Science.gov

Sample records for outage capacity rates

  1. Outage capacity of FSO link with pointing errors and link blockage.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Goran T; Petkovic, Milica I; Spasic, Miodrag; Antic, Dragan S

    2016-01-11

    In this paper, we analyze the outage capacity performance of free-space optical (FSO) systems. More precisely, taking the stochastic temporary blockage of the laser beam, atmospheric turbulence, misalignment between transmitter laser and receiver photodiode and path loss into account, we derive novel accurate analytical expressions for the outage capacity. The intensity fluctuations of the received signal are modeled by a Gamma-Gamma distribution with parameters directly related to the wide range of atmospheric conditions. The analytical results are validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, when the intensity fluctuations are caused only by atmospheric turbulence, derived expressions are reduced to the simpler forms already presented in literature. The numerical and simulation results show that the link blockage causes appearance of the outage floor that is a significant energetic characteristic of an FSO system. The results also show that there exists an optimal value of the laser beam radius at the waist for minimizing outage probability in order to achieve the specified outage capacity. This optimal value depends on atmospheric turbulence strength and standard deviation of pointing errors, but it is also strongly dependent on the probability of link blockage.

  2. Outage Capacity of Spectrum Sharing Cognitive Radio with Channel Estimation Errors and Feedback Delay in Rayleigh Fading Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Feng, Z.; Zhang, P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper considers a spectrum sharing cognitive radio (CR) network consisting of one secondary user (SU) and one primary user (PU) in Rayleigh fading environments. The channel state information (CSI) between the secondary transmitter (STx) and the primary receiver (PRx) is assumed to be imperfect. Particularly, this CSI is assumed to be not only having channel estimation errors but also outdated due to feedback delay, which is different from existing work. We derive the closed-form expression for the outage capacity of the SU with this imperfect CSI under the average interference power constraint at the PU. Analytical results confirmed by simulations are presented to show the effect of the imperfect CSI. Particularly, it is shown that the outage capacity of the SU is robust to the channel estimation errors and feedback delay for low outage probability and high channel estimation errors and feedback delay.

  3. Refinery Outages

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    Semiannual reporting on refinery outages and their potential implications for available refinery capacity, petroleum product markets, and supply of gasoline, diesel fuel, and heating oil. Dissemination of such analyses can be beneficial to market participants who may otherwise be unable to access such information.

  4. High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder Operations for Optimal Payload and Science Telemetry Management Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, Michael T.; McElyea, Richard M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All International Space Station (ISS) Ku-band telemetry transmits through the High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (HCOR). The HCOR provides the recording and playback capability for all payload, science, and International Partner data streams transmitting through NASA's Ku-band antenna system. The HCOR is a solid-state memory recorder that provides recording capability to record all eight ISS high-rate data during ISS Loss-of-Signal periods. NASA payloads in the Destiny module are prime users of the HCOR; however, NASDA and ESA will also utilize the HCOR for data capture and playback of their high data rate links from the Kibo and Columbus modules. Marshall Space Flight Center's Payload Operations Integration Center manages the HCOR for nominal functions, including system configurations and playback operations. The purpose of this paper is to present the nominal operations plan for the HCOR and the plans for handling contingency operations affecting payload operations. In addition, the paper will address HCOR operation limitations and the expected effects on payload operations. The HCOR is manifested for ISS delivery on flight 9A with the HCOR backup manifested on flight 11A. The HCOR replaces the Medium-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (MCOR), which has supported payloads since flight 5A.1.

  5. Outage management in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Pernu, J.; Vuorenmaa, A.

    1987-01-01

    Of the electricity generated in Finland, approx. 40% is produced by nuclear power. There are two nuclear power stations in Finland: a boiling water reactor (BWR) station in Olkiluoto operated by TVO and a pressurized water reactor (PWR) station in Loviisa operated by IVO. The main technical information and the year that commercial operation of the nuclear units began are listed. Finland has long, cold, and dark winters. The summers are pleasant with several hours of daylight. The Finns like to have their holidays during July-August, which is why the major part of the energy-intensive base industries are shut down during this period. This means that the load on the Finnish grid may vary by a factor of 3 between a cold winter morning and a warm summer day. Because of these conditions, the utilities are trying to concentrate the annual reloading outages during late spring and summer. To be able to perform the outages of all four nuclear units in a short period of low marginal production cost, huge efforts had to be made to reduce the duration of outages. This reduction could not be done at the expense of availability during winter because the costs of replacement energy in winter are very high. Both utilities have succeeded in achieving their goals. The outage times have been reduced significantly and, at the same time, the average load factor in Finland has exceeded the 85% level.

  6. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    SciTech Connect

    St Germain, Shawn Walter; Farris, Ronald Keith; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications

  7. Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Weatherby

    2012-05-01

    The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage

  8. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T. ); Roberts, K.H. . Walter A. Haas School of Business)

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  9. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  10. FPL's Christmas 1991 transmission outages

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, J.T.; Busch, D.W.; Renowden, J.D. . Transmission Line Dept.)

    1993-10-01

    A record number of contamination related outages occurred on FPL transmission lines during Christmas of 1991 and resulted in an investigation of inservice insulator performance. The field investigation process used was enhanced by recent improvements in outage data recording. Also used in the analysis were weather information, the results of recently completed accelerated aging tests of polymers, and specially conducted tests on the effects of weathering steel stain on porcelain insulators. Specific insulator problems were identified and actions taken to reduce the possibility of recurrence.

  11. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The long term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the U.S. will depend upon maintaining high capacity factors, avoiding nuclear safety issues and reducing operating costs. The slow progress in the construction on new nuclear power plants has placed in increased importance on maintaining the output of the current fleet of nuclear power plants. Recently expanded natural gas production has placed increased economic pressure on nuclear power plants due to lower cost competition. Until recently, power uprate projects had steadily increased the total output of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Errors made during power plant upgrade projects have now removed three nuclear power plants from the U.S. fleet and economic considerations have caused the permanent shutdown of a fourth plant. Additionally, several utilities have cancelled power uprate projects citing economic concerns. For the past several years net electrical generation from U.S. nuclear power plants has been declining. One of few remaining areas where significant improvements in plant capacity factors can be made is in minimizing the duration of refueling outages. Managing nuclear power plant outages is a complex and difficult task. Due to the large number of complex tasks and the uncertainty that accompanies them, outage durations routinely exceed the planned duration. The ability to complete an outage on or near

  12. Error Rates and Channel Capacities in Multipulse PPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Moision, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    A method of computing channel capacities and error rates in multipulse pulse-position modulation (multipulse PPM) has been developed. The method makes it possible, when designing an optical PPM communication system, to determine whether and under what conditions a given multipulse PPM scheme would be more or less advantageous, relative to other candidate modulation schemes. In conventional M-ary PPM, each symbol is transmitted in a time frame that is divided into M time slots (where M is an integer >1), defining an M-symbol alphabet. A symbol is represented by transmitting a pulse (representing 1) during one of the time slots and no pulse (representing 0 ) during the other M 1 time slots. Multipulse PPM is a generalization of PPM in which pulses are transmitted during two or more of the M time slots.

  13. [Morbidity rate and mental capacity of Moscow schoolchildren (longitudinal study)].

    PubMed

    Sukhareva, L M; Rapoport, I K; Polenova, M A

    2014-01-01

    In the article there are presented data of longitudinal study of the health of Moscow schoolchildren (426 children), followed throughout from the 1st to 9th class, inclusively. Students were annually clinically examined in the school. There was performed a comprehensive study of mental health and functional state of the organism in the process of education students in high school (over 2700 pupils of 5-9th classes). The health status of students was shown to deteriorate due to the increase of the prevalence of chronic disease, the rise in occupancy of the III-IV health groups, the decrease of the number of children referred to I and II health groups. Unfavorable trends in the health state among boys are more pronounced than in girls, while they are also characterized by lower functional capabilities of the CNS and lower resistance to the development of training fatigue. Relatively favorable stage of school ontogeny is characterized by period with reduced morbidity in children studying in 4th-6th classes. Deterioration in the health of students as a significant rate of the rise of chronic diseases morbidity is observed in 7-9th classes. Along with this, in the 7th and 9th classes there is revealed the deterioration of mental capacity and high frequency of the pronounced signs of fatigue among schoolchildren. PMID:25306705

  14. Estimates of outage costs of electricity in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, J.; Sabih, F.

    1993-12-31

    This article estimates outage costs of electricity for each of the four provinces in Pakistan (Punjab, North-West Frontier Province, Baluchistan, and Sind). The term {open_quotes}power outage{close_quotes} refers to all problems associated with electricity supply, such as voltage drops (brownouts), power failures (blackouts), and load shedding. The most significant of these in Pakistan is load shedding when power supply to different consumers is shut off during different times of the day, especially during peak hours when the pressure on the system is the highest. Power shortages mainly arise during the low-water months when the effective capacity of hydropower plants drops significantly. This decline in power supplied by hydro plants cannot be made up by operating thermal power plants because of the limited availability of gas and the high cost of alternative fuels required for the operation of gas turbines.

  15. Are Student Loan Default Rates Linked to Institutional Capacity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishitani, Terry T.; McKitrick, Sean A.

    2016-01-01

    As more undergraduates have taken out loans to attend college, the number of borrowers who fail to repay their student loans has increased. While previous research has focused on students' likelihood to default, this study employed institutional cohort default rates (CDRs) as an outcome variable. Using Integrated Postsecondary Education Data…

  16. Peak capacity, peak-capacity production rate, and boiling point resolution for temperature-programmed GC with very high programming rates

    PubMed

    Grall; Leonard; Sacks

    2000-02-01

    Recent advances in column heating technology have made possible very fast linear temperature programming for high-speed gas chromatography. A fused-silica capillary column is contained in a tubular metal jacket, which is resistively heated by a precision power supply. With very rapid column heating, the rate of peak-capacity production is significantly enhanced, but the total peak capacity and the boiling-point resolution (minimum boiling-point difference required for the separation of two nonpolar compounds on a nonpolar column) are reduced relative to more conventional heating rates used with convection-oven instruments. As temperature-programming rates increase, elution temperatures also increase with the result that retention may become insignificant prior to elution. This results in inefficient utilization of the down-stream end of the column and causes a loss in the rate of peak-capacity production. The rate of peak-capacity production is increased by the use of shorter columns and higher carrier gas velocities. With high programming rates (100-600 degrees C/min), column lengths of 6-12 m and average linear carrier gas velocities in the 100-150 cm/s range are satisfactory. In this study, the rate of peak-capacity production, the total peak capacity, and the boiling point resolution are determined for C10-C28 n-alkanes using 6-18 m long columns, 50-200 cm/s average carrier gas velocities, and 60-600 degrees C/min programming rates. It was found that with a 6-meter-long, 0.25-mm i.d. column programmed at a rate of 600 degrees C/min, a maximum peak-capacity production rate of 6.1 peaks/s was obtained. A total peak capacity of about 75 peaks was produced in a 37-s long separation spanning a boiling-point range from n-C10 (174 degrees C) to n-C28 (432 degrees C).

  17. 33 CFR 183.43 - Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2 horsepower or less. 183.43 Section 183.43... AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Safe Loading § 183.43 Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and... boat that is rated for manual propulsion or for motors of 2 horsepower or less must not exceed: (1)...

  18. 33 CFR 183.43 - Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2 horsepower or less. 183.43 Section 183.43... AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Safe Loading § 183.43 Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and... boat that is rated for manual propulsion or for motors of 2 horsepower or less must not exceed: (1)...

  19. 33 CFR 183.43 - Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2 horsepower or less. 183.43 Section 183.43... AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Safe Loading § 183.43 Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and... boat that is rated for manual propulsion or for motors of 2 horsepower or less must not exceed: (1)...

  20. 33 CFR 183.43 - Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2 horsepower or less. 183.43 Section 183.43... AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Safe Loading § 183.43 Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and... boat that is rated for manual propulsion or for motors of 2 horsepower or less must not exceed: (1)...

  1. 33 CFR 183.43 - Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... manual propulsion and boats rated for outboard motors of 2 horsepower or less. 183.43 Section 183.43... AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Safe Loading § 183.43 Persons capacity: Boats rated for manual propulsion and... boat that is rated for manual propulsion or for motors of 2 horsepower or less must not exceed: (1)...

  2. Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn St. Germain; Kenneth Thomas; Ronald Farris; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are

  3. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  4. Outage management and health physics issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2007-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: India: a potential commercial opportunity, a U.S. Department of Commerce Report, by Joe Neuhoff and Justin Rathke; The changing climate for nuclear energy, by Skip Bowman, Nuclear Energy Insitute; Selecting protective clothing, by J. Mark Price, Southern California Edison; and Succssful refurbishment outage, by Sudesh K. Gambhir, Omaha Public Power District. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Containment radiation monitoring spiking, by Michael W. Lantz and Robert Routolo, Arizona Public Service Company; Improved outage performance, by Michael Powell and Troy Wilfong, Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station; Stop repacking valves and achieve leak-free performance, by Kenneth Hart, PPL Susquehanna LLC; and Head assembly upgrade package, by Timothy Petit, Dominion Nuclear.

  5. Outage managment and health physics issue, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2008-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include: Outage optimization initiatives, by George B. Beam, AREVA NP, Inc.; New plant based on excellent track records, by Jim Scarola, Progress Energy; Meeting customer needs and providing environmental benefits, by Peter S. Hastings, Duke Energy; Plants with 3-D design, by Jack A. Bailey, Tennessee Valley Authority; and Highest quality with exceptional planning, by Jason A. Walls, Duke Energy. Industry innovation articles include: Integrated exposure reduction plan, by Ed Wolfe, Exelon; Performance-based radiation worker training, by Joe Giuffre and Timothy Vriezerma, American Electric Power.

  6. Guidelines for Implementation of an Advanced Outage Control Center to Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution, and Outage Risk Management

    SciTech Connect

    St. Germain, Shawn W.; Farris, Ronald K.; Whaley, April M.; Medema, Heather D.; Gertman, David I.

    2014-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The purpose of this research is to improve management of nuclear power plant (NPP) outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

  7. Benchmark Report on Key Outage Attributes: An Analysis of Outage Improvement Opportunities and Priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, Shawn St.; Farris, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC), is a multi-year pilot project targeted at Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) outage improvement. The purpose of this pilot project is to improve management of NPP outages through the development of an AOCC that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report documents the results of a benchmarking effort to evaluate the transferability of technologies demonstrated at Idaho National Laboratory and the primary pilot project partner, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The initial assumption for this pilot project was that NPPs generally do not take advantage of advanced technology to support outage management activities. Several researchers involved in this pilot project have commercial NPP experience and believed that very little technology has been applied towards outage communication and collaboration. To verify that the technology options researched and demonstrated through this pilot project would in fact have broad application for the US commercial nuclear fleet, and to look for additional outage management best practices, LWRS program researchers visited several additional nuclear facilities.

  8. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C - Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast...) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES Pt. 660, Subpt. C, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C—Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits Vessel length Capacity rating 400 311.80...

  9. Saliva flow rate, buffer capacity, and pH of autistic individuals.

    PubMed

    Bassoukou, Ivy Haralambos; Nicolau, José; dos Santos, Maria Teresa

    2009-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate saliva flow rate, buffer capacity, pH levels, and dental caries experience (DCE) in autistic individuals, comparing the results with a control group (CG). The study was performed on 25 noninstitutionalized autistic boys, divided in two groups. G1 composed of ten children, ages 3-8. G2 composed of 15 adolescents ages 9-13. The CG was composed of 25 healthy boys, randomly selected and also divided in two groups: CG3 composed of 14 children ages 4-8, and CG4 composed of 11 adolescents ages 9-14. Whole saliva was collected under slight suction, and pH and buffer capacity were determined using a digital pHmeter. Buffer capacity was measured by titration using 0.01 N HCl, and the flow rate expressed in ml/min, and the DCE was expressed by decayed, missing, and filled teeth (permanent dentition [DMFT] and primary dentition [dmft]). Data were plotted and submitted to nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis) and parametric (Student's t test) statistical tests with a significance level less than 0.05. When comparing G1 and CG3, groups did not differ in flow rate, pH levels, buffer capacity, or DMFT. Groups G2 and CG4 differ significantly in pH (p = 0.007) and pHi = 7.0 (p = 0.001), with lower scores for G2. In autistic individuals aged 3-8 and 9-13, medicated or not, there was no significant statistical difference in flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. The comparison of DCE among autistic children and CG children with deciduous (dmft) and mixed/permanent decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) did not show statistical difference (p = 0.743). Data suggest that autistic individuals have neither a higher flow rate nor a better buffer capacity. Similar DCE was observed in both groups studied. PMID:18594879

  10. RATE OF ACCLIMATION OF THE CAPACITY FOR ISOPRENE EMISSION IN RESPONSE TO LIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emission from plants accounts for nearly half of all non-methane hydrocarbons entering the atmosphere. Light and temperature regulate the instantaneous rate of isoprene emission, but there is increasing evidence that they also affect the capacity for isoprene emission (i...

  11. 25 CFR 161.204 - How are carrying capacities and stocking rates established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How are carrying capacities and stocking rates established? 161.204 Section 161.204 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS General Provisions § 161.204 How are carrying...

  12. Power outages, power externalities, and baby booms.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    Determining whether power outages have significant fertility effects is an important policy question in developing countries, where blackouts are common and modern forms of family planning are scarce. Using birth records from Zanzibar, this study shows that a month-long blackout in 2008 caused a significant increase in the number of births 8 to 10 months later. The increase was similar across villages that had electricity, regardless of the level of electrification; villages with no electricity connections saw no changes in birth numbers. The large fertility increase in communities with very low levels of electricity suggests that the outage affected the fertility of households not connected to the grid through some spillover effect. Whether the baby boom is likely to translate to a permanent increase in the population remains unclear, but this article highlights an important hidden consequence of power instability in developing countries. It also suggests that electricity imposes significant externality effects on rural populations that have little exposure to it.

  13. Nuclear cost control focuses on refueling outages

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    Extending operating cycles and shortening refueling outages are the mainstays of utility efforts to improve the economics of nuclear generation. Here are key management approaches that have contributed to recent successes. Improving operating efficiency remains the byword of nuclear power producers, as they intensify their drive to reduce operation and maintenance (O and M) costs and survive--even thrive--in a competitive environment. Because replacement-power and other costs can incur penalties of $0.5-million or more for each that a nuclear unit is inoperative--and almost $3-million/day, for one utility--refueling outages are an obvious focal point for such efforts, By the same token, the impact on the bottom line is greater and more dramatic here than for other cost-saving activities.

  14. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  15. "Value" of improved treadmill exercise capacity: lessons from a study of rate responsive pacing

    PubMed Central

    Staniforth, A; Andrews, R; Harrison, M; Perry, A; Cowley, A

    1998-01-01

    Objectives—To compare the value of a series of cardiovascular measurements in patients with symptomatic disease receiving an effective treatment (rate responsive pacing).
Patients—12 pacemaker dependent patients with VVIR units.
Interventions—Single blind crossover between VVI and VVIR.
Outcome measures—Exercise capacity was assessed by treadmill tests (modified Bruce protocol and a fixed workload protocol) with respiratory gas analysis. Self paced corridor walk tests were also undertaken. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed by questionnaire. Daily activity was measured in the patients' homes using shoe and belt pedometers.
Results—Treadmill tests and QOL questionnaires correctly identified the clinical benefit associated with VVIR. The modified Bruce protocol was superior to the fixed workload protocol as it was better tailored to the fairly well preserved exercise capacity of the patients. Symptom scores, but not walking times, were improved with VVIR during corridor walk tests. VVIR did not improve daily activity measured using either the belt or shoe pedometers.
Conclusions—VVIR pacing improved some but not all measures of exercise capacity. This finding illustrates the difficulty of selecting an instrument to measure symptomatic improvement in clinical research; and raises the question, what is the best way of measuring exercise capacity?

 Keywords: rate responsive pacing;  exercise capacity;  quality of life PMID:9875118

  16. OTRA-THS MAC to reduce Power Outage Data Collection Latency in a smart meter network

    SciTech Connect

    Garlapati, Shravan K; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Buehrer, Richard M; Reed, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of advanced metering infrastructure by the electric utilities poses unique communication challenges, particularly as the number of meters per aggregator increases. During a power outage, a smart meter tries to report it instantaneously to the electric utility. In a densely populated residential/industrial locality, it is possible that a large number of smart meters simultaneously try to get access to the communication network to report the power outage. If the number of smart meters is very high of the order of tens of thousands (metropolitan areas), the power outage data flooding can lead to Random Access CHannel (RACH) congestion. Several utilities are considering the use of cellular network for smart meter communications. In 3G/4G cellular networks, RACH congestion not only leads to collisions, retransmissions and increased RACH delays, but also has the potential to disrupt the dedicated traffic flow by increasing the interference levels (3G CDMA). In order to overcome this problem, in this paper we propose a Time Hierarchical Scheme (THS) that reduces the intensity of power outage data flooding and power outage reporting delay by 6/7th, and 17/18th when compared to their respective values without THS. Also, we propose an Optimum Transmission Rate Adaptive (OTRA) MAC to optimize the latency in power outage data collection. The analysis and simulation results presented in this paper show that both the OTRA and THS features of the proposed MAC results in a Power Outage Data Collection Latency (PODCL) that is 1/10th of the 4G LTE PODCL.

  17. How individual traces and interactive timelines could support outage execution - Toward an outage historian concept

    SciTech Connect

    Parfouru, S.; De-Beler, N.

    2012-07-01

    In the context of a project that is designing innovative ICT-based solutions for the organizational concept of outage management, we focus on the informational process of the OCR (Outage Control Room) underlying the execution of the outages. Informational process are based on structured and unstructured documents that have a key role in the collaborative processes and management of the outage. We especially track the structured and unstructured documents, electronically or not, from creation to sharing. Our analysis allows us to consider that the individual traces produced by an individual participant with a specific role could be multi-purpose and support sharing between participants without creating duplication of work. The ultimate goal is to be able to generate an outage historian, that is not just focused on highly structured information, which could be useful to improve the continuity of information between participants. We study the implementation of this approach through web technologies and social media tools to address this issue. We also investigate the issue of data access through interactive visualization timelines coupled with other modality's to assist users in the navigation and exploration of the proposed historian. (authors)

  18. Influence of oxygen transfer on Pseudomonas putida effects on growth rate and biodesulfurization capacity.

    PubMed

    Escobar, S; Rodriguez, A; Gomez, E; Alcon, A; Santos, V E; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-04-01

    The growth rate and desulfurization capacity accumulated by the cells during the growth of Pseudomonas putida KTH2 under different oxygen transfer conditions in a stirred and sparged tank bioreactor have been studied. Hydrodynamic conditions were changed using different agitation conditions. During the culture, several magnitudes associated to growth, such as the specific growth rate, the dissolved oxygen concentration and the carbon source consumption have been measured. Experimental results indicate that cultures are influenced by the fluid dynamic conditions into the bioreactor. An increase in the stirrer speed from 400 to 700 rpm has a positive influence on the cell growth rate. Nevertheless, the increase of agitation from 700 to 2000 rpm hardly has any influence on the growth rate. The effect of fluid dynamics on the cells development of the biodesulfurization (BDS) capacity of the cells during growth is different. The activities of the intracellular enzymes involved in the 4S pathway change with dissolved oxygen concentration. The enzyme activities have been evaluated in cells at several growth time and different hydrodynamic conditions. An increase of the agitation from 100 to 300 rpm has a positive influence on the development of the overall BDS capacity of the cells during growth. This capacity shows a decrease for higher stirrer speeds and the activity of the enzymes monooxygenases DszC and DszA decreases dramatically. The highest value of the activity of DszB enzyme was obtained with cells cultured at 100 rpm, while this activity decreases when the stirrer speed was increased higher than this value. PMID:26762940

  19. Minimizing forced outage risk in generator bidding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Dibyendu

    Competition in power markets has exposed the participating companies to physical and financial uncertainties. Generator companies bid to supply power in a day-ahead market. Once their bids are accepted by the ISO they are bound to supply power. A random outage after acceptance of bids forces a generator to buy power from the expensive real-time hourly spot market and sell to the ISO at the set day-ahead market clearing price, incurring losses. A risk management technique is developed to assess this financial risk associated with forced outages of generators and then minimize it. This work presents a risk assessment module which measures the financial risk of generators bidding in an open market for different bidding scenarios. The day-ahead power market auction is modeled using a Unit Commitment algorithm and a combination of Normal and Cauchy distributions generate the real time hourly spot market. Risk profiles are derived and VaRs are calculated at 98 percent confidence level as a measure of financial risk. Risk Profiles and VaRs help the generators to analyze the forced outage risk and different factors affecting it. The VaRs and the estimated total earning for different bidding scenarios are used to develop a risk minimization module. This module will develop a bidding strategy of the generator company such that its estimated total earning is maximized keeping the VaR below a tolerable limit. This general framework of a risk management technique for the generating companies bidding in competitive day-ahead market can also help them in decisions related to building new generators.

  20. Effect of aerobic capacity on sweat rate and fluid intake during outdoor exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Nakai, S; Yorimoto, A; Kawabata, T; Morimoto, T

    1995-01-01

    We measured the aerobic capacity, sweat rate and fluid intake of trained athletes during outdoor exercise and examined the relationship between aerobic capacity and thermoregulatory responses at high ambient temperatures. The maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) of the subjects, nine male baseball players of college age, was determined by maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. The subjects practised baseball regularly without drinking fluids from 1330 to 1530 hours. After 30 min rest, they played a baseball game with free access to a sports drink at 15 degrees C from 1600 to 1830 hours. At a mean ambient temperature of 36.7 (SEM 0.2) degree C, the mean percentage of body mass loss (delta mb) and increase of oral temperature (delta To) from 1330 to 1530 hours was 3.47 (SEM 0.12)% and 0.81 (SEM 0.14) degree C, respectively. The sweat loss from 1330 to 1830 hours was 56.53 (SEM 1.56)ml.kg-1 of body mass (mb) while the mean fluid consumption was 44.78 (SEM 2.39)ml.kg-1 of mb, with recovery of 76.08 (SEM 2.81)% of sweat loss. The VO2max was significantly inversely correlated with delta mb, fluid intake and rehydration amount, but showed no correlation with delta To. These results would suggest that at a given exercise intensity in subjects with a higher aerobic capacity body temperature is maintained with a lower sweating rate than that in subjects with a lower aerobic capacity.

  1. Quantifying the combined effects of attempt rate and swimming capacity on passage through velocity barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castro-Santos, T.

    2004-01-01

    The ability of fish to migrate past velocity barriers results from both attempt rate and swimming capacity. Here, I formalize this relationship, providing equations for estimating the proportion of a population successfully passing a barrier over a range of distances and times. These equations take into account the cumulative effect of multiple attempts, the time required to stage those attempts, and both the distance traversed on each attempt and its variability. I apply these equations to models of white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) ascending a 23-m-long flume against flows ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 m??s-1. Attempt rate varied between species, attempts, and over time and was influenced by hydraulic variables (velocity of flow and discharge). Distance of ascent was primarily influenced by flow velocity. Although swimming capacity was similar, white sucker had greater attempt rates, and consequently better passage success, than walleye. Over short distances, models for both species predict greater passage success against higher velocities owing to the associated increased attempt rate. These results highlight the importance of attraction to fish passage and the need for further investigation into the hydraulic and other environmental conditions required to simultaneously optimize both attempt rate and passage success.

  2. Estimation of the burn-back rate in high breaking capacity fuses using fast imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussière, W.

    2001-03-01

    The viewing of the erosion rate of the fuse element in high breaking capacity fuses is carried out using fast imagery. The rotating drum camera we have used provides up to 160 frames to observe the arc extinction throughout the phenomenon which lasts 4 ms. From these frames, we show that three stages follow each other with different values of burn-back rates: the maximum values are obtained at the beginning of the phenomenon and are equal to 6.65 m s-1 and 5.81 m s-1 for silver and copper fuse elements, respectively. The direct observation of the burn-back mechanism shows a reproducible disequilibrium depending on the nature of the electrode: the cathode erosion rate is 1.7 times that of the anode rate in the case of silver, and 1.2 times that of the anode in the case of copper.

  3. Universal roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: high rate capacity and atomistic origins

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianchao; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue; Shin, Swanee J.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R.I.; Wood, Brandon C.; Wang, Y. Morris

    2015-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes in graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. These findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes. PMID:26536830

  4. Paradoxical roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: High rate capacity and atomistic origins

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Jianchao C.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue Y.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; et al

    2015-11-05

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes inmore » graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. Furthermore, these findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes.« less

  5. Paradoxical roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: High rate capacity and atomistic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Jianchao C.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue Y.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Wood, Brandon C.; Wang, Y. Morris; Shin, Swanee J.

    2015-11-05

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes in graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. Furthermore, these findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes.

  6. Cycle 7 outage experience. [Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gadeken, A.D.

    1986-03-01

    The scheduled 58-day refueling outage in preparation for the seventh operating cycle of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was successfully completed three days ahead of schedule. The planning and execution of the outage was greatly aided by Project/2 automated scheduling capabilities. For example, the use of ''maintenance windows'' and resource loading capabilities was particularly effective. The value of the planning process was demonstrated by the smooth transition into the outage phase after an early shutdown and set the stage for our best outage to date.

  7. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  8. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 660 - Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits 2 Table 2 to Part 660 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... WEST COAST STATES Pt. 660, Table 2 Table 2 to Part 660—Vessel Capacity Ratings for West...

  9. Does the aerobic capacity of fish muscle change with growth rates?

    PubMed

    Pelletier, D; Guderley, H; Dutil, J D

    1993-08-01

    To ascertain whether growth rate modifies the oxidative capacity of fish white muscle, we examined the effects of individual growth rate on the activities of four mitochondrial enzymes in white muscle of the fast growing Atlantic cod,Gadus morhua. Growth rates were individually monitored in cod held at three acclimation temperatures during experiments repeated in four seasons. The size dependence of citrate synthase (CS), cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD) activities was established using wild cod ranging from 115 to 17,350 g. Given their negative allometry, CS and CCO activities in the experimental cod were corrected to those expected for a 1.2 kg animal. HOAD activities did not change with size. The specific activities of CCO and CS were positively correlated with growth rate. However, for both enzymes, season explained more of the variability than growth rate or temperature. Season was the only factor to significantly affect the activity of HOAD, while temperature and season interacted to determine glutamate dehydrogenase activity. CS activity was positively correlated with the initial condition of the cod, which differed among the seasons. The other enzymes did not show this relationship. The independent changes of these enzymes suggest that mitochondria undergo qualitative modifications with changes in growth rate, season and size. Although growth rate and the activities of CCO and CS are positively correlated, the activity of the mitochondrial enzymes is more affected by size, physical condition and season. PMID:24202687

  10. Determination of optimal lot size and production rate for multi-production channels with limited capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yeu-Shiang; Wang, Ruei-Pei; Ho, Jyh-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Due to the constantly changing business environment, producers often have to deal with customers by adopting different procurement policies. That is, manufacturers confront not only predictable and regular orders, but also unpredictable and irregular orders. In this study, from the perspective of upstream manufacturers, both regular and irregular orders are considered in coping with the situation in which an uncertain demand is faced by the manufacturer, and a capacity confirming mechanism is used to examine such demand. If the demand is less than or equal to the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the general supply channel is utilised to fully account for the manufacturing process, but if the demand is greater than the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the contingency production channel would be activated along with the ordinary channel to satisfy the upcoming high demand. Besides, the reproductive property of the probability distribution is employed to represent the order quantity of the two types of demand. Accordingly, the optimal production rates and lot sizes for both channels are derived to provide managers with insights for further production planning.

  11. A Person-Centered Approach to Financial Capacity Assessment: Preliminary Development of a New Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.; Stoltman, Jonathan; Ficker, Lisa J.; Iris, Madelyn; Mast, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Financial exploitation and financial capacity issues often overlap when a gerontologist assesses whether an older adult’s financial decision is an autonomous, capable choice. Our goal is to describe a new conceptual model for assessing financial decisions using principles of person-centered approaches and to introduce a new instrument, the Lichtenberg Financial Decision Rating Scale (LFDRS). We created a conceptual model, convened meetings of experts from various disciplines to critique the model and provide input on content and structure, and select final items. We then videotaped administration of the LFDRS to five older adults and had 10 experts provide independent ratings. The LFDRS demonstrated good to excellent inter-rater agreement. The LFDRS is a new tool that allows gerontologists to systematically gather information about a specific financial decision and the decisional abilities in question. PMID:25866438

  12. Improved outage management techniques for better plant availability

    SciTech Connect

    Bemer, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    To maintain high availability of nuclear generating units is one of the most important management objectives. The duration of outages-whether planned or unplanned-is the main parameter impacting on plant availability, but the planned outages, and essentially the refueling outages, are the most important in this respect, and they also have a heavy impact on the economics of plant operation. The following factors influence the duration of the outages: (1) modifications; (2) preventive maintenance operations; and (3) corrective maintenance operations of generic faults. In this paper, the authors examine how the outage management organization of Electricite de France (EdF) plants is tending to optimize the solutions to the above-mentioned points.

  13. Application of Hybrid Geo-Spatially Granular Fragility Curves to Improve Power Outage Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Steven J; Allen, Melissa R; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Fragility curves depict the relationship between a weather variable (wind speed, gust speed, ice accumulation, precipitation rate) and the observed outages for a targeted infrastructure network. This paper describes an empirical study of the county by county distribution of power outages and one minute weather variables during Hurricane Irene with the objective of comparing 1) as built fragility curves (statistical approach) to engineering as designed (bottom up) fragility curves for skill in forecasting outages during future hurricanes; 2) county specific fragility curves to find examples of significant deviation from average behavior; and 3) the engineering practices of outlier counties to suggest future engineering studies of robustness. Outages in more than 90% of the impacted counties could be anticipated through an average or generic fragility curve. The remaining counties could be identified and handled as exceptions through geographic data sets. The counties with increased or decreased robustness were characterized by terrain more or less susceptible to persistent flooding in areas where above ground poles located their foundations. Land use characteristics of the area served by the power distribution system can suggest trends in the as built power grid vulnerabilities to extreme weather events that would be subjects for site specific studies.

  14. Method for estimating power outages and restoration during natural and man-made events

    DOEpatents

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Fernandez, Steven J.

    2016-01-05

    A method of modeling electric supply and demand with a data processor in combination with a recordable medium, and for estimating spatial distribution of electric power outages and affected populations. A geographic area is divided into cells to form a matrix. Within the matrix, supply cells are identified as containing electric substations and demand cells are identified as including electricity customers. Demand cells of the matrix are associated with the supply cells as a function of the capacity of each of the supply cells and the proximity and/or electricity demand of each of the demand cells. The method includes estimating a power outage by applying disaster event prediction information to the matrix, and estimating power restoration using the supply and demand cell information of the matrix and standardized and historical restoration information.

  15. 75 FR 22125 - Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and... Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by Public Utilities, Order No. 697- C, FERC Stats. &...

  16. Quantum-locked key distribution at nearly the classical capacity rate.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-10-17

    Quantum data locking is a protocol that allows for a small secret key to (un)lock an exponentially larger amount of information, hence yielding the strongest violation of the classical one-time pad encryption in the quantum setting. This violation mirrors a large gap existing between two security criteria for quantum cryptography quantified by two entropic quantities: the Holevo information and the accessible information. We show that the latter becomes a sensible security criterion if an upper bound on the coherence time of the eavesdropper's quantum memory is known. Under this condition, we introduce a protocol for secret key generation through a memoryless qudit channel. For channels with enough symmetry, such as the d-dimensional erasure and depolarizing channels, this protocol allows secret key generation at an asymptotic rate as high as the classical capacity minus one bit.

  17. Quantum-locked key distribution at nearly the classical capacity rate.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

    2014-10-17

    Quantum data locking is a protocol that allows for a small secret key to (un)lock an exponentially larger amount of information, hence yielding the strongest violation of the classical one-time pad encryption in the quantum setting. This violation mirrors a large gap existing between two security criteria for quantum cryptography quantified by two entropic quantities: the Holevo information and the accessible information. We show that the latter becomes a sensible security criterion if an upper bound on the coherence time of the eavesdropper's quantum memory is known. Under this condition, we introduce a protocol for secret key generation through a memoryless qudit channel. For channels with enough symmetry, such as the d-dimensional erasure and depolarizing channels, this protocol allows secret key generation at an asymptotic rate as high as the classical capacity minus one bit. PMID:25361242

  18. Influence of type and neutralisation capacity of antacids on dissolution rate of ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin from tablets.

    PubMed

    Uzunović, Alija; Vranić, Edina

    2009-02-01

    Dissolution rate of two fluoroquinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin) was analysed in presence/absence of three antacid formulations. Disintegration time and neutralisation capacity of antacid tablets were also checked. Variation in disintegration time indicated the importance of this parameter, and allowed evaluation of the influence of postponed antacid-fluoroquinolone contact. The results obtained in this study showed decreased dissolution rate of fluoroquinolone antibiotics from tablets in simultaneous presence of antacids, regardless of their type and neutralisation capacity.

  19. Technology Integration Initiative In Support of Outage Management

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Weatherby; David Gertman

    2012-07-01

    Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Often, command and control during outages is maintained in the outage control center where many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. This research reports on the use of advanced integrating software technologies and hand held mobile devices as a means by which to reduce cycle time, improve accuracy, and enhance transparency among outage team members. This paper reports on the first phase of research supported by the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program that is performed in close collaboration with industry to examine the introduction of newly available technology allowing for safe and efficient outage performance. It is thought that this research will result in: improved resource management among various plant stakeholder groups, reduced paper work, and enhanced overall situation awareness for the outage control center management team. A description of field data collection methods, including personnel interview data, success factors, end-user evaluation and integration of hand held devices in achieving an integrated design are also evaluated. Finally, the necessity of obtaining operations cooperation support in field studies and technology evaluation is acknowledged.

  20. Changes of deceleration and acceleration capacity of heart rate in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Xing-De; Yang, Jia-Jun; Zhou, Li; Pan, Yong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Autonomic dysfunction is common after stroke, which is correlated with unfavorable outcome. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a newly developed technique for assessing cardiac autonomic function, by detecting sympathetic and vagal nerve activity separately through calculating acceleration capacity (AC) and deceleration capacity (DC) of heart rate. In this study, we used this technique for the first time to investigate the cardiac autonomic function of patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke. Methods A 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed in 63 patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke in hemisphere and sinus rhythm, as well as in 50 controls with high risk of stroke. DC, AC, heart rate variability parameters, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN), and square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD) were calculated. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was used to assess the severity of stroke. We analyzed the changes of DC, AC, SDNN, and RMSSD and also studied the correlations between these parameters and NIHSS scores. Results The R–R (R wave to R wave on electrocardiogram) intervals, DC, AC, and SDNN in the cerebral infarction group were lower than those in controls (P=0.003, P=0.002, P=0.006, and P=0.043), but the difference of RMSSD and the D-value and ratio between absolute value of AC (|AC|) and DC were not statistically significant compared with those in controls. The DC of the infarction group was significantly correlated with |AC|, SDNN, and RMSSD (r=0.857, r=0.619, and r=0.358; P=0.000, P=0.000, and P=0.004). Correlation analysis also showed that DC, |AC|, and SDNN were negatively correlated with NIHSS scores (r=−0.279, r=−0.266, and r=−0.319; P=0.027, P=0.035, and P=0.011). Conclusion Both DC and AC of heart rate decreased in patients with hemispheric infarction, reflecting a decrease in both vagal

  1. The effects of beta-alanine supplementation on physical working capacity at heart rate threshold.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Woessner, Mary N; Melvin, Malia N; Wingfield, Hailee L; Hackney, Anthony C

    2014-09-01

    Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation has been shown to delay neuromuscular fatigue as a result of increased muscle carnosine concentrations. Carnosine has also been found in brain and cardiac tissue. The physical working capacity test at heart rate threshold (PWC(HRT)) is a global estimate of the onset of fatigue during exercise, influenced by central and peripheral factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 28 days of BA supplementation on the PWC(HRT). Thirty subjects (mean ± SD; age: 21·0 ± 2·1 years; body mass: 72·7 ± 14·5 kg; height: 170·1 ± 7·9 cm) were randomly assigned to BA (n = 15) or placebo (PL, n = 15) groups. Testing included eight to nine total visits: an enrolment day, physical screening, peak oxygen consumption (V(·)O(2peak)) and two PWC(HRT) assessments over 4 days. Significant differences existed between BA and PL for PWC(HRT) (P = 0·001; mean∆: BA∆ = +24·2 watts, PL∆ = +11·2 watts), but not for V(·)O(2peak) (P = 0·222), time to exhaustion (TTE; P = 0·562) or ventilatory threshold (VT; P = 0·134). Results suggest that BA may increase heart rate training threshold. These results, in combination with one previous study reporting a potential effect of BA on HR, suggest that future studies should evaluate both central and peripheral aspects of fatigue with BA intake.

  2. Sample Results from MCU Solids Outage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Oji, L.; Coleman, C.; Poirier, M.

    2014-09-22

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has received several solid and liquid samples from MCU in an effort to understand and recover from the system outage starting on April 6, 2014. SRNL concludes that the presence of solids in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) is the likely root cause for the outage, based upon the following discoveries: A solids sample from the extraction contactor #1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate; A solids sample from the scrub contactor#1 proved to be mostly sodium oxalate; A solids sample from the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) proved to be mostly sodium oxalate; An archived sample from Tank 49H taken last year was shown to contain a fine precipitate of sodium oxalate; A solids sample from ; A liquid sample from the SSFT was shown to have elevated levels of oxalate anion compared to the expected concentration in the feed. Visual inspection of the SSFT indicated the presence of precipitated or transferred solids, which were likely also in the Salt Solution Receipt Tank (SSRT). The presence of the solids coupled with agitation performed to maintain feed temperature resulted in oxalate solids migration through the MCU system and caused hydraulic issues that resulted in unplanned phase carryover from the extraction into the scrub, and ultimately the strip contactors. Not only did this carryover result in the Strip Effluent (SE) being pushed out of waste acceptance specification, but it resulted in the deposition of solids into several of the contactors. At the same time, extensive deposits of aluminosilicates were found in the drain tube in the extraction contactor #1. However it is not known at this time how the aluminosilicate solids are related to the oxalate solids. The solids were successfully cleaned out of the MCU system. However, future consideration must be given to the exclusion of oxalate solids into the MCU system. There were 53 recommendations for improving operations recently identified. Some additional considerations or

  3. 75 FR 14342 - Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 35 Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy... Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services by Public Utilities, Order No. 697- C, FERC Stats. & Regs. ] 31,291 (2009). \\2\\ 18 CFR 35.42. \\3\\ Market-Based Rates for Wholesale Sales of Electric...

  4. Phosphorene ribbons as anode materials with superhigh rate and large capacity for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da; Guo, Gen-Cai; Wei, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Li-Min; Zhao, Shi-Jin

    2016-01-01

    By means of density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigated the adsorption and diffusion properties of lithium ions on the armchair and zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons (AC-PNR and ZZ-PNR), in comparison with the pristine phosphorene. It is shown that both AC- and ZZ-PNR have a significantly enhanced Li binding strength but without sacrificing the Li mobility due to the presence of unique edge states. Besides, the ZZ-PNR with the width of 21.5 Å has a moderate working voltage (0.504-0.021 V), high capacity (541 mA h/g) and fast charge/discharge rate, which is more promising to be used as an anode material for LIBs. By contrast, the obvious depravation of the voltage is found in AC-PNR, which is mainly due to its weak stiffness that cannot afford the observed structural deformation during the lithiated process. Thus, it is highly expected to avoid the undesirable structural expansion in AC-PNR. The results presented here provide valuable insights into exploring high performance armchair/zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons for potential Li-ion battery applications.

  5. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G

    2015-10-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6ºC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μ at the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) and generally covaried with μ but, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μ and K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. PMID:26362925

  6. Buffer capacity, pH, and flow rate in saliva of children aged 2-60 months with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Walter Luiz; Bermejo, Patrícia Rota; Mustacchi, Zan; Nicolau, José

    2005-03-01

    This study measured the flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity of saliva from children with Down syndrome aged 2-60 months. We compared 25 children with Down syndrome with 21 children without Down syndrome. The whole saliva was collected under slight suction and the pH and the buffer capacity were determined using a digital pHmeter. The buffer capacity was measured by titration with 0.01 N HCl. The Down syndrome group demonstrated higher buffer capacity than the control group in the pH ranges of 6.9-6.0, 5.9-5.0, and 4.9-4.0. The flow rate was low in the Down syndrome group. Boys from the Down syndrome group demonstrated higher buffer capacity in the pH ranges 6.9-6.0, 5.9-5.0, and 4.9-4.0 than controls, while girls from the Down syndrome group showed no difference compared with controls. Girls with Down syndrome demonstrated significant difference only in the range of pHi-pH 7.0. Conclusion. These data suggest that the Down syndrome persons present a better buffer capacity, supporting the results observed in several studies which found the low dental caries in persons with Down syndrome. PMID:15378405

  7. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C - Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vessel Capacity Ratings for West Coast Groundfish Limited Entry Permits 3 Table 3 to Part 660, Subpart C Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1441 - Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1441 Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity... crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements); § 1926.1434 (Equipment modifications); § 1926.1435 (Tower cranes); § 1926.1436 (Derricks); § 1926.1437 (Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1441 - Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1441 Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity... crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements); § 1926.1434 (Equipment modifications); § 1926.1435 (Tower cranes); § 1926.1436 (Derricks); § 1926.1437 (Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1441 - Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1441 Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity... crane/derrick lifts—supplemental requirements); § 1926.1434 (Equipment modifications); § 1926.1435 (Tower cranes); § 1926.1436 (Derricks); § 1926.1437 (Floating cranes/derricks and land cranes/derricks...

  11. Outages of electric power supply resulting from cable failures Boston Edison Company system

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Factual data are provided regarding 5 electric power supply interruptions that occurred in the Boston Metropolitan area during April to June, 1979. Common to all of these outages was the failure of an underground cable as the initiating event, followed by multiple equipment failures. There was significant variation in the voltage ratings and types of cables which failed. The investigation was unable to delineate a single specific Boston Edison design operating or maintenance practice that could be cited as the cause of the outages. After reviewing the investigative report the following actions were recommended: the development and implementation of a plan to eliminate the direct current cable network; develop a network outage restoration plan; regroup primary feeder cables wherever possible to minimize the number of circuits in manholes, and to separate feeders to high load density areas; develop a program to detect incipient cable faults; evaluate the separation of the north and south sections of Back Bay network into separate networks; and, as a minimum, install the necessary facilities to make it possible to re-energize one section without interfering with the other; and re-evaluate the cathodic protection scheme where necessary. (LCL)

  12. Estimation of salivary flow rate, pH, buffer capacity, calcium, total protein content and total antioxidant capacity in relation to dental caries severity, age and gender

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Pallavi; Reddy, N. Venugopal; Rao, V. Arun Prasad; Saxena, Aditya; Chaudhary, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, calcium, total protein content and total antioxidant capacity in relation to dental caries, age and gender. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 120 healthy children aged 7–15 years that was further divided into two groups: 7–10 years and 11–15 years. In this 60 children with DMFS/dfs = 0 and 60 children with DMFS/dfs ≥5 were included. The subjects were divided into two groups; Group A: Children with DMFS/dfs = 0 (caries-free) Group B: Children with DMFS/dfs ≥5 (caries active). Unstimulated saliva samples were collected from all groups. Flow rates were determined, and samples analyzed for pH, buffer capacity, calcium, total protein and total antioxidant status. Salivary antioxidant activity is measured with spectrophotometer by an adaptation of 2,2’-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) assays. Results: The mean difference of the two groups; caries-free and caries active were proved to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) for salivary calcium, total protein and total antioxidant level for both the sexes in the age group 7–10 years and for the age 11–15 years the mean difference of the two groups were proved to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) for salivary calcium level for both the sexes. Salivary total protein and total antioxidant level were proved to be statistically significant for male children only. Conclusions: In general, total protein and total antioxidants in saliva were increased with caries activity. Calcium content of saliva was found to be more in caries-free group and increased with age. PMID:25821379

  13. Vector computer implementation of power flow outage studies

    SciTech Connect

    Granelli, G.P.; Montagna, M.; Pasini, G.L. ); Marannino, P. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper presents an application of vector and parallel processing to power flow outage studies on large-scale networks. Standard sparsity programming is not well suited to the capabilities of vector and parallel computers because of the extremely short vectors processed in load flow studies. In order to improve computation efficiency, the operations required to perform both forward/backward solution and power residual calculation are gathered in the form of long FORTRAN DO loops. Two algorithms are proposed and compared with the results of a program written for scalar processing. Simulations for the outage studies on IEEE standard networks and some different configurations of the Italian and European (UCPTE) EHV systems are run on a CRAY Y-MP8/432 vector computer (and partially on a IBM 3090/200S VF). The multitasking facility of the CRAY computer is also exploited in order to shorten the wall clock time required by a complete outage simulation.

