni, Robertsonites williamsi, Hemicythere rekaensis, Thaerocythere mayburyae, Thaerocythere whatleyi, Leptocythere tjornesensis, Tetracytherura bardarsoni, and Cytheromorpha einarssoni are described. -from Author

  13. San Agustin Plains, New Mexico: Age and paleoenvironmental potential reassessed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markgraf, Vera; Bradbury, J.P.; Forester, R.M.; Singh, G.; Sternberg, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Paleomagnetic analysis of samples from the original 600-m-long core from the San Agustin Plains, New Mexico, showed an unquestionable reversal stratigraphy dating the record back to at least 1.6 my. Analysis of pollen, ostracodes, and algae of a duplicate sample section in the vicinity of the original coring site and spanning the last 18,000 yr B.P. shows a much higher resolution than the earlier results. ?? 1984.

  14. Stable isotopes, Sr/Ca, and Mg/Ca in biogenic carbonates from Petaluma Marsh, northern California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, B.L.; Deckker, P. de; Chivas, A.R.; Conrad, M.E.; Byrne, A.R.

    1998-10-01

    Stable isotope ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) and minor-element compositions (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios) of ostracodes and gastropods separated from marsh sediments from San Francisco Bay, Northern California, were used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental changes in Petaluma March over the past 700 yr. The value of {delta}{sup 18}O in the marsh carbonates reflects changes in freshwater inflow, evaporation, and temperature. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in ostracode calcite reflect changes in both freshwater inflow and temperature, although primarily reflect temperature changes in the salinity range of about 10--35{per_thousand}. Ostracode {delta}{sup 18}O values show a gradual increase by 5{per_thousand} between 500 yr BP and the present, probably reflecting rising sea level and increased evaporation in the marsh. Superimposed on this trend are higher frequency Mg/Ca and {delta}{sup 18}O variations (3--4{per_thousand}), probably reflecting changes in freshwater inflow and evaporation. A period of low Mg/Ca occurred between about 100--300 cal yr BP, suggesting wetter and cooler conditions during the Little Ice Age. Higher Mg/Ca ratios occurred 600--700 cal yr BP, indicating drier and warmer conditions during the end of the Medieval Warm Period. Both ostracode and gastropod {delta}{sup 13}C values decrease up-core, reflecting decomposition of marsh vegetation, which changes from C{sub 4} ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}12{per_thousand}) to CAM ({delta}{sup 13}C = {minus}26{per_thousand})-type vegetation over time.

  15. Stable isotopes, Sr/Ca, and Mg/Ca in biogenic carbonates from Petaluma Marsh, northern California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, B.L.; De Deckker, P.; Chivas, A.R.; Conrad, M.E.; Byrne, A.R.

    2004-10-19

    Stable isotope ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) and minor-element compositions (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios) of ostracodes and gastropods separated from marsh sediments from San Francisco Bay, Northern California, were used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental changes in Petaluma Marsh over the past 700 yr. The value of {delta}{sup 18}O in the marsh carbonates reflects changes in freshwater inflow, evaporation, and temperature. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in ostracode calcite reflect changes in both freshwater inflow and temperature, although primarily reflect temperature changes in the salinity range of about 10-35 {per_thousand}. Ostracode {delta}{sup 18}O values show a gradual increase by 5 {per_thousand} between 500 yr BR and the present, probably reflecting rising sea level and increased evaporation in the marsh. Superimposed on this trend are higher frequency Mg/Ca and {delta}{sup 18}O variations (3-4 {per_thousand}), probably reflecting changes in freshwater inflow and evaporation. A period of low Mg/Ca occurred between about 100-300 cal yr BP, suggesting wetter and cooler conditions during the Little Ice Age. Higher Mg/Ca ratios occurred 600-700 cal yr BP, indicating drier and warmer conditions during the end of the Medieval Warm Period. Both ostracode and gastropod {delta}{sup 13}C values decrease up-core, reflecting decomposition of marsh vegetation, which changes from C{sub 4} ({delta}{sup 13}C {approx} -12{per_thousand}) to CAM ({delta}{sup 13}C = -26 {per_thousand})-type vegetation over time.

  16. Correspondence of terrestrial and marine paleoclimates, SW Florida, during Mid-Pliocene periods of global warmth

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, D.A.; Cronin, T.M.; Litwin, R.J. National Center)

    1992-01-01

    Pollen and ostracode samples from shallow-marine strata of the Pinecrest Beds near Sarasota, FL were studied to compare terrestrial and marine paleoclimate records during periods of middle Pliocene global warmth. Pollen assemblages from strata deposited during sea-level highstands from about 3.5--3.0 Ma are dominated by Pinus pollen with subdominant Ouercus and common taxodiaceous pollen, which increases markedly in abundance near about 3.0 Ma. Comparison with modern, shallow-marine pollen assemblages from the east coast of the United States indicates that the 3.5--3.0 Ma vegetation was, overall, similar to vegetation from the southern third Florida. However, near 3.0 Ma, pollen assemblages become less similar to modern assemblages due to higher percentages of taxodiaceous pollen and lower percentages of herbaceous pollen. Such changes are consistent with warmer climates and, possibly, moister soil conditions. Marine ostracodes also show progressively higher percentages of thermophilic (subtropical/tropical) taxa and decreasing percentages of cryophilic (temperature) taxa between 3.5--3.0 Ma. From about 2.5--2.0 Ma, ostracode assemblages recorded open-bay, sometimes brackish environments similar to those in subtropical eastern North America today. The Pinecrest paleoclimate record shows (1) that during two periods of global warmth and high sea level, subtropical terrestrial and marine climates were not substantially warmer than today; (2) ocean and atmosphere temperatures probably were about the same as today, perhaps slightly higher during peak warmth near 3.0 Ma; (3) changes in pollen assemblages appear to lag behind changes in ostracode assemblages; (4) progressively warmer local climates 3.5--3.0 Ma probably record an increasing influence of warm Gulf Stream water as the Central American Isthmus closed.

  17. Morphological and geochemical variations of Cyprideis (Ostracoda) from modern waters of the northern Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J; Wrozyna, C; Gross, M; Leis, A; Piller, W E

    2017-01-01

    The variability of modern Cyprideis salebrosa and Cyprideis americana (Ostracoda) from the northern Neotropics were investigated in order to understand site specific influences on the isotopic composition of their valves (δ(18)O, δ(13)C) in comparison to their host water and to connect this to morphological features of their valves (valve size, nodosity). C. salebrosa was found in a stream (Shell Creek, Florida) and a slightly brackish lake (Laguna del Rincon, Dominican Republic; salinity <0.7 psu) while C. americana occurred in a coastal lake with polyhaline waters (Parrotee Pond, Jamaica; salinity: >20 psu). Valve size and position of nodes differed between the two species. A reverse temperature dependency have been considered to influence Shell length (seasonally in Shell Creek, summer: 1076 µm; winter: 1092 µm, supposedly permanently in Laguna del Rincon, 1035 µm). But, regarding the small dataset other factors could not be excluded to influence ostracod valve size. A decline of node frequency of C. salebrosa is mainly related to an increase in salinity. Isotopic values of ostracod valves reflect the trend in stable isotopes of their host water. Variations in Cyprideis salebrosa δ(18)O and δ(13)C values signify differences in their host water. Offsets of ostracod valves to a theoretical calcite precipitated in their host water with an uncertain time lag (+0.015 to +2.63 ‰) needs to be clarified. This study presents a contribution to the understanding of environmental influences on modern ostracod shell characters as basis for paleontological applications.

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Program on the South Florida Ecosystem - Proceedings of South Florida Restoration Science Forum, May 17-19, 1999, Boca Raton, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    the fauna (benthic foraminifers , ostracodes, and molluscs) and flora (palynomorphs and diatoms) present at each site are recorded. (Data from the...over time, and that dense seagrass coverage is not necessarily the "natural state" for Florida Bay. A preliminary analysis of the benthic foraminifers ... foraminifers and molluscs were added to the previous suite of terrestrial and freshwater molluscs. Dwarf-mangrove assemblages became established

  19. Biostratigraphy of the Middle Eocene succession at Gebel Mishgigah, Wadi Rayan, Libyan Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A.; Shamah, K.; Zalat, A.

    The present study deals with the biozonation of the exposed section at Gebel Mishgigah, which is mainly composed of highly fossiliferous limestones, dolostones and marls. These deposits belong to Mishgigah Member of Wadi Rayan Formation and are of Late Lutetian to Bartonian (Late Middle Eocene) age. The collected samples were investigated for their microfaunal and nannofloral content. Different associations of calcareous nannoplankton, planktonic foraminifers, ostracods and bryozoans were detected. The depositional environments and paleoecologic factors that prevailed during the sedimentation were also interpreted.

  20. The Miocene Cyprideis species flock (Ostracoda; Crustacea) of western Amazonia (Solimões Formation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F.; Piller, Werner E.

    2015-04-01

    The Miocene mega-wetland of western Amazonia holds a diverse, largely endemic aquatic invertebrate fauna (e.g., molluscs, ostracods). Among ostracods, the genus Cyprideis experienced a remarkable radiation. Micropalaeontologic investigations of a 400-m-long sediment core (~62 km SW Benjamin Constant, Amazonia, Brazil) permitted a taxonomic revision of about two-thirds of hitherto described Cyprideis species. Ostracod index species enabled a biostratigraphic allocation of the well succession to the Cyprideis minipunctata to Cyprideis cyrtoma biozones (late middle to early late Miocene age). The current study underlines once more Cyprideis' remarkable capability to produce species flocks and western Amazonian Cyprideis comply with the criteria of a species flock: i) endemicity: up to now not a single species is recorded in adjacent areas; ii) monophyly: although hardly verifiable to date and probably Amazonian Cyprideis is not monophyletic s.str., several closely related, quite rapidly evolving species are proved; iii) speciosity: due to the present study, 30 formally described species exist; several further species, left in open nomenclature, are recorded in the literature, which strongly hints to a much higher, still unrecorded species richness; iv) ecological diversity: based on rare sedimentologic cross-references, ecological diversity within a highly structured wetland is possible; the current results demonstrate the sympatric occurrence of up to 12 Cyprideis species, which may indicate adaptations to different microhabitats; v) habitat dominance: regularly Cyprideis holds more than >90 % in western Amazonian ostracod assemblages during the early and middle Miocene. Explanations for this extreme habitat monopolisation are still arguable and touch the highly disputed question about the nature of western Amazonia's environments during the Miocene. It seems, however, evident that a strictly actualistic approach to endemic Neogene Amazonian biota is highly

  1. The role of damselflies (Odonata: Zygoptera) as paratenic hosts in the transmission of Halipegus eccentricus (Digenea: Hemiuridae) to anurans.

    PubMed

    Bolek, Matthew G; Tracy, Heather R; Janovy, John

    2010-08-01

    Halipegus eccentricus is a common hemiurid trematode in the eustachian tubes of North America frogs. However, the life cycle of this species has never been completely elucidated. Studies on H. eccentricus suggest that it has a 3-host life cycle. Here, we show through fieldwork and host specificity experimental infections that the life cycle of Halipegus eccentricus utilizes 4 hosts. Metamorphosed anurans become infected with H. eccentricus by feeding on infected damselflies; worms reside in the stomach of anurans, migrate to the eustachian tubes within 32-39 days post-exposure (DPE), and release eggs 50-60 DPE. Cystophorous cercariae develop in Physa gyrina snails within 32-35 DPE, infect ostracod ( Cypridopsis sp.) second intermediate hosts, and develop to metacercariae. Fifteen- to 19-day-old metacercariae from ostracods are infective to both damselfly larvae and metamorphosed anurans. Field surveys of damselflies and tadpoles, along with laboratory exposure of damselfly larvae, metamorphosed anurans, and tadpoles with infected ostracods, indicated that only metamorphosed anurans and damselflies become infected with H. eccentricus , whereas field-collected tadpoles and laboratory-exposed tadpoles were never infected with H. eccentricus . Because little morphological change occurred in the metacercaria stage of H. eccentricus between the ostracod second intermediate host and damselfly host, and metamorphosed anurans became infected with H. eccentricus metacercariae recovered from both host groups, we suggest that odonates serve as paratenic hosts in this life cycle. Additionally, our field work and experimental infections provide data on the use of odonates as the route of infection by another North American Halipegus sp. that matures in the stomach of frogs. Our data indicate that when the life cycles are known, the use of odonates as the route of infection to anurans is common in the life cycles of Halipegus spp., and all species exhibit remarkable infection

  2. Validating and optimising palaeoclimate estimates by Multi-Proxy Consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David

    2013-04-01

    Biological proxies such as foraminifera, ostracods, diatoms, chironomid larvae, molluscs and pollen are widely used to estimate palaeoclimatic parameters, most commonly palaeotemperatures. Indicator species, Mutual Climatic Range (MCR), Modern Analogue Technique (MAT) and transfer function approaches are based on the ecology and distribution of living taxa, while geochemical techniques measure and interpret trace elements and stable isotope ratios preserved in, e.g., ostracod shells or foraminiferal tests. Any single proxy method will yield a result, often a plausible one, but the arguments used to justify the results are often inadequate and there is a need for more rigorous, multi-proxy comparative testing to validate such methods. The Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range (MOTR) method is an MCR approach for non-marine ostracods; if it is any good then it should provide true palaeotemperature estimates - a statement that can be applied to any proxy method. It follows that two or more proxy methods applied to the same interval at the same site should yield results that, if not identical, are at least consistent; if they do not, the validity of at least one (and potentially all) of the methods is called into question. The Multi-Proxy Consensus (MPC) approach not only tests two or more proxies against each other in order to validate (or not) their results, but also (subject to validation) enables a more precise palaeoclimate determination to be obtained from, e.g., the range of mutual agreement between two or more overlapping palaeotemperature ranges. Examples will be provided of using the MPC approach to test the MOTR method against beetle MCR, chironomid transfer function and other proxy methods in Quaternary assemblages. Problems that impede the MPC approach, such as the non-equivalence of samples, will also be discussed.

  3. North Atlantic deepwater temperature change during late pliocene and late quaternary climatic cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, Gary S.; Cronin, T. M.; Baker, P.A.; Raymo, M.E.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.; Correge, T.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of magnesium to calcium (Mg/Ca) in fossil ostracodes from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 in the deep North Atlantic show that the change in bottom water temperature during late Pliocene 41,000-year obliquity cycles averaged 1.5°C between 3.2 and 2.8 million years ago (Ma) and increased to 2.3°C between 2.8 and 2.3 Ma, coincidentally with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. During the last two 100,000-year glacial-to-interglacial climatic cycles of the Quaternary, bottom water temperatures changed by 4.5°C. These results show that glacial deepwater cooling has intensified since 3.2 Ma, most likely as the result of progressively diminished deep-water production in the North Atlantic and of the greater influence of Antarctic bottom water in the North Atlantic during glacial periods. The ostracode Mg/Ca data also allow the direct determination of the temperature component of the benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope record from Site 607, as well as derivation of a hypothetical sea-level curve for the late Pliocene and late Quaternary. The effects of dissolution on the Mg/Ca ratios of ostracode shells appear to have been minimal.

  4. Revision of Recent and fossil Mixtacandona Klie 1938 (Ostracoda, Candonidae) from Italy, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Ilaria; Marrone, Federico; Arculeo, Marco; Rossetti, Giampaolo

    2017-01-17

    Although studies on ostracods dwelling in inland subterranean habitats of Italy have increased in the last decades, highlighting a considerable taxonomic diversity, available information is still far from sufficient to understand phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships. Mixtacandona Klie 1938 is one of the most common and diverse genera of ostracods in subterranean waters. Of the 20 living recognized species in the genus, all stygobiontic and restricted to the Palearctic Region, four are known for the Italian peninsula and Sardinia, one of which exclusively as fossil. Several other Recent and fossil taxa attributable to Mixtacandona, but identified at supraspecific level, have been reported from various Italian regions. Here we report Mixtacandona idrisi n. sp., collected in a cave near Palermo, the first cavernicolous ostracod from the island of Sicily; in addition, the description of material recently collected in northern Italy, consisting of M. laisi and of a putative new species that has been tentatively allocated to the same genus, is given. Mixtacandona (Trapezicandona) italica Karanovic & Pesce, 2000 is tentatively treated as a junior synonym of M. talianae Gliozzi & Mazzini, 1998. The validity of species-groups within Mixtacandona is discussed. Relying on the results of this study, the authors argue for the need of a comprehensive revision of the genus.

  5. Neogene biostratigraphy and paleoenvironments of Enewetak Atoll, equatorial Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Bybell, L.M.; Brouwers, E.M.; Gibson, T.G.; Margerum, R.; Poore, R.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Micropaleontologic analyses of Neogene sediments from Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, provide data on the age of lagoonal deposits, stratigraphic disconformities and the paleoenvironmental and subsidence history of the atoll. Benthic foraminifers, planktic foraminifers, calcareous nannofossils and ostracodes were studied from six boreholes, the deepest penetrating 1605 feet below the lagoon floor into upper Oligocene strata. The Oligocene-Miocene boundary occurs at about 1200 ft below the lagoon floor. The early and middle Miocene is characterized by brief periods of deposition and numerous hiatuses. Ostracodes and benthic foraminifers indicate a shallow-marine reefal environment with occasional brackish water conditions. Upper Miocene and lower Pliocene deposits placed in calcareous nannofossil Zones NN9-15 and in planktic foraminifer Zones N16-19 contain species-rich benthic microfaunas which indicate alternating reefal and brackish water mangrove environments. The upper Pliocene contains at least two major depositional hiatuses that coincide with a major faunal turnover in benthic foraminiferal and ostracode assemblages. The Quaternary is characterized by benthic microfaunas similar to those of modern atoll lagoons and is punctuated by at least 11 disconformities which signify periods of low sea level. Atoll subsidence rates during the last 10 Ma averaged 30 to 40 m/m.y. ?? 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovery of silicified lacustrine micro-fossils and stromatolites: Triassic-Jurassic Fundy Group, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, B.

    1985-01-01

    A unique assemblage of silicified invertebrate and algal fresh-water lake fossils has been discovered in the Scots Bay Formation at the top of the Triassic-Jurassic Fundy Group of the Fundy Basin in Nova Scotia. This is important because the basins of the eastern North American Triassic-Jurassic rift system have not yielded many invertebrate and algal fossils. These new finds will contribute significantly to evolutionary, paleoecological and biostratigraphic studies of fresh-water Mesozoic deposits. Silicified fossils have been extracted from chert-bearing, mixed carbonate and siliciclastic lithologies. They include ostracodes, gastropods, rare bivalves, charaphytes (algae), stromatolites, and chert nodules cored with well-preserved woody tissues of tree trunks. Possible algal filaments occur in the silicified stromatolites. This association of charaphytes, ostracodes, microscopic gastropods and stromatolites is found in carbonate lakes today. The Scots Bay Formation is probably a near-shore carbonate facies of the more widespread silicilastic lacustrine McCoy Brook Formation. The gastropods and ostracodes, studied by SEM, indicate a Jurassic age for the Scots bay Formation, confirming speculations based on other data.

  7. On the Miocene Cyprideis species flock (Ostracoda; Crustacea) of Western Amazonia (Solimões Formation): Refining taxonomy on species level

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F.; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-01-01

    The Miocene mega-wetland of western Amazonia holds a diverse, largely endemic ostracod fauna. Among them, especially the genus Cyprideis experienced a remarkable radiation. Micropalaeontologic investigations of a 400 m long sediment core (~62 km SW Benjamin Constant, Amazonia, Brazil) permitted a taxonomic revision of about two-thirds of hitherto described Cyprideis species. We evaluate the diagnostic value of shell characters and provide an extensive illustration of the intraspecific variability of species. Based on comparative morphology, the 20 recorded Cyprideis species are arranged in groups and subgroups. The “smooth” group comprises C. amazonica, C. kotzianae, C. kroemmelbeini, C. machadoi, C. multiradiata, C. olivencai, C. paralela and C. simplex; the “ornate” group C. curucae nom. nov., C. cyrtoma, C. aff. graciosa, C. inversa, C. ituiae n. sp., C. matorae n. sp., C. minipunctata, C. munoztorresi nom. nov., C. pebasae, C. reticulopunctata, C. schedogymnos and C. sulcosigmoidalis. Five species have been revalidated, two renamed, two synonymised and two are new descriptions. Along with 10 further formally established species, for which a review is pending, Cyprideis keeps at least 30 endemic species in that region during Miocene times. Up to 12 Cyprideis species have been found to occur sympatrically, representing >90 % of the entire ostracod fauna. Ostracod index species enable a biostratigraphic allocation of the well succession to the Cyprideis minipunctata to Cyprideis cyrtoma biozones, corresponding to a late Middle to early Late Miocene age (late Serravallian–early Tortonian). PMID:25543674

  8. The effects of ultraviolet-B radiation on freshwater invertebrates: Experiments with a solar simulator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurtubise, R.D.; Havel, J.E.; Little, E.E.

    1998-01-01

    There is concern that decreases in stratospheric ozone will lead to hazardous levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation at the Earth's surface. In clear water, UV-B may penetrate to significant depths. The purpose of the current study was to compare the sensitivity of freshwater invertebrates to UV-B. We used a solar simulator, calibrated to match local ambient solar radiation, to expose five species of freshwater invertebrates to enhanced levels of UV-B radiation. UV-B measurements in a eutrophic pond revealed that 10% of the irradiance penetrated to 30-cm depth and 1% to 57-cm depth. The irradiance at the upper 5-20 cm was comparable to levels used in the simulator. Median lethal dose (LD50) values were determined for the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia reticulata, Scapholeberis kingii (two induced color morphs), and Daphnia magna; the ostracod Cyprinotus incongruens; and the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Among the species, 96-h LD50 estimates were quite variable, ranging from 4.2 to 84.0 ??W cm-2. These estimates indicated S. kingii to be highly sensitive and H. azteca, C. reticulata, and D. magna to be moderately sensitive, whereas the ostracod C. incongruens was very tolerant to UV-B radiation. Overall, this study suggests that, in shallow ponds without physical refuges, UV-B radiation would have the strongest effects upon cladocerans and amphipods occurring in the water column, whereas ostracods would be better protected.

  9. Timing of atmospheric precipitation in the Zagros Mountains inferred from a multi-proxy record from Lake Mirabad, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lora R.; Ito, Emi; Schwalb, Antje; Wright, Herbert E.

    2006-11-01

    A sediment core 7.2 m long from Lake Mirabad, Iran, was examined for loss-on-ignition, mineralogy, oxygen-isotopic composition of authigenic calcite, and trace-element composition of ostracodes to complement earlier pollen and ostracode-assemblage studies. Pollen, ostracode-inferred lake level, and high Sr/Ca ratios indicate that the early Holocene (10000 to 6500 cal yr BP) was drier than the late Holocene. Low δ18O values during this interval are interpreted as resulting from winter-dominated precipitation, characteristic of a Mediterranean climate. Increasing δ18O values after 6500 cal yr BP signal a gradual increase in spring rains, which are present today. A severe 600-yr drought occurred at ca. 5500 cal yr BP, shortly after the transition from pistachio-almond to oak forest. During the late Holocene, two milder droughts occurred at about 1500 and 500 cal yr BP. Within the resolution of the record, no drought is evident during the collapse of the Akkadian empire (4200-3900 cal yr BP). Rather, a decrease in δ18O values to early-Holocene levels may indicate the return to a Mediterranean precipitation regime.

  10. On the Miocene Cyprideis species flock (Ostracoda; Crustacea) of Western Amazonia (Solimões Formation): Refining taxonomy on species level.

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F; Piller, Werner E

    2014-12-18

    The Miocene mega-wetland of western Amazonia holds a diverse, largely endemic ostracod fauna. Among them, especially the genus Cyprideis experienced a remarkable radiation. Micropalaeontologic investigations of a 400 m long sediment core (~62 km SW Benjamin Constant, Amazonia, Brazil) permitted a taxonomic revision of about two-thirds of hitherto described Cyprideis species. We evaluate the diagnostic value of shell characters and provide an extensive illustration of the intraspecific variability of species. Based on comparative morphology, the 20 recorded Cyprideis species are arranged in groups and subgroups. The "smooth" group comprises C. amazonica, C. kotzianae, C. kroemmelbeini, C. machadoi, C. multiradiata, C. olivencai, C. paralela and C. simplex; the "ornate" group C. curucae nom. nov., C. cyrtoma, C. aff. graciosa, C. inversa, C. ituiae n. sp., C. matorae n. sp., C. minipunctata, C. munoztorresi nom. nov., C. pebasae, C. reticulopunctata, C. schedogymnos and C. sulcosigmoidalis. Five species have been revalidated, two renamed, two synonymised and two are new descriptions. Along with 10 further formally established species, for which a review is pending, Cyprideis keeps at least 30 endemic species in that region during Miocene times. Up to 12 Cyprideis species have been found to occur sympatrically, representing >90% of the entire ostracod fauna. Ostracod index species enable a biostratigraphic allocation of the well succession to the Cyprideis minipunctata to Cyprideis cyrtoma biozones, corresponding to a late Middle to early Late Miocene age (late Serravallian-early Tortonian).

  11. Macrofossils of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Thrasher, L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results of this study of the macrofossils of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota have reinforced the suggestion, based on previous paleontological work in Saskatchewan, that the Bakken is of both Devonian and Mississippian age, rather than being entirely of Lower Mississippian age as originally considered. Increased drilling and coring activity in the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin has provided the opportunity for acquiring a larger fauna that was previously available. Based on lithologic character, the Bakken has been divided into three informal members. These consist of a calcareous siltstone unit between two lithologically similar units of carbonaceous shale. These black shales contain similar faunas distinct from that of the middle member. The black shales contain inarticulate brachiopods, conchostracans, and rare cephalopods and fish remains as well as more abundant conodonts, ostracods, and palynomorphs. The middle siltstone unit contains a more abundant and diverse fauna consisting of inarticulate and articulate brachiopods together with corals, gastropods, cephalopods, ostracods, echinoderm remains, and trace fossils. This is the first report of cephalopods, conchostracans, ostracods, corals, trace fossils, and some of the brachiopods in the Bakken, although all, except the gastropods, have been reported from stratigraphic equivalents (Exshaw Formation of south-central Montana, the Leatham Formation of northeastern Utah, and the middle member of the Pilot Shale in western Utah and eastern Nevada).

  12. New data on microbiota of the Middle Volgian substage in the Loino Section (Kirov oblast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinova, M. A.; Tesakova, E. M.

    2017-05-01

    The calcareous nannoplankton was established for the first time in Upper Volgian deposits of the Loino Section (Kirov oblast). Here, single coccolites of representatives of genus Watznaueria of wide stratigraphic and geographic distributions dominate. Representatives of genus Zuegrhabdotus are less common, whereas species of genus Polypodorhabdus are rare. The taxonomic composition of the calcareous nannoplankton assemblage does not allow us to distinguish the nannoplankton zone in the Loino Section, but it gives us an idea about its distribution at the Volgian Stage in the Russian Plate. As corresponding microfauna, foraminifers, assigned to the Lenticulina infravolgaensis-Saracenaria pravoslavlevi Zone, and ostracods were identified to substantiate the age of host deposits. The ostracod assemblage is assigned to the Macrodentina (Polydentina) subtriangularis Beds established on the Volga River left bank in deposits corresponding to the ammonite zones Panderi and Virgatus assigned to the middle Volgian substage. On the basis of ostracods, the warm-water well-aerating environment of the upper sublittoral (as deep as 50 m) was reconstructed.

  13. Databases and Geographical Information Systems at the research/teaching interface: palaeoclimate proxies, freshwater biodiversity and the OMEGA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David

    2013-04-01

    The Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range (MOTR) method provides Quaternary palaeotemperature range estimates based on fossil ostracod assemblages calibrated using modern distributional databases and climate data. Over the past five years, aspects of the development and application of the MOTR method have been incorporated into undergraduate teaching in two second-year modules (Global Environmental Change and Digital Worlds: Cartography, Geographical Information Systems and Modelling) via lectures and practical exercises. Consequently, several students became sufficiently interested and enthused to undertake successful major projects aimed at developing, testing and applying aspects of the method, leading in turn to postgraduate work on the same topic in two cases and in a third case to co-authorship of a research publication. Thus both research and teaching have benefited from the integration of an innovative geoscience application with undergraduate coursework. The scope of MOTR applications is being expanded from European to global via the Ostracod Metadatabase of Environmental and Geographical Attributes (OMEGA) project; the current focus is on harmonising North American and European datasets, supported by the EU-funded (FP7) BioFresh project which is building a global information platform with access to all available databases of freshwater biodiversity. Undergraduate participation will be sought to underpin a Citizen Science initiative aimed at checking, correcting and validating the geographic referencing of species' records in the databases, using datasets exported as Keyhole Markup Language files for use in Google Earth.

  14. Sub-decadal resolution in sediments of Late Miocene Lake Pannon reveals speciation of Cyprideis (Crustacea, Ostracoda).

    PubMed

    Gitter, Frank; Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E

    2015-01-01

    Late Miocene "Lake Pannon" (~11.3 Ma) was a remnant of the Central Paratethyan Sea. Successive freshening and constantly changing environmental conditions, like oxygenation, nutrition and substrate led to a well-documented radiation in molluscs and ostracods. Among ostracods (small crustaceans), Cyprideis is one of the most common genera in "Lake Pannon", as well as in several other ancient lakes, showing numerous adaptations and speciations. Here, we present high-resolution data from an early transgression of "Lake Pannon" in the Eastern Styrian Basin (SE Austria). Mataschen clay pit is in the focus of geologic and paleontologic research since 20 years and its geologic and paleoecologic evolution is well-documented. We drilled five cores covering a ~2.3 m long section and completely sampled it in 5-mm thick intervals to reconstruct minute changes in the ostracod fauna over a transgression of a brackish water body. The dominant genus, Cyprideis, is represented by three species C. mataschensis, C. kapfensteinensis and C. ex gr. pannonica. Through morphometric analyses we highlight the variance of each taxon and suggest that there is no direct ecologic control on size or shape. Furthermore, we found a second, co-occurring morphotype of C. kapfensteinensis which is directly related to an elevation of salinities above 13 psu. The presence of two intermediate specimens between the two morphotypes in the sample directly below the first appearance of C. kapfensteinensis B leads us to the conclusion that we are facing a speciation event leading to four sympatric species of Cyprideis.

  15. A paleoecologic reconstruction of the history of Featherbed Bank, Biscayne National Park, Biscayne Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Jeffery R.; Cronin, T. M.; Brewster-Wingard, G. L.; Ishman, S.E.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Holmes, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    Using multiple-proxy biological indicators, a paleoecological history of the past 550 years of Featherbed Bank, Biscayne Bay, has been reconstructed from a short (2.26 m) sediment core. Paleoecological changes in ostracode, mollusc, and foraminifer assemblages show that core SEI297-FB-1 can be divided into three distinctly different zones, which together provide evidence for distinct changes in historical environmental conditions at Featherbed Bank. Assemblages from fossil biotic communities within zone 1, representing approximately 1440 to 1550 AD, are characterized by open-marine biota with relatively limited numbers of epiphytic biota. Molluscan faunal indicators suggest the sediment was capable of supporting infaunal organisms and that faunal richness was relatively limited during this time period. A change in the biotic community occurred around 1550 AD and continued until the late 1800's distinguishing zone 2. Fossil biotic indicators from zone 2 show a strong dominance of epiphytic organisms within all of the biotic communities examined. Foraminifers, molluscs, and ostracodes capable of subsisting in salinities slightly lower than normal marine begin to flourish in this time period, and there is a marked decline in infaunal molluscs. Zone 2 assemblages are replaced around 1900 AD by increased numbers of organisms that typify open-marine conditions and a return to decreased epiphytic assemblages, similar to zone 1. Zone 3 assemblages, however, show some strong dissimilarities from zone 1, including limited infaunal molluscs, increased abundances of the ostracode Malzella floridana, and a significant increase in molluscan faunal richness.

  16. Microfossils from Cerro Prieto geothermal wells, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, M.L.; Haar, S.V.

