Science.gov

Sample records for outer space testing

  1. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future. PMID:24875665

  2. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-05-30

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future.

  3. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-05-01

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future.

  4. Abrasion Testing of Candidate Outer Layer Fabrics for Lunar EVA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program, the space suit outer layer fabrics were badly abraded after just a few Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). For example, the Apollo 12 commander reported abrasive wear on the boots, which penetrated the outer layer fabric into the thermal protection layers after less than eight hours of surface operations. Current plans for the Constellation Space Suit Element require the space suits to support hundreds of hours of EVA on the Lunar surface, creating a challenge for space suit designers to utilize materials advances made over the last forty years and improve upon the space suit fabrics used in the Apollo program. A test methodology has been developed by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division for establishing comparative abrasion wear characteristics between various candidate space suit outer layer fabrics. The abrasion test method incorporates a large rotary drum tumbler with rocks and loose lunar simulant material to induce abrasion in fabric test cylinder elements, representative of what might occur during long term planetary surface EVAs. Preliminary materials screening activities were conducted to determine the degree of wear on representative space suit outer layer materials and the corresponding dust permeation encountered between subsequent sub -layers of thermal protective materials when exposed to a simulated worst case eight hour EVA. The test method was used to provide a preliminary evaluation of four candidate outer layer fabrics for future planetary surface space suit applications. This Paper provides a review of previous abrasion studies on space suit fabrics, details the methodologies used for abrasion testing in this particular study, and shares the results and conclusions of the testing.

  5. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  6. Welcome to Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This video gives a brief history of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, current missions and what the future may hold. Scenes includes various planets in the solar system, robotic exploration of space, discussions on the Hubble Space Telescope, the source of life, and solar winds. This video was narrated by Jodie Foster. Animations include: close-up image of the Moon; close-up images of the surface of Mars; robotic exploration of Mars; the first mapping assignment of Mars; animated views of Jupiter; animated views of Saturn; and views of a Giant Storm on Neptune called the Great Dark Spot.

  7. Outer Space Traffic Safety Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2013-09-01

    Management of traffic in outer space is a major safety problem. Traffic is increasing. Most satellites are navigable but they have to co-exist with space debris which is not navigable. We need minimum safety rules for outer space traffic. We have the possible beginnings of international safety standards in the form of national space object tracking; Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) standardization through ICAO and the International Committee on GNSS (ICG); the IADC space debris guidelines; and the proposed Code of Conduct. However, safety could be improved by standards for such activities as licensing launches of satellites into outer space; standards for accident investigation and search and rescue: operational safety zones around space objects such as the International Space Station. This paper describes legal authority for minimum safety standards. It considers safety standards established by private agreements among commercial operators. Finally it examines a number of options for an international forum to establish safety standards, including self-regulation, COPUOS, ICAO, ITU, a space code of conduct, and a new space organization.

  8. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  9. Chicago Meets Outer Space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The symposium included personal appearances by NASA astronauts, NASA exhibits, souvenir photos for each student attending the symposium, live demonstrations of how the Communication Technology Satellite links the U. S. with people around the world, and talks on job opportunities in aerospace and on the benefits of space. Monday through Friday, the program was directed mainly at (public, parochial and private) student groups, each of which spent a half day on the CSU campus to participate in the symposium activities. On Saturday and Sunday, the symposium was open to the general public and consisted of the NASA exhibits, films, a shorter version of the lectures and a special demonstration and tasting opportunity of space food meal systems. These quick meal systems that were designed for senior citizens.

  10. Prevention of the Outer Space Weaponization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Gennady P.

    2002-01-01

    9 states. The satellites of various functions (early warning, communication, data acquisition, reconnaissance and navigation) were actively used and continue to be used with the purposes of raising efficiency of ground armed forces, especially in fight against international terrorism. At the same time such satellites are not a weapon in the sense of that word since they do not create the threats of armed attack in outer space or from outer space. Moreover, they promote maintaining of stability in the international relations. For this reason the reconnaissance and data acquisition satellites used for the verification of observance by States of the arms limitation agreements are under international protection as national technical means of the control. Similar protection is enjoyed by the early warning satellites. With the help of space communication facilities the more reliable operative connection of the statesmen is organized in the strained situations. By this way the probability of making of the incorrect retaliatory decisions in critical political situations is reduced. At the same time it's necessary to take into consideration that the activities of such satellite systems are tightly connected with ground armed forces of the states. the earth, what from the point of view of international law may be qualified as establishing a partial demilitarization regime in outer space. After the prohibition of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) and anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons it will be possible to speak about establishing of an international legal regime of complete demilitarization in outer space eliminating any kinds of weapon from outer space. in a peaceful time. weaponization.The main task of this paper is to analyze and to discuss the present binding regime of the outer space deweaponization and particular measures on consolidation and strengthening of this regime. agreements of the Russian Federation and the USA into multilateral Treaties. Such "immunity" would cover

  11. Planet Nine From Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Brown, Michael E.

    2016-10-01

    All known Kuiper belt objects with orbital periods longer than 4,000 years have orbits that are clustered in physical space. Statistically, the chances of such alignment being coincidental are smaller than a hundredth of a percent. In this talk, we show that the observed clustering of Kuiper belt orbits can be explained by a distant, eccentric, Neptune-like planet, whose orbit lies in approximately the same plane as those of the distant Kuiper belt objects, but whose perihelion is 180° away from the perihelia of the minor bodies. In addition to accounting for the observed grouping of orbital trajectories, the existence of such a planet naturally explains the presence of high-perihelion Sedna-like objects, as well as the known collection of high semi-major axis objects with inclinations between 60° and 150°.

  12. Peaceful Use of Outer Space: principles of Japanese Policies on Utilization and Activities in Outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuge, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    " P e aceful use of outer space of outer space.....Principles of exploitation of outer space was passed in the Japanese Diet. It clearly mentioned that any activity of launching space object into outer space and developing launching rocket should be exclusively for peaceful purpose. NASDA was also established based upon the same principles of the public law. Japanese interpretation of Space Treaty and other related international agreements has been more strict on peaceful use of outer space, like non-military use rather than non-aggressive, because of influence of Japanese Constitution. Treaty and other agreements is analyzed through rapid development of its space activities, technologies and international cooperation with other space powers. Through more than thirty years experiences in space activities in public and private sectors, Japanese domestic laws and policies have not been changed in relation with basic principles. and laws relating to space activities in order to develop new space law and more international cooperation for space utilization rather than military use in new century.

  13. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  14. Dishwasher For Earth Or Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tromble, Jon D.

    1991-01-01

    Dishwashing machine cleans eating utensils in either Earth gravity or zero gravity of outer space. Cycle consists of three phases: filling, washing, and draining. Rotation of tub creates artificial gravity aiding recirculation of water during washing phase in absence of true gravity. Centrifugal air/water separator helps system function in zero gravity. Self-cleaning filter contains interdigitating blades catching solid debris when water flows between them. Later, blades moved back and forth in scissor-like manner to dislodge debris, removed by backflow of water.

  15. Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Outer Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Today we know of 66 moons in our very own Solar System, and many of these have atmospheres and oceans. In addition, the Hubble (optical) Space Telescope has helped us to discover a total of 100 extra-solar planets, i.e., planets going around other suns, including several solar systems. The Chandra (X-ray) Space Telescope has helped us to discover 33 Black Holes. There are some extremely fascinating things out there in our Universe to explore. In order to travel greater distances into our Universe, and to reach planetary bodies in our Solar System in much less time, new and innovative space propulsion systems must be developed. To this end NASA has created the Prometheus Program. When one considers space missions to the outer edges of our Solar System and far beyond, our Sun cannot be relied on to produce the required spacecraft (s/c) power. Solar energy diminishes as the square of the distance from the Sun. At Mars it is only 43% of that at Earth. At Jupiter, it falls off to only 3.6% of Earth's. By the time we get out to Pluto, solar energy is only .066% what it is on Earth. Therefore, beyond the orbit of Mars, it is not practical to depend on solar power for a s/c. However, the farther out we go the more power we need to heat the s/c and to transmit data back to Earth over the long distances. On Earth, knowledge is power. In the outer Solar System, power is knowledge. It is important that the public be made aware of the tremendous space benefits offered by Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and the minimal risk it poses to our environment. This paper presents an overview of the reasons for NEP systems, along with their basic components including the reactor, power conversion units (both static and dynamic), electric thrusters, and the launch safety of the NEP system.

  16. Legal Implications of Military Uses of Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catena, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    -fuelled rocket. Goddard's work coincided with the work of a German scientist Werner Von Braun, (1912-77) who designed the V1 and V2 rocket. The V2 was the first intercontinental ballistic missile. Compared to the V1, the V2 could carry a heavier payload and the range was much longer. Von Braun had originally sketched his ideas to the Germans, that the V2 was an effective design for space travel and it was rejected. After the war the V2 became the foundation to many new technologies and these modifications marked the beginning of the space race. This competition led to space travel, taking men to the moon using the Saturn V rocket, robotic missions to the planets, and into tactical nuclear missiles (Redstone). This also marked the future for such dual-purpose technologies (i.e. military and/or civilian use) and more interestingly it took the design of weapons for space travel to be taken seriously. Arthur C Clarke commented on the possibilities of placing weapons in outer space, `the only defence against the weapons of the future is to prevent them ever being used. The problem is political and not military at all.' Ambassador Peter Jankowitsch, quoting Stockholm International Peace Research Institute in his opening address to COPUOS in Austria 1978, `we must make sure that outer space can be spared the fate of so many human discoveries of previous ages, namely becoming a mere battlefield.' These statements may be analysed by applying the United Nations Charter alongside other international treaties, such as the Outer Space Treaty 1967, the Test Ban Treaty 1963 and the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in conjunction with the new Agreement signed by Russian and the USA. This may assist to highlight and conclude where problems reside whether political, legal, military, or a combination; and the impact for international peace and security.

  17. Outer Space Place: Exploring Space at the Maryland Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, M. W.; Mendez, F.

    1999-05-01

    The Maryland Science Center has been the state's premier vehicle for informal science education for over 20 years. Every day thousands of school children, families, and out-of-state visitors come for fun and come away with ideas, exciting experiences, and an appetite for more information about science. Opened on April 15, 1999, Outer Space Place (OSP) consolidates the Science Center's space exhibits and activities, both new and refurbished. In this paper, we describe OSP, which features SpaceLink, the Crosby Ramsey Memorial Observatory, the Davis Planetarium, Earth Orbit Gallery, and the Hubble Space Telescope National Visitor Center and provides hands-on educational experiences for kids of all ages. We illustrate how astronomers contribute to and educators benefit from OSP. We conclude with concrete suggestions for astronomers and educators who wish to enhance astronomy education in their local areas.

  18. Spend a Day in Outer Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama as stimulating experience for students in aerospace education. The center has the largest collection of space-age hardware assembled under one roof, a Space Flight simulator, a Skylab space station mock-up and many more interesting exhibits. (BR)

  19. Outer space law: A problem of astronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, V.

    1984-01-01

    The theory of space law is discussed from the point of view of similarities and differences between hypothetical space law and current (1932) aviation law. International legal aspects and economic and cultural effects are also addressed.

  20. Homesteading and the creation of property rights in outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheraga, Joel D.

    1986-08-01

    The rapid proliferation of space travel has made the colonization of space and the exploitation of its scarce resources imminent. The development of scarce resources in space has raised serious legal, political and economic questions that must soon be resolved if countries are to coexist peacefully in outer space. This paper examines the problem of defining property rights in outer space. Private property does not yet exist in space. This failure to establish property rights is critical because the scarcity of resources in the absence of ownership will inevitably lead to problems of congestion, inefficiency, and socially undesirable outcomes. A program of homesteading, combined with a competitive bidding system, is presented as an efficient and equitable means of distributing resources in space. The international debate over alternative schemes for allocating resources in space provides an opportunity for students to see the interaction of diverse but related disciplines in the liberal arts.

  1. Assessment of Identity Status in College Women Using Outer Space and Inner Space Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Linda B.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the validity of two approaches to the assessment of female identity status: the standard Outer Space interview used with males, and an Inner Space interview specifically developed for females. Found that, contrary to Erikson's theory, college women form their identities around Outer Space as well as Inner Space issues. (Author/GC)

  2. Dysbiosis and Immune Dysregulation in Outer Space.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Jorge L; Hong, Bo-Young

    2016-01-01

    In space, the lifestyle, relative sterility of spaceship and extreme environmental stresses, such as microgravity and cosmic radiation, can compromise the balance between human body and human microbiome. An astronaut's body during spaceflight encounters increased risk for microbial infections and conditions because of immune dysregulation and altered microbiome, i.e. dysbiosis. This risk is further heightened by increase in virulence of pathogens in microgravity. Health status of astronauts might potentially benefit from maintaining a healthy microbiome by specifically managing their diet on space in addition to probiotic therapies. This review focuses on the current knowledge/understanding of how spaceflight affects human immunity and microbiome.

  3. Humanizing outer space: architecture, habitability, and behavioral health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.

    2010-03-01

    Space architecture is the theory and practice of designing and building environments for humans in outer space. In our present century professional astronauts and cosmonauts will remain a focus for space architects, but new designs must better accommodate passengers (tourists and industrial workers) and settlers who set forth to establish off-world societies. Psychologists and architects can work together to assure good spaceflight behavioral health, defined by a lack of neuropsychiatric dysfunction, and the presence of high levels of personal adjustment, cordial interpersonal relations, and positive interactions with the physical and social environments. By designing and constructing facilities that are occupant centered and activity oriented, architects increase habitability thereby decreasing environmental challenges to behavioral health. Simulators and spaceflight-analogous environments make it possible to test design solutions prior to their deployment in space. This paper concludes with suggestions for increasing collaboration between architects and psychologists. These include increased sharing of hypotheses and data, articulating complementary research styles, and mutual advocacy for early, potent, and sustained involvement in mission planning and execution.