  14. 78 FR 70299 - Capacity Markets Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Capacity Markets Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... liability. Any person desiring to intervene or to protest should file with the Federal Energy...

  15. The Effect of Digestive Capacity on the Intake Rate of Toxic and Non-Toxic Prey in an Ecological Context

    PubMed Central

    Oudman, Thomas; Hin, Vincent; Dekinga, Anne; van Gils, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Digestive capacity often limits food intake rate in animals. Many species can flexibly adjust digestive organ mass, enabling them to increase intake rate in times of increased energy requirement and/or scarcity of high-quality prey. However, some prey species are defended by secondary compounds, thereby forcing a toxin limitation on the forager’s intake rate, a constraint that potentially cannot be alleviated by enlarging digestive capacity. Hence, physiological flexibility may have a differential effect on intake of different prey types, and consequently on dietary preferences. We tested this effect in red knots (Calidris canutus canutus), medium-sized migratory shorebirds that feed on hard-shelled, usually mollusc, prey. Because they ingest their prey whole and crush the shell in their gizzard, the intake rate of red knots is generally constrained by digestive capacity. However, one of their main prey, the bivalve Loripes lucinalis, imposes a toxin constraint due to its symbiosis with sulphide-oxidizing bacteria. We manipulated gizzard sizes of red knots through prolonged exposure to hard-shelled or soft foods. We then measured maximum intake rates of toxic Loripes versus a non-toxic bivalve, Dosinia isocardia. We found that intake of Dosinia exponentially increased with gizzard mass, confirming earlier results with non-toxic prey, whereas intake of Loripes was independent of gizzard mass. Using linear programming, we show that this leads to markedly different expected diet preferences in red knots that try to maximize energy intake rate with a small versus a large gizzard. Intra- and inter-individual variation in digestive capacity is found in many animal species. Hence, the here proposed functional link with individual differences in foraging decisions may be general. We emphasize the potential relevance of individual variation in physiology when studying trophic interactions. PMID:26287951

  16. Binder-free Ge-three dimensional graphene electrodes for high-rate capacity Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. D.; Chui, Y. S.; Chen, X. F. E-mail: apwjzh@cityu.edu.hk; Zhang, W. J. E-mail: apwjzh@cityu.edu.hk; Li, Y.

    2013-12-16

    A binder-free, high-rate Ge-three dimensional (3D) graphene composite was synthesized by directly depositing Ge film atop 3D graphene grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on Ni substrate. The Ge-3D graphene structure demonstrates excellent electrochemical performance as a lithium ion battery (LIB) anode with a reversible capacity of 1140 mAh g{sup −1} at 1/3C over 100 cycles and 835 mAh g{sup −1} at 8C after 60 cycles, and significantly a discharge capacity of 186 mAh g{sup −1} was still achieved at 32C. The high capacity and outstanding stability of the Ge-3D graphene composite propose it as a promising electrode in high-performance thin film LIBs.

  17. Optimizing assisted communication devices for Children with motor impairments using a model of information rate and channel capacity.

    PubMed

    Sanger, Terence D; Henderson, Juliet

    2007-09-01

    For children who depend on devices to communicate, the rate of communication is a primary determinant of success. For children with motor impairments, the rate of communication may be limited by inability to contact buttons or cells rapidly or accurately. It is, therefore, essential to know how to adjust the device interface in order to maximize each child's rate of communication. The optimal rate of communication is determined by the channel capacity, which is the maximum value of the information rate for all possible keyboard button or cell layouts for the communication device. We construct a mathematical model for the information rate based on the relationship between movement time and the number of buttons per screen, the size of the buttons, and the length of a sequence of buttons that must be pressed to communicate each word in the vocabulary. We measure the parameters of the model using a custom-programmed touchscreen interface in 10 children with disorders of arm movement due to cerebral palsy who use a DynaVox communication device. We measure the same parameters in 20 healthy control subjects. We show that the model approximates the measured information rate and that the information rate is lower in children with motor impairments compared with control subjects. The theory predicts that for each child there is a combination of button size and number that maximizes the predicted information rate and thereby achieves communication at the optimal channel capacity. Programming communication devices with each child's predicted optimal parameters improved the communication rate in five of the ten children, compared with programming by professionals. Therefore, measurement of information rate may provide an assessment of the effect of motor disorders on success in assisted communication. Optimization of the information rate may be useful for programming assisted communication devices.

  18. Rating batteries for initial capacity, charging parameters and cycle life in the photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, S.R.; Hund, T.D.

    1995-11-01

    Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) systems typically depend on battery storage to supply power to the load when there is cloudy weather or no sun. Reliable operation of the load is often dependent on battery performance. This paper presents test procedures for lead-acid batteries which identify initial battery preparation, battery capacity after preparation, charge regulation set-points, and cycle life based on the operational characteristics of PV systems.

  19. Leaf photosynthetic rate of tropical ferns is evolutionarily linked to water transport capacity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Bao; Sun, Mei; Cao, Kun-Fang; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Jiao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Ferns usually have relatively lower photosynthetic potential than angiosperms. However, it is unclear whether low photosynthetic potential of ferns is linked to leaf water supply. We hypothesized that there is an evolutionary association of leaf water transport capacity with photosynthesis and stomatal density in ferns. In the present study, a series of functional traits relating to leaf anatomy, hydraulics and physiology were assessed in 19 terrestrial and 11 epiphytic ferns in a common garden, and analyzed by a comparative phylogenetics method. Compared with epiphytic ferns, terrestrial ferns had higher vein density (Dvein), stomatal density (SD), stomatal conductance (gs), and photosynthetic capacity (Amax), but lower values for lower epidermal thickness (LET) and leaf thickness (LT). Across species, all traits varied significantly, but only stomatal length (SL) showed strong phylogenetic conservatism. Amax was positively correlated with Dvein and gs with and without phylogenetic corrections. SD correlated positively with Amax, Dvein and gs, with the correlation between SD and Dvein being significant after phylogenetic correction. Leaf water content showed significant correlations with LET, LT, and mesophyll thickness. Our results provide evidence that Amax of the studied ferns is linked to leaf water transport capacity, and there was an evolutionary association between water supply and demand in ferns. These findings add new insights into the evolutionary correlations among traits involving carbon and water economy in ferns.

  20. Estimating the carbon sequestration capacity of shale formations using methane production rates.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhiyuan; Clarens, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Hydraulically fractured shale formations are being developed widely for oil and gas production. They could also represent an attractive repository for permanent geologic carbon sequestration. Shales have a low permeability, but they can adsorb an appreciable amount of CO2 on fracture surfaces. Here, a computational method is proposed for estimating the CO2 sequestration capacity of a fractured shale formation and it is applied to the Marcellus shale in the eastern United States. The model is based on historical and projected CH4 production along with published data and models for CH4/CO2 sorption equilibria and kinetics. The results suggest that the Marcellus shale alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gt of CO2 between now and 2030, which represents more than 50% of total U.S. CO2 emissions from stationary sources over the same period. Other shale formations with comparable pressure-temperature conditions, such as Haynesville and Barnett, could provide significant additional storage capacity. The mass transfer kinetic results indicate that injection of CO2 would proceed several times faster than production of CH4. Additional considerations not included in this model could either reinforce (e.g., leveraging of existing extraction and monitoring infrastructure) or undermine (e.g., leakage or seismicity potential) this approach, but the sequestration capacity estimated here supports continued exploration into this pathway for producing carbon neutral energy.

  1. The effects of cigarette smoking on aerobic and anaerobic capacity and heart rate variability among female university students

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Lun; Chang, Wen-Dien

    2013-01-01

    Aim In this study, the effects of cigarette smoking on maximal aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity, and heart rate variability among female university students were investigated. Materials and methods Twelve smokers and 21 nonsmokers participated in this study. All participants performed an intermittent sprint test (IST) and a 20 m shuttle run test to measure their anaerobic capacity and maximal aerobic capacity. The IST was comprised of 6 × 10-second sprints with a 60-second active recovery between each sprint. Heart rate variability was recorded while the participants were in a supine position 20 minutes before and 30 minutes after the IST. Results The total work, peak power, and heart rate of the smokers and nonsmokers did not differ significantly. However, the smokers’ average power declined significantly during sprints 4 to 6 (smokers versus nonsmokers, respectively: 95% confidence interval =6.2–7.2 joule/kg versus 6.8–7.6 joule/kg; P<0.05), and their fatigue index increased (smokers versus nonsmokers, respectively: 35.8% ± 2.3% versus 24.5% ± 1.76%; P<0.05) during the IST. The maximal oxygen uptake of nonsmokers was significantly higher than that of the smokers (P<0.05). The standard deviation of the normal to normal intervals and the root mean square successive difference did not differ significantly between nonsmokers and smokers. However, the nonsmokers exhibited a significantly higher normalized high frequency (HF), and significantly lower normalized low frequency (LF), LF/HF ratio, and natural logarithm of the LF/HF when compared with those of the smokers (P<0.05). Conclusion Smoking may increase female smokers’ exercise fatigue and decrease their average performance during an IST, while reducing their maximal aerobic capacity. Furthermore, smoking reduces parasympathetic nerve activity and activates sympathetic cardiac control. PMID:24204174

  2. Practical angular-multiplexing holographic data storage system with 2 terabyte capacity and 1 gigabit transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshizawa, Taku; Shimada, Ken-ichi; Fujita, Kouji; Tada, Yukinobu

    2016-09-01

    Aiming at the realization of an optical data storage system with a large disc capacity and a high transfer rate suitable for digital data archiving, we have defined the specifications of an angular-multiplexing holographic data storage system with a disc capacity of 2 TB and a transfer rate of 1 Gbps on the basis of a run-length-limited (RLL) high-density recording method using RLL modulation. To realize the specifications, RLL turbo coding, a servo system for the reference beam angle, and a servo system for book tracking were newly invented. Also, to satisfy the specifications, a holographic disc and several key components were developed in cooperation with several specialty companies. Eventually, we confirmed a high-density recording of 2.4 Tbit/in.2 achieved by the RLL high-density recording method, using evaluation equipment complying with the specifications for single book recording.

  3. Cdc6 is a rate-limiting factor for proliferative capacity during HL60 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, Laura R.; Hong, Hye Kyung; Kingsbury, Sarah R.; James, Michelle; Stoeber, Kai Williams, Gareth H.

    2007-10-15

    The DNA replication (or origin) licensing pathway represents a critical step in cell proliferation control downstream of growth signalling pathways. Repression of origin licensing through down-regulation of the MCM licensing factors (Mcm2-7) is emerging as a ubiquitous route for lowering proliferative capacity as metazoan cells exit the cell division cycle into quiescent, terminally differentiated and senescent 'out-of-cycle' states. Using the HL60 monocyte/macrophage differentiation model system and a cell-free DNA replication assay, we have undertaken direct biochemical investigations of the coupling of origin licensing to the differentiation process. Our data show that down-regulation of the MCM loading factor Cdc6 acts as a molecular switch that triggers loss of proliferative capacity during early engagement of the somatic differentiation programme. Consequently, addition of recombinant Cdc6 protein to in vitro replication reactions restores DNA replication competence in nuclei prepared from differentiating cells. Differentiating HL60 cells over-expressing either wild-type Cdc6 or a CDK phosphorylation-resistant Cdc6 mutant protein (Cdc6A4) exhibit an extended period of cell proliferation compared to mock-infected cells. Notably, differentiating HL60 cells over-expressing the Cdc6A4 mutant fail to down-regulate Cdc6 protein levels, suggesting that CDK phosphorylation of Cdc6 is linked to its down-regulation during differentiation and the concomitant decrease in cell proliferation. In this experimental model, Cdc6 therefore plays a key role in the sequential molecular events leading to repression of origin licensing and loss of proliferative capacity during execution of the differentiation programme.

  4. Intraspecific Correlations of Basal and Maximal Metabolic Rates in Birds and the Aerobic Capacity Model for the Evolution of Endothermy

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, David L.; Thomas, Nathan E.; Liknes, Eric T.; Cooper, Sheldon J.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that basal (BMR) and maximal aerobic metabolic rates are phenotypically linked. However, because BMR is largely a function of central organs whereas maximal metabolic output is largely a function of skeletal muscles, the mechanistic underpinnings for their linkage are not obvious. Interspecific studies in birds generally support a phenotypic correlation between BMR and maximal metabolic output. If the aerobic capacity model is valid, these phenotypic correlations should also extend to intraspecific comparisons. We measured BMR, Msum (maximum thermoregulatory metabolic rate) and MMR (maximum exercise metabolic rate in a hop-flutter chamber) in winter for dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis; Msum and MMR only), and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus; BMR and Msum only) and examined correlations among these variables. We also measured BMR and Msum in individual house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in both summer, winter and spring. For both raw metabolic rates and residuals from allometric regressions, BMR was not significantly correlated with either Msum or MMR in juncos. Moreover, no significant correlation between Msum and MMR or their mass-independent residuals occurred for juncos or goldfinches. Raw BMR and Msum were significantly positively correlated for black-capped chickadees and house sparrows, but mass-independent residuals of BMR and Msum were not. These data suggest that central organ and exercise organ metabolic levels are not inextricably linked and that muscular capacities for exercise and shivering do not necessarily vary in tandem in individual birds. Why intraspecific and interspecific avian studies show differing results and the significance of these differences to the aerobic capacity model are unknown, and resolution of these questions will require additional studies of potential mechanistic links between

  5. Using Predictive Analytics to Predict Power Outages from Severe Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanik, D. W.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hartman, B.; Frediani, M. E.; Astitha, M.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of reliable power is essential to businesses, public services, and our daily lives. With the growing abundance of data being collected and created by industry (i.e. outage data), government agencies (i.e. land cover), and academia (i.e. weather forecasts), we can begin to tackle problems that previously seemed too complex to solve. In this session, we will present newly developed tools to aid decision-support challenges at electric distribution utilities that must mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from severe weather. We will show a performance evaluation of outage predictive models built for Eversource Energy (formerly Connecticut Light & Power) for storms of all types (i.e. blizzards, thunderstorms and hurricanes) and magnitudes (from 20 to >15,000 outages). High resolution weather simulations (simulated with the Weather and Research Forecast Model) were joined with utility outage data to calibrate four types of models: a decision tree (DT), random forest (RF), boosted gradient tree (BT) and an ensemble (ENS) decision tree regression that combined predictions from DT, RF and BT. The study shows that the ENS model forced with weather, infrastructure and land cover data was superior to the other models we evaluated, especially in terms of predicting the spatial distribution of outages. This research has the potential to be used for other critical infrastructure systems (such as telecommunications, drinking water and gas distribution networks), and can be readily expanded to the entire New England region to facilitate better planning and coordination among decision-makers when severe weather strikes.

  6. 25 CFR 161.204 - How are carrying capacities and stocking rates established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... range improvements in place to achieve uniformity of grazing under sustained yield management principles... agricultural resource management plan and range unit management plan. (b) BIA, with the concurrence of the Navajo Nation, will establish the stocking rate of each range or management unit. The stocking rate...

  7. A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

    2003-11-01

    A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small

  8. A nanonet-enabled Li ion battery cathode material with high power rate, high capacity, and long cycle lifetime.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sa; Yang, Xiaogang; Lin, Yongjing; Xie, Jin; Wang, Dunwei

    2012-01-24

    The performance of advanced energy conversion and storage devices, including solar cells and batteries, is intimately connected to the electrode designs at the nanoscale. Consider a rechargeable Li ion battery, a prevalent energy storage technology, as an example. Among other factors, the electrode material design at the nanoscale is key to realizing the goal of measuring fast ionic diffusion and high electronic conductivity, the inherent properties that determine power rates, and good stability upon repeated charge and discharge, which is critical to the sustainable high capacities. Here we show that such a goal can be achieved by forming heteronanostructures on a radically new platform we discovered, TiSi(2) nanonets. In addition to the benefits of high surface area, good electrical conductivity, and superb mechanical strength offered by the nanonet, the design also takes advantage of how TiSi(2) reacts with O(2) upon heating. The resulting TiSi(2)/V(2)O(5) nanostructures exhibit a specific capacity of 350 Ah/kg, a power rate up to 14.5 kW/kg, and 78.7% capacity retention after 9800 cycles of charge and discharge. These figures indicate that a cathode material significantly better than V(2)O(5) of other morphologies is produced.

  9. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk.

    PubMed

    McCraty, Rollin; Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems.

  10. Heart Rate Variability: New Perspectives on Physiological Mechanisms, Assessment of Self-regulatory Capacity, and Health risk

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate variability, the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operates on different time scales to adapt to environmental and psychological challenges. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart and offers some new perspectives on mechanisms underlying the very low frequency rhythm of heart rate variability. Interpretation of heart rate variability rhythms in the context of health risk and physiological and psychological self-regulatory capacity assessment is discussed. The cardiovascular regulatory centers in the spinal cord and medulla integrate inputs from higher brain centers with afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. We also discuss the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection pathways, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical, frontocortical, and motor cortex areas. In addition, the use of real-time HRV feedback to increase self-regulatory capacity is reviewed. We conclude that the heart's rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales that reflect both physiological and psychological functional status of these internal self-regulatory systems. PMID:25694852

  11. Odour emission inventory of German wastewater treatment plants--odour flow rates and odour emission capacity.

    PubMed

    Frechen, F-B

    2004-01-01

    Wastewater Treatment plants can cause odour emissions that may lead to significant odour annoyance in their vicinity. Thus, over the past 20 years, several measurements were taken of the odour emissions that occur at WWTPs of different sizes, treatment technology, plant design and under different operating conditions. The specific aspects of odour sampling and measurement have to be considered. I presented some of the results of my odour emission measurements 11 years ago. However, it is now necessary to update the figures by evaluating newer measurement results obtained from measurements taken from 1994 to 2003. These are presented in this paper. Also, the paper highlights the odour emission capacity (OEC) measurement technique which characterises liquids and can be used to assess the results achieved by different types of treatment in the liquid phase, e.g. in a sewerage system. In addition, the OEC is a suitable parameter to set standards for the odorant content of industrial wastewaters that are discharged into the publicly owned sewerage system.

  12. Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Methodologies and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

    2012-05-31

    Abstract- This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses different approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies. The second paper summarizes the state of the art in modeling tools for risk assessment of cascading outages.

  13. Capacity assessment of a system for metrological traceability on liquid micro flow rate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B. L.; Aquino, M. H.; Farias, M. H.; Koiller, J.; Gabriel, P. C.; Aibe, V. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The necessity of standardizing and traceability to SI in micro scale flow has been subject of intense discuss in the metrology community. The Bureau International of Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has encouraged National Metrology Institutes to be prepared to participate, in 2024, of the first Key Comparison event planned in this area. With this aim, the present work describes a standard system based on gravimetric method for fluid delivery and respective quantification, which was developed by the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (INMETRO) in order to provide traceability for microflow rate measurement. The system performance and capability were evaluated. An important goal of the work is contribute to the establishment and advancement of researches on microfluidic issues in the Institute.

  14. The degree of heart rate asymmetry is crucial for the validity of the deceleration and acceleration capacity indices of heart rate: A model-based study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing; Zhou, Gongzhan; Wang, Ruofan; Yu, Yihua; Li, Feng; Fang, Luping; Yan, Jing; Ning, Gangmin

    2016-09-01

    The deceleration capacity (DC) and acceleration capacity (AC) of heart rate are a pair of indices used for evaluating the autonomic nervous system (ANS). We assessed the role of heart rate asymmetry (HRA) in defining the relative performance of DC and AC using a mathematical model, which is able to generate a realistic RR interval (RRI) time series with controlled ANS states. The simulation produced a set of RRI series with random sympathetic and vagal activities. The multi-scale DCs and ACs were computed from the RRI series, and the correlation of DC and AC with the ANS functions was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the indices. In the model, the HRA level was modified by changing the inspiration/expiration (I/E) ratio to examine the influence of HRA on the performances of DC and AC. The results show that on the conventional scales (T=1, s=2), an HRA level above 50% results in a stronger association of DC with the ANS, compared with AC. On higher scales (T=4, s=6), there was no HRA and DC showed a similar performance to AC for all I/E ratios. The data suggest that the HRA level determines which of DC or AC is the optimal index for expressing ANS functions. Future clinical applications of DC and AC should be accompanied by an HRA analysis to provide a better index for assessing ANS. PMID:27392228

  15. DURABILITY OF VERY LOW CAPACITY PRESSURE ATOMIZED FUEL NOZZLES USED WITH LOW FIRING RATE RESIDENTIAL OIL BURNERS.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2007-05-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), has conducted a preliminary evaluation of the potential of very low fuel input capacity Simplex type pressure atomizing nozzles for use with oil burners designed for residential boilers, furnaces and water heaters. These nozzles under suitable conditions can be sufficiently reliable to enable new heating system designs. This would allow for the design of heating appliances that match the smaller load demands of energy efficient homes built with modern components and architectural systems designed to minimize energy use. When heating systems are installed with excessive capacity, oversized by three to four times the load, the result is a loss of up to ten percent as compared to the rated appliance efficiency. The use of low capacity nozzles in systems designed to closely match the load can thereby result in significant energy savings. BNL investigated the limitations of low flow rate nozzles and designed long-term experiments to see if ways could be determined that would be beneficial to long-term operation at low input capacities without failures. In order to maximize the potential for success the best possible industry practices available were employed. Low flow rate nozzles primarily fail by blockage or partial blockage of internal fuel flow passages inside the nozzle. To prevent any contaminants from entering the nozzle BNL investigated the geometry and critical dimensions and the current sate of the art of fuel filter design. Based on this investigation it was concluded that the best available filters should be more than capable of filtering contaminants from the fuel prior to entering the oil burner itself. This position was indeed validated based on the long-term trials conducted under this study no evidence resulted to change our position. It is highly recommended that these filters rated at 10 microns and with large filter capacity (surface area), should be used

  16. Changes in fetal organ weights during gestation after selection for ovulation rate and uterine capacity in swine.

    PubMed

    Vallet, J L; Freking, B A

    2006-09-01

    We hypothesized that the ability of the fetus to alter nutrient shunting and organ growth might be associated with uterine capacity. White crossbred gilts from a randomly selected control line, a line selected for ovulation rate, and a line selected for uterine capacity (UC) were unilaterally hysterectomized-ovariectomized at 160 d of age, mated at estrus, and slaughtered at 45, 65, 85, and 105 d of gestation (9 to 18 gilts for each line x day combination). Analysis of the data revealed that heart weights and fetal weights were decreased in the ovulation rate line. No significant differences were obtained in fetal, placental, or fetal organ weights between the control and UC lines. Allometric growth of organs was assessed by examination of the slopes of the relationships between fetal weights and fetal organ weights after natural log transformation. Only the relative growth of the liver differed between selection lines and was greater (P = 0.01) in the UC compared with the control line during early pregnancy (d 45 and 65). Allometric growth of the fetal brain, liver, and heart differed with day of gestation. A brain-sparing effect was greater (P < 0.01) on d 85 and 105 compared with d 45 and 65. By contrast, a heart-sparing effect was present during early gestation and disappeared in later gestation. Fetal liver weights were hypersensitive to differences in fetal weights on d 45, possibly associated with placental effects on fetal liver weight. Fetal spleen weights were proportional to fetal weights throughout gestation. These results indicate that selection for ovulation rate decreased total fetal and fetal heart weights, and that selection for UC altered the relationship between total fetal and fetal liver weights during early gestation. Results further indicate significant changes in allometric growth of organs during gestation.

  17. Evaluation by respirometry of the loading capacity of a high rate vermicompost bed for treating sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Clarke, William P; Taylor, Michael; Cossins, Rowan

    2007-09-01

    This study examines high rate vermicomposting of sewage sludge using high stocking densities of earthworms. To examine the loading capacity, two vermicompost beds were established in identical 0.84 m diameter reactors, one loaded at an average rate of 10 kg-wet-sludge-mixture m(-2) day(-1) (0.5 kg-carbon m(-2) day(-1)), the other loaded at 20 kg-wet-sludge-mixture m(-2) day(-1) (1 kg-carbon m(-2) day(-1)). The sludge mixture was from a commercial vermicomposting company (Vermitech) and contained 80-90% sludge and 10-20% green waste and clay. The beds were operated in fed-batch mode for 38 days, and then monitored for a further 12 days without any further sludge loading. Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were added once or twice weekly over the 38 days loading period to gradually decrease the ratio of sludge loading rate to total earthworm biomass. By adding earthworm incrementally, the feeding rate ranged from 3.9 to 1.25 kg-wet-sludge kg-earthworm(-1) day(-1) for the full load experiment and 2-0.62 kg-wet-sludge kg-earthworm(-1) day(-1) for the half load experiment. The extent of degradation was estimated by fitting a 1st order model to the CO2 production rate from the beds. Based on the 1st order model, 53+/-20% (95% CI) and 68+/-4% of the organic carbon was converted to CO2 -C in the full load and half load experiments respectively. The CO2 production rate in the half load experiment became stable and repeatable when the total earthworm biomass reached 5.4 kg, corresponding to a feed rate of 1.04 kg-wet-sludge-mixture kg-earthworm(-1) day(-1). In contrast, the rate of CO2 production was still climbing and traces of methane were evident in the full load experiment at the end of the 38 day loading period. The experiments indicate that high rate vermicomposting beds are sustainable providing the feeding rate does not exceed approximately 1 kg-wet-sludge kg-earthworm(-1) day(-1).

  18. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise

    PubMed Central

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power () is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P < 0.05) despite an increase in right atrial pressure (RAP) and a tendency (P = 0.056) for a reduction in left ventricular transmural filling pressure (LVFP). Atrial pacing increased HRmax from 184 ± 2 to 206 ± 3 beats min−1 (P < 0.05), but remained similar to the control condition at all intensities because of a lower SV and LVFP (P < 0.05). No differences in arterial pressure, peripheral haemodynamics, catecholamines or were observed, but pacing increased the rate pressure product and RAP (P < 0.05). Atrial pacing had a similar effect on haemodynamics during KEE, except that pacing decreased RAP. In conclusion, the human heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict close to . Key points During high intensity whole-body exercise, systemic and contracting skeletal muscle O2 delivery and uptake (>) are compromised, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We evaluated the effect of a ∼20 beats min−1 increase in heart rate (HR) by right atrial pacing during incremental cycling and knee

  19. Design Concepts for an Outage Control Center Information Dashboard

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Jacques Victor; St Germain, Shawn Walter; Thompson, Cheradan Jo; Whitesides, McKenzie Jo; Farris, Ronald Keith

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear industry, and the business world in general, is facing a rapidly increasing amount of data to be dealt with on a daily basis. In the last two decades, the steady improvement of data storage devices and means to create and collect data along the way influenced the manner in which we deal with information. Most data is still stored without filtering and refinement for later use. Many functions at a nuclear power plant generate vast amounts of data, with scheduled and unscheduled outages being a prime example of a source of some of the most complex data sets at the plant. To make matters worse, modern information and communications technology is making it possible to collect and store data faster than our ability to use it for making decisions. However, in most applications, especially outages, raw data has no value in itself; instead, managers, engineers and other specialists want to extract the information contained in it. The complexity and sheer volume of data could lead to information overload, resulting in getting lost in data that may be irrelevant to the task at hand, processed in an inappropriate way, or presented in an ineffective way. To prevent information overload, many data sources are ignored so production opportunities are lost because utilities lack the ability to deal with the enormous data volumes properly. Decision-makers are often confronted with large amounts of disparate, conflicting and dynamic information, which are available from multiple heterogeneous sources. Information and communication technologies alone will not solve this problem. Utilities need effective methods to exploit and use the hidden opportunities and knowledge residing in unexplored data resources. Superior performance before, during and after outages depends upon the right information being available at the right time to the right people. Acquisition of raw data is the easy part; instead, it is the ability to use advanced analytical, data processing and data

  20. Enhanced cardiac TBC1D10C expression lowers heart rate and enhances exercise capacity and survival

    PubMed Central

    Volland, Cornelia; Bremer, Sebastian; Hellenkamp, Kristian; Hartmann, Nico; Dybkova, Nataliya; Khadjeh, Sara; Kutschenko, Anna; Liebetanz, David; Wagner, Stefan; Unsöld, Bernhard; Didié, Michael; Toischer, Karl; Sossalla, Samuel; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Seidler, Tim

    2016-01-01

    TBC1D10C is a protein previously demonstrated to bind and inhibit Ras and Calcineurin. In cardiomyocytes, also CaMKII is inhibited and all three targeted enzymes are known to promote maladaptive cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Here, in accordance with lack of Calcineurin inhibition in vivo, we did not observe a relevant anti-hypertrophic effect despite inhibition of Ras and CaMKII. However, cardiomyocyte-specific TBC1D10C overexpressing transgenic mice exhibited enhanced longevity. Ejection fraction and exercise capacity were enhanced in transgenic mice, but shortening of isolated cardiomyocytes was not increased. This suggests longevity resulted from enhanced cardiac performance but independent of cardiomyocyte contractile force. In further search for mechanisms, a transcriptome-wide analysis revealed expressional changes in several genes pertinent to control of heart rate (HR) including Hcn4, Scn10a, Sema3a and Cacna2d2. Indeed, telemetric holter recordings demonstrated slower atrial conduction and significantly lower HR. Pharmacological reduction of HR was previously demonstrated to enhance survival in mice. Thus, in addition to inhibition of stress signaling, TBC1D10C economizes generation of cardiac output via HR reduction, enhancing exercise capacity and survival. TBC1D10C may be a new target for HR reduction and longevity. PMID:27667030

  1. Effects of the rate of releases from Sam Rayburn Reservoir on the Aeration Capacity of the Angelina River, eastern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, Jack; Goss, Richard L.; Rathbun, Ira G.

    1980-01-01

    A three-phase study was conducted during July and August 1979 to determine the effects of varying release rates through the power-outlet works at Sam Rayburn Reservoir, eastern Texas, on aeration capacity of a 14-mile reach of the Angelina River below Sam Rayburn Dam. The dominant factors that affected the aeration capacity during the study time were time of travel and the dissolved-oxygen deficit of the releases. Aeration was low throughout the study but increased in response to increases in the dissolved-oxygen deficit and the duration of time that the releases were exposed to the atmosphere (time of travel). The average concentration of dissolved oxygen sustained by release of 8,800 cubic feet per second decreased from 5.0 milligrams per liter at a site near the power outlet to 4.8 milligrams per liter at a site about 14 miles downstream; the time of travel averaged about 8 hours. The average concentration of dissolved oxygen in flow sustained by releases of 2,200 cubic feet per second increased from 5.2 to 5.5 milligrams per liter; the time of travel averaged about 20 hours. (USGS)

  2. Conceptus development during blastocyst elongation in lines of pigs selected for increased uterine capacity or ovulation rate.

    PubMed

    Miles, J R; Freking, B A; Blomberg, L A; Vallet, J L; Zuelke, K A

    2008-09-01

    Lines of pigs selected for increased uterine capacity have improved conceptus survival, whereas pigs selected for increased ovulation rate have decreased conceptus survival relative to an unselected control line. The objective of this study was to evaluate conceptus development during blastocyst elongation as a potential contributing factor to differences in conceptus survival rate among these pig lines. Conceptuses were recovered from pregnant control, uterine capacity, and ovulation rate line gilts at d 10 and 12 of gestation. At d 10 of gestation, conceptus morphologic diversity was assessed by comparing within-litter average conceptus diameter and the standard deviation of conceptus diameters. At d 12 of gestation, conceptus morphologic diversity was assessed by comparing blastocyst populations obtained from individual gilts. Real-time PCR analyses for transcripts involved in steroidogenesis, cellular differentiation, and immune responsiveness were performed on spherical, ovoid, and filamentous conceptuses recovered from these selection lines. Uterine flushings were also assayed for total protein and estradiol-17beta at d 10 and 12 of gestation. Morphological data were analyzed using ANOVA with the fixed effects of line, farrowing season, and their interactions. Conceptus mortality, uterine flushing, and real-time PCR data were analyzed using ANOVA with the fixed effects of line, day or blastocyst morphology, farrowing season, and their interactions. Conceptus mortality, measured as the ratio of conceptus recovery to ovulation rate, was not different between the lines on d 10 and 12 of gestation. There were no significant line effects for conceptus morphologic diversity at d 10 and 12 of gestation. Expression of transcripts associated with steroidogenesis (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage, and aromatase), cellular differentiation (cytokeratin-18 and vimentin), and immune responsiveness (interleukin-1beta) in spherical

  3. Number of fetuses and conceptus growth throughout gestation in lines of pigs selected for ovulation rate or uterine capacity.

    PubMed

    Freking, B A; Leymaster, K A; Vallet, J L; Christenson, R K

    2007-09-01

    Selection for 11 generations in swine for ovulation rate (OR) or uterine capacity (UC) resulted in 19.6% greater prenatal survival at term in UC compared with OR. Our objective was to characterize the number of fetuses throughout gestation in each line, including an unselected control (CO) line. Five hundred ninety-three gilts produced over 4 farrowing seasons were subjected to unilateral-hysterectomy-ovariectomy at 160 d of age and mated within line at 280 d of age. Gilts were assigned within sire family to be slaughtered (+/- 2 d) at d 25, 45, 65, 85, or 105 of gestation. Ovulation rate and number of live and dead fetuses were recorded for each pregnant gilt (n = 402). Fetal and placental weights were also recorded. Ovulation rate of OR line gilts (18.0 +/- 0.3 ova) exceeded (P < 0.001) CO and UC lines (15.0 +/- 0.3 and 14.0 +/- 0.3 ova, respectively). Line and gestational age interacted to affect number of live fetuses (P < 0.001). Least squares means for CO were 10.1, 8.3, 7.2, 6.7, and 7.3 live fetuses for d 25, 45, 65, 85, and 105, respectively (average SE = 0.46 fetuses). Corresponding means for OR were 13.4, 8.3, 7.9, 6.5, and 6.7 live fetuses, respectively (average SE = 0.44 fetuses). Means for UC were 10.2, 9.0, 8.5, 7.5, and 8.0 live fetuses, respectively (average SE = 0.47 fetuses). In each line, number of live fetuses at d 25 was approximately 72% of ovulation rate. Mortality to d 45 was greatest in OR, intermediate in CO, and least in UC. Reductions in live fetuses continued to occur from d 45 to 105, but line differences at d 45 were essentially maintained to d 105. Number of live fetuses in gilts at d 114 was estimated from each of the survival curves and predicted values of 7.0, 5.9, and 7.8 per uterine horn for CO, OR, and UC lines, respectively. Selection for uterine capacity improved fetal survival primarily during the time period between d 25 and 45. Relative growth rate coefficients throughout gestation for placental tissue indicated a change

  4. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  5. Meta-analysis of intrinsic rates of increase and carrying capacity of populations affected by toxic and other stressors.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, A Jan; Maas-Diepeveen, Johanna L M; Heugens, Evelyn H W; Van Straalen, Nico M

    2005-09-01

    Most of the thousands of substances and species that are of concern for environmental management will not be investigated empirically at ecologically relevant levels because of financial, practical, and ethical constraints. To allow risk assessment for these less well-known categories, we have developed a mechanistic model with classical equations from toxicology and ecology. The parameters are linked to well-known properties, such as the octanol-water partition ratio K(ow), acute lethal (body) concentrations, and organism size. This allows estimation of intrinsic rates of increase r and carrying capacity K over a wide range of substances and species. The model was calibrated with parameter values (micro +/- 95% confidence interval) obtained in reviews and validated by a meta-analysis with largely independent data from 200 laboratory experiments. For single substances, the 5 to 95% interval of the observations on intrinsic rates of increase overlapped with the range predicted by the model. Model and experiments independently indicated that population growth ceased below 1% of the acute median lethal concentration in about 5% of the cases. Exceptional values and possible explanations were identified. The reduction of the carrying capacity K was nearly proportional to the inhibition of the population growth r. Population-level effects of mixtures as estimated by concentration addition were confirmed by observations in the experiments. The impact of a toxicant and another stressor could generally be described by response multiplication, with the exception of cases with extreme stress. Data sets on population laboratory experiments are biased to metals and crustaceans. This field will benefit from empirical studies on chemicals, conditions, and species, identified as risky by the model. Other implications of the model for environmental management and research are discussed.

  6. Study, outlines why outages go long, short, or on-time

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    A recent report by a nuclear industry professional, based on a survey of outage managers at US nuclear power plants, declares that [open quotes]preplanned outage schedules appear to be grossly inaccurate, and the outage management planners and schedulers do not have a grasp of the requirements and/or the resources needed to complete the actual activities on schedule.[close quotes] It declares that [open quotes]the scheduled duration of a planned outage must be realistic.[close quotes] The study identifies personnel, planning and scheduling, and equipment/hardware as [open quotes]the primary reasons why refueling outages and outage activities finished ahead of, right on, or behind schedule.[close quotes

  7. Analysis of effective capacity for free-space optical communication systems over gamma-gamma turbulence channels with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, You-quan; Chi, Xue-fen; Shi, Jia-lin; Zhao, Lin-lin

    2015-05-01

    To facilitate the efficient support of quality-of-service (QoS) for promising free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, it is essential to model and analyze FSO channels in terms of delay QoS. However, most existing works focus on the average capacity and outage capacity for FSO, which are not enough to characterize the effective transmission data rate when delay-sensitive service is applied. In this paper, the effective capacity of FSO communication systems under statistical QoS provisioning constraints is investigated to meet heterogeneous traffic demands. A novel closed-form expression for effective capacity is derived under the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence conditions, pointing errors, beam widths, detector sizes and QoS exponents. The obtained results reveal the effects of some significant parameters on effective capacity, which can be used for the design of FSO systems carrying a wide range of services with diverse QoS requirements.

  8. Synthesis of power plant outage schedules. Final technical report, April 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.

    1997-07-01

    This document provides a report on the creation of domain theories in the power plant outage domain. These were developed in conjunction with the creation of a demonstration system of advanced scheduling technology for the outage problem. In 1994 personnel from Rome Laboratory (RL), Kaman Science (KS), Kestrel Institute, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) began a joint project to develop scheduling tools for power plant outage activities. This report describes our support for this joint effort. The project uses KIDS (Kestrel Interactive Development System) to generate schedulers from formal specifications of the power plant domain outage activities.

  9. 77 FR 25088 - Extension of the Commission's Rules Regarding Outage Reporting to Interconnected Voice Over...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... emergency response. 17. In these ways, the Commission's intervention has resulted in tangible improvements... information.'' Likewise, the Japanese government finds it necessary to require mandatory outage reporting...

  10. High capacity and high rate capability of nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres for capacitive deionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hui; Chen, Guorong; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianping; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong

    2016-04-01

    In this work, nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres (N-PHCS) were well prepared by using polystyrene (PS) spheres as hard templates and dopamine hydrochloride as carbon and nitrogen sources. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images demonstrate that the N-PHCS have a uniform, spherical and hollow structure. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis shows that the N-PHCS have a high specific area of 512 m2/g. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result reveals that the nitrogen doping amount is 2.92%. The hollow and porous structure and effective nitrogen doping can contribute to large accessible surface area, efficient ion transport and good conductivity. In the electrochemical tests, we can conclude that the N-PHCS have a high specific capacitance value, a good stability and low inner resistance. The N-PHCS electrodes present a high salt adsorption capacity of 12.95 mg/g at a cell voltage of 1.4 V with a flow rate of 40 mL/min in a 500 mg/L NaCl aqueous solution. Moreover, the N-PHCS electrodes show high salt adsorption rate and good regeneration performance in the CDI process. With high surface specific area and effective nitrogen doping, the N-PHCS is promising to the CDI and other electrochemical applications.

  11. A Novel Method for Quantifying the Inhaled Dose of Air Pollutants Based on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate and Forced Vital Capacity.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Roby; Hayat, Matthew J; Barton, Jerusha; Lopukhin, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the interaction of physical activity and air pollution exposure, it is important to quantify the change in ventilation rate incurred by activity. In this paper, we describe a method for estimating ventilation using easily-measured variables such as heart rate (HR), breathing rate (fB), and forced vital capacity (FVC). We recruited healthy adolescents to use a treadmill while we continuously measured HR, fB, and the tidal volume (VT) of each breath. Participants began at rest then walked and ran at increasing speed until HR was 160-180 beats per minute followed by a cool down period. The novel feature of this method is that minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]) was normalized by FVC. We used general linear mixed models with a random effect for subject and identified nine potential predictor variables that influence either [Formula: see text] or FVC. We assessed predictive performance with a five-fold cross-validation procedure. We used a brute force selection process to identify the best performing models based on cross-validation percent error, the Akaike Information Criterion and the p-value of parameter estimates. We found a two-predictor model including HR and fB to have the best predictive performance ([Formula: see text]/FVC = -4.247+0.0595HR+0.226fB, mean percent error = 8.1±29%); however, given the ubiquity of HR measurements, a one-predictor model including HR may also be useful ([Formula: see text]/FVC = -3.859+0.101HR, mean percent error = 11.3±36%). PMID:26809066

  12. A Novel Method for Quantifying the Inhaled Dose of Air Pollutants Based on Heart Rate, Breathing Rate and Forced Vital Capacity.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Roby; Hayat, Matthew J; Barton, Jerusha; Lopukhin, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the interaction of physical activity and air pollution exposure, it is important to quantify the change in ventilation rate incurred by activity. In this paper, we describe a method for estimating ventilation using easily-measured variables such as heart rate (HR), breathing rate (fB), and forced vital capacity (FVC). We recruited healthy adolescents to use a treadmill while we continuously measured HR, fB, and the tidal volume (VT) of each breath. Participants began at rest then walked and ran at increasing speed until HR was 160-180 beats per minute followed by a cool down period. The novel feature of this method is that minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]) was normalized by FVC. We used general linear mixed models with a random effect for subject and identified nine potential predictor variables that influence either [Formula: see text] or FVC. We assessed predictive performance with a five-fold cross-validation procedure. We used a brute force selection process to identify the best performing models based on cross-validation percent error, the Akaike Information Criterion and the p-value of parameter estimates. We found a two-predictor model including HR and fB to have the best predictive performance ([Formula: see text]/FVC = -4.247+0.0595HR+0.226fB, mean percent error = 8.1±29%); however, given the ubiquity of HR measurements, a one-predictor model including HR may also be useful ([Formula: see text]/FVC = -3.859+0.101HR, mean percent error = 11.3±36%).

  13. Evaluation of Flow Rate, pH, Buffering Capacity, Calcium, Total Proteins and Total Antioxidant Capacity Levels of Saliva in Caries Free and Caries Active Children: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Preethi, B P; Reshma, Dodawad; Anand, Pyati

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the physicochemical properties of saliva such as flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, calcium level, total protein and total antioxidant levels in caries free and caries active children. The present study included one hundred and twenty healthy children who were divided into two groups; group I and group II comprising of age groups 7-10 and 11-14 years, respectively. Both the groups were then sub-divided equally according to gender. They were further divided into caries free and caries active with 15 children in each group. Unstimulated saliva was collected by suction method and flow rates were determined. The samples were then analyzed for pH, buffering capacity, total protein, calcium and total antioxidant capacity. The data was statistically analyzed using student t test (unpaired). The results revealed that when all these parameters were compared among the caries free and caries active children, flow rate, pH, buffering capacity were slightly reduced in caries active children, but total protein and total antioxidant capacity of saliva increased significantly in caries active children and the total calcium decreased significantly in caries active children. Within the limitation of this study, we conclude that, the physicochemical properties of saliva play a major role in the development of caries. PMID:21966118

  14. Intra-seasonal flexibility in avian metabolic performance highlights the uncoupling of basal metabolic rate and thermogenic capacity.

    PubMed

    Petit, Magali; Lewden, Agnès; Vézina, François

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic winter weather events are predicted to increase in occurrence and amplitude at northern latitudes and organisms are expected to cope through phenotypic flexibility. Small avian species wintering in these environments show acclimatization where basal metabolic rate (BMR) and maximal thermogenic capacity (MSUM) are typically elevated. However, little is known on intra-seasonal variation in metabolic performance and on how population trends truly reflect individual flexibility. Here we report intra-seasonal variation in metabolic parameters measured at the population and individual levels in black-capped chickadees (Poecileatricapillus). Results confirmed that population patterns indeed reflect flexibility at the individual level. They showed the expected increase in BMR (6%) and MSUM (34%) in winter relative to summer but also, and most importantly, that these parameters changed differently through time. BMR began its seasonal increase in November, while MSUM had already achieved more than 20% of its inter-seasonal increase by October, and declined to its starting level by March, while MSUM remained high. Although both parameters co-vary on a yearly scale, this mismatch in the timing of variation in winter BMR and MSUM likely reflects different constraints acting on different physiological components and therefore suggests a lack of functional link between these parameters.

  15. Porous mesocarbon microbeads with graphitic shells: constructing a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yu; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Ying; Shen, Wanci; Zheng, Yongping; Sun, Hongyu; Kang, Feiyu

    2013-01-01

    Li₄Ti₅O₁₂/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor can combine the advantages of both lithium-ion battery and supercapacitor, which may meet the requirements for developing high-performance hybrid electric vehicles. Here we proposed a novel "core-shell" porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to replace conventional activated carbon for achieving excellent cell performance. In this PGC structure made from mesocarbon microbead (MCMB), the inner core is composed of porous amorphous carbon, while the outer shell is graphitic carbon. The abundant porosity and the high surface area not only offer sufficient reaction sites to store electrical charge physically, but also can accelerate the liquid electrolyte to penetrate the electrode and the ions to reach the reacting sites. Meanwhile, the outer graphitic shells of the porous carbon microbeads contribute to a conductive network which will remarkably facilitate the electron transportation, and thus can be used to construct a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor, especially at high current densities.

  16. Porous mesocarbon microbeads with graphitic shells: constructing a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Ying; Shen, Wanci; Zheng, Yongping; Sun, Hongyu; Kang, Feiyu

    2013-08-01

    Li4Ti5O12/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor can combine the advantages of both lithium-ion battery and supercapacitor, which may meet the requirements for developing high-performance hybrid electric vehicles. Here we proposed a novel ``core-shell'' porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to replace conventional activated carbon for achieving excellent cell performance. In this PGC structure made from mesocarbon microbead (MCMB), the inner core is composed of porous amorphous carbon, while the outer shell is graphitic carbon. The abundant porosity and the high surface area not only offer sufficient reaction sites to store electrical charge physically, but also can accelerate the liquid electrolyte to penetrate the electrode and the ions to reach the reacting sites. Meanwhile, the outer graphitic shells of the porous carbon microbeads contribute to a conductive network which will remarkably facilitate the electron transportation, and thus can be used to construct a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor, especially at high current densities.

  17. Porous mesocarbon microbeads with graphitic shells: constructing a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yu; Huang, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Ying; Shen, Wanci; Zheng, Yongping; Sun, Hongyu; Kang, Feiyu

    2013-01-01

    Li4Ti5O12/activated carbon hybrid supercapacitor can combine the advantages of both lithium-ion battery and supercapacitor, which may meet the requirements for developing high-performance hybrid electric vehicles. Here we proposed a novel “core-shell” porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to replace conventional activated carbon for achieving excellent cell performance. In this PGC structure made from mesocarbon microbead (MCMB), the inner core is composed of porous amorphous carbon, while the outer shell is graphitic carbon. The abundant porosity and the high surface area not only offer sufficient reaction sites to store electrical charge physically, but also can accelerate the liquid electrolyte to penetrate the electrode and the ions to reach the reacting sites. Meanwhile, the outer graphitic shells of the porous carbon microbeads contribute to a conductive network which will remarkably facilitate the electron transportation, and thus can be used to construct a high-rate, high-capacity cathode for hybrid supercapacitor, especially at high current densities. PMID:23963328

  18. 76 FR 33686 - Proposed Extension of Part 4 of the Commission's Rules Regarding Outage Reporting to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... on February 27, 1992 and published in the Federal Register at 57 FR 7883, March 5, 1992, the... Outage Reporting Order, released on August 19, 2004 and published in the Federal Register at 69 FR 70316..., accurate reporting. 41. We note that Japan requires outage reporting from broadband...