    1982-08-10

    To aid in a paleonenvironmental and age reconstruction of the Cerro Prieto reservoir system, 59 samples of well cuttings were analyzed for microfossils. The cuttings were obtained at depths from 351 to 3495m in 14 geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto field, Baja California, Mexico. Foraminifera was found in 6 samples, ostracodes in 19 samples and mannoplankton as coccoliths in 24 samples. Other groups, such as molluscus, insects, fish skeletal parts, and plant material were occasionally present. Detailed interpretations at this time cannot be made because of poor preservation of samples. This is primarily due to causes: dissolution by geothermal fluids that reach 350/sup 0/C, and the extensive mixing of filled Cretaceous forms (reworked from the Colorado Plateau region) with Tertiary species during drilling. Further studies of ostracodes and foraminifera from colder portions of the wells are needed. The abundant and well-preserved ostracodes indicate marine to backish water inviroments that correspond in part, to lagoonal or estuarine facies. The presence of the mid-Tertiary (15-m.y.-old) marine foraminifera, Cassigerinela chipolensis, in wells M-11 and M-38, 350 to 500m deep, is perplexing. These are not laboratory contaminates and, as yet have not been found in the drilling mud. If further studies confirm their presence at Cerro Prieto, established ideas about the opening of the Gulf of California and about Pacific Coast mid-Tertiary history will need to be rewritten.

  17. Microfossils from Cerro Prieto geothermal wells, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, M.L.; Vonder Haar, S.

    1980-01-01

    To aid in a paleoenvironmental and age reconstruction of the Cerro Prieto reservoir system, 59 samples of well cuttings were analyzed for microfossils. The cuttings were obtained at depths from 351 to 3495 m in 14 geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto field, Baja California, Mexico. We found foraminifera in 6 samples, ostracodes in 19 samples, and nannoplankton as coccoliths in 24 samples. Other groups, such as molluscs, insects, fish skeletal parts, and plant material were occasionally present. Detailed interpretations are not possible at this time because of poor preservation of samples. This is primarily due to causes: dissolution by geothermal fluids that reach 350{sup 0}C, and the extensive mixing of filled Cretaceous forms (reworked from the Colorado Plateau region) with Tertiary species during drilling. Further studies of ostracodes and foraminifera from colder portions of the wells are needed. The abundant and well-preserved ostracodes indicate marine to brackish water environments that correspond, in part, to lagoonal or estuarine facies. The presence of the mid-Tertiary (15-My-old) marine foraminifera, Cassigerinela chipolensis, in wells M-11 and M-38, 350 to 500 m deep, is perplexing. These are not laboratory contaminates and, as yet, have not been found in the drilling mud. If further studies confirm their presence at Cerro Prieto, established ideas about the opening of the Gulf of California and about Pacific Coast mid-Tertiary history will need to be rewritten.

  18. Lithostratigraphic description, sedimentological characteristics and depositional environments of rocks penetrated by Illela borehole, Sokoto Basin, NW Nigeria: A connection between Gulf of Guinea Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyin, A.; Adekeye, O. A.; Bale, R. B.; Sanni, Z. J.; Jimoh, O. A.

    2016-09-01

    The basal unit of the succession in the Illela borehole belongs to the Dange Formation comprising thick calcareous and variably coloured dark-greyish shale of 36.30 m thick which is overlain by a 31.44 m thick limestone of Kalambaina Formation with 1.7 m thick shaly-limestone inclusive. The uppermost part of the section belongs to the Gwandu Formation which has intercalation of silty-clay, muddy siltstones with well lithified ironstone capping the borehole section. The limestone/carbonate microfacie as deduced from their salient lithologic, sedimentologic and paleontologic features are comparable to standard microfacie (SMF) types 9 and 10, i.e. bioclastic wackestone/bioclastic micrite and packstone-wackestone respectively. Diagenetically, syndepositional and early diagenesis have taken place particularly cementation and replacement in the carbonate rocks and these have greatly affected the reservoir potential negatively. The matrix/grain relationships indicate a shallow marine environment of deposition. The borehole section is delineated into upper foraminifera and lower ostracod biostratigraphic units as no formal biostratigraphic zonation could be attempted due to low diversity of both benthic foraminifera, marine ostracods and the absence of planktonic foraminifera. The similarity of the ostracod assemblages between this study area, Illela borehole, West Africa, North Africa (Libya), Mali and Niger Republic) and South-Western Nigeria (West Africa) suggests that a marine connection exists between the Gulf of Guinea and the Sokoto Basin via the area occupied by the River Niger during the Paleocene.

  19. Comparing Early to Middle Miocene floras and probable vegetation types of Oberdorf N Voitsberg (Austria), Bohemia (Czech Republic), and Wackersdorf (Germany).

    PubMed

    Kovar-Eder, J; Kvacek, Z; Meller, B

    2001-03-01

    The Early Miocene vegetation of western Styria, Austria, is reconstructed on the basis of detailed investigations of leaves and diaspores from the mining area Oberdorf N Voitsberg. In this paper, the flora and probable vegetation are compared with other assemblages of similar age from the Czech Republic and Germany to elucidate the diversity of wetland and mesophytic plant communities. The floristic composition and the vegetational units represented in Oberdorf are compared to the middle part of the Most Formation (M Most Fm), Cypris Shale, Mydlovary Formation (Mydlovary Fm) of Bohemia, and the Wackersdorf mining area of Bavaria. Among these sites, Oberdorf is extremely poor in hydrophytes and reed-like monocotyledons, indicating rare pond-like habitats as well as possibly more closed swamp forest conditions than, e.g. in the M Most Fm. In Oberdorf, relatively high pH-values in the lignite-forming swamps and the possible scarcity of acidic, nutrient-poor (sandy) soils have probably influenced the floristic composition of the azonal communities. The peat-forming associations in all regions share the abundance of Glyptostrobus europaeus. However, distinct differences in the accompanying elements, such as Taxodium dubium (present and abundant only in the M Most Fm) indicate even stronger floristic variability of Early(/Middle) Miocene peat-forming and riparian plant communities than previously expected. The virtual absence of Pinus, Engelhardia, Comptonia, and probably also of Quercus kubinyii/Quercus drymeja in the megafossil record of Oberdorf can possibly be explained by the edaphic conditions. The abundance of Sequoia abietina (absent in all the other compared sites), which we assign to riparian (and mesophytic) forests in Oberdorf, may have been favoured by rich alluvial soils.In the mesophytic associations, thermophilous elements of the Lauraceae, Mastixiaceae, Symplocaceae, and Rutaceae are diverse. Usually they include Trigonobalanopsis rhamnoides

  20. Integrating palaeoenvironmental and climate cyclicities - Optimizing the stratigraphic framework in the non-marine Lower Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Studies on changing paleoenvironments and climate cycles in non-marine archives of the Cretaceous greenhouse earth are hitherto rare, primarily a result of the lack of high-resolution stratigraphy and correlations to the marine record. On the other hand, recent refinements of the geological time scale have made major advances for the Cretaceous to yield a resolution comparable to that of younger Earth history. In the Cretaceous marine record is now possible to correlate and date short-term sea-level records and their possible relation to climate and/or tectonic events with appropriate resolution. Correlation in the non-marine realm ('continental' aquatic) has long been fraught with considerable problems and limitations, especially on supraregional (i.e., inter-basinal) to global scales, thus often hampering serious attempts at dating and chronological linking of events documented by the respective deposits - let alone appropriate correlation to marine successions. A new interdisciplinary project and multi-proxy study funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) uses the Lower Cretaceous European record (English Wealden) as a test site for the integration of ostracod biostratigraphy and assemblage changes, and cyclostratigraphy (orbitally/climate driven cycles). Ostracods (microcrustaceans with a calcified shell) are the most useful biostratigraphical and palaeoenvironmental tool in Lower Cretaceous non-marine sequences. During the past two decades, research progress in late Mesozoic non-marine ostracods led to their extended applicability, whereas their wide dispersal ability has become a key conside-ration in their supraregional (inter-basinal to global) biostratigraphical utility. The integrative methodology applied in this project, targets the correlation of the ostracod faunal composition change with the variation of geochemical and sedimentological parameters through time and inferences on controlling (palaeoenvironmental) factors and their regulating mechanisms

  1. Holocene palaeoclimate and sea level fluctuation recorded from the coastal Barker Swamp, Rottnest Island, south-western Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouramanis, C.; Dodson, J.; Wilkins, D.; De Deckker, P.; Chase, B. M.

    2012-10-01

    The Holocene palaeoclimatic history of south-western Western Australia (SWWA) has received little attention compared to south-eastern Australia, and this has resulted in conflicting views over the impact of climate variability in the region. We present here a well-dated, high-resolution record from two overlapping sediment cores obtained from the centre of Barker Swamp, Rottnest Island, offshore Perth. The records span the last 8.7 ka, with the main lacustrine phase occurring after 7.4 ka. This site preserves both pollen and several ostracod taxa. The pollen record suggests a long-term shift from the early-mid Holocene to the late Holocene to drier conditions with less shrubland and more low-ground cover and less fire activity. A salinity transfer function was developed from ostracod faunal assemblage data and trace metal ratios (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Na/Ca) and stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) analysed on selected ostracod valves. These provide a detailed history of evaporation/precipitation (E/P) differences that clearly shows that the SWWA region was subjected to significant climatic shifts over the last 7.4 ka, with a broad shift towards increased aridity after 5 ka. The swamp ranged from fresh to saline as recorded in the ostracod valve chemistry and the independently-derived salinity transfer function. The ostracod record also indicates that a sea-level highstand occurred between ca. 4.5 and 4.3 ka, with probable step-wise increases at 6.75, 6.2, and 5.6 ka, with the last vestiges of salt water intrusion at ca. 1 ka. After about 2.3 ka, the fresh, groundwater lens that underlies the western portion of the island intersected the swamp depression, influencing the hydrology of the swamp. The broad climatic changes recorded in Barker Swamp are also compared with data from southern South Africa, and it is suggested that the Southern Annular Mode appears to have been the dominant driver in the climate of these regions and that the Indian Ocean Dipole is of little

  2. Palaeocopid and podocopid Ostracoda from the Lexington Limestone and Clays Ferry Formation (Middle and Upper Ordovician) of central Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warshauer, S.M.; Berdan, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Middle through lower Upper Ordovician Lexington Limestone and lower part of the Clays Ferry Formation contain an abundant and diversified ostracode fauna. More than 10,000 specimens belonging to 39 genera and 53 species have been found in 73 collections made by members of the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Kentucky Geological Survey between 1961 and 1970. Five of the genera and 17 of the species are new. New taxa include the genera Gephyropsis, Ningulella, Phelobythocypris, Quasibollia, and Uninodobolba and the following species: Americoncha dubia, Ballardina millersburgia, Brevidorsa strodescreekensis, Ceratopsis asymme , trica C. fimbriata, Ctenobolbina ventrispinifera, Cystomatochilina reticulotiara, Easchmidtella sinuidorsata, Gephyropsis trachyreticulata, Jonesella gonyloba, Laccoprimitia claysferryensis, L. cryptomorphologica, Leperditella? perplexa, Ningulella paupera, Parenthatia sadievillensis, Silenis kentuckyensis, and Uninodobolba franklinensis. In addition, a new species, Quasibollia copelandi, is described from the Middle Ordovician of Ontario. The type specimens of ostracodes previously described from these formations but not represented in the recent collections are redescribed and refigured. The genus Warthinia Spivey, 1939, is reinstated for Ordovician bolliids with two to four nodes, and the genus Ceratopsis Ulrich, 1894, is reviewed with new figures of all known North American species of the genus. Forty-four collections included enough specimens to warrant quantitative analysis. The temporal and spatial distribution of the genera were defined by using Q-mode cluster analysis based on Sorensen's quantified coefficient of association. The resulting phenogram indicated the existence of eight clusters; these clusters were characterized by calculation of constancy and fidelity measures for each of the variables. Generic diversity, compound generic diversity, and lithologic associations were scanned in an attempt to delineate the

  3. Meiofaunal abundances and faunal similarity on the continental rise off the coast of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohal, Melissa; Thistle, David; Easton, Erin E.

    2014-11-01

    Metazoan meiofauna (e.g., nematodes, benthic copepods) play important roles in deep-sea sediment communities, but information as basic as standing stocks is not known for much of the world ocean. We therefore sampled six stations: one near the 2700-m isobath and one near the 3700-m isobath off northern, central, and southern California. We counted benthic copepods, both Desmoscolecidae and nondesmoscolecid nematodes, kinorhynchs, nauplii, and ostracods from multiple-corer samples. Nematodes from our 2700-m and 3700-m stations, and ostracods and nauplii from our 3700-m stations, were unusually abundant compared to those from other stations from comparable depths in the Pacific. Off California, the abundances of benthic copepods, kinorhynchs, and nondesmoscolecids at the 2700-m stations were significantly greater than those at the 3700-m stations. Abundance of benthic copepods was correlated with the percentage of medium sand in the sediment, so sediment texture could be important to them. That of kinorhynchs was correlated with the concentration of chloroplastic-pigment equivalents and percentage nitrogen, so consumable material from the euphotic zone could be important to them. In contrast to the usual pattern of decreasing abundance with depth, Desmoscolecidae abundance in the central region was greater at the 3700-m than at the 2700-m station. The three regions differed significantly in both kinorhynch and ostracod abundances, independently of depth. In the food-poor deep sea, animals are expected to be more abundant where food is plentiful. Unexpectedly, ostracod abundance was negatively correlated with all food variables. A possible explanation is that the natural enemies of ostracods are abundant where food is abundant. Multivariate faunal similarity at 2700 m differed significantly from that at 3700 m, independently of regions. Benthic copepods were most responsible for the difference. Regions also differed in multivariate faunal similarity independently of

  4. The Ostracoda (Crustacea) of the Tina Menor estuary (Cantabria, southern Bay of Biscay): Distribution and ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Blanca; Pascual, Ana; Rodríguez-Lázaro, Julio; Martín-Rubio, Maite; Rofes, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Recent ostracods from the Tina Menor estuary (northern Spain, southern Bay of Biscay) have been analysed. Twenty-five species have been identified for the first time, 20 with living individuals during the sampling period. The most abundant species are Leptocythere castanea, Leptocythere porcellanea, Loxoconcha elliptica, Cytherois fischeri, and Hemicytherura hoskini, Leptocythere psammophila and Semicytherura aff. angulata. These species are grouped into four assemblages defining different environments: muddy inner estuary with euryhaline species (L. elliptica); middle estuary with silty sand flats and low marsh environments (L. castanea, L. porcellanea and C. fischeri); sandy outer estuary with marine characteristics (H. hoskini, S. aff. angulata, Leptocythere baltica and L. psammophila); and littoral to inner shelf environment (Caudites calceolatus, H. hoskini and Callistocythere murrayi). In the middle estuary, L. castanea also delimits sandy-silty low marshes, and L. porcellanea and C. fischeri the vegetated ecosystems. Multivariate analyses with the samples and species (cluster Q-type and detrended and canonical correspondence analysis) confirm that ostracod distribution in the Tina Menor estuary is controlled by sediment grain size and by the distance to the mouth of the estuary (associated to salinity). The geographical height in relation with mean tide levels (and therefore with emersion periods) also plays an important role in distribution. The results of this study confirm ostracod validity as tide-level markers due to the presence of C. fischeri below the MHWNT (mean high water neap tide), whereas L. castanea and L. porcellanea are present between the MHWNT and MHW (mean high water) levels. Ostracods can also indicate environmental changes due to human-influenced processes. Abundant individuals of L. elliptica in some areas of the middle estuary evidence discharges of lower-salinity water from a nearby fish farm. Ostracods from the marine shelf reach the

  5. Reconstructing the climatic ultrastructure and aquatic biotic communities response to Heinrich stadials in the continental northern Neotropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohuo, Sergio; Macario, Laura; Sylvestre, Florence; Pailles, Christine; Kutterolf, Steffen; Pérez, Liseth; Curtis, Jason; Schwalb, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Heinrich stadials (HS) are recognized as fast-acting "pulses" of global rapid environmental change that affect the climate and cause alterations in species composition and distribution. Past changes in aquatic ecosystems due to HSs may be an analog for future disruptions caused by climate change in the Neotropics. Our aim is to provide high resolution water temperature and conductivity records for HSs (HS1-HS6) in the northern Neotropics and identify their effects on aquatic communities. We analyzed the geochemical sediment composition (TIC and TOC) and quantified ostracode and diatom fossil abundances in cores PI-6 (73m long, from71m water depth) and PI-2 (84m long and from 54m water depth) from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala. Sediment cores were dated using a combination of radiocarbon and tephra chronology. Taxonomical analysis revealed that the ostracode fauna through all HSs had an exclusive tropical composition, reflecting that water temperatures remained warm, likely within the current tolerant range (26-33°C) observed for modern species inhabiting Central American lakes. Because of these warm conditions on the lake ecosystem, we infer that there was not a large change in temperatures as suggested by Hodell et al. (2012), but a small on such at the 5°C suggested by Correa-Metrio et al. (2012). Sediments during HSs are dominated by gypsum, suggesting variable water solute composition. Low TIC and TOC values during HSs indicate that these variations resulted from a decrease in precipitation and prevailing dry conditions. Bioproxy composition however, suggests sharp climatic transitions from humid to arid (HS5, HS3and H1) and from arid to humid (HS4, HS2). HS6 (63.2-60.1 ka BP) was characterized by domination of benthic diatoms and nektobenthic Cypria petenensis, Paracythereis opesta and Pseudocandona sp. ostracode species, suggesting low lake levels with predominance of littoral conditions. HS5 (50-47ka BP), HS3 (32.7-31.3ka BP) and HS1 (18-15.6ka BP) were

  6. A multi-proxy approach to tracing a regressive event at Ferguson's Gulf, Lake Turkana, Kenya: Implications for modern analogues to assist in interpretations of the Plio-Pleistocene record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Catherine; Feibel, Craig; Wright, James; Mortlock, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Located in the East African Rift Valley, the Turkana Basin has long been central to our understanding of how early hominins evolved. In particular, there is great curiosity as to the relationship between the paleoenvironment/paleoclimate conditions and evolution. Historical records aid in the interpretation of Plio-Pleistocene sediments by creating the opportunity to ground truth assumptions through the use of modern analogues. This project uses high-resolution, multi-proxy records from a series of short cores spanning the Little Ice Age to the modern, to suggest one possible model for how regressive events are recorded in lacustrine sequences. Because Lake Turkana is hydrologically closed, changes in lake level affect the water chemistry and thereby the ecosystems that depend upon it. Ferguson's Gulf is a 13 km2, shallow embayment located on the western shore of Lake Turkana. The gulf is connected to the rest of the lake by a narrow mouth on its northern end which is ~1 m deep. Therefore, relatively minor drops in lake level have the potential to restrict flow from Lake Turkana into Ferguson's Gulf, creating localized evaporative water chemistry which effects the suitability of this area for sustaining various benthic populations. Six short cores collected in 2011 and 2012 were picked for ostracods at 1-5 cm intervals to study the changes in assemblages and total abundances through time. An age model, generated using radiocarbon dating of ostracods, demonstrated that the record extending into the Little Ice Age (1550-1850 AD), a period when wetter conditions prevailed within the Turkana Basin. The ostracod faunal results were compared with sedimentology/stratigraphy, XRF data, and stable isotope analysis on ostracod shells for a multiproxy approach to reconstructing hydrologic conditions during the past ~500 years. The Ferguson's Gulf record can be subdivided into three bins based on the ostracod assemblages. The lowest third of the core shows high ostracod total

  7. Three dimensional tracking of exploratory behavior of barnacle cyprids using stereoscopy.

    PubMed

    Maleschlijski, S; Sendra, G H; Di Fino, A; Leal-Taixé, L; Thome, I; Terfort, A; Aldred, N; Grunze, M; Clare, A S; Rosenhahn, B; Rosenhahn, A

    2012-12-01

    Surface exploration is a key step in the colonization of surfaces by sessile marine biofoulers. As many biofouling organisms can delay settlement until a suitable surface is encountered, colonization can comprise surface exploration and intermittent swimming. As such, the process is best followed in three dimensions. Here we present a low-cost transportable stereoscopic system consisting of two consumer camcorders. We apply this novel apparatus to behavioral analysis of barnacle larvae (≈800 μm length) during surface exploration and extract and analyze the three-dimensional patterns of movement. The resolution of the system and the accuracy of position determination are characterized. As a first practical result, three-dimensional swimming trajectories of the cypris larva of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides are recorded in the vicinity of a glass surface and close to PEG2000-OH and C(11)NMe(3)(+)Cl(-) terminated self-assembled monolayers. Although less frequently used in biofouling experiments due to its short reproductive season, the selected model species [Marechal and Hellio (2011), Int Biodeterior Biodegrad, 65(1):92-101] has been used following a number of recent investigations on the settlement behavior on chemically different surfaces [Aldred et al. (2011), ACS Appl Mater Interfaces, 3(6):2085-2091]. Experiments were scheduled to match the availability of cyprids off the north east coast of England so that natural material could be used. In order to demonstrate the biological applicability of the system, analysis of parameters such as swimming direction, swimming velocity and swimming angle are performed.

  8. Nontoxic piperamides and their synthetic analogues as novel antifouling reagents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Zhong; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Yu; Wong, Yue Him; Han, Zhuang; Yin, Yan; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation of an acetone extract from a terrestrial plant Piper betle produced four known piperamides with potent antifouling (AF) activities, as evidenced by inhibition of settlement of barnacle cypris larvae. The AF activities of the four piperamides and 15 synthesized analogues were compared and their structure-activity relationships were probed. Among the compounds, piperoleine B and 1-[1-oxo-7-(3',4'-methylenedioxyphenyl)-6E-heptenyl]-piperidine (MPHP) showed strong activity against settlement of cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, having EC50 values of 1.1 ± 0.3 and 0.5 ± 0.2 μg ml(-1), respectively. No toxicity against zebra fish was observed following incubation with these two compounds. Besides being non-toxic, 91% of piperoleine B-treated cyprids and 84% of MPHP-treated cyprids at a concentration of 100 μM completed normal metamorphosis in recovery bioassays, indicating that the anti-settlement effect of these two compounds was reversible. Hydrolysis and photolysis experiments indicated that MPHP could be decomposed in the marine environment. It is concluded that piperamides are promising compounds for use in marine AF coatings.

  9. Locating the barnacle settlement pheromone: spatial and ontogenetic expression of the settlement-inducing protein complex of Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Dreanno, Catherine; Kirby, Richard R; Clare, Anthony S

    2006-01-01

    Barnacles are prominent members of hard substratum benthic communities and their study has been important to advances in experimental ecology and contemporary ecological theory. Having recently characterized the cue to gregarious settlement of Balanus amphitrite, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC), we use two polyclonal antibodies to examine the tissue distribution and ontogenetic expression of this glycoprotein. These antibodies were raised against two separate peptides located near the N- and C-termini of the SIPC and were used to detect the glycoprotein by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. By in situ hybridization we also show that the SIPC mRNA co-occurs with the expressed glycoprotein in the cuticles of both nauplius and cypris larval stages and the adult. In the larvae, the SIPC is expressed most strongly in the mouthparts and the hindgut of the stage 2 nauplius and in the thoracopods, antennules and bivalved carapace of the cyprid. In adult B. amphitrite, the expressed SIPC is present in protein extracts of the shell and in all organs that are lined by cuticular tissues. We suggest that the SIPC is produced by the epidermal cells that secrete the cuticle and discuss these observations with regard to earlier studies and the role of the SIPC as a contact pheromone. PMID:17015319

  10. Automated tracking and classification of the settlement behaviour of barnacle cyprids

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S.

    2017-01-01

    A focus on the development of nontoxic coatings to control marine biofouling has led to increasing interest in the settlement behaviour of fouling organisms. Barnacles pose a significant fouling challenge and accordingly the behaviour of their settlement-stage cypris larva (cyprid) has attracted much attention, yet remains poorly understood. Tracking technologies have been developed that quantify cyprid movement, but none have successfully automated data acquisition over the prolonged periods necessary to capture and identify the full repertoire of behaviours, from alighting on a surface to permanent attachment. Here we outline a new tracking system and a novel classification system for identifying and quantifying the exploratory behaviour of cyprids. The combined system enables, for the first time, tracking of multiple larvae, simultaneously, over long periods (hours), followed by automatic classification of typical cyprid behaviours into swimming, wide search, close search and inspection events. The system has been evaluated by comparing settlement behaviour in the light and dark (infrared illumination) and tracking one of a group of 25 cyprids from the water column to settlement over the course of 5 h. Having removed a significant technical barrier to progress in the field, it is anticipated that the system will accelerate our understanding of the process of surface selection and settlement by barnacles. PMID:28356538

  11. In vivo and in situ synchrotron radiation-based μ-XRF reveals elemental distributions during the early attachment phase of barnacle larvae and juvenile barnacles.

    PubMed

    Senkbeil, Tobias; Mohamed, Tawheed; Simon, Rolf; Batchelor, David; Di Fino, Alessio; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2016-02-01

    Barnacles are able to establish stable surface contacts and adhere underwater. While the composition of adult barnacle cement has been intensively studied, far less is known about the composition of the cement of the settlement-stage cypris larva. The main challenge in studying the adhesives used by these larvae is the small quantity of material available for analysis, being on the order of nanograms. In this work, we applied, for the first time, synchrotron radiation-based μ-X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-μ-XRF) for in vivo and in situ analysis of young barnacles and barnacle cyprids. To obtain biologically relevant information relating to the body tissues, adhesives, and shell of the organisms, an in situ sample environment was developed to allow direct microprobe investigation of hydrated specimens without pretreatment of the samples. In 8-day-old juvenile barnacles (Balanus improvisus), the junctions between the six plates forming the shell wall showed elevated concentrations of calcium, potassium, bromine, strontium, and manganese. Confocal measurements allowed elemental characterization of the adhesive interface of recently attached cyprids (Balanus amphitrite), and substantiated the accumulation of bromine both at the point of initial attachment as well as within the cyprid carapace. In situ measurements of the cyprid cement established the presence of bromine, chlorine, iodine, sulfur, copper, iron, zinc, selenium, and nickel for both species. The previously unrecognized presence of bromine, iron, and selenium in the cyprid permanent adhesive will hopefully inspire further biochemical investigations of the function of these substances.

  12. Effect of ultrasound on cyprids and juvenile barnacles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shi Feng; Lee, Heow Pueh; Chaw, Kuan Chun; Miklas, Jason; Teo, Serena Lay Ming; Dickinson, Gary H; Birch, William R; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2011-02-01

    Settlement inhibition of barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) cypris larvae resulting from exposure to ultrasound was measured at three frequencies (23, 63, and 102 kHz), applied at three acoustic pressure levels (9, 15, and 22 kPa) for exposure times of 30, 150, and 300 s. The lowest settlement was observed for 23 kHz, which also induced the highest cyprid mortality. Cyprid settlement following exposure to 23 kHz at 22 kPa for 30 s was reduced by a factor of two. Observing surface exploration by the cyprids revealed an altered behaviour following exposure to ultrasound: step length was increased, while step duration, walking pace, and the fraction of cyprids exploring the surface were significantly reduced with respect to control cyprids. The basal area of juvenile barnacles, metamorphosed from ultrasound-treated cyprids was initially smaller than unexposed individuals, but normalised over two weeks' growth. Thus, ultrasound exposure effectively reduced cyprid settlement, yet metamorphosed barnacles grew normally.

  13. Antennulary sensory organs in cyprids of Octolasmis and Lepas (Crustacea: Thecostraca: Cirripedia: Thoracica): a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Blomsterberg, Mikkel; Høeg, Jens T; Jeffries, William B; Lagersson, Niklas C

    2004-05-01

    Cypris larvae of the pedunculate barnacles Octolasmis angulata (Poecilasmatidae), Lepas australis, L. pectinata, and Dosima fascicularis (Lepadidae) were studied with scanning electron microscopy, focusing on the sensory setae and the attachment disc on the antennules. The antennules of O. angulata did not exhibit any remarkable trait, but carry the same number of setae as seen in most other thoracicans. The third segment is bell-shaped and quite distinct from the second and its attachment disc is surrounded by a skirt. We found several potential synapomorphies in antennulary morphology between cyprids of the lepadid species but none of them were shared with the cyprids of Octolasmis; the list of unique lepadid characters includes: one additional, preaxial seta on the second segment; multiple similar (up to eight) postaxial setae (PS3) on the third segment, unlike all other thoracicans, where there is only a single PS3; the third segment consists almost entirely of the attachment disc, which is distended and surrounded by two parallel rows of radial setae; on the fourth segment the terminal seta E is diminutive. We found no traits in cyprids of Octolasmis that seem to be adaptations to their attachment site within the branchial chamber of swimming crabs and, in particular, no similarities with cyprids of rhizocephalan barnacles, many of which also attach in the gill chamber. The synapomorphies between cyprids of the lepadid species may be adaptations to their life in the neuston.

  14. 'Flying barnacles': implications for the spread of non-indigenous species.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Anders P; Chan, Benny K K; Koskinen, Hannu; Høeg, Jens T

    2010-07-01

    The presence of adult barnacles of Fistulobalanus pallidus (Darwin) and Fistulobalanus albicostatus (Pilsbry) attached to field-readable plastic leg rings on the Lesser Black-backed Gull Larus fuscus in Northern Europe is reported. L. fuscus is a long-distance palaearctic migrant, breeding in temperate areas spreading widely over inland and marine habitats outside the breeding season. The species is known to perform long-distance migration to Africa and the Middle East. Combining present knowledge on the birds' migratory pattern and the home range of the barnacle species, it is concluded that the cypris larvae of F. pallidus must have settled in African waters, whereas the area where F. albicostatus settled on the bird leg rings is less certain. The barnacles were of adult size and must thus have been attached for a period of no less than 2 months. More than 30 individual barnacles could occur together on a single field-readable plastic leg ring. The barnacles could therefore, if ported alive to a new area, reproduce successfully and thus either introduce the species or genetically affect other native populations. This may pose a new and wholly unexpected transportation pathway for barnacles as invasive species.

  15. Towards a nanomechanical basis for temporary adhesion in barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides).

    PubMed

    Phang, In Yee; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2008-04-06

    Cypris larvae of barnacles are able to use a rapidly reversible temporary adhesion mechanism for exploring immersed surfaces. Despite decades of research interest, the means by which cyprids maintain attachment with surfaces prior to permanent settlement remain poorly understood. Here, we present novel observations on the morphology of 'footprints' of a putative adhesive secretion deposited by cyprids during surface exploration. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to image footprints at high resolution and to acquire measurements of interaction forces. R-CH3- and R-NH2-terminated glass surfaces were used for comparison of footprint morphology, and it was noted that on R-NH2 each footprint comprised three times the volume of material deposited for footprints on R-CH3. Direct scaling of adhesion forces derived from AFM measurements did not adequately predict the real attachment tenacity of cyprids, and it is suggested that a mixture of 'wet' and 'dry' adhesive mechanisms may be at work in cyprid adhesion. High-resolution images of cyprid footprints are presented that correlate well with the known morphology of the attachment structures.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of the morphology and mechanical behaviour of barnacle cyprid footprint proteins at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Phang, In Yee; Aldred, Nick; Ling, Xing Yi; Huskens, Jurriaan; Clare, Anthony S.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2010-01-01

    Barnacles are a major biofouler of man-made underwater structures. Prior to settlement, cypris larvae explore surfaces by reversible attachment effected by a ‘temporary adhesive’. During this exploratory behaviour, cyprids deposit proteinaceous ‘footprints’ of a putatively adhesive material. In this study, footprints deposited by Balanus amphitrite cyprids were probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in artificial sea water (ASW) on silane-modified glass surfaces. AFM images obtained in air yielded better resolution than in ASW and revealed the fibrillar nature of the secretion, suggesting that the deposits were composed of single proteinaceous nanofibrils, or bundles of fibrils. The force curves generated in pull-off force experiments in sea water consisted of regions of gradually increasing force, separated by sharp drops in extension force manifesting a characteristic saw-tooth appearance. Following the relaxation of fibrils stretched to high strains, force–distance curves in reverse stretching experiments could be described by the entropic elasticity model of a polymer chain. When subjected to relaxation exceeding 500 ms, extended footprint proteins refolded, and again showed saw-tooth unfolding peaks in subsequent force cycles. Observed rupture and hysteresis behaviour were explained by the ‘sacrificial bond’ model. Longer durations of relaxation (>5 s) allowed more sacrificial bond reformation and contributed to enhanced energy dissipation (higher toughness). The persistence length for the protein chains (LP) was obtained. At high elongation, following repeated stretching up to increasing upper strain limits, footprint proteins detached at total stretched length of 10 µm. PMID:19570797

  17. Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces showing marine antibiofouling properties.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Linlin; Li, Junsheng; Mieszkin, Sophie; Di Fino, Alessio; Clare, Anthony S; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel; Levkin, Pavel A

    2013-10-23

    Marine biofouling is a longstanding problem because of the constant challenges placed by various fouling species and increasingly restricted environmental regulations for antifouling coatings. Novel nonbiocidal strategies to control biofouling will necessitate a multifunctional approach to coating design. Here we show that slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) provide another possible strategy to obtaining promising antifouling coatings. Microporous butyl methacrylate-ethylene dimethacrylate (BMA-EDMA) surfaces are prepared via UV-initiated free-radical polymerization. Subsequent infusion of fluorocarbon lubricants (Krytox103, Krytox100, and Fluorinert FC-70) into the porous microtexture results in liquid-repellent slippery surfaces. To study the interaction with marine fouling organisms, settlement of zoospores of the alga Ulva linza and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite is tested in laboratory assays. BMA-EDMA surfaces infused with Krytox103 and Krytox100 exhibit remarkable inhibition of settlement (attachment) of both spores and cyprids to a level comparable to that of a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-terminated self-assembled monolayer. In addition, the adhesion strength of sporelings (young plants) of U. linza is reduced for BMA-EDMA surfaces infused with Krytox103 and Krytox100 compared to pristine (noninfused) BMA-EDMA and BMA-EDMA infused with Fluorinert FC-70. Immersion tests suggest a correlation between the stability of slippery coatings in artificial seawater and fouling resistance efficacy. The results indicate great potential for the application of this concept in fouling-resistant marine coatings.