  4. The Law of Neutrality in Outer Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    sont indvitablement influenc6es par la faqon dont les t tats pensent, planifient et m&nent la guerre. Inspir6es par la perspective de saisir F’ultime...Satellite-2B). 3 Both States agreed to provide land images from the satellite to African States along with imagery processing and analysis software with the...Eros-A and Eros- B high-resolution satellites to governments world-wide. In the process , Israel helps defray the cost of its space program by allowing

  5. The possibility of life in outer space.

    PubMed

    Imshenetsky, A A; Abyzov, S S; Voronov, G T; Zhukova, A I; Lysenko, S V

    1966-01-01

    Experiments were carried out dealing with the effect of extreme factors on microorganisms. Methods for microbiological analysis of meteorites were developed. The effect of temperature, from -20 degrees C to +15 degrees C, on trypsine activity was studied. It was shown that at about -3 degrees C a definite intramolecular reorganization occurs in the enzyme, leading to decreased activation energy. Previously reported resistance of microorganisms to high vacuum was confirmed. New species were tested at l0(-8)-10(-9) mm Hg. It was shown that very thin metal and metal oxide films, as well as films from other substances, may fully protect microorganisms from the hazardous effect of UV rays. By using an artificial climate, camera forms of microorganisms were selected which have the highest resistance to the whole complex of Martian climatic factors. Pigmented and spore-forming microorganisms resist UV up to a dose of 4.04 x 10(8) erg/cm2. There are microorganisms on Earth which show some activity in soil at a relative humidity of 0.096-0.196%. Preliminary data permit one to assume the possibility of existence of Earth-like forms on Mars. The majority of meteorites are accessible to Earth microorganisms. While choosing a meteorite for microbiological analysis it is necessary to consider the soil and climatic factors of the country where the latter has been found.

  6. Students’ misconceptions about Newton's second law in outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, B. K.; Yavuz, A.

    2014-07-01

    Students’ misconceptions about Newton's second law in frictionless outer space were investigated. The research was formed according to an epistemic game theoretical framework. The term ‘epistemic’ refers to students’ participation in problem-solving activities as a means of constructing new knowledge. The term ‘game’ refers to a coherent activity that consists of moves and rules. A set of questions in which students are asked to solve two similar Newton's second law problems, one of which is on the Earth and the other in outer space, was administered to 116 undergraduate students. The findings indicate that there is a significant difference between students’ epistemic game preferences and race-type (outer space or frictional surface) question. So students who used Newton's second law on the ground did not apply this law and used primitive reasoning when it came to space. Among these students, voluntary interviews were conducted with 18 students. Analysis of interview transcripts showed that: (1) the term ‘space’ causes spontaneity among students that prevents the use of the law; (2) students hesitate to apply Newton's second law in space due to the lack of a condition—the friction; (3) students feel that Newton's second law is not valid in space for a variety of reasons, but mostly for the fact that the body in space is not in contact with a surface.

  7. Outer Space Medicine and Relevant Ongoing Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, William R.

    1979-01-01

    An update of outer space medicine is given emphasizing main areas such as cardiopulmonary responses, vestibular functions, physiology, weightlessness, ecosystems, and radiation. A prospective view is also presented on the medical problems resulting from various hazards of outer space and planetary missions. Although an outgrowth of aviation and environmental medicine, this relatively new, special branch of medicine is currently undergoing an unprecedented rise as a vital modern specialty. The aims of the United States, Russia, and the nations of Europe in space research are shown to be in accord in learning how to live and work in space when confronted with the unique factors of zero gravity, cosmic radiation, and magnetic variations. PMID:439154

  8. Applications Of Graphite Fluoride Fibers In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheng; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1993-01-01

    Report characterizes graphite fluoride fibers made from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers and discusses some potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers in outer space. Applications include heat-sinking printed-circuit boards, solar concentrators, and absorption of radar waves. Other applications based on exploitation of increased resistance to degradation by atomic oxygen, present in low orbits around Earth.

  9. Outer Space: A Multi-Age, Integrated Subjects Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William D.

    This multi-age integrated teaching unit on outer space was developed by 19 rural teachers (grades K-8) from 12 Gallatin County (Montana) districts to associate all school subjects with a common theme, promote teaching efficiency by focusing on more than one subject at the same time, and increase student excitement. Topics explored by each grade…

  10. Law and politics in outer space: A bibliography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, I. L.; Wilson, C. E.; Vosburgh, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The materials are categorized by specific topics and by types of materials. The sources are books, articles, reports, United Nations materials, U.S. Government documents, etc. Books are listed by geographical areas, and articles are divided into what are considered to be the major space topics. Book and article sections are also divided into English and foreign language entries. A bibliographical essay introduces the literature to those unacquainted with law and politics of outer space.

  11. Manifesto for a Safe and Sustainable Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgobba, T.; Menzel, A.-P.; Jakhu, R.; Pelton, J.

    The human adventure in space is now more than a half century old. A total of about 6000 liftoffs have taken place and some 500 people have flown into space, but in the process a number of fatalities have occurred--both in space and on the ground. Furthermore, space traffic is becoming chaotic and the orbital environment is increasingly polluted by debris. The Technical Committees of the IAASS have spent a great deal of time to develop a “Manifesto” to express the goals and objectives that all space faring countries should collectively embrace to ensure that in future the space adventure will not be brought to a sudden halt by unacceptable risks. This newly launched “Manifesto for Safe and Sustainable Outer Space”, as presented at the end of this article encapsulates the urgent appeal, by concerned space safety scientists, technicians, and legal experts that make up the IAASS, to policy makers and stakeholders around the globe to build consensus around a shared vision of a safe and sustainable space. Over time this Manifesto may be refined and augmented but the six objectives of the Manifesto represent a good starting point for an overdue debate on organizing outer space as a precious global asset.

  12. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  13. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Perlman, Z.; Pearson, N.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV (ultraviolet radiation) is expected to be significantly weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are low. However, cosmic rays and micrometeoroid bombardment would be similar to first order. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from 0.35-5 microns and the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4 to 2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  14. Estimating Relative Positions of Outer-Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balian, Harry; Breckenridge, William; Brugarolas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A computer program estimates the relative position and orientation of two structures from measurements, made by use of electronic cameras and laser range finders on one structure, of distances and angular positions of fiducial objects on the other structure. The program was written specifically for use in determining errors in the alignment of large structures deployed in outer space from a space shuttle. The program is based partly on equations for transformations among the various coordinate systems involved in the measurements and on equations that account for errors in the transformation operators. It computes a least-squares estimate of the relative position and orientation. Sequential least-squares estimates, acquired at a measurement rate of 4 Hz, are averaged by passing them through a fourth-order Butterworth filter. The program is executed in a computer aboard the space shuttle, and its position and orientation estimates are displayed to astronauts on a graphical user interface.

  15. Space Shuttle Orbiter Digital Outer Mold Line Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Wilson, Brad; Pavek, Mike; Berger, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiters Discovery and Endeavor have been digitally scanned to produce post-flight configuration outer mold line surfaces. Very detailed scans of the windward side of these vehicles provide resolution of the detailed tile step and gap geometry, as well as the reinforced carbon carbon nose cap and leading edges. Lower resolution scans of the upper surface provide definition of the crew cabin windows, wing upper surfaces, payload bay doors, orbital maneuvering system pods and the vertical tail. The process for acquisition of these digital scans as well as post-processing of the very large data set will be described.

  16. Legal Provisions Applicable to the Definition of Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorin, T.

    2002-01-01

    Whether it be the adjective "spatial" or the definition "space", these two terms have, in many respects, a non-identifiable dimension, which serves as a reference point for all players in this field, without being concerned with the exact area of application. This is evident from the vast diversity of corporate names, acronyms, logos and other designations that we often use. Among some of the most worldwide common include: NASA, ISS, ESA, and so on. Without of course forgetting , a field which concerns all legal experts and should not be overlooked is "space law". Thus, it is apparent that although the "space" community (i.e. influential and space- minded governments and relevant international authorities) has been involved in this field over the last few decades, no specific and universally-accepted definition has been adopted to date. Apart from certain demands made or unilateral positions taken by a given state particularly concerned by the matter, it is important to underline that the international community has refrained from making legislation in this area, apart from some rather limited or symbolic provisions introduced. This vagueness, in legal terms, should clearly be taken as the assertion of nationalistic demands, but also shows divergence or even antagonism between states fuelled by hypothetical profits, as was the case when attempts were made to establish maritime boundaries. We can thus by now summarise this issue by asking the following question: "Where does outer space begin?" We shall begin by looking at the sketchy legal references that we have at our disposal, which as lawyers we must use to attempt to find a solution to practical commercial or scientific contingencies which we are increasingly confronted with. Such references include the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, Including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies of 10th October 1967, constituting the fundamental space charter

  17. Low-Outgassing Photogrammetry Targets for Use in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Jason N.; Sampler, Henry; Reed, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    A short document discusses an investigation of materials for photogrammetry targets for highly sensitive optical scientific instruments to be operated in outer space and in an outer-space-environment- simulating thermal vacuum chamber on Earth. A key consideration in the selection of photogrammetry-target materials for vacuum environments is the need to prevent contamination that could degrade the optical responses of the instruments. Therefore, in addition to the high levels and uniformity of reflectivity required of photogrammetry-target materials suitable for use in air, the materials sought must exhibit minimal outgassing. Commercially available photogrammetry targets were found to outgas excessively under the thermal and vacuum conditions of interest; this finding prompted the investigators to consider optically equivalent or superior, lower-outgassing alternative target materials. The document lists several materials found to satisfy the requirements, but does not state explicitly whether the materials can be used individually or must be combined in the proper sequence into layered target structures. The materials in question are an aluminized polyimide tape, an acrylic pressure- sensitive adhesive, a 500-A-thick layer of vapor-deposited aluminum, and spherical barium titanate glass beads having various diameters from 20 to 63 microns..

  18. Legal regime of human activities in outer space law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golda, Carlo

    1994-01-01

    Current developments in space activities increasingly involve the presence of humans on board spacecraft and, in the near future, on the Moon, on Mars, on board Space Stations, etc. With respect to these challenges, the political and legal issues connected to the status of astronauts are largely unclear and require a new doctrinal attention. In the same way, many legal and political questions remain open in the structure of future space crews: the need for international standards in the definition and training of astronauts, etc.; but, first of all, an international uniform legal definition of astronauts. Moreover, the legal structure for human life and operations in outer space can be a new and relevant paradigm for the definition of similar rules in all the situations and environments in which humans are involved in extreme frontiers. The present article starts from an overview on the existing legal and political definitions of 'astronauts', moving to the search of a more useful definition. This is followed by an analysis of the concrete problems created by human space activities, and the legal and political responses to them (the need for a code of conduct; the structure of the crew and the existing rules in the US and ex-USSR; the new legal theories on the argument; the definition and structure of a code of conduct; the next legal problems in fields such as privacy law, communications law, business law, criminal law, etc.).

  19. Plasma-Based Detector of Outer-Space Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Brinza, David E.; Henry, Michael D.; Clay, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    A report presents a concept for an instrument to be flown in outer space, where it would detect dust particles - especially those associated with comets. The instrument would include a flat plate that would intercept the dust particles. The anticipated spacecraft/dust-particle relative speeds are so high that the impingement of a dust particle on the plate would generate a plasma cloud. Simple electric dipole sensors located equidistantly along the circumference of the plate would detect the dust particle indirectly by detecting the plasma cloud. The location of the dust hit could be estimated from the timing of the detection pulses of the different dipoles. The mass and composition of the dust particle could be estimated from the shapes and durations of the pulses from the dipoles. In comparison with other instruments for detecting hypervelocity dust particles, the proposed instrument offers advantages of robustness, large collection area, and simplicity.

  20. [Behavior of the cardiovascular system in outer space].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Leal, R

    1987-01-01

    One of the important factors in outer space is the absence of gravity (OG). During longterm missions, this factor is responsible for the larger number of anatomical and physiological changes that astronauts experience. The cardiovascular system undergoes these changes with severe intensity, which is part of an adaptation process to the new environmental conditions. The modifications observed in both the anatomy of the cardiovascular system and its hemodynamics occur in two phases. The first phase begins when the astronauts enter into Earth orbit or in interplanetary trajectory and extends until the second or fourth day of the mission. It is characterized by an important shifting of fluids from the lower extremities to the cephalic regions which produces an increase of the venous return and the preload, the heart rate is increased, the blood volume in the thorax is also increased, the cardiac chambers become dilated, and by reflex action, the antidiuretic hormone diminishes, diuresis increases and leads to a virtual state of dehydration. Clinically, the first stage is manifested by headache, dizziness, space disorientation, nausea, anorexia, projectile vomiting, sweating and pallor. This constalation of data is known as "The Space Adaptation Syndrome". The second phase begins at the end of the first phase and finishes toward the fortieth or fiftieth day of the mission.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Cylindrical Asymmetrical Capacitors for Use in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.

    2007-01-01

    A report proposes that cylindrical asymmetrical capacitors (CACs) be used to generate small thrusts for precise maneuvering of spacecraft on long missions. The report notes that it has been known for decades that when high voltages are applied to CACs in air, thrusts are generated - most likely as a result of ionization of air molecules and acceleration of the ions by the high electric fields. The report goes on to discuss how to optimize the designs of CACs for operation as thrusters in outer space. Components that could be used to enable outerspace operation include a supply of gas and a shroud, partly surrounding a CAC, into which the gas would flow. Other elements of operation and design discussed in the report include variation of applied voltage and/or of gas flow to vary thrust, effects of CAC and shroud dimensions on thrust and weight, some representative electrode configurations, and several alternative designs, including one in which the basic CAC configuration would be modified into something shaped like a conventional rocket engine with converging/diverging nozzle and an anode with gas feed in the space that, in a conventional rocket engine, would be the combustion chamber.