  19. Use of collaboration software to improve nuclear power plant outage management

    SciTech Connect

    Germain, Shawn

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) refueling outages create some of the most challenging activities the utilities face in both tracking and coordinating thousands of activities in a short period of time. Other challenges, including nuclear safety concerns arising from atypical system configurations and resource allocation issues, can create delays and schedule overruns, driving up outage costs. Today the majority of the outage communication is done using processes that do not take advantage of advances in modern technologies that enable enhanced communication, collaboration and information sharing. Some of the common practices include: runners that deliver paper-based requests for approval, radios, telephones, desktop computers, daily schedule printouts, and static whiteboards that are used to display information. Many gains have been made to reduce the challenges facing outage coordinators; however; new opportunities can be realized by utilizing modern technological advancements in communication and information tools that can enhance the collective situational awareness of plant personnel leading to improved decision-making. Ongoing research as part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) has been targeting NPP outage improvement. As part of this research, various applications of collaborative software have been demonstrated through pilot project utility partnerships. Collaboration software can be utilized as part of the larger concept of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Collaborative software can be used for emergent issue resolution, Outage Control Center (OCC) displays, and schedule monitoring. Use of collaboration software enables outage staff and subject matter experts (SMEs) to view and update critical outage information from any location on site or off.

  20. Estimating Power Outage Cost based on a Survey for Industrial Customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yoshikuni; Matsuhashi, Ryuji

    A survey was conducted on power outage cost for industrial customers. 5139 factories, which are designated energy management factories in Japan, answered their power consumption and the loss of production value due to the power outage in an hour in summer weekday. The median of unit cost of power outage of whole sectors is estimated as 672 yen/kWh. The sector of services for amusement and hobbies and the sector of manufacture of information and communication electronics equipment relatively have higher unit cost of power outage. Direct damage cost from power outage in whole sectors reaches 77 billion yen. Then utilizing input-output analysis, we estimated indirect damage cost that is caused by the repercussion of production halt. Indirect damage cost in whole sectors reaches 91 billion yen. The sector of wholesale and retail trade has the largest direct damage cost. The sector of manufacture of transportation equipment has the largest indirect damage cost.

  1. Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

    2005-12-07

    Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR

  2. Evaluation of the resilience of a full-scale down-flow hanging sponge reactor to long-term outages at a sewage treatment plant in India.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Takayama, Daisuke; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Uemura, Shigeki; Harada, Hideki

    2016-10-01

    Resilience to process outages is an essential requirement for sustainable wastewater treatment systems in developing countries. In this study, we evaluated the ability of a full-scale down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor to recover after a 10-day outage. The DHS tested in this study uses polyurethane sponge as packing material. This full-scale DHS reactor has been tested over a period of about 4 years in India with a flow rate of 500 m(3)/day. Water was not supplied to the DHS reactor that was subjected to the 10-day outage; however, the biomass did not dry out because the sponge was able to retain enough water. Soon after the reactor was restarted, a small quantity of biomass, amounting to only 0.1% of the total retained biomass, was eluted. The DHS effluent achieved satisfactory removal of suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, and ammonium nitrogen within 90, 45, and 90 min, respectively. Conversely, fecal coliforms in the DHS effluent did not reach satisfactory levels within 540 min; instead, the normal levels of fecal coliforms were achieved within 3 days. Overall, the tests demonstrated that the DHS reactor was sufficiently robust to withstand long-term outages and achieved steady state soon after restart. This reinforces the suitability of this technology for developing countries. PMID:27450993

  3. Evaluation of the resilience of a full-scale down-flow hanging sponge reactor to long-term outages at a sewage treatment plant in India.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Takashi; Takayama, Daisuke; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Uemura, Shigeki; Harada, Hideki

    2016-10-01

    Resilience to process outages is an essential requirement for sustainable wastewater treatment systems in developing countries. In this study, we evaluated the ability of a full-scale down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor to recover after a 10-day outage. The DHS tested in this study uses polyurethane sponge as packing material. This full-scale DHS reactor has been tested over a period of about 4 years in India with a flow rate of 500 m(3)/day. Water was not supplied to the DHS reactor that was subjected to the 10-day outage; however, the biomass did not dry out because the sponge was able to retain enough water. Soon after the reactor was restarted, a small quantity of biomass, amounting to only 0.1% of the total retained biomass, was eluted. The DHS effluent achieved satisfactory removal of suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand, and ammonium nitrogen within 90, 45, and 90 min, respectively. Conversely, fecal coliforms in the DHS effluent did not reach satisfactory levels within 540 min; instead, the normal levels of fecal coliforms were achieved within 3 days. Overall, the tests demonstrated that the DHS reactor was sufficiently robust to withstand long-term outages and achieved steady state soon after restart. This reinforces the suitability of this technology for developing countries.

  4. Nanoparticulate Mn3O4/VGCF composite conversion-anode material with extraordinarily high capacity and excellent rate capability for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Yuan, Anbao; Xu, Jiaqiang

    2014-10-22

    In this work, highly conductive vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) was applied as an electrically conductive agent for facile synthesis of a nanoparticulate Mn3O4/VGCF composite material. This material exhibits super high specific capacity and excellent rate capability as a conversion-anode for lithium ion batteries. Rate performance test result demonstrates that at the discharge/charge current density of 0.2 A g(-1) a reversible capacity of ca. 950 mAh g(-1) is delivered, and when the current rate is increased to a high current density of 5 A g(-1), a reversible capacity of ca. 390 mAh g(-1) is retained. Cyclic performance examination conducted at the current density of 0.5 A g(-1) reveals that in the initial 20 cycles the reversible capacity decreases gradually from 855 to 747 mAh g(-1). However, since then, it increases gradually with cycle number increasing, and after 200 cycles an extraordinarily high reversible capacity of 1391 mAh g(-1) is achieved.

  5. Ergodic capacity analysis for DF strategies in cooperative FSO systems.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen

    2015-08-24

    This paper focuses on the ergodic capacity analysis in the context of cooperative free-space optical (FSO) systems when the line of sight is available. Novel asymptotic closed-form expressions for the ergodic capacity corresponding to two different decode-and-forward (DF) strategies are obtained for a cooperative FSO communication system. Here, the atmospheric turbulence is modeled by a gamma-gamma distribution of parameters α and β which allows to study a wide range of turbulence conditions (moderate-to-strong) as well as the effect of the misalignment with zero boresight. It is demonstrated that cooperative communications are able to achieve not only a better performance in terms of the error rate performance as well as outage probability than direct transmission, but also in terms of the channel capacity in the context of FSO systems without much increase in hardware. In this way, a 3-way FSO communication setup is considered, in which the cooperative protocol can be applied to achieve a greater ergodic capacity compared to a direct transmission. It can be concluded that a greater and robust capacity strongly dependent on the relay location is achieved compared to a direct transmission without cooperative communication when line of sight is available. Here, the line of sight is taken into account in order to achieve a significant robustness under different turbulence conditions and more severe pointing errors regardless of the relay location. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the derived results.

  6. Power Outages, Extreme Events and Health: a Systematic Review of the Literature from 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Chaamala; Landeg, Owen; Murray, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background Extreme events (e.g. flooding) threaten critical infrastructure including power supplies. Many interlinked systems in the modern world depend on a reliable power supply to function effectively. The health sector is no exception, but the impact of power outages on health is poorly understood. Greater understanding is essential so that adverse health impacts can be prevented and/or mitigated. Methods We searched Medline, CINAHL and Scopus for papers about the health impacts of power outages during extreme events published in 2011-2012. A thematic analysis was undertaken on the extracted information. The Public Health England Extreme Events Bulletins between 01/01/2013 - 31/03/2013 were used to identify extreme events that led to power outages during this three-month period. Results We identified 20 relevant articles. Power outages were found to impact health at many levels within diverse settings. Recurrent themes included the difficulties of accessing healthcare, maintaining frontline services and the challenges of community healthcare. We identified 52 power outages in 19 countries that were the direct consequence of extreme events during the first three months of 2013. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first review of the health impacts of power outages. We found the current evidence and knowledge base to be poor. With scientific consensus predicting an increase in the frequency and magnitude of extreme events due to climate change, the gaps in knowledge need to be addressed in order to mitigate the impact of power outages on global health. PMID:24459613

  7. High-rate aluminium yolk-shell nanoparticle anode for Li-ion battery with long cycle life and ultrahigh capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sa; Niu, Junjie; Zhao, Yu Cheng; So, Kang Pyo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chang An; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Alloy-type anodes such as silicon and tin are gaining popularity in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, but their rate/cycling capabilities should be improved. Here by making yolk-shell nanocomposite of aluminium core (30 nm in diameter) and TiO2 shell (∼3 nm in thickness), with a tunable interspace, we achieve 10 C charge/discharge rate with reversible capacity exceeding 650 mAh g(-1) after 500 cycles, with a 3 mg cm(-2) loading. At 1 C, the capacity is approximately 1,200 mAh g(-1) after 500 cycles. Our one-pot synthesis route is simple and industrially scalable. This result may reverse the lagging status of aluminium among high-theoretical-capacity anodes. PMID:26243004

  8. High-rate aluminium yolk-shell nanoparticle anode for Li-ion battery with long cycle life and ultrahigh capacity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sa; Niu, Junjie; Zhao, Yu Cheng; So, Kang Pyo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chang An; Li, Ju

    2015-08-05

    Alloy-type anodes such as silicon and tin are gaining popularity in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, but their rate/cycling capabilities should be improved. Here by making yolk-shell nanocomposite of aluminium core (30 nm in diameter) and TiO2 shell (∼3 nm in thickness), with a tunable interspace, we achieve 10 C charge/discharge rate with reversible capacity exceeding 650 mAh g(-1) after 500 cycles, with a 3 mg cm(-2) loading. At 1 C, the capacity is approximately 1,200 mAh g(-1) after 500 cycles. Our one-pot synthesis route is simple and industrially scalable. This result may reverse the lagging status of aluminium among high-theoretical-capacity anodes.

  9. High-rate aluminium yolk-shell nanoparticle anode for Li-ion battery with long cycle life and ultrahigh capacity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sa; Niu, Junjie; Zhao, Yu Cheng; So, Kang Pyo; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chang An; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Alloy-type anodes such as silicon and tin are gaining popularity in rechargeable Li-ion batteries, but their rate/cycling capabilities should be improved. Here by making yolk-shell nanocomposite of aluminium core (30 nm in diameter) and TiO2 shell (∼3 nm in thickness), with a tunable interspace, we achieve 10 C charge/discharge rate with reversible capacity exceeding 650 mAh g−1 after 500 cycles, with a 3 mg cm−2 loading. At 1 C, the capacity is approximately 1,200 mAh g−1 after 500 cycles. Our one-pot synthesis route is simple and industrially scalable. This result may reverse the lagging status of aluminium among high-theoretical-capacity anodes. PMID:26243004

  10. The Effects of Acquisition of Capacity for Sameness on Rate of Learning and Generalized Body and Object Imitations in Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Shira Adele

    2010-01-01

    I tested the effects of inducing the preverbal foundational developmental cusp for the capacity for sameness on the rate of learning for curriculum goals with 6 preschool aged children diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Prior to and following the implementation of the sensory matching procedure, participants were presented with learn unit…

  11. Evaluation of pH, buffering capacity, viscosity and flow rate levels of saliva in caries-free, minimal caries and nursing caries children: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Animireddy, Dwitha; Reddy Bekkem, Venkata Thimma; Vallala, Pranitha; Kotha, Sunil Babu; Ankireddy, Swetha; Mohammad, Noorjahan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the pH, buffering capacity, viscosity and flow rate of saliva in caries free, minimal caries and nursing caries children and to evaluate the relationship of these on the caries activity of children. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 school children of age group between 4 and 12 years were selected and divided into three equal groups: Group I, Group II and Group III, consisting of 25 subjects each. Group I included caries-free subjects, Group II included subjects with minimal caries and Group III included subjects with nursing caries. Saliva samples were collected from all subjects and were estimated for flow rate, pH, buffering capacity and viscosity. Results: There was a significant decrease in the mean salivary flow rate, salivary ph and salivary buffer capacity and a significant increase in the salivary viscosity among caries-free subjects, subjects with minimal caries and subjects with nursing caries. Conclusion: The physicochemical properties of saliva, such as salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity and viscosity, has a relation with caries activity in children and act as markers of caries activity. PMID:25191067

  12. Efficient Activation of High-Loading Sulfur by Small CNTs Confined Inside a Large CNT for High-Capacity and High-Rate Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feiying; Xiao, Suo; Lu, Lijie; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-13

    Sulfur with a high specific capacity of 1673 mAh g(-1) is yet to be used as commercial cathode for lithium batteries because of its low utilization rate and poor cycle stability. In this work, a tube-in-tube carbon structure is demonstrated to relieve the critical problems with sulfur cathode: poor electrical conductivity, dissolution of lithium polysulfides, and large volume change during cycling. A number of small carbon nanotubes (∼20 nm in diameter) and a high loading amount of 85.2 wt % sulfur are both filled completely inside a large amorphous carbon nanotube (∼200 nm in diameter). Owing to the presence of these electrically conductive, highly flexible and structurally robust small CNTs and a large CNT overlayer, sulfur material exhibits a high utilization rate and delivers a large discharge capacity of 1633 mAh g(-1) (based on the mass of sulfur) at 0.1 C, approaching its theoretical capacity (1673 mAh g(-1)). The obtained S-CNTs@CNT electrode demonstrates superior high-rate cycling performances. Large discharge capacities of ∼1146, 1121, and 954 mAh g(-1) are observed after 150 cycles at large current rates of 1, 2, and 5 C, respectively. PMID:26675744

  13. MoO2-ordered mesoporous carbon hybrids as anode materials with highly improved rate capability and reversible capacity for lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ailian; Li, Caixia; Tang, Rui; Yin, Longwei; Qi, Yongxin

    2013-08-28

    A novel hybrid of MoO2-ordered mesoporous carbon (MoO2-OMC) was prepared through a two-step solvothermal chemical reaction route. The electrochemical performances of the mesoporous MoO2-OMC hybrids were examined using galvanostatical charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The MoO2-OMC hybrid exhibits significantly improved electrochemical performance of high reversible capacity, high-rate capability, and excellent cycling performance as an anode electrode material for Li ion batteries. It is revealed that the MoO2-OMC hybrid could deliver the first discharge capacity of 1641.8 mA h g(-1) with an initial Coulombic efficiency of 63.6%, and a reversible capacity as high as 1049.1 mA h g(-1) even after 50 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g(-1), much higher than the theoretical capacity of MoO2 (838 mA h g(-1)) and OMC materials. The MoO2-OMC hybrid demonstrates an excellent high rate capability with capacity of ∼600 mA h g(-1) even at a charge current density of 1600 mA g(-1) after 50 cycles, which is approximately 11.1 times higher than that of the OMC (54 mA h g(-1)) materials. The improved rate capability and reversible capacity of the MoO2-OMC hybrid are attributed to a synergistic reaction between the MoO2 nanoparticles and mesoporous OMC matrices. It is noted that the electrochemical performance of the MoO2-OMC hybrid is evidently much better than the previous MoO2-based hybrids.

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1441 - Equipment with a rated hoisting/lifting capacity of 2,000 pounds or less.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Components and configuration. The employer must ensure that: (i) The selection of components, and the configuration of the equipment, that affect the capacity or safe operation of the equipment complies with either... equipment involved must approve, in writing, the selection and configuration of components; or (B)...

  15. Power outage estimation for tropical cyclones: improved accuracy with simpler models.

    PubMed

    Nateghi, Roshanak; Guikema, Seth; Quiring, Steven M

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we discuss an outage-forecasting model that we have developed. This model uses very few input variables to estimate hurricane-induced outages prior to landfall with great predictive accuracy. We also show the results for a series of simpler models that use only publicly available data and can still estimate outages with reasonable accuracy. The intended users of these models are emergency response planners within power utilities and related government agencies. We developed our models based on the method of random forest, using data from a power distribution system serving two states in the Gulf Coast region of the United States. We also show that estimates of system reliability based on wind speed alone are not sufficient for adequately capturing the reliability of system components. We demonstrate that a multivariate approach can produce more accurate power outage predictions.

  16. [Responding to patients with home mechanical ventilation after the Great East Japan Earthquake and during the planned power outages. How should we be prepared for a future disaster ?].

    PubMed

    Takechi, Yukako

    2011-12-01

    The unprecedented earthquake(magnitude-9 in the Japanese seismic intensity scale)hit off the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. Consequently, there were planned power outages in the area nearby Tokyo to avoid massive blackouts caused by a stoppage of Fukushima nuclear plants.Our clinic located in Kawasaki city was also hit by the earthquake(magnitude- 5).During the period of two months(March and April 2011), we had a total of 52 patients with home respiratory care (5-TPPV, 11-NPPV and 36-HOT)at that time.Two out of three 24 hour-TPPV users had no external battery.After the earthquake, there was a 7-hour electricity failure in some areas, and a patient with ASV(adaptive servo ventilator)was living there.Moreover, 3-hour/day power outages were carried out from March 14 to March 28, affecting people's everyday lives. However, the patient had no harmful influences from the power failure because a ventilation company lent us an external battery(4-9 hour life capacity)for the patients, and we were able to avoid an emergency situation caused by the power failure.In conclusion, we ought to be prepared for patients with home mechanical ventilation in the future toward unforeseen large scale power outages.

  17. Comparison and validation of statistical methods for predicting power outage durations in the event of hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Nateghi, Roshanak; Guikema, Seth D; Quiring, Steven M

    2011-12-01

    This article compares statistical methods for modeling power outage durations during hurricanes and examines the predictive accuracy of these methods. Being able to make accurate predictions of power outage durations is valuable because the information can be used by utility companies to plan their restoration efforts more efficiently. This information can also help inform customers and public agencies of the expected outage times, enabling better collective response planning, and coordination of restoration efforts for other critical infrastructures that depend on electricity. In the long run, outage duration estimates for future storm scenarios may help utilities and public agencies better allocate risk management resources to balance the disruption from hurricanes with the cost of hardening power systems. We compare the out-of-sample predictive accuracy of five distinct statistical models for estimating power outage duration times caused by Hurricane Ivan in 2004. The methods compared include both regression models (accelerated failure time (AFT) and Cox proportional hazard models (Cox PH)) and data mining techniques (regression trees, Bayesian additive regression trees (BART), and multivariate additive regression splines). We then validate our models against two other hurricanes. Our results indicate that BART yields the best prediction accuracy and that it is possible to predict outage durations with reasonable accuracy.

  18. Down-select ion specific media (ISM) utilization in upset and outage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, Mark S.; Bostick, William D.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a process that has been used to help nuclear power plant (NPP) clients resolve some of their more challenging waste water processing issues. These treatment issues may become even more evident during outage conditions, due (in part) to associated decontamination activities that may cause off-normal chemical conditions, which may subsequently change both the peak levels of activities for radionuclides introduced into the collected waste water and also the chemical forms in which they may exist (e.g., formation of colloids or soluble chelates). In one NPP waste processing example, a large proportion of soluble Co-58, which is normally present as a soluble cationic species or an uncharged colloidal solid, was found to behave like an anion; formation of an anionic chelation complex was implicated, possibly due to suspect EDTA, or similar additive, in a proprietary decontamination soap formulation. Antimony 125 (Sb{sup 125}), normally present as a weakly anionic (Sb(OH){sub 6}{sup -}) or even neutral (Sb(OH){sub 3}{sup 0}) species, was being displaced from previously-loaded media by other, more strongly bound species, causing an unacceptable peak activity in water intended for discharge. A quick resolution of the existing waste processing limitations was required, due to limited waste water holding capacity. Samples of the authentic NPP waste water containing the recalcitrant radionuclides were sent to our licensed off-site laboratory (MCLinc), where small-scale batch-equilibrium testing was used to down-select, from a large number (36) of candidate media (both commercially available and developed internally), those that were relatively effective and economical for use in achieving the required discharge criteria. Batch equilibrium testing is very efficient for use in screening the relative effectiveness of contaminant removal by candidate media in a select waste water composition, and can also provide an estimate of the ultimate contaminant loading

  19. The interaction among age, thermal acclimation and growth rate in determining muscle metabolic capacities and tissue masses in the threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Lavoie, B A; Dubois, N

    1994-11-01

    Thermal acclimation may directly modify muscle metabolic capacities, or may modify them indirectly via effects upon physiological processes such as growth, reproduction or senescence. To evaluate these interacting effects, we examined the influence of thermal acclimation and acclimatization upon muscle metabolic capacities and tissue masses in 1 + stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, in which confounding interactions between temperature and senescense should be absent. Furthermore, we examined the influence of thermal acclimation upon individual growth rate, muscle enzyme levels and tissue masses in 2 + stickleback sampled at the beginning of their final reproductive season. For 1 + stickleback, cold acclimation more than doubles mitochondrial enzyme levels in the axial muscle. Thermal acclimation did not change the condition of 1 + stickleback at feeding levels which could not maintain the condition of 2+ stickleback. Compensatory metabolic responses to temperature were not apparent in field acclimatized 1 + stickleback. The growth rate of 2 + stickleback was markedly affected by temperature: warm-acclimated fish generally lost mass even at very high levels of feeding (up to 78 enchytraid worms per day) while cold-acclimated fish gained mass. This suggests that warm temperatures accelerate the senescence of 2 + stickleback. Generally, muscle enzyme activities increased with growth rate. In axial muscle, the relationships between CS activity and growth rate differed with acclimation temperature. Independent of the influence of growth rate, CS activities were consistently higher in cold- than warm-acclimated 2 + stickleback, suggesting compensatory increases of CS activity with cold acclimation. PMID:24197078

  20. Hierarchical nanosheet-constructed yolk-shell TiO2 porous microspheres for lithium batteries with high capacity, superior rate and long cycle capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Huang, Shao-Zhuan; Li, Yu; Tian, He; Wang, Hong-En; Yu, Yong; Chen, Li-Hua; Hasan, Tawfique; Su, Bao-Lian

    2015-07-01

    A hierarchical nanosheet-constructed yolk-shell TiO2 (NYTiO2) porous microsphere is synthesized through a well-designed, one-pot, template-free solvothermal alcoholysis process using tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) as the structure directing reagent. Such a yolk-shell structure with a highly porous shell and dense mesoporous core is quite advantageous as an anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The outer, 2D nanosheet-based porous (15 nm) shell and the nanocrystal-based inner mesoporous (3 nm) core provide a stable, porous framework, effective grain boundaries and a short diffusion pathway for Li+ and electron transport, facilitating lithium insertion/extraction. The voids between the core and the shell can not only store the electrolyte due to capillary and facilitate charge transfer across the electrode/electrolyte interface but also buffer the volume change during the Li+ insertion/extraction. As a result, NYTiO2 demonstrates excellent Li+ capacity with outstanding cycle performance and superior rate capability at different rates for >700 cycles, retaining a 225 mA h g-1 reversible capacity after 100 cycles at 1 C. In particular, the reversible capacity can still be maintained at 113 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at 10 C. We also observe the formation of homogeneously distributed 5-10 nm Li2Ti2O4 nanocrystallites on the surface of the nanosheets during the discharge-charge process. The synergy of the yolk-shell structure with dual mesopores in the shell and core and the Li2Ti2O4 nanocrystallites endow the hierarchical NYTiO2 with high reversible capacity, excellent rate capability and outstanding cycle performance.A hierarchical nanosheet-constructed yolk-shell TiO2 (NYTiO2) porous microsphere is synthesized through a well-designed, one-pot, template-free solvothermal alcoholysis process using tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) as the structure directing reagent. Such a yolk-shell structure with a highly porous shell and dense mesoporous core is quite

  1. Reversible conversion-alloying of Sb2O3 as a high-capacity, high-rate, and durable anode for sodium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meijuan; Jiang, Yinzhu; Sun, Wenping; Wang, Hongtao; Jin, Chuanhong; Yan, Mi

    2014-11-12

    Sodium ion batteries are attracting ever-increasing attention for the applications in large/grid scale energy storage systems. However, the research on novel Na-storage electrode materials is still in its infancy, and the cycling stability, specific capacity, and rate capability of the reported electrode materials cannot satisfy the demands of practical applications. Herein, a high performance Sb(2)O(3) anode electrochemically reacted via the reversible conversion-alloying mechanism is demonstrated for the first time. The Sb(2)O(3) anode exhibits a high capacity of 550 mAh g(-1) at 0.05 A g(-1) and 265 mAh g(-1) at 5 A g(-1). A reversible capacity of 414 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) is achieved after 200 stable cycles. The synergistic effect involving conversion and alloying reactions promotes stabilizing the structure of the active material and accelerating the kinetics of the reaction. The mechanism may offer a well-balanced approach for sodium storage to create high capacity and cycle-stable anode materials.

  2. Capacity of Cognitive Radio with Partial Channel Distribution Information in Rayleigh Fading Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D.; Li, Q.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the capacity of the secondary user (SU) in a cognitive radio (CR) network in Rayleigh fading environments. Different from existing works where perfect channel state information (CSI) or channel distribution information (CDI) of the interference link from the SU to the primary user (PU) is assumed to be available, this paper assumes that only partial CDI is available. Specifically, we assume the distribution parameter is unknown and estimated from a set of channel gain samples. With such partial CDI, closed-form expressions for the ergodic and outage capacities of the SU are obtained under the transmit power and the interference outage constraints. It is shown that the capacity with partial CDI is not degraded compared to that with perfect CDI if the interference outage constraint is loose. It is also shown that the capacity can be significantly improved by increasing the number of channel gain samples.

  3. Catalyst-free synthesis of Si-SiOx core-shell nanowire anodes for high-rate and high-capacity lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwan Woo; Lee, Jung-In; Yang, Jieun; Kim, Young-Ki; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Soojin; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2014-05-14

    Si-SiOx core-shell nanowires (NWs) ranging from 10 to 30 nm in diameter are prepared by a simple evaporation of silicon monoxide and control of substrate temperatures without any catalyst. The Si-SiOx NWs grown at 735 and 955 °C are strongly anchored to the Cu current collector by forming copper silicide at the interface between Si and Cu, and subsequently used as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, in which no binder or conducting materials are used. The Si-SiOx NWs anodes show excellent electrochemical performances in terms of capacity retention and rate capability. In particular, the Si-SiOx NW anode grown at 955 °C shows a reversible capacity of ∼1000 mAh g(-1) even at a high-rate of 50 C. This catalyst-free synthetic route of Si-SiOx NWs that are strongly anchored to the Cu current collector opens up an effective process for fabricating other high-capacity anodes in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). PMID:24754908

  4. Sepiolite-sulfur as a high-capacity, high-rate performance, and low-cost cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Junan; Wu, Cheng; Cheng, Juanjuan; Pan, Yong; Ma, Zengsheng; Xie, Shuhong; Li, Jiangyu

    2015-10-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have the theoretical energy density of up to 2600 Wh/kg, though its commercialization is limited by high material cost and poor cyclic performance. In this work, we show that sepiolite-sulfur is a high-capacity, high-rate performance, and low-cost cathode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. Sepiolite is a porous mineral with specific structure, outstanding physical and chemical adsorption characteristics, and excellent ion exchange capability, making it an ideal matrix material for lithium-sulfur batteries. It is shown that the first specific discharge capacity of sepiolite-sulfur cathode is about 1436 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C current rate, and it remains as high as 901 mAh g-1 after 300 cycles. Under 1 C current density, the first discharge capacity is 1206 mAh g-1, and maintains a high value of 601 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles. The raw materials are abundant and low cost, and the manufacturing process is simple and scalable, making it promising for the commercialization of lithium-sulfur batteries.

  5. Evaluation of power outages in Connecticut during hypothetical future Hurricane Sandy scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanik, D. W.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Astitha, M.; Frediani, M. E.; Yang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable electric power is a staple of our modern society.The purpose of this work was to evaluate the occurrence of power outages under more intense, future Hurricane Sandy simulations in Connecticut. In addition, we also evaluated how many crews would be necessary to restore power in 7 days, and how different vegetation scenarios might contribute to a decrease in outages. We trained five pairwise models on each current Sandy runs (2012) as training using the random forest model (each validated using 10-fold cross-validation), and used each future Sandy run as an independent test. We predict that a future Sandy would have 2.5x as many outages as current Sandy, which would require 3.23x as many crews as current Sandy to restore power in 7 days. We also found that increased vegetation management might decrease outages, which has implications for both fair-weather and storm days of all types (i.e. blizzards, thunderstorms, ice storms). Although we have only evaluated outages for electric distribution networks, there are many other types (water supply, wastewater, telecommunications) that would likely benefit from an analysis of this type. In addition, given that we have the weather simulations already processed within our 2-km weather simulation domain, we would like to expand our vulnerability analyses to surrounding utilities in New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire to facilitate regional coordination among electric distribution networks.

  6. Distributed Power-Line Outage Detection Based on Wide Area Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Song, Wen-Zhan

    2014-01-01

    In modern power grids, the fast and reliable detection of power-line outages is an important functionality, which prevents cascading failures and facilitates an accurate state estimation to monitor the real-time conditions of the grids. However, most of the existing approaches for outage detection suffer from two drawbacks, namely: (i) high computational complexity; and (ii) relying on a centralized means of implementation. The high computational complexity limits the practical usage of outage detection only for the case of single-line or double-line outages. Meanwhile, the centralized means of implementation raises security and privacy issues. Considering these drawbacks, the present paper proposes a distributed framework, which carries out in-network information processing and only shares estimates on boundaries with the neighboring control areas. This novel framework relies on a convex-relaxed formulation of the line outage detection problem and leverages the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) for its distributed solution. The proposed framework invokes a low computational complexity, requiring only linear and simple matrix-vector operations. We also extend this framework to incorporate the sparse property of the measurement matrix and employ the LSQRalgorithm to enable a warm start, which further accelerates the algorithm. Analysis and simulation tests validate the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed approaches. PMID:25051035

  7. Distributed power-line outage detection based on wide area measurement system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Song, Wen-Zhan

    2014-01-01

    In modern power grids, the fast and reliable detection of power-line outages is an important functionality, which prevents cascading failures and facilitates an accurate state estimation to monitor the real-time conditions of the grids. However, most of the existing approaches for outage detection suffer from two drawbacks, namely: (i) high computational complexity; and (ii) relying on a centralized means of implementation. The high computational complexity limits the practical usage of outage detection only for the case of single-line or double-line outages. Meanwhile, the centralized means of implementation raises security and privacy issues. Considering these drawbacks, the present paper proposes a distributed framework, which carries out in-network information processing and only shares estimates on boundaries with the neighboring control areas. This novel framework relies on a convex-relaxed formulation of the line outage detection problem and leverages the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) for its distributed solution. The proposed framework invokes a low computational complexity, requiring only linear and simple matrix-vector operations. We also extend this framework to incorporate the sparse property of the measurement matrix and employ the LSQRalgorithm to enable a warm start, which further accelerates the algorithm. Analysis and simulation tests validate the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  8. Detecting Power Outages with the VIIRS DNB Images - potentials and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Shao, X.

    2012-12-01

    Power outages after a major storm or hurricane affect millions of people. The launch of the Suomi NPP with the VIIRS significantly enhances our capability to monitor and detect power outages on a daily basis with the Day Night Band (DNB) which outperforms the traditional OSL on DMSP satellites in both spatial and radiometric resolutions. This study explores the use of the DNB for detecting power outages in the Washington DC metropolitan area in June 2012, which was the largest non-hurricane power outage in history for the region with millions of people lost power, and state of emergency declared in some states such as Virginia. The DNB data were analyzed for the period one week before and after the storm. The light loss is estimated through image differencing techniques for spatial patterns, as well as total radiance and irradiance changes as a time series. The effects of cloud absorption and scattering are evaluated using the cloud masks from VIIRS products, and the long wave thermal infrared images are also used to assist the assessment. The results show that the DNB data are very useful for both spatial and radiometric detection of light loss, but also with some challenges due to clouds and the known terminator straylight effect of the instrument for the region during summer solstice. It is expected that further refinements in the methodology will significantly reduce the uncertainties. A VIIRS Data Robotics system is also being developed which will allow the routine detection of power outages for any given location worldwide.

  9. Effects of environmental pH and temperature on embryonic survival capacity and metabolic rates in the smallmouth salamander, Ambystoma texanum

    SciTech Connect

    Punzo, F.

    1983-10-01

    Although the deleterious effects of acid precipitation on forest ecosystems and fisheries have been documented, relatively little information is available on the effects of environmental pH in combination with temperature on the survival capacity and/or physiology of amphibians. Increased acidity resulting from acid precipitation common to the northwestern United States, can lead to increased mortality in the spotted salamander, Ambystoma maculatum. In view of the potentially significant deleterious effects of stressful pH conditions on amphibian survivorship and the relative paucity of data on this subject, the present study was conducted in order to ascertain the combined effects of temperature and pH on embryonic metabolic rates and survival capacity in the smallmouth salamander, Ambystoma texanum Mathes. No previous data on these parameters are available for this species.

  10. RATE AND CAPACITY OF HEPATIC MICROSOMAL RING HYDROXYLATION OF PHENOL TO HYDROQUINONE AND CATECHOL IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout liver microsomes were used to study the rate of ring-hydroxylation of phenol (PH) by directly measuring the production of hydroquinone (HQ), the primary metabolite, and catechol (CAT), a secondary metabolite. An HPLC method with integrated ultroviolet (UV) and elect...

  11. RATE AND CAPACITY OF HEPATIC MICROSOMAL RING HYDROXYLATION OF PHENOL TO HYDROQUINONE AND CATECHOL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver microsomes were used to study the rate of ring-hydroxylation of phenol PH) by directly measuring the production of hydroquinone (HQ), the primary metabolite, and catechol (CAT), a secondary metabolite. An HPLC method with integrated ultra...

  12. Phases Hybriding and Hierarchical Structuring of Mesoporous TiO2 Nanowire Bundles for High‐Rate and High‐Capacity Lithium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jun; Huang, Shao‐Zhuan; Liu, Jing; Chen, Li‐Hua; Yu, Yong; Wang, Hong‐En; Grey, Clare P.

    2015-01-01

    A hierarchical mesoporous TiO2 nanowire bundles (HM‐TiO2‐NB) superstructure with amorphous surface and straight nanochannels has been designed and synthesized through a templating method at a low temperature under acidic and wet conditions. The obtained HM‐TiO2‐NB superstructure demonstrates high reversible capacity, excellent cycling performance, and superior rate capability. Most importantly, a self‐improving phenomenon of Li+ insertion capability based on two simultaneous effects, the crystallization of amorphous TiO2 and the formation of Li2Ti2O4 crystalline dots on the surface of TiO2 nanowires, has been clearly revealed through ex situ transmission electron microcopy (TEM), high‐resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X‐ray diffraction (XRD), Raman, and X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques during the Li+ insertion process. When discharged for 100 cycles at 1 C, the HM‐TiO2‐NB exhibits a reversible capacity of 174 mA h g−1. Even when the current density is increased to 50 C, a very stable and extraordinarily high reversible capacity of 96 mA h g−1 can be delivered after 50 cycles. Compared to the previously reported results, both the lithium storage capacity and rate capability of our pure TiO2 material without any additives are among the highest values reported. The advanced electrochemical performance of these HM‐TiO2‐NB superstructures is the result of the synergistic effect of hybriding of amorphous and crystalline (anatase/rutile) phases and hierarchically structuring of TiO2 nanowire bundles. Our material could be a very promising anodic material for lithium‐ion batteries.

  13. Bio-inspired 2-line ferrihydrite as a high-capacity and high-rate-capability anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Ukita, Masahiro; Sakuma, Ryo; Nakanishi, Makoto; Fujii, Tatsuo; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Takada, Jun

    2016-10-01

    A high-capacity and high-rate-capability anode material for lithium-ion batteries, silicon-doped iron oxyhydroxide or 2-line ferrihydrite (2Fh), was prepared by mixing iron nitrate powder, tetraethyl orthosilicate, 2-propanol, and ammonium hydrogen carbonate powder at room temperature. The design of this material was inspired by a bacteriogenic product, a nanometric amorphous iron-based oxide material containing small amounts of structural Si. The atomistic structure of the prepared Si-doped 2Fh was strongly affected by the Si molar ratio [x = Si/(Fe + Si)]. Its crystallinity gradually decreased as the Si molar ratio increased, with a structural variation from nanocrystalline to amorphous at x = 0.25. The sample with x = 0.20 demonstrated the best Li storage performance. The developed material exhibited a high capacity of ∼400 mAh g-1 at the 25th cycle in the voltage range of 0.3-3.0 V and at a current rate of 9 A g-1, which was three times greater than that of the Si-free 2Fh. This indicates that Si-doping into the 2Fh structure realizes good rate capability, which are presumably because of the specific nanocomposite structure of iron-based electrochemical centers embedded in the Si-based amorphous matrix, generated by reversible Li insertion/deinsertion process.

  14. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on exercise blood pressure, heart rate, and capacity in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix; Linz, Dominik; Pöss, Janine; Cremers, Bodo; Kindermann, Ingrid; Laufs, Ulrich; Ukena, Christian; Böhm, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Renal denervation reduces office blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation on blood pressure, heart rate, and chronotropic index at rest, during exercise, and at recovery in 60 patients (renal denervation group=50, control group=10) with resistant hypertension using a standardized bicycle exercise test protocol performed 6 and 12 months after renal denervation. After renal denervation, exercise blood pressure at rest was reduced from 158±3/90±2 to 141±3/84±4 mm Hg (P<0.001 for systolic blood pressure/P=0.007 for diastolic blood pressure) after 6 months and 139±3/83±4 mm Hg (P<0.001/P=0.022) after 12 months. Exercise blood pressure tended to be lower at all stages of exercise at 6- and 12-month follow-up in patients undergoing renal denervation, although reaching statistical significance only at mild-to-moderate exercise levels (75-100 W). At recovery after 1 minute, blood pressure decreased from 201±4/95±2 to 177±4/88±2 (P<0.001/P=0.066) and 188±6/86±2 mm Hg (P=0.059/P=0.01) after 6 and 12 months, respectively. Heart rate was reduced after renal denervation from 71±3 bpm at rest, 128±5 bpm at maximum workload, and 96±5 bpm at recovery after 1 minute to 66±2 (P<0.001), 115±5 (P=0.107), and 89±3 bpm (P=0.008) after 6 months and to 69±3 (P=0.092), 122±7 (P=0.01), and 93±4 bpm (P=0.032) after 12 months. Mean exercise time increased from 6.59±0.33 to 8.4±0.32 (P<0.001) and 9.0±0.41 minutes (P=0.008), and mean workload increased from 93±2 to 100±2 (P<0.001) and 101±3 W (P=0.007) at 6- and 12-month follow-up, respectively. No changes were observed in the control group. In conclusion, renal denervation reduced blood pressure and heart rate during exercise, improved mean workload, and increased exercise time without impairing chronotropic competence.

  15. Carbon/SnO2/carbon core/shell/shell hybrid nanofibers: tailored nanostructure for the anode of lithium ion batteries with high reversibility and rate capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Junhua; Liu, Zhaolin; Yang, Zhengchun; Tan, Hui Ru; Xiong, Shanxin; Wong, Siew Yee; Li, Xu; Lu, Xuehong

    2012-01-01

    A carbon/SnO2/carbon core/shell/shell hybrid nanofibrous mat was successfully prepared via single-spinneret electrospinning followed by carbonization and hydrothermal treatment. The morphology and structure of carbon/SnO2/carbon hybrid nanofibers were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their electrochemical properties were studied as an anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). It is shown that the designed hybrid nanofibrous mat exhibits excellent electrochemical properties, including high reversible capacity with high columbic efficiency and impressive rate capacity. The greatly enhanced electrochemical performance is mainly due to the morphological stability and reduced diffusion resistance, which are induced by both the carbon core and deposited carbon skin. Furthermore, the embedded and de-aggregated SnO2 nanoparticles in the carbon phase, which are less than 10 nm in size, provide large numbers of reaction sites for lithium ions and ensure complete alloying with them.A carbon/SnO2/carbon core/shell/shell hybrid nanofibrous mat was successfully prepared via single-spinneret electrospinning followed by carbonization and hydrothermal treatment. The morphology and structure of carbon/SnO2/carbon hybrid nanofibers were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, wide-angle X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their electrochemical properties were studied as an anode in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). It is shown that the designed hybrid nanofibrous mat exhibits excellent electrochemical properties, including high reversible capacity with high columbic efficiency and impressive rate capacity. The greatly enhanced electrochemical performance is mainly due to the morphological stability and reduced diffusion

  16. {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an anode material with capacity rise and high rate capability for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Mohd Faiz; Guo, Zaiping; Chen, Zhixin; Liu, Huakun

    2011-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanosized porous {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder was successfully synthesized via the molten salt method. Electrochemical measurement results demonstrated that the electrode properties of the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could offers excellent cycling performance and high rate capability. The capacity of the product shows two different trends during cycling which are rarely reported in the literature, a decrease in capacity in the first 100 cycles and an increase afterwards up to 600 cycles, with the lowest and highest capacity around 970 and 1972 mAh/g, respectively. Research highlights: {yields} Nanosized {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as an anode material for lithium-ion battery. {yields} The nanosized {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows excellent electrochemical performance and exhibits the feature of capacity increase upon cycling. {yields} The porous rhombohedral structures of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could provides the short Li{sup +} diffusion length, decreases the traverse time for electrons and Li{sup +} ions, and reduces the volume expansion to some extent. {yields} The cubic structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been modified to a needle-like structure after prolonged cycling. -- Abstract: We report a simple molten salt method to prepare nanosize {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as its electrochemical performance as anode material for lithium ion batteries. The structure and morphology were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a rhombohedral phase of hematite with crystal size in the range of 20-40 nm. The electrochemical measurements were performed using the as-prepared powders as the active material for a lithium-ion cell. The nanosized {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows excellent cycling performance and rate capability. It also exhibits the feature of capacity increase upon cycling. The outstanding electrochemical performance of the {alpha

  17. Evidence of Circadian Rhythm, Oxygen Regulation Capacity, Metabolic Repeatability and Positive Correlations between Forced and Spontaneous Maximal Metabolic Rates in Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Jon C.; Genz, Janet; Anderson, W. Gary; Stol, Jennifer A.; Watkinson, Douglas A.; Enders, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Animal metabolic rate is variable and may be affected by endogenous and exogenous factors, but such relationships remain poorly understood in many primitive fishes, including members of the family Acipenseridae (sturgeons). Using juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), the objective of this study was to test four hypotheses: 1) A. fulvescens exhibits a circadian rhythm influencing metabolic rate and behaviour; 2) A. fulvescens has the capacity to regulate metabolic rate when exposed to environmental hypoxia; 3) measurements of forced maximum metabolic rate (MMRF) are repeatable in individual fish; and 4) MMRF correlates positively with spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMRS). Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, and a standard chase protocol was employed to elicit MMRF. Trials lasting 24 h were used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) and MMRS. Repeatability and correlations between MMRF and MMRS were analyzed using residual body mass corrected values. Results revealed that A. fulvescens exhibit a circadian rhythm in metabolic rate, with metabolism peaking at dawn. SMR was unaffected by hypoxia (30% air saturation (O2sat)), demonstrating oxygen regulation. In contrast, MMRF was affected by hypoxia and decreased across the range from 100% O2sat to 70% O2sat. MMRF was repeatable in individual fish, and MMRF correlated positively with MMRS, but the relationships between MMRF and MMRS were only revealed in fish exposed to hypoxia or 24 h constant light (i.e. environmental stressor). Our study provides evidence that the physiology of A. fulvescens is influenced by a circadian rhythm and suggests that A. fulvescens is an oxygen regulator, like most teleost fish. Finally, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between MMRF and MMRS support the conjecture that MMRF represents a measure of organism performance that could be a target of natural selection. PMID:24718688

  18. Brannerite-Type Vanadium-Molybdenum Oxide LiVMoO₆ as a Promising Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries with High Capacity and Rate Capability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Chunzhong; Hu, Fang; Bie, Xiaofei; Wei, Yingjin; Chen, Gang; Du, Fei

    2015-07-29

    Brannerite-type vanadium-molybdenum oxide LiVMoO6 is prepared by a facile liquid-phase method, and its electrochemical properties as anode of lithium-ion batteries are comprehensively studied by means of galvanostatic charge-discharge profiles, rate performance, and cyclic voltammetry. In the working voltage between 3.0 and 0.01 V, LiVMoO6 delivers a high reversible capacity of more than 900 mAh g(-1) at the current density of 100 mA g(-1) and a superior rate capability with discharge capacity of ca. 584 and 285 mAh g(-1) under the high current densities of 2 and 5 A g(-1), respectively. Moreover, ex situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are utilized to examine the phase evolution and valence changes during the first lithiated process. A small amount of inserted Li(+) induces a decomposition of LiVMoO6 into Li2Mo2O7 and V2O5, which play the host during further lithiated processes. When being discharged to 0.01 V, most V(5+) change into V(3+)/V(2+), suggesting intercalation/deintercalation processes, whereas Mo(6+) are reduced into a metallic state on the basis of the conversion reaction. The insights obtained from this study will benefit the design of novel anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Sodium chloride inhibits the growth and infective capacity of the amphibian chytrid fungus and increases host survival rates.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Michelle Pirrie; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen that causes the infectious disease chytridiomycosis and has been implicated as a contributing factor in the global amphibian decline. Since its discovery, research has been focused on developing various methods of mitigating the impact of chytridiomycosis on amphibian hosts but little attention has been given to the role of antifungal agents that could be added to the host's environment. Sodium chloride is a known antifungal agent used routinely in the aquaculture industry and this study investigates its potential for use as a disease management tool in amphibian conservation. The effect of 0-5 ppt NaCl on the growth, motility and survival of the chytrid fungus when grown in culture media and its effect on the growth, infection load and survivorship of infected Peron's tree frogs (Litoria peronii) in captivity, was investigated. The results reveal that these concentrations do not negatively affect the survival of the host or the pathogen. However, concentrations greater than 3 ppt significantly reduced the growth and motility of the chytrid fungus compared to 0 ppt. Concentrations of 1-4 ppt NaCl were also associated with significantly lower host infection loads while infected hosts exposed to 3 and 4 ppt NaCl were found to have significantly higher survival rates. These results support the potential for NaCl to be used as an environmentally distributed antifungal agent for the prevention of chytridiomycosis in susceptible amphibian hosts. However, further research is required to identify any negative effects of salt exposure on both target and non-target organisms prior to implementation. PMID:22590639

  20. Sodium chloride inhibits the growth and infective capacity of the amphibian chytrid fungus and increases host survival rates.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Michelle Pirrie; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen that causes the infectious disease chytridiomycosis and has been implicated as a contributing factor in the global amphibian decline. Since its discovery, research has been focused on developing various methods of mitigating the impact of chytridiomycosis on amphibian hosts but little attention has been given to the role of antifungal agents that could be added to the host's environment. Sodium chloride is a known antifungal agent used routinely in the aquaculture industry and this study investigates its potential for use as a disease management tool in amphibian conservation. The effect of 0-5 ppt NaCl on the growth, motility and survival of the chytrid fungus when grown in culture media and its effect on the growth, infection load and survivorship of infected Peron's tree frogs (Litoria peronii) in captivity, was investigated. The results reveal that these concentrations do not negatively affect the survival of the host or the pathogen. However, concentrations greater than 3 ppt significantly reduced the growth and motility of the chytrid fungus compared to 0 ppt. Concentrations of 1-4 ppt NaCl were also associated with significantly lower host infection loads while infected hosts exposed to 3 and 4 ppt NaCl were found to have significantly higher survival rates. These results support the potential for NaCl to be used as an environmentally distributed antifungal agent for the prevention of chytridiomycosis in susceptible amphibian hosts. However, further research is required to identify any negative effects of salt exposure on both target and non-target organisms prior to implementation.

  1. Sodium Chloride Inhibits the Growth and Infective Capacity of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus and Increases Host Survival Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Michelle Pirrie; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen that causes the infectious disease chytridiomycosis and has been implicated as a contributing factor in the global amphibian decline. Since its discovery, research has been focused on developing various methods of mitigating the impact of chytridiomycosis on amphibian hosts but little attention has been given to the role of antifungal agents that could be added to the host's environment. Sodium chloride is a known antifungal agent used routinely in the aquaculture industry and this study investigates its potential for use as a disease management tool in amphibian conservation. The effect of 0–5 ppt NaCl on the growth, motility and survival of the chytrid fungus when grown in culture media and its effect on the growth, infection load and survivorship of infected Peron's tree frogs (Litoria peronii) in captivity, was investigated. The results reveal that these concentrations do not negatively affect the survival of the host or the pathogen. However, concentrations greater than 3 ppt significantly reduced the growth and motility of the chytrid fungus compared to 0 ppt. Concentrations of 1–4 ppt NaCl were also associated with significantly lower host infection loads while infected hosts exposed to 3 and 4 ppt NaCl were found to have significantly higher survival rates. These results support the potential for NaCl to be used as an environmentally distributed antifungal agent for the prevention of chytridiomycosis in susceptible amphibian hosts. However, further research is required to identify any negative effects of salt exposure on both target and non-target organisms prior to implementation. PMID:22590639

  2. 77 FR 63757 - Extension of the Commission's Rules Regarding Outage Reporting to Interconnected Voice Over...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ..., regarding Interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) outage reporting rules, published at 77 FR..., and 4.9 published at 77 FR 25088, April 27, 2012, are effective December 16, 2012. FOR FURTHER... Voice Over Internet Protocol Service Providers and Broadband Internet Service Providers AGENCY:...