  18. Reconstruction of Paleoceanographic Conditions in the Rio Grande Rise Area, western South Atlantic: Evidence from Benthic Foraminiferal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, Liubov; Ovsepyan, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    Sediment core AI-3321 (30°56.85' S, 38°02.45' W, 2969 m water depth, 293 m length) collected from the western slope of the Rio Grande Rise was studied to count and identify benthic foraminifers in the >100 μm size fraction. Available information of the ecological preferences of benthic foraminiferal assemblages was used to reconstruct sea-surface bioproductivity and oxygenation conditions near the bottom during warm periods: Holocene, MIS 5e and MIS 7. A total of more than 100 species have been identified. They were classified according to their microhabitat preferences. All studied samples are characterized by a high abundance of calcareous epifaunal - shallow infaunal species together with low percentages of agglutinated taxa. Species diversity was described using several diversity indices that demonstrate similar variability during MIS 5 and 7 and an opposite changes during MIS 1. Cluster and Q-mode factor analysis were applied to establish dominant assemblages and major trends of foraminiferal variability. The assemblages (Factors I, II and III) are characterized by maximal scores of Epistominella exigua, Alabaminella weddellensis and Globocassidulina subglobosa, respectively. These opportunistic species are associated with seasonal supply of fresh, labile organic matter to the sea floor, and also prefer high oxygen concentrations in the bottom waters. In contrast to diversity indices, factor I, II and III do not demonstrate similar distribution throughout the studied intervals. This might be related to different combinations of amount and quality of organic matter supplied to the sea floor and corresponding oxygen content near the seafloor on the Rio Grande Rise during Holocene, MIS 5e and MIS 7. Accessory foraminiferal taxa thriving in well-oxygenated conditions and being capable to adapt to pulsed food supply (Oridorsalis umbonatus, Pullenia bulloides, Ioanella tumidula, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, Quinquelocilina spp., Pyrgo spp.) also occur throughout

  19. Deep-sea ecosystem response to the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunzel, Dorothea; Schmiedl, Gerhard; Friedrich, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the benthic foraminiferal diversity and species composition from North Atlantic IODP Site U1408 in order to document changes in deep-water circulation and organic matter fluxes across the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO). Site U1408 was drilled at a present water depth of 3022 m southeast of the coast of Newfoundland. The benthic foraminiferal faunas are characterized by generally high species diversity suggesting favorable environmental conditions throughout the studied interval. Among a total of 193 benthic foraminiferal taxa the most dominant genera include Nuttallides, Oridorsalis, Cibicidoides, Pullenia, Anomalinoides, Globocassidulina and Gyroidinoides. Increased abundances of elongate-cylindrical infaunal species suggest approximately 460 ka duration of the MECO (from around 40.19 to 39.73 Ma) and the presence of slightly less ventilated bottom waters and elevated food availability during this time interval. The duration of the MECO also coincides with the presence of the planktonic foraminifer Orbulinoides beckmanni, which therefore is used as an Eocene biostratigraphy marker defining the end of the warm interval with its Last Appearance Datum. Changes in the benthic foraminiferal fauna probably reflect the onset of deep-water formation in the northern North Atlantic Ocean as response to the long-term climatic cooling trend of the middle Eocene. The intensification of deep-water currents and increased influence of cold and well-ventilated deep-water masses is reflected by increased importance of the Nuttallides truempyi-fauna. Superimposed on this long-term faunal trend are changes in the distribution of Globocassidulina subglobosa at a period of approximately 200 ka suggesting an eccentricity forcing of deep-water formation and associated food quality at the sea floor.

  20. Pleistocene-Holocene lower bathyal benthic foraminifera: A pilot study in Keathley Canyon, northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent work on the shelf and upper slope have linked the distribution of benthic foraminifera to the presence of several Gulf of Mexico water masses. A pilot study consisting of three piston cores from lower bathyal depths (1,308 m, 1,543 m, 1,815 m) was undertaken to examine the distribution of benthic foraminifera across the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary and at several depths within the lower slope environment. The primary objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that abundance variations of benthic foraminifera can be used to refine the bathymetric zonation of deep Gulf of Mexico depositional environments based on their water mass associations. Preliminary results from this study support this hypothesis by showing a distinct variation in benthic foraminiferal abundances between the shallower cores (1,308 m, 1,543 m) and the deeper core (1,815 m). The cores from 1,308 m and 1,543 m contain a fauna that exhibits a moderate abundance (ca. 10-15%) of several species: Bolivina lowmania, Bulimina aculeata, Cassidulina subglobosa, Gyroidina soldanii and Oridorsalis spp., while the core from 1815 m contains a fauna strongly dominated (25-60%) by two species: Eponides turgidus and Nuttallides decorata. Abundance variations downcore or across the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary are subtle but present nonetheless. The preliminary results from this study suggest that the distribution of deep Gulf of Mexico benthic foraminifera may be related to the distribution of water masses comprising the deep gulf and that further bathymetric refinement of the lower slope may be possible.

  1. The Late Pleistocene Contourites on Ceara Rise: Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. V.; Murdmaa, I.; Borisov, D.; Seitkalieva, E.; Ovsepyan, E.

    2016-12-01

    The study of sediment cores obtained during the cruises 35 (2012) and 50 (2015) of RV Akademic Ioffe from the Ceara Rise in the western tropical Atlantic strongly supports a significant influence of bottom (contour) currents on the Late Quaternary sedimentation. Seismic evidence of contourites in the study area (migrating contourite sediment waves, furrows) was previously described by Kumar and Embley (1977) and Curry et al. (1995). Widespread distribution of seismic waves on the rise and adjacent areas was suggested by Murdmaa et al (2014) based on the results of high-resolution seismic profiling with SES-2000 deep (4-5 kHz) in 2012. Our sediment cores recovered intercalation of bioturbated clays and silty clays with thin linear or wavy sand and silt layers and lenses implying strong bottom current control on sedimentation. The stratigraphic frame of the reference core AI-3426 retrieved near the summit of the Ceara Rise, at the water depth of 3046 m is based on the foraminiferal (Globorotalia menardii zones), oxygen isotope and AMS-14C data. The core recovered sediments of the last 140 ka with very rich and well-preserved tropical planktic foraminiferal assemblages. G. menardii is common within MIS 1 and 5 and is almost absent in MIS 2-4 and upper MIS 6. The abundance of benthic foraminifers is rather low. However, dominance of Globocassidulina subglobosa in benthic assemblages likely indicates a moderate bottom-current activity on the Ceara Rise during the last glacial. The other 4-5m long sediment cores collected along the seismic profile from the northern and southern slopes demonstrate the similar contourite sedimentological features and insignificant reworking of the Neogene foraminiferal species as inferred from the core AI-3426 along with the significant variations in foraminiferal preservation during the Pleistocene. The study is supported by the projects RSF 14-50-00095, RFBR 14-05-00744 and RFBR 16-35-60111, and Program I3P by RAS.

  2. Holocene paleoclimate inferred from salinity histories of adjacent lakes in southwestern Sicily (Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B Brandon; Henne, Paul; Mezquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marrone, Federico; Pieri, Valentina; La Mantia, Tommaso; Calo, Camilla; Tinner, Willy

    2016-01-01

    Marked uncertainties persist regarding the climatic evolution of the Mediterranean region during the Holocene. For instance, whether moisture availability gradually decreased, remained relatively constant, or increased during the last 7000 years remains a matter of debate. To assess Holocene limnology, hydrology and moisture dynamics, the coastal lakes Lago Preola and Gorgo Basso, located in southwestern Sicily, were investigated through several stratigraphic analyses of ostracodes, including multivariate analyses of assemblages, transfer functions of salinity, and biochemical analyses of valves (Sr/Ca, δ18O and δ13C). During the early Holocene, the Gorgo Basso and Lago Preola ostracode records are similar. After an initial period of moderate salinity (1690–6100 mg/l from ca. 10,000–8190 cal yr BP), syndepositional or diagenetic dissolution of ostracode valves suggests that salinity declined to <250 mg/L from ca. 8190 to 7000 cal yr BP at both sites. After ca. 6250 cal yr BP, the ostracode records are strikingly different. Lago Preola became much more saline, with paleosalinity values that ranged from 2270 to about 24,420 mg/L. We suggest that Lago Preola's change from a freshwater to mesosaline lake at about 6250 cal yr BP was related to sea level rise and resulting intrusion of seawater-influenced groundwater. In contrast, Gorgo Basso remained a freshwater lake. The salinity of Gorgo Basso declined somewhat after 6250 cal yr BP, in comparison to the early Holocene, ranging from about 550 to 1680 mg/L. Cypria ophtalmica, a species capable of rapid swimming and flourishing in waters with low dissolved oxygen levels, became dominant at approximately the time when Greek civilization took root in Sicily (2600 cal yr BP), and it completely dominates the record during Roman occupation (roughly 2100 to 1700 cal yr BP). These freshwater conditions at Gorgo Basso suggest high effective moisture when evergreen olive-oak forests collapsed in response

  3. Holocene paleoclimatic evidence and sedimentation rates from a core in southwestern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Jones, Glenn A.; Forester, R.M.; Foster, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results of a multidisciplinary study of cores in southwestern Lake Michigan suggest that the materials in these cores can be interpreted in terms of both isostatically and climatically induced changes in lake level. Ostracodes and mollusks are well preserved in the Holocene sediments, and they provide paleolimnologic and paleoclimatic data, as well as biogenic carbonate for stable-isotope studies and radiocarbon dating. Pollen and diatom preservation in the cores is poor, which prevents comparison with regional vegetation records. New accelerator-mass spectrometer 14C ages, from both carbon and carbonate fractions, provide basin-wide correlations and appear to resolve the longstanding problem of anomalously old ages that result from detrital organic matter in Great Lakes sediments. Several cores contain a distinct unconformity associated with the abrupt fall in lake level that occurred about 10.3 ka when the isostatically depressed North Bay outlet was uncovered by the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet. Below the unconformity, ostracode assemblages imply deep, cold water with very low total dissolved solids (TDS), and bivalves have ?? 18O (PDB) values as light as - 10 per mil. Samples from just above the unconformity contain littoral to sublittoral ostracode species that imply warmer, higher-TDS (though still dilute) water than that inferred below the unconformity. Above this zone, another interval with ?? 18O values more negative than - 10 occurs. The isotopic data suggest that two influxes of cold, isotopically light meltwater from Laurentide ice entered the lake, one shortly before 10.3 ka and the other about 9 ka. These influxes were separated by a period during which the lake was warmer, shallower, but still very low in dissolved solids. One or both of the meltwater influxes may be related to discharge from Lake Agassiz into the Great Lakes. Sedimentation rates appear to have been constant from about 10 ka to 5 ka. Bivalve shells formed between about

  4. Patterns and controlling factors of species diversity in the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Hunt, Gene; van Dijken, Gert; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Wollenburg, Jutta E.

    2012-01-01

    Aim  The Arctic Ocean is one of the last near-pristine regions on Earth, and, although human activities are expected to impact on Arctic ecosystems, we know very little about baseline patterns of Arctic Ocean biodiversity. This paper aims to describe Arctic Ocean-wide patterns of benthic biodiversity and to explore factors related to the large-scale species diversity patterns.Location  Arctic Ocean.Methods  We used large ostracode and foraminiferal datasets to describe the biodiversity patterns and applied comprehensive ecological modelling to test the degree to which these patterns are potentially governed by environmental factors, such as temperature, productivity, seasonality, ice cover and others. To test environmental control of the observed diversity patterns, subsets of samples for which all environmental parameters were available were analysed with multiple regression and model averaging.Results  Well-known negative latitudinal species diversity gradients (LSDGs) were found in metazoan Ostracoda, but the LSDGs were unimodal with an intermediate maximum with respect to latitude in protozoan foraminifera. Depth species diversity gradients were unimodal, with peaks in diversity shallower than those in other oceans. Our modelling results showed that several factors are significant predictors of diversity, but the significant predictors were different among shallow marine ostracodes, deep-sea ostracodes and deep-sea foraminifera.Main conclusions  On the basis of these Arctic Ocean-wide comprehensive datasets, we document large-scale diversity patterns with respect to latitude and depth. Our modelling results suggest that the underlying mechanisms causing these species diversity patterns are unexpectedly complex. The environmental parameters of temperature, surface productivity, seasonality of productivity, salinity and ice cover can all play a role in shaping large-scale diversity patterns, but their relative importance may depend on the ecological

  5. A quantitative micropaleontologic method for shallow marine peleoclimatology: Application to Pliocene deposits of the western North Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dowsett, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer function was developed to estimate summer and winter paleotemperatures for arctic to tropical regions of the western North Atlantic Ocean using fossil ostracode assemblages. Q-mode factor analysis was run on ostracode assemblages from 100 modern bottom sediment samples from continental shelves of North America, Greenland and the Caribbean using 59 ostracode taxa. Seven factors accounting for 80% of the variance define assemblages that correspond to frigid, subfrigid, cold temperate, mild temperate, warm temperate, subtropical and tropical climatic zones. Multiple regression of the factor matrix against observed February and August bottom temperatures yielded an astracode transfer function with an accuracy of about ??2??C. The transfer function was used to reconstruct middle Pliocene (3.5-3.0 Ma) shallow marine climates of the western North Atlantic during the marine transgression that deposited the Yorktown Formation (Virginia and North Carolina), the Duplin Formation (South and North Carolina) and the Pinecrest beds (Florida). Middle Pliocene paleowater temperatures in Virginia averaged 19??C in August and 13.5??C in February, about 5??C to 8??C warmer than at comparable depths off Virginia today. August and February water temperatures in North Carolina were 23??C and 13.4??C, in South Carolina about 23??C and 13.5??C and in southern Florida about 24.6??C and 15.4??C. Marine climates north of 35??N were warmer than today; south of 35??N, they were about the same or slightly cooler. Thermal gradients along the coast were generally not as steep as they are today. The North Atlantic transfer function can be applied to other shallow marine Pliocene and Pleistocene deposits of eastern North America. ?? 1990 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.

  6. Recent microfauna and -flora in the Gulf of Cádiz and W off Portugal: a key to the history of the Mediterranean Outflow Water (IOPD Expedition 339)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, Patrick; Balestra, Barbara; Hodell, David; Flores, José-Abel; Alvarez-Zarikian, Carlos; Hernández-Molina, Javier; Stow, Dorrik

    2013-04-01

    IODP Expedition 339 recently drilled 5 sites in the Gulf of Cádiz and 2 west off Portugal, and recovered 5.5 km of core. The Gulf of Cádiz was targeted for drilling 1) to investigate the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) and its influence on global circulation and climate, and 2) to understand the effects of tectonic activity and eustatic changes on evolution of the Gibraltar Gateway and margin sedimentation. During the expedition samples from surface-waters and the seafloor were collected to evaluate recent communities of foraminifers, ostracods and calcareous nannoplankton. The results will serve as an important reference for future paleoceanographic work based on the actualistic approach in the Upper Miocene-Pleistocene deposits drilled during IODP Expedition 339. Over 400 foraminiferal taxa have been identified in size fractions >125µm at six sites of IODP Expedition 339. The preliminary results show that living specimens are rare (1-5% of the assemblages), which is most likely related to deep-sea patchiness; loss during the drilling process cannot be excluded for some samples. The composition of live and dead assemblages strongly depends on water depth and position along the pathway of MOW. Statistical analysis indicates the distinction of three groups of foraminiferal assemblages that reflect the influence of the upper and lower cores of MOW, and North Atlantic Deep Water. Combined with ostracod and nannoplankton assemblages the results will provide insights into the effect of spatial and vertical fluctuation of North Atlantic Deep Water, Antarctic Intermediate Water and MOW circulation on the microfauna and -flora. Moreover, δ13C, δ18O, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca of foraminifers, ostracods and coccoliths will be determined and compared to seawater geochemistry to evaluate "vital effects".

  7. Sub-Decadal Resolution in Sediments of Late Miocene Lake Pannon Reveals Speciation of Cyprideis (Crustacea, Ostracoda)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E.

    2015-01-01

    Late Miocene "Lake Pannon" (~11.3 Ma) was a remnant of the Central Paratethyan Sea. Successive freshening and constantly changing environmental conditions, like oxygenation, nutrition and substrate led to a well-documented radiation in molluscs and ostracods. Among ostracods (small crustaceans), Cyprideis is one of the most common genera in "Lake Pannon", as well as in several other ancient lakes, showing numerous adaptations and speciations. Here, we present high-resolution data from an early transgression of "Lake Pannon" in the Eastern Styrian Basin (SE Austria). Mataschen clay pit is in the focus of geologic and paleontologic research since 20 years and its geologic and paleoecologic evolution is well-documented. We drilled five cores covering a ~2.3 m long section and completely sampled it in 5-mm thick intervals to reconstruct minute changes in the ostracod fauna over a transgression of a brackish water body. The dominant genus, Cyprideis, is represented by three species C. mataschensis, C. kapfensteinensis and C. ex gr. pannonica. Through morphometric analyses we highlight the variance of each taxon and suggest that there is no direct ecologic control on size or shape. Furthermore, we found a second, co-occurring morphotype of C. kapfensteinensis which is directly related to an elevation of salinities above 13 psu. The presence of two intermediate specimens between the two morphotypes in the sample directly below the first appearance of C. kapfensteinensis B leads us to the conclusion that we are facing a speciation event leading to four sympatric species of Cyprideis. PMID:25902063

  8. Cryptic Species in Putative Ancient Asexual Darwinulids (Crustacea, Ostracoda)

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Isa; Pinto, Ricardo L.; Halse, Stuart; Smith, Alison J.; Martens, Koen; Birky, C. William

    2012-01-01

    Background Fully asexually reproducing taxa lack outcrossing. Hence, the classic Biological Species Concept cannot be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings We used DNA sequences from the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear ITS2 region to check species boundaries according to the evolutionary genetic (EG) species concept in five morphospecies in the putative ancient asexual ostracod genera, Penthesilenula and Darwinula, from different continents. We applied two methods for detecting cryptic species, namely the K/θ method and the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC). We could confirm the existence of species in all five darwinulid morphospecies and additional cryptic diversity in three morphospecies, namely in Penthesilenula brasiliensis, Darwinula stevensoni and in P. aotearoa. The number of cryptic species within one morphospecies varied between seven (P. brasiliensis), five to six (D. stevensoni) and two (P. aotearoa), respectively, depending on the method used. Cryptic species mainly followed continental distributions. We also found evidence for coexistence at the local scale for Brazilian cryptic species of P. brasiliensis and P. aotearoa. Our ITS2 data confirmed that species exist in darwinulids but detected far less EG species, namely two to three cryptic species in P. brasiliensis and no cryptic species at all in the other darwinulid morphospecies. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly demonstrate that both species and cryptic diversity can be recognized in putative ancient asexual ostracods using the EG species concept, and that COI data are more suitable than ITS2 for this purpose. The discovery of up to eight cryptic species within a single morphospecies will significantly increase estimates of biodiversity in this asexual ostracod group. Which factors, other than long-term geographic isolation, are important for speciation processes in these ancient asexuals remains to be investigated. PMID:22802945

  9. Meiofauna, microflora and geochemical properties of the late quaternary (Holocene) core sediments in the Gulf of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yümün, Zeki Ü.; Meriç, Engin; Avşar, Niyazi; Nazik, Atike; Barut, İpek F.; Yokeş, Baki; Sagular, Enis K.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Eryilmaz, Mustafa; Kam, Erol; Başsari, Asiye; Sonuvar, Bora; Dinçer, Feyza; Baykal, Kubilay; Kaya, Seyhan

    2016-12-01

    The Gulf of Izmir has seen the construction of marinas at four locations; Karşıyaka, Bayraklı, İnciraltı and Urla (Çeşmealtı). Six drilling holes have been structured for each location. Morphological abnormities observed in foraminifer tests, obtained from these core drillings, and coloring encountered in both foraminifer tests and ostracod carapeces, provide evidence of natural and unnatural environmental pollution. The objectives of this study are to identify micro and macro fauna, foraminifers in particular, contained within sediments in the above-mentioned locations; to investigate the background of pollution in the Gulf Region; and to determine pollution's impact upon benthic foraminifer and ostracods. Çeşmealtı foraminifera tests did not lead to color and morphological changes. But foraminifera tests samples collected from Karşıyaka, Bayraklı and İnciraltı led them to turn black (Plate 4-6). However, concentrations of heavy metals (Ni, Cr and Mn) obtained from the sediments of Karşıyaka, Bayraklı and İnciraltı locations are higher than those obtained from the Çeşmealtı samples and high concentrations of these elements may be the cause of the color change in the samples during the foraminifera tests. In Karşıyaka and Bayraklı ostracod samples, Bosquetina carinella, Pterygocythereis jonesi, Semicytherura species; in the Çeşmealtı/Urla zone, Cyprideis torosa; in İnciraltı, Pseudopsammocythere reniformis; and in four zones, Loxoconcha and Xestoleberis species were observed in the range of relative frequency. The same analyses were done on nannoplankton but they did not lead to color and morphological changes.

  10. Inconsistent Climate Inferences between Pollen and other Paleontological, Geochemical, and Geophysical Proxies in Late Pleistocene Lacustrine Sediments from Summer Lake, Oregon, Western Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, E.; Thompson, G.; Negrini, R. M.; Wigand, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study has established a high resolution paleoclimate record from western Great Basin pluvial Summer Lake, Oregon during the late Pleistocene Mono Lake Excursion (~34 ka), Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) interstadials 7 and 8, and the end of Heinrich Even 4 (~38 ka). Proxies of grain-size, carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, ostracode analysis and palynology from a depocenter core show new results regarding high amplitude, high frequency changes in lake level, precipitation and temperature which correspond directly with colder/warmer and respectively drier/wetter climates as documented with Northern Atlantic Greenland ice core data. The granulometry, geochemical, and ostracode results consistently demonstrate the correspondence of low lake conditions and colder water temperatures during D-O stadials and warmer/wetter climate during interstadials. These results are contradicted by the pollen results. Existence of cold temperature spores Botrychium and Selaginella coincide with increases in Artemisia, Atriplex, Sarcobatus, Cyperaceae and decreases in Pinus, also suggesting periods of colder/drier climate and shallower lake levels but the timing does not match that of those conditions inferred by the other methods. Granulometry, geochemical, and ostracode proxies denote cold periods and low lake levels roughly between 37.5-35.6 ka and 34.6-33.8 ka. Pollen analysis suggests near-opposite time intervals with cold periods roughly 38-37.5 ka, 35.6-35 ka. This pollen inconsistency suggests the possibility of (1) a millennial-scale lag response of vegetation to climate change, (2) runoff from stadial precipitation causing influx in pollen abundances and variety found in the depocenter core, or (3) turbulent mixing from shallow lake level causing resuspension and redeposition of pollen (Bradley 1999).

  11. Microfaunal evidence of age and depositional environments of the Cerro Prieto section (Plio-Pleistocene), Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ingle, J.C. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Microfossils including benthic and planktic foraminifera, ostracodes, calcareous algae, fish skeletal material, and fragments of pelecypods were found in 14 core samples from depths of 185 to 1952 m in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, providing evidence of both the age and depositional history of sediments comprising the 3000-m-thick Pliocene and Pleistocene section in this area. Ostracodes of brackish water and marine origin constitute the most common microfossils present in this sequence occurring in 8 samples; in situ littoral and neritic species of benthic foraminifera occur in 5 samples with planktic species present in 2 samples. Distributional patterns of ostracodes and foraminifera together with previously analyzed lithofacies (Lyons and van de Kamp, 1980) indicate that the Cerro Prieto section represents an intertonguing complex of alluvial, deltaic, estuarine, and shallow marine environments deposited along the front of the Colorado River delta as it prograded across the Salton Trough during Pliocene and Pleistocene time. Foraminiferal evidence indicates that a sand and shale unit commonly present at depths between 700 and 1100 m represents a significant mid-Pleistocene marine incursion in the Cerro Prieto area. Tentative correlation of the Cerro Prieto section with the well dated Palm Springs Formation of the Imperial Valley, California area suggests that the Pliocene/Pleistocene boundary occurs at a depth of approximately 2000 m in the area of well M-93. Reworked specimens of Cretaceous foraminifera and fragments of the Cretaceous pelecypod Inoceramus were found in five samples further substantiating the Colorado Plateau provenance of a significant portion of the Colorado River deltaic sediments in the Cerro Prieto area.

  12. The ecology of shallow water meiofauna in two New England estuaries.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, John H

    1969-03-01

    The distribution and abundance of shallow subtidal meiofauna in four habitats in the Niantic and Pettaquamscutt estuaries in southeastern New England were studied from October 1964 through October 1965. Numbers of individuals ranged from 1,184 to 5,163/10 cm(2), and wet weights from 8.5 to 62.5 mg/10 cm(2). Nematodes were the dominant group, averaging 83% of the total numbers and 64% of the total biomass. Among the nematodes, epigrowth-feeding species were dominant at all four stations; in addition, deposit-feeding species were abundant at three stations where the amount of detritus was high relative to the fourth station. At these three stations ostracods and deposit-feeding polychaetes were also abundant.Nematodes showed marked seasonal changes i their species composition, with epigrowth-feeding species reaching maximum densities in spring and summer (coincident with observed increases in benthic microflora production), and deposit and omnivorous-feeding species in fall and winter (coincident with observed increases in organic detritus). Increases in the epigrowth feeders were responsible for significant increases in the total nematode populations in spring and summer.Ostracods were most abundant in late summer, fall and winter in association with the increases in detritus. Polychaetes, amphipods and lamellibranchs were most abundant in summer, the first-named in association with elevated water temperatures. Harpactacoid copepods were inconsistent in their seasonal distributions.Approximately 80% of the meiofauna occurred in the upper 3 cm of sediment. Copepods and ostracods were virtually limited to the upper 3 cm, while amphipods and lamellibranchs were limited to the upper 2 cm of sediment. Nematodes and polychaetes extended down to 5 cm (the lowest depth studied), although usually in significantly reduced numbers.

  13. Centennial Drought Cyclicity in the Great Plains, USA: A Dominant Climate Pattern over the Past 4000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalb, A.; Dean, W. E.; Kromer, B.

    2003-04-01

    A 17-m long sediment core from Pickerel Lake, northeastern South Dakota, provides a continuous record of climatic and environmental change for the last 12,000 years. The upper 6 m of sediment, representing the past 4000 years, are marked by distinct 1-m cycles in magnetic susceptibility, contents of carbonates, organic carbon and major elements, ostracode species assemblages, as well as stable oxygen- and carbon-isotopes in ostracodes and authigenic carbonates. Proxies indicate that there were cyclic changes in effective moisture, temperature and wind activity. Maxima in magnetic susceptibility are accompanied by maxima in abundances of the ostracode Candona rawsoni, indicating windy and dry conditions. Proxies between these aridity maxima indicate calmer and wetter periods with increased lake productivity. Our age model, based on 6 bulk sediment and 4 charcoal 14CAMS dates and the timing of the historical settlement (ca. AD 1880), indicates that the 1-m cycles have an average periodicity of 700 years and large amplitudes. In addition, there are 200-year cycles with lower amplitudes. The 700-year cycles are best preserved in magnetic susceptibility, whereas the 200-year cycles are particularly well documented by major-element percentages. The 200-year cycles in the Pickerel Lake record suggest that solar activity contributes significantly to climate variability in the Great Plains of the United States. The prominent 700-year cycles, however, suggest that longer-term oceanic/atmospheric forcing cannot be excluded. Our data are consistent with century-scale cyclic variations in various proxy variables for aridity and eolian activity recorded in sediments deposited over the past 2000 years in other lakes in the northern Great Plains, as well as in sand dune activity. The onset of these drought cycles at around 4000 yr BP is consistent with transformations in human societies in Europe and the Near East and suggests that there were major changes in global atmospheric

  14. Microfossil zonation and correlation of nonmarine Triassic of southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kietzke, K.K. )

    1989-09-01

    Recent studies of the nonmarine Triassic in New Mexico and adjacent states by the New Mexico Museum of Natural History have resulted in a data base that for the first allows the use of calcareous microfossils for zonation of the Moenkopi and Chinle formations. Three biostratigraphic assemblages have been recognized thus far: Moenkopi, lower Chinle, and upper Chinle. The Middle Triassic Moenkopi assemblage is characterized by the charophyte Porochara, uncoiled species of Spirorbis, and the presence of the ostracod genus Darwinuloides. The Upper Triassic lower Chinle assemblage is present in the lower shale member of the Chinle Formation. It is characterized by lacking a charophyte component and in containing an exceptionally large species of Darwinula. The upper Chinle assemblage is present in the upper shale and Redonda members of the Chinle Formation and in the Sloan Canyon Formation. It contains the charophyte Stellatochara, a diverse assemblage of darwinulid ostracods, the ostracod genus Lutkevichinella, and a generally coiled species of Spirorbis. These three microfossil assemblages contain several elements of apparent cosmopolitan distribution and should greatly facilitate long-range correlations. Initial correlations suggest the Moenkopi can be correlated with the middle Bundsandstein of Europe and the Lower Triassic of the Caspian depression of the Soviet Union. The lower Chinle assemblage appears to be restricted to the southwestern US with no known correlatives elsewhere. The upper Chinle assemblage contains elements in common with the middle and upper Keuper of Europe and the Upper Triassic Wayaobu Formation of Shaanxi, China. As more collections are made and studied, correlations with other Triassic assemblages should increase in refinement and utility. Additionally, the paleoecologic aspects of these assemblages should help greatly in refining Triassic paleoenvironmental interpretations.

  15. Late Pliocene climate change 3.4-2.3 Ma: paleoceanographic record from the Yabuta Formation, Sea of Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Kitamura, A.; Ikeya, Noriyuki; Watanabe, M. E.; Kamiya, T.

    1994-01-01

    Late Pliocene paleoceanographic changes in the Sea of Japan between 3.4 and2.3 Ma were investigated through study of molluscs, diatoms, and ostracodes from the Yabuta Formation in Toyama Prefecture. The period 3.4-2.7 Ma was characterized by relatively high sea level and cool water benthic faunas. A progressive paleoceanographic shift towards colder oceanic conditions and lower sea level occurred beginning near 2.7 Ma, intenifying about 2.5 Ma, when important changes in ostracode and molluscan faunas occurred. Between 2.7 and 2.3 Ma, eight glacial events can be inferred based on drops in sea level of 50-60 m and increasing proportions of cold, shallow water ostracode species whose modern ecology and zoogeography indicate colder winter water temperatures (3-4??C). The glacial events between 2.5 and 2.3 Ma were the most intense. Preliminary interpretation of the faunal and oceanographic events of the Yabuta Formation suggests that they correspond to Northern Hemispheric cooling also known from North Atlantic deep-sea oxygen isotope, IRD, and planktic foraminiferal records, North Pacific diatom and radiolarian record, and the Chinese loess sequences. The eight glacial events may record a 41,000-yr obliquity cycle which characterized other late Pliocene climate proxy records. Inferred sea level drops near 2.5-2.3 Ma of about 50-60 m provide direct evidence from an ocean margin setting that supports deep sea oxygen isotopic evidence indicating major changes in global ice volume changes. ?? 1994.