  2. Conceptual Change about Outer Space: How Does Informal Training Combined with Formal Teaching Affect Seventh Graders' Understanding of Gravitation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frappart, Sören; Frède, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Concepts relating to outer space are difficult to grasp because we lack direct experience of this environment. We analysed students' understanding of gravitation on Earth and beyond by testing the effect of training on it. In a pretest (T1), 28 seventh graders answered a questionnaire about space concepts. They all then underwent the same formal…

  3. Reusable Hybrid Propellant Modules for Outer-Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Mankins, John C.

    2005-01-01

    A report summarizes the concept of reusable hybrid propellant modules (HPMs), which would be used in outer space for long-term cryogenic storage of liquefied spacecraft-propellant gases, including for example, oxygen and hydrogen for combustion-based chemical rocket engines and xenon for electric thrusters. The HPM concept would provide the fundamental building block for an efficient, reusable in-space transportation system for both crewed and uncrewed missions. Each HPM would be equipped to implement an advanced zero-boil-off method of managing cryogenic fluids, and would include a fluid-transfer interface comprising standardized fittings that would be compatible with fittings on all supply facilities and on spacecraft to be supplied. The HPM, combined with a chemical or electric orbital transfer spacecraft, would provide an integrated propulsion system. HPMs would supply chemical propellant for time-critical transfers such as crewed missions, and utilize the more efficient electric-propulsion transfer vehicles to transport filled HPMs to the destinations and to return empty HPMs back to near-Earth orbits or other intermediate locations for replenishment and reuse. The HPM prepositioned using electric propulsion would provide the chemical propellant for the crew s return trip in a much more efficient manner than a chemical-only approach. The propellants to fill the HPMs would be delivered from the Earth or other initial supply locations to the intermediate locations by use of automated, compatible spacecraft designed specifically for that purpose. Additionally, multiple HPMs could be aggregated and positioned in orbits and on planets, moons, and asteroids to supply fluids to orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft.

  4. Science, technology and imaginable social and behavioral impacts as outer space develops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Edythe E.; Faiyetole, Ayodele Adekunle

    2014-02-01

    The main body of international law governing outer space, the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, requires that all people benefit from space activities and it mandates equality and sharing of outer space resources for all people from all nations. Yet, only a few experts have the knowledge and information regarding colonization of the final frontier. The space community is eager to engage and involve the global community in the development of outer space. However, people do not seem to have the information needed to make them care about the development of outer space. Most people still seem to view space travel, asteroid mining and other space activities as exotic and far out. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to discuss a unique pedagogical approach to help mend the knowledge gaps and to suggest the possibility of preventing inequality gaps from emerging as outer space is developed. To achieve equality in outer space for future generations, we must begin formulating a contagious desire for knowledge and a universal consciousness regarding newly emerging trends.

  5. Space Electronic Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rodney D.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch at NASA Glenn Research center has the important duty of controlling electronic test engineering services. These services include test planning and early assessment of Space projects, management and/or technical support required to safely and effectively prepare the article and facility for testing, operation of test facilities, and validation/delivery of data to customer. The Space Electronic Test Engineering Branch is assigned electronic test engineering responsibility for the GRC Space Simulation, Microgravity, Cryogenic, and Combustion Test Facilities. While working with the Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch I am working on several different assignments. My primary assignment deals with an electrical hardware unit known as Sunny Boy. Sunny Boy is a DC load Bank that is designed for solar arrays in which it is used to convert DC power form the solar arrays into AC power at 60 hertz to pump back into the electricity grid. However, there are some researchers who decided that they would like to use the Sunny Boy unit in a space simulation as a DC load bank for a space shuttle or even the International Space Station hardware. In order to do so I must create a communication link between a computer and the Sunny Boy unit so that I can preset a few of the limits (such power, set & constant voltage levels) that Sunny Boy will need to operate using the applied DC load. Apart from this assignment I am also working on a hi-tech circuit that I need to have built at a researcher s request. This is a high voltage analog to digital circuit that will be used to record data from space ion propulsion rocket booster tests. The problem that makes building this circuit so difficult is that it contains high voltage we must find a way to lower the voltage signal before the data is transferred into the computer to be read. The solution to this problem was to transport the signal using infrared light which will lower

  6. Testing weapons in space

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, A.B.

    1989-07-01

    The Antiballistic-Missile Treaty seems to forbid the testing of ABM weapons in space, but the US has pushed for a broad interpretation of the language. Would a more permissive regime really serve US interests This paper reviews the rationale of the treaty's provisions to help answer this question. Four modes of testing a space weapon are treated differently by the ABM treaty: (1) an orbiting weapon intercepts a ballistic weapon is flight; (2) intercepting weapon is launched on a suborbital flight; (3) both weapon and target are placed in space; and (4) orbiting weapon is aimed at an aircraft in flight or a target on the ground. Three approaches to negotiating an agreement to limit testing weapons in space are discussed. They differ in the strictness of the limits.

  7. Maintaining outer space for peaceful purposes through international cooperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, George E.; Thacher, David J.; Kupperman, Helen S.

    1988-01-01

    NASA activities in support of international cooperation in space exploration and exploitation are briefly reviewed, with a focus on their compatibility with UN treaties. Particular attention is given to the provisions of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 and other applicable legislation, the over 1000 bilateral and international agreements NASA has entered into since 1958, international participation in currently ongoing NASA projects (Hubble Space Telescope, Galileo, Ulysses, Rosat, the D-2 Spacelab mission), and plans for the International Space Station.

  8. Survival of rock-colonizing organisms after 1.5 years in outer space.

    PubMed

    Onofri, Silvano; de la Torre, Rosa; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Ott, Sieglinde; Zucconi, Laura; Selbmann, Laura; Scalzi, Giuliano; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J; Rabbow, Elke; Sánchez Iñigo, Francisco J; Horneck, Gerda

    2012-05-01

    Cryptoendolithic microbial communities and epilithic lichens have been considered as appropriate candidates for the scenario of lithopanspermia, which proposes a natural interplanetary exchange of organisms by means of rocks that have been impact ejected from their planet of origin. So far, the hardiness of these terrestrial organisms in the severe and hostile conditions of space has not been tested over extended periods of time. A first long-term (1.5 years) exposure experiment in space was performed with a variety of rock-colonizing eukaryotic organisms at the International Space Station on board the European EXPOSE-E facility. Organisms were selected that are especially adapted to cope with the environmental extremes of their natural habitats. It was found that some-but not all-of those most robust microbial communities from extremely hostile regions on Earth are also partially resistant to the even more hostile environment of outer space, including high vacuum, temperature fluctuation, the full spectrum of extraterrestrial solar electromagnetic radiation, and cosmic ionizing radiation. Although the reported experimental period of 1.5 years in space is not comparable with the time spans of thousands or millions of years believed to be required for lithopanspermia, our data provide first evidence of the differential hardiness of cryptoendolithic communities in space.

  9. Mutagenesis by outer space parameters other than cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda; Rabbow, Elke

    We have studied the ability of microorganisms to cope with the complex interplay of the parameters of space in experiments in low Earth orbit and using space simulation facilities on ground. Emphasis was laid on space parameters other than cosmic rays. The studies are directed towards understanding prebiotic chemical evolution and biological evolution processes, and interplanetary transfer of life. Effects of space vacuum: Space experiments have shown that up to 70% of bacterial and fungal spores survived short-term exposure to space vacuum. The chances of survival in space were increased when spores were embedded in chemical protectants such as sugars, or salt crystals, or when they were exposed in multilayer. During the six years lasting LDEF mission up to 80% of bacterial spores survived exposure to space vacuum. A 10-fold increased mutation rate over the spontaneous rate has been observed in spores of Bacillus subtilis after exposure to space vacuum, which is probably based on a unique molecular signature of tandem-double base change at restricted sites in the DNA. In addition, DNA strand breaks have been observed to be induced by vacuum treatment. Effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation: Solar UV radiation has been found to be the most deleterious factor of space. The reason for this is the highly energetic UV-C and vacuum UV radiation that is directly absorbed by the DNA and which induces specific photoproducts in the DNA that are highly mutagenic and lethal. The damaging effect of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was even aggravated, when the spores were simultaneously exposed to both, solar UV radiation and space vacuum. In order to investigate the mutagenic potential of solar UV radiation, DNA of the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19 was exposed to selected wavebands of UV radiation (from vacuum UV to UV-A) by use of a solar simulator and space simulation facilities. Action spectra revealed that for vacuum UV different kinds of photochemical damage

  10. Results of studies on long-term exposition of dormant forms of various organisms in outer space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Nataliya; Gusev, Oleg; Sugimoto, Manabu; Deshevaya, Elena; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Okuda, Takashi; Orlov, Oleg; Alekseev, Victor; Poddubko, Svetlana; Polikarpov, Nikolay

    The planetary quarantine is one of the key problems of deep space exploration. Risks of the possible transfer of biological objects across interplanetary space should be necessarily assessed during space exploration. The risks associated with a possible transfer of biological objects and primarily microorganisms in interplanetary space is a priority for space studies We can assume, that on the exterior side of both unmanned and manned space stations there can be millions of microbial cells, many of which are in spore forms, the stability of which towards the unfavorable factors is extremely high. However, direct evidence to support this assumption, obtained only in recent years. “Biorisk” is an apparatus designed for conduction of space experiments focused on long-term exposition of latent stages of different forms of organism on the outer side of Russian Segment of International Space Station was developed and used in SSC RF - Institute for Biomedical Problems RAS. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the principle capability of preservation of life capacity in test-cultures of microorganisms during long-term exposure (comparable with the term of interplanetary flight) in space. The first experiment was performed using spores of bacteria (Bacillus) and fungi (Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladosporium) housed in 3 boxes that were exposed to outer space for 7, 12 or 18 months. It was for the first time demonstrated that bacterial and fungal spores could survive an exposure to outer space during the time period comparable with the duration of a return mission to Mars. Moreover, the microbial strains proved viable and highly active. The second experiment was expanded by flying, in addition to the above spores, dormant forms of higher plants, insects, lower crustaceans and vertebrates. The 31-month experiment showed that, in spite of harsher than in the first study temperatures, some specimens remained viable and capable of further multiplication. In

  11. Composing a model of outer space through virtual experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Julieta C.

    2015-03-01

    This paper frames issues of trans-scalar perception in visualization, reflecting on the limits of the human senses, particularly those which are related to space, and describe planetarium shows, presentations, and exhibit experiences of spatial immersion and interaction in real time.

  12. Behavior of stem cells under outer-space microgravity and ground-based microgravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Jinfu

    2015-06-01

    With rapid development of space engineering, research on life sciences in space is being conducted extensively, especially cellular and molecular studies on space medicine. Stem cells, undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells, are considered a key resource for regenerative medicine. Research on stem cells under conditions of microgravity during a space flight or a ground-based simulation has generated several excellent findings. To help readers understand the effects of outer space and ground-based simulation conditions on stem cells, we reviewed recent studies on the effects of microgravity (as an obvious environmental factor in space) on morphology, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of stem cells.

  13. Test spaces and characterizations of quadratic spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij

    1996-10-01

    We show that a test space consisting of nonzero vectors of a quadratic space E and of the set all maximal orthogonal systems in E is algebraic iff E is Dacey or, equivalently, iff E is orthomodular. In addition, we present another orthomodularity criteria of quadratic spaces, and using the result of Solèr, we show that they can imply that E is a real, complex, or quaternionic Hilbert space.

  14. [Analysis of the 4th generation outer space bred Angelica dahurica by FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-ying; Wu, Peng-le; Liu, Mei-yi; Wang, Zhi-zhou; Guo, Xi-hua; Guan, Ying

    2012-03-01

    The major components of the 4th generation outer space bred angelica and the ground group were determined and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and second derivative spectrum, considering the large mutation of the plants with space mutagenesis. The results show that the content of the coumarin (1741 cm(-1)), which is the main active components of the space angelica dahurica increased, and the content of the protein (1 459, 1 419 cm(-1)) and the fat (930 cm(-1)) increased slightly, whereas the content of the starch and the dietary fiber reduced drastically. There are obvious differences between the peak values of the second derivative spectra of the plants, revealing that the outer space angelica dahurica contained amine component at 1 279 cm(-1). Space mutation breeding is favor of breeding angelica with better idiosyncrasy.

  15. Outer Space Research Helps Color Habitability in Earth Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1977-01-01

    Color is one of the most important elements in making an environment habitable. Both color and light level combine to create comfortable and efficient work areas and satisfying leisure time environments. Indeed, without light, color cannot even be experienced. It is vitally important for the designer to understand the subject of habitability and to know how to make a positive impact upon the habitability of spaces through the application of proven principles of color-design developed by the scientific community. Consider some of these possibilities and pitfalls: A color chosen in broad daylight will not appear the same under dim lighting conditions. If a designer were creating a dimly lit cocktail lounge, for example, there is little sense in using dark colors, which also tend to be more expensive. When the eyes have dark-adapted for even five minutes, any color reflecting 20 percent or less will appear black, and the color experience will be lost. Therefore, surface reflectances should be kept at least above 20 to 25 percent to maintain color where illumination is at low levels. In effect, for lower reflectance surfaces, higher levels of illumination are required to produce the most accurate color discriminability.

  16. Outer Space...Calling All Readers. 1991 Summer Reading Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Cultural Resources, Raleigh. Div. of State Library.

    This manual provides guidelines and materials for librarians planning a summer reading program for children in North Carolina on the theme of outer space. An evaluation form to be returned to the State Library of North Carolina at the end of the summer is included. The introduction includes discussions of summer reading materials and programs;…

  17. DOD Space Test Program (STP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Llwyn

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Space Test Program (STP) which provides access to space for the DOD-wide space research and development (R&D) community. STP matches a ranked list of sanctioned experiments with available budgets and searches for the most cost effective mechanisms to get the experiments into space. The program has successfully flown over 350 experiments, using dedicated freeflyer spacecraft, secondary space on the Space Shuttle, and various host satellites.

  18. Space Environmental Testing at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of space environmental testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The contents include: 1) Solar Absorptance measurements; 2) Emittance measurements; 3) Transient Calorimetric Technique; 4) Electrostatic charge testing; 5) UV degradation testing; 6) Solar Wind Facility; and 7) Solar Wind testing.

  19. Viability of barley seeds after long-term exposure to outer side of international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Ishii, Makoto; Mori, Izumi C.; Elena, Shagimardanova; Gusev, Oleg A.; Kihara, Makoto; Hoki, Takehiro; Sychev, Vladimir N.; Levinskikh, Margarita A.; Novikova, Natalia D.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.

    2011-09-01

    Barley seeds were exposed to outer space for 13 months in a vented metal container without a climate control system to assess the risk of physiological and genetic mutation during long-term storage in space. The space-stored seeds (S0 generation), with an 82% germination rate in 50 seeds, lost about 20% of their weight after the exposure. The germinated seeds showed normal growth, heading, and ripening. The harvested seeds (S1 generation) also germinated and reproduced (S2 generation) as did the ground-stored seeds. The culm length, ear length, number of seed, grain weight, and fertility of the plants from the space-stored seeds were not significantly different from those of the ground-stored seeds in each of the S0 and S1 generation. Furthermore, the S1 and S2 space-stored seeds respectively showed similar β-glucan content to those of the ground-stored seeds. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis with 16 primer combinations showed no specific fragment that appears or disappears significantly in the DNA isolated from the barley grown from the space-stored seeds. Though these data are derived from nine S0 space-stored seeds in a single exposure experiment, the results demonstrate the preservation of barley seeds in outer space for 13 months without phenotypic or genotypic changes and with healthy and vigorous growth in space.