  3. 47 CFR 4.9 - Outage reporting requirements-threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...—threshold criteria. (a) Cable. All cable communications providers shall submit electronically a Notification..., any official who has been designated by the management of the affected 911 facility as the provider's... (d) and (e) of § 4.7.) Not later than 72 hours after discovering the outage, the provider...

  4. 47 CFR 4.9 - Outage reporting requirements-threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...—threshold criteria. (a) Cable. All cable communications providers shall submit electronically a Notification..., any official who has been designated by the management of the affected 911 facility as the provider's... (d) and (e) of § 4.7.) Not later than 72 hours after discovering the outage, the provider...

  5. 47 CFR 4.9 - Outage reporting requirements-threshold criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...—threshold criteria. (a) Cable. All cable communications providers shall submit electronically a Notification..., any official who has been designated by the management of the affected 911 facility as the provider's... (d) and (e) of § 4.7.) Not later than 72 hours after discovering the outage, the provider...

  6. Effect of air flow rate on the polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of convective dried cactus pear cladodes (Opuntia ficus indica).

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Infante, José-Alberto; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria-Elizabeth; González-Laredo, Ruben-Francisco; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Medina-Torres, Luis; Cervantes-Cardozo, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The interest in nopal has encouraged the use of dehydration; there are few studies about the effect of process parameters on the nopal polyphenol content and antioxidant activity. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of air-drying flow rates on the amount and antioxidant capacity of extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes. Nopal was dried at 45 degrees C and air flow rates of 3 and 5 m/sec. Samples were analyzed for moisture, total polyphenol, flavonoid, and flavonol contents, chain-breaking activity, inhibition of low-density lipoprotein and deoxyribose oxidation. Nopal drying at an air flow rate of 3 m/sec showed higher values of phenols, flavonoids and flavonols. The best value of low-density lipoprotein inhibition and deoxyribose was found at 1,000 microg/ml. The air flow rate affected the amount of polyphenols and the OH( . ) radical scavenging, but did not modify the chain-breaking activity and the low-density lipoprotein inhibition activity. PMID:19468951

  7. Effect of air flow rate on the polyphenols content and antioxidant capacity of convective dried cactus pear cladodes (Opuntia ficus indica).

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Infante, José-Alberto; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria-Elizabeth; González-Laredo, Ruben-Francisco; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Medina-Torres, Luis; Cervantes-Cardozo, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The interest in nopal has encouraged the use of dehydration; there are few studies about the effect of process parameters on the nopal polyphenol content and antioxidant activity. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the effect of air-drying flow rates on the amount and antioxidant capacity of extracts of Opuntia ficus indica cladodes. Nopal was dried at 45 degrees C and air flow rates of 3 and 5 m/sec. Samples were analyzed for moisture, total polyphenol, flavonoid, and flavonol contents, chain-breaking activity, inhibition of low-density lipoprotein and deoxyribose oxidation. Nopal drying at an air flow rate of 3 m/sec showed higher values of phenols, flavonoids and flavonols. The best value of low-density lipoprotein inhibition and deoxyribose was found at 1,000 microg/ml. The air flow rate affected the amount of polyphenols and the OH( . ) radical scavenging, but did not modify the chain-breaking activity and the low-density lipoprotein inhibition activity.

  8. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Association with Physical Capacity, Disability, and Self-Rated Health among Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study Participants

    PubMed Central

    Botoseneanu, Anda; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Beavers, Daniel P.; de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Anton, Stephen; Church, Timothy; Folta, Sara C.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; King, Abby C.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Spring, Bonnie; Wang, Xuewen; Gill, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its association with physical capacity, disability, and self-rated health among older adults at high risk for mobility disability, including those with and without diabetes. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study. Participants 1,535 community-dwelling sedentary adults aged 70–89 years old at high risk for mobility disability [short physical performance battery (SPPB) score ≤ 9; mean (SD) = 7.4 (1.6)]. Measurements MetS was defined according to the 2009 multi-agency harmonized criteria; outcomes were physical capacity (400m walk time, grip strength, and SPPB score), disability (composite 19-item score), and self-rated health (5-point scale ranging from “excellent” to “poor”). Results The prevalence of MetS was 49.8% in the overall sample, and 83.2% and 38.1% among diabetics and non-diabetics, respectively. MetS was associated with greater grip strength [mean difference (kilograms) Δ = 1.2, p = .01] in the overall sample and among participants without diabetes, and with poorer self-rated health (Δ = 0.1, p < .001) in the overall sample only. No significant differences were found in the 400m walk time, SPPB score, and disability score between participants with and without MetS, in either the overall sample or diabetes subgroups. Conclusion Metabolic dysfunction is highly prevalent among older adults at risk for mobility disability, yet consistent associations were not observed between MetS and walking speed, lower extremity function, and self-reported disability after adjusting for known and potential confounders. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether MetS accelerates declines in functional status in high-risk older adults and to inform clinical and public health interventions aimed at preventing or delaying disability in this group. PMID:25645664

  9. Characterizing rapid capacity fade and impedance evolution in high rate pulsed discharged lithium iron phosphate cells for complex, high power loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Derek N.; Wetz, David A.; Heinzel, John M.; Mansour, Azzam N.

    2016-10-01

    Three 26650 LiFePO4 (LFP) cells are cycled using a 40 A pulsed charge/discharge profile to study their performance in high rate pulsed applications. This profile is used to simulate naval pulsed power loads planned for deployment aboard future vessels. The LFP cells studied experienced an exponential drop in their usable high-rate recharge capacity within sixty cycles due to a rapid rise in their internal resistance. Differential capacitance shows that the voltage window for charge storage is pushed outside of the recommended voltage cutoff limits. Investigation into the state of health of the electrodes shows minimal loss of active material from the cathode to side reactions. Post-mortem examination of the anodic surface films reveals a large increase in the concentration of reduced salt compounds indicating that the pulsed profile creates highly favorable conditions for LiPF6 salt to break down into LiF. This film slows the ionic movement at the interface, affecting transfer kinetics, resulting in charge buildup in the bulk anode without successful energy storage. The results indicate that the use of these cells as a power supply for high pulsed power loads is hindered because of ionically resistant film development and not by an increasing rate of active material loss.

  10. Retinoic acid-induced differentiation increases the rate of oxygen consumption and enhances the spare respiratory capacity of mitochondria in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Xun, Zhiyin; Lee, Do-Yup; Lim, James; Canaria, Christie A; Barnebey, Adam; Yanonne, Steven M; McMurray, Cynthia T

    2012-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is used in differentiation therapy to treat a variety of cancers including neuroblastoma. The contributing factors for its therapeutic efficacy are poorly understood. However, mitochondria (MT) have been implicated as key effectors in RA-mediated differentiation process. Here we utilize the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line as a model to examine how RA influences MT during the differentiation process. We find that RA confers an approximately sixfold increase in the oxygen consumption rate while the rate of glycolysis modestly increases. RA treatment does not increase the number of MT or cause measurable changes in the composition of the electron transport chain. Rather, RA treatment significantly increases the mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. We propose a competition model for the therapeutic effects of RA. Specifically, the high metabolic rate in differentiated cells limits the availability of metabolic nutrients for use by the undifferentiated cells and suppresses their growth. Thus, RA treatment provides a selective advantage for the differentiated state.

  11. Effects of the April 1st, 2014 GLONASS Outage on GNSS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Romero, I.; D'Anastasio, E.

    2014-12-01

    The use of multi-constellation GNSS receivers has been assumed as a way to increase system integrity both by increased coverage during normal operations and failover redundancy in the event of a constellation failure. At approximately 21:00 UTC on April 1st the entire GLONASS constellation was disrupted as illegal ephemeris uploaded to each satellite took effect simultaneously. The outage continued for more than 10 hours. While ephemeris were incorrect, pseudoranges were correctly broadcast on both L1 and L2 and carrier phases were not affected; in the best case, GNSS receivers could be expected to continue to track all signals including GLONASS and at the worst to continue to track GPS and other constellations. It became clear to operators of the GeoNet network in New Zealand that the majority of their 79 GLONASS-enabled receivers experienced total tracking failures. Further detailed analysis of data from these and 315 additional GLONASS-enabled stations worldwide showed that receiver tracking behavior was affected for most receiver brands and models, both for GLONASS and GPS. Findings regarding the impacts of the GLONASS outage on receiver behavior will be highlighted. We use data recorded by GLONASS enabled global sites for the days during, preceding and following the outage to evaluate the impact of the outage on tracking and positioning performance. We observe that for some receiver types the onboard receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) failed to ignore the incorrect messages, resulting in degraded GLONASS and GPS tracking and in some cases complete tracking failures and significant data loss. In addition, many of the receivers with clock steering enabled showed outliers in their receiver clock bias estimates that also coincided with the outage. Our results show in detail how different brands, configurations, and distributions of receivers were affected to varying extents, but no common factors are apparent. This event shows that many manufacturers

  12. Exercise capacity and heart rate responses to exercise as predictors of short-term outcome among patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Lepojärvi, Samuli; Kenttä, Tuomas V; Junttila, M Juhani; Perkiömäki, Juha S; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Ukkola, Olavi; Hautala, Arto J; Tulppo, Mikko P; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2015-11-15

    Although exercise capacity (EC) and autonomic responses to exercise predict clinical outcomes in various populations, they are not routinely applied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that the composite index of EC and exercise heart rate responses would be a powerful determinant of short-term risk in CAD. Patients with angiographically documented stable CAD and treated with β blockers (n = 1,531) underwent exercise testing to allow the calculation of age- and gender-adjusted EC, maximal chronotropic response index (CRI), and 2-minute postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR, percentage of maximal heart rate). Cardiovascular deaths and hospitalization due to heart failure, registered during a 2-year follow-up (n = 39, 2.5%), were defined as the composite primary end point. An exercise test risk score was calculated as the sum of hazard ratios related to abnormal (lowest tertile) EC, CRI, and HRR. Abnormal EC, CRI, and HRR predicted the primary end point, involving 4.5-, 2.2-, and 6.2-fold risk, respectively, independently of each other. The patients with intermediate and high exercise test risk score had 11.1-fold (95% confidence interval 2.4 to 51.1, p = 0.002) and 25.4-fold (95% confidence interval 5.5 to 116.8, p <0.001) adjusted risk for the primary end point in comparison with the low-risk group, respectively. The addition of this risk score to the established risk model enhanced discrimination by integrated discrimination index and reclassification by categorical and continuous net reclassification index (p <0.001 for all). In conclusion, the composite index of EC and heart rate responses to exercise and recovery is a powerful predictor of short-term outcome in patients with stable CAD.

  13. Outage performance of multihop free-space optical communication system over exponentiated Weibull fading channels with nonzero boresight pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-xia; Wang, Ping; Cao, Tian

    2016-09-01

    The outage performance of the multihop free-space optical (FSO) communication system with decode-and-forward (DF) protocol is studied by considering the joint effects of nonzero boresight pointing errors and atmospheric turbulence modeled by exponentiated Weibull (EW) distribution. The closed-form analytical expression of outage probability is derived, and the results are validated through Monte Carlo simulation. Furthermore, the detailed analysis is provided to evaluate the impacts of turbulence strength, receiver aperture size, boresight displacement, beamwidth and number of relays on the outage performance for the studied system.

  14. Recent performance of and plasma outage studies with the SNS H- source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, M. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R.

    2016-02-01

    Spallation Neutron Source ramps to higher power levels that can be sustained with high availability. The goal is 1.4 MW despite a compromised radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), which requires higher radio frequency power than design levels to approach the nominal beam transmission. Unfortunately at higher power the RFQ often loses its thermal stability, a problem apparently enhanced by beam losses and high influxes of hydrogen. Delivering as much H- beam as possible with the least amount of hydrogen led to plasma outages. The root cause is the dense 1-ms long ˜55-kW 2-MHz plasma pulses reflecting ˜90% of the continuous ˜300 W, 13-MHz power, which was mitigated with a 4-ms filter for the reflected power signal and an outage resistant, slightly detuned 13-MHz match. Lowering the H2 gas also increased the H- beam current to ˜55 mA and increased the RFQ transmission by ˜7% (relative).

  15. Recent Performance of and Plasma Outage Studies with the SNS H- Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    SNS ramps to higher power levels that can be sustained with high availability. The goal is 1.4 MW despite a compromised RFQ, which requires higher RF power than design levels to approach the nominal beam transmission. Unfortunately at higher power the RFQ often loses its thermal stability, a problem apparently enhanced by beam losses and high influxes of hydrogen. Delivering as much H- beam as possible with the least amount of hydrogen led to plasma outages. The root cause is the dense 1-ms long ~55-kW 2-MHz plasma pulses reflecting ~90% of the continuous ~300W, 13-MHz power, which was mitigated with a 4-ms filter for the reflected power signal and an outage resistant, slightly-detuned 13-MHz match. Lowering the H2 also increased the H- beam current to ~55 mA, and increased the transmission by ~7%.

  16. Noise Temperature Increase Effect on Total Outage Analysis of an Interfered Satellite Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakarellos, Vassileios K.; Panagopoulos, Athanasios D.; Kanellopoulos, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The ever increasing demand for bandwidth and multimedia services has led to the employment of Ka and V band in modern satellite communication networks. In these frequency bands, rain attenuation is the most dominant fading mechanism deteriorating the performance of the Earth-space links. Moreover, interference due to propagation phenomena increases the outage time of the satellite links and should be taken into account for the reliable design of a satellite communication network. In this paper, a physical propagation model for the prediction of carrier-to-noise plus interference ratio statistics of a broadband satellite link incorporating the receiver noise temperature increase due to rain, is presented The obtained numerical results highlight the significance of the latter effect and investigate the impact of various operational, geometrical and climatic parameters in the total outage analysis. Some simple mathematical formulas for the prediction of the carrier-to-noise plus interference ratio, based on the above theoretical results, are also presented.

  17. Estimated times to exhaustion and power outputs at the gas exchange threshold, physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold, and respiratory compensation point.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Zuniga, Jorge M; Camic, Clayton L; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the power outputs and estimated times to exhaustion (T(lim)) at the gas exchange threshold (GET), physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold (PWC(RPE)), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Three male and 5 female subjects (mean ± SD: age, 22.4 ± 2.8 years) performed an incremental test to exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer to determine peak oxygen consumption rate, GET, and RCP. The PWC(RPE) was determined from ratings of perceived exertion data recorded during 3 continuous workbouts to exhaustion. The estimated T(lim) values for each subject at GET, PWC(RPE), and RCP were determined from power curve analyses (T(lim) = ax(b)). The results indicated that the PWC(RPE) (176 ± 55 W) was not significantly different from RCP (181 ± 54 W); however, GET (155 ± 42 W) was significantly less than PWC(RPE) and RCP. The estimated T(lim) for the GET (26.1 ± 9.8 min) was significantly greater than PWC(RPE) (14.6 ± 5.6 min) and RCP (11.2 ± 3.1 min). The PWC(RPE) occurred at a mean power output that was 13.5% greater than the GET and, therefore, it is likely that the perception of effort is not driven by the same mechanism that underlies the GET (i.e., lactate buffering). Furthermore, the PWC(RPE) and RCP were not significantly different and, therefore, these thresholds may be associated with the same mechanisms of fatigue, such as increased levels of interstitial and (or) arterial [K⁺]. PMID:22716291

  18. Use of VIIRS DNB Data to Monitor Power Outages and Restoration for Significant Weather Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Molthan, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    NASA fs Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) project operates from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The team provides unique satellite data to the National Weather Service (NWS) and other agencies and organizations for weather analysis. While much of its work is focused on improving short-term weather forecasting, the SPoRT team supported damage assessment and response to Hurricane Superstorm Sandy by providing imagery that highlighted regions without power. The team used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite. The VIIRS low-light sensor, known as the day-night-band (DNB), can detect nighttime light from wildfires, urban and rural communities, and other human activity which emits light. It can also detect moonlight reflected from clouds and surface features. Using real time VIIRS data collected by our collaborative partner at the Space Science and Engineering Center of the University of Wisconsin, the SPoRT team created composite imagery to help detect power outages and restoration. This blackout imagery allowed emergency response teams from a variety of agencies to better plan and marshal resources for recovery efforts. The blackout product identified large-scale outages, offering a comprehensive perspective beyond a patchwork GIS mapping of outages that utility companies provide based on customer complaints. To support the relief efforts, the team provided its imagery to the USGS data portal, which the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other agencies used in their relief efforts. The team fs product helped FEMA, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and U.S. Army monitor regions without power as part of their disaster response activities. Disaster responders used the images to identify possible outages and effectively distribute relief resources. An enhanced product is being developed and integrated into a web

  19. Lights out: Impact of the August 2003 power outage on mortality in New York, NY

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about how power outages affect health. We investigated mortality effects of the largest US blackout to date, August 14–15, 2003 in New York, NY. Methods We estimated mortality risk in New York, NY, using a generalized linear model with data from 1987–2005. We incorporated possible confounders, including weather and long-term and seasonal mortality trends. Results During the blackout, mortality increased for accidental deaths (122% [95% confidence interval = 28%–287%]) and non-accidental (i.e., disease-related) deaths (25% [12%–41%]), resulting in approximately 90 excess deaths. Increased mortality was not from deaths being advanced by a few days; rather, mortality risk remained slightly elevated through August 2003. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of power outages and non-accidental mortality. Understanding the impact of power outages on human health is relevant, given that increased energy demand and climate change are likely to put added strain on power grids. PMID:22252408

  20. A novel fusion methodology to bridge GPS outages for land vehicle positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xu; Song, Xiang; Li, Bin; Song, Xianghui; Xu, Qimin

    2015-07-01

    Many intelligent transportation system applications require accurate, reliable, and continuous vehicle position information whether in open-sky environments or in Global Positioning System (GPS) denied environments. However, there remains a challenging task for land vehicles to achieve such positioning performance using low-cost sensors, especially microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors. In this paper, a novel and cost-effective fusion methodology to bridge GPS outages is proposed and applied in the Inertial Navigation System (INS)/GPS/ compass integrated positioning system. In the implementation of the proposed methodology, a key data preprocessing algorithm is first developed to eliminate the noise in inertial sensors in order to provide more accurate information for subsequent modeling. Then, a novel hybrid strategy incorporating the designed autoregressive model (AR model)-based forward estimator (ARFE) with Kalman filter (KF) is presented to predict the INS position errors during GPS outages. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methodology, real road tests with various scenarios were performed. The proposed methodology illustrates significant improvement in positioning accuracy during GPS outages.

  1. Outage performance of MIMO FSO links over strong turbulence and misalignment fading channels.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2011-07-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces fluctuations in the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam, which is known as atmospheric scintillation, severely degrading the performance over free-space optical (FSO) links. Additionally, since FSO systems are usually installed on high buildings, building sway causes vibrations in the transmitted beam, leading to an unsuitable alignment between transmitter and receiver and, hence, a greater deterioration in performance. In this paper, the outage probability as a performance measure for multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) FSO communication systems with intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD) over strong atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors is analyzed. Novel closed-form expressions for the outage probability as well as their corresponding asymptotic expressions are presented when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to either strong turbulence conditions, following a negative exponential distribution, and pointing error effects, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. Obtained results show that the diversity order is independent of the pointing error when the equivalent beam radius at the receiver is at least twice the value of the pointing error displacement standard deviation at the receiver. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the analytical results. Additionally, since proper FSO transmission requires transmitters with accurate control of their beamwidth, asymptotic expressions here obtained for different diversity techniques are used to find the optimum beamwidth that minimizes the outage performance.

  2. Improving the predictive accuracy of hurricane power outage forecasts using generalized additive models.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Ryong; Guikema, Seth D; Quiring, Steven M

    2009-10-01

    Electric power is a critical infrastructure service after hurricanes, and rapid restoration of electric power is important in order to minimize losses in the impacted areas. However, rapid restoration of electric power after a hurricane depends on obtaining the necessary resources, primarily repair crews and materials, before the hurricane makes landfall and then appropriately deploying these resources as soon as possible after the hurricane. This, in turn, depends on having sound estimates of both the overall severity of the storm and the relative risk of power outages in different areas. Past studies have developed statistical, regression-based approaches for estimating the number of power outages in advance of an approaching hurricane. However, these approaches have either not been applicable for future events or have had lower predictive accuracy than desired. This article shows that a different type of regression model, a generalized additive model (GAM), can outperform the types of models used previously. This is done by developing and validating a GAM based on power outage data during past hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region and comparing the results from this model to the previously used generalized linear models.

  3. Effects of α-tocopherol and freezing rates on the quality and heterologous in vitro fertilization capacity of stallion sperm after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos Franco, J S; Faheem, M; Chaveiro, A; Moreira da Silva, F

    2016-09-01

    The effects of supplementation of α-tocopherol and different freezing rates (FRs) on the ability of stallion sperm to fertilize bovine oocytes with intact zona pellucida were investigated, in an attempt to develop a model to assess cryopreserved sperm function. Semen was obtained from four purebred Lusitano stallions (n = 4). Each ejaculate was subjected to cryopreservation with a commercial extender (Ghent, Minitub Iberia, Spain), without any supplementation (control) or supplemented with 2-mM α-tocopherol. The semen was exposed to two different FRs between 5 °C and -15 °C: slow (5 °C/min) and moderate (10 °C/min). After thawing, the viability (SYBR®-14 and propidium iodide [PI]), mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'tetraethylbenzimidazolyl carbocyanine iodine) and membrane lipid peroxidation (C11-BODIPY(581/591)) of each sample were determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, the heterologous IVF rate was measured to evaluate the fertilization capacity of postthaw semen in the four different treatments. For both extenders, the viability was higher for spermatozoa cooled slowly (39.40 ± 2.17 vs. 17.59 ± 2.25-control; 31.96 ± 2.19 vs. 11.46 ± 1.34-Tocopherol; P < 0.05). The α-tocopherol extender improved (P < 0.05) postthaw lipid peroxidation (10.28 ± 0.70 vs. 15.40 ± 0.95-slow FR; 10.14 ± 0.40 vs. 13.48 ± 0.34-moderate FR); however, it did not improve viability and mitochondrial membrane potential. Regarding the IVF rate, in the moderate FR, α-tocopherol supplementation reported a higher percentage of IVF (20.50 ± 2.11; P < 0.05), comparing with the control (14.00 ± 1.84). Regarding the slow FR, no significance differences were observed for percentage of IVF between the two extenders and the FRs. However, it seems that the α-tocopherol supplementation improved the IVF rate. In conclusion, this research reported that bovine oocytes intact zona pellucida can be used to evaluate the

  4. Soft-contact conductive carbon enabling depolarization of LiFePO4 cathodes to enhance both capacity and rate performances of lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenju; Wang, Kai; Yang, Jinlong; Tan, Rui; Hu, Jiangtao; Guo, Hua; Duan, Yandong; Zheng, Jiaxin; Lin, Yuan; Pan, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Conductive nanocarbons generally are used as the electronic conductive additives to contact with active materials to generate conductive network for electrodes of commercial Li-ion batteries (LIBs). A typical of LiFePO4 (LFP), which has been widely used as cathode material for LIBs with low electronic conductivity, needs higher quantity of conductive nanocarbons to enhance the performance for cathode electrodes. In this work, we systematically studied three types of conductive nanocarbons and related performances in the LFP electrodes, and classify them as hard/soft-contact conductive carbon (named as H/SCC), respectively, according to their crystallite size, surface graphite-defect, specific surface area and porous structure, in which SCC can generate much larger contact area with active nano-particles of cathode materials than that of HCC. It is found that LFP nanocrystals wrapped in SCC networks perform significantly enhanced both capacity and rate performance than that in HCC. Combined experiments with multiphysics simulation, the mechanism is that LFP nanoparticles embedded in SCC with large contact area enable to generate higher depolarized effects with a relatively uniform current density vector (is) and lithium flux vector (NLi) than that in HCC. This discovery will guide us to how to design LIBs by selective using conductive carbon for high-performance LIBs.

  5. The application of the Modified Band Approach for the calculation of on-line photodissociation rate constants in TM5: implications for oxidative capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; Strunk, A.; Huijnen, V.; van Weele, M.

    2012-01-01

    A flexible and explicit on-line parameterization for the calculation of tropospheric photodissociation rate constants (J-values) has been integrated into the global Chemistry Transport Model TM5. Here we provide a comprehensive description of this Modified Band Approach (MBA) including details of the optimization procedure employed, the methodology applied for calculating actinic fluxes, the photochemical reaction data used for each chemical species, the aerosol climatology which is adopted and the parameterizations adopted for improving the description of scattering and absorption by clouds. The resulting J-values change markedly throughout the troposphere when compared to the offline approach used to date, with significant increases in the boundary layer and upper troposphere. Conversely, for the middle troposphere a reduction in the actinic flux results in a decrease in J-values. Integrating effects shows that application of the MBA introduces seasonal dependent differences in important trace gas oxidants. Tropospheric ozone (O3) changes by ±10% in the seasonal mean mixing ratios throughout the troposphere, especially over land. These changes and the perturbations in the photolysis rate of O3 induce changes of ±15% in tropospheric OH. In part this is due to an increase in the re-cycling efficiency of nitrogen oxides. The overall increase in northern hemispheric tropospheric ozone strengthens the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere significantly and reduces the lifetime of CO and CH4 by ~5 % and ~4%, respectively. Changes in the tropospheric CO burden, however, are limited to a few percent due to competing effects. Comparing the distribution of tropospheric ozone in the boundary layer and middle troposphere against observations in Europe shows there are improvements in the model performance during boreal winter in the Northern Hemisphere near regions affected by high nitrogen oxide emissions. Monthly mean total columns of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

  6. Power Outages

    MedlinePlus

    ... surge protectors. If you are considering purchasing a generator for your home, consult an electrician or engineer before purchasing and installing. Only use generators away from your home and NEVER run a ...

  7. Problems of Excess Capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, G.

    1972-01-01

    The problems of excess capacity in the airline industry are discussed with focus on the following topics: load factors; fair rate of return on investment; service-quality rivalry among airlines; pricing (fare) policies; aircraft production; and the impacts of excess capacity on operating costs. Also included is a discussion of the interrelationships among these topics.

  8. The application of the Modified Band Approach for the calculation of on-line photodissociation rate constants in TM5: implications for oxidative capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; Strunk, A.; Huijnen, V.; van Weele, M.

    2011-09-01

    A flexible and explicit on-line parameterization for the calculation of tropospheric photodissociation rate constants (J-values) has been integrated into the global Chemistry Transport Model TM5. Here we provide a comprehensive description of this Modified Band Approach (MBA) including details of the optimization procedure employed, the methodology applied for calculating actinic fluxes, the photochemical reaction data used for each chemical species and the parameterizations adopted for improving the description of scattering and absorption by clouds and aerosols. The resulting J-values change markedly throughout the troposphere when compared to the offline approach used to date, with significant increases in the boundary layer and upper troposphere. Conversely, for the middle troposphere a reduction in the actinic flux results in a decrease in J-values. Integrating effects shows that application of the MBA introduces seasonal dependent differences in important trace gas oxidants. Tropospheric ozone changes by ±5% in the seasonal mean mixing ratios throughout the troposphere, which induces changes of ±15% in tropospheric OH. In part this is due to an increase in the re-cycling efficiency of nitrogen oxides. The overall increase in northern hemispheric tropospheric ozone strengthens the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere significantly and reduces the lifetime of CO and CH4 by ~5% and ~4%, respectively. Changes in the tropospheric CO burden, however, are limited to a few percent due to competing effects. Comparing the distribution of tropospheric ozone in the boundary layer and middle troposphere against observations in Europe shows there are improvements in the model performance during boreal winter in the Northern Hemisphere near regions affected by high nitrogen oxide emissions. Monthly mean total columns of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde also compare more favorably against OMI and SCIAMACHY total column observations.

  9. A Parallel Disintegrated Model for Uncertainty Analysis in Estimating Electrical Power Outage Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omitaomu, O. A.

    2008-05-01

    The electrical infrastructure is central to national economy and security in view of the interdependencies that exist between it and other critical infrastructures. Recent studies show that the proportion of electric power outages attributed to weather-related events such as tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and fires appears to be growing; this increase is attributed to the steady increase in the number of most severe weather events over the past few decades. Assessing the impacts of an actual extreme weather event on electrical infrastructure is usually not a difficult task; however, such an after-the-fact assessment is not useful for disaster preparedness. Therefore, the ability to estimate the possible power outage areas and affected population in case of an anticipated extreme weather event is a necessary tool for effective disaster preparedness and response management. Data for electrical substations are publicly available through the annual Federal Energy Regulatory Commission filings. However, the data do not include substations' service areas; therefore, the geographical area served by each substation critical for estimating outage areas is unknown. As a result, a Cellular Automata (CA) model was developed by the author for estimating substations' service areas using modified Moore neighborhood approach. The outputs of the CA model has recently been used for estimating power outage areas during the February 5/6, 2008 tornado outbreaks in Tennessee and for estimating the number of affected population during the February 26, 2008 substation failure in Florida. The estimation of these outage areas, like all assessments of impacts of extreme weather events, is subject to several sources of uncertainty. The uncertainty is due largely to events variability and incomplete knowledge about the events. Events variability (temporal and spatial variability) is attributed to inherent fluctuations or differences in the variable of concern; incomplete knowledge about

  10. [Influence of below-freezing temperatures on the rate of post-mortem metabolism and the water-holding capacity in prerigor frozen beef muscles (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fischer, C; Honikel, K O; Hamm, R

    1980-09-01

    Prerigor beef is very suitable for the production of "bruehwurst" (frankfurter and bologna type sausages) because of its high waterholding capacity (WHC). This high WHC can be preserved for several months by rapid freezing of prerigor beef either unsalted or salted. In order to elucidate the optimum conditions of frozen storage for the preservation of high WHC, intact beef muscle, ground beef and ground, salted (2% NaC1) beef (neck muscles) were frozen at - 18 degrees or --40 degrees C in a thin layer (0.5-1 cm) 30--60 min after slaugther and stored at various temperatures between --5 degrees and --40 degrees C. The changes of biochemical parameters (content of glycogen and lactate, R-value [it corresponds to ATP concentration] and pH) in the tissue and the WHC of raw and heated muscle homogenates, prepared from the frozen material and containing 2% NaC1, were measured and related to time and temperature of frozen storage. At storage temperature of --18 degrees and --40 degrees C no appreciable biochemical changes occur in intact and ground, unsalted tissue over a period of 10 months. Above 18 degrees C, however, rising temperature causes an increased rate of ATP turnover and glycolysis. In ground muscle higher rates of postmortem metabolism are generally found than in the intact tissue. In prerigor salted and frozen beef a faster drug of ATP concentration (increase of R-value) occurs whereas the breakdown of glycogen to lactate is inhibited. The WHC of raw and heated muscle homogenates depends on time and temperature of frozen storage. As soon as the ATP concentration in unsalted beef falls to a level, at which the onset of rigor mortis occurs, the WHC of homogenates decreases markedly. With beef, ground and salted in the prerigor state and than frozen muscle homogenates are obtained which show always a high WHC even after complete breakdown at ATP during frozen storage. These results have practical consequences with regard to processing of hot-deboned beef.

  11. Methodology to predict the number of forced outages due to creep failure

    SciTech Connect

    Palermo, J.V. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    All alloy metals at a temperature above 950 degrees Fahrenheit experience creep damage. Creep failures in boiler tubes usually begin after 25 to 40 years of operation. Since creep damage is irreversible, the only remedy is to replace the tube sections. By predicting the number of failures per year, the utility can make the best economic decision concerning tube replacement. This paper describes a methodology to calculate the number of forced outages per yea due to creep failures. This methodology is particularly useful to utilities that have boilers that have at least 25 years of operation.

  12. Feasibility Study for the K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (643-1G)

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.R.

    1997-05-01

    The K-Area Bingham Pump Outage Pit (KBPOP) is one of four BPOP areas at Savannah River Site (SRS), collectively referred to as the BPOP waste unit group. This Feasibility Study (FS) of Remedial Alternatives serves as the lead FS for the BPOP waste unit group. This section identifies the purpose and scope of the FS and presents site background information summarized from the Final Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment (RI/BRA) WSRC-RP- 95-1555, Rev. 1.2 (WSRC 1997).

  13. Utah Governor blacks out data on state-wide energy outage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    The Governor of Utah squelched information linking a six-hour blackout on January 8 to a trash fire and explosion at the Utah State Prison. Ionizing gases from the explosion allegedly caused a phase fault on the penitentiary grounds that triggered the nearly state-wide outage. The Attorney General recommended a freeze on public information on the grounds that further discussion would be detrimental in the event of lawsuits and evidence from an independent investigation would be more admissable. The Public Service Commission disagreed with efforts to prevent an internal investigation. (DCK)

  14. Porous α-MoO3/MWCNT nanocomposite synthesized via a surfactant-assisted solvothermal route as a lithium-ion-battery high-capacity anode material with excellent rate capability and cyclability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Yuan, Anbao; Xu, Jiaqiang; Hu, Pengfei

    2015-07-22

    A high-performance α-MoO3/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposite material is synthesized via a novel surfactant-assisted solvothermal process followed by low-temperature calcination. Its structure, composition, and morphology are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, carbon element analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption determination, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Its electrochemical performance as a high-capacity lithium-ion-battery anode material is investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic discharge/recharge methods. This composite material exhibits not only high capacity but also excellent rate capability and cyclability. For example, when the discharge/charge current density is increased from 0.1 to 2 A g(-1), the reversible charge capacity is only decreased from 1138.3 to 941.4 mAh g(-1), giving a capacity retention of 82.7%. Even if it is cycled at a high current density of 20 A g(-1), a reversible charge capacity of 490.2 mAh g(-1) is still retained, showing a capacity retention of 43.1%. When it is repeatedly cycled at a current of 0.5 A g(-1), the initial reversible charge capacity is 1041.1 mAh g(-1). A maximum charge capacity of 1392.2 mAh g(-1) is achieved at the 292th cycle. After 300 cycles, a high charge capacity of 1350.3 mAh g(-1) is maintained. Enhancement of the electrical conduction contributed by the MWCNT composite component as well as the loose and porous texture of the MoO3/MWCNT composite is suggested to be responsible for the excellent performance. PMID:26132052

  15. Porous α-MoO3/MWCNT nanocomposite synthesized via a surfactant-assisted solvothermal route as a lithium-ion-battery high-capacity anode material with excellent rate capability and cyclability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feng; Yuan, Anbao; Xu, Jiaqiang; Hu, Pengfei

    2015-07-22

    A high-performance α-MoO3/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposite material is synthesized via a novel surfactant-assisted solvothermal process followed by low-temperature calcination. Its structure, composition, and morphology are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, carbon element analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption determination, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Its electrochemical performance as a high-capacity lithium-ion-battery anode material is investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic discharge/recharge methods. This composite material exhibits not only high capacity but also excellent rate capability and cyclability. For example, when the discharge/charge current density is increased from 0.1 to 2 A g(-1), the reversible charge capacity is only decreased from 1138.3 to 941.4 mAh g(-1), giving a capacity retention of 82.7%. Even if it is cycled at a high current density of 20 A g(-1), a reversible charge capacity of 490.2 mAh g(-1) is still retained, showing a capacity retention of 43.1%. When it is repeatedly cycled at a current of 0.5 A g(-1), the initial reversible charge capacity is 1041.1 mAh g(-1). A maximum charge capacity of 1392.2 mAh g(-1) is achieved at the 292th cycle. After 300 cycles, a high charge capacity of 1350.3 mAh g(-1) is maintained. Enhancement of the electrical conduction contributed by the MWCNT composite component as well as the loose and porous texture of the MoO3/MWCNT composite is suggested to be responsible for the excellent performance.

  16. Economic costs of electrical system instability and power outages caused by snakes on the Island of Guam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Brown Tree Snake, Boiga irregularis, is an introduced species on Guam where it causes frequent electrical power outages. The snake's high abundance, its propensity for climbing, and use of disturbed habitats all contribute to interruption of Guam's electrical service and the activities that depend on electrical power. Snakes have caused more than 1600 power outages in the 20-yr period of 1978-1997 and most recently nearly 200 outages per year. Single outages spanning the entire island and lasting 8 or more hours are estimated to cost in excess of $3,000,000 in lost productivity, but the costs of outages that involve only parts of the island or those of shorter durations are more difficult to quantify. Costs to the island's economy have exceeded $4.5 M per year over a 7-yr period without considering repair costs, damage to electrical equipment, and lost revenues. Snakes pose the greatest problem on high voltage transmission lines, on transformers, and inside electrical substations.

  17. Coordinate Update Algorithms for Robust Power Loading for the MU-MISO Downlink With Outage Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Foad; Davidson, Timothy N.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of power allocation for the single-cell multi-user (MU) multiple-input single-output (MISO) downlink with quality-of-service (QoS) constraints. The base station acquires an estimate of the channels and, for a given beamforming structure, designs the power allocation so as to minimize the total transmission power required to ensure that target signal-to-interference-and-noise ratios at the receivers are met, subject to a specified outage probability. We consider scenarios in which the errors in the base station's channel estimates can be modelled as being zero-mean and Gaussian. Such a model is particularly suitable for time division duplex (TDD) systems with quasi-static channels, in which the base station estimates the channel during the uplink phase. Under that model, we employ a precise deterministic characterization of the outage probability to transform the chance-constrained formulation to a deterministic one. Although that deterministic formulation is not convex, we develop a coordinate descent algorithm that can be shown to converge to a globally optimal solution when the starting point is feasible. Insight into the structure of the deterministic formulation yields approximations that result in coordinate update algorithms with good performance and significantly lower computational cost. The proposed algorithms provide better performance than existing robust power loading algorithms that are based on tractable conservative approximations, and can even provide better performance than robust precoding algorithms based on such approximations.

  18. Recent performance of and plasma outage studies with the SNS H⁻ source.

    PubMed

    Stockli, M P; Han, B; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Piller, C; Santana, M; Welton, R

    2016-02-01

    Spallation Neutron Source ramps to higher power levels that can be sustained with high availability. The goal is 1.4 MW despite a compromised radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ), which requires higher radio frequency power than design levels to approach the nominal beam transmission. Unfortunately at higher power the RFQ often loses its thermal stability, a problem apparently enhanced by beam losses and high influxes of hydrogen. Delivering as much H(-) beam as possible with the least amount of hydrogen led to plasma outages. The root cause is the dense 1-ms long ∼55-kW 2-MHz plasma pulses reflecting ∼90% of the continuous ∼300 W, 13-MHz power, which was mitigated with a 4-ms filter for the reflected power signal and an outage resistant, slightly detuned 13-MHz match. Lowering the H2 gas also increased the H(-) beam current to ∼55 mA and increased the RFQ transmission by ∼7% (relative). PMID:26932022

  19. Exploiting Outage and Error Probability of Cooperative Incremental Relaying in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Hina; Javaid, Nadeem; Sher, Muhammad; Qasim, Umar; Khan, Zahoor Ali; Alrajeh, Nabil; Niaz, Iftikhar Azim

    2016-01-01

    This paper embeds a bi-fold contribution for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs); performance analysis of incremental relaying in terms of outage and error probability, and based on the analysis proposition of two new cooperative routing protocols. Subject to the first contribution, a three step procedure is carried out; a system model is presented, the number of available relays are determined, and based on cooperative incremental retransmission methodology, closed-form expressions for outage and error probability are derived. Subject to the second contribution, Adaptive Cooperation in Energy (ACE) efficient depth based routing and Enhanced-ACE (E-ACE) are presented. In the proposed model, feedback mechanism indicates success or failure of data transmission. If direct transmission is successful, there is no need for relaying by cooperative relay nodes. In case of failure, all the available relays retransmit the data one by one till the desired signal quality is achieved at destination. Simulation results show that the ACE and E-ACE significantly improves network performance, i.e., throughput, when compared with other incremental relaying protocols like Cooperative Automatic Repeat reQuest (CARQ). E-ACE and ACE achieve 69% and 63% more throughput respectively as compared to CARQ in hard underwater environment. PMID:27420061

  20. Exploiting Outage and Error Probability of Cooperative Incremental Relaying in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Hina; Javaid, Nadeem; Sher, Muhammad; Qasim, Umar; Khan, Zahoor Ali; Alrajeh, Nabil; Niaz, Iftikhar Azim

    2016-01-01

    This paper embeds a bi-fold contribution for Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs); performance analysis of incremental relaying in terms of outage and error probability, and based on the analysis proposition of two new cooperative routing protocols. Subject to the first contribution, a three step procedure is carried out; a system model is presented, the number of available relays are determined, and based on cooperative incremental retransmission methodology, closed-form expressions for outage and error probability are derived. Subject to the second contribution, Adaptive Cooperation in Energy (ACE) efficient depth based routing and Enhanced-ACE (E-ACE) are presented. In the proposed model, feedback mechanism indicates success or failure of data transmission. If direct transmission is successful, there is no need for relaying by cooperative relay nodes. In case of failure, all the available relays retransmit the data one by one till the desired signal quality is achieved at destination. Simulation results show that the ACE and E-ACE significantly improves network performance, i.e., throughput, when compared with other incremental relaying protocols like Cooperative Automatic Repeat reQuest (CARQ). E-ACE and ACE achieve 69% and 63% more throughput respectively as compared to CARQ in hard underwater environment. PMID:27420061

  1. Doped Si nanoparticles with conformal carbon coating and cyclized-polyacrylonitrile network as high-capacity and high-rate lithium-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Piper, Daniela Molina; Tian, Miao; Clancey, Joel; George, Steven M; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhou, Yun

    2015-09-11

    Doped Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) with conformal carbon coating and cyclized-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) network displayed capacities of 3500 and 3000 mAh g(-1) at C/20 and C/10, respectively. At 1 C, the electrode preserves a specific discharge capacity of ∼1500 mAh g(-1) for at least 60 cycles without decay. Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) helps improve the initial Coulombic efficiency (CE) to 85%. The dual coating of conformal carbon and cyclized-PAN help alleviate volume change and facilitate charge transfer. Ultra-thin Al2O3 ALD layers help form a stable solid electrolyte interphase interface.

  2. Doped Si nanoparticles with conformal carbon coating and cyclized-polyacrylonitrile network as high-capacity and high-rate lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ming; Molina Piper, Daniela; Tian, Miao; Clancey, Joel; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhou, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Doped Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) with conformal carbon coating and cyclized-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) network displayed capacities of 3500 and 3000 mAh g-1 at C/20 and C/10, respectively. At 1 C, the electrode preserves a specific discharge capacity of ˜1500 mAh g-1 for at least 60 cycles without decay. Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) helps improve the initial Coulombic efficiency (CE) to 85%. The dual coating of conformal carbon and cyclized-PAN help alleviate volume change and facilitate charge transfer. Ultra-thin Al2O3 ALD layers help form a stable solid electrolyte interphase interface.

  3. Doped Si nanoparticles with conformal carbon coating and cyclized-polyacrylonitrile network as high-capacity and high-rate lithium-ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Piper, Daniela Molina; Tian, Miao; Clancey, Joel; George, Steven M; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhou, Yun

    2015-09-11

    Doped Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) with conformal carbon coating and cyclized-polyacrylonitrile (PAN) network displayed capacities of 3500 and 3000 mAh g(-1) at C/20 and C/10, respectively. At 1 C, the electrode preserves a specific discharge capacity of ∼1500 mAh g(-1) for at least 60 cycles without decay. Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) helps improve the initial Coulombic efficiency (CE) to 85%. The dual coating of conformal carbon and cyclized-PAN help alleviate volume change and facilitate charge transfer. Ultra-thin Al2O3 ALD layers help form a stable solid electrolyte interphase interface. PMID:26289444

  4. Outage Performance of Cooperative Relay Selection with Multiple Source and Destination Antennas over Dissimilar Nakagami-m Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wooju; Yoon, Dongweon

    Cooperative relay selection, in which one of multiple relays is selected to retransmit the source signal to the destination, has received considerable attention in recent years, because it is a simple way to obtain cooperative diversity in wireless networks. The exact expression of outage probability for a decode-and-forward cooperative relay selection with multiple source and destination antennas over Rayleigh fading channels was recently derived in [9]. In this letter, we derive the exact expressions of outage probability and diversity-multiplexing tradeoff over independent and non-identically distributed Nakagami-m fading channels as an extension of [9]. We then analyze the effects of various parameters such as fading conditions, number of relays, and number of source and destination antennas on the outage probability.

  5. HTFLO: a computer model of a resistively-heated UO/sub 2/ pin with a rate-dependent heat capacity. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Smaardyk, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    A one-dimensional model is presented to describe the thermal behavior of an uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) rod that is heated resistively and cooled by surface radiation. A standard forward differencing scheme is used for the heat transfer calculations. Temperature-dependent electrical and thermal properties are calculated at the beginning of each time step. In addition, the heat capacity is calculated from a dynamic enthalpy model based on equilibrium and instantaneous heat capacity models with a user-selectable relaxation time. This report describes the finite difference equations used, the treatment of the source and boundary terms, and the dynamic enthalpy model. Detailed input instructions are provided and a sample calculation is shown.

  6. Characteristics and trends in a National Study of Consumer Outage Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Leora; Eto, Joseph H.; Katz, Aaron; Sullivan, Michael

    2003-04-01

    Ensuring reliability has and will continue to be a priority for electricity industry restructuring. Assessing the balance between public and private actions to ensure reliability should be guided in part by an understanding of the value of reliability to the nations' residential, commercial and industrial customers. Yet, there is no comprehensive body of information on this topic. This paper begins to address this information gap by analyzing studies conducted by electric utilities over the past 15 years to assess the value of electric service to their customers. Outage cost measurements prepared by 7 electric utilities through 20 studies are assembled and standardized into a national database of customer interruption costs. The database is used to describe trends in interruption costs, and regional (geographic) differences, differences in interruption costs by customer type. It can also be used to estimate customer damage functions. Results from the study are intended to contribute to an improved understanding of the importance of electricity reliability to the nation.

  7. A A field test for extremity dose assessment during outages at Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2013-05-01

    During maintenance on the water chamber of a steam generator, the pressuriser heater and the pressure tube feeder in nuclear power plants, workers are likely to receive high radiation doses due to the severe workplace conditions. In particular, it is expected that workers' hands would receive the highest radiation doses because of their contact with the radioactive materials. In this study, field tests for extremity dose assessments in radiation workers undertaking contact tasks with high radiation doses were conducted during outages at pressurised water reactors and pressurised heavy water reactors in Korea. In the test, the radiation workers were required to wear additional thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) on their backs and wrists and an extremity dosemeter on the finger, as well as a main TLD on the chest while performing the maintenance tasks. PMID:23091221

  8. A low-cost evolutionary algorithm for the unit commitment problem considering probabilistic unit outages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asouti, V. G.; Giannakoglou, K. C.

    2012-07-01

    This article presents a solution method to the unit commitment problem with probabilistic unit failures and repairs, which is based on evolutionary algorithms and Monte Carlo simulations. Regarding the latter, thousands of availability-unavailability trial time patterns along the scheduling horizon are generated. The objective function to be minimised is the expected total operating cost, computed after adapting any candidate solution, i.e. any series of generating/non-generating (ON/OFF) unit states, to the availability-unavailability patterns and performing evaluations by considering fuel, start-up and shutdown costs as well as the cost for buying electricity from external resources, if necessary. The proposed method introduces a new efficient chromosome representation: the decision variables are integer IDs corresponding to the binary-to-decimal converted ON/OFF (1/0) scenarios that cover the demand in each hour. In contrast to previous methods using binary strings as chromosomes, the new chromosome must be penalised only if any of the constraints regarding start-up, shutdown and ramp times cannot be met, chromosome repair is avoided and, consequently, the dispatch problems are solved once in the preparatory phase instead of during the evolution. For all these reasons, with or without probabilistic outages, the proposed algorithm has much lower CPU cost. In addition, if probabilistic outages are taken into account, a hierarchical evaluation scheme offers extra noticeable gain in CPU cost: the population members are approximately pre-evaluated using a small 'representative' set of the Monte Carlo simulations and only a few top population members undergo evaluations through the full Monte Carlo simulations. The hierarchical scheme makes the proposed method about one order of magnitude faster than its conventional counterpart.