  16. Northwestward range extension for Diacyclops harryi (Crustacea: Copepoda)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Janet W.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Bowen, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent find of the groundwater-inhabiting copepod crustacean Diacyclops harryi extended the known range of this species far northwestward, to include northern Ohio and the drainage basin of the Laurentian Great Lakes. The species was previously collected in drainages of the Atlantic Slope from New York to North Carolina. Ostracodes tentatively identified as ?Nannocandona n. sp., and amphipods belonging to the subterranean species Bactrurus mucronatus were also found at the Ohio locality.

  17. Quaternary paleoceanography of the deep Arctic Ocean based on quantitative analysis of Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Holtz, T.R.; Whatley, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Ostracodes were studied from deep Arctic Ocean cores obtained during the Arctic 91 expedition of the Polarstern to the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov Basins, the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jesup Rise and Yermak Plateau, in order to investigate their distribution in Arctic Ocean deep water (AODW) and apply these data to paleoceanographic reconstruction of bottom water masses during the Quaternary. Analyses of coretop assemblages from Arctic 91 boxcores indicate the following: ostracodes are common at all depths between 1000 and 4500 m, and species distribution is strongly influenced by water mass characteristics and bathymetry; quantitative analyses comparing Eurasian and Canada Basin assemblages indicate that distinct assemblages inhabit regions east and west of the Lomonosov Ridge, a barrier especially important to species living in lower AODW; deep Eurasian Basin assemblages are more similar to those living in Greenland Sea deep water (GSDW) than those in Canada Basin deep water; two upper AODW assemblages were recognized throughout the Arctic Ocean, one living between 1000 and 1500 m, and the other, having high species diversity, at 1500-3000 m. Downcore quantitative analyses of species' abundances and the squared chord distance coefficient of similarity reveals a distinct series of abundance peaks in key indicator taxa interpreted to signify the following late Quaternary deep water history of the Eurasian Basin. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), a GSDW/AODW assemblage, characteristic of cold, well oxygenated deep water > 3000 m today, inhabited the Lomonosov Ridge to depths as shallow as 1000 m, perhaps indicating the influence of GSDW at mid-depths in the central Arctic Ocean. During Termination 1, a period of high organic productivity associated with a strong inflowing warm North Atlantic layer occurred. During the mid-Holocene, several key faunal events indicate a period of warming and/or enhanced flow between the Canada and Eurasian Basins. A long

  18. Recent Ostracoda of the Laptev and Kara seas as indicators of bottom water environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, A.; Taldenkova, E.; Bauch, H. A.; Simstich, J.

    2003-04-01

    Ostracods from coretop sediments collected at 56 localities from different parts of the Laptev and Kara seas were investigated for assemblage studies. A total of 48 species belonging to 25 genera have been identified. Three assemblages have been established in the Laptev Sea that are linked to certain ranges in water depth and bottom salinities as well as water circulation and sea-ice transportation. The species-rich and abundant assemblages of the western and central Laptev Sea could be related to Atlantic waters occupying the upper continental slope. These include relatively deep-water species that show clear affinities to the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean (Cytheropteron biconvexa, C. testudo, C. simplex, C. nodosoalatum, C. inflatum, C. porterae, Krithe glacialis, K. minima, Pseudocythere caudata, Polycope punctata, P. orbicularis). In the eastern middle shelf region, the assemblage is comprised of Acanthocythereis dunelmensis together with other normal marine species (Semicytherura complanata, Elofsonella concinna, Cluthia cluthae). This latter assemblage is distributed within the region of the winter flaw polynya which is believed to be the main area of sediment entrainment into sea ice. The inner shelf assemblage of the southern Laptev Sea is dominated by shallow-water euryhaline species (Paracyprideis pseudopunctillata and Heterocyprideis sorbyana) with admixture of brackish-water species Cytheromorpha macchesneyi. The fact that many shallow-water ostracod species were found on the upper continental slope seems to be a result of ice-rafting which these ostracods are probably able to survive. Preliminary studies of ostracods from the eastern Kara Sea coretop samples allowed distinguishing three different assemblages. One of them reported from the Ob’ estuary is completely different from the Laptev Sea assemblages being comprised of freshwater species only. Two other assemblages can be referred to as a brackish-water and marine ones. Taxonimically poor

  19. Palaeontological analysis of Middle Miocene siltstones at Wiślica (Carpathian Foredeep, Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płonka, Katarzyna

    2017-03-01

    Middle Miocene siltstones of the Skawina Formation that crop out at Wiślica, within the axial part of the Carpathian Foredeep in Poland, were analysed. The deposits studied contain numerous benthic and planktonic foraminifera, ostracods, echinoid spines, bryozoans, bivalves and otoliths. The fossils recognised document an early `Badenian' (= Lang-hian in the Mediterranean area), or, more precisely, `Moravian' age of the deposit. Palaeoecological analysis suggests normal-marine conditions with full salinity. The studied siltstones were deposited from middle-lower shoreface to lower-offshore, warm surface water and locally suboxic to dysoxic conditions in the sediment.

  20. Ocular shell structures in some Cretaceous trachyleberid Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kontrovitz, M.; Puckett, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    This is the first study of internal ocular shell structures of Cretaceous ostracodes. Internal molds from eight species of four genera from Santonian, Campanian, and Maastrichtian strata revealed a stalked ocular sinus constricted along its length and distally inflated. The latter part has anterior and posterior lobes and a subcentral concavity. These Cretaceous trachyleberids have ocular shell structures similar to Cenozoic taxa and it is presumed they functioned similarly. However, each taxon has a diagnostic ocular sinus and an inner surface of the eye tubercle that distinguishes each from all other forms examined.

  1. Pliocene palaeotemperature reconstruction for the southern North Sea Based on Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, A.M.; Whatley, R.C.; Cronin, T. M.; Holtz, T.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a large northeastern Atlantic shelf ostracod database has confirmed that an intrinsic relationship exists between watermass temperature and the spatial (latitudinal) distribution of benthonic shelf Ostracoda. A second Pliocene ostracod database, using assemblages from four boreholes in The Netherlands and a number of localities from the East Anglian Neogene succession has also been constructed. A quantitative method of modern analogues and the Squared Chord Distance dissimilarity coefficient has been employed as a means of calculating the level of similarity between Recent and Neogene assemblages and, therefore, to aid in the reconstruction of palaeotemperatures in the southern North Sea Basin during the Pliocene. The results, in the form of contoured dissimilarity values, indicate the presence of at least seven palaeoceanographical climatic phases between ca. 5.2 and 1.6 Ma BP. An early Pliocene cooling phase (ecozone A), in which the fauna is dominated by the cryophilic species; Palmenella limicola (Norman), Elofsonella concinna (Jones), Robertsonites tuberculatus (Sars), Neomonoceratina tsurugasakensis (Tabuki) and Acanthocythereis dunelmensis (Norman), supervenes a period of stable subtropical conditions in the Miocene. A 'mid' Pliocene warming phase (ecozone B), which has been documented throughout the North Atlantic, can be recognized in the faunal composition of the sublittoral ostracod assemblages of both The Netherlands and East Anglia. A hiatus between the Coralline and Waltonian crags is thought to be associated with a deterioration in climatic conditions. Recent analogues to The Netherlands faunas of ecozone C (first phase late Pliocene cooling, ca. 2.9 Ma BP) indicate a decrease of approximately 5-6??C in mean summer surface temperatures. A return to elevated temperatures, of a Mauritanian aspect, can be seen in the fauna of the FA2 zone and Waltonian Crag. This amelioration of climate occurred prior to the Praetiglian cold phase

  2. Paleontological evidence of Paleozoic age for the Walden Creek Group, Ocoee Supergroup, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrug, Raphael; Unrug, Sophia

    1990-11-01

    A newly discovered fossil assemblage including trilobite, ostracod, bryozoan, and microcrinoid fragments and agglutinated foraminifers has been found in the Wilhite Formation, Walden Creek Group, Ocoee Supergroup, in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee. These fossils prove a Paleozoic age for the Walden Creek Group, which had been interpreted to be of Late Proterozoic age. The foraminiferal assemblage indicaes the Silurian as the older age limit for the Walden Creek Group. These findings make necessary a redefinition of the Ocoee sedimentary basin and reinterpretation of models of the evolution of the Blue Ridge structural province.

  3. Assemblage Composition and Glacial-Interglacial Variations in Deep-Sea Ostracoda from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (odp Site 1238) Over the Last 460 KA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, A.; Lyle, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    We examine the benthic ostracod assemblages and their glacial-interglacial variations over the last 460 ka at ODP Site 1238 located ~200 km west of Ecuador at a water depth of 2203 m. Ages for Site 1238 were estimated by correlating its carbonate profile to cores v19-28 and v19-29, which have oxygen isotope age control. The CaCO3 profile for Site 1238 was generated by XRF scanning. For the 25-28 mcd interval of the core 1238 age was obtained by linear interpolation using a tie-point of 460 ka at 27.44 mcd. A total of three different assemblages were distinguished: glacial, interglacial and background. Glacial assemblage is characterized by higher total ostracod abundance, ostracod valve accumulation rates, and diversity. The typical glacial taxa here are Krithe spp., Legitimocythere castanea, Bradleya mesembrina, Cytheropteron spp. and Apatihowella (Fallacihowella) sol. Interglacial intervals are characterized by low abundance and diversity and the characteristic taxa are Pseudobosquetina mucronalata, Bradleya dictyon, Agrenocythere hazelae, Poseidonamicus major. A background assemblage is found throughout the entire record and consists of Krithe spp., Parakrithe sp., Ambocythere cf. sturgio and Rugocythereis sp. Taxonomic composition of the glacial assemblage suggests a deep sea environment with stronger influence of cold water from Antarctica (Circumpolar Deep Water) and higher oxygen content. Higher Corg MAR during glacials result in overall higher total abundance levels. The interglacial assemblage appears to be related to dissolution intervals. Although the characteristic taxa are not restricted to corrosive bottom waters, it is possible that only they can grow and reproduce in calcite undersaturated bottom waters. In the Equatorial Pacific interglacials are associated with increased dissolution and corrosiveness of bottom water. So, it seems natural that the low abundance low diversity interglacial assemblage of ostracods at Site 1238 reflects the

  4. The life history and in vivo culture of Coelomomyces utahensis (Blastocladiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Whisler, Howard C; Karanja, Diana M Sabwa; Shemanchuk, Joseph A; Zebold, Stephen L; Romney, Steven V; Nielsen, Lewis T

    2009-01-01

    Coelomomyces utahensis is a fungal parasite of several genera of mosquitoes that inhabit rock-pools in southern Utah. Studies of the biology of Coelomomyces and their potential use in biological control of mosquitoes have been hindered by their complex life history, lack of axenic culture methods, and logistical problems producing their arthropod hosts for in vivo culture. In the case of C. utahensis, we have identified the alternate microcrustacean host as Potamocypris unicaudata, which is an ostracod that can be easily reared in abundance and stored for long periods. Described here are the life cycle and culturing of C. utahensis.

  5. Cytherellid species (Ostracoda) and their significance to the Late Quaternary events in the Santos Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergue, C.T.; Coimbra, J.C.; Cronin, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    Four autochthonous cytherellid species (Cytherella serratula (BRADY, 1880), C. hermargentina WHATLEY et al. 1998, C. pleistocenica sp. nov. and C. santosensis sp. nov.) have been identified from two offshore cores (44 samples) within the Santos Basin. The distribution of these ostracodes is controlled by local hydrological conditions such as the temperature and, possibly, the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). However, these factors cannot explain completely the species occurrence in the analysed cores, and relative sea level changes and productivity variation driven by climatic changes are proposed as additional explanations for the faunal distribution pattern. ?? E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung (Na??gele u. Obermiller), 2007.

  6. Microfossils in micrites from Serra da Bodoquena (MS), Brazil: taxonomy and paleoenvironmental implications.

    PubMed

    Utida, Giselle; Petri, Setembrino; Oliveira, Emiliano C; Boggiani, Paulo C

    2012-06-01

    Microfossils present in Quaternary micrites from Serra da Bodoquena, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, are here described for the first time. The studied taxa are: a) ostracods: Candona sp., Candonopsis sp., Cyclocypris sp., Cypria sp., Cypridopsis sp., Notodromas sp., Ilyocypris sp., Cyprideis sp., Wolburgiopsis cf. chinamuertensis (Musacchio 1970), Darwinula sp. and 5 morphotypes; b) microgastropod Acrobis sp., and c) Characeae remains and gyrogonites Chara sp.. The presence of these microfossils suggests clear-water shallow lacustrine paleoenvironments and the presence of aquatic vegetation. Similarities between microfossils and the living taxa suggest possible Holocene ages for these deposits, which is in accordance with previous C(14) dates.

  7. High-Resolution Geochemical and Paleoecological Records of Climate Change Since the Late Glacial at Lake Tanganyika, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alin, S. R.; Cohen, A. S.

    2002-12-01

    We used high-resolution geochemical and paleoecological records from shallow-water sediment cores to refine previous descriptions of climatic conditions at Lake Tanganyika, East Africa, for the period from the Late Glacial to the present. Radiocarbon and 210Pb dating were used to establish chronologies for the cores. Sedimentological changes indicate that lake level has risen approximately 50-70 m since the Late Glacial. A depositional hiatus occurred between 6.4 and 11.4 ka BP (all dates in calendar years) in several of the shallow-water cores. Elemental abundance (%C, %N) and stable isotopic (δ15N, δ13C) data for one core suggest that substantial changes in primary productivity and nutrient recycling regimes have occurred since 6.4 ka BP. Carbonate and ostracode crustacean preservation were low and nil, respectively, prior to 2.4 ka BP. Generally, these data support previous interpretations of regional paleoclimate and lake conditions, with wet and warm conditions during the interval from 6.4 to 4.0 ka, and increasingly arid conditions since 2.4 ka. However, for the interval from 4.0 to 2.4 ka, paleoenvironmental indicators (δ15N, reduced carbonate and ostracode preservation) suggest that the central part of Lake Tanganyika was stably stratified at a shallower depth than present as a result of diminished southerly trade winds. After 2.4 ka BP, sedimentary carbonate concentrations increase, and δ13C values become enriched, suggesting that lacustrine productivity increased with the resumption of deeper wind-driven mixing, lasting until 1 ka BP. For post-2.4 ka samples, species abundance data for ostracodes were used to generate an ostracode water depth index (OWDI). OWDI indicated that severe drought conditions were persistent or recurred at Lake Tanganyika between 1550 and 1850 A.D. Droughts resulted in marked lowstands at Lake Tanganyika at 1580+/-15 A.D., 1730+/-35 A.D., and 1800+/-30 A.D. These data contribute new information on the timing of Little Ice Age

  8. Oligocene to mid-Pliocene deep sea Ostracoda from the South Pacific Gyre and their paleoceanographic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Zarikian, C. A.; Wade, B. S.; Villarejo, J.; Firth, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    We report on the taxonomic, biostratigraphical and paleoceanographic significance of early Paleocene, Oligocene, and middle Miocene to middle Pliocene ostracod faunas from IODP Sites U1367, U1368 and U1370. Sites U1367 (4289 m water depth) and U1368 (3740 water depth) are located near the center of the South Pacific Gyre (SPG) along ~26° S latitude, whereas Site U1370 (5074 m water depth) is located in the southwestern region of the SPG at 41° S latitude. The SPG is the largest of the ocean gyres, its center farther from continents and productive ocean regions than the center of any other gyre, and is considered Earth's largest oceanic desert. According to the magnetic sea floor lineations the crustal age has been estimated to be between 33.3 and 33.7 Ma at Site U1367, between 13.4 and 13.6 Ma at U1368, and between 73.6 and 79.5 Ma at U1370. Carbonate ooze are the dominant lithology at Sites U1367 and U1368, whereas at Site U1370 carbonate ooze was present only within a short (<2 m) interval near the base of the cored sequence. Planktonic foraminifer and calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy established that the carbonate ooze at U1367 extends from ~33.7 Ma to ~26 Ma; at U1368 from ~13 Ma to ~1.9 Ma; and the short carbonate sequence at U1370 is 64 My old. The Oligocene ostracod assemblage consists of a relatively diverse fauna characterized by higher occurrences of Krithe, Poseidonamicus, Argilloecia and Cytheropteron, and suggests increased food supply to the ocean floor during the early Oligocene. The mid-Miocene to mid-Pliocene ostracod assemblage is comparatively less diverse and dominated by Krithe, Poseidonamicus, Henryhowella and Bradleya suggesting more oligotrophic conditions and a fauna more adapted to the corrosive bottom waters. Only one specimen of Marwickcythereis was found in a Paleocene sample at U1370. Preservation of ostracods and their stratigraphic variability are affected by the position of each site with respect to the lysocline and the

  9. Pliocene palaeotemperature reconstruction for the southern North Sea Based on Ostracoda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, A. M.; Whatley, R. C.; Cronin, T. M.; Holtz, T.

    The development of a large northeastern Atlantic shelf ostracod database has confirmed that an intrinsic relationship exists between watermass temperature and the spatial (latitudinal) distribution of benthonic shelf Ostracoda. A second Pliocene ostracod database, using assemblages from four boreholes in The Netherlands and a number of localities from the East Anglian Neogene succession has also been constructed. A quantitative method of modern analogues and the Squared Chord Distance dissimilarity coefficient has been employed as a means of calculating the level of similarity between Recent and Neogene assemblages and, therefore, to aid in the reconstruction of palaeotemperatures in the southern North Sea Basin during the Pliocene. The results, in the form of contoured dissimilarity values, indicate the presence of at least seven palaeoceanographical climatic phases between ca. 5.2 and 1.6 Ma BP. An early Pliocene cooling phase (ecozone A), in which the fauna is dominated by the cryophilic species; Palmenella limicola (Norman), Elofsonella concinna (Jones), Robertsonites tuberculatus (Sars), Neomonoceratina tsurugasakensis (Tabuki) and Acanthocythereis dunelmensis (Norman), supervenes a period of stable subtropical conditions in the Miocene. A 'mid' Pliocene warming phase (ecozone B), which has been documented throughout the North Atlantic, can be recognized in the faunal composition of the sublittoral ostracod assemblages of both The Netherlands and East Anglia. A hiatus between the Coralline and Waltonian crags is thought to be associated with a deterioration in climatic conditions. Recent analogues to The Netherlands faunas of ecozone C (first phase late Pliocene cooling, ca. 2.9 Ma BP) indicate a decrease of approximately 5-6°C in mean summer surface temperatures. A return to elevated temperatures, of a Mauritanian aspect, can be seen in the fauna of the FA2 zone and Waltonian Crag. This amelioration of climate occurred prior to the Praetiglian cold phase

  10. Speciation and stasis in marine Ostracoda: Climatic modulation of evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic and paleozoogeographic analysis of Cenozoic marine Ostracoda from the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Pacific indicates that climatic change modulates evolution by disrupting long-term stasis and catalyzing speciation during sustained, unidirectional climatic transitions and, conversely, by maintaining morphologic stasis during rapid, high-frequency climatic osculations. In the middle Pliocene, 4 to 3 million years ago, at least six new species of Puriana suddenly appeared as the Isthmus of Panama closed, changing oceanographic circulation and global climate. Since then morphologic stasis has characterized ancestral and descendant species during many glacial-interglacial cycles. The frequency and duration of climatic events have more impact on ostracode evolution than the magnitude of climatic changes.

  11. Combined records from a stalagmite from Barbados and from lake sediments in Haiti reveal variable seasonality in the Caribbean between 6.7 and 3 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangini, A.; Blumbach, P.; Verdes, P.; Spötl, C.; Scholz, D.; Machel, H.; Mahon, S.

    2007-05-01

    The growth of a well-dated stalagmite from Barbados records high infiltration rates into the karst aquifer and hence increased rainfall intensity between 6.7 and 3 ka BP in agreement with records from Lake Miragoane, Haiti [Hodell et al., 1991. Reconstruction of the Caribbean climate change over the past 10,500 years. Nature 352, 790-793], mainly reflecting the insolation maximum of the Northern Hemisphere. Both the lake record and the stable isotope record of the stalagmite reveal additional centennial variability of recharge. High oxygen isotope values in stalagmite calcite, corresponding to reduced recharge, are synchronous with periods of lower stable isotope values recorded in Lake Miragoane ostracods, previously attributed to enhanced precipitation. Accordingly, periods of increased recharge in Barbados correspond to 18O-enriched isotope values of ostracods, which were attributed to higher evaporation/precipitation ratios in the lakes. We ascribe this apparent discrepancy to changes in seasonality, i.e., winter periods of reduced temperature and relative humidity following summer months of increased precipitation. At present, such climate conditions occur during periods of enhanced Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO +). If enhanced seasonality is a consequence of a NAO + situation, the apparent discrepancy of high isotope values in lakes (previously attributed to droughts) can be reconciled with lower winter temperatures in the lakes. Further, the correlation of solar intensity (derived from 14C and 10Be) with the isotopic signals recorded in the lacustrine sediments suggests a solar forcing of the NAO during the mid Holocene.

  12. Model for carbonate deposition in an Epicontinental Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, C.; Smosna, R.

    1986-05-01

    By mapping the distribution of correlative sediments across the north-central region of the Appalachian basin, a paleogeographic model has been generated for part of the Mississippian period. During the Chesterian, the upper Greenbrier Limestone was deposited in an embayment that extended northward into parts of West Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvanian, and Maryland. The bay, only a few hundred kilometers wide, was surrounded by lowlands to the west and north, and deltaic sediments shed from nearby highlands diluted the easternmost facies. In the bay, several different shallow-water carbonate environments are distinguished. Muddy skeletal sand was deposited in the central part, which was characterized by normal marine circulation and salinity. This open-bay facies supported a moderately diverse fauna of forams, brachiopods, and mollusks. From the central facies to the bay margins, water depth decreased, circulation became more restricted, and salinity was slightly higher. A restricted-bay facies developed closer to shore, with sediment consisting of pelletal mud and scattered skeletal grains. Diversity was lower, and the fauna was composed primarily of forams and ostracodes. A tidal mud flat surrounded the embayment on all three sides where partly to totally dolomitized mud containing cryptalgal structures formed. Oolite shoals, present on the eastern side of the bay near its mouth, mark areas where tidal currents were concentrated. Eventually, the epicontinental sea flooded the small enclosed bay, replacing the shallow-water facies with an open-marine facies. The new environment supported a highly diverse fauna including crinoids, brachiopods, mollusks, forams, and ostracods.

  13. Biochronology and paleoecology of fine-grained sediments belonging to Esmeralda Formatino in Stewart Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Starratt, S.W.

    1987-05-01

    Fine-grained rocks belonging to the middle Miocene Esmeralda Formation in Stewart Valley, Nevada, are rich in diatoms and ostracods as well as domal and subpherical stromatolites. In addition to their use as paleoecological indicators, the diatoms have also been used to date the rocks. The diatom flora, collected from a 45-m section consisting of thinly bedded to laminated siliceous shales, is dominated by Fragilaria construens (Ehrenberg) Grunow and Melosira granulata (Ehrenberg) Ralfs. This indicates that during the time represented, the waters in the deeper part of the lake were alkaline, clean, and low in salinity (0-5 per thousand). The lake was eutrophic and probably possessed a seasonal thermocline which was responsible for low-oxygen bottom waters at least part of the year. Varved rocks from another section in the valley tend to support this conclusion. The presence of the diatoms Coscinodiscus miocaenicus Krasske and Coscinodiscus grobunovii Scheschukova-Poretskaya in the deeper water deposits suggests an age of 12-15 Ma. This age is in agreement with that indicated by mammalian fossils present in closely associated rocks. The ostracod fauna suggests that the shallow waters of the lake may have been more saline. The domal and subspherical stromatolites indicate that the shallow-water environment was alkaline enough to exclude algae-grazing gastropods. Such gastropods appear in other parts of the lake.

  14. Biofacies and habitats of Brereton Limestone member (Carbondale Formation, Middle Pennsylvanian), Southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.B.; Utgaard, J.

    1983-09-01

    The Brereton Limestone is a shallow-water, open-marine carbonate deposited over peat or delta-plain muds after delta abandonment and a marine transgression. Data on autecology, lithology, insoluble residue content, and thickness were used to interpret the habitats of each biofacies. Biofacies V, a low-diversity biofacies dominated by brachiopods and ostracods, occupied turbid-water, mud- or shelly mud-bottom areas during influxes of detrital clays late in the abandonment of the Herrin delta and, also, early in the construction of the Jamestown delta. Low-relief carbonate mud mounds accumulated within and around baffles provided by thickets of phylloid algae and foraminifers, are capped locally by biofacies VI, a low-diversity biofacies dominated by ostracods. Biofacies VI, occupied the high subtidal to supratidal crests of algal mud mounds which had a stressed (possibly hypersaline) environment. Deeper water mud mounds were occupied by either Biofacies III, a crinoid-mixed fossil biofacies, or by Biofacies IV, which is dominated by fusulinids, strophomenids, and trilobites. Biofacies II, dominated by sponges, mollusks, and impunctate brachiopods, generally occurred on the flanks of the shallow-water mounds. Biofacies I, III, and IV also occurred in broad, muddy intermound areas and Biofacies III in narrow, winnowed intermound areas.

  15. Paleobiology of the Sand Beneath the Valders Diamicton at Valders, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maher, L.J.; Miller, N.G.; Baker, R.G.; Curry, B. Brandon; Mickelson, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    Previously undescribed pollen, plant macrofossils, molluscs, and ostracodes were recovered from a 2.5-m-thick glaciolacustrine unit of silty sand and clay at Valders, Wisconsin. The interstadial sediment was deposited about 12,200 14C yr B.P. after retreat of the Green Bay lobe that deposited diamicton of the Horicon Formation, and before advance of the Lake Michigan lobe that deposited the red-brown diamicton of the Valders Member of the Kewaunee Formation. Fluctuations of abundance of Candona subtriangulata, Cytherissa lacustris, and three other species define four ostracode biozones in the lower 1.7 m, suggesting an open lake environment that oscillated in depth and proximity to glacial ice. Pollen is dominated by Picea and Artemisia, but the low percentages of many other types of longdistance origin suggest that the terrestrial vegetation was open and far from the forest border. The upper part of the sediment, a massive sand deposited in either a shallow pond or a sluggish stream, contains a local concentration of plant macrofossils. The interpretation of a cold open environment is supported by the plant macrofossils of more than 20 species, dominated by those of open mineral soils (Arenaria rubella, Cerastium alpinum type, Silene acaulis, Sibbaldia procumbens, Dryas integrifolia, Vaccinium uliginosum var. alpinum, Armeria maritima, etc.) that in North America occur largely in the tundra and open tundra-forest ecotone of northern Canada. Ice-wedge casts occur in the sand. ?? 1998 University of Washington.

  16. Three new brackish-water thalassocypridine species (Crustacea: Ostracoda: Paracyprididae) from the Ryukyu Islands, southwestern Japan.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Shimpei F; Kakui, Keiichi

    2016-09-21

    We describe three new species of brackish-water ostracods representing two genera in the ostracod tribe Thalassocypridini from mangrove forests in the Ryukyu Islands, subtropical southwestern Japan, and provide their barcoding sequences for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Mangalocypria ryukyuensis sp. nov. was found on Okinawa Island. We also found a Mangalocypria population on Ishigaki Island that was morphologically identical to M. ryukyuensis on Okinawa, but an individual differed by 4.7% in COI sequence (K2P distance) from an individual from Okinawa. This is the first record for Japan of a species in Mangalocypria. Paracypria longiseta sp. nov., obtained from Okinawa Island, is similar to Pontoparta hartmanni. Paracypria plumosa sp. nov. from Ishigaki Island is similar to Pa. adnata described from Yakushima Island, Japan. The COI genetic distance between individuals of Pa. longiseta and Pa. plumosa was roughly as large as that between either of these species and individuals in the Mangalocypria populations. Our study underscores that genera in Thalassocypridini may not represent natural groups, and that this tribe needs taxonomic revision.

  17. Did the Mississippian Lodgepole buildup at Dickinson Field (North Dakota) form as a gas seep ({open_quotes}vent{close_quotes}) community?

    SciTech Connect

    Longman, M.W.

    1996-10-01

    The Lower Mississippian Lodgepole carbonate buildup reservoir at Dickinson Field in Stark County, North Dakota, has been widely reported as being a Waulsortian (or Waulsortian-like) mound. The term {open_quotes}Waulsortian mound{close_quotes} is used for a variety of Early Mississippian carbonate buildups that share a number of features including an abundance of carbonate mud, a {open_quotes}framework{close_quotes} of organisms such as fenestrate bryozoans and crinoids that tended to trap or baffle sediment, and a general absence of marine-cemented reef framework. Although the age of the Lodgepole mound at Dickinson Field qualifies it to be a Waulsortian mound, petrographic study of cores reveals that the reservoir rocks are quite unlike those in true Waulsortian mounds. Instead of being dominated by carbonate mud, the Lodgepole mound core is dominated by marine cement. Furthermore, ostracods and microbial limestones are common in the mound core where they occur with crinoid debris and small amounts of bryozoan, coral, and brachiopod debris. The abundant microbial limestones and marine cement indicate that the Dickinson mound formed as a lithified reef on the sea floor rather than as a Waulsortian mud mound. The microbial limestones, marine cement, and common ostracods in the mount core, and the fact that the mound nucleated almost directly o top of the Bakken Shale, suggest that the Dickinson Lodgepole mound formed at the site of a submarine spring and gas seep.

  18. Evidence of late Gelasian dispersal of African fauna at Coste San Giacomo (Anagni Basin, central Italy): Early Pleistocene environments and the background of early human occupation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, L.; Bona, F.; Corrado, P.; Magri, D.; Mazzini, I.; Parenti, F.; Scardia, G.; Sardella, R.

    2014-07-01

    Since the late 70s, the Early Pleistocene (Gelasian) site of Coste San Giacomo (Anagni Basin, central Italy) has been known amongst palaeontologists for its diverse vertebrate fauna. During the last 5 years, new excavations and the drilling of a 46-m-deep core have provided novel pieces of information. Palaeomagnetic data, pollen and small vertebrates analyses are presented here for the first time and combined with the updated list of the large vertebrates and ostracod analysis in a multidisciplinary perspective. Large and small mammals, pollen and ostracod analyses have allowed an integrated palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of the sedimentary sequence, depicting the evolution of the alluvial plain in the surrounding landscape. Moreover, magnetostratigraphy, pollen and small mammal biochronological data have confirmed the position of the Coste San Giacomo Faunal Unit, focusing the possible age of the mammal assemblage around 2.1 Ma, in a reversed phase before the base of the Olduvai chron. In particular, the occurrence of the large vole Mimomys pliocaenicus has important biochronological significance. The Coste San Giacomo site offers a unique opportunity to investigate the faunal and environmental changes that occurred in Mediterranean Europe during the Early Pleistocene, coinciding with major climatic changes at a global scale. The occurrence of taxa such as Hippopotamus sp. in the assemblage provides evidence of early dispersal events of African taxa prior to the early Homo diffusion into Europe.

  19. Abrupt climate change and collapse of deep-sea ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, T. M.; Demenocal, P.B.; Okahashi, H.; Linsley, B.K.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the deep-sea fossil record of benthic ostracodes during periods of rapid climate and oceanographic change over the past 20,000 years in a core from intermediate depth in the northwestern Atlantic. Results show that deep-sea benthic community "collapses" occur with faunal turnover of up to 50% during major climatically driven oceanographic changes. Species diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index falls from 3 to as low as 1.6 during these events. Major disruptions in the benthic communities commenced with Heinrich Event 1, the Inter-Aller??d Cold Period (IACP: 13.1 ka), the Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.5 ka), and several Holocene Bond events when changes in deep-water circulation occurred. The largest collapse is associated with the YD/IACP and is characterized by an abrupt two-step decrease in both the upper North Atlantic Deep Water assemblage and species diversity at 13.1 ka and at 12.2 ka. The ostracode fauna at this site did not fully recover until ???8 ka, with the establishment of Labrador Sea Water ventilation. Ecologically opportunistic slope species prospered during this community collapse. Other abrupt community collapses during the past 20 ka generally correspond to millennial climate events. These results indicate that deep-sea ecosystems are not immune to the effects of rapid climate changes occurring over centuries or less. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  20. The influences of various anthropogenic sources of deterioration on meiobenthos (Ostracoda) over the last 100 years in Suo-Nada in the Seto Inland Sea, southwest Japan.