  20. A LAMP-based schematic prototype instrument for detection of microorganisms in human outer space activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongfei; Liu, Zhiheng; Li, Junxiong; Zhu, Baoli

    One of the main tasks of human outer space exploration is to detect signs of life. Based on meteoritic evidence, common ancestry hypothesis has been posed. Therefore, searching for the fundamental molecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) that constitute life as we know on Earth is feasible and now the typical approach. To achieve this goal, portable, robust, and highly sensitive instrument is also needed. In this study, based on Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique that targets life information storage molecular, DNA, we designed a schematic prototype instrument for microorganism detection. First, we designed LAMP primers used for amplification of DNA markers of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungus; then, we optimized the LAMP reaction system for space using; and finally, we designed a prototype instrument and operating software system that are compatible with the LAMP reaction system. The results of simulation experiments showed that our instrument performed well for detecting representative microorganisms and the device can achieve semi-automatization. The detection process, from sample preparation to signal visualization, was completed in 1.5 hour. Our study provides a new method and corresponding device for detection of DNA molecular, which has great potential for applications in outer space exploration. Besides, the instrument we designed can also been used for monitoring changes of terrestrial microorganisms in outer space, for example in aircraft.

  1. The sleeping chironomid: an insect survived 18 months of exposure to outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Oleg; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Sychev, Vladimir; Novikova, Nataliya; Sugimoto, Manabu; Malyutina, Ludmila; Kikawada, Takahiro; Okuda, Takashi

    Anhydrobiosis is an ametabolic state of life entered by an organism in response to desiccation. There are only few groups of higher invertebrates capable to survival complete water loss. An African chironomid Polypedilum vanderpalnki is the only anhydrobiotic insect. Larvae of this sleeping chironomid living in temporary pools in semi-arid areas on the African continent become completely desiccated upon drought, but can revive after water becomes available upon the next rain. Dry larvae can revive after several decades of anhydrobiosis and show cross-resistance to different environmental stresses, including temperature fluctuation, high doses of ionizing radiation and organic solvents. This enormous resistance of the sleeping chironomid to extreme environments points to the high probability of their survival and transfer across outer space and makes this species promising model organism for astrobiological studies. In period from 2005 to 2010 the sleeping chironomid was utilized as a model organism in experiments on resistance of resting stages of invertebrates to space environment both inside of ISS ("Aquarium" research program) and on the outer side of ISS ("Biorisk-2" and "EXPOSE-R" experiments) . In the present report we mainly focus on results of "Biorisk-2" experiment where there containers with anhydrobiotic larvae were continuously exposed to outer space environment. Container 1 (FC1) remained exposed to outer space for 405 days (from June 6, 2007 to July 15, 2008), Container 2 (FC2) for 566 days (from June 6, 2007 to December 23, 2008), and Container 3 (FC3) is expected to be returning to the Earth later this year. First analysis of the larvae from the first two containers FC1 and FC2 showed that the sleeping chironomid have succesfully survived the continous space exposure comparable with duration of interpanetary spaceflight and recovered both biomolecules and cells complexes upon rehydration

  2. Dual-Use Concept on Civil and Defense Uses of Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Yasuo; Ohkami, Yoshiaki; Naohiko Kohtake; Sakurai, Tomoaki

    The outer space utilizations play a vital role for both civil and defense fields. As for Japan, after the Basic Space Law was enacted, the new utilizations and R&D of space are promoted to enforce the national security. Under the circumstances, Dual-Use has become an important concept. However, the past studies were often focused on the technologies themselves which could be used for both civil and defense purposes as well. This paper deals with Japanese space policy, focuses on the Dual-Use concept on civil and defense uses and developments of outer space. First, the meaning of Dual-Use concept and the effectiveness of the system would be defined, and the key aspects such as data policy for integrating the dual system were dissected. Then, the operational configurations and retaining Dual-Use system were suggested, and early warning satellite system and space situational awareness project as the concrete applications of Dual-Use system would be discussed.

  3. Stress analysis and testing of the outer capsule design for the Strontium Heat Source Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, F.A.; Shippell, R.J. Jr.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Strontium Heat Source Development Program is to obtain the data needed to license /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat sources - specifically the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsules produced in the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) at Hanford. Toward this end, a high integrity outer capsule has been designed to replace the present outer capsule of the WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsule. The proposed design of a Hastelloy S outer capsule which features a mechanical interlock type of end closure is described. Qualification testing requirements are outlined, and stress analyses and developmental tests are described. These tests were performed on AISI-1018 steel stand-in capsules, and included both external pressure and impact tests. The external pressure tests showed that stress calculations seriously overestimated the pressure capability of the outer capsule. Possible reasons for the lack of agreement between the tests and the analyses are evaluated. The stress analyses and tests results indicate that the proposed outer capsule will meet the heat source qualification requirements. Future tests will be conducted to experimentally verify that the Hastelloy S outer capsule in an aged condition meets the structural integrity requirements.

  4. Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 and early 2010, a test was performed to quantify the torque required to manipulate joints in several existing operational and prototype space suits in an effort to develop joint torque requirements appropriate for a new Constellation Program space suit system. The same test method was levied on the Constellation space suit contractors to verify that their suit design meets the requirements. However, because the original test was set up and conducted by a single test operator there was some question as to whether this method was repeatable enough to be considered a standard verification method for Constellation or other future space suits. In order to validate the method itself, a representative subset of the previous test was repeated, using the same information that would be available to space suit contractors, but set up and conducted by someone not familiar with the previous test. The resultant data was compared using graphical and statistical analysis and a variance in torque values for some of the tested joints was apparent. Potential variables that could have affected the data were identified and re-testing was conducted in an attempt to eliminate these variables. The results of the retest will be used to determine if further testing and modification is necessary before the method can be validated.

  5. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  6. Imaging and Spectroscopy of Outer Planets and Their Satellites with the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, J. E.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Stansberry, J. A.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Devost, D.; Emery, J. P.; Fazio, G.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Glaccum, W.; Grillmair, C.; Houck, J. R.; Meadows, V. S.; Morris, P.; Reach, W.; Reitsema, H.; Rieke, G. H.; Werner, M. W.

    2004-05-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope, formerly known as SIRTF, is now operational and delivers unprecedented sensitivity for the observation of Solar System targets. Spitzer's imagers and spectrometers cover the 3.6 to 160 micron wavelength range. Guaranteed Time Observer (GTO) programs include the moons of the outer Solar System, Pluto, Centaurs, Kuiper Belt Objects, and comets. For example, the "Moons and Planets" program is now examining the principal satellites of outer Solar System planets, as well as Uranus and Neptune, using all SIRTF instruments. In our poster, we present the early results of the Spitzer Space Telescope "Moons and Planets" program, including but not limited to: 1. Photometry and derived albedos of the rings of Uranus and its principal satellites between 3.6 and 15 microns. 2. Images and spectra of Rhea, Titan, Iapetus, and Phoebe. 3. Images and spectra of Neptune and Triton, if those observations are scheduled between April 29 and the beginning of this conference. and interpretation of these data in terms of surface composition, temperature, and thermal inertia. We will also relate the data presented in item 2 to the data that will be collected by Cassini, which is due to encounter Phoebe and enter orbit around Saturn shortly after this conference. This material is based on work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Award No. NAS7-03001, The California Institute of Technology, and Cornell University

  7. NEP Space Test Program Objective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) space test program is to launch an NEP satellite powered by the Russion Topaz 2 reactor by Dec. 1995. The primary goals of the NEP space test program are as follows: (1) demonstrate the feasibility of launching a space nuclear power system; (2) demonstrate and orbit adjust capability using NEP; (3) evaluate the in-orbit performance of the Topaz 2 reactor and selected electric thrusters; and (4) measure, analyze, and model the NEP self-induced environment. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  8. Accelerated testing of space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. Frank; Heshmat, Hooshang

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of various existing life prediction techniques used for a wide range of space mechanisms. Life prediction techniques utilized in other non-space fields such as turbine engine design are also reviewed for applicability to many space mechanism issues. The development of new concepts on how various tribological processes are involved in the life of the complex mechanisms used for space applications are examined. A 'roadmap' for the complete implementation of a tribological prediction approach for complex mechanical systems including standard procedures for test planning, analytical models for life prediction and experimental verification of the life prediction and accelerated testing techniques are discussed. A plan is presented to demonstrate a method for predicting the life and/or performance of a selected space mechanism mechanical component.

  9. Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated.

  10. STATISTICS OF DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS DURING THE TRANSITION FROM THE OUTER SOLAR CORONA TO THE INTERPLANETARY SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Telloni, D.; Antonucci, E.; Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Carbone, V.

    2009-11-20

    This paper investigates the evolution of the plasma density fluctuations of the fast and slow solar wind from the solar corona into the interplanetary space. The study is performed by comparing the low-frequency spectra and the phase correlation of the proton density oscillations, measured in the inner heliosphere with the Helios 2 in situ instrumentation, with those due to the large-scale density perturbations observed with UVCS/SOHO in the outer corona. We find that the characteristics of density fluctuations of the fast solar wind are maintained in the transition from the outer corona to the inner heliosphere, thus suggesting a coronal imprint for the heliospheric large-scale 1/f {sup 2} noise spectrum. In contrast, a quick dynamical evolution is observed in the slow wind, which, starting from large-scale fluctuations with strong phase correlations in the outer corona, gives rise to a Kolmogorov-like spectrum and an accumulation of density structures at small scales at 0.3 AU. This can be explained in the framework of nearly incompressible turbulence.

  11. Technical Guidance from the International Safety Framework for Nuclear Power Source Applications in Outer Space for Design and Development Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerer, Leopold

    2014-08-01

    In 2009, the International Safety Framework for Nuclear Power Source Applications in Outer Space [1] has been adopted, following a multi-year process that involved all major space faring nations in the frame of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. The safety framework reflects an international consensus on best practices. After the older 1992 Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space, it is the second document at UN level dedicated entirely to space nuclear power sources.This paper analyses aspects of the safety framework relevant for the design and development phases of space nuclear power sources. While early publications have started analysing the legal aspects of the safety framework, its technical guidance has not yet been subject to scholarly articles. The present paper therefore focuses on the technical guidance provided in the safety framework, in an attempt to assist engineers and practitioners to benefit from these.

  12. Space station propulsion test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briley, G. L.; Evans, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    A test bed was fabricated to demonstrate hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the intital operating configuration (IOC) space station application. The test bed propulsion module and computer control system were delivered in December 1985, but activation was delayed until mid-1986 while the propulsion system baseline for the station was reexamined. A new baseline was selected with hydrogen/oxygen thruster modules supplied with gas produced by electrolysis of waste water from the space shuttle and space station. As a result, an electrolysis module was designed, fabricated, and added to the test bed to provide an end-to-end simulation of the baseline system. Subsequent testing of the test bed propulsion and electrolysis modules provided an end-to-end demonstration of the complete space station propulsion system, including thruster hot firings using the oxygen and hydrogen generated from electrolysis of water. Complete autonomous control and operation of all test bed components by the microprocessor control system designed and delivered during the program was demonstrated. The technical readiness of the system is now firmly established.

  13. Space Fission System Test Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houts, Mike; Schmidt, Glen L.; van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Harper, Roger

    2004-02-01

    Space fission technology has the potential to enable rapid access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential, however, near-term customers need to be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and utilized. One key to successful utilization is to develop reactor designs that are highly testable. Testable reactor designs have a much higher probability of being successfully converted from paper concepts to working space hardware than do designs which are difficult or impossible to realistically test. ``Test Effectiveness'' is one measure of the ability to realistically test a space reactor system. The objective of this paper is to discuss test effectiveness as applied to the design, development, flight qualification, and acceptance testing of space fission systems. The ability to perform highly effective testing would be particularly important to the success of any near-term mission, such as NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, the first mission under study within NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program.

  14. Space Fission System Test Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, Mike; Schmidt, Glen L.; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Harper, Roger

    2004-02-04

    Space fission technology has the potential to enable rapid access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential, however, near-term customers need to be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and utilized. One key to successful utilization is to develop reactor designs that are highly testable. Testable reactor designs have a much higher probability of being successfully converted from paper concepts to working space hardware than do designs which are difficult or impossible to realistically test. ''Test Effectiveness'' is one measure of the ability to realistically test a space reactor system. The objective of this paper is to discuss test effectiveness as applied to the design, development, flight qualification, and acceptance testing of space fission systems. The ability to perform highly effective testing would be particularly important to the success of any near-term mission, such as NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, the first mission under study within NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program.

  15. The International Safety Framework for nuclear power source applications in outer space-Useful and substantial guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerer, L.; Wilcox, R. E.; Bechtel, R.; Harbison, S.

    2015-06-01

    In 2009, the International Safety Framework for Nuclear Power Source Applications in Outer Space was adopted, following a multi-year process that involved all major space faring nations under the auspices of a partnership between the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Safety Framework reflects an international consensus on best practices to achieve safety. Following the 1992 UN Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources in Outer Space, it is the second attempt by the international community to draft guidance promoting the safety of applications of nuclear power sources in space missions. NPS applications in space have unique safety considerations compared with terrestrial applications. Mission launch and outer space operational requirements impose size, mass and other space environment limitations not present for many terrestrial nuclear facilities. Potential accident conditions could expose nuclear power sources to extreme physical conditions. The Safety Framework is structured to provide guidance for both the programmatic and technical aspects of safety. In addition to sections containing specific guidance for governments and for management, it contains technical guidance pertinent to the design, development and all mission phases of space NPS applications. All sections of the Safety Framework contain elements directly relevant to engineers and space mission designers for missions involving space nuclear power sources. The challenge for organisations and engineers involved in the design and development processes of space nuclear power sources and applications is to implement the guidance provided in the Safety Framework by integrating it into the existing standard space mission infrastructure of design, development and operational requirements, practices and processes. This adds complexity to the standard space mission and launch approval processes. The Safety Framework is deliberately

  16. The Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference. Terrestrial Test for Space Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Seventeenth Space Simulation Conference, 'Terrestrial Test for Space Success' provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme of 'terrestrial test for space success.'