  9. Are Older Adults Prepared to Ensure Food Safety during Extended Power Outages and Other Emergencies?: Findings from a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosa, Katherine M.; Cates, Sheryl C.; Karns, Shawn; Godwin, Sandria L.; Coppings, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters and other emergencies can cause an increased risk of foodborne illness. We conducted a nationally representative survey to understand consumers' knowledge and use of recommended practices during/after extended power outages and other emergencies. Because older adults are at an increased risk for foodborne illness, this paper…

  10. Emergency preparedness for power outages and wi-fi loss: tips for students and educators of online courses.

    PubMed

    Heithaus, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Severe weather can impact online education due to a loss of power and Internet access that can last hours or weeks. Planning for such losses is essential to enable participation in the online classroom. This article discusses measures that can be used to maintain an online presence in the event of a power outage or loss of Wi-Fi.

  11. 47 CFR 4.11 - Notification and initial and final communications outage reports that must be filed by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... description of the problem; service effects; the geographic area affected by the outage; and a contact name... Commission, The Office of Secretary, Attention: Chief, Public Safety & Homeland Security Bureau. Electronic... Commission. “Submitted electronically” refers to submission of the information using Commission-approved...

  12. 47 CFR 4.11 - Notification and initial and final communications outage reports that must be filed by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... description of the problem; service effects; the geographic area affected by the outage; and a contact name... Commission, The Office of Secretary, Attention: Chief, Public Safety & Homeland Security Bureau. Electronic... Commission. “Submitted electronically” refers to submission of the information using Commission-approved...

  13. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale “subjective physical and mental performance” and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies.

  14. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale "subjective physical and mental performance" and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. PMID:27616894

  15. The relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus; Theisen-Flies, Christiane; Federspiel, Carine; Sütterlin, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale “subjective physical and mental performance” and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. PMID:27616894

  16. GeOx/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Anode for Li-ion Batteries: Enhanced Capacity via Reversible Utilization of Li2O along with Improved Rate Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, Dongping; Gordin, Mikhail; Yi, Ran; Xu, Terrence; Song, Jiangxuan; Jiang, Yingbing; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    A self-assembled GeOx/reduced graphene oxide (GeOx/RGO) composite, where GeOx nanoparticles were grown directly on reduced graphene oxide sheets, was synthesized via a facile one-step reduction approach and studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental mapping, and other techniques. Electrochemical evaluation indicates that incorporation of reduced graphene oxide enhances both the rate capability and reversible capacity of GeOx, with the latter being due to the RGO enabling reversible utilization of Li2O. The composite delivers a high reversible capacity of 1600 mAhg-1 at a current density of 100 mAg-1, and still maintains a capacity of 410 mAhg-1 at a high current density of 20 Ag-1. Owing to the flexible reduced graphene oxide sheets enwrapping the GeOx particles, the cycling stability of the composite was also improved significantly. To further demonstrate its feasibility in practical applications, the synthesized GeOx/RGO composite anode was successfully paired with a high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode to form a full cell, which showed good cycling and rate performance.

  17. Plasma reactive oxygen metabolites and non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity are not affected by an acute increase of metabolic rate in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Beamonte-Barrientos, Rene; Verhulst, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the sources of variation in oxidative stress level is a challenging issue due to the implications of oxidative stress for late age diseases, longevity and life-history trade-offs. Reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress are mostly a by-product of energy metabolism and it is therefore often assumed that oxidative stress is proportional to energy consumption. In mammals, an increased metabolic rate induced by cold exposure generally increases oxidative stress. However, compared to mammals, birds generate fewer free radicals per ATP produced and hence it is not obvious that, in birds, a cold-induced increase of metabolic rate increase oxidative stress. We tested whether cold-induced increase in metabolic rate increased oxidative stress in zebra finches by exposing individuals to cold and warm overnight temperatures. We registered metabolic rate and plasma levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants and reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), a measure of oxidative damage. Metabolic rate was on average 88 % higher in cold compared to warm temperature, with females being stronger affected than males. However, temperature had no effect on plasma antioxidants or our measure of oxidative damage. Middle-age birds had higher levels of plasma antioxidants than younger and older birds, but age was unrelated to ROMs. Birds showed repeatability of plasma ROMs across temperatures but not of non-enzymatic antioxidants. In contrast to similar studies in mammals, our results do not show evidence of increased oxidative stress in plasma after an acute cold-induced increase of metabolic rate but research in more bird species is needed to assess the generality of this pattern.

  18. Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Extraction Rate, and Particle Size Reduction on Flour and Gluten Functionality Explored by Solvent Retention Capacity (SRC) and Mixograph

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorination is an essential soft wheat flour treatment for production of high-ratio cakes in the USA, frequently coupled with a post-milling treatment to reduce flour particle size. The effects of extent of chlorination, extraction rate, and particle size reduction on flour and gluten functionalit...

  19. Exact error rate analysis of free-space optical communications with spatial diversity over Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing; Li, Kangning; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Cao, Yubin

    2016-02-01

    The error rate performances and outage probabilities of free-space optical (FSO) communications with spatial diversity are studied for Gamma-Gamma turbulent environments. Equal gain combining (EGC) and selection combining (SC) diversity are considered as practical schemes to mitigate turbulence. The exact bit-error rate (BER) expression and outage probability are derived for direct detection EGC multiple aperture receiver system. BER performances and outage probabilities are analyzed and compared for different number of sub-apertures each having aperture area A with EGC and SC techniques. BER performances and outage probabilities of a single monolithic aperture and multiple aperture receiver system with the same total aperture area are compared under thermal-noise-limited and background-noise-limited conditions. It is shown that multiple aperture receiver system can greatly improve the system communication performances. And these analytical tools are useful in providing highly accurate error rate estimation for FSO communication systems.

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  1. Utilizing Joint Routing and Capacity Assignment Algorithms to Achieve Inter- and Intra-Group Delay Fairness in Multi-Rate Multicast Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Yeong-Sung; Hsiao, Chiu-Han; Lin, Leo Shih-Chang; Wen, Yean-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Recent advance in wireless sensor network (WSN) applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT) have attracted a lot of attention. Sensor nodes have to monitor and cooperatively pass their data, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. through the network under constrained physical or environmental conditions. The Quality of Service (QoS) is very sensitive to network delays. When resources are constrained and when the number of receivers increases rapidly, how the sensor network can provide good QoS (measured as end-to-end delay) becomes a very critical problem. In this paper; a solution to the wireless sensor network multicasting problem is proposed in which a mathematical model that provides services to accommodate delay fairness for each subscriber is constructed. Granting equal consideration to both network link capacity assignment and routing strategies for each multicast group guarantees the intra-group and inter-group delay fairness of end-to-end delay. Minimizing delay and achieving fairness is ultimately achieved through the Lagrangean Relaxation method and Subgradient Optimization Technique. Test results indicate that the new system runs with greater effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23493123

  2. Utilizing joint routing and capacity assignment algorithms to achieve inter- and intra-group delay fairness in multi-rate multicast wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank Yeong-Sung; Hsiao, Chiu-Han; Lin, Leo Shih-Chang; Wen, Yean-Fu

    2013-03-14

    Recent advance in wireless sensor network (WSN) applications such as the Internet of Things (IoT) have attracted a lot of attention. Sensor nodes have to monitor and cooperatively pass their data, such as temperature, sound, pressure, etc. through the network under constrained physical or environmental conditions. The Quality of Service (QoS) is very sensitive to network delays. When resources are constrained and when the number of receivers increases rapidly, how the sensor network can provide good QoS (measured as end-to-end delay) becomes a very critical problem. In this paper; a solution to the wireless sensor network multicasting problem is proposed in which a mathematical model that provides services to accommodate delay fairness for each subscriber is constructed. Granting equal consideration to both network link capacity assignment and routing strategies for each multicast group guarantees the intra-group and inter-group delay fairness of end-to-end delay. Minimizing delay and achieving fairness is ultimately achieved through the Lagrangean Relaxation method and Subgradient Optimization Technique. Test results indicate that the new system runs with greater effectiveness and efficiency.

  3. [Assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity].

    PubMed

    Dreßing, H; Foerster, K; Leygraf, J; Schneider, F

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity require thorough knowledge of the legal framework and the relevant case law. This paper explains the concept of the legal capacity to contract and the concept of testamentary capacity with respect to German civil law. The relevance of major mental disorders for the assessment of legal capacity and testamentary capacity is discussed.

  4. Synthesis of dandelion-like TiO2 microspheres as anode materials for lithium ion batteries with enhanced rate capacity and cyclic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jin; Liu, Yan-lin; Wang, Yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Hu, She-jun; Li, Wei-shan

    2012-11-01

    Dandelion-like TiO2 microspheres consisting of numerous rutile single-crystalline nanorods were synthesized for the first time by a hydrothermal method. Their crystal structure, morphology and electrochemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and galvanostatic charge and discharge tests. The results show that the synthesized TiO2 microspheres exhibit good rate and cycle performances as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. It can be found that the dandelion-like structure provides a larger specific surface area and the single-crystalline nanorod provides a stable structure and fast pathways for electron and lithium ion transport, which contribute to the rate and cycle performances of the battery.

  5. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Mankamo, T.; Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.

    1992-12-31

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  6. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Mankamo, T. ); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. )

    1992-01-01

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  7. Plant Outage Time Savings Provided by Subcritical Physics Testing at Vogtle Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cupp, Philip; Heibel, M.D.

    2006-07-01

    The most recent core reload design verification physics testing done at Southern Nuclear Company's (SNC) Vogtle Unit 2, performed prior to initial power operations in operating cycle 12, was successfully completed while the reactor was at least 1% {delta}K/K subcritical. The testing program used was the first application of the Subcritical Physics Testing (SPT) program developed by the Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. The SPT program centers on the application of the Westinghouse Subcritical Rod Worth Measurement (SRWM) methodology that was developed in cooperation with the Vogtle Reactor Engineering staff. The SRWM methodology received U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval in August of 2005. The first application of the SPT program occurred at Vogtle Unit 2 in October of 2005. The results of the core design verification measurements obtained during the SPT program demonstrated excellent agreement with prediction, demonstrating that the predicted core characteristics were in excellent agreement with the actual operating characteristics of the core. This paper presents an overview of the SPT Program used at Vogtle Unit 2 during operating cycle 12, and a discussion of the critical path outage time savings the SPT program is capable of providing. (authors)

  8. Rate of decline of forced vital capacity predicts future arterial hypertension: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David R.; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Hearst, Mary O.; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Kalhan, Ravi; Rosenberg, Sharon; Smith, Lewis J.; Barr, R. Graham; Duprez, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Lung function studies in middle-aged subjects predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. We studied if greater loss of forced vital capacity (FVC) early in life predicted incident hypertension (HTN). The sample was 3205 black and white men and women in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study examined between 1985-86 (CARDIA year 0, ages 18-30 years) and 2005-06 and who were not hypertensive by year 10. FVC was assessed at years 0, 2, 5, 10, and 20. Proportional hazard ratios (HR) and linear regression models predicted incident HTN at years 15 or 20 (n=508) from the change in FVC (FVC at year 10 – peak FVC, where peak FVC was estimated as the maximum across years 0, 2, 5 and 10). Covariates included demographics, center, systolic blood pressure, FVC max, smoking, physical activity, asthma and BMI. Unadjusted cumulative incident HTN was 25% in the lowest FVC loss quartile (Q1, median loss=370ml) compared to 12% cumulative incident HTN in those who achieved peak FVC at year 10 (Q4). Minimally adjusted HR for Q1 vs. Q4 was 2.21 (95% CI: 1.73-2.83) and this association remained significant in the fully adjusted model (1.37, 95% CI: 1.05-1.80). Decline in FVC from average age at peak (29.4 years) to 35 years old predicted incident hypertension between average ages 35 and 45. The findings may represent a common pathway that may link low normal FVC to cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. PMID:22203738

  9. Recovery capacity of glial progenitors after in vivo fission-neutron or X irradiation: age dependence, fractionation and low-dose-rate irradiations.

    PubMed

    Philippo, H; Winter, E A M; van der Kogel, A J; Huiskamp, R

    2005-06-01

    Previous experiments on the radiosensitivity of O-2A glial progenitors determined for single-dose fission-neutron and X irradiation showed log-linear survival curves, suggesting a lack of accumulation of recovery of sublethal damage. In the present study, we addressed this question and further characterized the radiobiological properties of these glial stem cells by investigating the recovery capacity of glial stem cells using either fractionated or protracted whole-body irradiation. Irradiations were performed on newborn, 2-week-old or 12-week-old rats. Fractionated irradiations (four fractions) were performed with 24-h intervals, followed by cell isolations 16- 24 h after the last irradiation. Single-dose irradiations were followed by cell isolation 16-24 h after irradiation or delayed cell isolation (4 days after irradiation) of the O-2A progenitor cells from either spinal cord (newborns) or optic nerve (2- and 12-week-old rats). Results for neonatal progenitor cell survival show effect ratios for both fractionated fission-neutron and X irradiation of the order of 1.8 when compared with single-dose irradiation. A similar ratio was found after single-dose irradiation combined with delayed plating. Comparable results were observed for juvenile and adult optic nerve progenitors, with effect ratios of the order of 1.2. The present investigation clearly shows that fractionated irradiation regimens using X rays or fission neutrons and CNS tissue from rats of various ages results in an increase in O-2A progenitor cell survival while repair is virtually absent. This recovery of the progenitor pool after irradiation can be observed at all ages but is greatest in the neonatal spinal cord and can probably be attributed to repopulation. PMID:15913395

  10. A high proportion of blue light increases the photosynthesis capacity and leaf formation rate of Rosa × hybrida but does not affect time to flower opening.

    PubMed

    Terfa, Meseret Tesema; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar; Olsen, Jorunn Elisabeth; Torre, Sissel

    2013-05-01

    Alterations in light quality affect plant morphogenesis and photosynthetic responses but the effects vary significantly between species. Roses exhibit an irradiance-dependent flowering control but knowledge on light quality responses is scarce. In this study we analyzed, the responses in morphology, photosynthesis and flowering of Rosa × hybrida to different blue (B) light proportions provided by light-emitting diodes (LED, high B 20%) and high pressure sodium (HPS, low B 5%) lamps. There was a strong morphological and growth effect of the light sources but no significant difference in total dry matter production and flowering. HPS-grown plants had significantly higher leaf area and plant height, yet a higher dry weight proportion was allocated to leaves than stems under LED. LED plants showed 20% higher photosynthetic capacity (Amax ) and higher levels of soluble carbohydrates. The increase in Amax correlated with an increase in leaf mass per unit leaf area, higher stomata conductance and CO2 exchange, total chlorophyll (Chl) content per area and Chl a/b ratio. LED-grown leaves also displayed a more sun-type leaf anatomy with more and longer palisade cells and a higher stomata frequency. Although floral initiation occurred at a higher leaf number in LED, the time to open flowers was the same under both light conditions. Thereby the study shows that a higher portion of B light is efficient in increasing photosynthesis performance per unit leaf area, enhancing growth and morphological changes in roses but does not affect the total Dry Matter (DM) production or time to open flower.

  11. Enhanced assimilation rate and water use efficiency with latitude through increased photosynthetic capacity and internal conductance in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.).

    PubMed

    Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Guy, Robert D; Silim, Salim N; Drewes, Eric C; Schroeder, William R

    2009-12-01

    In outdoor common gardens, high latitude populations of deciduous tree species often display higher assimilation rates (A) than low latitude populations, but they accomplish less height. To test whether trends in A reflect adaptation to growing season length or, alternatively, are garden growth artefacts, we examined variation in height increment and ecophysiological traits in a range-wide collection of Populus balsamifera L. populations from 21 provenances, during unconstrained growth in a greenhouse. Rooted cuttings, maintained without resource limitation under 21 h photoperiod for 90 d, displayed increasing height growth, A, leaf mass per area and leaf N per area with latitude whereas stomatal conductance (g(s)) showed no pattern. Water-use efficiency as indicated by both gas exchange and delta(13)C increased with latitude, whereas photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency decreased. Differences in delta(13)C were less than expected based on A/g(s), suggesting coextensive variation in internal conductance (g(m)). Analysis of A-C(i) curves on a subset of populations showed that high latitude genotypes had greater g(m) than low-latitude genotypes. We conclude that higher peak rates of height growth in high latitude genotypes of balsam poplar are supported by higher A, achieved partly through higher g(m), to help compensate for a shorter growing season.

  12. Key strategies for enhancing the cycling stability and rate capacity of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 as high-voltage cathode materials for high power lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ting-Feng; Mei, Jie; Zhu, Yan-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) is one of the most promising high voltage cathode materials for future application due to its advantages of large reversible capacity, high thermal stability, low cost, environmental friendliness, and high energy density. LNMO can provide 20% and 30% higher energy density than traditional cathode materials LiCoO2 and LiFePO4, respectively. Unfortunately, LNMO-based batteries with LiPF6-based carbonate electrolytes always suffer from severe capacity deterioration and poor thermostability because of the oxidization of organic carbonate solvents and decomposition of LiPF6, especially at elevated temperatures and water-containing environment. Hence, it is necessary to systematically and comprehensively summarize the progress in understanding and modifying LNMO cathode from various aspects. In this review, the structure, transport properties and different reported possible fading mechanisms of LNMO cathode are first discussed detailedly. And then, the major goal of this review is to highlight new progress in using proposed strategies to improve the cycling stability and rate capacity of LNMO-based batteries, including synthesis, control of special morphologies, element doping and surface coating etc., especially at elevated temperatures. Finally, an insight into the future research and further development of LNMO cathode is discussed.

  13. Outage Performance Analysis of Relay Selection Schemes in Wireless Energy Harvesting Cooperative Networks over Non-Identical Rayleigh Fading Channels.

    PubMed

    Do, Nhu Tri; Bao, Vo Nguyen Quoc; An, Beongku

    2016-02-26

    In this paper, we study relay selection in decode-and-forward wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks. In contrast to conventional cooperative networks, the relays harvest energy from the source's radio-frequency radiation and then use that energy to forward the source information. Considering power splitting receiver architecture used at relays to harvest energy, we are concerned with the performance of two popular relay selection schemes, namely, partial relay selection (PRS) scheme and optimal relay selection (ORS) scheme. In particular, we analyze the system performance in terms of outage probability (OP) over independent and non-identical (i.n.i.d.) Rayleigh fading channels. We derive the closed-form approximations for the system outage probabilities of both schemes and validate the analysis by the Monte-Carlo simulation. The numerical results provide comprehensive performance comparison between the PRS and ORS schemes and reveal the effect of wireless energy harvesting on the outage performances of both schemes. Additionally, we also show the advantages and drawbacks of the wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks and compare to the conventional cooperative networks.

  14. Automatic scheduling of outages of nuclear power plants with time windows. Final report, January-December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, C.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes a successful project for transference of advanced AI technology into the domain of planning of outages of nuclear power plants as part of DOD`s dual-use program. ROMAN (Rome Lab Outage Manager) is the prototype system that was developed as a result of this project. ROMAN`s main innovation compared to the current state-of-the-art of outage management tools is its capability to automatically enforce safety constraints during the planning and scheduling phase. Another innovative aspect of ROMAN is the generation of more robust schedules that are feasible over time windows. In other words, ROMAN generates a family of schedules by assigning time intervals as start times to activities rather than single start times, without affecting the overall duration of the project. ROMAN uses a constraint satisfaction paradigm combining a global search tactic with constraint propagation. The derivation of very specialized representations for the constraints to perform efficient propagation is a key aspect for the generation of very fast schedules - constraints are compiled into the code, which is a novel aspect of our work using an automatic programming system, KIDS.

  15. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  16. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  17. Space-based Scintillation Nowcasting with the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, K.; Starks, M.; Beach, T.; Basu, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory's Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) fuses ground- and space-based data in a near real-time physics-based model aimed at forecasting and nowcasting equatorial scintillations and their impacts on satellite communications and navigation. A key component of the system is the C/NOFS satellite that was launched into a low-inclination (13°) elliptical orbit (400 km x 850 km) in April 2008. The satellite contains six sensors to measure space environment parameters including electron density and temperature, ion density and drift, electric and magnetic fields and neutral wind, as well as a tri-band radio beacon transmitting at 150 MHz, 400 MHz and 1067 MHz. Scintillation nowcasts are derived from measuring the one-dimensional in situ electron density fluctuations and subsequently modeling the propagation environment for satellite-to-ground radio links. The modeling process requires a number of simplifying assumptions regarding the three-dimensional structure of the ionosphere and the results are readily validated by comparisons with ground-based measurements of the satellite's tri-band beacon signals. In mid-September 2008 a campaign to perform detailed analyses of space-based scintillation nowcasts with numerous ground observations was conducted in the vicinity of Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands. To maximize the collection of ground-truth data, the ALTAIR radar was employed to obtain detailed information on the spatial structure of the ionosphere during the campaign and to aid the improvement of space-based nowcasting algorithms. A comparison of these results will be presented; it appears that detailed information on the electron density structure is a limiting factor in modeling the scintillation environment from in situ observations.

  18. Importance of rate control or rate regulation for improving exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation and normal left ventricular function: a randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Levy, T; Walker, S; Mason, M; Spurrell, P; Rex, S; Brant, S; Paul, V

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the importance of rhythm regulation or rate control in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and normal left ventricular function.
PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS—Thirty six patients with a mixed fast and slow ventricular response rate to their AF were randomised to either His bundle ablation (HBA) and VVIR pacemaker (HBA group) or VVI pacemaker and atrioventricular modifying drugs (Med group). Outcomes assessed at one, three, six, and 12 months included exercise duration and quality of life.
RESULTS—Exercise duration significantly improved from baseline in both groups. There was no difference in outcome between the groups (Med +40% v HBA +20%, p = NS). The heart rate profile on exercise was similarly slowed in both groups compared to baseline. Quality of life significantly improved in both treatment arms for the modified Karolinska questionnaire (KQ) (Med +50% v HBA +50%, p = NS) and the Nottingham health profile (NHP) (Med +40% v HBA +20%, p = NS). However, for the individual symptom scores of each questionnaire more were improved in the Med group (KQ-Med 6 improved v HBA 4, NHP-Med 3 v HBA 1). Left ventricular function was equally preserved by both treatments during follow up.
CONCLUSION—In these patients control of ventricular response rate with either HBA + VVIR pacemaker or atrioventricular modifying drugs + VVI pacemaker will lead to a significant improvement in exercise duration and quality of life. Rhythm regulation by HBA did not confer additional benefit, suggesting rate control alone is necessary for the successful symptomatic treatment of these patients in permanent AF.


Keywords: ablation; atrial fibrillation; pacemaker; atrioventricular modifying drugs PMID:11156667

  19. Causes of decreased photosynthetic rate and metabolic capacity in water-deficient leaf cells: a critical evaluation of mechanisms and integration of processes

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, David W.; Tezara, Wilmer

    2009-01-01

    Background Water deficit (WD) decreases photosynthetic rate (A) via decreased stomatal conductance to CO2 (gs) and photosynthetic metabolic potential (Apot). The relative importance of gs and Apot, and how they are affected by WD, are reviewed with respect to light intensity and to experimental approaches. Scope and Conclusions With progressive WD, A decreases as gs falls. Under low light during growth and WD, A is stimulated by elevated CO2, showing that metabolism (Apot) is not impaired, but at high light A is not stimulated, showing inhibition. At a given intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) A decreases, showing impaired metabolism (Apot). The Ci and probably chloroplast CO2 concentration (Cc), decreases and then increases, together with the equilibrium CO2 concentration, with greater WD. Estimation of Cc and internal (mesophyll) conductance (gi) is considered uncertain. Photosystem activity is unaffected until very severe WD, maintaining electron (e−) transport (ET) and reductant content. Low A, together with photorespiration (PR), which is maintained or decreased, provides a smaller sink for e−, causing over-energization of energy transduction. Despite increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), excess energy and e− result in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence is considered that ROS damages ATP synthase so that ATP content decreases progressively with WD. Decreased ATP limits RuBP production by the Calvin cycle and thus Apot. Rubisco activity is unlikely to determine Apot. Sucrose synthesis is limited by lack of substrate and impaired enzyme regulation. With WD, PR decreases relative to light respiration (RL), and mitochondria consume reductant and synthesise ATP. With progressing WD at low A, RL increases Ci and Cc. This review emphasises the effects of light intensity, considers techniques, and develops a qualitative model of photosynthetic metabolism under WD that explains many observations: testable hypotheses are suggested. PMID

  20. Relation of resting heart rate to risk for all-cause mortality by gender after considering exercise capacity (the Henry Ford exercise testing project).

    PubMed

    Aladin, Amer I; Whelton, Seamus P; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Blaha, Michael J; Keteyian, Steven J; Juraschek, Stephen P; Rubin, Jonathan; Brawner, Clinton A; Michos, Erin D

    2014-12-01

    Whether resting heart rate (RHR) predicts mortality independent of fitness is not well established, particularly among women. We analyzed data from 56,634 subjects (49% women) without known coronary artery disease or atrial fibrillation who underwent a clinically indicated exercise stress test. Baseline RHR was divided into 5 groups with <60 beats/min as reference. The Social Security Death Index was used to ascertain vital status. Cox hazard models were performed to determine the association of RHR with all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, or revascularization after sequential adjustment for demographics, cardiovascular disease risk factors, medications, and fitness (metabolic equivalents). The mean age was 53 ± 12 years and mean RHR was 73 ± 12 beats/min. More than half of the participants were referred for chest pain; 81% completed an adequate stress test and mean metabolic equivalents achieved was 9.2 ± 3. There were 6,255 deaths over 11.0-year mean follow-up. There was an increased risk of all-cause mortality with increasing RHR (p trend <0.001). Compared with the lowest RHR group, participants with an RHR ≥90 beats/min had a significantly increased risk of mortality even after adjustment for fitness (hazard ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.35). This relationship remained significant for men, but not significant for women after adjustment for fitness (p interaction <0.001). No significant associations were seen for men or women with major adverse cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, or revascularization after accounting for fitness. In conclusion, after adjustment for fitness, elevated RHR was an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in men but not women, suggesting gender differences in the utility of RHR for risk stratification. PMID:25439450

  1. U.S. Refining Capacity Utilization

    EIA Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article briefly reviews recent trends in domestic refining capacity utilization and examines in detail the differences in reported crude oil distillation capacities and utilization rates among different classes of refineries.

  2. A comparison of the in vitro moisture vapour transmission rate and in vivo fluid-handling capacity of six adhesive foam dressings to a newly reformulated adhesive foam dressing.

    PubMed

    Zehrer, Cindy L; Holm, David; Solfest, Staci E; Walters, Shelley-Ann

    2014-12-01

    This study compared moisture vapour transmission rate (MVTR) and wear time or fluid-handling capacities of six adhesive foam dressings to a reformulated control dressing. Standardised in vitro MVTR methodology and a previously published in vivo artificial wound model (AWM) were used. Mean inverted MVTR for the reformulated dressing was 12 750 g/m(2) /24 hours and was significantly higher than four of the six comparator dressings (P < 0·0001), which ranged from 830 to 11 360 g/m(2) /24 hours. Mean upright MVTR for the reformulated dressing was 980 g/m(2) /24 hours and was significantly different than all of the comparator dressings (P < 0·0001), which ranged from 80 to 1620 g/m(2) /24 hours (three higher/three lower). The reformulated dressing median wear time ranged from 6·1 to >7·0 days, compared with 1·0 to 3·5 days for the comparator dressings (P = 0·0012 to P < 0·0001). The median fluid volume handled ranged from 78·0 to >87 ml compared with 13·0 to 44·5 ml for the comparator dressings (P = 0·0007 to P < 0·001). Interestingly, inverted MVTR did not correspond well to the AWM. These results suggest that marked differences exist between the dressings in terms of both MVTR and wear time or fluid-handling capacity. Furthermore, high inverted MVTR does not necessarily predict longer wear time or fluid-handling capacities of absorbent dressings.

  3. A comparison of the in vitro moisture vapour transmission rate and in vivo fluid-handling capacity of six adhesive foam dressings to a newly reformulated adhesive foam dressing.

    PubMed

    Zehrer, Cindy L; Holm, David; Solfest, Staci E; Walters, Shelley-Ann

    2014-12-01

    This study compared moisture vapour transmission rate (MVTR) and wear time or fluid-handling capacities of six adhesive foam dressings to a reformulated control dressing. Standardised in vitro MVTR methodology and a previously published in vivo artificial wound model (AWM) were used. Mean inverted MVTR for the reformulated dressing was 12 750 g/m(2) /24 hours and was significantly higher than four of the six comparator dressings (P < 0·0001), which ranged from 830 to 11 360 g/m(2) /24 hours. Mean upright MVTR for the reformulated dressing was 980 g/m(2) /24 hours and was significantly different than all of the comparator dressings (P < 0·0001), which ranged from 80 to 1620 g/m(2) /24 hours (three higher/three lower). The reformulated dressing median wear time ranged from 6·1 to >7·0 days, compared with 1·0 to 3·5 days for the comparator dressings (P = 0·0012 to P < 0·0001). The median fluid volume handled ranged from 78·0 to >87 ml compared with 13·0 to 44·5 ml for the comparator dressings (P = 0·0007 to P < 0·001). Interestingly, inverted MVTR did not correspond well to the AWM. These results suggest that marked differences exist between the dressings in terms of both MVTR and wear time or fluid-handling capacity. Furthermore, high inverted MVTR does not necessarily predict longer wear time or fluid-handling capacities of absorbent dressings. PMID:23362795

  4. Standby rate design: current issues and possible innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, A.J.; Bahceci, Serkan

    2007-05-15

    While options pricing principles have some relevance for the design a standby distribution rates, insurance pricing may provide an even better model. An insurance-based approach using an outage probability methodology also provides powerful incentives to the utility to connect additional DG resources to the grid. (author)

  5. Electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models for energy policy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, E.; Edenburn, M.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models developed for energy policy analysis. The models use the same principles (life cycle cost minimization, least operating cost dispatching, and incorporation of outages and reserve margin) as comprehensive utility capacity planning tools, but are faster and simpler. The models were not designed for detailed utility capacity planning, but they can be used to accurately project trends on a regional level. Because they use the same principles as comprehensive utility capacity expansion planning tools, the models are more realistic than utility modules used in present policy analysis tools. They can be used to help forecast the effects energy policy options will have on future utility power generation capacity expansion trends and to help formulate a sound national energy strategy. The models make renewable energy source competition realistic by giving proper value to intermittent renewable and energy storage technologies, and by competing renewables against each other as well as against conventional technologies.

  6. Community Capacity Building:

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Crispin N.; Todaro-Rivera, Lea; Brenner, Barbara; Shepard, Peggy; Piedras, Veronica; Horowitz, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful community–academic research partnerships require building the capacity of both community-based organizations (CBOs) and academics to conduct collaborative research of mutual interest and benefit. Yet, information about the needs and goals of research-interested CBOs is lacking. Our partnership aimed to conduct a community research needs assessment and to use results to develop future capacity-building programs for CBOs. Methods: Based on our review of the literature, informal interviews with research-interested CBOs and community-engaged research groups locally and nationally, we developed a needs assessment survey. Key domains of this survey included history and experience with research collaboration, interest in specific research topics, and preference for learning format and structure. We trained community health workers (CHWs) to recruit senior leaders from CBOs in New York City (NYC) and encourage them to complete an on-line survey. Results: Fully 54% (33/61) of CBOs completed the needs assessment. Most (69%) reported involvement with research or evaluation in the last 2 years and 33% had some funding for research. Although 75% had collaborated with academic institutions in the past, 58% did not rate this experience well. The four areas respondents prioritized for skills building were program evaluation, developing needs assessments, building surveys, and understanding statistical analyses. They were less interested in learning to build collaborations with academics. Conclusions: A formal needs assessment of research training and educational needs of CBOs revealed that most had experience, albeit negative, with academic collaborations. CBO leaders wanted to build skills to conduct and analyze assessments and program evaluations. Our community–academic partnership is using these findings to develop a research capacity-building course. Other partnerships should consider conducting such assessments to transform the capacity of CBOs to

  7. Seasonal proliferation rates and the capacity to express genes involved in cell cycling and maintenance in response to seasonal and experimental food shortage in Laternula elliptica from King George Island.

    PubMed

    Husmann, G; Philipp, E E R; Abele, D

    2016-07-01

    Melting of coastal glaciers at the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) causes shorter winter sea ice duration, intensified ice scouring, sediment erosion and surface freshening in summer, which alters coastal productivity and feeding conditions for the benthos. The soft shell clam Laternula elliptica is a fast growing and abundant filter feeder in coastal Antarctica and a key element for bentho-pelagic carbon recycling. Our aim was to assess the cellular growth and maintenance capacity of small and large clams during natural winter food shortage (seasonal sampling) and in response to experimental starvation exposure. We measured tissue specific proliferation rates, the expression of cell cycling genes, and the iron binding protein Le-ferritin in freshly collected specimens in spring (Nov 2008) and at the end of summer (March 2009). For the experimental approach, we focused on 14 cell cycling and metabolic genes using the same animal size groups. Mantle tissue of young bivalves was the only tissue showing accelerated proliferation in summer (1.7% of cells dividing per day in March) compared to 0.4% dividing cells in animals collected in November. In mantle, siphon and adductor muscle proliferation rates were higher in younger compared to older individuals. At transcript level, Le-cyclin D was upregulated in digestive gland of older animals collected in spring (Nov) compared to March indicating initiation of cell proliferation. Likewise, during experimental starvation Le-cyclin D expression increased in large clam digestive gland, whereas Le-cyclin D and the autophagic factor beclin1 decreased in digestive gland of smaller starved clams. The paper corroborates earlier findings of size and age dependent differences in the metabolic response and gene expression patterns in L. elliptica under energetic deprivation. Age structure of shallow water populations can potentially change due to differences in cellular response between young and old animals as environmental stress

  8. Abscisic acid and aldehyde oxidase activity in maize ear leaf and grain relative to post-flowering photosynthetic capacity and grain-filling rate under different water/nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shujun; Zhang, Zongzheng; Ning, Tangyuan; Ren, Shizhong; Su, Licheng; Li, Zengjia

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated changes in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations and grain ABA concentrations in two maize cultivars and analyzed the following relationships under different water/nitrogen treatments: leaf ABA concentrations and photosynthetic parameters; leaf ABA concentrations and grain ABA concentrations; leaf/grain ABA concentrations and grain-filling parameters; and aldehyde oxidase (AO, EC 1.2.3.1) activities and ABA concentrations. The ear leaf average AO activities and ABA concentrations were lower in the controlled release urea treatments compared with the conventional urea treatments. The average AO activities in the grains were higher in the controlled release urea treatments, and the ABA concentrations were significantly increased at 11-30 DAF. The Pn and ABA concentrations in ear leaves were negatively correlated. And the Gmean were positively correlated with the grain ABA concentrations at 11-30 DAF and negatively correlated with the leaf ABA concentrations at 20 and 40-50 DAF. The grain ABA concentrations and leaf ABA concentrations were positively correlated. Thus, the Gmean were closely related to the AO activities and to the ear leaf and grain ABA concentrations. As compared to other treatments, the subsoiling and controlled release urea treatment promoted the uptake of water and nitrogen by maize, increased the photosynthetic capacity of the ear leaves, increased the grain-filling rate, and improved the movement of photosynthetic assimilates toward the developing grains. In the cultivar Z958, higher ABA concentrations in grains at 11-30 DAF and lower ABA concentrations in ear leaves during the late grain-filling stage, resulted in higher grain-filling rate and increased accumulation of photosynthetic products (relative to the cultivar D3). PMID:23770596

  9. Abscisic acid and aldehyde oxidase activity in maize ear leaf and grain relative to post-flowering photosynthetic capacity and grain-filling rate under different water/nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shujun; Zhang, Zongzheng; Ning, Tangyuan; Ren, Shizhong; Su, Licheng; Li, Zengjia

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated changes in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations and grain ABA concentrations in two maize cultivars and analyzed the following relationships under different water/nitrogen treatments: leaf ABA concentrations and photosynthetic parameters; leaf ABA concentrations and grain ABA concentrations; leaf/grain ABA concentrations and grain-filling parameters; and aldehyde oxidase (AO, EC 1.2.3.1) activities and ABA concentrations. The ear leaf average AO activities and ABA concentrations were lower in the controlled release urea treatments compared with the conventional urea treatments. The average AO activities in the grains were higher in the controlled release urea treatments, and the ABA concentrations were significantly increased at 11-30 DAF. The Pn and ABA concentrations in ear leaves were negatively correlated. And the Gmean were positively correlated with the grain ABA concentrations at 11-30 DAF and negatively correlated with the leaf ABA concentrations at 20 and 40-50 DAF. The grain ABA concentrations and leaf ABA concentrations were positively correlated. Thus, the Gmean were closely related to the AO activities and to the ear leaf and grain ABA concentrations. As compared to other treatments, the subsoiling and controlled release urea treatment promoted the uptake of water and nitrogen by maize, increased the photosynthetic capacity of the ear leaves, increased the grain-filling rate, and improved the movement of photosynthetic assimilates toward the developing grains. In the cultivar Z958, higher ABA concentrations in grains at 11-30 DAF and lower ABA concentrations in ear leaves during the late grain-filling stage, resulted in higher grain-filling rate and increased accumulation of photosynthetic products (relative to the cultivar D3).

  10. Seasonal proliferation rates and the capacity to express genes involved in cell cycling and maintenance in response to seasonal and experimental food shortage in Laternula elliptica from King George Island.

    PubMed

    Husmann, G; Philipp, E E R; Abele, D

    2016-07-01

    Melting of coastal glaciers at the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) causes shorter winter sea ice duration, intensified ice scouring, sediment erosion and surface freshening in summer, which alters coastal productivity and feeding conditions for the benthos. The soft shell clam Laternula elliptica is a fast growing and abundant filter feeder in coastal Antarctica and a key element for bentho-pelagic carbon recycling. Our aim was to assess the cellular growth and maintenance capacity of small and large clams during natural winter food shortage (seasonal sampling) and in response to experimental starvation exposure. We measured tissue specific proliferation rates, the expression of cell cycling genes, and the iron binding protein Le-ferritin in freshly collected specimens in spring (Nov 2008) and at the end of summer (March 2009). For the experimental approach, we focused on 14 cell cycling and metabolic genes using the same animal size groups. Mantle tissue of young bivalves was the only tissue showing accelerated proliferation in summer (1.7% of cells dividing per day in March) compared to 0.4% dividing cells in animals collected in November. In mantle, siphon and adductor muscle proliferation rates were higher in younger compared to older individuals. At transcript level, Le-cyclin D was upregulated in digestive gland of older animals collected in spring (Nov) compared to March indicating initiation of cell proliferation. Likewise, during experimental starvation Le-cyclin D expression increased in large clam digestive gland, whereas Le-cyclin D and the autophagic factor beclin1 decreased in digestive gland of smaller starved clams. The paper corroborates earlier findings of size and age dependent differences in the metabolic response and gene expression patterns in L. elliptica under energetic deprivation. Age structure of shallow water populations can potentially change due to differences in cellular response between young and old animals as environmental stress

  11. Lightning-Generated Whistler Waves Observed by Probes On The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite at Low Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; McCarthy, M. P.; Pfaff, R. F.; Jacobson, A. R.; Willcockson, W. L.; Rowland, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    Direct evidence is presented for a causal relationship between lightning and strong electric field transients inside equatorial ionospheric density depletions. In fact, these whistler mode plasma waves may be the dominant electric field signal within such depletions. Optical lightning data from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and global lightning location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network are presented as independent verification that these electric field transients are caused by lightning. The electric field instrument on C/NOFS routinely measures lightning ]related electric field wave packets or sferics, associated with simultaneous measurements of optical flashes at all altitudes encountered by the satellite (401.867 km). Lightning ]generated whistler waves have abundant access to the topside ionosphere, even close to the magnetic equator.

  12. The Fixed-bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, Jeffrey H.; Rowland, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasmadensity is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future xed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  13. The Fixed-Bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  14. The fixed-bias Langmuir probe on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite: calibration and validation.

    PubMed

    Klenzing, J; Rowland, D

    2012-11-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. C/NOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H(+) and O(+). The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the C/NOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on C/NOFS.

  15. Quantum reading capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano; Braunstein, Samuel L.

    2011-11-01

    The readout of a classical memory can be modelled as a problem of quantum channel discrimination, where a decoder retrieves information by distinguishing the different quantum channels encoded in each cell of the memory (Pirandola 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 090504). In the case of optical memories, such as CDs and DVDs, this discrimination involves lossy bosonic channels and can be remarkably boosted by the use of nonclassical light (quantum reading). Here we generalize these concepts by extending the model of memory from single-cell to multi-cell encoding. In general, information is stored in a block of cells by using a channel-codeword, i.e. a sequence of channels chosen according to a classical code. Correspondingly, the readout of data is realized by a process of ‘parallel’ channel discrimination, where the entire block of cells is probed simultaneously and decoded via an optimal collective measurement. In the limit of a large block we define the quantum reading capacity of the memory, quantifying the maximum number of readable bits per cell. This notion of capacity is nontrivial when we suitably constrain the physical resources of the decoder. For optical memories (encoding bosonic channels), such a constraint is energetic and corresponds to fixing the mean total number of photons per cell. In this case, we are able to prove a separation between the quantum reading capacity and the maximum information rate achievable by classical transmitters, i.e. arbitrary classical mixtures of coherent states. In fact, we can easily construct nonclassical transmitters that are able to outperform any classical transmitter, thus showing that the advantages of quantum reading persist in the optimal multi-cell scenario.

  16. The fixed-bias Langmuir probe on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite: calibration and validation.

    PubMed

    Klenzing, J; Rowland, D

    2012-11-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. C/NOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H(+) and O(+). The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the C/NOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on C/NOFS. PMID:23206077

  17. An Overview of Scientific and Space Weather Results from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; de la Beaujardiere, O.; Hunton, D.; Heelis, R.; Earle, G.; Strauss, P.; Bernhardt, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) Mission of the Air Force Research Laboratory is described. C/NOFS science objectives may be organized into three categories: (1) to understand physical processes active in the background ionosphere and thermosphere in which plasma instabilities grow; (2) to identify mechanisms that trigger or quench the plasma irregularities responsible for signal degradation; and (3) to determine how the plasma irregularities affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves. The satellite was launched in April, 2008 into a low inclination (13 deg), elliptical (400 x 850 km) orbit. The satellite sensors measure the following parameters in situ: ambient and fluctuating electron densities, AC and DC electric and magnetic fields, ion drifts and large scale ion composition, ion and electron temperatures, and neutral winds. C/NOFS is also equipped with a GPS occultation receiver and a radio beacon. In addition to the satellite sensors, complementary ground-based measurements, theory, and advanced modeling techniques are also important parts of the mission. We report scientific and space weather highlights of the mission after nearly four years in orbit

  18. Exact outage analysis of the effect of co-channel interference on secured multi-hop relaying networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Nguyen, Sang; Kong, Hyung Yun

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the presence of multi-hop relaying, eavesdropper and co-channel interference (CCI) in the same system model is investigated. Specifically, the effect of CCI on a secured multi-hop relaying network is studied, in which the source communicates with the destination via multi-relay-hopping under the presence of an eavesdropper and CCI at each node. The optimal relay at each cluster is selected to help forward the message from the source to the destination. We apply two relay selection approaches to such a system model, i.e. the optimal relay is chosen based on (1) the maximum channel gain from the transmitter to all relays in the desired cluster and (2) the minimum channel gain from the eavesdropper to all relays in each cluster. For the performance evaluation and comparison, we derived the exact closed form of the secrecy outage probability of the two approaches. That analysis is verified by Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, the effects of the number of hops, the transmit power at the source, relays and the external sources, the distance between the external sources and each node in the system, and the location of the eavesdropper are presented and discussed.

  19. Working Memory Capacity, Confidence and Scientific Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ahmadi, Fatheya; Oraif, Fatima

    2009-01-01

    Working memory capacity is now well established as a rate determining factor in much learning and assessment, especially in the sciences. Most of the research has focussed on performance in tests and examinations in subject areas. This paper outlines some exploratory work in which other outcomes are related to working memory capacity. Confidence…

  20. Outage Performance Analysis of Relay Selection Schemes in Wireless Energy Harvesting Cooperative Networks over Non-Identical Rayleigh Fading Channels †

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nhu Tri; Bao, Vo Nguyen Quoc; An, Beongku

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study relay selection in decode-and-forward wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks. In contrast to conventional cooperative networks, the relays harvest energy from the source’s radio-frequency radiation and then use that energy to forward the source information. Considering power splitting receiver architecture used at relays to harvest energy, we are concerned with the performance of two popular relay selection schemes, namely, partial relay selection (PRS) scheme and optimal relay selection (ORS) scheme. In particular, we analyze the system performance in terms of outage probability (OP) over independent and non-identical (i.n.i.d.) Rayleigh fading channels. We derive the closed-form approximations for the system outage probabilities of both schemes and validate the analysis by the Monte-Carlo simulation. The numerical results provide comprehensive performance comparison between the PRS and ORS schemes and reveal the effect of wireless energy harvesting on the outage performances of both schemes. Additionally, we also show the advantages and drawbacks of the wireless energy harvesting cooperative networks and compare to the conventional cooperative networks. PMID:26927119

  1. Variable capacity turbocharger control device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiguchi, F.; Noguchi, M.; Hatanaka, K.

    1987-07-14

    A device is described for controlling a turbocharger having a compressor and a turbine coupled to the compressor, the device comprising: means for determining the supercharge pressure of air from the compressor; variable capacity means for varying the flow rate of exhaust gas introduced into the turbine in a low speed state of an engine connected to the turbocharger, the variable capacity means responsive to a first control signal; exhaust gas bypass means for controlling the flow rate of the exhaust gas bypassing the variable capacity means and the turbine in a high speed state of the engine, the bypass means responsive to a second control signal; a control means, responsive to operating parameters for the engine, for generating the first and second control signals; and the control means for detecting an acceleration state of the engine and responsive to the determined supercharge procedure and generating the second control signal for controlling the operation of the exhaust gas bypass means. The exhaust gas bypass means reduces the flow rate of the exhaust gas introduced into the turbine only when the determined supercharge pressure reaches a predetermined pressure in an acceleration state of the engine.

  2. NiH2 capacity fade during early cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagrodnik, Jeffrey P.

    1993-01-01

    Tests were conducted on nickel hydrogen batteries to determine the charge efficiency of the nickel electrode as a function of rate and temperature, cell discharge capacity, and capacity fade. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  3. Heat Capacity Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. Findikakis

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide heat capacity values for the host and surrounding rock layers for the waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The heat capacity representations provided by this analysis are used in unsaturated zone (UZ) flow, transport, and coupled processes numerical modeling activities, and in thermal analyses as part of the design of the repository to support the license application. Among the reports that use the heat capacity values estimated in this report are the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' report, the ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' report, the ''Ventilation Model and Analysis Report, the Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms'' report, the ''Dike/Drift Interactions report, the Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' report, and the ''In-Drift Natural Convection and Condensation'' report. The specific objective of this study is to determine the rock-grain and rock-mass heat capacities for the geologic stratigraphy identified in the ''Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170031], Table 1-1). This report provides estimates of the heat capacity for all stratigraphic layers except the Paleozoic, for which the mineralogic abundance data required to estimate the heat capacity are not available. The temperature range of interest in this analysis is 25 C to 325 C. This interval is broken into three separate temperature sub-intervals: 25 C to 95 C, 95 C to 114 C, and 114 C to 325 C, which correspond to the preboiling, trans-boiling, and postboiling regimes. Heat capacity is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of a unit mass of material by one degree (Nimick and Connolly 1991 [DIRS 100690], p. 5). The rock-grain heat capacity is defined as the heat capacity of the rock solids (minerals), and does not include the effect of water that exists in the rock pores. By comparison, the rock-mass heat capacity considers the heat capacity of both solids and pore

  4. Nonequilibrium heat capacity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Dibyendu

    2013-12-01

    Development of steady state thermodynamics and statistical mechanics depends crucially on our ability to extend the notions of equilibrium thermodynamics to nonequilibrium steady states (NESS). The present paper considers the extension of heat capacity. A modified definition is proposed which continues to maintain the same relation to steady state Shannon entropy as in equilibrium, thus providing a thermodynamically consistent treatment of NESS heat capacity.