    PubMed

    Irizuki, Toshiaki; Takimoto, Ayako; Sako, Megumi; Nomura, Ritsuo; Kakuno, Kouji; Wanishi, Akihito; Kawano, Shigenori

    2011-10-01

    This study focuses on the relationships of water and sediment quality with meiobenthos (Ostracoda) over the past 100 years, using a sediment core obtained from Suo-Nada in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan. We compared high-resolution ostracode results with geochemical and sedimentological data obtained from the study core as well as with rich environmental monitoring data that are available. R-mode cluster analysis revealed two bioassociations (BC, KA). Until the 1960 s, assemblages continued to show high diversity. They changed in approximately 1970, when excessive nutrients and organic matter began to be supplied, and most species decreased in number. All species of bioassociation BC were dominant again by the mid-1990 s; however, those of bioassociation KA containing infaunal species did not increase and have been absent or rare since the 1970s because organic pollution of sediments has continued to date. This study provided robust baseline for ostracode-based long-term environmental monitoring in East Asia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Change and recovery of coastal mesozooplankton community structure during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carassou, L.; Hernandez, F. J.; Graham, W. M.

    2014-12-01

    The response of mesozooplankton community structure to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico was investigated using data from a long-term plankton survey off the coast of Alabama (USA). Environmental conditions observed in the study area during the oil spill (2010) were compared to historical observations (2005-2009), to support the contention that variations observed in zooplankton assemblage structure may be attributed to the oil spill, as opposed to natural climatic or environmental variations. Zooplankton assemblage structure observed during the oil spill period (May-August) in 2010 was then compared to historical observations from the same period (2005-2009). Significant variations were detected in assemblage structure in May and June 2010, but these changes were no longer significant by July 2010. The density of ostracods, cladocerans and echinoderm larvae were responsible for most of the differences observed, but patterns differed depending on taxa and months. Many taxa had higher densities during the oil spill year, including calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, ostracods, bivalve larvae and cladocerans, among others. Although this result is somewhat surprising, it is possible that increased microbial activity related to the infusion of oil carbon may have stimulated secondary production through microbial-zooplankton trophic linkages. Overall, results suggest that, although changes in zooplankton community composition were observed during the oil spill, variations were weak and recovery was rapid.

  2. Abrupt climate change and collapse of deep-sea ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, Thomas M; Demenocal, Peter B; Okahashi, Hisayo; Linsley, Braddock K

    2008-02-05

    We investigated the deep-sea fossil record of benthic ostracodes during periods of rapid climate and oceanographic change over the past 20,000 years in a core from intermediate depth in the northwestern Atlantic. Results show that deep-sea benthic community "collapses" occur with faunal turnover of up to 50% during major climatically driven oceanographic changes. Species diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index falls from 3 to as low as 1.6 during these events. Major disruptions in the benthic communities commenced with Heinrich Event 1, the Inter-Allerød Cold Period (IACP: 13.1 ka), the Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.5 ka), and several Holocene Bond events when changes in deep-water circulation occurred. The largest collapse is associated with the YD/IACP and is characterized by an abrupt two-step decrease in both the upper North Atlantic Deep Water assemblage and species diversity at 13.1 ka and at 12.2 ka. The ostracode fauna at this site did not fully recover until approximately 8 ka, with the establishment of Labrador Sea Water ventilation. Ecologically opportunistic slope species prospered during this community collapse. Other abrupt community collapses during the past 20 ka generally correspond to millennial climate events. These results indicate that deep-sea ecosystems are not immune to the effects of rapid climate changes occurring over centuries or less.

  3. Vegetation changes during the last deglacial and early Holocene: a record from Little Salt Spring Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, C. E.; Willard, D. A.; Landacre, B.; Gifford, J.

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution, 7000 year long pollen record of vegetation change that spans the Younger Dryas and Early Holocene. An 8.2 m sediment core was collected from Little Salt Spring (LSS), FL, which is an hourglass-shaped karst sinkhole lake with a water depth of 72 m. Previous paleohydrological reconstructions based on carbon and oxygen isotopes indicate that LSS is sensitive to past deglacial climate and sea-level changes. Distinct changes in pollen assemblages from the LSS core correspond to well-documented climatic events. For example, cooler climate during the Younger Dryas is characterized by an abrupt increase in Carya pollen. This change in pollen assemblages corresponds to estimates of cooler temperatures from ostracode isotopic records from LSS. In addition, precipitation and temperature in the early Holocene is relatively invariate as reflected in the development of a comparatively stable bayhead hammock plant community. In general, the vegetation response at LSS indicates an abrupt onset of a cooler Younger Dryas followed by, based ostracode isotopic records, a warmer and a relatively stable Early Holocene. The LSS record has potential to examine human response to abrupt climate variability because recent archeological finds indicate Early Native Americans were present there at least 10,000 years ago.

  4. Rapid and fundamental paleolimnological changes in Lake Iznik (NW Turkey) during the Holocene/Pleistocene transition: a multiproxy - multisite approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromig, R.; Viehberg, F. A.; Damcı, E.; Ülgen, U. B.; Assonov, S.; Franz, S. O.; Cagatay, M. N.; Litt, T.; Melles, M.; Wagner, B.; Staubwasser, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Marmara region is a key area to investigate the teleconnection and environmental changes of the Black Sea/Eastern Mediterranean Sea and northern hemisphere climate patterns. Lake Iznik, an oligohaline lake, is the largest lake in the Bosphorous region, which holds a continuous sediment archive. A hydro-acoustic survey screened the locations of three sediment cores (5 to 17 m) from previous field campaigns. The longest record reaches back almost to the Campanian Ignimbrite (39.3 cal kyr BP), which represents most likely the lowermost high amplitude reflector in hydro-acoustic profiles. The late Pleistocene ostracode fauna appears low in diversity and evolves abruptly to an abundant monospecific species assemblage of Limnocythere inopinata during the Younger Dryas after substantial alteration in the hydrocarbonate and alkalinity system of Lake Iznik. This distinct change in hydrochemistry is reflected in the appearence of different shell phenotypes and the occurence of a population with sexual reproduction (males/females). Independently, results from stable isotope analyses (δ18O and δ13C) on ostracode shells also suggest that Lake Iznik evolves from a freshwater system to a closed basin sensitive to temperature and precipitation changes.

  5. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Claudio; Vertino, Agostina; Rosso, Antonietta; Rüggeberg, Andres; Pirkenseer, Claudius; Spangenberg, Jorge E.; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Camozzi, Osvaldo; Rappo, Sacha; Hajdas, Irka

    2015-01-01

    Cold-water coral (CWC) ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago). However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata) that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents PMID:26447699

  6. Occurrence and food habits of the round goby in the profundal zone of southwestern Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, M.G.; Dittman, D.E.; O'Gorman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the ecology of round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), an invasive benthic fish, in the profundal zone of the Great Lakes. In April 2002–2005 we caught increasing numbers of round gobies with a bottom trawl in the 45–150 m depth range of southwestern Lake Ontario. In 2005, we examined gut contents of 30 round gobies from each of three depths, 55, 95, and 130 m, and qualitatively compared gut contents with density of benthic invertebrates determined by Ponar grabs. Round goby guts contained mostly Dreissena spp. and opposum shrimp, Mysis relicta (Mysis); the frequency of occurrence of dreissenids in guts decreased with depth, whereas the frequency of occurrence of Mysis in guts increased with depth. Abundance of these invertebrates in the environment followed the same pattern, although dreissenids of optimum edible size (3–12 mm) were still abundant (1,373/m2) at 130 m, where round gobies primarily consumed Mysis, suggesting that round gobies may switch from dreissenids to more profitable prey when it is available. Other food items were ostracods and fish, with ostracods generally eaten by smaller round gobies and fish eaten by larger round gobies. Occurrence and increasing abundance of round gobies in the profundal zone and predation on Mysis by round goby could have far-reaching consequences for the Lake Ontario fish community.

  7. Late Miocene sedimentary environments in south-western Amazonia (Solimões Formation; Brazil).

    PubMed

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E; Ramos, Maria Ines; Douglas da Silva Paz, Jackson

    2011-08-01

    In Miocene times a vast wetland existed in Western Amazonia. Whereas the general development of this amazing ecosystem is well established, many questions remain open on sedimentary environments, stratigraphical correlations as well as its palaeogeographical configuration. Several outcrops located in a barely studied region around Eirunepé (SW Amazonas state, Brazil) were investigated to obtain basic sedimentological data. The observed deposits belong to the upper part of the Solimões Formation and are biostratigraphically dated to the Late Miocene. Vertically as well as laterally highly variable fine-grained clastic successions were recorded. Based on the lithofacies assemblages, these sediments represent fluvial deposits, possibly of an anastomosing river system. Sand bodies formed within active channels and dominant overbank fines are described (levees, crevasse splays/channels/deltas, abandoned channels, backswamps, floodplain paleosols). Lacustrine environments are restricted to local floodplain ponds/lakes. The mollusc and ostracod content as well as very light δ(18)O and δ(13)C values, measured on ostracod valves, refer to exclusively freshwater conditions. Based on palaeontological and geological results the existence of a long-lived lake ("Lake Pebas") or any influx of marine waters can be excluded for that region during the Late Miocene.

  8. Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Charophyte Gyrogonites from the Lameta Formation of Jabalpur, Central India: Palaeobiogeographic and Palaeoecological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Ashu

    2014-12-01

    A charophyte gyrogonite assemblage consisting of Platychara cf. sahnii, Nemegtichara grambastii and Microchara sp. is reported herein from two localities (Bara Simla Hill and Chui Hill sections) of the Lameta Formation at Jabalpur. he Lameta Formation locally underlying the Deccan traps has been shown to be pedogenically modified alluvial plain deposits containing one of the most extensive dinosaur nesting sites in the world. They are associated with dinosaur bones and freshwater ostracod assemblages that suggest a Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) age. This is the first detailed systematic account of charophyte gyrogonites from the Lameta Formation. This charophyte assemblage is compatible with the biostratigraphic attribution provided by the ostracods. From a biogeographic viewpoint, it exhibits considerable similarity to other infratrappean assemblages of the Nand, Dongargaon, and Dhamni-Pavna sections (Maharashtra), and some intertrappean assemblages of Kora in Gujarat, Rangapur in Andhra Pradesh and Gurmatkal in South India. Globally, the genus Microchara is well distributed throughout Eurasia, whereas the genus Platychara occurs richly in the Upper Cretaceous deposits of Europe, Asia, America and Africa. However, at the specific level, Platychara cf. sahnii shows close affinities with charophytes from the Maastrichtian of Iran whilst Nemegtichara grambastii shows distinct affinities with two species of Early Palaeogene deposits of China and Mongolia. The presence of charophyte gyrogonites in the Lameta sediments is attributed to local lacustrine and palustrine conditions within a flood plain environment.

  9. A multi-proxy palaeoecological and palaeoclimatic record within full glacial lacustrine deposits, western Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimley, D.A.; Daniel, L.; Kaplan, S.W.; Yansa, C.H.; Curry, B. Brandon; Oches, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fulton Section, along the Mississippi River in western Tennessee, USA, is a 1km continuous exposure (~20m vertically) of Quaternary fluvial and lacustrine deposits, inset within Eocene sediments and buried by thick loess. Fossiliferous slackwater lake sediments record maximum aggradation during the last two major glaciations, with deposition between ca. 190-140 ka and 24-1814C ka BP, based on amino acid and radiocarbon chronology, respectively. During the onset of full glacial conditions (ca. 24-22 14C ka BP), a relatively permanent shallow lake environment is indicated by ostracods, aquatic molluscs, and both pollen and macrofossils of aquatic plants. By 21.8 14C ka BP, increasing emergent plants, amphibious gastropods (Pomatiopsis) and heavier ??18O compositions suggest marsh-like conditions in a periodically drying lake. The surrounding uplands consisted of Picea-Pinus woodlands mixed with cool-temperate hardwoods (e.g. Quercus, Populus, Carya), grasses and herbs. More open conditions ensued ca. 20 14C ka BP, with loess and slopewash gradually infilling the former lake by 18 14C ka BP. Modern analogue analyses of ostracods and palaeontological evidence imply a full glacial climate similar to today's mixed-boreal zone in central Minnesota, USA, about 98C cooler in mean annual temperature than present-day western Tennessee. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Late Quaternary Spatio-temporal Limnological Variations in the Altiplano of Bolivia and Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirrmann, Denis; Mourguiart, Philippe

    1995-05-01

    Between the western and eastern Andean cordilleras in Peru and Bolivia, there are three main lacustrine basins: Lake Titicaca, Lake Poopó, and the group of Coipasa-Uyuni. For the past few millennia, highly variable environmental conditions have been recorded in their sediments. Today a latitudinal meteorological gradient influences the lakes' status, leading to specific deposits and ostracod communities. Lake Titicaca in the north is oligohaline, whereas Lake Poopó further south is polyhaline. In the south, the Coipasa-Uyuni depression is characterized by a 12,000-km 2 surficial salt crust. During the Late Pleistocene (ca. 40,000 to 25,000 yr B.P.), the water depth and salinity in paleolake Poopó fluctuated widely and paleolake Titicaca was slightly larger than at present. Sedimentation was mostly biocarbonate in the shallower areas and it was detrital-organic in the deepest zones. During the Holocene, a dry period transformed Lake Poopó into a "salar" with evaporite precipitation. Lake Titicaca registered a large decline in water level (8100-3600 yr B.P.) initially inducing gypsum precipitation followed by short influxes of water, with an ostracod faunal composition similar to that of the modern brines of Lake Poopó. Lake Titicacas' present condition only appeared between 2200 and 1500 yr B.P.

  11. L-Lake zooplankton: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chimney, M.J.

    1988-03-01

    The objectives of this portion of the L-Lake Biological Monitoring Program are to provide an analysis of the zooplankton community in L-Lake that will help determine whether this ecosystem contains, or is developing in a manner that indicates that it will contain, a balanced biological community pursuant to the requirements for a successful 316(a) demonstration. The data presented in this report cover the period January 1986--December 1987. A total of 125 taxa were collected from the mixed zone of L-Lake in 1986 and 105 taxa from the mixed zone in 1987. Of the taxa identified, the microzooplankton accounted for 103 taxa (59 protozoans and 44 rotifers: 82.4% of all taxa) in 1986 and 88 taxa (53 protozoans and 35 rotifers: 83.8% of all taxa) in 1987. Taxa richness for each of the major taxonomic groups in the mixed zone ranged from 42 to 47 protozoans, 27 to 31 rotifers, eight to 11 cladocerans, seven to nine copepods, and one ostracod in each region in 1986 and 39 to 44 protozoans, 21 to 27 rotifers, seven to nine cladocerans, six to seven copepods and one ostracod in each region in 1987.

  12. Monthly changes in the abundance and biomass of zooplankton and water quality parameters in Kukkarahalli Lake of Mysore, India.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Beenamma; Yamakanamardi, Sadanand M

    2011-09-01

    Zooplankton abundance and distribution are of ecological importance, as they are very sensitive to change, therefore zooplankton make ideal indicators of aquatic ecosystem. This study carried out on the abundance of rotifer, cladoceran, cyclopoid-copepod and ostracod zooplankton groups and biomass of total zooplankton were studied every month for one year. It is interesting and noteworthy to note that Calanoid and Harpacticoid zooplankton groups and free carbon dioxide were completely absent in all the four sampling sites throughout the study year. About 53% of the variation in the abundance of Cladoceran, 55% of variation in the Cyclopoid-copepod, 39% of variation in the ostracod and 53% of variation in the abundance of total zooplankton were mainly due to pH. Interestingly, negative relationship was found between the total zooplankton and concentration of phosphate as in this lake 67% decrease in wet biomass was mainly because of phosphate, where as 47% of dry biomass of total zooplankton was positively correlated with conductivity.

  13. Positive correspondence between the completeness of Late Quaternary fossiliferous lacustrine successions in Illinois and the basin index

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, B.B. )

    1994-04-01

    The basin index, defined as the ratio of the maximum area of a paleolake versus the area of the catchment (A[sub L]/A[sub C]), initially was used to compare the moisture balance of pluvial lakes in closed and semi-closed basins under arid climates. In this study the basin index also corresponds to the completeness of ostracode and pollen successions preserved in the basins. The basin indices of four breached kettles located in south-central Illinois as well as the thickness of fossiliferous zones determined from cores are compared. Collectively, the basins contain ostracode and pollen records spanning from the late Illinoian ([approx] 150 ka) to the Holocene. Hopwood Farm has the smallest index (0.03) and has a fossil record that terminates in Sangamonian clay. The fossil succession at Bald Knob Basin, with an intermediate basin index of 0.4, contains several lacuna in post-Sangamonian sediment and poorly preserved pollen in Holocene material. Raymond and Pittsburg Basins have indices > 1.0 and contain the most complete fossil records. The data indicate that the basin index is a useful guide for choosing sites with the greatest potential for yielding cores with conformable sediment successions.

  14. Synimpact-postimpact transition inside Chesapeake Bay crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    The transition from synimpact to postimpact sedimentation inside Chesapeake Bay impact crater began with accumulation of fallout debris, the final synimpact deposit. Evidence of a synimpact fallout layer at this site comes from the presence of unusual, millimeter-scale, pyrite microstructures at the top of the Exmore crater-fill breccia. The porous geometry of the pyrite microstructures indicates that they originally were part of a more extensive pyrite lattice that encompassed a layer of millimeter-scale glass microspherules-fallout melt particles produced by the bolide impact. Above this microspherule layer is the initial postimpact deposit, a laminated clay-silt-sand unit, 19 cm thick. This laminated unit is a dead zone, which contains abundant stratigraphically mixed and diagenetically altered or impact-altered microfossils (foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, dinoflagellates, ostracodes), but no evidence of indigenous biota. By extrapolation of sediment-accumulation rates, I estimate that conditions unfavorable to microbiota persisted for as little as <1 k.y. to 10 k.y. after the bolide impact. Subsequently, an abrupt improvement of the late Eocene paleoenvironment allowed species-rich assemblages of foraminifera, ostracodes, dinoflagellates, radiolarians, and calcareous nannoplankton to quickly reoccupy the crater basin, as documented in the first sample of the Chickahominy Formation above the dead zone.

  15. Toxic effect of commercial detergents on organisms from different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Figueroa, A

    2016-10-18

    The toxic effects of four powder detergents: two laundry detergents (A and B), one household detergent (C), one dishwashing detergent (D), and the surfactant alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) were analyzed in this study on organisms from different trophic levels (microalgae, cladocerans, ostracods, amphipods, macrophytes, and fish). LC50 and EC50 values obtained in the toxicity bioassays varied between 0.019 and 116.9 mg L(-1). The sensitivity of the organisms to the detergents was (from most sensitive to least sensitive) Ostracods > microalgae > amphipods > cladocerans > fishes > macrophytes. The toxicity of the commercial products (from most toxic to least toxic) was LAS > D (dishwashing detergent) > A (laundry detergent) > B (laundry detergent) > C (household detergent). When comparing the sensitivity of organisms that inhabit temperate zones (T = 18 °C) to those that are found in tropical zones (T > 25 °C), it was clear that the species that inhabit the tropics are more sensitive to detergents.

  16. Paleo-environmental interpretation of Paleocene Sepultura Formation in type locality, Mesa La sepultura, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Arzate-Hernandez, L.; Tellezduarte, M.

    1988-03-01

    The Sepultura Formation in its type locality consists of two major lithostratigraphic units. The basal A unit overlies the Cretaceous Rosario Formation. It consists predominantly of fine-grained, poorly consolidated sandstones; some conglomerates; and thin beds of well-consolidated lenticular fossiliferous sandstones, which show some cyclic sedimentation. The poorly consolidated sandstones contain glauconitic layers; abundant shark teeth, benthic forams, and ostracods; and sparse mollusks, brachiopods, and Ophiomorpha-like trace fossils. These faunas indicate deposition in nearshore shallow waters. The interbedded consolidated lenticular sandstones probably indicate storm-induced deposition below wave base. This mechanism is assumed to be responsible for the high concentration of fossils consisting predominantly of unworn molluscan shells, scaphopods, echinoid spines, corals, and forams. In places, the elongated shells of Turritella pachecoensis show a preferential orientation to the southwest. At the top of the unit, a poorly fossiliferous red conglomerate indicates deltaic conditions. Overlying the conglomerate is unit B which shows a change in the sedimentary environment. It consists of a calcareous shallowing upward sequence of nodular to massive algal limestone with caliche at top. The microfossils of this unit show glauconitization in places, and consist, in addition to algal fragments, of forams, microscopic mollusks, and some ostracods and calcispherules from shallow waters (less than 30 m deep).

  17. Quaternary glacial and deglacial Ostracoda in the thermocline of the Little Bahama Bank (NW Atlantic): Palaeoceanographic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, J.; Cronin, T. M.

    1999-01-01

    We determined faunal and oceanographic changes during the last glacial and deglacial in the Providence Channel, Little Bahama Bank (LBB), using modern ocean (from LBB, Florida-Hatteras Slope and Blake Plateau, western North Atlantic) and late Quaternary (LBB) distributions of the benthic ostracode genus Krithe from the mid-depth (300-1600 m) subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. Nine species of Krithe are limited in their bathymetric distribution by warm bottom water temperatures (or a temperature-related parameter) in the thermocline of the modern Atlantic. During the last glacial interval in the northwest Providence Channel of the Little Bahama Bank five species of Krithe (K. aequabilis, K. dolichodeira, K. gr. minima, K. reversa and K. trinidadensis) migrated upslope; conversely, during the deglaciation, most Krithe species migrated downslope, re-occupying their deeper niches. These vertical species migrations are attributed to decreased glacial bottom water temperatures and perhaps increased dissolved oxygen during the last glacial and warmer water temperatures during the deglacial. Based upon thermal values of recent depth ranges of selected species of Krithe, we estimate that glacial waters cooled about 4??C (shallower than 900 m) and about 2??C (deeper than 900 m) and deglacial waters warmed about the same values in shallow and mid-depth water masses, comparing to modern temperatures. The discovery of common Halocypris, a mesopelagic ostracode, in Little Bahama Bank glacial and deglacial sediments also suggests greater oxygenation relative to the late Holocene.

  18. Paleobiology of the Sand Beneath the Valders Diamicton at Valders, Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Louis J.; Miller, Norton G.; Baker, Richard G.; Curry, B. Brandon; Mickelson, David M.

    1998-03-01

    Previously undescribed pollen, plant macrofossils, molluscs, and ostracodes were recovered from a 2.5-m-thick glaciolacustrine unit of silty sand and clay at Valders, Wisconsin. The interstadial sediment was deposited about 12,200 14C yr B.P. after retreat of the Green Bay lobe that deposited diamicton of the Horicon Formation, and before advance of the Lake Michigan lobe that deposited the red-brown diamicton of the Valders Member of the Kewaunee Formation. Fluctuations of abundance of Candona subtriangulata, Cytherissa lacustris,and three other species define four ostracode biozones in the lower 1.7 m, suggesting an open lake environment that oscillated in depth and proximity to glacial ice. Pollen is dominated by Piceaand Artemisia,but the low percentages of many other types of long-distance origin suggest that the terrestrial vegetation was open and far from the forest border. The upper part of the sediment, a massive sand deposited in either a shallow pond or a sluggish stream, contains a local concentration of plant macrofossils. The interpretation of a cold open environment is supported by the plant macrofossils of more than 20 species, dominated by those of open mineral soils ( Arenaria rubella, Cerastium alpinumtype, Silene acaulis, Sibbaldia procumbens, Dryas integrifolia, Vaccinium uliginosumvar. alpinum, Armeria maritima,etc.) that in North America occur largely in the tundra and open tundra-forest ecotone of northern Canada. Ice-wedge casts occur in the sand.

  19. Paleoecology of the Niland Tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    The swamp or paludal ecosystem is preserved in coals and carbonaceous shales. Remains of organisms of the swamp communities consist of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, ostracodes, and insects; vertebrates such as a hard-shelled turtle and crocodiles; and vascular plant remains. Aquatic communities are found in dark shale and are represented by the remains of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, and insects; and vertebrates such as crocodiles, fish, and a soft-shelled turtle. No vascular macrophytes (rooted aquatic vegetation) could be identified in the pollen and spore assemblage. Charophytes are abundant and show that colonies of the aquatic alga lived on the lake bottoms. The great variety of organisms suggests that the environment had a high input of nutrients. The phosphate-rich Phosphoria Formation, which could serve as a good source of nutrients, cropped out in the watershed of the Niland Tongue basin. The ostracode-crocodile association, calcareous charophytes, and good preservation of plant tissues and palynomorphs put limits on the alkaline geochemical environment in which the lacustrine rocks were deposited. The palynomorphs in the Niland Tongue rocks are dark yellow and light brown in color. These colors suggest that rocks containing them have been buried deeper in the past than they are today.

  20. Late Miocene sedimentary environments in south-western Amazonia (Solimões Formation; Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E.; Ramos, Maria Ines; Douglas da Silva Paz, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    In Miocene times a vast wetland existed in Western Amazonia. Whereas the general development of this amazing ecosystem is well established, many questions remain open on sedimentary environments, stratigraphical correlations as well as its palaeogeographical configuration. Several outcrops located in a barely studied region around Eirunepé (SW Amazonas state, Brazil) were investigated to obtain basic sedimentological data. The observed deposits belong to the upper part of the Solimões Formation and are biostratigraphically dated to the Late Miocene. Vertically as well as laterally highly variable fine-grained clastic successions were recorded. Based on the lithofacies assemblages, these sediments represent fluvial deposits, possibly of an anastomosing river system. Sand bodies formed within active channels and dominant overbank fines are described (levees, crevasse splays/channels/deltas, abandoned channels, backswamps, floodplain paleosols). Lacustrine environments are restricted to local floodplain ponds/lakes. The mollusc and ostracod content as well as very light δ18O and δ13C values, measured on ostracod valves, refer to exclusively freshwater conditions. Based on palaeontological and geological results the existence of a long-lived lake (“Lake Pebas”) or any influx of marine waters can be excluded for that region during the Late Miocene. PMID:26523089

  1. Experimental evaluation of Candonocypris novaezelandiae (Crustacea: Ostracoda) in the biocontrol of Schistosomiasis mansoni transmission.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Fouad; Hafez, Sherif; El Bardicy, Samia; Tadros, Menerva; Taleb, Hoda Abu; Huat, Lim Boon

    2013-04-01

    To test Candonocypris novaezelandiae (Baird) (C. novaezelandiae), sub-class Ostracoda, obtained from the Nile, Egypt for its predatory activity on snail, Biomphalaria alexandrina (B. alexandrina), intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) and on the free-living larval stages of this parasite (miracidia and cercariae). The predatory activity of C. novaezelandiae was determined on B. alexandrina snail (several densities of eggs, newly hatched and juveniles). This activity was also determined on S. mansoni miracidia and cercariae using different volumes of water and different numbers of larvae. C. novaezelandiae was also tested for its effect on infection of snails and on the cercarial production. C. novaezelandiae was found to feed on the eggs, newly hatched and juvenile snails, but with significant reduction in the consumption in the presence of other diet like the blue green algae (Nostoc muscorum). This ostracod also showed considerable predatory activity on the free-living larval stages of S. mansoni which was affected by certain environmental factors such as volume of water, density of C. novaezelandiae and number of larvae of the parasite. The presence of this ostracod in the aquatic habitat led to significant reduction of snail population, infection rate of snails with schistosme miracidia as well as of cercarial production from the infected snails. This may suggest that introducing C. novaezelandiae into the habitat at schistosome risky sites could suppress the transmission of the disease.

  2. Experimental evaluation of Candonocypris novaezelandiae (Crustacea: Ostracoda) in the biocontrol of Schistosomiasis mansoni transmission

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Fouad; Hafez, Sherif; El Bardicy, Samia; Tadros, Menerva; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test Candonocypris novaezelandiae (Baird) (C. novaezelandiae), sub-class Ostracoda, obtained from the Nile, Egypt for its predatory activity on snail, Biomphalaria alexandrina (B. alexandrina), intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) and on the free-living larval stages of this parasite (miracidia and cercariae). Methods The predatory activity of C. novaezelandiae was determined on B. alexandrina snail (several densities of eggs, newly hatched and juveniles). This activity was also determined on S. mansoni miracidia and cercariae using different volumes of water and different numbers of larvae. C. novaezelandiae was also tested for its effect on infection of snails and on the cercarial production. Results C. novaezelandiae was found to feed on the eggs, newly hatched and juvenile snails, but with significant reduction in the consumption in the presence of other diet like the blue green algae (Nostoc muscorum). This ostracod also showed considerable predatory activity on the free-living larval stages of S. mansoni which was affected by certain environmental factors such as volume of water, density of C. novaezelandiae and number of larvae of the parasite. Conclusions The presence of this ostracod in the aquatic habitat led to significant reduction of snail population, infection rate of snails with schistosme miracidia as well as of cercarial production from the infected snails. This may suggest that introducing C. novaezelandiae into the habitat at schistosome risky sites could suppress the transmission of the disease. PMID:23620849

  3. First Report of Microfaunal Remains from Lignitic Sequences of Bhavnagar Lignite Mine (khadsaliya Formation), Gujarat, India: Implication to Depositional Environments and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    FIRST REPORT OF MICROFAUNAL REMAINS FROM LIGNITIC SEQUENCES OF BHAVNAGAR LIGNITE MINE (KHADSALIYA FORMATION), GUJARAT, INDIA: IMPLICATION TO DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS AND AGEABHAYANAND SINGH MAURYA1*, SANJAY KUMAR VERMA1, PRAGYA PANDEY11Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee Moderately preserved fish otoliths, fish vertebra, bivalves, pteropods, ostracods and foraminifereral remains were recovered from the grey to greenish-grey clays of Khadsaliya Formation, Bhavnagar Lignite Mine (western India) and quantitatively analyzed to understand the depositional environment. The bio-facies assemblage is diverse and dominated by fauna Fishes, Bivalve, Pteropods and with rare occurrences of Ostracoda and Foraminifera. Fish fauna includes otoliths represented by Ambassidarum, Apogonidarum, Percoideorum and Gobiidarum vastani, out of which Gobiidarum vastani is possibly representing Ypresian (early Eocene). The Globanomalina ovalis a smaller planktic foraminifer is known to be a very short ranged species corresponds to Planktic Foranimiferal Zone 5 to 6 (P5-P6) i.e late Thanetian to early Yepresian. Presence of both fresh water (Lepisosteus, Osteoglossidae), fresh water (Cypridopsis) ostracods and shallow marine fauna (Enchodus, Egertonia and Stephanodus) of fish vertebra; (Cardita) bivalve, , marine water (Globanomalina, Eggrella, Pyrulinoides) foraminifer suggests that Bhavnagar lignite mine have an assemblage of admixed fauna and rocks of Khaldsiya formation at Bhavnagar Lignite mine deposited under marine transgressive-regressive cycles. Some of the microfauna from Bhavnagar lignite mine show close affinities with microfaunal assemblages of the Vastan lignite mine of Gujarat, India which is stated to be of Ypresian (early Eocene).

  4. Microcrustacea in flowing water - experimental-analysis of washout times and a field-test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, W.B.