  17. Space weathering and the color indexes of minor bodies in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Zuzana; Brunetto, Rosario; Melita, Mario; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2012-09-01

    The surfaces of small bodies in the outer Solar System are rich in organic compounds and carbonaceous refractories mixed with ices and silicates. As made clear by dedicated laboratory experiments space weathering (e.g. energetic ion bombardment) can produce red colored materials starting from bright and spectrally flat ices. In a classical scenario, the space weathering processes “nurture” alter the small bodies surface spectra but are in competition with resurfacing agents that restore the original colors, and the result of these competing processes continuously modifying the surfaces is supposed to be responsible for the observed spectral variety of those small bodies. However an alternative point of view is that the different colors are due to “nature” i.e. to the different primordial composition of different objects. In this paper we present a model, based on laboratory results, that gives an original contribution to the “nature” vs. “nurture” debate by addressing the case of surfaces showing different fractions of rejuvenated vs. space weathered surface, and calculating the corresponding color variations. We will show how a combination of increasing dose coupled to different resurfacing can reproduce the whole range of observations of small outer Solar System bodies. Here we demonstrate, for the first time that objects having a fully weathered material turn back in the color-color diagrams. At the same time, object with the different ratio of pristine and weathered surface areas lay on specific lines in color-color diagrams, if exposed to the same amount of irradiation.

  18. Maintaining Peace in Outer Space. Conference on the United Nations of the Next Decade (17th, Cooperstown, NY, June 19-24, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley Foundation, Muscatine, IA.

    This is a report of a conference held to discuss maintaining peace in outer space. Nineteen space specialists participated in the conference. Topics discussed were recent technological developments, international cooperation for peaceful uses of outer space, prevention of weapons in space, and the future role of the United Nations. The report's…

  19. 30 CFR 33.31 - Test space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test space. 33.31 Section 33.31 Mineral... § 33.31 Test space. (a) Drilling tests shall be conducted in a test space formed by two curtains suspended across a mine opening in such a manner that the volume of the test space shall be approximately...

  20. 30 CFR 33.31 - Test space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test space. 33.31 Section 33.31 Mineral... § 33.31 Test space. (a) Drilling tests shall be conducted in a test space formed by two curtains suspended across a mine opening in such a manner that the volume of the test space shall be approximately...

  1. 30 CFR 33.31 - Test space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test space. 33.31 Section 33.31 Mineral... § 33.31 Test space. (a) Drilling tests shall be conducted in a test space formed by two curtains suspended across a mine opening in such a manner that the volume of the test space shall be approximately...

  2. 30 CFR 33.31 - Test space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test space. 33.31 Section 33.31 Mineral... § 33.31 Test space. (a) Drilling tests shall be conducted in a test space formed by two curtains suspended across a mine opening in such a manner that the volume of the test space shall be approximately...

  3. Marginally outer trapped surfaces in de Sitter space by low-dimensional geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, Emilio; Nicolodi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    A marginally outer trapped surface (MOTS) in de Sitter spacetime is an oriented spacelike surface whose mean curvature vector is proportional to one of the two null sections of its normal bundle. Associated with a spacelike immersed surface there are two enveloping maps into Möbius space (the conformal 3-sphere), which correspond to the two future-directed null directions of the surface normal planes. We give a description of MOTSs based on the Möbius geometry of their envelopes. We distinguish three cases according to whether both, one, or none of the fundamental forms in the normal null directions vanish. Special attention is given to MOTSs with non-zero parallel mean curvature vector. It is shown that any such a surface is generically the central sphere congruence (conformal Gauss map) of a surface in Möbius space which is locally Möbius equivalent to a non-zero constant mean curvature surface in some space form subgeometry.

  4. The potential of the lichen symbiosis to cope with the extreme conditions of outer space II: germination capacity of lichen ascospores in response to simulated space conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vera, J-P; Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Ott, S

    2004-01-01

    Complementary to the already well-studied microorganisms, lichens, symbiotic organisms of the mycobiont (fungi) and the photobiont (algae), were used as "model systems" in which to examine the ecological potential to resist to extreme environments of outer space. Ascospores (sexual propagules of the mycobiont) of the lichens Fulgensia bracteata, Xanthoria elegans and Xanthoria parietina were exposed to selected space-simulating conditions (up to 16 h of space vacuum at 10(-3) Pa and UV radiation at 160 nm < or = lambda < or = 400 nm), while embedded in the lichen fruiting bodies. After exposure, the ascospores were discharged and their viability was tested as germination capacity on different culture media including those containing Mars regolith simulant. It was found that (i) the germination rate on media containing Mars regolith simulant was as high as on other mineral-containing media, (ii) if enclosed in the ascocarps, the ascospores survived the vacuum exposure, the UV-irradiation as well as the combined treatment of vacuum and UV to a high degree. In general, 50 % or more viable spores were recovered, with ascospores of X. elegans showing the highest survival. It is suggested that ascospores inside the ascocarps are well protected by the anatomical structure, the gelatinous layer and the pigments (parietin and carotene) against the space parameters tested.

  5. A Code of Ethics and Standards for Outer-Space Commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Now is the time to put forth an effective code of ethics for businesses in outer space. A successful code would be voluntary and would actually promote the growth of individual companies, not hinder their efforts to provide products and services. A properly designed code of ethics would ensure the development of space commerce unfettered by government-created barriers. Indeed, if the commercial space industry does not develop its own professional code of ethics, government- imposed regulations would probably be instituted. Should this occur, there is a risk that the development of off-Earth commerce would become more restricted. The code presented in this paper seeks to avoid the imposition of new barriers to space commerce as well as make new commercial space ventures easier to develop. The proposed code consists of a preamble, which underscores basic values, followed by a number of specific principles. For the most part, these principles set forth broad commitments to fairness and integrity with respect to employees, consumers, business transactions, political contributions, natural resources, off-Earth development, designated environmental protection zones, as well as relevant national and international laws. As acceptance of this code of ethics grows within the industry, general modifications will be necessary to accommodate the different types of businesses entering space commerce. This uniform applicability will help to assure that the code will not be perceived as foreign in nature, potentially restrictive, or threatening. Companies adopting this code of ethics will find less resistance to their space development plans, not only in the United States but also from nonspacefaring nations. Commercial space companies accepting and refining this code would demonstrate industry leadership and an understanding that will serve future generations living, working, and playing in space. Implementation of the code would also provide an off-Earth precedent for a modified

  6. Eighteenth Space Simulation Conference: Space Mission Success Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Eighteenth Space Simulation Conference, 'Space Mission Success Through Testing' provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme 'Space Mission Success Through Testing.'

  7. Space testing of LSI memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Suzuki, K.; Nakajima, K.; Sakagawa, Y.; Hayashi, T.

    LSI memory soft error was tested in space on 64K-bit Dynamic RAM (n MOS), 16K-bit Static RAM (n MOS), and 1K-bit Static RAM (C MOS), using a sounding rocket. These LSIs had a 161 kbyte memory capacity. The test data ('1' or '0') were written and read out cyclically, and compared with the original data. If bit error was detected, error data were transmitted by telemetry. Vibration and thermal vacuum tests led to the conclusion that the LSI test equipment sufficiently satisfied the requirements to be loaded on the sounding rocket. No error was observed during the flight. LSI memories were not influenced by the launch environment or cosmic rays. Analytical results of the flight data are also discussed in this paper.

  8. Conceptual Design of In-Space Vehicles for Human Exploration of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. B.; Alexander, R. A.; Chapman, J. M.; Fincher, S. S.; Hopkins, R. C.; Philips, A. D.; Polsgrove, T. T.; Litchford, R. J.; Patton, B. W.; Statham, G.

    2003-01-01

    During FY-2002, a team of engineers from TD30/Advanced Concepts and TD40/Propulsion Research Center embarked on a study of potential crewed missions to the outer solar system. The study was conducted under the auspices of the Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts activity administered by Langley Research Center (LaRC). The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) team interacted heavily with teams from other Centers including Glenn Research Center, LaRC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Johnson Space Center. The MSFC team generated five concept missions for this project. The concept missions use a variety of technologies, including magnetized target fusion (MTF), magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, solid core reactors, and molten salt reactors in various combinations. The Technical Publication (TP) reviews these five concepts and the methods used to generate them. The analytical methods used are described for all significant disciplines and subsystems. The propulsion and power technologies selected for each vehicle are reviewed in detail. The MSFC team also expended considerable effort refining the MTF concept for use with this mission. The results from this effort are also contained within this TP. Finally, the lessons learned from this activity are summarized in the conclusions section.

  9. Resistance of Bacterial Endospores to Outer Space for Planetary Protection Purposes—Experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Nicholson, Wayne L.; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the “trip to Mars” spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the “stay on Mars” spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the “trip to Mars” or “stay on Mars” spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations. Key Words: Planetary protection—Bacterial spores—Space experiment—Simulated Mars mission. Astrobiology 12, 445–456. PMID:22680691

  10. 30 CFR 33.31 - Test space.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test space. 33.31 Section 33.31 Mineral... MINING PRODUCTS DUST COLLECTORS FOR USE IN CONNECTION WITH ROCK DRILLING IN COAL MINES Test Requirements § 33.31 Test space. (a) Drilling tests shall be conducted in a test space formed by two...

  11. International Directory of Facilities for Education and Training in Basic Subjects Related to the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations, New York, NY.

    International facilities are described in the first section of this directory on the facilities for education and training in basic subjects related to the peaceful uses of outer space. Entries are organized into these categories: organizations of the United Nations system; intergovernmental agencies; international agencies; international…

  12. Resistance of bacterial endospores to outer space for planetary protection purposes--experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Horneck, Gerda; Moeller, Ralf; Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Mancinelli, Rocco L; Nicholson, Wayne L; Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Spry, Andrew; Stackebrandt, Erko; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J

    2012-05-01

    Spore-forming bacteria are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection because their tough endospores may withstand certain sterilization procedures as well as the harsh environments of outer space or planetary surfaces. To test their hardiness on a hypothetical mission to Mars, spores of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 were exposed for 1.5 years to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station. Mounted as dry layers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons, the "trip to Mars" spores experienced space vacuum, cosmic and extraterrestrial solar radiation, and temperature fluctuations, whereas the "stay on Mars" spores were subjected to a simulated martian environment that included atmospheric pressure and composition, and UV and cosmic radiation. The survival of spores from both assays was determined after retrieval. It was clearly shown that solar extraterrestrial UV radiation (λ≥110 nm) as well as the martian UV spectrum (λ≥200 nm) was the most deleterious factor applied; in some samples only a few survivors were recovered from spores exposed in monolayers. Spores in multilayers survived better by several orders of magnitude. All other environmental parameters encountered by the "trip to Mars" or "stay on Mars" spores did little harm to the spores, which showed about 50% survival or more. The data demonstrate the high chance of survival of spores on a Mars mission, if protected against solar irradiation. These results will have implications for planetary protection considerations.

  13. Disposal of type-II long-lived fission products into outer space

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Chen, Xinyi

    1996-12-31

    The authors propose an alternative approach to dispose of long-lived fission products (LLFPs) of type-II, such as {sup 79}Se, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, and long-lived radioactive {sup 93}Zr into outer solar space. An escape velocity from the solar system of 42 km/s will be provided from either a parking orbit or the moon`s surface using an electrostatic accelerator and by neutralizing the charged accelerated LLFPs ions. LLFP ions must be neutralized to avoid their being trapped in earth and solar magnetic fields; almost 100% neutralization can be achieved by recirculating the non-neutralized ions through a magnetic field in the neutralizing device. This mode of disposition requires 2.2 kW power to eject most of the LLFPs generated by one LWR. This process is much smaller than a medium-energy proton beam power, a few tens of MW, which would be necessary to transmute these LLFPs using spallation neutrons created by protons. Due to their low radioactivity composed of mainly beta decay and low-energy gamma-rays, the shielding needed is not excessive and can be easily accommodated.

  14. An adaptive scale factor based MPPT algorithm for changing solar irradiation levels in outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Trevor Hocksun; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) techniques are popularly used for maximizing the output of solar panels by continuously tracking the maximum power point (MPP) of their P-V curves, which depend both on the panel temperature and the input insolation. Various MPPT algorithms have been studied in literature, including perturb and observe (P&O), hill climbing, incremental conductance, fuzzy logic control and neural networks. This paper presents an algorithm which improves the MPP tracking performance by adaptively scaling the DC-DC converter duty cycle. The principle of the proposed algorithm is to detect the oscillation by checking the sign (ie. direction) of the duty cycle perturbation between the current and previous time steps. If there is a difference in the signs then it is clear an oscillation is present and the DC-DC converter duty cycle perturbation is subsequently scaled down by a constant factor. By repeating this process, the steady state oscillations become negligibly small which subsequently allows for a smooth steady state MPP response. To verify the proposed MPPT algorithm, a simulation involving irradiances levels that are typically encountered in outer space is conducted. Simulation and experimental results prove that the proposed algorithm is fast and stable in comparison to not only the conventional fixed step counterparts, but also to previous variable step size algorithms.

  15. Swift Observatory Space Simulation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espiritu, Mellina; Choi, Michael K.; Scocik, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Observatory is a Middle-Class Explorer (MIDEX) mission that is a rapidly re-pointing spacecraft with immediate data distribution capability to the astronomical community. Its primary objectives are to characterize and determine the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and to use the collected data on GRB phenomena in order to probe the universe and gain insight into the physics of black hole formation and early universe. The main components of the spacecraft are the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Optical Bench (OB) instruments coupled with the Swift spacecraft (S/C) bus. The Swift Observatory will be tested at the Space Environment Simulation (SES) chamber at the Goddard Space Flight Center from May to June 2004 in order to characterize its thermal behavior in a vacuum environment. In order to simulate the independent thermal zones required by the BAT, XRT, UVOT, and OB instruments, the spacecraft is mounted on a chariot structure capable of maintaining adiabatic interfaces and enclosed in a modified, four section MSX fixture in order to accommodate the strategic placement of seven cryopanels (on four circuits), four heater panels, and a radiation source burst simulator mechanism. There are additionally 55 heater circuits on the spacecraft. To mitigate possible migration of silicone contaminants from BAT to the XRT and UVOT instruments, a contamination enclosure is to be fabricated around the BAT at the uppermost section of the MSX fixture. This paper discuses the test requirements and implemented thermal vacuum test configuration for the Swift Observatory.