  5. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  6. Who needs capacity?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2015-01-01

    The UK Law Commission's Discussion Paper, Criminal Liability: Insanity and Automatism, recommends introducing the concept of capacity to the insanity defence. The concept of capacity has an established role in those parts of the law that concern the validity of the decisions that people make, for instance in composing a will or entering into a contract. Making mental capacity a criterion for criminal responsibility in a mentally disordered defendant, however, is potentially problematic. First, the term capacity already has several different meanings in the literature on the jurisprudence of mental abnormality. Second, using the concept of capacity in the way that the Law Commission proposes poses difficulties that relate to the provision of testimony by expert witnesses.

  7. Who needs capacity?

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2015-01-01

    The UK Law Commission's Discussion Paper, Criminal Liability: Insanity and Automatism, recommends introducing the concept of capacity to the insanity defence. The concept of capacity has an established role in those parts of the law that concern the validity of the decisions that people make, for instance in composing a will or entering into a contract. Making mental capacity a criterion for criminal responsibility in a mentally disordered defendant, however, is potentially problematic. First, the term capacity already has several different meanings in the literature on the jurisprudence of mental abnormality. Second, using the concept of capacity in the way that the Law Commission proposes poses difficulties that relate to the provision of testimony by expert witnesses. PMID:25939285

  8. Reduce power outages

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, R.; Ramirez, R.

    1995-06-01

    A case history shows the cost-effectiveness of doing a reliability study on a new, grassroots refinery constructed in Venezuela. Constructing grassroots refineries in developing countries pose many challenges, especially when considering electrical power and steam supplies. Without dependable electrical and steam sources, the refinery will not operate according to design expectations. Consequently, utility systems are critical and expensive challenges that must be considered early in design. Because of tighter operating budgets, refiners are equally interested in cutting out system overdesign. Redundant backup systems are damaging in capital and operating expenditures. Using reliability analysis techniques, designers can evaluate the reliability, availability and maintainability of operating systems. In the following example, a Venezuelan operating company used a reliability analysis to: assess onstream factors for the refinery`s power plant; identify critical equipment that have the greatest impact on available electrical and steam sources; and achieve a cost-effective equipment configuration that eliminates redundant backup systems. Results from the study allowed decision-makers to initiate objective plans and created an equipment-failure database that will service the refinery for its useful life.

  9. Perioperative functional residual capacity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, R W

    1991-04-01

    The literature dealing with the magnitude, mechanism and effects of reduced FRC in the perioperative period is reviewed. During general anaesthesia FRC is reduced by approximately 20%. The reduction is greater in the obese and in patients with COPD. The most likely mechanism is the loss of inspiratory muscle tone of the muscles acting on the rib cage. Gas trapping is an additional mechanism. Lung compliance decreases and airways resistance increases, in large part, due to decreased FRC. The larynx is displaced anteriorly and elongated, making laryngoscopy and intubation more difficult. The change in FRC creates or increases intrapulmonary shunt and areas of low ventilation to perfusion. This is due to the occurrence of compression atelectasis, and to regional changes in mechanics and airway closure which tend to reduce ventilation to dependent lung zones which are still well perfused. Abdominal and thoracic operations tend to increase shunting further. Large tidal volume but not PEEP will improve oxygenation, although both increase FRC. Both FRC and vital capacity are reduced following abdominal and thoracic surgery in a predictable pattern. The mechanism is the combined effect of incisional pain and reflex dysfunction of the diaphragm. Additional effects of thoracic surgery include pleural effusion, cooling of the phrenic nerve and mediastinal widening. Postoperative hypoxaemia is a function of reduced FRC and airway closure. There is no real difference among the various methods of active lung expansion in terms of the speed of restoration of lung function, or in preventing postoperative atelectasis/pneumonia. Epidural analgesia does not influence the rate of recovery of lung function, nor does it prevent atelectasis/pneumonia. PMID:2036700

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  11. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a “Knudsen heat capacity” as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  12. Panama Canal capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bronzini, M.S.

    1995-04-27

    Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

  13. Correlates of functional capacity among centenarians.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter; MacDonald, Maurice; Margrett, Jennifer; Siegler, Ilene; Poon, Leonard W; Jazwinski, S M; Green, R C; Gearing, M; Markesbery, W R; Woodard, J L; Johnson, M A; Tenover, J S; Rodgers, W L; Hausman, D B; Rott, C; Davey, A; Arnold, J

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated correlates of functional capacity among participants of the Georgia Centenarian Study. Six domains (demographics and health, positive and negative affect, personality, social and economic support, life events and coping, distal influences) were related to functional capacity for 234 centenarians and near centenarians (i.e., 98 years and older). Data were provided by proxy informants. Domain-specific multiple regression analyses suggested that younger centenarians, those living in the community and rated to be in better health were more likely to have higher functional capacity scores. Higher scores in positive affect, conscientiousness, social provisions, religious coping, and engaged lifestyle were also associated with higher levels of functional capacity. The results suggest that functional capacity levels continue to be associated with age after 100 years of life and that positive affect levels and past lifestyle activities as reported by proxies are salient factors of adaptation in very late life.

  14. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow valve must have a vapor or liquid flow capacity that is greater than the rated closing flow under § 154.546. ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section...

  15. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow valve must have a vapor or liquid flow capacity that is greater than the rated closing flow under § 154.546. ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section...

  16. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section 154.548... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow valve must have a vapor or liquid flow capacity that is greater than the rated closing flow under § 154.546....

  17. 46 CFR 154.548 - Cargo piping: Flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo piping: Flow capacity. 154.548 Section 154.548... and Process Piping Systems § 154.548 Cargo piping: Flow capacity. Piping with an excess flow valve must have a vapor or liquid flow capacity that is greater than the rated closing flow under § 154.546....

  18. Heat capacity of coal chars

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The selected starting materials were, a North Dakota lignite, an Illinois No. 6 bituminous and a Virginia coking coal. The carbon content of these coals ranged from 59 to 75 wt% (mineral matter included). Half of each of the received coal sample was demineralized using a standard procedure. Chars were prepared from the received and demineralized pulverized coals by pyrolysis. Heating rate of 5/sup 0/C/minute was employed for the pyrolysis under dry nitrogen gas atmosphere. The pyrolysis temperatures were 700, 900 and 1100/sup 0/C for periods of 0.1, 1 and 24. The char samples were characterized by chemical composition analysis, x-ray diffraction and porosimetry. Heat capacity data were collected over 75 to 300/sup 0/K temperature range using an adiabatic calorimeter. The heat capacity of these samples increases, with increasing temperature and moisture content, and its behavior and order of magnitude are similar to that of carbon when compared on a moisture free basis. Due to the uncertainties of the chemical forms of the mineral matter and the water phase below room temperature, all the heat capacity data are analyzed on a dry mineral matter free basis.

  19. Uncertainty in adaptive capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adger, W. Neil; Vincent, Katharine

    2005-03-01

    The capacity to adapt is a critical element of the process of adaptation: it is the vector of resources that represent the asset base from which adaptation actions can be made. Adaptive capacity can in theory be identified and measured at various scales, from the individual to the nation. The assessment of uncertainty within such measures comes from the contested knowledge domain and theories surrounding the nature of the determinants of adaptive capacity and the human action of adaptation. While generic adaptive capacity at the national level, for example, is often postulated as being dependent on health, governance and political rights, and literacy, and economic well-being, the determinants of these variables at national levels are not widely understood. We outline the nature of this uncertainty for the major elements of adaptive capacity and illustrate these issues with the example of a social vulnerability index for countries in Africa. To cite this article: W.N. Adger, K. Vincent, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  20. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  1. Capacity Maximizing Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged; Jones, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Some non-traditional signal constellations have been proposed for transmission of data over the Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) channel using such channel-capacity-approaching codes as low-density parity-check (LDPC) or turbo codes. Computational simulations have shown performance gains of more than 1 dB over traditional constellations. These gains could be translated to bandwidth- efficient communications, variously, over longer distances, using less power, or using smaller antennas. The proposed constellations have been used in a bit-interleaved coded modulation system employing state-ofthe-art LDPC codes. In computational simulations, these constellations were shown to afford performance gains over traditional constellations as predicted by the gap between the parallel decoding capacity of the constellations and the Gaussian capacity

  2. Proteomics: capacity versus utility.

    PubMed

    Harry, J L; Wilkins, M R; Herbert, B R; Packer, N H; Gooley, A A; Williams, K L

    2000-04-01

    Until recently scientists studied genes or proteins one at a time. With improvements in technology, new tools have become available to study the complex interactions that occur in biological systems. Global studies are required to do this, and these will involve genomic and proteomic approaches. High-throughput methods are necessary in each case because the number of genes and proteins in even the simplest of organisms are immense. In the developmental phase of genomics, the emphasis was on the generation and assembly of large amounts of nucleic acid sequence data. Proteomics is currently in a phase of technological development and establishment, and demonstrating the capacity for high throughput is a major challenge. However, funding bodies (both in the public and private sector) are increasingly focused on the usefulness of this capacity. Here we review the current state of proteome research in terms of capacity and utility.

  3. The Moral Capacity Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilks, Duffy; Ratheal, Juli D'Ann

    2011-01-01

    Effective counseling practice continues to be inevitably linked to underlying theories of behavioral causality. In this article, the authors present the Moral Capacity Profile of an individual from the perspective of the Amoral, Moral, Quasi-Moral/Quasi-Immoral, and Immoral Model of Behavior, a model that uniquely expands counseling's theoretical…

  4. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  5. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  6. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  7. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... adjusted for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  8. World ethylene capacity increased marginally in 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-13

    Although ethylene capacity increased little the past year, the industry is perched on the edge of a construction boom. US producers have announced plans to build 5.9 million mty of capacity by the year 2000, while proposals in Thailand call for as much as 2.8 million mty. On the demand side, China`s booming economy is supporting a capacity increase of 1.7 million mty over the period. The Journal`s annual Petrochemical Report, written and analyzed by Petrochemical Editor Anne K. Rhodes, also reveals that planned expansion of the polyolefins industry will cause loose markets until 1997/1998, when operating rates will begin to improve. A technological overview of a VCM plant revamp shows how a producer in the Ukraine plans to increase capacity and reduce emissions.

  9. Increased chronic acceleration exposure enhances work capacity.

    PubMed

    Burton, R R; Smith, A H

    1997-10-01

    Adult male chickens adapted to 1.75 or 2.5 G from long term centrifugation, were maximally exercised on an animal treadmill at 1 g (Earth's gravity) and compared with the exercise capacities of control chickens raised at 1 g. The increased-G birds had statistically significantly greater exercise capacities than the controls during the first 3 weeks of the study after the initial exercise exposure. Thereafter however for the following two months of the study, there was no difference in either group's exercise capacities. This early increased work capacity was attributed to the increased-G birds improved ability to maximize their muscular strength with neurological adaptation. The increased-G birds lost body mass at a 31% greater rate during exercise than the controls although this difference was not statistically significant. This increased body mass loss was considered to have resulted from increased use of glycogen during exercise.

  10. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  11. CSTI High Capacity Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Jerry M.

    1989-01-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY-86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase 1 of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY-88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA's new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  12. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  13. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, F; Sindoni, L; Caccioli, F; Ududec, C

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations. PMID:27627325

  14. Optimal growth trajectories with finite carrying capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravelli, F.; Sindoni, L.; Caccioli, F.; Ududec, C.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of finding optimal strategies that maximize the average growth rate of multiplicative stochastic processes. For a geometric Brownian motion, the problem is solved through the so-called Kelly criterion, according to which the optimal growth rate is achieved by investing a constant given fraction of resources at any step of the dynamics. We generalize these finding to the case of dynamical equations with finite carrying capacity, which can find applications in biology, mathematical ecology, and finance. We formulate the problem in terms of a stochastic process with multiplicative noise and a nonlinear drift term that is determined by the specific functional form of carrying capacity. We solve the stochastic equation for two classes of carrying capacity functions (power laws and logarithmic), and in both cases we compute the optimal trajectories of the control parameter. We further test the validity of our analytical results using numerical simulations.

  15. Is dynamic rating the answer?

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Capacity of transmission line to move power is very dependent on weather conditions. If all transmission lines could be instrumented so that the dispatchers know their capacity at all times, much uncertainty about network capacity would be eliminated. The problem is high cost; dynamic line-rating systems are likely to be in widespread use in the near future. Dynamic rating is very useful for dealing with contingency, when dispatchers need to know the maximum capacity of equipment and how many minutes they have before action must be taken.

  16. Heat Capacity in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Ninad V.; Sharp, Kim A.

    2005-05-01

    Heat capacity (Cp) is one of several major thermodynamic quantities commonly measured in proteins. With more than half a dozen definitions, it is the hardest of these quantities to understand in physical terms, but the richest in insight. There are many ramifications of observed Cp changes: The sign distinguishes apolar from polar solvation. It imparts a temperature (T) dependence to entropy and enthalpy that may change their signs and which of them dominate. Protein unfolding usually has a positive ΔCp, producing a maximum in stability and sometimes cold denaturation. There are two heat capacity contributions, from hydration and protein-protein interactions; which dominates in folding and binding is an open question. Theoretical work to date has dealt mostly with the hydration term and can account, at least semiquantitatively, for the major Cp-related features: the positive and negative Cp of hydration for apolar and polar groups, respectively; the convergence of apolar group hydration entropy at T ≈ 112°C; the decrease in apolar hydration Cp with increasing T; and the T-maximum in protein stability and cold denaturation.

  17. Early hominin auditory capacities.

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G; Thackeray, J Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-09-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats. PMID:26601261

  18. Working memory's workload capacity.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Andrew; Coleman, James R; Eidels, Ami; Watson, Jason M; Houpt, Joseph; Strayer, David L

    2015-10-01

    We examined the role of dual-task interference in working memory using a novel dual two-back task that requires a redundant-target response (i.e., a response that neither the auditory nor the visual stimulus occurred two back versus a response that one or both occurred two back) on every trial. Comparisons with performance on single two-back trials (i.e., with only auditory or only visual stimuli) showed that dual-task demands reduced both speed and accuracy. Our task design enabled a novel application of Townsend and Nozawa's (Journal of Mathematical Psychology 39: 321-359, 1995) workload capacity measure, which revealed that the decrement in dual two-back performance was mediated by the sharing of a limited amount of processing capacity. Relative to most other single and dual n-back tasks, performance measures for our task were more reliable, due to the use of a small stimulus set that induced a high and constant level of proactive interference. For a version of our dual two-back task that minimized response bias, accuracy was also more strongly correlated with complex span than has been found for most other single and dual n-back tasks.

  19. Early hominin auditory capacities

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J.; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G.; Thackeray, J. Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats. PMID:26601261

  20. Early hominin auditory capacities.

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf; Martínez, Ignacio; Rosa, Manuel; Bonmatí, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Carlos; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Conde Valverde, Mercedes; Jarabo, Pilar; Menter, Colin G; Thackeray, J Francis; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2015-09-01

    Studies of sensory capacities in past life forms have offered new insights into their adaptations and lifeways. Audition is particularly amenable to study in fossils because it is strongly related to physical properties that can be approached through their skeletal structures. We have studied the anatomy of the outer and middle ear in the early hominin taxa Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus and estimated their auditory capacities. Compared with chimpanzees, the early hominin taxa are derived toward modern humans in their slightly shorter and wider external auditory canal, smaller tympanic membrane, and lower malleus/incus lever ratio, but they remain primitive in the small size of their stapes footplate. Compared with chimpanzees, both early hominin taxa show a heightened sensitivity to frequencies between 1.5 and 3.5 kHz and an occupied band of maximum sensitivity that is shifted toward slightly higher frequencies. The results have implications for sensory ecology and communication, and suggest that the early hominin auditory pattern may have facilitated an increased emphasis on short-range vocal communication in open habitats.

  1. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way. PMID:27031845

  2. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way.

  3. Determining Maximum Glycolytic Capacity Using Extracellular Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee, Shona A.; Nicholls, David G.; Brand, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity using extracellular flux analysis can give crucial information about cell status and phenotype during normal operation, development of pathology, differentiation, and malignant transformation. They are also of great use when assessing the effects of chemical or drug treatments. Here, we experimentally define maximum glycolytic capacity, demonstrate how it differs from glycolytic rate, and provide a protocol for determining the basal glycolytic rate and maximum glycolytic capacity in cells using extracellular flux measurements. The results illustrate the power of extracellular flux analysis to describe the energetics of adherent cells in culture in a fully quantitative way. PMID:27031845

  4. Advanced high capacity domestic satellite communications system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Akio; Kohiyama, Kenji; Odate, Hitoshi; Ishida, Noriaki

    This paper describes a concept of multibeam high capacity transmission possible with a 30/20 GHz and 50/40 GHz domestic satellite communication system. The relationship between satellite antenna pointing accuracy and multi-beam antenna interference, as well as the relationship between satellite antenna pointing accuracy and multi-satellite interference are looked at. The ultra high capacity domestic satellite communication system will have multi-beam antennas with a 76.0 dB at both 20 GHz and 40 GHz. These antennas will provide 4950 beams that approximately correspond to the number of end office of the Japanese telephone network, and have a pointing accuracy of 0.005 degrees. This system will be equipped with 9900 30/20 GHz and 50/40 GHz transponder channels with bit rates of 800 Mbps. Its capacity will be 119 Tbps through use of 15 large communication satellite platforms.

  5. North American fertilizer capacity data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This listing of producers and their fertilizer production capacities was compiled in January 1991 with the cooperation of the US and Canadian fertilizer industry. Capacity is only an indicator of supply. Nameplate capacity differs from planned production levels or actual production because plants often operate above or below design capacity. Unless reported otherwise, plant capacities are based on 340 days per year of operation. No adjustment is made for partial year operation. Numerical data for the production of ammonia, ammonium nitrate, nitrogen solutions, urea, phosphate rock, phosphoric acid and ammonium phosphates is included.

  6. Light dependence of carboxylation capacity for C3 photosynthesis models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthesis at high light is often modelled by assuming limitation by the maximum capacity of Rubisco carboxylation at low carbon dioxide concentrations, by electron transport capacity at higher concentrations, and sometimes by triose-phosphate utilization rate at the highest concentrations. Pho...

  7. Minimization of outage probability of WiMAX link supported by laser link between a high-altitude platform and a satellite.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2009-07-01

    Various technologies for the implementation of a WiMAX (IEEE802.16) base station on board a high-altitude platform (HAP) are currently being researched. The network configuration under consideration includes a satellite, several HAPs, and subscribers on the ground. The WiMAX base station is positioned on the satellite and connects with the HAP via an analog RF over-laser communication (LC) link. The HAPs house a transparent transponder that converts the optic signal to a WiMAX RF signal and the reverse. The LC system consists of a laser transmitter and an optical receiver that need to be strictly aligned to achieve a line-of-sight link. However, mechanical vibration and electronic noise in the control system challenge the transmitter-receiver alignment and cause pointing errors. The outcome of pointing errors is fading of the received signal, which leads to impaired link performance. In this paper, we derive the value of laser transmitter gain that can minimize the outage probability of the WiMAX link. The results indicate that the optimum value of the laser transmitter gain is not a function of the pointing error statistics. PMID:19568289

  8. Minimization of outage probability of WiMAX link supported by laser link between a high-altitude platform and a satellite.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2009-07-01

    Various technologies for the implementation of a WiMAX (IEEE802.16) base station on board a high-altitude platform (HAP) are currently being researched. The network configuration under consideration includes a satellite, several HAPs, and subscribers on the ground. The WiMAX base station is positioned on the satellite and connects with the HAP via an analog RF over-laser communication (LC) link. The HAPs house a transparent transponder that converts the optic signal to a WiMAX RF signal and the reverse. The LC system consists of a laser transmitter and an optical receiver that need to be strictly aligned to achieve a line-of-sight link. However, mechanical vibration and electronic noise in the control system challenge the transmitter-receiver alignment and cause pointing errors. The outcome of pointing errors is fading of the received signal, which leads to impaired link performance. In this paper, we derive the value of laser transmitter gain that can minimize the outage probability of the WiMAX link. The results indicate that the optimum value of the laser transmitter gain is not a function of the pointing error statistics.

  9. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  10. CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer Software

    2004-11-30

    The CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application that determines the most economic amount of capacity of distributed generation and thermal utilization equipment (e.g., absorption chillers) to install for any user-defined set of load and cost data. Installing the optimum amount of capacity is critical to the life-cycle economic viability of a distributed generation/cooling heat and power (CHP) application. Using advanced optimization algorithms, the software accesses the loads, utility tariffs, equipment costs,more » etc., and provides to the user the most economic amount of system capacity to install.« less

  11. Adaptive capacity and its assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, Nathan L.

    2011-04-20

    This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

  12. The Capacity to Build Organizational Capacity in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, M. Bruce; Bouchard, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Reformers, policymakers, and researchers have given considerable attention to organizational capacity in schools, especially in those schools that perpetuate or exacerbate achievement gaps among diverse student groups and reproduce social inequalities. There is an emerging consensus about key dimensions of school capacity and how they can…

  13. Relationships, autonomy and legal capacity: Mental capacity and support paradigms.

    PubMed

    Series, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Within law and legal scholarship there are different models of legal personality and legal capacity. The most well known of these emphasises individual rationality, and is distilled into the medico-legal concept of 'mental capacity'. In connection with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) a new approach to legal personality is being developed, emphasising relationships of support and recognition of universal legal capacity. Recent scholarship on both 'mental capacity' and CRPD approaches to legal capacity has drawn from feminist writings on relational autonomy. In this paper, I use this scholarship on relational autonomy to explore the differences between these approaches to legal capacity. I argue that the approach connected with the CRPD offers a refreshing take on the importance of relationships of support in exercising legal capacity. However, despite their pronounced differences, especially in relation to the legitimacy of coercion, there are remarkable similarities in the underlying challenges for each approach: the extent to which others can 'know' our authentic and autonomous selves, and the inextricable relationships of power that all forms of legal capacity are embedded within. PMID:25982964

  14. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  15. Measuring Capacities for Community Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrieb, Kathleen; Norris, Fran H.; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the sets of adaptive capacities for Economic Development and Social Capital in the Norris et al. (2008) community resilience model with publicly accessible population indicators. Our approach involved five steps. First, we conducted a literature review on measurements of the capacities. Second, we created…

  16. Heat capacity, configurational heat capacity and fragility of hydrous magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Genova, D.; Romano, C.; Giordano, D.; Alletti, M.

    2014-10-01

    The glassy and liquid heat capacities of four series of dry and hydrous natural glasses and magma as a function of temperature and water content (up to 19.9 mol%) were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The analyzed compositions are basalt, latite, trachyte and pantellerite. The results of this study indicate that the measured heat capacity of glasses (Cpg) is a linear function of composition and is well reproduced by the empirical model of Richet (1987). For the investigated glasses, the partial molar heat capacity of water can be considered as independent of composition, in agreement with Bouhifd et al. (2006). For hydrous liquids, the heat capacity (Cpliq) decreases nonlinearly with increasing water content. Previously published models, combined with the partial molar heat capacity of water from the literature, are not able to reproduce our experimental data in a satisfactory way. We estimated the partial molar heat capacity of water (CpH2O) in hydrous magma over a broad compositional range. The proposed value is 41 ± 3 J mol-1 K-1. Water strongly affects the configurational heat capacity at the glass transition temperature [Cpconf (Tg)]. An increases of Cpconf (Tg) with water content was measured for the polymerized liquids (trachyte and pantellerite), while the opposite behavior was observed for the most depolymerized liquids (basalt and latite). Structural and rheological implications of this behavior are discussed in light of the presented results.

  17. North American fertilizer capacity data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    This listing of fertilizer producers and their production capacities was compiled in February 1993 with the cooperation of the US and Canadian fertilizer industry. TVA does not guarantee the completeness or accuracy of the information. Capacity is only an indicator of supply. Nameplate capacity differs from planned production levels or actual production because plants often operate above or below design capacity. Unless reported otherwise, plant capacities are based on 340 days per year of operation. No adjustment is made for partial year operation. Information is given on the following types of fertilizers: ammonia, ammonium nitrate, nitrogen solutions, urea, ammonium sulfate, phosphate rock, wet-process phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphates, concentrated superphosphates, potash, nitric acid, superphosphoric acid, upgraded phosphoric acids, normal superphosphate, elemental phosphorus, potassium sulfate, and sulfate of potash/magnesia.

  18. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed.

  19. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed. PMID:25530462

  20. Coalitional capacities and environmental strategies to prevent underage drinking.

    PubMed

    Nargiso, Jessica E; Friend, Karen B; Egan, Crystelle; Florin, Paul; Stevenson, John; Amodei, Brenda; Barovier, Linda

    2013-03-01

    Coalitions are the most common platform for implementing community-level environmental strategies (ES), such as media, policy, or enforcement for substance use prevention. The current study examines the associations between two types of coalition capacity (general and innovation-specific) and ES implementation efforts and outputs within 14 intervention communities over a three-year period. Efforts refer to the amount of energy exerted to implement an ES while outputs refer to the materials produced through these efforts. Quantitative measures of capacity were provided by coalition key informants and expert-raters. Additionally, Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) provided proactively to improve the implementation of ES was also examined. Greater general capacity, as rated by a coalition informant, was associated with more ES policy effort. Both expert-rated general and innovation-specific capacity, however, were associated with greater ES outputs. Study results also found that community coalitions that endorsed weaker mobilization, structure and task leadership, (measures of general capacity), utilized more TTA compared to those who perceived their coalition as having greater capacity. Moreover, communities that utilized more TTA resources reported a greater number of successful policy changes. The study supports the need to consider both general and innovation-specific capacity for ES implementation and offers promising preliminary findings regarding the role of TTA for improving coalitions' capacity to facilitate policy change. PMID:22752558

  1. [Institutionalized elderly: functional capacity and physical fitness].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Lúcia Hisako Takase; Silva, Aline Huber da; Mazo, Giovana Zarpsellon; Benedetti, Tânia R Bertoldo; dos Santos, Silvia Maria Azevedo; Marques, Sueli; Rodrigues, Rosalina A Partezani; Portella, Marilene Rodrigues; Scortegagna, Helenice de Moura; Santos, Silvana Sidney C; Pelzer, Marlene Teda; Souza, Andrea dos Santos; Meira, Edmeia Campos; Sena, Edite Lago da Silva; Creutzberg, Marion; Resende, Thais de Lima; Rezende, Tais de Lima

    2010-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between physical fitness and functional capacity in 78 residents of long-stay institutions for low-income elderly located in five regions of Brazil. The majority of the sample consisted of women, and mean age was 77.4 years (SD = 7.9). Physical fitness was assessed with the AAHPERD test, adjusted for institutionalized elderly. The Katz scale was used for functional capacity. The five components of physical fitness rated fair for flexibility, coordination, agility, and aerobic endurance and good for strength. The mean general physical fitness (GPF) index was fair. According to the findings, the greater the degree of dependency in institutionalized elderly, the lesser their strength and GPF level; meanwhile, better coordination and agility are associated with greater independence for performing activities of daily living. The results can contribute to appropriate physical exercise programs for maintenance and/or recovery of functionality.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-09-29

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were

  3. Capacity of avalanche-photodiode-detected pulse position modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, GuiFen; Yin, FuChang

    2002-08-01

    The capacity of channel is tha highest data rate it can reliably support.Whenever the data rate is less than the capacity of the channel, there exists an error-correcting code for the channel that has an output probability of error as small as desired, and coversely, whenever the data rate is more than the capacity the probability oferror is bounded away from zero. The capacity is determined an optical channel employing Pulse Position modulation (PPM) and an Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detector. The channel is different from the usual optical channel in that the detector output is characterized by a webb-plus-gaussian distribution, not a poisson distribution. The capacity is expressed as a funtion of the PPM order, solt width ,laser dead time , average number of incident singal and background photons received, and APD parameters. Based on a system using a laser and detector proposed for x2000 second delivery, numerical results provide upper bounds on the data rate and level of background noise that the channel can support while operating at a given BER For the particular case studied, the capacity-maximizing PPM order is near 2048 for nighttime reception and 16 for daytime reception. Reed-Solomon codes can hanndle backgroun levels 2.3 to 7.6 dB below the ultimate level that can be handled by codes operating at the Shannon limit.

  4. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity.

  5. Maximizing the optical network capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A.; Lavery, Domaniç; Killey, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  6. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  7. Capacity Value of Wind Power

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, Andrew; Milligan, Michael; Dent, Chris; Hasche, Bernhard; DAnnunzio, Claudine; Dragoon, Ken; Holttinen, Hannele; Samaan, Nader A.; Soder, Lennart; O'Malley, Mark J.

    2011-05-04

    Power systems are planned such that they have adequate generation capacity to meet the load, according to a defined reliability target. The increase in the penetration of wind generation in recent years has led to a number of challenges for the planning and operation of power systems. A key metric for system adequacy is the capacity value of generation. The capacity value of a generator is the contribution that a given generator makes to overall system adequacy. The variable and stochastic nature of wind sets it apart from conventional energy sources. As a result, the modeling of wind generation in the same manner as conventional generation for capacity value calculations is inappropriate. In this paper a preferred method for calculation of the capacity value of wind is described and a discussion of the pertinent issues surrounding it is given. Approximate methods for the calculation are also described with their limitations highlighted. The outcome of recent wind capacity value analyses in Europe and North America are highlighted with a description of open research questions also given.

  8. High-Capacity Communications from Martian Distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Dan; Collins, Michael; Hodges, Richard; Orr, Richard S.; Sands, O. Scott; Schuchman, Leonard; Vyas, Hemali

    2007-01-01

    High capacity communications from Martian distances, required for the envisioned human exploration and desirable for data-intensive science missions, is challenging. NASA s Deep Space Network currently requires large antennas to close RF telemetry links operating at kilobit-per-second data rates. To accommodate higher rate communications, NASA is considering means to achieve greater effective aperture at its ground stations. This report, focusing on the return link from Mars to Earth, demonstrates that without excessive research and development expenditure, operational Mars-to-Earth RF communications systems can achieve data rates up to 1 Gbps by 2020 using technology that today is at technology readiness level (TRL) 4-5. Advanced technology to achieve the needed increase in spacecraft power and transmit aperture is feasible at an only moderate increase in spacecraft mass and technology risk. In addition, both power-efficient, near-capacity coding and modulation and greater aperture from the DSN array will be required. In accord with these results and conclusions, investment in the following technologies is recommended:(1) lightweight (1 kg/sq m density) spacecraft antenna systems; (2) a Ka-band receive ground array consisting of relatively small (10-15 m) antennas; (3) coding and modulation technology that reduces spacecraft power by at least 3 dB; and (4) efficient generation of kilowatt-level spacecraft RF power.

  9. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  10. 1992 Annual Capacity Report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR Part 961) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to issue an Annual Capacity Report (ACR) for planning purposes. This report is the fifth in the series published by DOE. In May 1993, DOE published the 1992 Acceptance Priority Ranking (APR) that established the order in which DOE will allocate projected acceptance capacity. As required by the Standard Contract, the acceptance priority ranking is based on the date the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) was permanently discharged, with the owners of the oldest SNF, on an industry-wide basis, given the highest priority. The 1992 ACR applies the projected waste acceptance rates in Table 2.1 to the 1992 APR, resulting in individual allocations for the owners and generators of the SNF. These allocations are listed in detail in the Appendix, and summarized in Table 3.1. The projected waste acceptance rates for SNF presented in Table 2.1 are nominal and assume a site for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility will be obtained; the facility will initiate operations in 1998; and the statutory linkages between the MRS facility and the repository set forth in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), will be modified. During the first ten years following projected commencement of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) operation, the total quantity of SNF that could be accepted is projected to be 8,200 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This is consistent with the storage capacity licensing conditions imposed on an MRS facility by the NWPA. The annual acceptance rates provide an approximation of the system throughput and are subject to change as the program progresses.

  11. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recovered. You must use this calculated rate to determine if you have sufficient recovery capacity to... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... equipment effective daily recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate...

  12. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recovered. You must use this calculated rate to determine if you have sufficient recovery capacity to... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... equipment effective daily recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate...

  13. 30 CFR 254.44 - Calculating response equipment effective daily recovery capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must use this calculated rate to determine if you have sufficient recovery capacity to respond to your... recovery capacities. 254.44 Section 254.44 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... recovery capacities. (a) You are required by § 254.26(d)(1) to calculate the effective daily...

  14. The Mental Capacity Act 2005: mental capacity and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    In this series of articles on the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) the author now turns to the interrelation between mental capacity and mental disorder and between the Mental Health Act 1983 (MHA) (as amended by the Mental Health Act 2007 [MHA, 2007]) and the Bournewood safeguards. The article explains how the MCA and the MHA are designed to cover distinct situations: the one mental capacity; the other mental disorder and the different definitions are considered. The article also looks at the different principles which apply and the different powers available under each Act. The different forms of protection under each Act are contrasted. Because of criticism of the UK by the European Court of Human Rights in the Bournewood case, amendments have been made by the MHA 2007 to the MCA to provide protection for those incapable of making decisions who suffer from mental disorder and whose best interests require a loss of liberty.

  15. Individual differences in working memory capacity and workload capacity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ju-Chi; Chang, Ting-Yun; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and workload capacity (WLC). Each participant performed an operation span (OSPAN) task to measure his/her WMC and three redundant-target detection tasks to measure his/her WLC. WLC was computed non-parametrically (Experiments 1 and 2) and parametrically (Experiment 2). Both levels of analyses showed that participants high in WMC had larger WLC than those low in WMC only when redundant information came from visual and auditory modalities, suggesting that high-WMC participants had superior processing capacity in dealing with redundant visual and auditory information. This difference was eliminated when multiple processes required processing for only a single working memory subsystem in a color-shape detection task and a double-dot detection task. These results highlighted the role of executive control in integrating and binding information from the two working memory subsystems for perceptual decision making. PMID:25566143

  16. CO2 storage capacity estimation: Methodology and gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachu, S.; Bonijoly, D.; Bradshaw, J.; Burruss, R.; Holloway, S.; Christensen, N.P.; Mathiassen, O.M.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of CO2 capture and geological storage (CCGS) technology at the scale needed to achieve a significant and meaningful reduction in CO2 emissions requires knowledge of the available CO2 storage capacity. CO2 storage capacity assessments may be conducted at various scales-in decreasing order of size and increasing order of resolution: country, basin, regional, local and site-specific. Estimation of the CO2 storage capacity in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is straightforward and is based on recoverable reserves, reservoir properties and in situ CO2 characteristics. In the case of CO2-EOR, the CO2 storage capacity can be roughly evaluated on the basis of worldwide field experience or more accurately through numerical simulations. Determination of the theoretical CO2 storage capacity in coal beds is based on coal thickness and CO2 adsorption isotherms, and recovery and completion factors. Evaluation of the CO2 storage capacity in deep saline aquifers is very complex because four trapping mechanisms that act at different rates are involved and, at times, all mechanisms may be operating simultaneously. The level of detail and resolution required in the data make reliable and accurate estimation of CO2 storage capacity in deep saline aquifers practical only at the local and site-specific scales. This paper follows a previous one on issues and development of standards for CO2 storage capacity estimation, and provides a clear set of definitions and methodologies for the assessment of CO2 storage capacity in geological media. Notwithstanding the defined methodologies suggested for estimating CO2 storage capacity, major challenges lie ahead because of lack of data, particularly for coal beds and deep saline aquifers, lack of knowledge about the coefficients that reduce storage capacity from theoretical to effective and to practical, and lack of knowledge about the interplay between various trapping mechanisms at work in deep saline aquifers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd

  17. Antioxidant capacity of lycopene-containing foods.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Z; Powell, L C

    2001-03-01

    Increased consumption of tomatoes and tomato products has been associated with decreased cancer risks. One fat-soluble compound identified in tomatoes which may be responsible for this association is lycopene. There may, however, be other antioxidants present in tomato-based foods, and total antioxidant capacity may be another way to rate the health benefits of these foods. In this work, we examined the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of aqueous and organic extracts of lycopene-containing foods: ketchup, fresh tomatoes, tomato paste, tomato sauce, tomato soup, tomato juice, vegetable juice, canned tomatoes and watermelon. Antioxidant activity in these food extracts was greater in the aqueous versus organic fractions, except for watermelon and tomato sauce where the levels were similar in the two fractions. Lycopene levels in the food samples tested, however, were relatively greater in the organic fractions, with the exception of the two juices, which had similar levels in the two fractions, and two highly concentrated tomato products, tomato paste and ketchup, which had relatively higher lycopene levels in the aqueous fractions. The foods with the highest antioxidant capacity per serving overall (tomato soup was highest) did not have the highest lycopene levels. This indicates that it may be important to consume a variety of tomato-containing products in order to obtain the largest variety of dietary antioxidants possible. PMID:11303462

  18. Capacity sharing of water reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Norman J.; Musgrave, Warren F.

    1988-05-01

    The concept of a water use property right is developed which does not apply to water volumes as such but to a share of the capacity (not contents) of river storage reservoirs and their inflows. The shareholders can withdraw water from their share over time in accordance with their preferences for stability of water deliveries. The reservoir authority does not manage reservoir releases but keeps record of individual shareholder's withdrawals and net inflows to monitor the quantity of water in each shareholder's capacity share. A surplus of total reservoir contents over the sum of the contents of the individual shareholder's capacity shares will accrue over time. Two different criteria for its periodic distribution among shareholders are compared. A previous paper Dudley (this issue(b)) noted a loss of short-run economic efficiency as reservoir and farm management decision making become separated. This is largely overcome by capacity sharing which allows each user to integrate the management of their portion of the reservoir and their farming operations. The nonattenuated nature of the capacity sharing water rights also promotes long-run economic efficiency.

  19. Walking Capacity of Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    PubMed Central

    King, WC; Engel, SG; Elder, KA; Chapman, WH; Eid, GM; Wolfe, BM; Belle, SH

    2011-01-01

    Background This study characterizes the walking limitations of bariatric surgery candidates by age and body mass index (BMI) and determines factors independently associated with walking capacity. Setting Multi-institutional at research university hospitals in the United States. Methods 2458 participants of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study (age: 18-78 y, BMI: 33-94 kg/m2) attended a pre-operative research visit. Walking capacity was measured via self-report and the 400 meter Long Distance Corridor Walk (LDCW). Results Almost two-thirds (64%) of subjects reported limitations walking several blocks, 48% had an objectively-defined mobility deficit, and 16% reported at least some walking aid use. In multivariable analysis, BMI, older age, lower income and greater bodily pain were independently associated (p<.05) with walking aid use, physical discomfort during the LDCW, inability to complete the LDCW, and slower time to complete the LDCW. Female sex, Hispanic ethnicity (but not race), higher resting heart rate, history of smoking, several comoribidities (history of stroke, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea, venous edema with ulcerations), and depressive symptoms were also independently related (p<.05) to at least one measure of reduced walking capacity. Conclusions Walking limitations are common in bariatric surgery candidates, even among the least severely obese and youngest patients. Physical activity counseling must be tailored to individuals' abilities. While several factors identified in this study (e.g., BMI, age, pain, comorbidities) should be considered, directly assessing walking capacity will facilitate appropriate goal-setting. PMID:21937285

  20. High capacity heavy media processing

    SciTech Connect

    Chedgy, D.G.; Yu, S.; Addison, F.; Stanley, F.

    1996-12-31

    Pittston Coal Company recognized the potential economic benefit of improving process efficiency with increased capacity at it`s U.K. No. 1 Coal Preparation Plant. Accordingly, extensive research, both domestically and internationally, was conducted to select the appropriate technologies to achieve the desired circuit in the most cost effective manner while, at the same time, sacrificing neither structural integrity nor process performance. Large diameter heavy media cyclone technology was combined with highly efficient banana type screens and improved high intensity magnetic separators to create a coordinated process circuit that provided high efficiency at very high capacities in an economically attractive package.

  1. Free Energy and Heat Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, Masaki; Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2015-10-13

    Free energy and heat capacity of actinide elements and compounds are important properties for the evaluation of the safety and reliable performance of nuclear fuel. They are essential inputs for models that describe complex phenomena that govern the behaviour of actinide compounds during nuclear fuel fabrication and irradiation. This chapter introduces various experimental methods to measure free energy and heat capacity to serve as inputs for models and to validate computer simulations. This is followed by a discussion of computer simulation of these properties, and recent simulations of thermophysical properties of nuclear fuel are briefly reviewed.

  2. Buffer Capacity: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Steven O.; Hanania, George I. H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a quantitative experiment designed to demonstrate buffer action and the measurement of buffer capacity. Discusses how to make acetate buffers, determine their buffer capacity, plot the capacity/pH curve, and interpret the data obtained. (TW)

  3. Pediatric surgical capacity and demand: analysis reveals a modest gap in capacity and additional efficiency opportunities.

    PubMed

    Fixler, Tamas; Menaker, Rena J; Blair, Geoffrey K; Wright, James G

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Paediatric Surgical Wait Times Project conducted an analysis of the alignment between capacity (supply) and demand for pediatric surgery at nine participating hospitals in five provinces. Demand for surgery was modelled using wait list data by assigning patients into monthly buckets of demand ("demand windows") based on the date on which a decision was made to proceed with their surgery plus their surgical wait time access target. Demand was then related to available capacity for various key resources (e.g., operating room availability, intensive care unit [ICU] and in-patient beds). The results indicate a small and not insurmountable gap of 8.5-11% in pediatric surgical capacity at these hospitals. A further capacity issue at many hospitals was ICU occupancy. In addition, an examination of several key performance indicators related to the management of peri-operative resources indicated that opportunities exist for deploying existing resources more efficiently, such as increasing on-time starts and reducing cancellation rates for elective surgery.

  4. Characteristics of storage related capacity loss in Ni/H2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari

    1993-01-01

    The changes in the capacity, voltage and pressure profile of flight configuration Ni/H2 cells when they are stored for extended periods is examined. The Ni/H2 cells exhibit capacity fade phenomenon regardless of their design when they are stored at room temperature. Capacity loss also occurs if old cells (5 years old) are stored in a very low rate trickle charge (C/200 rate) condition. A periodic recharge technique leads to pressure rise in the cells. Conventional trickle charge (C/100 rate) helps in minimizing or eliminating the second plateau which is one of the characteristics of the capacity fade phenomenon.

  5. Capacity Issue Looms for Vouchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    State-level momentum in support of vouchers and tax credits that help students go to private schools highlights what has been a largely theoretical issue: private school capacity to support voucher-financed enrollment. Academics say the national supply of seats in secular and religious private schools is sufficient to meet short-term demand from…

  6. AccessSTEM: Building Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DO-IT, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A series of activities were undertaken to understand the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers and increase their participation in these fields. "AccessSTEM" collaborated with key stakeholders to conduct a "Capacity-Building Institute" ("CBI") in April 2009; share…

  7. Leadership Matters: Building Leadership Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Steve; Bottoms, Gene; Feagin, Caro H.; Clark, Susan

    This guide is designed to offer strategies for building leadership capacity in schools and to assist school administrators in finding new ways to encourage and support teachers and students in their efforts to succeed. The guide answers four questions: (1) What do leaders do to create curriculum and instruction that push all students to higher…

  8. North American fertilizer capacity data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This listing of producers and their fertilizer production capacities was compiled in October 1991 with the cooperation of the US and Canadian fertilizer industries. Yearly production and forecasts are given for 1987 through 1997. Fertilizers reported on include: ammonium sulfate, nitric acid, wet-process superphosphoric acid, normal superphosphate, elemental phosphorus, potassium sulfate, and sulfate of potash/magnesia.

  9. North American fertilizer capacity data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This listing of producers and their fertilizer production capacities was compiled in October 1991 with the cooperation of the US and Canadian fertilizer industry. Fertilizers production is reported or forecasted for the years 1987 through 1997. The fertilizers reported on are: ammonia, ammonium nitrate, nitrogen solutions, urea, phosphate rock, wet-process phosphoric acid, ammonium phosphates, concentrated superphosphates, and potash.

  10. Solid Electrolyte Interphase Growth and Capacity Loss in Silicon Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Michan, Alison L; Divitini, Giorgio; Pell, Andrew J; Leskes, Michal; Ducati, Caterina; Grey, Clare P

    2016-06-29

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) of the high capacity anode material Si is monitored over multiple electrochemical cycles by (7)Li, (19)F, and (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, with the organics dominating the SEI. Homonuclear correlation experiments are used to identify the organic fragments -OCH2CH2O-, -OCH2CH2-, -OCH2CH3, and -CH2CH3 contained in both oligomeric species and lithium semicarbonates ROCO2Li, RCO2Li. The SEI growth is correlated with increasing electrode tortuosity by using focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy. A two-stage model for lithiation capacity loss is developed: initially, the lithiation capacity steadily decreases, Li(+) is irreversibly consumed at a steady rate, and pronounced SEI growth is seen. Later, below 50% of the initial lithiation capacity, less Si is (de)lithiated resulting in less volume expansion and contraction; the rate of Li(+) being irreversibly consumed declines, and the Si SEI thickness stabilizes. The decreasing lithiation capacity is primarily attributed to kinetics, the increased electrode tortuousity severely limiting Li(+) ion diffusion through the bulk of the electrode. The resulting changes in the lithiation processes seen in the electrochemical capacity curves are ascribed to non-uniform lithiation, the reaction commencing near the separator/on the surface of the particles.

  11. Solid Electrolyte Interphase Growth and Capacity Loss in Silicon Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Michan, Alison L; Divitini, Giorgio; Pell, Andrew J; Leskes, Michal; Ducati, Caterina; Grey, Clare P

    2016-06-29

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) of the high capacity anode material Si is monitored over multiple electrochemical cycles by (7)Li, (19)F, and (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, with the organics dominating the SEI. Homonuclear correlation experiments are used to identify the organic fragments -OCH2CH2O-, -OCH2CH2-, -OCH2CH3, and -CH2CH3 contained in both oligomeric species and lithium semicarbonates ROCO2Li, RCO2Li. The SEI growth is correlated with increasing electrode tortuosity by using focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy. A two-stage model for lithiation capacity loss is developed: initially, the lithiation capacity steadily decreases, Li(+) is irreversibly consumed at a steady rate, and pronounced SEI growth is seen. Later, below 50% of the initial lithiation capacity, less Si is (de)lithiated resulting in less volume expansion and contraction; the rate of Li(+) being irreversibly consumed declines, and the Si SEI thickness stabilizes. The decreasing lithiation capacity is primarily attributed to kinetics, the increased electrode tortuousity severely limiting Li(+) ion diffusion through the bulk of the electrode. The resulting changes in the lithiation processes seen in the electrochemical capacity curves are ascribed to non-uniform lithiation, the reaction commencing near the separator/on the surface of the particles. PMID:27232540

  12. Capacity Utilization Study for Aviation Security Cargo Inspection Queuing System

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, Glenn O; Olama, Mohammed M; Lake, Joe E; Brumback, Daryl L

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The queuing model employed in our study is based on discrete-event simulation and processes various types of cargo simultaneously. Onsite measurements are collected in an airport facility to validate the queuing model. The overall performance of the aviation security cargo inspection system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, throughput, capacity utilization, subscribed capacity utilization, resources capacity utilization, subscribed resources capacity utilization, and number of cargo pieces (or pallets) in the different queues. These metrics are performance indicators of the system s ability to service current needs and response capacity to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as number of pieces per pallet, number of TSA inspectors and ATS personnel, number of forklifts, number of explosives trace detection (ETD) and explosives detection system (EDS) inspection machines, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures should reduce the overall cost and shipping delays associated with new inspection requirements.

  13. The Capacity of Cognitive Control Estimated from a Perceptual Decision Making Task

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Dufford, Alexander J.; Mackie, Melissa-Ann; Egan, Laura J.; Fan, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive control refers to the processes that permit selection and prioritization of information processing in different cognitive domains to reach the capacity-limited conscious mind. Although previous studies have suggested that the capacity of cognitive control itself is limited, a direct quantification of this capacity has not been attempted. In this behavioral study, we manipulated the information rate of cognitive control by parametrically varying both the uncertainty of stimul measured as information entropy and the exposure time of the stimuli. We used the relationship between the participants’ response accuracy and the information rate of cognitive control (in bits per second, bps) in the model fitting to estimate the capacity of cognitive control. We found that the capacity of cognitive control was approximately 3 to 4 bps, demonstrating that cognitive control as a higher-level function has a remarkably low capacity. This quantification of the capacity of cognitive control may have significant theoretical and clinical implications. PMID:27659950

  14. Remarks on entanglement assisted classical capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Heng

    2003-06-01

    The property of the optimal signal ensembles of entanglement assisted channel capacity is studied. A relationship between entanglement assisted channel capacity and one-shot capacity of unassisted channel is obtained. The data processing inequalities, convexity and additivity of the entanglement assisted channel capacity are reformulated by simple methods.