    1992-01-01

    1. Flow-chamber experiments were conducted to evaluate the ability of microcrustacea to maintain position in moving water. These results were compared to distributions of zooplankton and water velocity in a stream pool to determine the relationship of animal density to water movement and swimming ability.^2. Cladocerans exhibited negative rheotaxis (directed behaviour against a current) but poor ability to maintain position at velocities >2.5 Cm s-1. Daphnia and scapholeberis were better at avoiding washout than moina and diaphanosoma. At velocities 2.5 Cm s-1, scapholeberis >3.2 Cm s-1 and eucyclops >7.75 Cm s-1. Washout time of daphnia and scapholeberis was positively related to body size and negatively to water velocity and possession of eggs. Washout was inversely related to water velocity for eucyclops.^4. Highest densities of microcrustacea in a stream pool were found in non-flowing or downstream zones of the pool. Benthic (hydracarina, harpacticoid copepods, ostracods) and fast-swimming (cyclopoids) forms were most common in flowing zones. Facultatively benthic cladocera were abundant in regions of no flow. Rotifers and immature copepods were most abundant at the downstream end of the pool.^5. Behavioural mechanisms for remaining in stream pools at times of high flow appear to include: (i) flow avoidance (simocephalus, chydorus, scapholeberis and cyclopoids), (ii) use of benthic habitat (ostracods, harpacticoids, hydracarina), (iii) strong swimming ability (cyclopoids).

  5. Influence of agriculture on aquatic invertebrate communities of temporary wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of intensive agriculture on invertebrate communities of temporary wetlands as indicated by aquatic invertebrate resting eggs, shells, and cases remaining after wetlands dried. To facilitate the comparison, we sampled 19 wetlands within cropland areas and 19 wetlands within grassland areas. We found resting eggs, shells, and cases of significantly more taxa and greater numbers of cladoceran resting eggs (ephippia), planorbid and physid snail shells, and ostracod shells in wetlands within grasslands than in croplands. We also successfully incubated greater numbers of cladocerans and ostracods from soil samples collected from grassland sites. We were unable to detect differences in the viability of cladoceran ephippia between grassland and cropland wetlands, but our sample size was small due to an absence of ephippia in most cropland wetlands sampled; 74% of the cropland wetlands were devoid of cladoceran ephippia whereas ephippia were well represented in nearly all of our grassland sites. Our results corroborate findings of other investigators that prairie pothole wetlands have been negatively impacted by human activ-, ities. Our study demonstrates that aquatic invertebrates of temporary wetlands have, been negatively impacted by intensive agriculture and suggests that future studies need to assess the influence of agricultural practices on wetland-dependant wildlife.

  6. Stratigraphy and facies development of the marine Late Devonian near the Boulongour Reservoir, northwest Xinjiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttner, Thomas J.; Kido, Erika; Chen, Xiuqin; Mawson, Ruth; Waters, Johnny A.; Frýda, Jiří; Mathieson, David; Molloy, Peter D.; Pickett, John; Webster, Gary D.; Frýdová, Barbora

    2014-02-01

    Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous stratigraphic units within the 'Zhulumute' Formation, Hongguleleng Formation (stratotype), 'Hebukehe' Formation and the Heishantou Formation near the Boulongour Reservoir in northwestern Xinjiang are fossil-rich. The Hongguleleng and 'Hebukehe' formations are biostratigraphically well constrained by microfossils from the latest Frasnian linguiformis to mid-Famennian trachytera conodont biozones. The Hongguleleng Formation (96.8 m) is characterized by bioclastic argillaceous limestones and marls (the dominant facies) intercalated with green spiculitic calcareous shales. It yields abundant and highly diverse faunas of bryozoans, brachiopods and crinoids with subordinate solitary rugose corals, ostracods, trilobites, conodonts and other fish teeth. The succeeding 'Hebukehe' Formation (95.7 m) consists of siltstones, mudstones, arenites and intervals of bioclastic limestone (e.g. 'Blastoid Hill') and cherts with radiolarians. A diverse ichnofauna, phacopid trilobites, echinoderms (crinoids and blastoids) together with brachiopods, ostracods, bryozoans and rare cephalopods have been collected from this interval. Analysis of geochemical data, microfacies and especially the distribution of marine organisms, which are not described in detail here, but used for facies analysis, indicate a deepening of the depositional environment at the Boulongour Reservoir section. Results presented here concern mainly the sedimentological and stratigraphical context of the investigated section. Additionally, one Late Devonian palaeo-oceanic and biotic event, the Upper Kellwasser Event is recognized near the section base.

  7. Diet Composition of Mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, from Restoring and Unrestricted Regions of a New England (U.S.A.) Salt Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James-Pirri, M. J.; Raposa, K. B.; Catena, J. G.

    2001-08-01

    Diet composition of mummichogs, Fundulus heteroclitus, from three marsh habitats (creeks, pools, and marsh surface) within tidally restored and an adjacent unrestricted (reference) region of Sachuest Point salt marsh (Middletown, RI, U.S.A.) was examined. Major diet components were detritus, copepods, diatoms, insects (larvae and adults), ostracods, and chironomids. Total length, wet weight, and gut fullness of mummichogs were equivalent within habitats between the restoring and unrestricted marshes. Diet composition and percent abundance of diet items were also similar within habitats between the unrestricted and restoring marshes. However, differences in diet patterns were observed among habitats (creeks, pools, and marsh surface) within each marsh. Fish collected from creeks had fuller guts than those sampled from the marsh surface for both the restoring and unrestricted marsh. Diet composition also differed among marsh habitats, but only within the restoring marsh. In the restoring marsh, fish sampled from the creeks consumed primarily detritus, diatoms, and ostracods, whereas fish from the pools consumed mainly detritus, copepods, chironomids, and insects. Differences in diet composition among habitats were most likely a reflection of prey availability. This study provides evidence that tidally restored marshes can provide similar food resources as unrestricted marshes, in terms of consumption patterns of dominant marsh consumers, within the first year after restoration, before major shifts in dominant vegetation (i.e. from Phragmites australis to Spartina spp.) occur.

  8. The origin and disappearance of the late Pleistocene-early Holocene short-lived coastal wetlands along the Carmel coast, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, Dorit; Greenbaum, Noam; Cohen-Seffer, Ronit; Sisma-Ventura, Guy; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva

    The formation of short-lived backswamps along the Carmel coast of Israel coincides with the rapid global sea-level rise during the late Pleistocene-early Holocene transition. The current study shows that the wetland phenomena originated around 10,000 yr ago and dried up shortly before the local Pre-Pottery Neolithic humans settled on the wetland dark clay sediments 9430 cal yr BP. Palaeontological and stable-isotope data were used in this study to elucidate previously published sedimentological reconstruction obtained from a core drilled into the western trough of the Carmel coastal plain. The water body contained typical brackish calcareous fauna, with variable numerical abundance and low species richness of ostracods and foraminifera. The δ 18O and δ 13C of the ostracod Cyprideis torosa show close similarity to the present Pleistocene coastal aquifer isotopic values. This study therefore concludes that the wetlands were shallow-water bodies fed by groundwater, with no evidence of sea-water mixing. It seems that they developed as the result of high groundwater levels, transportation of sediments landward, and deposition of sand bars at the paleo-river mouths. It is still not fully understood why these wetlands deteriorated abruptly and disappeared within less than 1000 yr.

  9. A multi disciplinary overview of factors controlling on meiofauna assemblages around Maden and Alibey islands in Ayvalik (Balikesir, Eastern Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriç, Engin; Avsar, Niyazi; Nazik, Atike; Yokes, Baki; Barut, Ipek F.; Suner, Fikret; Sarı, Erol; Eryılmaz, Mustafa; Yucesoy-Eryılmaz, Fulya; Dora, Özcan; Kam, Erol; Dinçer, Feyza

    2017-05-01

    In coastal parts of the study areas, heavy metals containing ground water flows along the faults and fractures and reaches at sea. In these contaminated waters, morphologically abnormal individuals of the affected meiofauna (benthic foraminifera, ostracod, mollusc) can be found. Three cores were taken from the seafloor in the four separate stations that are located in NW of Ayvalık village, around Alibey and Maden islands, and one core of each three core groups was studied in order to investigate the aforementioned morphological affects on the recent meiofauna, which have been inhibited in those contaminated waters. Lead, manganese, hematite and limonite deposits with small reserves were present in Alibey, Maden and Küçük (Small) Maden islands. Morphological changes and coloring were observed in tests of large number of Peneroplis, Lobatula, Ammonia and Elphidium samples collected from these areas. This observation vindicates impact of heavy metals onto the foraminifera assemblages. Heavy metals and other chemical and radioactive elements found in the surrounding country side have been naturally transported into the adjacent sea water during the past and present. The aim of this study is to figure out the effects of the chemical and radioactive elements, which were carried from the land on the meiofaunal (benthic foraminifera, ostracod and mollusc) assemblages.

  10. Stratigraphy and paleoceanography of Pliocene deposits of Karaginsky Island, eastern Kamchatka, U.S.S.R.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gladenkov, Yu. B.; Barinov, K.B.; Basilian, A.E.; Cronin, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    The lithology and paleontology of Pliocene deposits from Karaginsky Island, off eastern Kamchatka Peninsula, U.S.S.R., are described in order to provide a paleoceanographic reconstruction of this region of the eastern North Pacific Ocean. The stratigraphic sequence is divided into three suites - the Limimtevayamian, the Ust-Limimtevayamian, and the Tusatuvayamian, which correspond to three standard Pacific diatom zones - the Thalassiosira oestrupii, Neodenticula koizumi-N. kamtschatica, and N. koizumi. The entire sequence is further subdivided into six members and 18 distinct beds on the basis of molluscan assemblages and three members and seven beds on the basis of benthic foraminiferal assemblages. Marine ostracodes are described from the Limimtevayamian suite. The marine invertebrate assemblages from Karaginsky Island provide evidence that: (1) ocean water temperatures were warmer than today about 4 Ma and again about 3.5-3.0 Ma; (2) several Arctic-Atlantic species of molluscs and ostracodes migrated to the eastern North Pacific between 4.2-3.0 Ma, presumably through the proto-Bering Strait; (3) many species found in the Karaginsky Island Pliocene represent Pacific taxa which migrated through the Arctic into the North Atlantic during the late Pliocene. ?? 1991.

  11. Influence of biotic variables on invertebrate size structure and diversity in coastal wetlands of Southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón-Pardo, María; Armengol, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Biomass and size-based estimations provide relevant information regarding ecosystem functioning and biotic interactions. Our aims were to study the effect of fish and macrophytes on the size structure of invertebrate assemblages (from rotifers to insects) in a set of coastal water bodies, estimating the biomass (total and main invertebrate groups), the biomass-size spectra (model of Pareto) and size diversity. In fishless ponds, cladoceran and ostracod biomass were higher, and they presented greater size diversity. In fish ponds, rotifer biomass presented greater proportion; while in fishless ponds, cladocerans were usually the most abundant taxa and the largest organisms. The biomass size spectra showed more irregularities in fishless ponds, due to the low densities of small taxa (rotifers and copepod juveniles) and big taxa (malacostraceans or insects). Differences is size structure and diversity were also observed between spring and summer, suggesting a higher recruitment of juveniles in spring, and thus, a higher predation pressure upon zooplankton at that moment. Macrophyte cover did not apparently influence those parameters, except for the biomass of ostracods, copepods, and insects. Therefore, predation by fish strongly affected invertebrate biomass, reflecting their selective feeding, and allowing high densities of small taxa. Predation pressure decreased size diversity, by limiting the abundance of vulnerable taxa of specific size. Seasonal changes were likely related to the spring recruitment of fish juveniles. The presence of small fish and invertebrate predator taxa among the macrophytes, restrict their role as refuges for prey invertebrates.

  12. Morphotypes of Cytheridella Ilosvayi (Ostracoda) Detected by Soft and Hard Part Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wrozyna, Claudia; Piller, Werner E.; Gross, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative approaches dealing with soft- and hard-part morphological variability of ostracods are very rare for most species. Here we present intraspecific limb and shell variability of the Neotropical freshwater ostracod species assumed as Cytheridella ilosvayi. For the first time such an analysis considered adult females and males, as well as juveniles. Variability of the appendages included the antennule, second antenna as well as the first and second thoracopod and was analysed in terms of ratios of podomeres, setae and limbs. Limb variability of adult and juvenile individuals (down to A-3) is generally low. The highest variation is shown in podomere proportions of the antennas, while thoracopods and setae provide minor and/or non-significant influence on the variability. Based on discrimination analyses shell parameters (i.e., shell length, position of the transversal sulcus) emerge to be more important for differentiation of groups than limb ratios. Adult females exhibit a large size range in which two clearly separated morphotypes exist. Although differences in limbs are small their existence can be proven also on the basis of proportions between podomeres of the antennas. Males and juveniles, however, do not display a separation into corresponding subgroups or morphotypes. The presence of two morphologically similar females and only one type of males indicates the coexistence of female morphotypes which may represent either two (cryptic) species or a mixed reproduction population in which parthenogenetic and sexual reproduction coexists. PMID:28090120

  13. Carbonate platform facies development of the Turonian Wata Formation in central and eastern Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, M. A.; Farouk, S.; Hassan, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Wata carbonate platform in central and eastern Sinai show a clear pattern of evolutionary development during sedimentation. Three facies are recognized in the carbonate platform. Inner-platform in the south, inter-platform basin in the middle, and outer-platform in the northwest. Such classification was probably performed by the effect of Syrian Arc System that culminated during Turonian in Sinai. Inner-platform includes fining-upward cycles, each begins with packstone, followed by wackestone and capped by lime-mudstone or claystone or molluscan bioclastic wackestone at the base capped by sandy oolitic packstone or dolostone. The dominant faunal associations are molluscs, and echinoids. Inter-platform basin occurs north of inner-platform and extends northwest-southeast direction and comprises fining-upward cycles, each of which begins with bioclastic ostracodal packstone, calcisphere packstone, bioclastic packstone, capped by wackestone and lime-mudstone The faunal association includes, sponge spines, ostracodes, molluscan debris and calcispheres. They were deposited in shoal marine and barrier. The outer-platform occurs at Gebel Giddi and extended northwestwards. The lithofacies are entirely represented by calcisphere wackestone/packstone, with a reduced thickness of 20 m.

  14. Evidence for stagnation of the Harvard sublobe (Lake Michigan lobe) in Northeastern Illinois, U.S.A., from 24 000 to 17 600 BP and subsequent tundra-like ice-marginal paleoenvironments from 17 600 to 15 700 BP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Yansa, C.H.

    2004-01-01

    Glacial deposits of the last glaciation associated with the Harvard sublobe (Lake Michigan lobe) in northeastern Illinois, U.S.A., occur between sediment with dateable organics. The lower organics include fragments of Picea sp. as young as 24 000 ?? 270 BP. The supraglacial organics occur sparsely in laminated silt and fine sand in landforms that are positioned relatively high on the landscape, such as deposits from ice-walled lakes. These terrestrial organics yield ages that are 2500 to 1300 14C years older than organics at the base of sediment successions in nearby kettle basins. Basal 14C ages from four upland sites range from 17 610 ?? 270 to 16 120 ?? 80 BP. Our revised time-distance diagram of the Harvard sublobe now reflects a period of stagnation from 24 000 to about 17 600 BP. The supraglacial lacustrine silt yielded plant macrofossil assemblages of primarily tundra plants, including Salix herbacea and Dryas integrifolia. These plants likely grew in supraglacial and ice-marginal environments. The ostracode fauna include Cytherissa lacustris and Limnocythere friabilis. Geomorphic relations and ostracode ecology indicate that more than 17 m of ice buttressed some of the supraglacial lakes.

  15. How is a giant sperm ejaculated? Anatomy and function of the sperm pump, or "Zenker organ," in Pseudocandona marchica (Crustacea, Ostracoda, Candonidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shinnosuke; Matzke-Karasz, Renate

    2012-07-01

    `Giant sperm', in terms of exceptionally long spermatozoa, occur in a variety of taxa in the animal kingdom, predominantly in arthropod groups, but also in flatworms, mollusks, and others. In some freshwater ostracods (Cypridoidea), filamentous sperm cells reach up to ten times the animal's body length; nonetheless, during a single copulation several dozen sperm cells can be transferred to the female's seminal receptacle. This highly effective ejaculation has traditionally been credited to a chitinous-muscular structure within the seminal duct, which has been interpreted as a sperm pump. We investigated this organ, also known as the Zenker organ, of a cypridoid ostracod, Pseudocandona marchica, utilizing light and electron microscope techniques and produced a three-dimensional reconstruction based on serial semi-thin histological sections. This paper shows that numerous muscle fibers surround the central tube of the Zenker organ, running in parallel with the central tube and that a thin cellular layer underlies the muscular layer. A cellular inner tube exists inside the central tube. A chitinous-cellular structure at the entrance of the organ has been recognized as an ejaculatory valve. In male specimens during copulation, we confirmed a small hole derived from the passage of a single spermatozoon through the valve. The new data allowed for proposing a detailed course of operation of the Zenker organ during giant sperm ejaculation.

  16. Degradation kinetics of a potent antifouling agent, butenolide, under various environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianguo; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wenxiong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated the degradation kinetics of butenolide, a promising antifouling compound, under various environmental conditions. The active ingredient of the commercial antifoulant SeaNine 211, 4,5-dichloro-2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (DCOIT), was used as positive control. The results showed that the degradation rate increased with increasing temperature. Half-lives of butenolide at 4 °C, 25 °C and 40 °C were>64 d, 30.5 d and 3.9 d, respectively. Similar half-lives were recorded for DCOIT: >64 d at 4 °C, 27.9 d at 25 °C and 4.5d at 40 °C. Exposure to sunlight accelerated the degradation of both butenolide and DCOIT. The photolysis half-lives of butenolide and DCOIT were 5.7 d and 6.8 d, respectively, compared with 9.7 d and 14.4 d for the dark control. Biodegradation led to the fastest rate of butenolide removal from natural seawater, with a half-life of 0.5 d, while no obvious degradation was observed for DCOIT after incubation for 4 d. The biodegradative ability of natural seawater for butenolide was attributed mainly to marine bacteria. During the degradation of butenolide and DCOIT, a gradual decrease in antifouling activity was observed, as indicated by the increased settlement percentage of cypris larvae from barnacle Balanus amphitrite. Besides, increased cell growth of marine diatom Skeletonema costatum demonstrated that the toxicity of seawater decreased gradually without generation of more toxic by-products. Overall, rapid degradation of butenolide in natural seawater supported its claim as a promising candidate for commercial antifouling industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ostracoda (Crustacea) association and a new species (Dolerocypris anatolia nov. sp.) from the Pliocene-Pleistocene Afşin-Elbistan (Kahraman Maraş) Coal Basin of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunoǧlu, Cemal; Besbelli, Berk; Ertekin, İbrahim Kadri

    2012-04-01

    The Afşin-Elbistan Coal Basin, which is one of the largest and most important Pliocene-Pleistocene lignite basins of Turkey, is located in Eastern Anatolia. The basin was formed between two normal faults having NE-SW direction and these faults controlled both the sedimentation and the subsidence. The coal horizon of over 50 meters in thickness indicates the balance between the sedimentation and subsidence rates, and was preserved during peat deposition. Coals were generated in this extensive and shallow freshwater lake and evolved from the Pliocene to Pleistocene. Typical faunal and floral assemblages of this ancient Afşin-Elbistan freshwater lake are Ostracoda, Mollusca (Gastropoda and Pelecypoda), spore-pollen and Characeae (gyrogonites). Eleven Cypridoidea species were identified from the investigation area. Eight of them are already known (Candona neglecta Sars, Candona iliensis Mandelstam, Candona aff. candida (Müller), Pseudocandona compressa (Koch), Cyclocypris ovum (Jurine), Ilyocypris gibba (Ramdohr), Cypris pubera Müller, Heterocypris salina (Brady)), whereas three belong to open nomenclature — Candona sp. and Eucypris sp.; Dolerocypris anatolia nov. sp. is proposed as a new species. Dolerocypris Kaufmann is one of the largest genera among the freshwater Ostracoda. It has a very wide geographical distribution. Representatives of this genus are actively swimming species found in shallow zones of freshwater lakes and reported from small grassy water bodies with megascopic plants. Dolerocypris anatolia nov. sp. is recorded from core samples of the Pliocene-Pleistocene Afşin-Elbistan Coal Basin for the first time.

  18. Instantaneous Flow Structures and Opportunities for Larval Settlement: Barnacle Larvae Swim to Settle.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ann I; Granhag, Lena M; Jonsson, Per R

    2016-01-01

    Water flow affects settlement of marine larvae on several scales. At the smallest scale local flow regime may control the probability of adhesion to the substrate. Our aim was to mechanistically understand the transition from suspended to attached larvae in turbulent flow. Recently it was proposed that opportunities for larval settlement in turbulent boundary layers depend on time windows with suitable instantaneous flow properties. In flume flow we characterized the proportion of suitable time windows in a series of flow velocities with focus on the near-bed flow. The change in the proportion of potential settling windows with increasing free-stream velocities was compared to the proportion of temporary attachment of barnacle cypris larvae at different flow velocities. We found large instantaneous flow variations in the near-bed flow where cyprid attachment took place. The probability of temporary attachment in cyprids declined with local flow speed and this response was compatible with a settling window lasting at least 0.1 s with a maximum local flow speed of 1.9-2.4 cm s-1. Cyprids swam against the near-bed flow (negative rheotaxis) and the swimming speed (1.8 cm s-1) was close to the critical speed that permitted temporary attachment. We conclude that temporary attachment in barnacle cyprids requires upstream swimming to maintain a fixed position relative to the substrate for at least 0.1 s. This behaviour may explain the ability of barnacles to recruit to high-flow environments and give cyprids flexibility in the pre-settlement choice of substrates based on flow regime.

  19. Analysis of the Behaviours Mediating Barnacle Cyprid Reversible Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Nick; Høeg, Jens T.; Maruzzo, Diego; Clare, Anthony S.

    2013-01-01

    When exploring immersed surfaces the cypris larvae of barnacles employ a tenacious and rapidly reversible adhesion mechanism to facilitate their characteristic ‘walking’ behaviour. Although of direct relevance to the fields of marine biofouling and bio-inspired adhesive development, the mechanism of temporary adhesion in cyprids remains poorly understood. Cyprids secrete deposits of a proteinaceous substance during surface attachment and these are often visible as ‘footprints’ on previously explored surfaces. The attachment structures, the antennular discs, of cyprids also present a complex morphology reminiscent of both the hairy appendages used by some terrestrial invertebrates for temporary adhesion and a classic ‘suction cup’. Despite the numerous analytical approaches so-far employed, it has not been possible to resolve conclusively the respective contributions of viscoelastic adhesion via the proteinaceous ‘temporary adhesive’, ‘dry’ adhesion via the cuticular villi present on the disc and the behavioural contribution by the organism. In this study, high-speed photography was used for the first time to capture the behaviour of cyprids at the instant of temporary attachment and detachment. Attachment is facilitated by a constantly sticky disc surface – presumably due to the presence of the proteinaceous temporary adhesive. The tenacity of the resulting bond, however, is mediated behaviourally. For weak attachment the disc is constantly moved on the surface, whereas for a strong attachment the disc is spread out on the surface. Voluntary detachment is by force, requiring twisting or peeling of the bond – seemingly without any more subtle detachment behaviours. Micro-bubbles were observed at the adhesive interface as the cyprid detached, possibly an adaptation for energy dissipation. These observations will allow future work to focus more specifically on the cyprid temporary adhesive proteins, which appear to be fundamental to adhesion

  20. Bioassays and selected chemical analysis of biocide-free antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Watermann, B T; Daehne, B; Sievers, S; Dannenberg, R; Overbeke, J C; Klijnstra, J W; Heemken, O

    2005-09-01

    Over the years several types of biocide-free antifouling paints have entered the market. The prohibition of biocidal antifouling paints in special areas of some European countries such as Sweden, Denmark and Germany has favoured the introduction of these paints to the market. Several types of biocide-free antifouling paints were subjected to bioassays and selected chemical analysis of leachate and incorporated substances. Both non-eroding coatings (silicones, fibre coats, epoxies, polyurethane, polyvinyl) and eroding coatings (SPCs, ablative) were tested to exclude the presence of active biocides and dangerous compounds. The paints were subjected to the luminescent bacteria test and the cypris larvae settlement assay, the latter delivering information on toxicity as well as on efficacy. The following chemical analyses of selected compounds of dry-film were performed: The results of the bioassays indicated that none of the coatings analysed contained leachable biocides. Nevertheless, some products contained or leached dangerous compounds. The analyses revealed leaching of nonylphenol (up to 74.7 ng/cm2/d after 48 h) and bisphenol A (up to 2.77 ng/cm2/d after 24 h) from epoxy resins used as substitutes for antifouling paints. The heavy metal, zinc, was measured in dry paint film in quantities up to 576,000 ppm in erodable coatings, not incorporated as a biocide but to control the rate of erosion. Values for TBT in silicone elutriates were mostly below the detection limit of 0.005 mg/kg. Values for DBT ranged between <0.005 and 6.28 mg/kg, deriving from catalysts used as curing agents. Some biocide-free paints contained leachable, toxic and dangerous compounds in the dry film, some of which may act as substitutes for biocides or are incorporated as plasticizers or catalysts. Implications to environmental requirements and legislation are discussed.

  1. Instantaneous Flow Structures and Opportunities for Larval Settlement: Barnacle Larvae Swim to Settle

    PubMed Central

    Granhag, Lena M.; Jonsson, Per R.

    2016-01-01

    Water flow affects settlement of marine larvae on several scales. At the smallest scale local flow regime may control the probability of adhesion to the substrate. Our aim was to mechanistically understand the transition from suspended to attached larvae in turbulent flow. Recently it was proposed that opportunities for larval settlement in turbulent boundary layers depend on time windows with suitable instantaneous flow properties. In flume flow we characterized the proportion of suitable time windows in a series of flow velocities with focus on the near-bed flow. The change in the proportion of potential settling windows with increasing free-stream velocities was compared to the proportion of temporary attachment of barnacle cypris larvae at different flow velocities. We found large instantaneous flow variations in the near-bed flow where cyprid attachment took place. The probability of temporary attachment in cyprids declined with local flow speed and this response was compatible with a settling window lasting at least 0.1 s with a maximum local flow speed of 1.9–2.4 cm s-1. Cyprids swam against the near-bed flow (negative rheotaxis) and the swimming speed (1.8 cm s-1) was close to the critical speed that permitted temporary attachment. We conclude that temporary attachment in barnacle cyprids requires upstream swimming to maintain a fixed position relative to the substrate for at least 0.1 s. This behaviour may explain the ability of barnacles to recruit to high-flow environments and give cyprids flexibility in the pre-settlement choice of substrates based on flow regime. PMID:27463968

  2. Evaluation of foraminiferal trace element cleaning methods on the Mg/Ca of marine ostracoda Krithe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, W. R.; Holmes, J. A.; Shevenell, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mg/Ca of marine ostracod Krithe calcite is a potentially important tool for reconstructing oceanic bottom water (150-4000m) temperatures, as core top studies show ostracod Mg uptake is unaffected by carbonate ion saturation. Rigorous cleaning procedures, routinely used to remove clays, organic matter and Fe-Mn-oxides in trace element studies of foraminifera are not regularly applied to marine ostracods. Here we assess the possibility of reducing the analytical uncertainty in Krithe Mg/Ca analyses by employing foraminiferal trace element cleaning procedures and determining the effects of these cleaning procedures on valve chemistry. Using coretop samples of adult and juvenile male Krithe pernoides valves from boxcore OCE205-50BC (26.23oN, 77.7oW, 817m water depth), we apply methanol sonication, hydrogen peroxide oxidation, and hydrazine reduction to single ostracod valves, and sequentially assess the impact of each cleaning step. We compare the results from each cleaning step to valves cleaned using the traditional ethanol/DI rinse method. Significant correlation between Al/Fe and Mn/Fe respectively indicate that clays and Fe-Mn-oxides are detectable in traditionally cleaned samples. Mn and Al covary with Mg in juvenile but not in adult valves, indicating that clays and Fe-Mn-oxides exert a significant control on the Mg/Ca of low valve weight juveniles. Results of our Krithe cleaning experiments confirm that the removal of clays by sonication in methanol results in a decrease in average Fe, Al and Mn values, as well as a reduction in Mg/Ca by 1 mmol/mol in juveniles and 0.5 mmol/mol in adults. Following hydrogen peroxide oxidation samples show a reduction in Fe, Al and Mn concentrations with no significant change in valve Mg/Ca (±0.15 mmol/mol). After reductive cleaning we observe a significant decrease in valve Mg (>1 mmol/mol in juveniles), however there is little effect on Mn and Fe. Examination of adult and juvenile Krithe valves using scanning electron

  3. Holocene evolution of Lake Shkodra: Multidisciplinary evidence for diachronic landscape change in northern Albania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Ilaria; Gliozzi, Elsa; Galaty, Michael; Bejko, Lorenc; Sadori, Laura; Soulié-Märsche, Ingeborg; Koçi, Rexhep; Van Welden, Aurelien; Bushati, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    A multidisciplinary micro-paleontological study of a sediment core (SK19) drilled in the coastal area of Lake Shkodra, northern Albania, integrated with archaeological data from the Projekti Arkeologjikë i Shkodrës (PASH), provides compelling evidence for a long-term relationship between Shkodra's natural environment and its inhabitants. Charophyte and ostracod data recovered from SK19 combined with those already studied from the distal core SK13 (Mazzini et al., 2015), reveal important information concerning the changing characteristics of the water body through time. In particular, the ostracod fauna display a truly Balkanic character with eight taxa endemic to the area. Palaeoenvironmental analysis of the two cores indicates that a wide marshland extended towards the present eastern coast of the lake, fed discontinuously both by surface- and ground-water, beginning sometime before 12,140 cal yrs BP. For about 7000 years ostracods do not record any significant changes, whereas the Characeae record in the proximal zone displays important variations. Those variations do not match any of the climatic oscillations revealed in previous studies by δ18O or pollen data, thereby implicating human activities. Ostracods and charophytes indicate that permanent shallow waters occurred in the Shkodra basin only around 5800 cal yrs BP. Historical sources of the Roman Empire indicate a swamp (the Palus labeatis), crossed by the River Morača, which flowed into the River Buna. Evidence for local fires, whether natural or anthropogenic, is recorded in SK13, scattered between 4400 and 1200 yrs BP. From 4400 to 2000 yrs BP, during the Bronze and Iron Age, hill forts ringed the marsh and burial mounds marked its edges. But around 2000 cal yrs BP, a dramatic change in the water body occurred: the disappearance of Characeae. Possibly fires were used for the elimination of natural vegetation and the subsequent cultivation of olive and walnut trees, causing an increase on organic

  4. Living and dead foraminiferal assemblages from an active submarine canyon and surrounding sectors: the Gioia Canyon system (Tyrrhenian Sea, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letizia, Di Bella; Martina, Pierdomenico; Roberta, Porretta; Chiocci, Francesco Latino; Eleonora, Martorelli

    2017-05-01

    Living (rose Bengal stained) and dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages were studied from 23 stations located between 60 and 670 m depth along the Gioia Canyon and the adjacent continental shelf and slope (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea). The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships among sedimentary processes, hydrological patterns and benthic foraminiferal distribution, in a highly dynamic environment. High sedimentation rates on the shelf and occasional turbidity flows along the canyon, lead to unstable environmental conditions at the seafloor that reflect on the microbenthic community influencing faunal density, diversity, species composition and distribution inside the sediment. The foraminiferal distribution seems to be controlled by sedimentary processes, nutrient supply and organic matter recycling, which in turn are strongly controlled by the seasonal variability of riverine inputs and current dynamics in the Gulf of Gioia. From the inner shelf to the upper continental slope (550 m depth), the living foraminiferal assemblage is dominated by agglutinated taxa, likely favored by the high terrigenous supply. Frequent eutrophic taxa (Valvulineria bradyana and Nonionella turgida) tolerant high turbidity (Leptohalysis scottii,) and low oxygen (Bolivina spp. and Bulimina spp.) are recorded on the edge of the inner shelf, where channeling, deposition of coastal deposits and occasional sediment gravity flows occur. In the outer sector of the shelf a turnover of species is observed; L. scottii replaced by the opportunistic species Reophax scorpiurus, and taxa indicative of high energy conditions (Cassidulina spp.) become dominant in association with mesotrophic species like Globocassidulina subglobosa. Along the continental slope, lower sedimentation rates and more stable environmental conditions support richer and more diversified foraminiferal assemblage. The abundance of Bulimina marginata indicates eutrophic conditions at the shallower station (300 m depth

  5. Freshwater Influence Over the South Brazilian Continental Shelf: Indications From Foraminiferal Species Dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, P. P.; Sen Gupta, B. K.; Eichler, B. B.; Campos, E. J.