  16. The Role of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space in Building Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubold, Hans

    The Office for Outer Space Affairs (OOSA) will provide an overview of achievements of UN- COPUOS, UNISPACE Conferences, particularly the establishment of the Programme on Space Applications and its priority thematic areas, UN-affiliated Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education, the International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG), the UN Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-Spider), and legal framework governing space activities of UN Member States. OOSA will review results of the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative, particularly the development of networks of astronomical telescope facilities, planetariums, and instrument arrays for space research in developing nations. The mission of OOSA, implemented through on-going programmes developed for the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (IHY2007) and the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) will be highlighted.

  17. Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A cloud of extremely hot steam boils out of the flame deflector at the A-1 test stand during a test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) at the John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi.

  18. Space shuttle orbiter test flight series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, D.; Gordon, R.; Jackson, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed studies on the space shuttle orbiter test taxi runs and captive flight tests were set forth. The orbiter test flights, the approach and landing tests (ALT), and the ground vibration tests were cited. Free flight plans, the space shuttle ALT crews, and 747 carrier aircraft crew were considered.

  19. Optical effect of the contamination of infrared windows by the outgassing of materials in outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberman, E.

    1975-01-01

    The composition and evaporation rate of the outgassing of a space vehicle thermal control paint as a function of temperature were studied. A contamination chamber was designed, constructed, and tested. Samples of thermal control paint were tested to determine if heating to moderate temperatures causes them to release outgassing products which can be collected on a cooled cesium iodide window for identification by IR analysis. Results showed that outgassing of surfaces other than the sample was a problem. Spectral bands of the deposits collected were compared.

  20. The de Finetti theorem for test spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jonathan; Leifer, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    We prove a de Finetti theorem for exchangeable sequences of states on test spaces, where a test space is a generalization of the sample space of classical probability theory and the Hilbert space of quantum theory. The standard classical and quantum de Finetti theorems are obtained as special cases. By working in a test space framework, the common features that are responsible for the existence of these theorems are elucidated. In addition, the test space framework is general enough to imply a de Finetti theorem for classical processes. We conclude by discussing the ways in which our assumptions may fail, leading to probabilistic models that do not have a de Finetti theorem.

  1. Simulating the Performance of the Whipple Space Survey of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, C.

    2011-01-01

    Whipple is a proposed Discovery-class mission that will explore the outer Solar System be searching for serendipitous occultations of stars by small bodies. Whipple will test fundamental predictions of the theories of the origin and evolution of the solar system by studying directly the populations of small objects that lie beyond the orbit of Neptune, including the Kuiper Belt and scattered disk, the region surrounding Sedna, and the Oort Cloud. Whipple will employ a Schmidt-Cassegrain optical design with a 77 cm aperture, imaging onto a focal plane of 37 square degrees. The focal plane will comprise nine CMOS devices that can produce high signal-to-noise photometric light curves for stars at a variety of cadences: 10,000 stars at 40 Hz, 20,000 stars at 20 Hz, or 40,000 stars at 10 Hz. We have developed a series of tools that simulate stellar populations, occultation light curves (including noise), onboard detection and our fitting routines. We describe all the routines and the simulation pipeline as well as details of the detection algorithms, including statistical arguments. Results of expected rates for different model populations are also presented, demonstrating the anticipated performance and event yield for the mission. These simulations show how Whipple will measure size distributions as a function of (three dimensional) position for these populations.

  2. Planetary quarantine: Space research and technology. [satellite quarantine constraints on outer planet mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The impact of satisfying satellite quarantine constraints on current outer planet mission and spacecraft designs is considered. Tools required to perform trajectory and navigation analyses for determining satellite impact probabilities are developed.

  3. The Space Launch System and Missions to the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, Kurt K.; Post, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Introduction: America’s heavy lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System, enables a variety of planetary science missions. The SLS can be used for most, if not all, of the National Research Council’s Planetary Science Decadal Survey missions to the outer planets. The SLS performance enables larger payloads and faster travel times with reduced operational complexity.Europa Clipper: Our analysis shows that a launch on the SLS would shorten the Clipper mission travel time by more than four years over earlier mission concept studies.Jupiter Trojan Tour and Rendezvous: Our mission concept replaces Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs) in the original design with solar arrays. The SLS capability offers many more target opportunities.Comet Surface Sample Return: Although in our mission concept, the SLS launches later than the NRC mission study (November 2022 instead of the original launch date of January 2021), it reduces the total mission time, including sample return, by two years.Saturn Apmospheric Entry Probe: Though Saturn arrivial time remains the same in our concept as the arrival date in the NRC study (2034), launching on the SLS shortens the mission travel time by three years with a direct ballistic trajectory.Uranus Orbiter with Probes: The SLS shortens travel time for an Uranus mission by four years with a Jupiter swing-by trajectory. It removes the need for a solar electric propulsion (SEP) stage used in the NRC mission concept study.Other SLS Science Mission Candidates: Two other mission concepts we are investigating that may be of interest to this community are the Advanced Technology Large Aperature Space Telescope (ATLAST) and the Interstellar Explorer also referred to as the Interstellar Probe.Summary: The first launch of the SLS is scheduled for 2018 followed by the first human launch in 2021. The SLS in its evolving configurations will enable a broad range of exploration missions which will serve to recapture the enthusiasm and

  4. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-01-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration. PMID:21593797

  5. Exposure of phototrophs to 548 days in low Earth orbit: microbial selection pressures in outer space and on early earth.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S; Rettberg, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2011-10-01

    An epilithic microbial community was launched into low Earth orbit, and exposed to conditions in outer space for 548 days on the European Space Agency EXPOSE-E facility outside the International Space Station. The natural phototroph biofilm was augmented with akinetes of Anabaena cylindrica and vegetative cells of Nostoc commune and Chroococcidiopsis. In space-exposed dark controls, two algae (Chlorella and Rosenvingiella spp.), a cyanobacterium (Gloeocapsa sp.) and two bacteria associated with the natural community survived. Of the augmented organisms, cells of A. cylindrica and Chroococcidiopsis survived, but no cells of N. commune. Only cells of Chroococcidiopsis were cultured from samples exposed to the unattenuated extraterrestrial ultraviolet (UV) spectrum (>110 nm or 200 nm). Raman spectroscopy and bright-field microscopy showed that under these conditions the surface cells were bleached and their carotenoids were destroyed, although cell morphology was preserved. These experiments demonstrate that outer space can act as a selection pressure on the composition of microbial communities. The results obtained from samples exposed to >200 nm UV (simulating the putative worst-case UV exposure on the early Earth) demonstrate the potential for epilithic colonization of land masses during that time, but that UV radiation on anoxic planets can act as a strong selection pressure on surface-dwelling organisms. Finally, these experiments have yielded new phototrophic organisms of potential use in biomass and oxygen production in space exploration.

  6. Station Robotics Testing at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    At the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center, NASA tests the Japanese Experiment Module ORU Transfer Interface, or JOTI. This device would allow astronauts to transfer orbital repla...

  7. NASA Tests Transfer Device for Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Inside the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, NASA tests the Japanese Experiment Module ORU Transfer Interface, or JOTI. This device would allow astronauts to transfe...

  8. Sultan: an 8 Tesla, 1 meter bore test facility for the outer solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Pasotti, G.; Ricci, M.V.; Sacchetti, N.; Spadoni, M.

    1981-09-01

    In the framework of the international collaboration among SIN-Villigen (CH), ECN-Patten (NL) and CNEN-Frascati (I) aiming at the realization of the SULTAN (SUpraLeitender TestANlage) test facility the CNEN contribution is concerned with the realization of the outer part of the solenoid, i.e., the section which will provide the 6T field in the useful region, the remaining 2T being supplied by the coaxial ECN insert. A description of the 6T superconducting solenoid is presented. The main features are: (1) pancake structure wound by a Nb-Ti multifilamentary hollow cable; and (2) cooling by forced flow of slightly subcooled liquid helium. Details of the design, winding technique and structure, the hydraulic circuitry as well as the status report of the construction are discussed. 10 refs.

  9. Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two -fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z -2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z -1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

  10. Design, Engineering, and Testing for the Alcator C-Mod Outer Divertor Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S.; Vieira, R.; Lipschultz, B.; Ellis, R.; Karnes, D.; Doody, J.; Zhou, L.; Titus, P.; Zhang, H.; Beck, W.; Granetz, R.

    2012-10-01

    Alcator C-mod's major outer divertor upgrade will enable significant advances in our understanding of reactor relevant physics and operations. Two primary features of the new outer divertor are its toroidally continuous design (electrical and mechanical), and ability to be operated up to or independently heated to 600 C. Full control of the divertor PFC temperature from ambient vessel temperature to 600 C, will enable new and important tokamak research into the temperature dependence of fuel retention, PFC deposition and erosion, and divertor recycling. Significant design, analysis, and testing is underway to complete this important and challenging upgrade, which will provide valuable information for ITER and future reactors. Among other aspects of the innovative approach, the divertor plate supports, halo current shunts, and thermal shield assemblies will be discussed. The divertor supports enable pure radial motion of the divertor ring as it expands thermally and robustness to massive disruption induced electro-mechanical loads. Halo current shunts conduct 400kA in an 8T magnetic field and allow for divertor displacement relative to the vessel. Thermal shielding significantly reduces radiation and conduction to surrounding vessel structures.

  11. Reacting to nuclear power systems in space: American public protests over outer planetary probes since the 1980s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    2014-03-01

    The United States has pioneered the use of nuclear power systems for outer planetary space probes since the 1970s. These systems have enabled the Viking landings to reach the surface of Mars and both Pioneers 10 and 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 to travel to the limits of the solar system. Although the American public has long been concerned about safety of these systems, in the 1980s a reaction to nuclear accidents - especially the Soviet Cosmos 954 spacecraft destruction and the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accidents - heightened awareness about the hazards of nuclear power and every spacecraft launch since that time has been contested by opponents of nuclear energy. This has led to a debate over the appropriateness of the use of nuclear power systems for spacecraft. It has also refocused attention on the need for strict systems of control and rigorous checks and balances to assure safety. This essay describes the history of space radioisotope power systems, the struggles to ensure safe operations, and the political confrontation over whether or not to allow the launch the Galileo and Cassini space probes to the outer planets. Effectively, these efforts have led to the successful flights of 12 deep space planetary probes, two-thirds of them operated since the accidents of Cosmos 954, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl.

  12. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry.

  13. Space shuttle orbiter windshield system design and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K.; Suppanz, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The development and testing of primary structural elements that are necessary to design a windshield system for the space shuttle orbiter are summarized. The elements include the outer (heat shield) panes, the inner pressure panes, the seals for both panes, and components of both window frames. One test article representing a pressure pane, including frames and seals, was tested under two sets of conditions. One set represented 100 mission cycles with temperature and pressure typical of those exerted on the innermost pane of the three-pane window system, and the second set represented 100 mission cycles with temperature and pressure typical of those exerted on a middle pane. A second test article representing an outer (heat sheild) pane was tested to conditions of 120 entry cycles, which equates to 100 entry cycles plus sufficient fatigue on the pane to account for 100 boost cycles. All elements of the design survived the test conditions in good condition. Window system for the shuttle orbiter vehicle.

  14. Space weathering and the color indexes of minor bodies in the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaňuchová, Z.; Brunetto, R.; Melita, M.; Strazzulla, G.

    2012-09-01

    We present a model based on laboratory results which contributes to the "nature" versus "nurture" debate on the colors of small bodies in the outer Solar System (OSS). According to our model, objects having suffered the same balance of irradiation and impacts follow specific curves in color-color diagrams. Appropriate combination of composition and weathering can reproduce the whole range of colors observed on OSS small bodies

  15. SpaceFibre Demonstrator (Demonstration and Testing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfers, T.; Rastetter, P.; Papadas, C.; Parkes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Currently Astrium GmbH and ISD S.A. are planning the development of a demonstrator for SpaceFibre. The SpaceFibre demonstrator will be used to execute functional performance tests and EMC (Electro Magnetic Compatibility) tests. University of Dundee is program prime contractor and provides Astrium with the SpaceFibre IP core. The work si shared between the two partners in the following way: • Astrium: Prime Contractor and Technical Coordination; FPGA Design; EMC Testing• ISD: Development of Demonstrator Board including housing, development of test bed and functional performance testingThe driving requirements for this development are:• SpaceFibre performance, while implementing it into space equivalent components• Design and MAIT of the demonstrator in such a way that representative EMC testing is possible.

  16. Space Shuttle wind tunnel testing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Hillje, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    A major phase of the Space Shuttle Vehicle (SSV) Development Program was the acquisition of data through the space shuttle wind tunnel testing program. It became obvious that the large number of configuration/environment combinations would necessitate an extremely large wind tunnel testing program. To make the most efficient use of available test facilities and to assist the prime contractor for orbiter design and space shuttle vehicle integration, a unique management plan was devised for the design and development phase. The space shuttle program is reviewed together with the evolutional development of the shuttle configuration. The wind tunnel testing rationale and the associated test program management plan and its overall results is reviewed. Information is given for the various facilities and models used within this program. A unique posttest documentation procedure and a summary of the types of test per disciplines, per facility, and per model are presented with detailed listing of the posttest documentation.

  17. Astronauts in Outer Space Teaching Students Science: Comparing Chinese and American Implementations of Space-to-Earth Virtual Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Song A.; Zhang, Meilan; Tillman, Daniel A.; Robertson, William; Siemssen, Annette; Paez, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between science lessons taught by Chinese astronauts in a space shuttle and those taught by American astronauts in a space shuttle, both of whom conducted experiments and demonstrations of science activities in a microgravity space environment. The study examined the instructional structure…

  18. Space shuttle L-tube radiator testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to support the development of the Orbiter Heat Rejection System. The details of the baseline radiator were defined by designing, fabricating, and testing representative hardware. The tests were performed in the Space Environmental Simulation Laboratory Chamber A. An IR source was used to simulate total solar and infrared environmental loads on the flowing shuttle radiators panel. The thermal and mechanical performance of L tube space radiators and their thermal coating were established.