  15. Determining Capacity within Systemic Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Century, Jeanne Rose

    The idea of "capacity" is particularly important in the reform of educational systems because the system can be both the initiator and the subject of change. In fact, the requirement for capacity is present at all levels of the system in systemic reform. In educational change, four types of capacity are generally considered: (1) human capacity;…

  16. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  17. Cardiac Regenerative Capacity and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kazu; Poss, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The heart holds the monumental yet monotonous task of maintaining circulation. Although cardiac function is critical to other organs and to life itself, mammals are not equipped with significant natural capacity to replace heart muscle that has been lost by injury. This deficiency plays a role in leaving millions worldwide each year vulnerable to heart failure. By contrast, certain other vertebrate species like zebrafish are strikingly good at heart regeneration. A cellular and molecular understanding of endogenous regenerative mechanisms, combined with advances in methodology to transplant cells, together project a future in which cardiac muscle regeneration can be therapeutically stimulated in injured human hearts. This review will focus on what has been discovered recently about cardiac regenerative capacity and how natural mechanisms of heart regeneration in model systems are stimulated and maintained. PMID:23057748

  18. High capacity immobilized amine sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Soong, Yee; Filburn, Thomas

    2007-10-30

    A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  19. Development of Cognitive Mapping Capacities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Donald; And Others

    The development of children's capacity to induce spatial relations between locations in a space was investigated in this study. The sample consisted of 60 children, 20 in each of three age groups: 3-4, 5-6, and 7-8 years of age. The children were trained to move one hand from a home base to each of three target positions. The positions were…

  20. Health reform requires policy capacity

    PubMed Central

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Denis, Jean-Louis; Brown, Lawrence D.; Helms, David

    2015-01-01

    Among the many reasons that may limit the adoption of promising reform ideas, policy capacity is the least recognized. The concept itself is not widely understood. Although policy capacity is concerned with the gathering of information and the formulation of options for public action in the initial phases of policy consultation and development, it also touches on all stages of the policy process, from the strategic identification of a problem to the actual development of the policy, its formal adoption, its implementation, and even further, its evaluation and continuation or modification. Expertise in the form of policy advice is already widely available in and to public administrations, to well-established professional organizations like medical societies and, of course, to large private-sector organizations with commercial or financial interests in the health sector. We need more health actors to join the fray and move from their traditional position of advocacy to a fuller commitment to the development of policy capacity, with all that it entails in terms of leadership and social responsibility. PMID:25905476

  1. [Mental capacity of psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang

    2010-12-01

    Nearly every society maintains legal norms that define those members of society qualified to participate in social affairs. Mental capacity and legal competence are deemed necessary conditions for legal actions to have legal validity. On Nov. 23, 2009, newly revised adult guardianship provisions came into effect in Taiwan. However, there has been lack of discussion with regard to how assessments of mental capacity and legal competence should be conducted on psychiatric patients. This paper reviewed relevant overseas literature on this subject and followed common practice in separating legal mental capacity into causal and functional components. The causal component predicates the diseases and illnesses that render the disability, while the functional component represents legally substantial impairments in terms of cognition, emotion and behavior. The paper explored functional component contents, including finance management, individual health care, independence in daily life, interpersonal relationships and communing. Findings pointed out that in setting up competence standards, a trade-off between respect for autonomy and beneficence is unavoidable. As Taiwan does not have rich empirical data on competence assessments and decisions, collaboration between the legal and psychiatric professions is recommended to engage in relevant research to enhance legal consistencies and the science of competence assessment.

  2. Health reform requires policy capacity.

    PubMed

    Forest, Pierre-Gerlier; Denis, Jean-Louis; Brown, Lawrence D; Helms, David

    2015-04-17

    Among the many reasons that may limit the adoption of promising reform ideas, policy capacity is the least recognized. The concept itself is not widely understood. Although policy capacity is concerned with the gathering of information and the formulation of options for public action in the initial phases of policy consultation and development, it also touches on all stages of the policy process, from the strategic identification of a problem to the actual development of the policy, its formal adoption, its implementation, and even further, its evaluation and continuation or modification. Expertise in the form of policy advice is already widely available in and to public administrations, to well-established professional organizations like medical societies and, of course, to large private-sector organizations with commercial or financial interests in the health sector. We need more health actors to join the fray and move from their traditional position of advocacy to a fuller commitment to the development of policy capacity, with all that it entails in terms of leadership and social responsibility.

  3. Holographic memory module with ultra-high capacity and throughput

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir A. Markov, Ph.D.

    2000-06-04

    High capacity, high transfer rate, random access memory systems are needed to archive and distribute the tremendous volume of digital information being generated, for example, the human genome mapping and online libraries. The development of multi-gigabit per second networks underscores the need for next-generation archival memory systems. During Phase I we conducted the theoretical analysis and accomplished experimental tests that validated the key aspects of the ultra-high density holographic data storage module with high transfer rate. We also inspected the secure nature of the encoding method and estimated the performance of full-scale system. Two basic architectures were considered, allowing for reversible compact solid-state configuration with limited capacity, and very large capacity write once read many memory system.

  4. Changing recruitment capacity in global fish stocks.

    PubMed

    Britten, Gregory L; Dowd, Michael; Worm, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Marine fish and invertebrates are shifting their regional and global distributions in response to climate change, but it is unclear whether their productivity is being affected as well. Here we tested for time-varying trends in biological productivity parameters across 262 fish stocks of 127 species in 39 large marine ecosystems and high-seas areas (hereafter LMEs). This global meta-analysis revealed widespread changes in the relationship between spawning stock size and the production of juvenile offspring (recruitment), suggesting fundamental biological change in fish stock productivity at early life stages. Across regions, we estimate that average recruitment capacity has declined at a rate approximately equal to 3% of the historical maximum per decade. However, we observed large variability among stocks and regions; for example, highly negative trends in the North Atlantic contrast with more neutral patterns in the North Pacific. The extent of biological change in each LME was significantly related to observed changes in phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration and the intensity of historical overfishing in that ecosystem. We conclude that both environmental changes and chronic overfishing have already affected the productive capacity of many stocks at the recruitment stage of the life cycle. These results provide a baseline for ecosystem-based fisheries management and may help adjust expectations for future food production from the oceans. PMID:26668368

  5. Changing recruitment capacity in global fish stocks

    PubMed Central

    Britten, Gregory L.; Dowd, Michael; Worm, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Marine fish and invertebrates are shifting their regional and global distributions in response to climate change, but it is unclear whether their productivity is being affected as well. Here we tested for time-varying trends in biological productivity parameters across 262 fish stocks of 127 species in 39 large marine ecosystems and high-seas areas (hereafter LMEs). This global meta-analysis revealed widespread changes in the relationship between spawning stock size and the production of juvenile offspring (recruitment), suggesting fundamental biological change in fish stock productivity at early life stages. Across regions, we estimate that average recruitment capacity has declined at a rate approximately equal to 3% of the historical maximum per decade. However, we observed large variability among stocks and regions; for example, highly negative trends in the North Atlantic contrast with more neutral patterns in the North Pacific. The extent of biological change in each LME was significantly related to observed changes in phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration and the intensity of historical overfishing in that ecosystem. We conclude that both environmental changes and chronic overfishing have already affected the productive capacity of many stocks at the recruitment stage of the life cycle. These results provide a baseline for ecosystem-based fisheries management and may help adjust expectations for future food production from the oceans. PMID:26668368

  6. Changing recruitment capacity in global fish stocks.

    PubMed

    Britten, Gregory L; Dowd, Michael; Worm, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Marine fish and invertebrates are shifting their regional and global distributions in response to climate change, but it is unclear whether their productivity is being affected as well. Here we tested for time-varying trends in biological productivity parameters across 262 fish stocks of 127 species in 39 large marine ecosystems and high-seas areas (hereafter LMEs). This global meta-analysis revealed widespread changes in the relationship between spawning stock size and the production of juvenile offspring (recruitment), suggesting fundamental biological change in fish stock productivity at early life stages. Across regions, we estimate that average recruitment capacity has declined at a rate approximately equal to 3% of the historical maximum per decade. However, we observed large variability among stocks and regions; for example, highly negative trends in the North Atlantic contrast with more neutral patterns in the North Pacific. The extent of biological change in each LME was significantly related to observed changes in phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration and the intensity of historical overfishing in that ecosystem. We conclude that both environmental changes and chronic overfishing have already affected the productive capacity of many stocks at the recruitment stage of the life cycle. These results provide a baseline for ecosystem-based fisheries management and may help adjust expectations for future food production from the oceans.

  7. Youth Development Needs and Capacities in the District of Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cave, George

    This report examines, ward-by-ward, indicators of need for youth development services in the District of Columbia (DC), including high school dropout rates, unemployment, poverty, involvement with the criminal justice system, teen parenting, and youth mortality. It discusses capacity to provide various youth development services to address those…

  8. 33 CFR 183.325 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183.325 Section 183.325 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of 2 Horsepower or...

  9. 33 CFR 183.225 - Flotation test for persons capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flotation test for persons capacity. 183.225 Section 183.225 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of More Than 2...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1097 - Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carburetor deicing fluid system capacity. 23.1097 Section 23.1097 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... at the rate specified in § 23.1095 for a time equal to three percent of the maximum endurance of...

  11. The College Bound Program: Building Human Capacity in Underserved Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rustin Mahon

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the role of the college access intervention program College Bound as a means of building human capacity in underserved youth. The need to prepare underserved youth to remain competitive in a global economy gained momentum as a consequence of diminished national high school graduation rates and ineffective education public…

  12. On the optimal production capacity for influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Forslid, Rikard; Herzing, Mathias

    2015-06-01

    This paper analyzes the profit maximizing capacity choice of a monopolistic vaccine producer facing the uncertain event of a pandemic in a homogenous population of forward-looking individuals. For any capacity level, the monopolist solves the intertemporal price discrimination problem within the dynamic setting generated by the standard mathematical epidemiological model of infectious diseases. Even though consumers are assumed to be identical, the monopolist will be able to exploit the ex post heterogeneity between infected and susceptible individuals by raising the price of vaccine in response to the increasing hazard rate. The monopolist thus bases its investment decision on the expected profits from the optimal price path given the infection dynamics. It is shown that the monopolist will always choose to invest in a lower production capacity than the social planner. Through numerical simulation, it is demonstrated how the loss to society of having a monopoly producer decreases with the speed of infection transmission. Moreover, it is illustrated how the monopolist's optimal vaccination rate increases as its discount rate rises for cost parameters based on Swedish data. However, the effect of the firm discount rate on its investment decision is sensitive to assumptions regarding the cost of production capacity.

  13. Temporal Processing Capacity in High-Level Visual Cortex Is Domain Specific.

    PubMed

    Stigliani, Anthony; Weiner, Kevin S; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2015-09-01

    Prevailing hierarchical models propose that temporal processing capacity--the amount of information that a brain region processes in a unit time--decreases at higher stages in the ventral stream regardless of domain. However, it is unknown if temporal processing capacities are domain general or domain specific in human high-level visual cortex. Using a novel fMRI paradigm, we measured temporal capacities of functional regions in high-level visual cortex. Contrary to hierarchical models, our data reveal domain-specific processing capacities as follows: (1) regions processing information from different domains have differential temporal capacities within each stage of the visual hierarchy and (2) domain-specific regions display the same temporal capacity regardless of their position in the processing hierarchy. In general, character-selective regions have the lowest capacity, face- and place-selective regions have an intermediate capacity, and body-selective regions have the highest capacity. Notably, domain-specific temporal processing capacities are not apparent in V1 and have perceptual implications. Behavioral testing revealed that the encoding capacity of body images is higher than that of characters, faces, and places, and there is a correspondence between peak encoding rates and cortical capacities for characters and bodies. The present evidence supports a model in which the natural statistics of temporal information in the visual world may affect domain-specific temporal processing and encoding capacities. These findings suggest that the functional organization of high-level visual cortex may be constrained by temporal characteristics of stimuli in the natural world, and this temporal capacity is a characteristic of domain-specific networks in high-level visual cortex. Significance statement: Visual stimuli bombard us at different rates every day. For example, words and scenes are typically stationary and vary at slow rates. In contrast, bodies are dynamic

  14. Multi-calculation rate simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Akhter, M.

    1977-01-01

    It is common in real time simulations of large aerospace systems to separate the high and low frequency subsystems within the simulation and perform the integrations of the subsystems at different calculation rates. This is done to strike a balance between accuracy of calculation and capacity of the digital computer. Questions arising as to the accuracy of this structure compared to single calculation rates were studied using a linear aircraft model. Also investigated were interactions arising to cause errors worse than those expected. Problems are specifically identified and guidelines are given for selection of sample rates for multiple rate simulations.

  15. [Parenting capacity of mothers with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Arvaniti, A; Spyropoulou, A; Zervas, I

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the pregnancy rates of mothers with schizophrenia do not differ significantly from those of the general population. Mothers' severe mental illness, combined with poor social support and comorbidity, may significantly affect her parenting capacity. However, the poor quality of parenting by psychotic mothers should not be taken for granted, in advance. Some of them may become excellent parents while other may abuse their children and finally lose custody because of this. The parenting capacity is significantly influenced by the existing insight of patient-parent's disease. Assessing the parenting capacity comprises the measurement of insight and of the risk of child abuse as well. Factors associated with increased risk for child abuse are: (a) active psychiatric symptomatology, (b) history of violent behavior in the past, (c) maternal history of abuse during childhood, (d) dangerous domestic environment, (e) stressful events and poor social support to the mother and (f) unrealistic parental expectations. These factors should be assessed both clinically and by using the appropriate psychometric tools. Tools which have been widely used for this purpose are: (a) "Schedule for Assessment of Insight-SAI", (b) "Childhood Trauma Interview", (c) "Home Observation for the Measurement of the Environment Inventory-HOME" and "Home Screening Questionnaire -HSQ", (d) "Parental Stress Inventory-PSI", "Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire-SPSQ", "Arizona Social Support Inventory" (e) "Parent Opinion Questionnaire-POQ". Interventions to ensure a more adequate parenting capacity should be focused on family planning: mothers with severe mental illness have poor knowledge about reproductive and contraception issues. Their pregnancies are mostly not planned. It is important for the family planning to be tailored according to the specific needs of schizophrenic mothers and to take into account the following issues: (a) the severity and the duration

  16. Reexamination of the field capacity concept in a Brazilian oxisol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong van Lier, Quirijn; Wendroth, Ole

    2015-04-01

    The most frequently cited soil physical quantity, "field capacity" is also the most ambiguous one. It is used for several purposes, among which irrigation management (where field capacity is the maximum recommended water content after an irrigation), estimation of plant available soil water (considered as the difference between field capacity and wilting point), maximum soil water storage (as used in so-called "tipping bucket models"), and others. The true assessment of field capacity involves an internal drainage experiment in the absence of evaporation and transpiration, together with the establishment of a drainage rate considered as negligible. Indirect ways of determining field capacity have been developed, and although theoretically unsustainable, correlation to a fixed value of pressure head is the most common practice. When soil hydraulic properties are known, simulation of internal drainage experiments by Richards equation based models can be used to assess field capacity. Twarakavi et al. (2008) performed a study with HYDRUS assuming homogeneous soil profiles. Using tensiometers and TDR-probes, we determined hydraulic properties from 5 depths of 46 locations on a 50 m transect in an oxisol from Brazil with a vertical texture gradient. We used the obtained data set in simulations of internal drainage scenarios with the SWAP model. We show that flux-based estimates of field capacity are highly correlated to the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the lower limit of the considered soil profile, with hydraulic gradients ranging from about 0.3 to almost 1. We demonstrate that this conclusion is in conflict with Assouline and Or (2014) whose proposal is not related with the flux- or time based concept of field capacity. In our data set, time or flux criteria to determine field capacity pressure head showed a similar reliability. Considering the 46 simulated locations, bottom flux varied over one order of magnitude at a fixed time, whereas the time to reach a

  17. Lithium thionyl chloride high rate discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinedinst, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements in high rate lithium thionyl chloride power technology achieved by varying the electrolyte composition, operating temperature, cathode design, and cathode composition are discussed. Discharge capacities are plotted as a function of current density, cell voltage, and temperature.

  18. Economic performance of water storage capacity expansion for food security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Abdelaziz A.; Ward, Frank A.; Amer, Saud A.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryContinued climate variability, population growth, and rising food prices present ongoing challenges for achieving food and water security in poor countries that lack adequate water infrastructure. Undeveloped storage infrastructure presents a special challenge in northern Afghanistan, where food security is undermined by highly variable water supplies, inefficient water allocation rules, and a damaged irrigation system due three decades of war and conflict. Little peer-reviewed research to date has analyzed the economic benefits of water storage capacity expansions as a mechanism to sustain food security over long periods of variable climate and growing food demands needed to feed growing populations. This paper develops and applies an integrated water resources management framework that analyzes impacts of storage capacity expansions for sustaining farm income and food security in the face of highly fluctuating water supplies. Findings illustrate that in Afghanistan's Balkh Basin, total farm income and food security from crop irrigation increase, but at a declining rate as water storage capacity increases from zero to an amount equal to six times the basin's long term water supply. Total farm income increases by 21%, 41%, and 42% for small, medium, and large reservoir capacity, respectively, compared to the existing irrigation system unassisted by reservoir storage capacity. Results provide a framework to target water infrastructure investments that improve food security for river basins in the world's dry regions with low existing storage capacity that face ongoing climate variability and increased demands for food security for growing populations.

  19. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  20. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, H E; Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer, protocol) proved to be adequate in terms of power output (P30, P5) velocity and heart rate. Male and female athletes were comparable with respect to personal characteristics (age, body weight, training hours). Track athletes (classified in 4 different functional classes) showed a class-related mean power output (P30: mean power produced during the 30-second sprint period) of 23, 68, 100, and 138 W for the male athletes (n = 38) and 38, 77, and 76 W for females in the upper three classes (n = 10). Sprint power was low for the group of subjects with cerebral palsy (35 W; mixed, n = 6) and relatively high for the amputee group (121 W; mixed, n = 6), female basketball players (81 W; n = 5), and two male field athletes (110 W). Significant differences between male and female athletes were found for P30 and P5 (highest mean power output over any of the six 5-second periods). As was to be expected, mean maximum heart rate in the sprint test varied significantly between the track groups from 112 (high lesion group) to 171 beats/minute(-1) (low lesion group) but not for both genders. The lower P30 in the T1 and T2 groups must be explained not only by the reduced functional muscle mass and impaired coordination but also by phenomena of cardiovascular dysfunction. Based on the performance parameters, the functional classification of the track athletes into four groups seems adequate. P30 was significantly associated with the personal characteristics of gender and hours of training. A significant correlation was found between P30 and sprint performance times for 200 meters (r = -0.79). No correlation was found between either of the forms of power output and the marathon times

  1. Effects of paternal cigarette smoking on testicular function, sperm fertilizing capacity, embryonic development, and blastocyst capacity for implantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapawa, A; Giannakis, D; Tsoukanelis, K; Kanakas, N; Baltogiannis, D; Agapitos, E; Loutradis, D; Miyagawa, I; Sofikitis, N

    2004-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of paternal smoking on testicular function, sperm fertilizing capacity, embryonic development, and blastocyst capacity for implantation. Rats of group A were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 weeks. Rats of group B were exposed to the smoke of incense sticks for 10 weeks. Rats of group C served as a control group. Rats of group D were exposed to cigarette smoke for 7 weeks only. Experimental period was 10 weeks in all groups. At the end of the experimental period serum testosterone responses to human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation, androgen-binding protein activity in testicular cytosols, epididymal sperm motility, and oocyte fertilization rate, oocyte cleavage rate, and blastocyst development rate after in vitro fertilization (IVF) trials were significantly smaller in group A compared with groups B and C. In contrast, fertilization rate, cleavage rate, and blastocyst development rate after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures were not significantly different among groups A, B, C, and D. Both after IVF trials and ICSI techniques, the proportion of the alive offspring to the number of transferred oocytes was significantly smaller in group A than in groups B and C. Cigarette smoke-exposure results in a secretory deficiency of Leydig and Sertoli cells leading to an impaired epididymal sperm maturation process and diminished capacity of spermatozoa to penetrate oocytes. In addition paternal cigarette smoke exposure affects the embryonic ability for implantation.

  2. Iran outlines oil productive capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-09

    National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

  3. Age and physical work capacity.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1999-01-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decrement in various components of physical work capacity, including aerobic power and capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and the tolerance of thermal stress. A part of the functional loss can be countered by regular physical activity, control of body mass, and avoidance of cigarette smoking. Nevertheless, athletes who continue to train regularly still show a substantial aging of both physiological function and competitive performance, reflecting a deterioration of cardiac pump function, a decrease of muscle strength, and a progressive impairment of heat tolerance. These various changes are of concern to the occupational physician, because of the rising average age of the labor force. In theory, an over-taxing of the heart and skeletal muscles might be thought to lead to a decrease of productivity, manifestations of worker fatigue such as absenteeism, accidents, and industrial disputes, and an increased susceptibility to musculoskeletal injuries, heart attacks, and strokes. However, in practice, the productivity, health, and safety of the older worker pose relatively few problems. Reasons for this paradox are discussed, and it is stressed that in general there is no longer need to push workers to their physical limits because of automation-related changes in methods of production.

  4. Physical Activity, Aerobic Capacity, and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Healthy Men and in Men with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gawron-Skarbek, Anna; Chrzczanowicz, Jacek; Kostka, Joanna; Nowak, Dariusz; Drygas, Wojciech; Jegier, Anna; Kostka, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of the study was to assess total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of blood serum in relation with habitual leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and aerobic capacity in a group of 90 men with coronary heart disease (CHD) aged 34.8–77.0 years and in 90 age-matched peers without CHD. Methods. Two spectrophotometric methods were applied to assess TAC: Ferric Reducing Ability of Serum (TAC-FRAS) and 2.2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (TAC-DPPH) tests. Aerobic capacity was expressed as physical working capacity at 85% of the maximal heart rate (PWC85%HRmax). Results. CHD patients had higher values of TACFRAS (1.37 ± 0.28 versus 1.27 ± 0.23 mmol FeCl2·L−1; P < 0.05) but there were no group differences for TAC-DPPH and for uric acid (UA). Negative correlation was found between LTPA (also when calculated per kg of body mass) and TAC-DPPH in CHD patients. In CHD patients, TAC-FRAS and UA were lower in subjects with higher aerobic capacity expressed as PWC85%HRmax/kg. Those associations were not found in healthy men. Conclusions. We conclude that TAC of blood serum is moderately adversely related to LTPA and aerobic capacity in patients with CHD. UA, as the main determinant of serum TAC, may be partially responsible for those associations. PMID:26451234

  5. Safeguarding people's rights under the Mental Capacity Act.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Jakki; Lee, Sue

    2011-02-01

    People who lack capacity to make certain decisions have a statutory right to be represented by an independent mental capacity advocate (IMCA). However, there is concern among the organisations that provide IMCA services about the lower than expected number of referrals (instructions) by trusts in the NHS. The authors discuss possible reasons for the low instruction rate and how this could be improved. A case study of a woman with mental health problems is used to demonstrate how the role of the IMCA works in practice.

  6. Hostility measurement and its relationship to fantasy capacity.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, A

    1975-02-01

    Two-hundred and three male high school freshmen and sophomore students were administered a daydreaming questionnaire, Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory, and Rotter ISB. The latter was scored for hostility by the Renner, Maher, and Campbell method. The Subjects also rated one another on a sociometric scale measuring behavioral hostility. Subjects were divided into high and low fantasy groups. Analyses of variance were computed on the hostility measure data for 108 Subjects. The independent variables were obtained for the fantasy capacity measure and not for the peer rating measure. There was no positive correlation between the sociometric ratings and the hostility measures. In view of the results, the hostility measurement instruments are interpreted as measures of an individual's capacity to regard himself as hostile, rather than as measures of the actual hostility of his behavoir. PMID:1089780

  7. Testamentary capacity of the schizophrenic patient.

    PubMed

    Bergman-Levy, Tal; Heinik, Jeremia; Melamed, Yuval

    2014-03-01

    Testamentary capacity refers to an individual's capability to write his or her own will. Psychiatrists are required occasionally to give expert opinions regarding the testamentary capacity of individuals with a medical history or suspected diagnosis of a mental illness. This may stem from the patient/lawyer/ family initiative to explore the current capacity to testate in anticipation of a possible challenge, or may be sought when testamentary capacity of a deceased has been challenged. In this article we examine the medico-legal construct of testamentary capacity of the schizophrenic patient, and discuss the various clinical situations specific to schizophrenic patients, highlighting their impact on the medical opinion regarding testamentary capacity through examining the rulings of Israel's Supreme Court in a specific case where the testamentary capacity of a mentally ill individual who was challenged postmortem, and provide a workable framework for the physician to evaluate the capacity of a schizophrenic patient to write a will..

  8. Towards Smart Grid Dynamic Ratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, Jamal; Clark, Adrian; Kilimnik, Justin; Pavlovski, Chris; Redman, David; Vu, Maria

    2011-08-01

    The energy distribution industry is giving greater attention to smart grid solutions as a means for increasing the capabilities, efficiency and reliability of the electrical power network. The smart grid makes use of intelligent monitoring and control devices throughout the distribution network to report on electrical properties such as voltage, current and power, as well as raising network alarms and events. A further aspect of the smart grid embodies the dynamic rating of electrical assets of the network. This fundamentally involves a rating of the load current capacity of electrical assets including feeders, transformers and switches. The mainstream approach to rate assets is to apply the vendor plate rating, which often under utilizes assets, or in some cases over utilizes when environmental conditions reduce the effective rated capacity, potentially reducing lifetime. Using active intelligence we have developed a rating system that rates assets in real time based upon several events. This allows for a far more efficient and reliable electrical grid that is able to extend further the life and reliability of the electrical network. In this paper we describe our architecture, the observations made during development and live deployment of the solution into operation. We also illustrate how this solution blends with the smart grid by proposing a dynamic rating system for the smart grid.

  9. Argon Dewar Required Relief Flow Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, J.B.; /Fermilab

    1987-09-28

    This report calculates the required fire relief valve flow capacity, the required vaporizer failure relief valve flow capacity, and the required loss of vacuum relief valve flow capacity of the liquid argon storage tank in use at the D-Zero site.

  10. Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frontera, Walter R.; Fuhrer, Marcus J.; Jette, Alan M.; Chan, Leighton; Cooper, Rory A.; Duncan, Pamela W.; Kemp, John D.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Peckham, P. Hunter; Roth, Elliot J.; Tate, Denise G.

    2006-01-01

    The general objective of the "Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity" was to advance and promote research in medical rehabilitation by making recommendations to expand research capacity. The 5 elements of research capacity that guided the discussions were (a) researchers; (b) research culture, environment, and infrastructure;…

  11. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in the crop year NAP assistance is requested... and such practices can be expected to have a positive impact on the forage's carrying capacity in...

  12. Specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The assumed cooling process and the method used to calculate the specific cooling capacity of liquid nitrogen are described, and the simple equation fitted to the calculated specific cooling capacity data, together with the graphical form calculated values of the specific cooling capacity of nitrogen for stagnation temperatures from saturation to 350 K and stagnation pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, are given.

  13. Understanding Dimensions of Organizational Evaluation Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Isabelle; Cousins, J. Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Organizational evaluation capacity building has been a topic of increasing interest in recent years. However, the actual dimensions of evaluation capacity have not been clearly articulated through empirical research. This study sought to address this gap by identifying the key dimensions of evaluation capacity in Canadian federal government…

  14. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  15. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  16. 7 CFR 1437.402 - Carrying capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carrying capacity. 1437.402 Section 1437.402... Determining Coverage of Forage Intended for Animal Consumption § 1437.402 Carrying capacity. (a) CCC will establish a carrying capacity for all grazed forage present in the county for purposes of administering...

  17. The heat capacity mapping mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, N. M.

    1981-01-01

    The first in a series of low cost Atmospheric Explorer Satellites, the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) was designed to evaluate the utility of thermal inertial and other thermal and reflectance data for: (1) discriminating bedrock and unconsolidated regolith types; (2) mapping soil moisture; (3) measuring plant canopy temperatures; (4) examining thermal circulation in large bodies of water; and (5) monitoring urban heat islands. Final reports from the HCMM investigator's program are beginning to define the utility of day/the night thermal data. Under favorable circumstances, some major rock types can be identified, soil moisture in extensive agricultural and alluvial terrains can be detected and at least semiqualitatively assessed; and circulation of currents in large bodies of water can be followed by noting thermal patterns.

  18. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  19. Programming placental nutrient transport capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fowden, A L; Ward, J W; Wooding, F P B; Forhead, A J; Constancia, M

    2006-01-01

    Many animal studies and human epidemiological findings have shown that impaired growth in utero is associated with physiological abnormalities in later life and have linked this to tissue programming during suboptimal intrauterine conditions at critical periods of development. However, few of these studies have considered the contribution of the placenta to the ensuing adult phenotype. In mammals, the major determinant of intrauterine growth is the placental nutrient supply, which, in turn, depends on the size, morphology, blood supply and transporter abundance of the placenta and on synthesis and metabolism of nutrients and hormones by the uteroplacental tissues. This review examines the regulation of placental nutrient transfer capacity and the potential programming effects of nutrition and glucocorticoid over-exposure on placental phenotype with particular emphasis on the role of the Igf2 gene in these processes. PMID:16439433

  20. The sensitizing capacity of atranorin.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, M; Thune, P

    1984-09-01

    The allergenic potential of the aromatic lichen substance atranorin has been investigated by means of the guinea pig maximization test of Magnusson & Kligman. Sensitivity was induced in 30% of the animals, which corresponds to a moderate allergenic capacity (grade III). This is in agreement with the clinically-observed frequency of 1.5% among our patients. A modified photoallergy test on the same animals was performed, but irradiation did not increase the number of positive reactions. 4 patients with proven contact sensitivity to atranorin, evernic, usnic or physodic acid, were examined with different dilutions from 0.001 to 0.1%. Irradiation of the test series did not provoke any clear-cut photoallergic reaction. PMID:6499416

  1. High capacity, reversible alloying reactions in SnSb/C nanocomposites for Na-ion battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Kovarik, Libor; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A new SnSb/C nanocomposite based on Na alloying reactions is demonstrated as anode for Na-ion battery applications. The electrode can achieve an exceptionally high capacity (544 mA h g-1, almost double that of intercalation carbon materials), good rate capacity and cyclability (80% capacity retention over 50 cycles) for Na-ion storage.

  2. [The parasite capacity of the host population].

    PubMed

    Kozminskiĭ, E V

    2002-01-01

    ) for which the probability of size decrease through T generations is less than the probability of its increase. [formula: see text] The estimation of the probabilities of host population size changes is necessary for the parasite capacity determination. The classical methods for the estimation of extinction probability of population are unsuitable in this case, as these methods require the knowledge of population growth rates and their variances for all possible population sizes. Thus, the development methods of estimate of extinction probability of population, based on the using of available parameters (sex ratio, fecundity, mortality, prevalence of infection PI) is necessary. The population size change can be considered as the Markov process. The probabilities of all changes of population size for a generation in this case are described by a matrix of transition probabilities of Markov process (pi) with dimensions Nmax x Nmax (maximum population size). The probabilities of all possible size changes for T generations can be calculated as pi T. Analyzing the behaviour matrix of transition at various prevalence of infection, it is possible to determine the parasite capacity of the host population. In constructing of the matrix of transition probabilities, should to be taken into account the features the host population and the influence of parasites on its reproductive potential. The set of the possible population size at a generation corresponds to each initial population size. The transition probabilities for the possible population sizes at a generation can be approximated to the binomial distribution. The possible population sizes at a generation nj(t + 1) can be calculated as sums of the number of survived parents N1 and posterities N2; their probabilities--as P(N1) x P(N2). The probabilities of equal sums N1 + N2 and nj(t + 1) > or = Nmax are added. The number of survived parents N1 may range from 0 to (1-PI) x ni(t). The survival probabilities can be estimated

  3. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  4. Capacity Choice in a Large Market

    PubMed Central

    Godenhielm, Mats; Kultti, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We analyze endogenous capacity formation in a large frictional market with perfectly divisible goods. Each seller posts a price and decides on a capacity. The buyers base their decision on which seller to visit on both characteristics. In this setting we determine the conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a symmetric equilibrium. When capacity is unobservable there exists a continuum of equilibria. We show that the “best” of these equilibria leads to the same seller capacities and the same number of trades as the symmetric equilibrium under observable capacity. PMID:25133676

  5. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J

    SciTech Connect

    Yakle, J.; Darby, J.; Whitehead, D.; Staple, B.

    1994-06-01

    This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

  6. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2011-06-01

    This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

  7. Assessing urban adaptive capacity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Araya-Muñoz, Dahyann; Metzger, Marc J; Stuart, Neil; Wilson, A Meriwether W; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Despite the growing number of studies focusing on urban vulnerability to climate change, adaptive capacity, which is a key component of the IPCC definition of vulnerability, is rarely assessed quantitatively. We examine the capacity of adaptation in the Concepción Metropolitan Area, Chile. A flexible methodology based on spatial fuzzy modelling was developed to standardise and aggregate, through a stepwise approach, seventeen indicators derived from widely available census statistical data into an adaptive capacity index. The results indicate that all the municipalities in the CMA increased their level of adaptive capacity between 1992 and 2002. However, the relative differences between municipalities did not change significantly over the studied timeframe. Fuzzy overlay allowed us to standardise and to effectively aggregate indicators with differing ranges and granularities of attribute values into an overall index. It also provided a conceptually sound and reproducible means of exploring the interplay of many indicators that individually influence adaptive capacity. Furthermore, it captured the complex, aggregated and continued nature of the adaptive capacity, favouring to deal with gaps of data and knowledge associated with the concept of adaptive capacity. The resulting maps can help identify municipalities where adaptive capacity is weak and identify which components of adaptive capacity need strengthening. Identification of these capacity conditions can stimulate dialogue amongst policymakers and stakeholders regarding how to manage urban areas and how to prioritise resources for urban development in ways that can also improve adaptive capacity and thus reduce vulnerability to climate change. PMID:27604755

  8. Assessing urban adaptive capacity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Araya-Muñoz, Dahyann; Metzger, Marc J; Stuart, Neil; Wilson, A Meriwether W; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Despite the growing number of studies focusing on urban vulnerability to climate change, adaptive capacity, which is a key component of the IPCC definition of vulnerability, is rarely assessed quantitatively. We examine the capacity of adaptation in the Concepción Metropolitan Area, Chile. A flexible methodology based on spatial fuzzy modelling was developed to standardise and aggregate, through a stepwise approach, seventeen indicators derived from widely available census statistical data into an adaptive capacity index. The results indicate that all the municipalities in the CMA increased their level of adaptive capacity between 1992 and 2002. However, the relative differences between municipalities did not change significantly over the studied timeframe. Fuzzy overlay allowed us to standardise and to effectively aggregate indicators with differing ranges and granularities of attribute values into an overall index. It also provided a conceptually sound and reproducible means of exploring the interplay of many indicators that individually influence adaptive capacity. Furthermore, it captured the complex, aggregated and continued nature of the adaptive capacity, favouring to deal with gaps of data and knowledge associated with the concept of adaptive capacity. The resulting maps can help identify municipalities where adaptive capacity is weak and identify which components of adaptive capacity need strengthening. Identification of these capacity conditions can stimulate dialogue amongst policymakers and stakeholders regarding how to manage urban areas and how to prioritise resources for urban development in ways that can also improve adaptive capacity and thus reduce vulnerability to climate change.

  9. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk Young; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yihyun; Lee, Kyungdo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at −10 and −1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at −10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively). Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils. PMID:23646290

  10. Field tests for evaluating the aerobic work capacity of firefighters.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Gavhed, Désirée; Malm, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Working as a firefighter is physically strenuous, and a high level of physical fitness increases a firefighter's ability to cope with the physical stress of their profession. Direct measurements of aerobic capacity, however, are often complicated, time consuming, and expensive. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlations between direct (laboratory) and indirect (field) aerobic capacity tests with common and physically demanding firefighting tasks. The second aim was to give recommendations as to which field tests may be the most useful for evaluating firefighters' aerobic work capacity. A total of 38 subjects (26 men and 12 women) were included. Two aerobic capacity tests, six field tests, and seven firefighting tasks were performed. Lactate threshold and onset of blood lactate accumulation were found to be correlated to the performance of one work task (r(s) = -0.65 and -0.63, p<0.01, respectively). Absolute (mL · min(-1)) and relative (mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) maximal aerobic capacity was correlated to all but one of the work tasks (r(s) = -0.79 to 0.55 and -0.74 to 0.47, p<0.01, respectively). Aerobic capacity is important for firefighters' work performance, and we have concluded that the time to row 500 m, the time to run 3000 m relative to body weight (s · kg(-1)), and the percent of maximal heart rate achieved during treadmill walking are the most valid field tests for evaluating a firefighter's aerobic work capacity. PMID:23844153

  11. Determining anaerobic capacity in sporting activities.

    PubMed

    Noordhof, Dionne A; Skiba, Philip F; de Koning, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic capacity/anaerobically attributable power is an important parameter for athletic performance, not only for short high-intensity activities but also for breakaway efforts and end spurts during endurance events. Unlike aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity cannot be easily quantified. The 3 most commonly used methodologies to quantify anaerobic capacity are the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method, the critical power concept, and the gross efficiency method. This review describes these methods, evaluates if they result in similar estimates of anaerobic capacity, and highlights how anaerobic capacity is used during sporting activities. All 3 methods have their own strengths and weaknesses and result in more or less similar estimates of anaerobic capacity but cannot be used interchangeably. The method of choice depends on the research question or practical goal.

  12. Factors Considered by Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals in Employability and Earning Capacity Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John M.; Dunn, Patrick L.; Bast, Steve; Giesen, Judy

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to vocational rehabilitation assessment of earning capacity. Rehabilitation professionals who attended a national forensic rehabilitation conference were asked to rate the importance of 26 variables in development of opinions of earning capacity. Exploratory factor analysis…

  13. Global-scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashehad A; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Fisher, Rosie A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Reich, Peter B; Vrugt, Jasper A; Bauerle, William L; Santiago, Louis S; Wilson, Cathy J

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (V(cm)) rate scaled to 25 degrees C (i.e., V(c),25; μmol CO2 x m(-2)x s(-1)) and maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) scaled to 25 degrees C (i.e., J25; μmol electron x m(-2) x s(-1)) at the global scale. Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed V(c),25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2-2.5 times and 6-9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain -56% and -66% of the variation in V(c),25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. Our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land-atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.

  14. Global scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Ashehad; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Reich, Peter B.; Bauerle, William L.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Santiago, Louis S.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (Vc,m) rate scaled to 25°C (i.e., Vc,25; μmol CO2·m–2·s–1) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled to 25°C (i.e., J25; μmol electron·m–2·s–1) at the global scale. Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed Vc,25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2–2.5 times and 6–9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain ~56% and ~66% of the variation in Vc,25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. As a result, our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land–atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.

  15. Global scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity

    DOE PAGES

    Ali, Ashehad; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Reich, Peter B.; Bauerle, William L.; Wilson, Cathy J.; et al

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (Vc,m) rate scaled to 25°C (i.e., Vc,25; μmol CO2·m–2·s–1) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled to 25°C (i.e., J25; μmol electron·m–2·s–1) at the global scale.more » Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed Vc,25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2–2.5 times and 6–9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain ~56% and ~66% of the variation in Vc,25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. As a result, our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land–atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.« less

  16. User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M.; Feldman, S.

    1982-05-01

    SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.

  17. Advancing leadership capacity in nursing.

    PubMed

    Scott, Elaine S; Miles, Jane

    2013-01-01

    To address the potential shortage of nurse leaders, the profession must evaluate current strategies in both education and practice. While many new graduates dream of becoming a nurse practitioner or nurse anesthetist, few transition into practice with the goal of becoming a nurse leader. To increase the number of nurses capable of leadership, the profession must address 2 critical issues. First, effort must be made to augment faculty and students' conceptualization of nursing such that leadership is seen as a dimension of practice for all nurses, not just those in formal leadership roles. In so doing, leadership identity development would be seen as a part of becoming an expert nurse. Second, a comprehensive conceptual framework for lifelong leadership development of nurses needs to be designed. This framework should allow for baseline leadership capacity building in all nurses and advanced leadership development for those in formal administrative and advanced practice roles. The knowledge and skill requirements for quality improvement and patient safety have been explored and recommendations made for Quality and Safety Education for Nurses, but parallel work needs to be done to outline educational content, objectives, and effective pedagogy for advancing leadership development in nursing students at all levels.

  18. High capacity tieback installation method

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherby, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A method of installing a high capacity tieback is described comprising: connecting a unitary hollow casing to a drill; inserting prestressing steel within the casing; fixing a lost bit to one end of the casing; positioning the drill and casing at the desired location of the tieback; rotating the casing into the ground with the drill and removing soil with a drilling fluid as the casing is advanced into the ground; releasing the bit from the casing and pumping grout down the hollow interior of the casing at a pressure of at least 150 psi forcing water in the grout to bleed from the grout; extracting the casing from the ground by developing a torque of at least 12,000 ft./lbs on the casing with the drill to overcome the frictional engagement between the grout and the casing and by applying a pulling force to the casing generally along the axis of the casing with the drill; and anchoring the prestressing steel.

  19. The COSPAR Capacity Building Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Willmore, P.; Méndez, M.; Mathieu, P.-P.; Santolik, O.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-01

    The COSPAR Capacity Building Workshops have been conceived to meet the following objectives: (1) To increase knowledge and use of public archives of space data in order both to broaden the scope of research programs in developing countries and to ensure that scientists in those countries are aware of the full range of facilities that are available to them; (2) To provide highly-practical instruction in the use of these archives and the associated publicly-available software; and (3) To foster personal links between participants and experienced scientists attending the workshops to contribute to reducing the isolation often experienced by scientists in developing countries. Since 2001 a total of twelve workshops have been successfully held in different scientific areas (X-ray, Gamma-ray, Space Optical and UV Astronomy, Magnetospheric Physics, Space Oceanography and Planetary Science) in nine developing countries (Brazil, India, China, South Africa, Morocco, Romania, Uruguay, Egypt and Malaysia). In this contribution we discuss the modalities of the workshops, the experience so-far gained, and the future including collaborations with other institutions sharing the aim of increasing the scientific activities in developing countries.

  20. HIV communication capacity strengthening: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Lettenmaier, Cheryl; Kraft, Joan Marie; Raisanen, Keris; Serlemitsos, Elizabeth

    2014-08-15

    HIV communication is most effective and sustainable when it is designed and implemented locally and tailored to the local context. This requires capacity strengthening at national, subnational, and community levels. Through a review of the published and selected "grey" literature, we examine HIV communication capacity strengthening: definitions, measurements, implementation, and effects. We found limited documentation of HIV communication capacity needs or systematic approaches to address them. Most HIV communication capacity strengthening to date has focused on building individual competencies to design and manage social and behavior change communication programs through training courses, often coupled with networking opportunities for participants, post-training mentoring, and technical assistance. A few of these efforts have been evaluated through pre- and post-training tests and qualitative interviews with participants and have shown potential for improvement in individual skills and knowledge. Health communication capacity assessment tools that measure individual and organizational competencies exist, but they have most often been used to identify capacity building needs, not for evaluating capacity strengthening efforts. A new definition of capacity strengthening, grown out of recent efforts to improve effectiveness of international health and development programs, focuses on improving organizational and societal systems that support performance and individual competencies. We propose a holistic model for HIV communication capacity strengthening and call for rigorous documentation and evaluation to determine and scale-up optimal capacity building interventions for strengthening social and behavior change communication for HIV prevention, care, and treatment in developing countries. PMID:25007200

  1. National and State Treatment Need and Capacity for Opioid Agonist Medication-Assisted Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campopiano, Melinda; Baldwin, Grant; McCance-Katz, Elinore

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated national and state trends in opioid agonist medication-assisted treatment (OA-MAT) need and capacity to identify gaps and inform policy decisions. Methods. We generated national and state rates of past-year opioid abuse or dependence, maximum potential buprenorphine treatment capacity, number of patients receiving methadone from opioid treatment programs (OTPs), and the percentage of OTPs operating at 80% capacity or more using Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration data. Results. Nationally, in 2012, the rate of opioid abuse or dependence was 891.8 per 100 000 people aged 12 years or older compared with national rates of maximum potential buprenorphine treatment capacity and patients receiving methadone in OTPs of, respectively, 420.3 and 119.9. Among states and the District of Columbia, 96% had opioid abuse or dependence rates higher than their buprenorphine treatment capacity rates; 37% had a gap of at least 5 per 1000 people. Thirty-eight states (77.6%) reported at least 75% of their OTPs were operating at 80% capacity or more. Conclusions. Significant gaps between treatment need and capacity exist at the state and national levels. Strategies to increase the number of OA-MAT providers are needed. PMID:26066931

  2. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  3. [Regeneration capacity of skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Wernig, A

    2003-07-01

    The organotypic stem cell of skeletal muscle has previously been known as satellite cell. They allow muscle fiber growth during ontogenesis, enable fiber hypertrophy and are responsible for the very efficient repair of muscle fibers. This efficient apparatus is to some degree counterbalanced by an enormous use of the satellite cell pool: fiber atrophy probably is accompanied by loss of myonuclei such that every reversal of atrophy is bound to use new myonuclei i.e. satellite cells. How often in life does this occur? Hard to say. Moreover, the potent repair capacity is challenged by an unexpected vulnerability of skeletal muscle fibers: Passive stretching of contracted muscles may cause multiple "microdamage," disruption of contractile elements or tiny areas of true necrosis (focal necrosis). How often does this happen? Well, for many of us at least once per year when we go up and down mountains during vacation time, followed by sour muscles. Others may decide to change his/her (locomotor) behaviour by severe onset of jogging; it may happen that they suffer kidney failure on Monday due to muscle microdamage and the transfer of myoproteins into the serum over weekend. Also 20 minutes of stepping up and down something like a chair will do: There is a remarkable increase in kreatin kinase and other muscle derived proteins which lasts for days and is bound to reflect some muscle damage. How about sportsmen and worker who repeatedly use their muscles in such a way? We don't have answers yet to most of these questions, but considerable amount of information has been collected over the last years both in animal and--less--in human. What is common in all cases of growth and repair is the proliferation of the satellite cells and their consequent incorporation and fusion with the parent fiber. This way focal damage is repaired often without visible reminders. We would run out of satellite cells were they not stem cells: After division one daughter remains a satellite cell

  4. Entanglement capacity of nonlocal Hamiltonians: A geometric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, Behzad; Hassan, Ali Saif M.; Joag, Pramod S.

    2009-12-15

    We develop a geometric approach to quantify the capability of creating entanglement for a general physical interaction acting on two qubits. We use the entanglement measure proposed by us for N-qubit pure states [Ali Saif M. Hassan and Pramod S. Joag, Phys. Rev. A 77, 062334 (2008)]. This geometric method has the distinct advantage that it gives the experimentally implementable criteria to ensure the optimal entanglement production rate without requiring a detailed knowledge of the state of the two qubit system. For the production of entanglement in practice, we need criteria for optimal entanglement production, which can be checked in situ without any need to know the state, as experimentally finding out the state of a quantum system is generally a formidable task. Further, we use our method to quantify the entanglement capacity in higher level and multipartite systems. We quantify the entanglement capacity for two qutrits and find the maximal entanglement generation rate and the corresponding state for the general isotropic interaction between qutrits, using the entanglement measure of N-qudit pure states proposed by us [Ali Saif M. Hassan and Pramod S. Joag, Phys. Rev. A 80, 042302 (2009)]. Next we quantify the genuine three qubit entanglement capacity for a general interaction between qubits. We obtain the maximum entanglement generation rate and the corresponding three qubit state for a general isotropic interaction between qubits. The state maximizing the entanglement generation rate is of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger class. To the best of our knowledge, the entanglement capacities for two qutrit and three qubit systems have not been reported earlier.

  5. Malaria transmission rates estimated from serological data.

    PubMed Central

    Burattini, M. N.; Massad, E.; Coutinho, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model was used to estimate malaria transmission rates based on serological data. The model is minimally stochastic and assumes an age-dependent force of infection for malaria. The transmission rates estimated were applied to a simple compartmental model in order to mimic the malaria transmission. The model has shown a good retrieving capacity for serological and parasite prevalence data. PMID:8270011

  6. Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles.