    2005-05-01

    transect (75, 109m) is dominated by Uvigerina peregrina and Cassidulina subglobosa, which indicates the presence of the cold, nutrient-rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW).

  6. Nutrient Distribution and Benthic Foraminiferal Assemblages on the South Brazilian Shelf: Relationship With Water Masses and Freshwater Influx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, B. B.; Sen Gupta, B. K.; Eichler, P. P.; Braga, E. S.; Campos, E. J.; Berbel, G. G.; Rodrigues, A. R.

    2005-05-01

    abundance of diatoms. The assemblage at offshore stations, in contrast, was characterized by smaller forms and higher species diversity. The foraminiferal data correlate well with nutrient distributions. Our findings suggest that during winter, when freshwater influence is stronger, the front along its plume has a strong effect on physical-chemical-biological interactions. In summer, the foraminiferal species Bulimina marginata, Cancris sacra, Cassidulina subglobosa, and Uvigerina peregrina found in the area suggest the influence of SACW nutrients brought up by upwelling processes.

  7. Calcareous assemblages of the southeastern Mediterranean low-tide estuaries - Seasonal dynamics and paleo-environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnaim-Katav, Simona; Agnon, Amotz; Sivan, Dorit; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva

    2016-02-01

    The study of estuarine ecosystems is essential for protecting and reestablishing their threatened biota. In this research the spatio-temporal variations in the distribution patterns of foraminifera, ostracods and molluscs are analyzed in surficial sediments sampled in 2012/13 at six low-tide estuaries of the southeastern Mediterranean coast. Live assemblages are studied using multivariate statistical analyses to determine their ecological preferences and seasonal dynamics whereas the dead assemblages are used to establish a reference baseline for future paleoenvironmental reconstruction. The statistical analysis indicates that salinity, TOC and % carbonate are the main environmental factors explaining 60% of the cumulative variance and controlling the distribution pattern of the different brackish taxa encountered in these estuaries. The foraminifera Ammonia tepida and some miliolids (Quinqueloculina and Varidentella) inhabit most estuaries during summer when salinities of 13-18 psu and temperatures of 26-34 °C occur. At the Naaman stream the agglutinated species Birsteiniolla macrostoma and Trichohyalus aguayoi dominate the assemblage during autumn and winter, respectively when salinities of 3-7 psu and temperature of 18-24 °C prevail. High abundance of the monospecific assemblage of the ostracod Cyprideis torosa was encountered at the Tanninim year round in oligohaline water. The gastropod Heleobia phaeniciaca prefers living at the Naaman and Tanninim streams while Pyrgophorus sp., an invasive and low salinity species, continue colonizing more stream reaches along the Israeli coast. The dead assemblages are composed of high numbers of local and transported species. It includes post storm-surge sediments containing high numbers of inland fresh and brackish water species transported by the floods. Those are mixed with inner to mid-shelf benthic and planktonic foraminifera, ostracods and molluscs. Transportation of the marine organisms a few hundred of meters

  8. Solar Cycle Driven Environmental Changes on Decadal to Centennial Scale of Late Miocene Lake Sediments (tortonian, Lake Pannon, Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.; Soliman, A.; Mandic, O.

    2012-12-01

    High time resolution is a key issue in reconstructing past climate systems. This is of particular importance when searching for model predictions of future climate change, such as the warm Late Miocene. For this study we selected Lake Pannon, a paleo-ancient, alkaline, brackish lake in Europe during the Tortonian (early Late Miocene). On a continuous sediment core including the interval from ca. 10.5 - 10.4 Ma we show the power of high resolution multiproxy analyses for reconstructing paleoclimatology on a decadal scale over several millennia of Late Miocene time. To demonstrate this high-resolution interpretation we selected a core from the western margin of Lake Pannon and studied it in respect to 2 different time resolutions. A continuous 6-m-core clearly displays regular fluctuations and modulations within three different environmental proxies (natural gamma radiation, magnetic susceptibility, total abundance of ostracods). Lomb-Scargle and REDFIT periodograms next to wavelet spectra of all data sets reveal distinct frequencies. Only few of these are deciphered in all proxy data sets at the same power, while some occur only in two or one proxies. A higher resolution study was conducted on a 1.5-m-long core interval based on pollen and dinoflagellate cysts, ostracod abundance, carbon and sulfur contents as well as magnetic susceptibility and natural gamma radiation. Based on an already established age model the study covers about two millennia of Late Miocene time with a resolution of ~13.7 years per sample. No major ecological turnovers are expected in respect to this very short interval. Thus, the pollen record suggests rather stable wetland vegetation with a forested hinterland. Shifts in the spectra can be mainly attributed to variations in transport mechanism, represented by few phases of fluvial input but mainly by changes in wind intensity and probably also wind direction. Even within this short time span, dinoflagellates document rapid changes between

  9. Late Glacial temperature and precipitation changes in the lowland Neotropics by tandem measurement of δ 18O in biogenic carbonate and gypsum hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodell, David A.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Wiseman, Camilla J.; Escobar, Jaime; Curtis, Jason H.; Brenner, Mark; Gilli, Adrian; Mueller, Andreas D.; Anselmetti, Flavio; Ariztegui, Daniel; Brown, Erik T.

    2012-01-01

    We applied a new method to reconstruct paleotemperature in the tropics during the last deglaciation by measuring oxygen isotopes of co-occurring gypsum hydration water and biogenic carbonate in sediment cores from two lakes on the Yucatan Peninsula. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope values of interstitial and gypsum hydration water indicate that the crystallization water preserves the isotopic signal of the lake water, and has not undergone post-depositional isotopic exchange with sediment pore water. The estimated lake water δ18O is combined with carbonate δ18O to calculate paleotemperature. Three paired measurements of 1200-yr-old gypsum and gastropod aragonite from Lake Chichancanab, Mexico, yielded a mean temperature of 26 °C (range 23-29.5 °C), which is consistent with the mean and range of mean annual temperatures (MAT) in the region today. Paired measurements of ostracods, gastropods, and gypsum hydration water samples were measured in cores from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala, spanning the Late Glacial and early Holocene period (18.5-10.4 ka). The lowest recorded temperatures occurred at the start of Heinrich Stadial (HS) 1 at 18.5 ka. Inferred temperatures from benthic ostracods ranged from 16 to 20 °C during HS 1, which is 6-10 °C cooler than MAT in the region today, whereas temperatures derived from shallow-water gastropods were generally warmer (20-25 °C), reflecting epilimnetic temperatures. The derived temperatures support previous findings of greater tropical cooling on land in Central America during the Late Glacial than indicated by nearby marine records. Temperature increased in two steps during the last deglaciation. The first occurred during the Bolling-Allerod (B-A; from 14.7 to 13 ka) when temperature rose to 20-24 °C towards the end of this period. The second step occurred at 10.4 ka near the beginning of the Holocene when ostracod-inferred temperature rose to 26 °C, reflecting modern hypolimnetic temperature set during winter, whereas

  10. Late Pleistocene-Holocene Climate Change Inferred from Fossil Fauna in the Marmara Sea, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, D.; McHugh, C. M.; Ryan, W. B.; Giosan, L.; Mart, Y.; Cagatau, N.

    2006-12-01

    Paleoenvironmental changes that document the reconnection of the Marmara Sea to the world's oceans were investigated from sediment cores and high-resolution CHIRP subbottom profiles acquired by the R/V Mediterranean Explorer in 2005. The transition from a glacial fresh/brackish water lake to a sea took place after global sea-level reached the Dardanelles outlet sill depth of -85m. We surveyed the continental shelf-slope boundary along the northern margin at Cekmece and the eastern margin at the Prince Islands in water depths extending from 80 to 135 m. Mollusk, ostracod, and foraminiferal faunal assemblages calibrated to radiocarbon chronology and sediment analyses reveal the mixing of marine and lake sediments, and very high sedimentation rates, 50 cm per 1000 years, from ~12 to 10.5 cal ka BP. Very high sedimentation rates (70 cm/1000 years) and an abrupt transition from lake stage to marine were documented along the southern shelf at Imrali from ~12.5 to 11.5 cal ka BP. This older age was derived from foraminifers. Marine mollusks Corbula sp., Lucinella sp., and Gouldia sp. are found in sand beds contained within stiff clays. The sands are rich in spherical, calcium carbonate, oolites commonly associated with shallow environments, agitated waters, and warm evaporative climates. The stiff clays contain low salinity 1-5 per mil bivalve Dreissena rostriformis, gastropod, Theodoxus fluviatilis, and fresh brackish ostracods and are interpreted as lake sediments. Paleoshorelines along the northern, eastern, and southern shelves were below the Dardanelles outlet sill of -85m at the time of marine reconnection. The drawdown of Marmara Lake prior to marine intrusion is also consistent with regional aridity. After 10.5 cal ka BP sediments and faunal assemblages are fully marine with mollusks (Corbula sp., Lucinella sp., Turritela sp., and Gouldia sp) and ostracods. Even though benthic foraminifers are rich after the marine conditions were established, planktonic

  11. Behavior and reproduction of invertebrate animals during and after a long-term microgravity: space experiments using an Autonomous Biological System (ABS).

    PubMed

    Ijiri, K; Mizuno, R; Narita, T; Ohmura, T; Ishikawa, Y; Yamashita, M; Anderson, G; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T

    1998-12-01

    Aquatic invertebrate animals such as Amphipods, Gastropods (pond snails), Ostracods and Daphnia (water flea) were placed in water-filled cylindrical vessels together with water plant (hornwort). The vessels were sealed completely and illuminated with a fluorescent lamp to activate the photosynthesis of the plant for providing oxygen within the vessels. Such ecosystem vessels, specially termed as Autonomous Biological System or ABS units, were exposed to microgravity conditions, and the behavior of the animals and their reproduction capacity were studied. Three space experiments were carried out. The first experiment used a Space shuttle only and it was a 10-day flight. The other two space experiments were carried out in the Space station Mir (Shuttle/Mir mission), and the flight units had been kept in microgravity for 4 months. Daphnia produced their offspring during a 10-day Shuttle flight. In the first Mir experiment, no Daphnia were detected when recovered to the ground. However, they were alive in the second Mir experiment. Daphnia were the most fragile species among the invertebrate animals employed in the present experiments. All the animals, i.e., Amphipods, pond snails, Ostracods and Daphnia had survived for 4 months in space, i.e., they had produced their offspring or repeated their life-cycles under microgravity. For the two Mir experiments, in both the flight and ground control ecosystem units, an inverse relationship was noted between the number of Amphipods and pond snails in each unit. Amphipods at 10 hours after the recovery to the ground frequently exhibited a movement of dropping straight-downward to the bottom of the units. Several Amphipods had their legs bent abnormally, which probably resulted from some physiological alterations during their embryonic development under microgravity. From the analysis of the video tape recorded in space, for Ostracods and Daphnia, a half of their population were looping under microgravity. Such looping animals

  12. Integrated palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of a Lower Pleistocene section (Sousaki basin, Northeastern Corinth Gulf): using fuzzy logic to decipher long term palaeoenvironmental changes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulou, Pinelopi; Iliopoulos, George; Koukouvelas, Ioannis; Rentoumi, Evaggelia; Groumpos, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Palaeoecological analyses are important tools for the reconstruction of palaeoenvironmental changes. In this paper microfossil assemblages (ostracodes and palynomorphs) of Lower Pleistocene age, are used to reconstruct the biological and physical conditions of the palaeoenvironment during a time interval when palaeoclimatic and palaeoecological data from the Balkan Peninsula are scarce. Lower Pleistocene is an epoch when major changes in the palaeoclimate occurred (commencement of the Quaternary glaciations) affecting the palaeoenvironments worldwide. The studied section, geotectonically belongs to the Northeastern Corinth gulf, and lies near the town Ag. Theodoroi, west of Athens, consisting of alterations of marls and marly limestones with intercalations of organic rich sediments and gypsum beds. Detailed logging of the section was carried out and 76 samples were collected for micropalaeontological analysis. Additionally, 22 samples were studied for their palynological content. The results were statistically processed using standard palaeoecological methods (percentage abundance diagrams, biodiversity indices and multivariate analysis). Our interpretation was further supported by fuzzy logic methods, in order to remove subjectivity from the biostratigraphical data providing a higher degree of detail. Despite this though, their use in geology remains limited until now. In our case study, fuzzy sets examine the data from a more general perspective and contain natural variations that are present in species abundance gradients between evolving environments. The lithological and micropalaeontological analysis revealed a brackish lagoonal environment dominated by the typical brackish ostracode species Cyprideis torosa. The studied sequence shows cyclically changing subenvironments fluctuating from the outer to the inner zone of a lagoon as imposed by the alternating occurrence of the ostracode families Tyrrhenocytheridae and Candonidae and the foraminifera species A

  13. The sedimentary record of climatic and anthropogenic influence on the Patuxent estuary and Chesapeake Bay ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Vann, C.D.

    2003-01-01

    Ecological and paleoecological studies from the Patuxent River mouth reveal dynamic variations in benthic ostracode assemblages over the past 600 years due to climatic and anthropogenic factors. Prior to the late 20th century, centennial-scale changes in species dominance were influenced by climatic and hydrological factors that primarily affected salinity and at times led to oxygen depletion. Decadal-scale droughts also occurred resulting in higher salinities and migration of ostracode species from the deep channel (Loxoconcha sp., Cytheromorpha newportensis) into shallower water along the flanks of the bay. During the 19th century the abundance of Leptocythere nikraveshae and Perissocytheridea brachyforma suggest increased turbidity and decreased salinity. Unprecedented changes in benthic ostracodes at the Patuxent mouth and in the deep channel of the bay occurred after the 1960s when Cytheromorpha curta became the dominant species, reflecting seasonal anoxia. The change in benthic assemblages coincided with the appearance of deformities in foraminifers. A combination of increased nitrate loading due to greater fertilizer use and increased freshwater flow explains this shift. A review of the geochemical and paleoecological evidence for dissolved oxygen indicates that seasonal oxygen depletion in the main channel of Chesapeake Bay varies over centennial and decadal timescales. Prior to 1700 AD, a relatively wet climate and high freshwater runoff led to oxygen depletion but rarely anoxia. Between 1700 and 1900, progressive eutrophication occurred related to land dearance and increased sedimentation, but this was superimposed on the oscillatory pattern of oxygen depletion most likely driven by climatological and hydrological factors. It also seems probable that the four- to five-fold increase in sedimentation due to agricultural and timber activity could have contributed to an increased natural nutrient load, likely fueling the early periods (1700-1900) of hypoxla

  14. Biotic and abiotic response to palaeoenvironmental changes at Lake Pannons' western margin (Central Europe, Late Miocene)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E.; Scholger, Robert; Gitter, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A multidisciplinary study was performed on a c. 30 m thick, limnic–deltaic sequence in the Styrian Basin (Austria). Geophysical (gamma ray activity, rock magnetism), geochemical (organic carbon, sulphur) and sedimentological observations were combined with palaeontological information (mainly ostracods). On this base, several ecological factors were deduced (terrigenous influx, salinity, water depth and oxygenation). Based on integrated stratigraphy as well as on palaeomagnetic results the whole section is set to Chron C5r.2r−1n (11.308–11.263 Ma) and covers a period of less than 45 kyr. In addition to the long-term record, we analysed short-term changes by high-resolution sampling (5 mm sample interval; ostracods, magnetic susceptibility). This ~ 2.3 m-thick interval spans in total < 3500 yr with an individual sample resolution of a few years only. The combination of these data permit the description of the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the section in detail: at the base of the section, the development of a conifer swamp on the lakeside of Lake Pannon is documented. This almost freshwater swamp existed for some centuries before it became extinct within a few decades due to a rise of the water-table. The drowning is related to a transgression of Lake Pannon, which triggered the establishment of a brackish-water fauna as well as greigite formation in the lake sediments. In general, the ongoing transgression favoured benthic life due to increased salinity (up to mesohaline conditions). The high-resolution ostracod and magnetic susceptibility record reflect short-term fluctuations in bottom-water ventilation. These oscillations probably range in the order of centuries and decades and are possibly related to climatic shifts. Later, the successive deepening of the lake resulted in a significant faunal turnover. A meromictic system with a well-established, oxygen-depleted hypolimnion developed. Finally, the limnic phase was replaced by a prograding

  15. Wetland evolution in the Qinghai Lake area, China, in response to hydrodynamic and eolian processes during the past 1100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dada; Wünnemann, Bernd; Hu, Yanbo; Frenzel, Peter; Zhang, Yongzhan; Chen, Kelong

    2017-04-01

    The Daotanghe riverine wetland in close proximity to the Qinghai Lake was investigated to demonstrate the interrelationships between Qinghai Lake hydrodynamic processes, eolian mobility and ecological conditions during the past 1100 years in response to climate change. We used ostracod assemblages from various sites east of Qinghai Lake and from the sediment core QW15 of Daotanghe Pond and combined them with grain size and geochemical data from the same core. The statistical extraction of grain size endmembers (EM) revealed three different transportation processes responsible for pond-related fluvio-lacustrine, pure fluvial and eolian deposits. Identified seasonal effects (eolian mobility phase) and timing of ice cover are possible tracers for the competing influence between the Asian summer monsoon and the Westerlies in the Daotanghe Wetland and surrounding area. Our results show that ostracod associations and sediment properties are evidence of a fluvio-lacustrine fresh water environment without ingression of Qinghai Lake into the wetland. Hydrodynamic variations coupled with phases of eolian input indicate highly variable water budgets in response to climate-induced effective moisture supply. The Medieval Warm Period (MWP) until about 1270 CE displays generally moist and warm climate conditions with minor fluctuations, likely in response to variations in summer monsoon intensity. The three-partite period of the Little Ice Age (LIA), shows hydrologically unstable conditions between 1350 and 1530 CE with remarkably colder periods, assigned to a prolonged seasonal ice cover. Pond desiccation and replacement by fluvial deposits occurred between 1530 and 1750 CE, superimposed by eolian deposits. The phase 1730-1900 CE is recorded by the re-occurrence of a pond environment with reduced eolian input. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on ostracod abundances shows similar trends. All three phases of the LIA developed during a weak summer monsoon influence, favoring

  16. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Sedimentology and invertebrate paleontology of Triassic and Jurassic Lacustrine deposits, Culpeper Basin, northern Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, P. J. W.

    The Culpeper Basin contains late Triassic and early Jurassic continental sedimentary rocks. Lacustrine rocks are present in the Bull Run Formation, Buckland Formation, and Waterfall formation. The lacustrine rocks were grouped into eight lithofacies using cluster analysis: (1) red massive siltstone or mudstone, (2) gray massive siltsone or mudstone, (3) disrupted graded siltstone and mudstone, (4) laminated mudstone, (5) limestone, (6) black shale, (7) red laminated and cross-laminated siltstone, sandstone, and mudstone, and (8) sandstone. Freshwater invertebrate fossils (conchostracans, notostracans, ostracodes, and pelecypods) which inhabited shallow water are abundant in some lacustrine beds. The Culpeper Basin notostracans (Triops) are the first to be reported from the Triassic of North America. The conchostracans, Cyzicus and Cornia may be useful for correlation in the Culpeper Basin. Cyzicus is present in the Triassic Bull Run Formation. Cornia is present in the Jurassic Waterfall Formation. This is the first report of Cornia from the Newark Supergroup.

  18. Intertidal meiofauna of Jeju Island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuk, Olga N.; Trebukhova, Yulia A.

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, the structure of the meiobenthos community and marine nematodes in particular was investigated in the different intertidal zones of Jeju Island (South Sea of Korea). A relationship was found between the density of meiobenthic communities and the type of the bottom sediment. In addition, in the silty sediments, nematodes were dominant, while in the sandy sediments harpacticoids and ostracods were dominant groups. Sixty eight species belonging to 60 genera and 19 families of nematodes were found in the whole area. Four different nematode taxocenosis were distinguished using a cluster analysis. Dominant feeding groups were omnivores (2B) and epistratum-feeders (2A). The highest number of non-selective deposit-feeders (1B) was detected in the lagoon with the bottom silty sediments.

  19. Climate at the edge of human dispersal in the European Middle Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David

    2014-05-01

    Pleistocene palaeoclimatic reconstructions based on fossils from sites containing archaeological evidence of human occupation can answer key questions about the climatic context of early human dispersal in Europe. Biological proxies including foraminifera, ostracods, diatoms, chironomid larvae, molluscs and pollen are widely used to estimate palaeoclimatic parameters, typically palaeotemperatures, using indicator species, Mutual Climatic Range (MCR), Modern Analogue Technique (MAT) and transfer function approaches. Any single proxy method will yield plausible results, but there is a need for multi-proxy testing; matching or overlapping results inspire confidence, whereas if independent proxies yield results that do not match or even overlap, one or more must be wrong. The Multi-Proxy Consensus (MPC) approach not only compares two or more proxy results in order to check for agreement, but also offers potential for more refined results to be obtained from the range of mutual agreement between two or more overlapping palaeotemperature ranges. Studies of MIS9 (late Middle Pleistocene) deposits in the Thames-Medway river system in SE England (some of which contain stone implements representing human occupation) have yielded palaeotemperature estimates based on ostracods, beetles, fish, herpetiles, pollen and plant macrofossils. The MPC approach demonstrates the consistency of the results and defines a more continental climate than today (mean July air temperatures similar or 1 degree warmer, mean January air temperatures at least 2 degrees colder). Two River Thames MIS11 sites (Ebbsfleet and Swanscombe) have yielded MPC results indicating summers up to 1.5 degrees warmer and winters at least 5 degrees colder than today. British early Middle Pleistocene sites record the earliest human presence in Europe North of the Alps. At Boxgrove (MIS13), well-known for its rich record of human activity (stone tools and butchered bones), combined ostracod and herpetile MCR results

  20. Welwitschiaceae from the Lower Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dilcher, David L; Bernardes-De-Oliveira, Mary E; Pons, Denise; Lott, Terry A

    2005-08-01

    Welwitschiaceae, a family in the Gnetales, is known today from only one extant species, Welwitschia mirabilis. This species is distributed in the Namibian desert, along the western coast of southern Africa, about 10 km inland from the coast. Very little is known about the fossil record of this family. Lower Cretaceous megafossils of various organs, assigned to Welwitschiaceae, are presented here. These fossils include young stems with paired cotyledons attached (Welwitschiella austroamericana n. gen. et sp.), isolated leaves (Welwitschiophyllum brasiliense n. gen. et sp.), and axes bearing male cones (Welwitschiostrobus murili n. gen. et sp.). They were collected in the Crato Formation, which is dated by palynomorphs and ostracods as Late Aptian (114 to 112 million years ago). These sediments are exposed in the Araripe Basin of northeastern Brazil. This study brings together new information of the megafossil record of Welwitschia-like plants and also reports of pollen said to be similar to that of Welwitschia from Lower Cretaceous sediments.

  1. The aquatic and semiaquatic biota in Miocene amber from the Campo LA Granja mine (Chiapas, Mexico): Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Sánchez, María de Lourdes; Hegna, Thomas A.; Schaaf, Peter; Pérez, Liseth; Centeno-García, Elena; Vega, Francisco J.

    2015-10-01

    Amber from the Campo La Granja mine in Chiapas, Mexico, is distinct from other sources of amber in Chiapas. Campo La Granja amber has distinct layers created by successive flows of resin with thin layers of sand on most surfaces. Aquatic and semi-aquatic arthropods are commonly found. Together these pieces of evidence suggest an estuarine environment similar to modern mangrove communities. The aquatic crustaceans are the most intriguing aspect of the biota. A large number of ostracods have been found in the amber-many with their carapaces open, suggesting that they were alive and submerged in water at the time of entombment. The only known examples of brachyuran crabs preserved in amber are found in the Campo La Granja amber. Amphipods, copepods, isopods, and tanaids are also members of the crustacean fauna preserved in amber.

  2. Contribution to the knowledge of the genus Vestalenula Rossetti & Martens, 1998 (Crustacea, Ostracoda, Darwinulidae), with the description of a new species, V. carinata n. sp., from the island of Florianópolis, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ricardo L; Rocha, Carlos E F; Rossetti, Giampaolo; Martens, Koen

    2013-01-01

    The genus Vestalenula is the most species rich in the putative ancient asexual ostracod Family Darwinulidae. Several new Recent species were described from various continents, mostly based on carapace shape and structure. These species were found in a variety of aquatic and (semi-) terrestrial habitats, including springs, streams, interstitial waters, leaf litter in forests and in splash zones of waterfalls. Here, we describe V carinata n. sp. from moist leaf litter, collected from the Brazilian island of Florian6polis. The species belongs to the danielopoli-lineage within the genus because of its elongated internal tooth in the left valve and elongated external keel on the right valve. It can be distinguished from all other species in this group by its size, its L/H ratio and the relative length of the keel. The relationship of this new species to the enigmatic, putative marine species Senidarwinula terraenuxforna Choe, 1988, is discussed. An identification key to species of the genus is provided.

  3. Combining Small-Vertebrate, Marine and Stable-Isotope Data to Reconstruct Past Environments.

    PubMed

    Rofes, Juan; Garcia-Ibaibarriaga, Naroa; Aguirre, Mikel; Martínez-García, Blanca; Ortega, Luis; Zuluaga, María Cruz; Bailon, Salvador; Alonso-Olazabal, Ainhoa; Castaños, Jone; Murelaga, Xabier

    2015-09-22

    Three very different records are combined here to reconstruct the evolution of environments in the Cantabrian Region during the Upper Pleistocene, covering ~35.000 years. Two of these records come from Antoliñako Koba (Bizkaia, Spain), an exceptional prehistoric deposit comprising 9 chrono-cultural units (Aurignacian to Epipaleolithic). The palaeoecological signal of small-vertebrate communities and red deer stable-isotope data (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) from this mainland site are contrasted to marine microfaunal evidence (planktonic and benthic foraminifers, ostracods and δ(18)O data) gathered at the southern Bay of Biscay. Many radiocarbon dates for the Antoliña's sequence, made it possible to compare the different proxies among them and with other well-known North-Atlantic records. Cooling and warming events regionally recorded, mostly coincide with the climatic evolution of the Upper Pleistocene in the north hemisphere.

  4. Ecotoxicological evaluation of areas polluted by mining activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, M. L.; Martínez-Sánchez, M. J.; Pérez-Sirvent, C.; Molina, J.

    2009-04-01

    Determination of the contaminant content is not enough to evaluate the toxic effects or to characterise contaminated sites, because such a measure does not reflect the ecotoxicological danger in the environment and does not provide information on the effects of the chemical compounds. To estimate the risk of contaminants, chemical methods need to be complemented with biological methods. Therefore, ecotoxicological testing may be a useful approach for assessing the toxicity as a complement to chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to develop a battery of bioassays for the ecotoxicological screening of areas polluted by mining activities. Particularly, the toxicity of water samples, sediments and their pore-water extracts was evaluated by using three assays: bacteria, plants and ostracods. Moreover, the possible relationship between observed toxicity and results of chemical analysis was studied. The studied area, Sierra Minera, is close to the mining region of La Uni

  5. New OSL dates of Sangamon Episode biozones from Raymond Basin, Illinois, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, B.; Wang, H.

    2010-12-01

    Pollen and ostracode records from lake sediments spanning from the penultimate to the last glaciation from south-central Illinois provide key evidence for past climates in central North America. The records come from kettle basins formed in Illinois Episode till. The records are sandwiched at the base and top by “glacial” biozones containing Picea pollen and the cryophyllic ostracode Limnocythere friabilis. Evidence of especially warm and moist conditions during the intervening interglacial conditions includes abundant Liquidambar pollen, and the sub-tropical ostracode Heterocypris punctata. The succession of biozones are repeated in the records of three kettle basins (Raymond, Pittsburg, and Balk Knob). The ostensibly coeval vertebrate record at Hopwood Farm, Illinois, does not have similar pollen or ostracode records, but has fossils of Geochelone crassiscutata, an extinct tortoise related to the modern Galapagos species which presumably could not tolerate the prolonged periods of subfreezing winter temperatures typical of Illinois’ present climate. Although attempts have been made, the chronology of these records has not been adequately resolved. One attempt involved wiggle matching of the 2nd DCA axis of the pollen record (ostensibly a proxy of paleoprecipitation) from Raymond Basin of Zhu and Baker (1995) with the δ13C record from Crevice Cave stalagmites (Dorale et al., 1998, and other data). This correlation suggested that the sediment accumulation rate in the basin was slow (about 1 m/yr), and that a key warm/moist period during the Sangamon Episode coincided with the onset of Marine Isotope Stage 4 (about 75,000 yr). We attempted to verify these age assignments using OSL dating of fine sand from a new sediment core from Raymond Basin, and from adjacent ice-contact deposits. The oldest pollen-bearing lake sediment in Raymond Basin core RB-8 (7 m depth) yielded an OSL date of 129,520 ± 7700 yr. This age coincides with the transition from tundra

  6. Late Devonian sedimentary record of the Paleotethys Ocean - The Mae Sariang section, northwestern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königshof, P.; Savage, N. M.; Lutat, P.; Sardsud, A.; Dopieralska, J.; Belka, Z.; Racki, G.

    2012-06-01

    An 11 m thick condensed sequence of Late Devonian limestones in northwestern Thailand exhibits faunal associations and sedimentological-/microfacies data which are indicative of a pelagic facies setting. The entire long-ranging section is completely free from clastic input. Similar successions are known worldwide in a few sections only. The Mae Sariang section is characterised by low sedimentation rates as recognised by a number of hardgrounds, neptunian dikes and Fe/Mn crusts. The succession comprises a number of pelagic faunal elements e.g. conodonts, cephalopods and pelagic ostracodes. The fauna records rare macrofossils and the faunal diversity is low. The very condensed section ranges from the Late rhenana to praesulcata conodont biozones, but contains some global events as undoubtedly shown by biostratigraphical and carbon-isotope results (including major Kellwasser and Hangenberg biotic crises). In terms of plate tectonics this important succession most probably belongs to the Inthanon Zone comprising remnants of the Paleotethys Ocean.

  7. New Devonian fossil localities in Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blieck, A.; Gagnier, P.-Y.; Bigey, F. P.; Edgecombe, G. D.; Janvier, P.; Loboziak, S.; Rachebȩuf, P. R.; Sempere, T.; Steemans, P.

    1996-11-01

    An examination of Palaeozoic sections west of Cochabamba, and west of Lake Poopó, in western Bolivia, was conducted during a field expedition in 1991. The Río Iglesiani valley, west of Cochabamba, surprisingly yielded a Middle Devonian age to all the visited sites, originally supposed to be Ordovician. This result is based on spores, shelly faunas (brachiopods and bivalves), and trilobites. The Copacabana de Andamarca section, west of Lake Poopó, is also dated as Middle Devonian on account of its rather rich fauna (bryozoans, corals, brachiopods, conulariids, hyolithids, tentaculitids, ostracodes, trilobites, crinoids, vertebrates). Both localities correlate to the Icla and/or Huamampampa Formation of the Tarabuco area and Subandean belt, and to the Belén and/or Sica Sica Formation of the northern Altiplano.