  19. Skylab rescue space vehicle flight readiness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jevitt, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle flight readiness test is described which ensures that space vehicle systems are in a state of flight readiness and are compatible with associated ground support equipment. The functions of propellant loading, umbilical ejection, ignition, holddown arm release, liftoff, and service arm and tail service mast retraction are simulated. The test outline is presented along with a list of references, intercommunications information, operations interface control chart, and flight test.

  20. Integration Testing of Space Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowards, Stephanie; Honeycutt, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefits of conducting multi-system integration testing of space flight elements in lieu of merely shipping and shooting to the launch site and launching. "Ship and shoot" is a philosophy that proposes to transport flight elements directly from the factory to the launch site and begin the mission without further testing. Integration testing, relevant to validation testing in this context, is a risk mitigation effort that builds upon the individual element and system levels of qualification and acceptance tests, greatly improving the confidence of operations in space. The International Space Station Program (ISSP) experience is the focus of most discussions from a historical perspective, while proposed integration testing of the Constellation Program is also discussed. The latter will include Multi-Element Integration Testing (MElT) and Flight Element Integration Testing (FElT).

  1. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  2. Course: Tests of Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Daniel; Simpson, Alda D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the structural tests appropriate for a satellite, and the requirements its structures are expected to perform. Special attention is given to the structural environments which act upon a satellite during and after launch, the effects of those environments, including vibration and shock, and the analysis of those effects.

  3. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Phillips, Brandon S.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats, Communication Satellites, and Outer Planet Science Satellites all share one thing in common: Mission success depends on maintaining power in the harsh space environment. For a vast majority of satellites, spacecraft power is sourced by a photovoltaic (PV) array system. Built around PV cells, the array systems also include wiring, substrates, connectors, and protection diodes. Each of these components must function properly throughout the mission in order for power production to remain at nominal levels. Failure of even one component can lead to a crippling loss of power. To help ensure PV array systems do not suffer failures on-orbit due to the space environment, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a wide ranging test and evaluation capability. Key elements of this capability include: Testing: a. Ultraviolet (UV) Exposure b. Charged Particle Radiation (Electron and Proton) c. Thermal Cycling d. Plasma and Beam Environments Evaluation: a. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Screening b. Optical Inspection and easurement c. PV Power Output including Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) measurements This paper will describe the elements of the space environment which particularly impact PV array systems. MSFC test capabilities will be described to show how the relevant space environments can be applied to PV array systems in the laboratory. A discussion of MSFC evaluation capabilities will also be provided. The sample evaluation capabilities offer test engineers a means to quantify the effects of the space environment on their PV array system or component. Finally, examples will be shown of the effects of the space environment on actual PV array materials tested at MSFC.

  4. MISSE-X: Affordable Space Environment Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    MISSE–X is a robotically serviceable ISS external facility providing government, industry and academia experimenters with affordable access to space for materials durability testing of potential ...

  5. Telerobotics test bed for space structure assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitami, M.; Ogimoto, K.; Yasumoto, F.; Katsuragawa, T.; Itoko, T.; Kurosaki, Y.; Hirai, S.; Machida, K.

    1994-01-01

    A cooperative research on super long distance space telerobotics is now in progress both in Japan and USA. In this program. several key features will be tested, which can be applicable to the control of space robots as well as to terrestrial robots. Local (control) and remote (work) sites will be shared between Electrotechnical Lab (ETL) of MITI in Japan and Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in USA. The details of a test bed for this international program are discussed in this report.

  6. Space station structures and dynamics test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.; Townsend, John S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a low-Earth orbit space station poses unique challenges for development and implementation of new technology. The technology arises from the special requirement that the station be built and constructed to function in a weightless environment, where static loads are minimal and secondary to system dynamics and control problems. One specific challenge confronting NASA is the development of a dynamics test program for: (1) defining space station design requirements, and (2) identifying the characterizing phenomena affecting the station's design and development. A general definition of the space station dynamic test program, as proposed by MSFC, forms the subject of this report. The test proposal is a comprehensive structural dynamics program to be launched in support of the space station. The test program will help to define the key issues and/or problems inherent to large space structure analysis, design, and testing. Development of a parametric data base and verification of the math models and analytical analysis tools necessary for engineering support of the station's design, construction, and operation provide the impetus for the dynamics test program. The philosophy is to integrate dynamics into the design phase through extensive ground testing and analytical ground simulations of generic systems, prototype elements, and subassemblies. On-orbit testing of the station will also be used to define its capability.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  8. Z-1 Prototype Space Suit Testing Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Space Suit team of the NASA-Johnson Space Center performed a series of test with the Z-1 prototype space suit in 2012. This paper discusses, at a summary level, the tests performed and results from those tests. The purpose of the tests were two-fold: 1) characterize the suit performance so that the data could be used in the downselection of components for the Z-2 Space Suit and 2) develop interfaces with the suitport and exploration vehicles through pressurized suit evaluations. Tests performed included isolated and functional range of motion data capture, Z-1 waist and hip testing, joint torque testing, CO2 washout testing, fit checks and subject familiarizations, an exploration vehicle aft deck and suitport controls interface evaluation, delta pressure suitport tests including pressurized suit don and doff, and gross mobility and suitport ingress and egress demonstrations in reduced gravity. Lessons learned specific to the Z-1 prototype and to suit testing techniques will be presented.

  9. Development and Testing of a Laser-Powered Cryobot for Outer Planet Icy Moon Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, V.; Stone, W.; Hogan, B.; Lelievre, S.; Flesher, C.

    2013-12-01

    Project VALKYRIE (Very-deep Autonomous Laser-powered Kilowatt-class Yo-yoing Robotic Ice Explorer) is a NASA-funded effort to develop the first laser powered cryobot - a self-contained intelligent ice penetrator capable of delivering science payloads through ice caps of the outer planet icy moons. The long range objective is to enable a full-scale Europa lander mission in which an autonomous life-searching underwater vehicle is transported by the cryobot and launched into the sub-surface Europan ocean. Mission readiness testing will involve an Antarctic sub-glacial lake cryobot sample return through kilometers of ice cap thickness. A key element of VALKYRIE's design is the use of a high energy laser as the primary power source. 1070 nm laser light is transmitted at a power level of 5 kW from a surface-based laser and injected into a custom-designed optical waveguide that is spooled out from the descending cryobot. Light exits the downstream end of the fiber, travels through diverging optics, and strikes a beam dump, which channels thermal power to hot water jets that melt the descent hole. Some beam energy is converted, via photovoltaic cells, to electricity for running onboard electronics and jet pumps. Since the vehicle can be sterilized prior to deployment and the melt path freezes behind it, preventing forward contamination, expansions on VALKYRIE concepts may enable cleaner and faster access to sub-glacial Antarctic lakes. Testing at Stone Aerospace between 2010 and 2013 has already demonstrated high power optical energy transfer over relevant (kilometer scale) distances as well as the feasibility of a vehicle-deployed optical waveguide (through which the power is transferred). The test vehicle is equipped with a forward-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that can detect obstacles out to 1 kilometer from the vehicle. The initial ASTEP test vehicle will carry a science payload consisting of a DUV flow cytometer and a water sampling sub-system that will be

  10. Torsional suspension system for testing space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H., III (Inventor); Gold, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A low frequency torsional suspension system for testing a space structure uses a plurality of suspension stations attached to the space structure along the length thereof in order to suspend the space structure from an overhead support. Each suspension station includes a disk pivotally mounted to the overhead support, and two cables which have upper ends connected to the disk and lower ends connected to the space structure. The two cables define a parallelogram with the center of gravity of the space structure being vertically beneath the pivot axis of the disk. The vertical distance between the points of attachment of the cables to the disk and the pivot axis of the disk is adjusted to lower the frequency of the suspension system to a level which does not interfere with frequency levels of the space structure, thereby enabling accurate measurement.

  11. Space station propulsion technology: Space station propulsion system test bed test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briley, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Testing of the hydrogen/oxygen Space Station Propulsion System will demonstrate the technology readiness for the IOC application. To facilitate early demonstration of this technology and to allow demonstration of maturing technology, this testing will be performed with the components installed on a test bed which simulated the Space Station Structure. The test plan contains a description of the test bed, test objective, instrumentation plan, and controls plan. Each of these is discussed in detail.

  12. Tenth Report By the International Telecommunication Union on Telecommunication and the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Telecommunication Union, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Reports are presented on the 1970-71 activities of the General Secretariat of the International Telecommunication Union, the International Frequency Registration Board, the International Radio Consultative Committee, and the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee. In addition progress in the field of space communications made…

  13. Solaris: Orbital station: Automatic laboratory for outer space rendezvous and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runavot, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The preliminary design for a modular orbital space station (unmanned) is outlined. The three main components are a support module, an experiment module, and an orbital transport vehicle. The major types of missions (assembly, materials processing, and Earth observation) that could be performed are discussed.

  14. MISSE 6-Testing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S; Kinard, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment by placing them in space environment for several months. In this paper, a few materials and components from NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) that have been flown on MISSE 6 mission will be discussed. These include laser and optical elements for photonic devices. The pre-characterized MISSE 6 materials were packed inside a ruggedized Passive Experiment Container (PEC) that resembles a suitcase. The PEC was tested for survivability due to launch conditions. Subsequently, the MISSE 6 PEC was transported by the STS-123 mission to International Space Station (ISS) on March 11, 2008. The astronauts successfully attached the PEC to external handrails and opened the PEC for long term exposure to the space environment.

  15. Life Science Research in Outer Space: New Platform Technologies for Low-Cost, Autonomous Small Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Parra, Macarena P.; Niesel, David; McGinnis, Michael; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Nicholson, Wayne; Mancinelli, Rocco; Piccini, Matthew E.; Beasley, Christopher C.; Timucin, Linda R.; Ricks, Robert D.; McIntyre, Michael J.; Squires, David; Yost, Bruce D.; Hines, John W.

    2009-01-01

    We develop integrated instruments and platforms suitable for economical, frequent space access for autonomous life science experiments and processes in outer space. The technologies represented by three of our recent free-flyer small-satellite missions are the basis of a rapidly growing toolbox of miniaturized biologically/biochemically-oriented instrumentation now enabling a new generation of in-situ space experiments. Autonomous small satellites ( 1 50 kg) are less expensive to develop and build than fullsize spacecraft and not subject to the comparatively high costs and scheduling challenges of human-tended experimentation on the International Space Station, Space Shuttle, and comparable platforms. A growing number of commercial, government, military, and civilian space launches now carry small secondary science payloads at far lower cost than dedicated missions; the number of opportunities is particularly large for so-called cube-sat and multicube satellites in the 1 10 kg range. The recent explosion in nano-, micro-, and miniature technologies, spanning fields from telecommunications to materials to bio/chemical analysis, enables development of remarkably capable autonomous miniaturized instruments to accomplish remote biological experimentation. High-throughput drug discovery, point-of-care medical diagnostics, and genetic analysis are applications driving rapid progress in autonomous bioanalytical technology. Three of our recent missions exemplify the development of miniaturized analytical payload instrumentation: GeneSat-1 (launched: December 2006), PharmaSat (launched: May 2009), and O/OREOS (organism/organics exposure to orbital stresses; scheduled launch: May 2010). We will highlight the overall architecture and integration of fluidic, optical, sensor, thermal, and electronic technologies and subsystems to support and monitor the growth of microorganisms in culture in these small autonomous space satellites, including real-time tracking of their culture

  16. Department of Defense Space Test Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Eleni M.; Zdenek, Jeffery S.

    2000-11-01

    During the 1960's, as the importance of the space environment was recognized, it became apparent that space systems technologies needed to be developed at a rapid rate. The Department of Defense (DoD) realized that before developing and deploying space systems for operational use, the needed to be tested in space. At that time no organization of funds were readily available to provide timely spaceflight for military space systems. As a result, the DoD Space Test Program (STP) was created in 1966 by a memorandum from the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E). The purpose of this program was to provide flight opportunities for all DoD research and development activities in an economic and efficient manner. For a payload to be flown by STP it must first be sponsored by a DoD organization. The payload is then briefed through a series of service review boards until it reaches the DoD level. The DoD Space Experiment Review Board (SERB) makes the final selections and gives STP a ranked list of payloads to attempt to fly. This process happens annually, and STP flies as many payloads as funding and opportunity allow.

  17. Scientific American Inventions From Outer Space: Everyday Uses For NASA Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present some of the inventions highlighted in the yearly publication of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spinoff. These inventions cover a wide range, some of which include improvements in health, medicine, public safety, energy, environment, resource management, computer technology, automation, construction, transportation, and manufacturing technology. NASA technology has brought forth thousands of commercial products which include athletic shoes, portable x-ray machines, and scratch-resistant sunglasses, guidance systems, lasers, solar power, robotics and prosthetic devices. These products are examples of NASA research innovations which have positively impacted the community.

  18. Outer layers of a carbon star: The view from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Ensman, Lisa M.; Alexander, D. R.; Avrett, E. H.; Brown, A.; Carpenter, K. G.; Eriksson, K.; Gustafsson, B.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Judge, Philip D.

    1995-01-01

    To advance our understanding of the relationship between stellar chromospheres and mass loss, which is a common property of carbon stars and other asymptotic giant branch stars, we have obtained ultraviolet spectra of the nearby N-type carbon star UU Aur using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this paper we describe the HST observations, identify spectral features in both absorption and emission, and attempt to infer the velocity field in the chromosphere, upper troposphere, and circumstellar envelope from spectral line shifts. A mechanism for producing fluoresced emission to explain a previously unobserved emission line is proposed. Some related ground-based observations are also described.

  19. Clearing the Air: New Approaches to Life Support in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, J.; Howard, D.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on research into atmospheric revitalization systems for long-term space travel and the use ofCOMSOL Multiphysics to understand how structured sorbents can be used to improve the performance of adsorption processes via thermal management. We are developing the next generation of atmosphere revitalization systems, which will reach for new levels of resource conservation via a high percentage of loop closure. For example, a high percentage of carbon dioxide, exhaled by crew, can be converted via reaction to drinking water, closing the loop from human metabolic waste to supply. Adsorption processes play a lead role in these new/closed loop systems.