    PubMed

    Lind, J; Lindenfors, P; Ghirlanda, S; Lidén, K; Enquist, M

    2013-01-01

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term "cultural capacity". The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages. PMID:23648831

  7. [Environment capacity of eco-tourism resort].

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Wang, R

    2000-08-01

    The results of quantitative analysis on the amount of tourist, service-environment capacity, eco-environment capacity, and their relations in Five-finger Mountain eco-tourism resort indicate that the amount of tourist in common situation and in its extreme was 1918 and 2301 visitor-hour per day, and the service-environment capacity and eco-environment capacity were 6000 and 2400 visitor-hour per day, respectively. The eco-environment capacity was smaller than its service-environment capacity, and would become the first limiting factor to the increase of tourist amount, which was mainly due to the ecological fragility of resort, the lower resistance of biological communities to the disturbance, and the slower speed of ecosystem restoration after its being destroyed.

  8. Large capacity cryopropellant orbital storage facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive study was performed to develop the major features of a large capacity orbital propellant storage facility for the space-based cryogenic orbital transfer vehicle. Projected propellant usage and delivery schedules can be accommodated by two orbital tank sets of 100,000 lb storage capacity, with advanced missions expected to require increased capacity. Information is given on tank pressurization schemes, propellant transfer configurations, pump specifications, the refrigeration system, and flight tests.

  9. Refiners boost crude capacity; Petrochemical production up

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A.

    1988-03-21

    Continuing demand strength in refined products and petrochemical markets caused refiners to boost crude-charging capacity slightly again last year, and petrochemical producers to increase production worldwide. Product demand strength is, in large part, due to stable product prices resulting from a stabilization of crude oil prices. Crude prices strengthened somewhat in 1987. That, coupled with fierce product competition, unfortunately drove refining margins negative in many regions of the U.S. during the last half of 1987. But with continued strong demand for gasoline, and an increased demand for higher octane gasoline, margins could turn positive by 1989 and remain so for a few years. U.S. refiners also had to have facilities in place to meet the final requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's lead phase-down rules on Jan. 1, 1988. In petrochemicals, plastics demand dept basic petrochemical plants at good utilization levels worldwide. U.S. production of basics such as ethylene and propylene showed solid increases. Many of the derivatives of the basic petrochemical products also showed good production gains. Increased petrochemical production and high plant utilization rates didn't spur plant construction projects, however. Worldwide petrochemical plant projects declined slightly from 1986 figures.

  10. Nickel-hydrogen capacity loss on storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1989-01-01

    A controlled experiment evaluating the capacity loss experienced by nickel electrodes stored under various conditions of temperature, hydrogen pressure, and electrolyte concentration was conducted using nickel electrodes from four different manufacturers. It was found that capacity loss varied with respect to hydrogen pressure, and storage temperature as well as with respect to electrode manufacturing processes. Impedance characteristics were monitored and found to be indicative of electrode manufacturing processes and capacity loss. Cell testing to evaluate state-of-charge effects on capacity loss were inconclusive as no loss was sustained by the cells tested in this experiment.

  11. Private classical capacity with a symmetric side channel and its application to quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme

    2008-08-01

    We study the symmetric-side-channel-assisted private capacity of a quantum channel, for which we provide a single-letter formula. This capacity is additive, convex, and, for degradable channels, equal to the unassisted private capacity. While a channel’s (unassisted) capacity for private classical communication may be strictly larger than its quantum capacity, we will show that these capacities are equal for degradable channels, thus demonstrating the equivalence of privacy and quantum coherence in this context. We use these ideas to find new bounds on the key rate of quantum key distribution protocols with one-way classical post-processing. For the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol, our results demonstrate that collective attacks are strictly stronger than individual attacks.

  12. The effect of the windmill`s parameters on the capacity factor

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, Z.M.; Safari, I.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper a methodology to study the effect of the windmill`s parameters on the capacity factor is presented. The study is based on finding the capacity factors (CF) of the identically rated available windmills. This is done by using long term wind speed data recorded at different hours of the day for many years. This data is then used to generate mean wind speeds for a typical day in a month. Probability density functions for the mean wind speeds for the different hours of the day are generated and used to calculate the capacity factors for the windmills taking into account the manufacturer`s parameters of the windmills. The study shows that although the windmills have the same rating they have different capacity factors. The windmill with the highest average capacity factor for the specific site is to be recommended.

  13. Methodology and Method and Apparatus for Signaling With Capacity Optimized Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Communication systems are described that use geometrically shaped constellations that have increased capacity compared to conventional constellations operating within a similar SNR band. In several embodiments, the geometrically shaped is optimized based upon a capacity measure such as parallel decoding capacity or joint capacity. In many embodiments, a capacity optimized geometrically shaped constellation can be used to replace a conventional constellation as part of a firmware upgrade to transmitters and receivers within a communication system. In a number of embodiments, the geometrically shaped constellation is optimized for an Additive White Gaussian Noise channel or a fading channel. In numerous embodiments, the communication uses adaptive rate encoding and the location of points within the geometrically shaped constellation changes as the code rate changes.

  14. Scalable processing and capacity of Si microwire array anodes for Li ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Si microwire array anodes have been prepared by an economical, microelectronics compatible method based on macropore etching. In the present report, evidence of the scalability of the process and the areal capacity of the anodes is presented. The anodes exhibit record areal capacities for Si-based anodes. The gravimetric capacity of longer anodes is comparable to the one of shorter anodes at moderate lithiation/delithiation rates. The diffusion limitation of the lithium ions through the electrolyte in depth among the wires is the limiting factor for cycling longer wires at high rates. PACS 82.47.Aa; 82.45.Vp; 81.16.-c PMID:25177226

  15. Scalable processing and capacity of Si microwire array anodes for Li ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroga-González, Enrique; Carstensen, Jürgen; Föll, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    Si microwire array anodes have been prepared by an economical, microelectronics compatible method based on macropore etching. In the present report, evidence of the scalability of the process and the areal capacity of the anodes is presented. The anodes exhibit record areal capacities for Si-based anodes. The gravimetric capacity of longer anodes is comparable to the one of shorter anodes at moderate lithiation/delithiation rates. The diffusion limitation of the lithium ions through the electrolyte in depth among the wires is the limiting factor for cycling longer wires at high rates.

  16. Wind Capacity Credit in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Porter, K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide an analysis and comparison of recent studies on the capacity credit of wind in the United States. We offer suggestions and recommendations for future studies, based on the recent work. We examine key wind capacity studies in the United States, emphasizing those done in the past three years.

  17. 14 CFR 25 - Traffic and Capacity Elements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting part 241, section 25, see the List of CFR Sections... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Traffic and Capacity Elements Section 25... Traffic Reporting Requirements Section 25 Traffic and Capacity Elements General Instructions. (a)...

  18. On entanglement-assisted classical capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holevo, A. S.

    2002-09-01

    We give a modified proof of the recent result of C. H. Bennett, P. W. Shor, J. A. Smolin, and A. V. Thapliyal concerning entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel and discuss the relation between entanglement-assisted and unassisted classical capacities.

  19. REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-30

    The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

  20. A capacity assessment towards more resilient societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlicke, C.; Steinführer, A.

    2012-04-01

    Social capacity building for natural hazards is a topic increasingly gaining relevance not only for so-called developing countries but also for European welfare states which are continuously challenged by the social, economic and ecological impacts of natural hazards. Following an outline of recent governance changes with regard to natural hazards, we develop a heuristic model of social capacity building by taking into account a wide range of existing expertise from different fields of research. Particular attention is paid to social vulnerability and its assessment, as well as to risk communication and risk education as specific strategies of social capacity building. We propose to distinguish between interventionist and participatory approaches, thus enabling for a better understanding of existing practices of social capacity building as well as their particular strengths and weaknesses. It is from this typology the presentation will develop two kinds of operational social capacity audits; one for communities and one for organisations. These assessments aim to identify appropriate measures and strategies regarding how to enhance, develop and build different kinds of capacities. By using these assessments participants will be able to identify strong capacities and can refer to the recommendations for tips on how to improve capacities identified as weak. That way deficits and outcomes are defined by those who are most likely to be affected by a future hazard event and most likely to be implementing improvements towards resilience.

  1. Thinking about Community Capacity Building & Asset Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Building Resources, Spruce Grove (Alberta).

    This book describes the mindshift that is the key to successful community capacity building and to the development of social and economic structures that nurture local sustainability. Its focus is how the development of community, through community capacity building, connects, animates, and informs citizens. Chapter I introduces community building…

  2. The Heat Capacity of Ideal Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The heat capacity of an ideal gas has been shown to be calculable directly by statistical mechanics if the energies of the quantum states are known. However, unless one makes careful calculations, it is not easy for a student to understand the qualitative results. Why there are maxima (and occasionally minima) in heat capacity-temperature curves…

  3. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association. PMID:23586491

  4. What Does Leadership Capacity Really Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Schools have differing levels of ability to develop leadership capacity. Yet even high leadership capacity schools may not always sustain improvements in student achievement. Several factors are key to realizing the promise of leadership. These factors challenge traditional concepts about leadership and the distribution of power, but when…

  5. Economic Development Capacity amongst Small Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines indigenous capacity for local community development. Examines new economic development initiatives by communities, nature of relationships between local and larger economies, and how relationships affect local capacity for new economic activities. Discusses benefits of spatial framework in rural development and planning. (TES)

  6. Developing Evaluation Capacity through Process Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jean A.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to make process use an independent variable in evaluation practice: the purposeful means of building an organization's capacity to conduct and use evaluations in the long run. The goal of evaluation capacity building (ECB) is to strengthen and sustain effective program evaluation practices through a number of activities:…

  7. UNDERSTANDING, DERIVING, AND COMPUTING BUFFER CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Derivation and systematic calculation of buffer capacity is a topic that seems often to be neglected in chemistry courses and given minimal treatment in most texts. However, buffer capacity is very important in the chemistry of natural waters and potable water. It affects corro...

  8. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... intelligence, mental illness, incompetence, condition, or disease, is a danger to himself or herself or to... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental health... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mental capacity. 1572.109 Section...

  9. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... intelligence, mental illness, incompetence, condition, or disease, is a danger to himself or herself or to... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental health... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mental capacity. 1572.109 Section...

  10. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... intelligence, mental illness, incompetence, condition, or disease, is a danger to himself or herself or to... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental health... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mental capacity. 1572.109 Section...

  11. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... intelligence, mental illness, incompetence, condition, or disease, is a danger to himself or herself or to... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental health... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mental capacity. 1572.109 Section...

  12. 49 CFR 1572.109 - Mental capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... intelligence, mental illness, incompetence, condition, or disease, is a danger to himself or herself or to... lacking mental capacity, mental illness, and drug use. This does not include commitment to a mental health... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mental capacity. 1572.109 Section...

  13. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  14. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  15. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  16. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  17. 15 CFR 241.1 - Capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OTHER DRY COMMODITIES, AND FOR CRANBERRIES § 241.1 Capacities. (a) The capacities of the standard barrel for fruits, vegetables, and other dry commodities, other than cranberries, and its subdivisions, are... standard cranberry barrel and its subdivisions are as follows: Size Cubic inches Bushels 1 Quarts...

  18. Measuring Fiscal Capacity of School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Harry A.

    Ways of measuring the fiscal capacity of school systems are examined in this paper, which presents a representative tax system model. Fiscal capacity is influenced by factors other than tax base size; the "ideal" model should address adjustments for variations in cost across communities and school systems. The first section examines the…

  19. Comparison of three methods for wind turbine capacity factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Ditkovich, Y; Kuperman, A

    2014-01-01

    Three approaches to calculating capacity factor of fixed speed wind turbines are reviewed and compared using a case study. The first "quasiexact" approach utilizes discrete wind raw data (in the histogram form) and manufacturer-provided turbine power curve (also in discrete form) to numerically calculate the capacity factor. On the other hand, the second "analytic" approach employs a continuous probability distribution function, fitted to the wind data as well as continuous turbine power curve, resulting from double polynomial fitting of manufacturer-provided power curve data. The latter approach, while being an approximation, can be solved analytically thus providing a valuable insight into aspects, affecting the capacity factor. Moreover, several other merits of wind turbine performance may be derived based on the analytical approach. The third "approximate" approach, valid in case of Rayleigh winds only, employs a nonlinear approximation of the capacity factor versus average wind speed curve, only requiring rated power and rotor diameter of the turbine. It is shown that the results obtained by employing the three approaches are very close, enforcing the validity of the analytically derived approximations, which may be used for wind turbine performance evaluation. PMID:24587755

  20. Comparison of Three Methods for Wind Turbine Capacity Factor Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Ditkovich, Y.; Kuperman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Three approaches to calculating capacity factor of fixed speed wind turbines are reviewed and compared using a case study. The first “quasiexact” approach utilizes discrete wind raw data (in the histogram form) and manufacturer-provided turbine power curve (also in discrete form) to numerically calculate the capacity factor. On the other hand, the second “analytic” approach employs a continuous probability distribution function, fitted to the wind data as well as continuous turbine power curve, resulting from double polynomial fitting of manufacturer-provided power curve data. The latter approach, while being an approximation, can be solved analytically thus providing a valuable insight into aspects, affecting the capacity factor. Moreover, several other merits of wind turbine performance may be derived based on the analytical approach. The third “approximate” approach, valid in case of Rayleigh winds only, employs a nonlinear approximation of the capacity factor versus average wind speed curve, only requiring rated power and rotor diameter of the turbine. It is shown that the results obtained by employing the three approaches are very close, enforcing the validity of the analytically derived approximations, which may be used for wind turbine performance evaluation. PMID:24587755

  1. Comparison of three methods for wind turbine capacity factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Ditkovich, Y; Kuperman, A

    2014-01-01

    Three approaches to calculating capacity factor of fixed speed wind turbines are reviewed and compared using a case study. The first "quasiexact" approach utilizes discrete wind raw data (in the histogram form) and manufacturer-provided turbine power curve (also in discrete form) to numerically calculate the capacity factor. On the other hand, the second "analytic" approach employs a continuous probability distribution function, fitted to the wind data as well as continuous turbine power curve, resulting from double polynomial fitting of manufacturer-provided power curve data. The latter approach, while being an approximation, can be solved analytically thus providing a valuable insight into aspects, affecting the capacity factor. Moreover, several other merits of wind turbine performance may be derived based on the analytical approach. The third "approximate" approach, valid in case of Rayleigh winds only, employs a nonlinear approximation of the capacity factor versus average wind speed curve, only requiring rated power and rotor diameter of the turbine. It is shown that the results obtained by employing the three approaches are very close, enforcing the validity of the analytically derived approximations, which may be used for wind turbine performance evaluation.

  2. High-Capacity Sulfur Dioxide Absorbents for Diesel Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2005-01-05

    High capacity sulfur dioxide absorbents based on manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS) have been identified. These materials are based on MnO6 octahedra sharing faces and edges to form various tunnel structures (2x2, 2x3, 2x4, 3x3) differentiated by the number of octahedra on a side. The SO2 capacities of these materials, measured at 325 C with a feed containing 250 ppmv SO2 in air, are as high as 70wt% (wt/wt), remarkably higher than conventional metal oxide-based SO2 absorbents. Among the OMS materials the 2x2 member, cryptomelane, exhibits the highest capacity and adsorption rate. Its SO2 absorption behavior has been further characterized as a function of temperature, space velocity, and feed composition. The dominant pathway for SO2 absorption is through the oxidation of SO2 to SO3 by Mn4+ followed by SO3 reaction with Mn2+ to form MnSO4. Absorption can occur in the absence of gas phase oxygen, with a moderate loss in overall capacity. The inclusion of reducible gases NO and CO in the feed does not reduce SO2 capacity. The absorption capacity decreases at high space velocity and lower absorption temperature, indicating the important role of diffusion of sulfate from the surface to the bulk of the material in order to reach full capacity. A color change of cryptomelane from black to yellow-brown after SO2 absorption can be used as an indicator of absorption progress. Cryptomelane can be synthesized using MnSO4 as a reagent. Therefore, after full SO2 absorption the product MnSO4 can be re-used as raw material for a subsequent cryptomelane synthesis. Cryptomelane has a similarly high capacity toward SO3, therefore it can be used for removal of all SOx species generated from a variety of combustion sources. Cryptomelane may find application as a replaceable absorbent for the removal of SOx from diesel truck exhaust, protecting downstream emissions control devices such as particulate filters and NOx traps.

  3. Studying the future of pipeline capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, F.

    1996-03-01

    Over the next five years, many 15- or 20-year contracts between natural gas pipelines and local distribution companies (LDCs) for firm-transportation service will come up for renewal. In addition, clauses in some existing contracts permit LDCs to periodically exercise options to reduce or relinquish portions of their firm-transportation capacity. To the extent that LDC-shippers stepdown, turnback or relinquish capacity, pipelines may be confronted with the possibility of revenue shortfalls. In December, the LDC Caucus released a study exploring the emerging problem of unsubscribed pipeline capacity. The 50-page document -- An Issue Paper Regarding Future Unsubscribed Pipeline Capacity -- describes the causes of capacity relinquishment on interstate natural gas pipelines, estimates the scope of the problem, explores the ramifications and implications for shippers and pipelines, and recommends policy approaches for consideration by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and affected stakeholders. This paper summarizes this document.

  4. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data are released twice each year near the end of May (data for March 31) and near the end of November (data for September 30).

  5. Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles

    PubMed Central

    Lind, J.; Lindenfors, P.; Ghirlanda, S.; Lidén, K.; Enquist, M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term “cultural capacity”. The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages. PMID:23648831

  6. Trade-off capacities of the quantum Hadamard channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bradler, Kamil; Hayden, Patrick; Touchette, Dave; Wilde, Mark M.

    2010-06-15

    Coding theorems in quantum Shannon theory express the ultimate rates at which a sender can transmit information over a noisy quantum channel. More often than not, the known formulas expressing these transmission rates are intractable, requiring an optimization over an infinite number of uses of the channel. Researchers have rarely found quantum channels with a tractable classical or quantum capacity, but when such a finding occurs, it demonstrates a complete understanding of that channel's capabilities for transmitting classical or quantum information. Here we show that the three-dimensional capacity region for entanglement-assisted transmission of classical and quantum information is tractable for the Hadamard class of channels. Examples of Hadamard channels include generalized dephasing channels, cloning channels, and the Unruh channel. The generalized dephasing channels and the cloning channels are natural processes that occur in quantum systems through the loss of quantum coherence or stimulated emission, respectively. The Unruh channel is a noisy process that occurs in relativistic quantum information theory as a result of the Unruh effect and bears a strong relationship to the cloning channels. We give exact formulas for the entanglement-assisted classical and quantum communication capacity regions of these channels. The coding strategy for each of these examples is superior to a naieve time-sharing strategy, and we introduce a measure to determine this improvement.

  7. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ali, A. A.; Fisher, R.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Rogers, A.; McDowell, N. G.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc,max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25oC) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55% of the variation in observed Vc,max25 and 65% of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc,max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc,max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.

  8. Capacity-limiting mechanisms in Li/O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Khaleghi Rahimian, Saeed; Monroe, Charles W

    2016-08-17

    A continuum model of an aprotic lithium/oxygen battery is validated against experimental first-discharge data and used to examine how the apparent cell capacity is affected by macroscopic multicomponent mass transfer, interfacial kinetics, and electronic conduction or tunneling through the discharge product. The model accounts for the three-phase nature of the positive electrode in detail, including an explicit discharge-product layer whose properties and volume distribution generally depend on the local discharge depth. Several hypothetical positive-electrode reaction mechanisms involving different product morphologies and electron-transfer sites are explored within the theoretical framework. To match experimental discharge-voltage vs. capacity and capacity vs. discharge-current trends qualitatively, the discharge-product layer must be assumed to have electronic resistivity several orders of magnitude lower than typical insulators, supporting the notion that the presence of lithium peroxide does not wholly prevent electrons from reaching dissolved reactants. The discharge product also appears to allow charge transport over length scales longer than electron tunneling permits. 'Sudden death' of voltage in lithium/oxygen cells is explained by macroscopic oxygen-diffusion limitations in the positive electrode at high rates, and by pore clogging associated with discharge-product formation at low rates. PMID:27459368

  9. Placental diffusing capacities at varied carbon monoxide tensions.

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, J M; Wickham, W K; Drummond, W H

    1977-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that carbon monoxide transfer across the placenta is, in part, a facilitated process, we have looked for evidence of saturation kinetics for carbon monoxide. In eight pregnant ewes, fetal to maternal carbon monoxide transfer was examined in a preparation in which the fetal side of the placenta was perfused with blood. The carboxyhemoglobin concentrations on the fetal side of the placenta were varied from 4.8 to 70% in 23 measurements. At increased carbon monoxide tensions, the transfer from fetus to mother always decreased. The slope of log rate of carbon monoxide transfer vs. log partial pressure gradient across the placenta was significantly different from 1. Placental membrane diffusing capacity was calculated separately from total placental diffusing capacity which includes hemoglobin reaction rates and erythrocyte membrane diffusion. Placental membrane diffusing capacity decreased at increased carbon monoxide tensions. Placental permeability for urea did not change with increasing carbon monoxide tensions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that carbon monoxide diffusion in the placenta is, in part, carrier mediated. PMID:864001

  10. Effect of electrode density on cycle performance and irreversible capacity loss for natural graphite anode in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-12-02

    The effect of electrode thickness and density for unpressed and pressed natural graphite electrodes were studied using electrochemical characterization. Pressing the graphite electrode decreases the reversible capacity and the irreversible capacity loss during formation. As electrode density increased, the capacity retention at high rate increased until 0.9g/cm{sup 3}, and then decreased. The cycle performances of the pressed graphite electrodes were more stable than the unpressed one. Pressing graphite electrode affected on its electrochemical characterization such as irreversible capacity loss, high rate cycling and cycle performance.

  11. Towards green high capacity optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesk, I.; Mohd Warip, M. N.; Idris, S. K.; Osadola, T. B.; Andonovic, I.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for fast, secure, energy efficient high capacity networks is growing. It is fuelled by transmission bandwidth needs which will support among other things the rapid penetration of multimedia applications empowering smart consumer electronics and E-businesses. All the above trigger unparallel needs for networking solutions which must offer not only high-speed low-cost "on demand" mobile connectivity but should be ecologically friendly and have low carbon footprint. The first answer to address the bandwidth needs was deployment of fibre optic technologies into transport networks. After this it became quickly obvious that the inferior electronic bandwidth (if compared to optical fiber) will further keep its upper hand on maximum implementable serial data rates. A new solution was found by introducing parallelism into data transport in the form of Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) which has helped dramatically to improve aggregate throughput of optical networks. However with these advancements a new bottleneck has emerged at fibre endpoints where data routers must process the incoming and outgoing traffic. Here, even with the massive and power hungry electronic parallelism routers today (still relying upon bandwidth limiting electronics) do not offer needed processing speeds networks demands. In this paper we will discuss some novel unconventional approaches to address network scalability leading to energy savings via advance optical signal processing. We will also investigate energy savings based on advanced network management through nodes hibernation proposed for Optical IP networks. The hibernation reduces the network overall power consumption by forming virtual network reconfigurations through selective nodes groupings and by links segmentations and partitionings.

  12. Towards green high capacity optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesk, I.; Mohd Warip, M. N.; Idris, S. K.; Osadola, T. B.; Andonovic, I.

    2011-09-01

    The demand for fast, secure, energy efficient high capacity networks is growing. It is fuelled by transmission bandwidth needs which will support among other things the rapid penetration of multimedia applications empowering smart consumer electronics and E-businesses. All the above trigger unparallel needs for networking solutions which must offer not only high-speed low-cost "on demand" mobile connectivity but should be ecologically friendly and have low carbon footprint. The first answer to address the bandwidth needs was deployment of fibre optic technologies into transport networks. After this it became quickly obvious that the inferior electronic bandwidth (if compared to optical fiber) will further keep its upper hand on maximum implementable serial data rates. A new solution was found by introducing parallelism into data transport in the form of Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) which has helped dramatically to improve aggregate throughput of optical networks. However with these advancements a new bottleneck has emerged at fibre endpoints where data routers must process the incoming and outgoing traffic. Here, even with the massive and power hungry electronic parallelism routers today (still relying upon bandwidth limiting electronics) do not offer needed processing speeds networks demands. In this paper we will discuss some novel unconventional approaches to address network scalability leading to energy savings via advance optical signal processing. We will also investigate energy savings based on advanced network management through nodes hibernation proposed for Optical IP networks. The hibernation reduces the network overall power consumption by forming virtual network reconfigurations through selective nodes groupings and by links segmentations and partitionings.

  13. Capacity expansion options for NGL fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, D.B.

    1998-12-31

    Mixtures of liquid hydrocarbons recovered from natural gas are commercially separated in fractionator plants to produce higher value ethane, propane, isobutane, normal butane and gasoline products. Figure 1 shows a conventional fractionator with deethanizer, depropanizer, debutanizer and deisobutanizer columns. As demand for natural gas liquids grows, it may be cost effective to expand the capacity of an existing fractionator rather than building a new one. In this case, it may be difficult or expensive to add new distillation columns; and it is advantageous to find ways to increase the capacity of existing columns with as little disturbance of the surrounding infrastructure as possible. Distillation column capacity can sometimes be incrementally increased by replacing the existing column trays with more modern, higher capacity internals. However, when this is done the energy efficiency of the process is not improved, and large increases in capacity are generally precluded. It has been shown that fractionator energy consumption may be reduced by as much as 60% by using distributed distillation combined with careful heat integration. The present discussion shows how large increases in fractionator capacity may be achieved, while also significantly reducing energy consumption, by incorporating several new process improvements. The front end deethanizer shown in a figure is chosen as an example, but the same improvements may be used in the other columns to achieve increased capacity and reduced energy consumption.

  14. Study on the Korean adult cranial capacity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Y I; Lee, K H; Choi, B Y; Lee, K S; Lee, H Y; Sir, W S; Kim, H J; Koh, K S; Han, S H; Chung, M S

    1995-08-01

    Cranial capacity was measured in Korean adult skulls. The cavity was filled with rice seeds and the volume of the seeds were measured in a graduated cylinder. The results were 1470 +/- 107 (mean +/- standard deviation) in male and 1317 +/- 117 cc in female skulls. These values were in good accordance with those previously reported. In addition, regression formulae were obtained with the product of the length, breadth, and height of the skull as an independent parameter and the measured capacity as a dependent one. With known external measurements, the expected cranial capacity was as follows: when using baso-bregmatic height, male: capacity = 307.5 + 333 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.baso-bregmatic height) female: capacity = -12.0 + 435 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.baso-bregmatic height) and, when using auriculo-bregmatic height, male: capacity = 214.6 + 429 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.auriculo-bregmatic height) female: capacity = 131.6 + 461 x 10(-6) x (length.breadth.auriculo-bregmatic height). PMID:8593202

  15. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant capacity increase options

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Studies are being conducted by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project on ways to increase the waste processing capacity within the current Vitrification Building structural design. The Phase 1 study on remote systems concepts identification and extent of capacity increase was completed. The study concluded that the HWVP capacity could be increased to four times the current capacity with minor design adjustments to the fixed facility design, and the required design changes would not impact the current footprint of the vitrification building. A further increase in production capacity may be achievable but would require some technology development, verification testing, and a more systematic and extensive engineering evaluation. The primary changes included a single advance melter with a higher capacity, new evaporative feed tank, offgas quench collection tank, ejector venturi scrubbers, and additional inner canister closure station,a smear test station, a new close- coupled analytical facility, waste hold capacity of 400,000 gallon, the ability to concentrate out-of-plant HWVP feed to 90 g/L waste oxide concentration, and limited changes to the current base slab construction package.

  16. Physical fitness capacity and absenteeism of police officers.

    PubMed

    Boyce, R W; Jones, G R; Hiatt, A R

    1991-11-01

    Police officers (n = 514) were studied to determine the relationship between physical fitness capacity and annual absenteeism rate. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that for officers aged 34 years and younger, only 5% of the variability in absenteeism could be accounted for by age, sex, and physical fitness variables. For officers 35 years old and older, 7% of the variability was explained by these variables, and a bicycle ergometer score was a significant predictor of absenteeism. Each individual test and an overall physical fitness score were classified into five levels. ANOVAs revealed no significant differences between overall fitness levels and absenteeism. However, men 35 and over who were most fit on the bicycle ergometer test had fewer absences, and women 34 and under who were thinnest had more absences. In conclusion, at least among police officers, the extent to which physical fitness capacity can predict absenteeism is low.

  17. Quantum-capacity-approaching codes for the detected-jump channel

    SciTech Connect

    Grassl, Markus; Wei Zhaohui; Ji Zhengfeng; Zeng Bei

    2010-12-15

    The quantum-channel capacity gives the ultimate limit for the rate at which quantum data can be reliably transmitted through a noisy quantum channel. Degradable quantum channels are among the few channels whose quantum capacities are known. Given the quantum capacity of a degradable channel, it remains challenging to find a practical coding scheme which approaches capacity. Here we discuss code designs for the detected-jump channel, a degradable channel with practical relevance describing the physics of spontaneous decay of atoms with detected photon emission. We show that this channel can be used to simulate a binary classical channel with both erasures and bit flips. The capacity of the simulated classical channel gives a lower bound on the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel. When the jump probability is small, it almost equals the quantum capacity. Hence using a classical capacity-approaching code for the simulated classical channel yields a quantum code which approaches the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel.

  18. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, D.; Darby, J.; Yakle, J.

    1994-06-01

    This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

  20. Design of Refractory Linings for Balanced Energy Efficiency, Uptime, and Capacity in Lime Kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, John Peter; Hemrick, James Gordon; Walker, Harold; Leary, William R; Ellis, Murray

    2014-01-01

    The rotary kilns used by the pulp and paper industry to regenerate lime in the Kraft process are very energy intensive. Throughout the 90 s, in response to increasing fuel prices, the industry used back up insulation in conjunction with the high alumina brick used to line the burning zones of their kilns. While this improved energy efficiency, the practice of installing insulating brick behind the working lining increased the inner wall temperatures. In the worst case, due to the increased temperatures, rapid brick failures occurred causing unscheduled outages and expensive repairs. Despite these issues, for the most part, the industry continued to use insulating refractory linings in that the energy savings were large enough to offset any increase in the cost of maintaining the refractory lining. Due to the dramatic decline in the price of natural gas in some areas combined with mounting pressures to increasing production of existing assets, over the last decade, many mills are focusing more on increasing the uptime of their kilns as opposed to energy savings. To this end, a growing number of mills are using basic (magnesia based) brick instead of high alumina brick to line the burning zone of the kiln since the lime mud does not react with these bricks at the operating temperatures of the burning zone of the kiln. In the extreme case, a few mills have chosen to install basic brick in the front end of the kiln running a length equivalent to 10 diameters. While the use of basic brick can increase the uptime of the kiln and reduce the cost to maintain the refractory lining, it does dramatically increase the heat losses resulting from the increased operating temperatures of the shell. Also, over long periods of time operating at these high temperatures, damage can occur in the shell. There are tradeoffs between energy efficiency, capacity and uptime. When fuel prices are very high, it makes sense to insulate the lining. When fuel prices are lower, trading some

  1. 25 CFR 167.6 - Carrying capacities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Carrying capacities shall be stated in terms of sheep units yearlong, in the ratio of horses, mules, and..., goats, cattle, horses, mules, and burros one year of age or older shall be counted against the...

  2. Organizational capacity of nonprofit social service agencies.

    PubMed

    Paynter, Sharon; Berner, Marueen

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. social safety net is formed by governmental and nonprofit organizations, which are trying to respond to record levels of need. This is especially true for local level organizations, such as food pantries. The organizational capacity literature has not covered front-line, local, mostly volunteer and low resource organizations in the same depth as larger ones. This analysis is a consideration of whether grassroots nonprofit organizations have the ability to be a strong component of the social safety net. Based on the literature on organizational capacity, a model is developed to examine how service delivery at the local level is affected by organizational capacity. Surprisingly, we find few of the characteristics previously identified as important are statistically significant in this study. Even when so, the material effect is negligible. Current organizational capacity research may apply to larger nonprofits, but not to the tens of thousands of small community nonprofits, a significant limitation to the research to date.

  3. The Irony of the Capac Nan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Presents information on the Capac Nan, the highway system of the Incas. Describes its use by the Spanish conquistadors in the destruction of the Incan empire. Includes suggested classroom uses for the article, a homework assignment, and discussion topics. (DK)

  4. Some Underexamined Aspects of Evaluation Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation capacity building (ECB) has progressed as a concept since it was the conference theme of the American Evaluation Association in the year 2000. This commentary poses some questions about underexamined issues in ECB about organizations, evaluators, and funders.

  5. Heat Capacity of Hydrous Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2015-12-01

    We determined the heat capacities of four series of glasses and liquids of basaltic and basaltic andesite compositions including two natural remelts from Fuego volcano, Guatemala, and two Fe-free analogs. The samples are low-alkali, Ca- and Mg-rich aluminosilicates with non-bridging oxygen to tetrahedrally-coordinated cation ratios (NBO/T) ranging between 0.33 and 0.67. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were performed at atmospheric pressure between room temperature and ≈100 K above the glass transition for hydrous samples and up to ≈1800 K for dry samples. The water contents investigated range up to 5.34 wt.% (16.4 mol%). Water does not measurably affect the heat capacity of glasses (T capacity, which generally gets larger with increasing water content and with decreasing polymerization. The onset of the glass transition in hydrous samples also occurs below the Dulong-Petit limit of 3R/g atom. We see little change in liquid heat capacity with increasing water content; hydrous liquid heat capacities are within 3-6% of the dry liquid, at low temperatures just above the glass transition. However, dry liquids show a decrease in heat capacity with increasing temperature above the glass transition, from supercooled to superliquidus temperatures. Liquid heat capacity values just above the glass transition range between 95-100 J/mol K, whereas liquid heat capacity values at superliquidus temperatures are between 85-91 J/mol K. Comparison with other studies of the heat capacity of hydrous glasses and liquids shows that the liquid heat capacity of strongly depolymerized samples (NBO/T ≥ 0.8) increases with increasing water content, whereas depolymerized samples (0.4 ≤ NBO/T ≤ 0.8) or polymerized samples (NBO/T ≤ 0.4) generally show little change or a moderate decrease in liquid heat capacity with increasing water content.

  6. Heat Capacity, Body Temperature, and Hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Even when air and water are at the same temperature, water will "feel" distinctly colder to us. This difference is due to the much higher heat capacity of water than of air. Offered here is an interesting life science application of water's high heat capacity and its serious implications for the maintenance of body temperature and the prevention of hypothermia in warm-blooded animals.

  7. Total antioxidant capacity of the Korean diet

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Hye-Jin; Cho, Mi Ran; Chang, Namsoo; Kim, Yuri; Oh, Se-Young

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to measure and/or estimate the total antioxidant capacity of the Korean diet. MATERIALS/METHODS Eighty-one plant foods that were expected to exhibit rather high antioxidant activities were selected from the Korean diet using the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey (KNHANES V). These foods were categorized into 11 food groups: cereals, potatoes, legumes, nuts, vegetables, kimchies, mushrooms, fruits, fruit juices, sea weeds, and oils. The foods were mixed in the proportions specified in traditional Korean recipes and analyzed. The measured indicators for antioxidant capacities were total phenolics, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). RESULTS Total phenolics were high in the fruit juices, nuts, vegetables, and fruits; and the average DPPH, ORAC, and TEAC values were high in the vegetables, fruits, fruit juices, and nuts. The correlation coefficient between the content of total phenolics of each food and the in vitro antioxidant capacity was relatively high at 0.851. The intake of total phenolics per capita per day in the Republic of Korea was estimated to be 127 mg. The total dietary antioxidant capacity (TDAC) values, which were obtained from the total antioxidant capacity of each food, taking into account the intake of each food, were 20,763, 54,335, and 876.4 µmol of Trolox equivalents using the DPPH, ORAC, and TEAC methods, respectively. The food group that contributed the most to the Korean TDAC was cereals at 39.7%, followed by fruits and vegetables at 27.8% and 13.9%, respectively. The contribution of legumes, nuts, fruit juices, and mushrooms was quite minimal at less than 2% each. CONCLUSIONS The content of total phenolics and the antioxidant capacity of the Korean diet are significantly correlated and the high contributing food groups are cereals, fruits, and vegetables. PMID:24741403

  8. Heat capacity in weakly correlated liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Khrustalyov, Yu. V.; Vaulina, O. S.; Koss, X. G.

    2012-12-15

    Previously unavailable numerical data related to the heat capacity in two- and three-dimensional liquid Yukawa systems are obtained by means of fluctuation theory. The relations between thermal conductivity and diffusion constants are numerically studied and discussed. New approximation for heat capacity dependence on non-ideality parameter for weakly correlated systems of particles is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing theoretical and numerical data is discussed.

  9. Adaptability of the oxidative capacity of motoneurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a chronic change in neuronal activation can produce a change in soma oxidative capacity, suggesting that: (i) these 2 variables are directly related in neurons and (ii) ion pumping is an important energy requiring activity of a neuron. Most of these studies, however, have focused on reduced activation levels of sensory systems. In the present study the effect of a chronic increase or decrease in motoneuronal activity on motoneuron oxidative capacity and soma size was studied. In addition, the effect of chronic axotomy was studied as an indicator of whether cytoplasmic volume may also be related to the oxidative capacity of motoneurons. A quantitative histochemical assay for succinate dehydrogenase activity was used as a measure of motoneuron oxidative capacity in experimental models in which chronic electromyography has been used to verify neuronal activity levels. Spinal transection reduced, and spinal isolation virtually eliminated lumbar motoneuron electrical activity. Functional overload of the plantaris by removal of its major synergists was used to chronically increase neural activity of the plantaris motor pool. No change in oxidative capacity or soma size resulted from either a chronic increase or decrease in neuronal activity level. These data indicate that the chronic modulation of ionic transport and neurotransmitter turnover associated with action potentials do not induce compensatory metabolic responses in the metabolic capacity of the soma of lumbar motoneurons. Soma oxidative capacity was reduced in the axotomized motoneurons, suggesting that a combination of axoplasmic transport, intracellular biosynthesis and perhaps neurotransmitter turnover represent the major energy demands on a motoneuron. While soma oxidative capacity may be closely related to neural activity in some neural systems, e.g. visual and auditory, lumbar motoneurons appear to be much less sensitive to modulations in chronic activity levels.

  10. 25 CFR 168.5 - Grazing capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grazing capacity. 168.5 Section 168.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.5 Grazing capacity. (a) The Area Director shall prescribe the maximum number of each kind of livestock which may be grazed on...

  11. The heat capacity of titanium disilicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sylla, W. K.; Stillman, S. E.; Sabella, M. S.; Cotts, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    The heat capacity of TiSi2 has been measured in the temperature range 105-500 K. The heat capacity of TiSi2 varies monotonically between temperatures of 100 and 500 K with a reference value of 22.0 +/- 0.2 J/g atom K at 298.15 K. Based upon our heat capacity data, the standard molar entropy of TiSi2 at 298.15 K estimated to be 22.2 +/- 0.8 J/g atom K. Our data support estimates of the higher temperature heat capacity of TiSi2 based upon previously measured heat capacities of different, but similar, substances. A number of TiSi2 samples were prepared by rapidly quenching (greater than 10(exp 5) K/s) from the melt. The structure and the measured heat capacity of these samples were similar to those of well annealed samples, underscoring the thermal stability of this material.

  12. Groundwater environmental capacity and its evaluation index.

    PubMed

    Xing, Li Ting; Wu, Qiang; Ye, Chun He; Ye, Nan

    2010-10-01

    To date, no unified and acknowledged definition or well-developed evaluation index system of groundwater environment capacity can be found in the academia at home or abroad. The article explores the meaning of water environment capacity, and analyzes the environmental effects caused by the exploitation of groundwater resources. This research defines groundwater environmental capacity as a critical value in terms of time and space, according to which the groundwater system responds to the external influences within certain goal constraint. On the basis of observing the principles of being scientific, dominant, measurable, and applicable, six level 1 evaluation indexes and 11 constraint factors are established. Taking Jinan spring region for a case study, this research will adopt groundwater level and spring flow as constraint factors, and the allowable groundwater yield as the critical value of groundwater environmental capacity, prove the dynamic changeability and its indicating function of groundwater environmental capacity through calculation, and finally point out the development trends of researches on groundwater environmental capacity. PMID:19763854

  13. Capacity Value of Wind Power - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.; Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Dent, C.; Keane, A.

    2010-01-01

    Power systems are planned such that they have adequate generation capacity to meet the load, according to a defined reliability target. The increase in the penetration of wind generation in recent years has led to a number of challenges for the planning and operation of power systems. A key metric for generation system adequacy is the capacity value of generation. The capacity value of a generator is the contribution that a given generator makes to generation system aequacy. The variable and stochastic nature of wind sets it apart from conventional energy sources. As a result, the modeling of wind generation in the same manner as conventional generation for capacity value calculations is inappropriate. In this paper a preferred method for calculation of the capacity value of wind is described and a discussion of the pertinent issues surrounding it is given. Approximate methods for the calculation are also described with their limitations highlighted. The outcome of recent wind capacity value analyses in Europe and North America, along with some new analysis, are highlighted with a discussion of relevant issues also given.

  14. Coping capacity among women with abusive partners.

    PubMed

    Nurius, P S; Furrey, J; Berliner, L

    1992-01-01

    Coping capacity, although increasingly implicated as a mediating force in how individuals respond to personal threat, is an underrecognized factor in work with women of abusive partners. To explore the utility of coping capacity as a multivariable set to guide intervention with women of abusive partners, findings are reported comparing four groups of women: those whose partners do not engage in abuse, are abusive toward them, are sex offenders of children for whom the woman is a parent, or are offenders of children for whom the woman is not a parent. Three variable sets were included: vulnerability factors that may negatively influence appraisals of threat and ability to cope with abuse; coping responses that include cognitive, emotional, and behavioral reactions to the abuse; and coping resources expected to mediate effects of vulnerability factors and to influence the mobilization (of lack thereof) of coping responses. There were significant differences in coping capacity profiles across the four groups. These appeared to be a continuum of coping capacity, with women who were most directly threatened showing the lowest and women who were least directly threatened showing the highest levels of coping capacity. In order from the lowest to the highest levels of coping capacity were (1) battered women, (2) women whose partners are offenders against their children, (3) women whose partners are offenders against children of whom they are not the parent, and (4) control group women. The paper ends with a conceptual interpretation of the mediating functions of coping resources and implications for intervention and further study.

  15. Working Memory Capacity as a Dynamic Process

    PubMed Central

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Perone, Sammy

    2013-01-01

    A well-known characteristic of working memory (WM) is its limited capacity. The source of such limitations, however, is a continued point of debate. Developmental research is positioned to address this debate by jointly identifying the source(s) of limitations and the mechanism(s) underlying capacity increases. Here we provide a cross-domain survey of studies and theories of WM capacity development, which reveals a complex picture: dozens of studies from 50 papers show nearly universal increases in capacity estimates with age, but marked variation across studies, tasks, and domains. We argue that the full pattern of performance cannot be captured through traditional approaches emphasizing single causes, or even multiple separable causes, underlying capacity development. Rather, we consider WM capacity as a dynamic process that emerges from a unified cognitive system flexibly adapting to the context and demands of each task. We conclude by enumerating specific challenges for researchers and theorists that will need to be met in order to move our understanding forward. PMID:23335902

  16. Methodology and Method and Apparatus for Signaling with Capacity Optimized Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsoum, Maged F. (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Design Methodology and Method and Apparatus for Signaling with Capacity Optimized Constellation Abstract Communication systems are described that use geometrically PSK shaped constellations that have increased capacity compared to conventional PSK constellations operating within a similar SNR band. The geometrically shaped PSK constellation is optimized based upon parallel decoding capacity. In many embodiments, a capacity optimized geometrically shaped constellation can be used to replace a conventional constellation as part of a firmware upgrade to transmitters and receivers within a communication system. In a number of embodiments, the geometrically shaped constellation is optimized for an Additive White Gaussian Noise channel or a fading channel. In numerous embodiments, the communication uses adaptive rate encoding and the location of points within the geometrically shaped constellation changes as the code rate changes.

  17. Capacity factor analysis for evaluating water and sanitation infrastructure choices for developing communities.

    PubMed

    Bouabid, Ali; Louis, Garrick E

    2015-09-15

    40% of the world's population lacks access to adequate supplies of water and sanitation services to sustain human health. In fact, more than 780 million people lack access to safe water supplies and about 2.5 billion people lack access to basic sanitation. Appropriate technology for water supply and sanitation (Watsan) systems is critical for sustained access to these services. Current approaches for the selection of Watsan technologies in developing communities have a high failure rate. It is estimated that 30%-60% of Watsan installed infrastructures in developing countries are not operating. Inappropriate technology is a common explanation for the high rate of failure of Watsan infrastructure, particularly in lower-income communities (Palaniappan et al., 2008). This paper presents the capacity factor analysis (CFA) model, for the assessment of a community's capacity to manage and sustain access to water supply and sanitation services. The CFA model is used for the assessment of a community's capacity to operate, and maintain a municipal sanitation service (MSS) such as, drinking water supply, wastewater and sewage treatment, and management of solid waste. The assessment of the community's capacity is based on seven capacity factors that have been identified as playing a key role in the sustainability of municipal sanitation services in developing communities (Louis, 2002). These capacity factors and their constituents are defined for each municipal sanitation service. Benchmarks and international standards for the constituents of the CFs are used to assess the capacity factors. The assessment of the community's capacity factors leads to determine the overall community capacity level (CCL) to manage a MSS. The CCL can then be used to assist the community in the selection of appropriate Watsan technologies for their MSS needs. The selection is done from Watsan technologies that require a capacity level to operate them that matches the assessed CCL of the

  18. Capacity indicators for disaster preparedness in hospitals within Nairobi County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Simiyu, Cynthia Nekesa; Odhiambo-Otieno, George; Okero, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess hospital capacity for disaster preparedness within Nairobi County. This information would be valuable to institutional strategists to resolve weaknesses and reinforce strengths in hospital capacity hence ensure efficient and effective service delivery during disasters. Analytical cross-sectional research design was used. Indicator variables for capacity were hospital equipment, hospital infrastructure, surrounding hospital environment, training, drills, staff knowledge and staff capabilities. Thirty two hospitals were studied of which nine of them were public hospitals. Data analysis was done using SPSS and presented in the form of frequency tables at p < 0.05. Study results indicated that hospital capacity to disaster preparedness in Nairobi County existed in 22 (68.88%) hospitals, in 6 (64.95%) public hospitals and 16 (69.64%) private hospitals. The difference in capacity between public and private hospitals within the County was less than 5%. This showed that both public and private hospitals were relatively at par, with regard to the capacity to handle disaster cases. Study findings also revealed that the surrounding hospital environment was the most highly rated indicator while inter hospital training and drills were the least rated. Although existent in hospitals within Nairobi County, for maximum hospital capacity and disaster preparedness within Nairobi County to be achieved, the existent gap in inter hospital training and inter hospital drills, both of which fall under the finance health systems pillar, required addressing.

  19. Capacity indicators for disaster preparedness in hospitals within Nairobi County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Simiyu, Cynthia Nekesa; Odhiambo-Otieno, George; Okero, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess hospital capacity for disaster preparedness within Nairobi County. This information would be valuable to institutional strategists to resolve weaknesses and reinforce strengths in hospital capacity hence ensure efficient and effective service delivery during disasters. Analytical cross-sectional research design was used. Indicator variables for capacity were hospital equipment, hospital infrastructure, surrounding hospital environment, training, drills, staff knowledge and staff capabilities. Thirty two hospitals were studied of which nine of them were public hospitals. Data analysis was done using SPSS and presented in the form of frequency tables at p < 0.05. Study results indicated that hospital capacity to disaster preparedness in Nairobi County existed in 22 (68.88%) hospitals, in 6 (64.95%) public hospitals and 16 (69.64%) private hospitals. The difference in capacity between public and private hospitals within the County was less than 5%. This showed that both public and private hospitals were relatively at par, with regard to the capacity to handle disaster cases. Study findings also revealed that the surrounding hospital environment was the most highly rated indicator while inter hospital training and drills were the least rated. Although existent in hospitals within Nairobi County, for maximum hospital capacity and disaster preparedness within Nairobi County to be achieved, the existent gap in inter hospital training and inter hospital drills, both of which fall under the finance health systems pillar, required addressing. PMID:25574325

  20. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21-31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18-75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.