  8. Suspension freezing of bottom sediment and biota in the Northwest Passage and implications for Arctic Ocean sedimentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Marincovich, L.; McCormick, M.; Briggs, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    No evidence was seen for entrainment by bottom adfreezing, bluff slumping, river flooding, dragging ice keels, or significant eolian transport from land to sea. Muddy sediment with pebbles and cobbles, algae with holdfasts, ostracodes with appendages, and well-preserved mollusks and sea urchins were collected from two sites in a 50 km long stretch of turbid ice. These materials indicate that suspension freezing reaching to a water depth of 25-30 m during the previous fall was responsible for entrainment. This mechanism requires rapid ice formation in open, shallow water during a freezing storm, when the ocean becomes supercooled, and frazil and anchor ice attach to and ultimately lift sediment and living organisms to the sea surface. -from Authors

  9. Distribution of biologic, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents as a proxy for sediment transport in the San Francisco Bay coastal system, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, M.; Erikson, L. H.; Wan, E.; Powell, C., II; Maddocks, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The biological, anthropogenic, and volcanic constituents of more than 300 samples collected from 1995 to 2010 in San Francisco Bay and the nearby coastal area were analyzed to discern patterns of sediment transport and deposition. The biological constituents investigated include microfauna (benthic and planktic foraminifers, ostracods, radiolarians, diatoms, and thecamoebians), macrofauna (bivalve mollusks, gastropods, barnacles, bryozoa, worm tubes, echinoids, crabs, and fish fragments), and flora (woody stems, roots, spores, and seeds). The distributional pattern of the benthic foraminifers was further refined by Q-mode cluster analysis into four assemblages that reflect where the taxa reside: the Brackish Shallow Subtidal Assemblage, the Estuarine Shallow Subtidal Assemblage, the Estuarine Intermediate/Deep Subtidal Assemblage, and the Nearshore Marine Assemblage. The anthropogenic objects recovered in this study include welding slag and glass microspheres most likely used to increase roadway line reflectivity. The volcanic constituents are glass shards of the Pliocene (3.27 Ma) Nomlaki Tuff, and Miocene tephra mostly derived from the Great Central Valley (including from the 23-19 Ma Valley Springs Formation, among others) and from the Sonoma Volcanic Field of California. The presence of allochthonous sedimentological constituents in this study was used to identify pathways of sediment transport and deposition within the San Francisco Bay coastal system. Several patterns have been identified: 1) volcanic glass shards are transported from the Great Central Valley through the delta to all regions of the bay, including the extreme end of south bay, as well as along the coast outside the bay and southward to Pedro Point; 2) microorganisms (benthic and planktic foraminifers, ostracods, diatoms, and radiolaria) from the marine realm outside San Francisco Bay are found in the estuary at the southern end of south bay, commonly in the middle of San Pablo Bay, and

  10. Effects of an experimental in situ diesel oil spill on the benthic community of unvegetated tidal flats in a subtropical estuary (Paranaguá Bay, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Egres, Aline Gonzalez; Martins, César C; Oliveira, Verônica Maria de; Lana, Paulo da Cunha

    2012-12-01

    The effects of diesel oil on benthic associations from unvegetated tidal flats in a subtropical estuary were experimentally evaluated using a Multivariate Before and After/Control and Impact Model (M-BACI). Impacted treatments were contrasted with controls in 14 successive periods before and after the oil spill. An acute effect was recorded just after the impact, but the recovery to pre-disturbance population levels was extremely fast. The increase in the total density of the benthic community after the disturbance was the result of an increase in the densities of Heleobia australis, oligochaetes, and ostracods, observed in both impacted and control treatments, as a reflection of background variability and not the presence of the contaminant. The experimental spill had little influence on the biological descriptors of the benthic associations, which were resilient or tolerant to oil disturbance at the temporal (147 days) and spatial (cm²) scales used in the experiment.

  11. Early Tertiary marine fossils from northern Alaska: implications for Arctic Ocean paleogeography and faunal evolution.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marincovich, L.; Brouwers, E.M.; Carter, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Marine mollusks and ostracodes indicate a post-Danian Paleocene to early Eocene (Thanetian to Ypresian) age for a fauna from the Prince Creek Formation at Ocean Point, northern Alaska, that also contains genera characteristic of the Cretaceous and Neogene-Quaternary. The life-assocation of heterochronous taxa at Ocean Point resulted from an unusual paleogeographic setting, the nearly complete isolation of the Arctic Ocean from about the end of the Cretaceous until sometime in the Eocene, in which relict Cretaceous taxa survived into Tertiary time while endemic taxa evolved in situ; these later migrated to the northern mid- latitudes. Paleobiogeographic affinities of the Ocean Point assocation with mild temperate faunas of the London Basin (England), Denmark, and northern Germany indicate that a shallow, intermittent Paleocene seaway extended through the Norwegian-Greenland Sea to the North Sea Basin. Early Tertiary Arctic Ocean paleogeography deduced from faunal evidence agrees with that inferred from plate-tectonic reconstructions.-Authors

  12. Upper Miocene Pannonian sediments from Belgrade (Serbia): new evidence and paleoenvironmental considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundić, Ljupko; Ganić, Meri; Knežević, Slobodan; Soliman, Ali

    2011-06-01

    The Late Miocene sublittoral marls of the Pannonian Stage (the long-lived Lake Pannon) were studied. From neotectonic point of view, the investigated area represents a natural border between two different morphostructural domains: the Pannonian Basin to the north and the Peri-Pannonian Realm to the south. More than 20 mollusc and 34 ostracod species were identified which indicate the upper part of the Lower Pannonian and the lower part of the Middle Pannonian ("Serbian") predominantly. The identified dinoflagellate cyst assemblage (21 taxa) hinders assignment of the studied samples to a Pannonian substage but supports the high endemism of the Pannonian flora. The lithostratigraphical, paleontological, and paleoecological analyses indicate a mesohaline (8-16 ‰), sublittoral (<90 m deep) environment of the early Lake Pannon. The estimated stratigraphic range for the investigated deposits is 9.8-11.4 Ma.

  13. Selected Least Studied but not Forgotten Bioluminescent Systems.

    PubMed

    Oba, Yuichi; Stevani, Cassius V; Oliveira, Anderson G; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Chepurnykh, Tatiana V; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2017-03-01

    Bioluminescence is a form of chemiluminescence generated by luminous organisms. Luminous taxa have currently been reported from about 800 genera and probably over 10 000 species in the world. On the other hand, their bioluminescent systems, including chemical structures of luciferins/chromophores and the genes encoding luciferases/photoproteins, have been elucidated from only a few taxonomic groups, for example beetles, bacteria, dinoflagellates, ostracods and some cnidarians. Research efforts to understand unknown bioluminescence systems are being conducted around the world, and recently, for example, novel luciferin structures of luminous enchytraeid potworms and fungi were identified by the authors. In this study, we review the current status and perspectives, in the context of postgenomic era, of most likely novel but less-revealed bioluminescence systems of ten selected organisms: earthworm, parchment tubeworm, fireworm, scaleworm, limpet, millipede, brittle star, acorn worms, tunicate and shark, which indeed are the next focus of our international collaboration.

  14. Epizooic metazoan meiobenthos associated with tubeworm and mussel aggregations from cold seeps of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bright, M; Plum, C; Riavitz, L A; Nikolov, N; Martinez Arbizu, P; Cordes, E E; Gollner, S

    2010-11-01

    The abundance and higher taxonomic composition of epizooic metazoan meiobenthic communities associated with mussel and tubeworm aggregations of hydrocarbon seeps at Green Canyon, Atwater Valley, and Alaminos Canyon in depths between 1400 and 2800 m were studied and compared to the infaunal community of non-seep sediments nearby. Epizooic meiofaunal abundances of associated meiobenthos living in tubeworm bushes and mussel beds at seeps were extremely low (usually <100 ind. 10 cm(-2)), similar to epizooic meiofauna at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and the communities were composed primarily of nematodes, copepods, ostracods, and halacarids. In contrast, epizooic meiobenthic abundance is lower than previous studies have reported for infauna from seep sediments. Interestingly, non-seep sediments contained higher abundances and higher taxonomic diversity than epizooic seep communities, although in situ primary production is restricted to seeps.

  15. Combining Small-Vertebrate, Marine and Stable-Isotope Data to Reconstruct Past Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofes, Juan; Garcia-Ibaibarriaga, Naroa; Aguirre, Mikel; Martínez-García, Blanca; Ortega, Luis; Zuluaga, María Cruz; Bailon, Salvador; Alonso-Olazabal, Ainhoa; Castaños, Jone; Murelaga, Xabier

    2015-09-01

    Three very different records are combined here to reconstruct the evolution of environments in the Cantabrian Region during the Upper Pleistocene, covering ~35.000 years. Two of these records come from Antoliñako Koba (Bizkaia, Spain), an exceptional prehistoric deposit comprising 9 chrono-cultural units (Aurignacian to Epipaleolithic). The palaeoecological signal of small-vertebrate communities and red deer stable-isotope data (δ13C and δ15N) from this mainland site are contrasted to marine microfaunal evidence (planktonic and benthic foraminifers, ostracods and δ18O data) gathered at the southern Bay of Biscay. Many radiocarbon dates for the Antoliña’s sequence, made it possible to compare the different proxies among them and with other well-known North-Atlantic records. Cooling and warming events regionally recorded, mostly coincide with the climatic evolution of the Upper Pleistocene in the north hemisphere.

  16. Phytotoxkit® and Ostracodtoxkit® tests for assessing the toxicity of sediment samples with high concentration of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Molina, Jose; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the risk of contaminants, chemical methods need to be complemented with biological methods. Ecotoxicological testing may be a useful approach for assessing the toxicity as a complement to chemical analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and applicability of two bioassays representing multiple trophic levels, for the preliminary ecotoxicological screening of sediments from sites contaminated by mining activities: a chronic toxicity test with the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens and a phytotoxicity test using Lepidium sativum, Sorghum saccharatum and Sinapis alba seeds. For this study, 30 soils samples were collected from the Sierra Minera (Murcia, SE Spain) for general analytical determinations and the total metal content (Pb, Zn, Cd and As) was determined. The Phytotoxkit® test measures the decrease in (or the absence of) seed germination and of the growth of the young roots after 3 days of exposure of seeds of selected higher plants to a contaminated matrix compared with the controls germinated in a reference soil. The plants selected for the Phytotoxkit® microbiotest were: the monocotyl Sorghum saccharatum (Sorgho) and the dicotyls Lepidium sativum (Garden cress) and Sinapis alba (mustard) (Phytotoxkit®, 2004). The percent inhibition of seed germination (SG) and root growth inhibition (RI) for each plant were calculated. Ostracodtoxkit® test consists of placing freshly hatched ostracod neonates in multiwell cups in 2 ml synthetic freshwater, with 300 µl sediment and 3x107 algal cells (Selenastrum capricornutum). After 6 days, incubation at 25 °C in darkness, the mortality of test organisms was determined (Ostracodtoxkit® FTM, 2001) and growth inhibition was calculated. Soil samples showed a mean pH value of 6.0 in water and 5.7 in KCl. The EC varied from 1.0 dS m-1 to 56.2 dS m-1, with a mean value of 17.7 dS m-1. The mean value for Pb was 0.84 mg kg-1, 10593 mg kg-1 for Zn, 23.18 mg kg-1 for Cd and 0.16 mg kg-1 for As

  17. Epizooic metazoan meiobenthos associated with tubeworm and mussel aggregations from cold seeps of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bright, M.; Plum, C.; Riavitz, L.A.; Nikolov, N.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Cordes, E.E.; Gollner, S.

    2010-01-01

    The abundance and higher taxonomic composition of epizooic metazoan meiobenthic communities associated with mussel and tubeworm aggregations of hydrocarbon seeps at Green Canyon, Atwater Valley, and Alaminos Canyon in depths between 1400 and 2800 m were studied and compared to the infaunal community of non-seep sediments nearby. Epizooic meiofaunal abundances of associated meiobenthos living in tubeworm bushes and mussel beds at seeps were extremely low (usually <100 ind. 10 cm−2), similar to epizooic meiofauna at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and the communities were composed primarily of nematodes, copepods, ostracods, and halacarids. In contrast, epizooic meiobenthic abundance is lower than previous studies have reported for infauna from seep sediments. Interestingly, non-seep sediments contained higher abundances and higher taxonomic diversity than epizooic seep communities, although in situ primary production is restricted to seeps. PMID:21264038

  18. Radiocarbon dating of terrestrial carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffrey S.; Rink, W. Jack; Thompson, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbonates encompass a wide range of materials that potentially could be used for radiocarbon (14C) dating. Biogenic carbonates, including shells and tests of terrestrial and aquatic gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, and foraminifera, are preserved in a variety of late Quaternary deposits and may be suitable for 14C dating. Primary calcareous deposits (marls, tufa, speleothems) and secondary carbonates (rhizoliths, fracture fill, soil carbonate) may also be targeted for dating when conditions are favorable. This chapter discusses issues that are commonly encountered in 14C dating of terrestrial carbonates, including isotopic disequilibrium and open-system behavior, as well as methods used to determine the reliability of ages derived from these materials. Recent methodological advancements that may improve the accuracy and precision of 14C ages of terrestrial carbonates are also highlighted.

  19. Microfacies of the Billingen-Aseri (Lower-Middle Ordovician) carbonate deposits northwest of the Russian Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, A.

    2012-04-01

    The microfacies were distinguished based on distribution of associations of lithotypes of carbonate rocks in the natural outcrops along the Baltic-Ladoga Klint. The macrofacies were genetically interpreted considering distribution of the main types of microfacies in a different parts of homoclinal carbonate ramp, formulated by E. Flügel (2004). The tidal deposits of the inner ramp are spread in the northwestern Estonia to the west of Tallinn and include Kunda (sandy fine-grained mudstones) and lowermost Aseri Regional Stages (echinoderm-algae dolomitized wackestones with admixture of quartz grains to the east of Tallinn and echinoderm-algae packstones with phosphate ooids to the west of Tallinn). The uppermost O. evae conodont zone (Billingen Regional Stage, quartz-glauconitic sands and sandstones, packstones with various bentic fauna) probably should be referred to the sandy shoals and banks of the inner ramp. The echinoderm-ostracod packstones with goethite-hydrogoethite ooids (L. variabilis conodont zone and base of the Y. crassus Zone) in the Klint outcrops to the east of Tallinn were probably formed under the same conditions. Protected-marine settings of the inner ramp are characterized by the bioclastic packstones with numerous echinoderms and wackestones with ostracods. In the outcrops of St. Petersburg Region these deposits correspond to the B. triangularis-lower part of L. variabilis conodont zones. In the North Estonia they compose lower part of the Kunda Regional Stage (Mäekalda road section and further to the east) and lower part of the Aseri Regional Stage (Sõtke River). The sediments formed in the open-marine settings of the inner ramp (trilobite-echinoderm packstones) compose several stratigraphic intervals exposed along the Baltic-Ladoga Klint line from the Syas River on the east to the western most regions of the North Estonian Klint. In the eastern part of the territory (Lynna River) they form boundary interval of the B. navis and M. parva

  20. Pliocene age of coastal units, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Otvos, E.G.

    1988-09-01

    Evidence for the Pliocene age of units, previously considered Miocene, in limy deposits of the eastern Florida Panhandle first emerged in the 1970s. A wide gap still exists in the generally recognized distribution area of Pliocene marginal-marine and shelf deposits between these calcareous units and the Mississippi delta area to the west. Drill sample studies aimed at narrowing this gap revealed several siliciclastic lithosomes of Pliocene age within a dominantly continental/highly brackish sequence between 125 and 460 ft east and south of Mobile Bay. Planktonic forams in these fine-grained sediments included Globigerina riveroae (upper part of planktonic praecursor), and Globorotalia dutertrei. Pliocene ostracods Loxoconcha edentonensis, Malzella devexa, Puriana mesocostalis, and the typical Jackson Bluff bivalve Nuculana trochilia were also present.

  1. Mineralized rods and cones suggest colour vision in a 300 Myr-old fossil fish.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Gengo; Parker, Andrew R; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Siveter, David J; Yamamoto, Ryoichi; Miyashita, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yuichi; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Mukuda, Takao; Matsuura, Marie; Tomikawa, Ko; Furutani, Masumi; Suzuki, Kayo; Maeda, Haruyoshi

    2014-12-23

    Vision, which consists of an optical system, receptors and image-processing capacity, has existed for at least 520 Myr. Except for the optical system, as in the calcified lenses of trilobite and ostracod arthropods, other parts of the visual system are not usually preserved in the fossil record, because the soft tissue of the eye and the brain decay rapidly after death, such as within 64 days and 11 days, respectively. The Upper Carboniferous Hamilton Formation (300 Myr) in Kansas, USA, yields exceptionally well-preserved animal fossils in an estuarine depositional setting. Here we show that the original colour, shape and putative presence of eumelanin have been preserved in the acanthodii fish Acanthodes bridgei. We also report on the tissues of its eye, which provides the first record of mineralized rods and cones in a fossil and indicates that this 300 Myr-old fish likely possessed colour vision.

  2. Microfacies, depositional models and diagenesis of Lagoa Feia Formation (lower cretaceous), Campos Basin, offshore Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, R. T.

    The Lagoa Feia Formation consists of the sediments deposited during the rift valley stage of the Campos Basin, varying from 200m to more than 1500m in thickness. In this unit seventeen microfacies were recognized, grouped into four main sequences, respectively dominated by terrigenous supplies, ostracods, pelecypods, and basic volcaniclastics. The vertical sequence of microfacies and the associations of syndepositional diagenetic minerals were used to reconstruct the general environment of deposition. Five diagenetic stages were recognized. Pelecypod rich microfacies present the highest potential for development of intraparticle and moldic secondary porosity. Two types of fabric selective porosity were experimentally developed in low porosity samples under simulated burial conditions. Intercrystal microporosity was formed by preferential dissolution of micrite size calcite compared to coarse calcite crystals of sparite and neomorphosed bioclasts, and intraparticle porosity was developed in pelecypod shells by selective dissolution of neomorphic calcite compared to sparite cement.

  3. The present environmental scenario of the Nador Lagoon (Morocco).

    PubMed

    Ruiz, F; Abad, M; Olías, M; Galán, E; González, I; Aguilá, E; Hamoumi, N; Pulido, I; Cantano, M

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we present a multivariate approach (waters, sediments, microfauna) concerning the environmental state of the Nador Lagoon (NE Morocco). The normal water quality parameters (salinity, pH, nutrients) of the dominant marine flows are altered by local fecal water effluents, urban discharges, sewages derived from a water treatment station, and residues originated in a slaughterhouse. The geochemical analyses carried out in surficial sediment samples show very high concentrations of all metals studied near an old iron mine and moderate contents between Nador and its treatment station. Ostracods are good bioindicators of these environmental impacts, with the presence of a highly brackish assemblage in the quieter, more confined areas or the appearance of opportunistic species under hypoxic conditions. In addition, these microcrustaceans are absent in polluted bottom sediments or areas with high hydrodynamic gradients, whereas they decrease in both density and diversity if the subaerial exposure increases.

  4. Ecology and shell chemistry of Loxoconcha matagordensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Kamiya, T.; Dwyer, G.S.; Belkin, H.; Vann, C.D.; Schwede, S.; Wagner, R.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of the seasonal ecology and shell chemistry of the ostracode Loxoconcha matagordensis and related species of Loxoconcha from regions off eastern North America reveal that shell size and trace elemental (Mg/Ca ratio) composition are useful in paleothermometry using fossil populations. Seasonal sampling of populations from Chesapeake Bay, augmented by samples from Florida Bay, indicate that shell size is inversely proportional to water temperature and that Mg/Ca ratios are positively correlated with the water temperature in which the adult carapace was secreted. Microprobe analyses of sectioned valves reveal intra-shell variability in Mg/Ca ratios but this does not strongly influence the utility of whole shell Mg/Ca analyses for paleoclimate application.

  5. Combining Small-Vertebrate, Marine and Stable-Isotope Data to Reconstruct Past Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rofes, Juan; Garcia-Ibaibarriaga, Naroa; Aguirre, Mikel; Martínez-García, Blanca; Ortega, Luis; Zuluaga, María Cruz; Bailon, Salvador; Alonso-Olazabal, Ainhoa; Castaños, Jone; Murelaga, Xabier

    2015-01-01

    Three very different records are combined here to reconstruct the evolution of environments in the Cantabrian Region during the Upper Pleistocene, covering ~35.000 years. Two of these records come from Antoliñako Koba (Bizkaia, Spain), an exceptional prehistoric deposit comprising 9 chrono-cultural units (Aurignacian to Epipaleolithic). The palaeoecological signal of small-vertebrate communities and red deer stable-isotope data (δ13C and δ15N) from this mainland site are contrasted to marine microfaunal evidence (planktonic and benthic foraminifers, ostracods and δ18O data) gathered at the southern Bay of Biscay. Many radiocarbon dates for the Antoliña’s sequence, made it possible to compare the different proxies among them and with other well-known North-Atlantic records. Cooling and warming events regionally recorded, mostly coincide with the climatic evolution of the Upper Pleistocene in the north hemisphere. PMID:26391668

  6. Benthic myodocopid Ostracoda (Philomedidae) from the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Chavtur, Vladimir G; Keyser, Dietmar

    2016-07-25

    This study is based on the material of myodocopid ostracodes of the family Philomedidae collected by the Russian Antarctic Polar Expeditions (1963-2007) and the Germany Expeditions on R/V "Polarstern" (1990-2002) from the continental shelf and upper slope near the Mawson and Davis stations, the Weddell Seas, the region of the South Shetland Islands near the Russian Polar station "Molodezhnaya" and adjacent waters. Eight philomedid species belonging to two genera were identified in these collections. Scleroconcha tuberculata sp. nov. is described and figured as a new species. Additional descriptions and figures for the species S. gallardoi Kornicker, 1971, Philomedes assimilis Brady, 1907, P. charcoti Daday, 1908, P. heptatrix Kornicker, 1975, P. rotunda Skogsberg, 1920, P. orbicularis Brady, 1907 and P. tetrathrix Kornicker, 1975 are given. Keys for all species of the mentioned genera known from the Southern Ocean are presented. A list of sampling stations and species collected is provided in the Appendix 1.

  7. Evaluation of a funnel trap for collecting copepods and immature mosquitoes from wells.

    PubMed

    Kay, B H; Cabral, C P; Araujo, D B; Ribeiro, Z M; Braga, P H; Sleigh, A C

    1992-12-01

    A simple funnel trap which inverts on entry to and exit from the water, was evaluated with respect to sampling the aquatic fauna of wells in and around Fortaleza, Brazil. Mosquito larvae, copepods, ostracods, fish and tadpoles were collected. When known numbers of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae and Mesocyclops aspericornis copepods were introduced into negative wells, overnight sampling resulted in 50% positivity of traps when 10 larvae (1/1,000 cm2) and 25 copepods (1/176 liters) were introduced. All traps were positive when 100 and 400 larve and copepods, respectively, were present. Over a range of 10-2,000 and 25-800 released larvae and copepods, respectively, average recovery rates were 6.1 and 3.6%, but on the basis of one sample, the variability was such that a precise estimate of absolute abundance could not be made.

  8. Terrestrial and marine records of climatic and environmental changes during the Pliocene in subtropical Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Ishman, S.E.; Litwin, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pollen, ostracode, and benthic foraminifer assemblages deposited during sea-level highstands in subtropical Florida record a climate change during the period 4.5-1.0 Ma. Before 3.5 Ma, open-shelf marine faunas and pollen assemblages with abundant Pinus, Quercus, Fagus, Carya, and nonarboreal pollen were present, indicating cooler conditions than today. From ~3.5 to 1.0 Ma, marine and terrestrial records indicate warmer conditions, similar to those existing in south Florida today. Combined with evidence for much warmer than modern conditions at high latitudes, these data suggest that increased poleward oceanic heat transport, possibly related to the emergence of the Central American isthmus between ~3.5 and 2.5 Ma, was a major influence on mid-Pliocene warmth. -Authors

  9. Stratigraphy and depositional settings of Cretaceous organic-rich sequences in the Brazilian marginal basins

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, M.R.; Koutsoukos, E.A.M.; Santos Neto, E.V. )

    1991-03-01

    A comprehensive geochemical and paleontological survey of the stratigraphic framework and depositional setting of the organic-rich and most prolific petroleum source rocks sequences in the Brazilian marginal basins has been undertaken. The geochemical analysis of the rocks included organic carbon determinations, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements, porphyrin analysis, and biological markers investigations, using chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) of the saturate and aromatic fractions. The paleontological study involved the assessment of the distribution and diversity patterns of microfossils (foraminifers, radiolarians, diatoms and ostracods), calcareous nannofossils, and palynomorphs in dating and paleoenvironmental assignments. The results demonstrate the importance of the integration of geochemical and paleontological data for both characterization and lateral and vertical correlations of organic-rich sequences. Furthermore, such an approach is a powerful tool in ascertaining types of depositional environment and age constraints within different petroleum stratigraphic frameworks.

  10. Fossils from the Middle Jurassic Wanakah formation near Delta in western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Sullivan, R. B.; Carey, M.A.; Good, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Middle Jurassic Wanakah Formation averages about 30 m in thickness in Colorado. Fossils are sparse and include fish, ostracodes, and trace fossils. A thin (0.03-0.45 m) fossil bed near the middle of the formation extends for some 48 km along the northeast flank of the Uncompahgre Plateau near Delta. The fossil bed at one locality contains one pelecypod identified possibly as Modiolus cf. M. subimbricatus (Meek), as well as other specimens too poorly preserved for identification. Previously, Mytilus was found in the same fossil bed at another locality by C.N. Holmes. The Wanakah Formation is primarily of terrestrial origin, but the fossil bed represents a shallow-marine incursion.

  11. Fossil invertebrates records in cave sediments and paleoenvironmental assessments: a study of four cave sites from Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, O. T.; Constantin, S.; Panaiotu, C.; Roban, R. D.; Frenzel, P.; Miko, L.

    2015-06-01

    Fossil invertebrates from cave sediments have been recently described as a potential new proxy for paleoenvironment and used in cross-correlations with alternate proxy records from cave deposits. Here we present the results of a fossil invertebrates study in four caves from two climatically different regions of the Romanian Carpathians, to complement paleoenvironmental data previously reported. Oribatid mites and ostracods are the most common invertebrates in the studied cave sediments. Some of the identified taxa are new for science, and most of them are indicative for either warm/cold stages or dry/wetter oscillations. In two caves the fossil invertebrates records indicate rapid climate oscillations during times known for a relatively stable climate. By corroborating the fossil invertebrates' record with the information given by magnetic properties and sediment structures, complementary data on past vegetation, temperatures, and hydraulic regimes could be gathered. This paper analyses the potential of fossil invertebrate records as a paleoenvironmental proxy, potential problems and pitfalls.

  12. Freshwater lakes--a potential source for aquaculture activities--a model study on Perumal Lake, Cuddalore, Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Usha, R; Ramalingam, K; Bharathi Rajan, U D

    2006-10-01

    The freshwater Perumal lake located at Cuddalore was assessed for its suitability and potential for aquaculture practices. Various hydrobiological parameters determined reveals that the various physicochemical characteristics are with in normal range of values. The DO level, BOD and COD values determined in the lake revealed the consequences of community activities and pollution possibilities. The primary productivity data revealed maximum productivity during March which infer that the lake is unaffected by anthropogenic disturbance and community contamination. The bacterial count remained higher during the monsoon periods, which characterize profuse rainfall and storm water discharge into the lake. The microfauna includes zooplankter such as cladocerans, copepods, rotifers and ostracods. Benthos include carps, catfishes, mullets and prawns. The above study revealed that the various parameters in the lake conform to the levels suited for freshwater fish culture and represents a resource for scientific management.

  13. A mid-european decadal isotope-climate record from 15,500 to 5000 years B.P

    PubMed

    von Grafenstein U; Erlenkeuser; Brauer; Jouzel; Johnsen

    1999-06-04

    Oxygen-isotope ratios of precipitation (delta18OP) inferred from deep-lake ostracods from the Ammersee (southern Germany) provide a climate record with decadal resolution. The record in detail shows many of the rapid climate shifts seen in central Greenland ice cores between 15,000 and 5000 years before the present (B.P.). Negative excursions in the estimated delta18OP from both of these records likely reflect short weakenings of the thermohaline circulation caused by episodic discharges of continental freshwater into the North Atlantic. Deviating millennial-scale trends, however, indicate that climate gradients between Europe and Greenland changed systematically, reflecting a gradual rearrangement of North Atlantic circulation during deglaciation.

  14. Les récifs coniaciens à rudistes de Tunisie centro-occidentale: sédimentologie, cadre paléogéographique et interprétation séquentielle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saïdi, Fouiâd; Ismaïl, Mohamed Hédi Ben; M'rabet, Ali

    1997-05-01

    Coniacian rudist-buildups have been discovered in the Dernaïa-Tamesmida area (west central Tunisia). They are sedimentologically studied in detail in this paper. Reefs sensu stricto are made up of rudists (Hippuritidae and Radiolitidae) and they show a height:lateral extension ratio of about 1:50. The fore-reef is composed of southwest progradang pelletoid sandwaves, whilst hemipelagic micrite has been deposited in the distal talus. The back-reef lagoons (NE side) include green algae and annelid, miliolid, ostracod and gastropod biotopes. Perilagoonal oolitic bars may border these environments. These reefs evolved in a shallow, relatively open environment. They correspond to barrier-reef complexes which developed at the margin of a generally shallow carbonate ramp. In terms of the sequence stratigraphy, they characterise late low sea levels and especially the high sea levels of the uppermost Turonien-Coniacian depositional sequence.

  15. Possible new constraints on late Miocene depositional patterns in west-central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liniecki-Laporte, Margaret; Andersen, David W.

    1988-03-01

    In the San Francisco Bay area, estuarine, lacustrine, and fluvial depositional environments existed contemporaneously within the Mulholland Formation, which was deposited in the Contra Costa basin from 7.7 to 6.5 Ma. The estuarine facies is differentiated from the nonmarine facies on the bases of ostracodes and sedimentology. Presence of the estuarine facies in the Mulholland Formation demonstrates that the Contra Costa basin was at sea level, the western part of the basin being a marine embayment for about 1 m.y. Absence of fresh Sierra Nevada-derived material in the lower Mulholland Formation indicates that a topographically elevated area existed east of the Contra Costa basin, effectively deflecting the Sierran debris, which is represented by the coeval Neroly Formation found in the eastern central Coast Ranges. To the west of the Contra Costa basin, some gaps in the Coast Ranges allowed connection with the Pacific Ocean.

  16. A new species of Elpidium (Crustacea, Ostracoda) from bromeliads in Cusuco National Park, Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ricardo L.; Jocqué, Merlijn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Passively dispersing aquatic invertebrates such as Ostracoda in restricted aquatic habitats such as bromeliads remain an intriguing observation considering the highly specialised dispersal vectors needed for efficient colonisation. Here we describe a new species of Elpidium, Elpidium merendonense sp. n., collected from bromeliads in the cloud forest from Cusuco National Park, Honduras. Elpidium merendonense sp. n. is a small to medium-sized species that can be easily distinguished from its congeners by its unique outgrowth at the posterior end of the left valve, visible especially in females. The species was common all through the park occurring at a wide range of altitudes and in different species of bromeliads. This finding is the first freshwater ostracod species described from Honduras and is in agreement with the prediction that the genus Elpidium contains a large number of species with small geographic distributions. We update the list of described species of Elpidium and present a key to species. PMID:23840164

  17. Ostracodology-Linking Bio- and Geosciences: Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Ostracoda, Berlin, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas M.

    2008-04-01

    If you want to know about the ``paradox of sex'' or why a tiny crustacean prefers spinach over brussels sprouts, then read this book. Ostracodes are a class of small crustaceans of 33,000 known living and extinct species and many more yet to be described. They are notable for their application to paleoclimatology and paleoenvironmental reconstruction-as described by J. Holmes and A. Chivas in the 2002 AGU Geophysical Monograph Series volume 131. In addition, they can make the evolutionary claim to the oldest proven male animal, a 435-million-year-old Silurian fossil from England called Colymbosathon ecplecticos (D. J. Siveter et al., Science, 302, 1749-1751, 2003).

  18. Benthos response following petroleum exploration in the southern Caspian Sea: Relating effects of nonaqueous drilling fluid, water depth, and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Tait, R D; Maxon, C L; Parr, T D; Newton, F C

    2016-09-15

    The effects of linear alpha olefin (LAO) nonaqueous drilling fluid on benthic macrofauna were assessed over a six year period at a southern Caspian Sea petroleum exploration site. A wide-ranging, pre-drilling survey identified a relatively diverse shelf-depth macrofauna numerically dominated by amphipods, cumaceans, and gastropods that transitioned to a less diverse assemblage dominated by hypoxia-tolerant annelid worms and motile ostracods with increasing depth. After drilling, a similar transition in macrofauna assemblage was observed with increasing concentration of LAO proximate to the shelf-depth well site. Post-drilling results were consistent with a hypothesis of hypoxia from microbial degradation of LAO, supported by the presence of bacterial mats and lack of oxygen penetration in surface sediment. Chemical and biological recoveries at ≥200m distance from the well site were evident 33months after drilling ceased. Our findings show the importance of monitoring recovery over time and understanding macrofauna community structure prior to drilling.

  19. Younger Dryas interval and outflow from the Laurentide ice sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, T.C.; Walker, J.C.G.; Rea, David K.; Lewis, C.F.M.; Shane, L.C.K.; Smith, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    A boxmodel of the Great Lakes is used to estimate meltwater flow into the North Atlantic between 8000 and 1