  20. Development of Lightweight Material Composites to Insulate Cryogenic Tanks for 30-Day Storage in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed for an MLI system which will meet the design constraints of an ILRV used for 7- to 30-day missions. The ten tasks are briefly described: (1) material survey and procurement, material property tests, and selection of composites to be considered; (2) definition of environmental parameters and tooling requirements, and thermal and structural design verification test definition; (3) definition of tanks and associated hardware to be used, and definition of MLI concepts to be considered; (4) thermal analyses, including purge, evacuation, and reentry repressurization analyses; (5) structural analyses (6) thermal degradation tests of composite and structural tests of fastener; (7) selection of MLI materials and system; (8) definition of a conceptual MLI system design; (9) evaluation of nondestructive inspection techniques and definition of procedures for repair of damaged areas; and (10) preparation of preliminary specifications.

  1. Making astronomy incredibly easy, engaging and affordable for anyone with a desire to see outer space for themselves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We have built a social interface and funding model based on collaborative consumption to empower public access to powerful telescopes.Slooh’s robotic observatories put anyone with a desire to look up and wonder in the driver’s seat of powerful mountaintop telescopes. Our members have taken millions of images of over 50,000 objects in the night sky, from tracking asteroids for NASA to discovering supernovae. Slooh launched December 25th, 2003 from our flagship observatory at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands and in the ensuing decade we’ve built a network of 20+ observatory partners around the world to capture every magical moment in outer space. We are the world’s largest community of people peering into space together.About SloohSlooh makes astronomy incredibly easy, engaging and affordable for anyone with a desire to see outer space for themselves. Since 2003 Slooh has connected telescopes to the Internet for access by the broader public. Slooh’s automated observatories develop celestial images in real-time for broadcast to the Internet. Slooh’s technology is protected by Patent No.: US 7,194,146 B2 which was awarded in 2006. Slooh members have taken over 3m photos/150,000 FITS of over 50,000 celestial objects, participated in numerous discoveries with leading astronomical institutions and made over 2,000 submissions to the Minor Planet Center. Slooh’s flagship observatories are situated on Mt. Teide, in partnership with the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), and in Chile, in partnership with the Catholic University. Slooh has also broadcast live celestial events from partner observatories in Arizona, Japan, Hawaii, Cypress, Dubai, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Norway. Slooh’s free live broadcasts of potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), comets, transits, eclipses, solar activity etc. feature narration by astronomy experts Will Gater, Bob Berman, Paul Cox and Eric Edelman and are syndicated to

  2. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph A.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Nappier, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test

  3. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra; Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph; Nappier, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test

  4. [Ultraviolet radiation as a risk factor on the Earth and outer space].

    PubMed

    Strzhizhovskiĭ, A D

    1998-01-01

    UVR effects on human health are considered. The critical organs for UVR are skin, eye, and the immune system. In the skin, UVR can induce erythema, tanning, vitamin D photosynthesis, premature aging, and cancer. UVR has a specific immunosuppressive effect on the skin secondary to altered lymphoid cells function. It results in inhibition of the anti-neoplastic activity and suppression of contact hypersensitivity and delayed hypersensitivity to various antigens. UV can induce photokeratoconjunctivitis and play an active role in etiology of cataracts, corneal and retinal degeneration, pterigium and uveal melanoma. Action spectra and biologically effective doses for the effects are presented. Measured UV energy spectra naturally occurring at the Earth's surface and in space were used to calculate the effective time of UV exposure to produce these effects. Data obtained and modulation of the UV effects by other space flight factors are discussed. Quantitative analysis of maximum permissible UV levels in the production area established in Russia, USA, and the Netherlands was performed. As a result, substantive differences in the approaches of these countries to setting limits and permissible ranges were stated. Applicability of the UV limits to regulation of natural UV exposures is considered.

  5. Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in our approach to EVA suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete 50 EVAs in the dirt under intense UV exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising its mobility. We conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials to determine performance degradation after exposure to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. This testing will help mature the material technologies and provide performance data that can be used by not only the space suit development teams but for all Mars inflatable and soft goods derived structures from airlocks to habitats.

  6. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1984 in Langley test facilities are highlighted. The broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  7. Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1999-11-01

    Radioisotopes have been used successfully for more than 25 years to supply the heat for thermoelectric generators on various deep-space probes. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems have been proposed as low-thrust ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. The perceived liability of radioisotope electric generators for ion propulsion is their high mass. Conventional radioisotope thermoelectric generators have a specific mass of about 200 kg/kW of electric power. Many development efforts have been undertaken with the aim of reducing the specific mass of radioisotope electric systems. Recent performance estimates suggest that specific masses of 50 kg/kW may be achievable with thermophotovoltaic and alkali metal thermal-to-electric conversion generators. Powerplants constructed from these near-term radioisotope electric generators and long-life ion thrusters will likely have specific masses in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power if development continues over the next decade. In earlier studies, it was concluded that flight times within the Solar System are indeed insensitive to reductions in the powerplant specific mass, and that a timely scientific program of robotic planetary rendezvous and near-interstellar space missions is enabled by primary electric propulsion once the powerplant specific mass is in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW. Flight times can be substantially reduced by using hybrid propulsion schemes that combine chemical propulsion, gravity assist, and electric propulsion. Hybrid schemes are further explored in this article to illustrate how the performance of REP is enhanced for Pluto rendezvous, heliopause orbiter, and gravitational lens missions.

  8. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote earth field sensing magnetometer and servo control building; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils are 42-foot in diameter and a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils accommodates spacecraft access to the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  9. Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Compliance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) defines an open architecture for software defined radios. This document describes the testing methodology to aid in determining the degree of compliance to the STRS architecture. Non-compliances are reported to the software and hardware developers as well as the NASA project manager so that any non-compliances may be fixed or waivers issued. Since the software developers may be divided into those that provide the operating environment including the operating system and STRS infrastructure (OE) and those that supply the waveform applications, the tests are divided accordingly. The static tests are also divided by the availability of an automated tool that determines whether the source code and configuration files contain the appropriate items. Thus, there are six separate step-by-step test procedures described as well as the corresponding requirements that they test. The six types of STRS compliance tests are: STRS application automated testing, STRS infrastructure automated testing, STRS infrastructure testing by compiling WFCCN with the infrastructure, STRS configuration file testing, STRS application manual code testing, and STRS infrastructure manual code testing. Examples of the input and output of the scripts are shown in the appendices as well as more specific information about what to configure and test in WFCCN for non-compliance. In addition, each STRS requirement is listed and the type of testing briefly described. Attached is also a set of guidelines on what to look for in addition to the requirements to aid in the document review process.

  10. Interferometric and nonlinear-optical spectral-imaging techniques for outer space and live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Multidimensional signals such as the spectral images allow us to have deeper insights into the natures of objects. In this paper the spectral imaging techniques that are based on optical interferometry and nonlinear optics are presented. The interferometric imaging technique is based on the unified theory of Van Cittert-Zernike and Wiener-Khintchine theorems and allows us to retrieve a spectral image of an object in the far zone from the 3D spatial coherence function. The retrieval principle is explained using a very simple object. The promising applications to space interferometers for astronomy that are currently in progress will also be briefly touched on. An interesting extension of interferometric spectral imaging is a 3D and spectral imaging technique that records 4D information of objects where the 3D and spectral information is retrieved from the cross-spectral density function of optical field. The 3D imaging is realized via the numerical inverse propagation of the cross-spectral density. A few techniques suggested recently are introduced. The nonlinear optical technique that utilizes stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for spectral imaging of biomedical targets is presented lastly. The strong signals of SRS permit us to get vibrational information of molecules in the live cell or tissue in real time. The vibrational information of unstained or unlabeled molecules is crucial especially for medical applications. The 3D information due to the optical nonlinearity is also the attractive feature of SRS spectral microscopy.

  11. Deep Space Test Bed for Radiation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Adcock, Leonard; Apple, Jeffery; Christl, Mark; Cleveand, William; Cox, Mark; Dietz, Kurt; Ferguson, Cynthia; Fountain, Walt; Ghita, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    The Deep Space Test-Bed (DSTB) Facility is designed to investigate the effects of galactic cosmic rays on crews and systems during missions to the Moon or Mars. To gain access to the interplanetary ionizing radiation environment the DSTB uses high-altitude polar balloon flights. The DSTB provides a platform for measurements to validate the radiation transport codes that are used by NASA to calculate the radiation environment within crewed space systems. It is also designed to support other Exploration related investigations such as measuring the shielding effectiveness of candidate spacecraft and habitat materials, testing new radiation monitoring instrumentation and flight avionics and investigating the biological effects of deep space radiation. We describe the work completed thus far in the development of the DSTB and its current status.

  12. Inner and outer waste storage vaults with leak-testing accessibility

    SciTech Connect

    Splinter, B.C.

    1985-04-23

    A storage arrangement for waste materials of the type which tend to pollute the environment consists of a waterproof reinforced concrete vault, preferably located underground, and a permanent reinforced concrete storage vault within the underground vault and spaced from the walls thereof by a water lock. Sealed containers filled with chemical or nuclear waste are deposited in the permanent storage vault and sealed therein with bitumen. The underground vault is provided with an access opening to the water lock to enable testing of the water periodically for contamination due to leakage from the permanent storage vault. If no leakage is evident after a predetermined time period has elapsed, the permanent storage vault is removed from the underground vault and shipped to a permanent storage site.

  13. Towards testing quantum physics in deep space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbaek, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    MAQRO is a proposal for a medium-sized space mission to use the unique environment of deep space in combination with novel developments in space technology and quantum technology to test the foundations of physics. The goal is to perform matter-wave interferometry with dielectric particles of up to 10^{11} atomic mass units and testing for deviations from the predictions of quantum theory. Novel techniques from quantum optomechanics with optically trapped particles are to be used for preparing the test particles for these experiments. The core elements of the instrument are placed outside the spacecraft and insulated from the hot spacecraft via multiple thermal shields allowing to achieve cryogenic temperatures via passive cooling and ultra-high vacuum levels by venting to deep space. In combination with low force-noise microthrusters and inertial sensors, this allows realizing an environment well suited for long coherence times of macroscopic quantum superpositions and long integration times. Since the original proposal in 2010, significant progress has been made in terms of technology development and in refining the instrument design. Based on these new developments, we submitted/will submit updated versions of the MAQRO proposal in 2015 and 2016 in response to Cosmic-Vision calls of ESA for a medium-sized mission. A central goal has been to address and overcome potentially critical issues regarding the readiness of core technologies and to provide realistic concepts for further technology development. We present the progress on the road towards realizing this ground-breaking mission harnessing deep space in novel ways for testing the foundations of physics, a technology pathfinder for macroscopic quantum technology and quantum optomechanics in space.

  14. Space station ECLSS simplified integrated test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathyrn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the Space Station Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) was conducted. The first in a series of three integrated Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system tests, the primary objectives of the SIT were to verify proper operation of ECLS subsystems functioning in an integrated fashion as well as to gather preliminary performance data for the partial ECLS system used in the test. A description of the SIT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements and water and gas samples taken during the test are included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test is reported providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item.

  15. Space simulation test for thermal control materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardgrove, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Tests were run in TRW's Combined Environment Facility to examine the degradation of thermal control materials in a simulated space environment. Thermal control materials selected for the test were those presently being used on spacecraft or predicted to be used within the next few years. The geosynchronous orbit environment was selected as the most interesting. One of the goals was to match degradation of those materials with available flight data. Another aim was to determine if degradation can adequately be determined with accelerated or short term ground tests.

  16. Resistance of spacecraft isolates to outer space for planetary protection purposes -first results of the experiment PROTECT of the EXPOSE-E mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda; Moeller, Ralf

    Spore-forming microbes are of particular concern in the context of planetary protection, be-cause their endospores are highly resistant to a variety of environmental extremes, including certain sterilization procedures and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary sur-faces (Nicholson et al., 2000; Horneck et al. 2009). Furthermore, isolates from space craft and space craft assembly facilities have been identified that form spores of an elevated resistance to various physical and chemical conditions, such as ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress (La Duc et al., 2007). This observation led to the supposition that the spe-cial conditions of ultraclean spacecraft assembly facilities and the applied spacecraft cleaning and decontamination measures cause a selection of the most resistant organisms as survivors. To test this hypothesis, spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 isolated from these environments as well as spores of the laboratory strain B. subtilis 168 were subjected to selected parameters of space in the experiment PROTECT during the EXPOSE-E mission (February 7, 2008 -September 12, 2009), attached to the EuTEF platform outside of the Columbus module of the International Space Station. The spores were mounted as dry layers onto spacecraft-qualified material (aluminum coupons) and exposed to the following parameters of space, applied sep-arately or in selected combinations: (i) space vacuum, (ii) solar extraterrestrial UV radiation including vacuum-UV, (iii) simulated Mars atmosphere and UV radiation climate, and (iv) galactic cosmic radiation. After recovery, visual inspection showed color changes of the sun-exposed spore samples from white to brownish demonstrating photochemical damage caused by solar extraterrestrial UV radiation. On-going analyses include studies of viability and capabil-ity of repair of damage, mutagenic spectrum, e.g. trp-revertants, rifampicin-resistant mutants, DNA lesion, global gene expression, and genomic and

  17. Space Shuttle Orbiter Approach and Landing Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Approach and Landing Test Program consisted of a series of steps leading to the demonstration of the capability of the Space Shuttle orbiter to safely approach and land under conditions similar to those planned for the final phases of an orbital flight. The tests were conducted with the orbiter mounted on top of a specially modified carrier aircraft. The first step provided airworthiness and performance verification of the carrier aircraft after modification. The second step consisted of three taxi tests and five flight tests with an inert unmanned orbiter. The third step consisted of three mated tests with an active manned orbiter. The fourth step consisted of five flights in which the orbiter was separated from the carrier aircraft. For the final two flights, the orbiter tail cone was replaced by dummy engines to simulate the actual orbital configuration. Landing gear braking and steering tests were accomplished during rollouts following the free flight landings. Ferry testing was integrated into the Approach and Landing Test Program to the extent possible. In addition, four ferry test flights were conducted with the orbiter mated to the carrier aircraft in the ferry configuration after the free-flight tests were completed.

  18. Space Power Facility Readiness for Space Station Power System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roger L.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides information which shows that the NASA Lewis Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) will be ready to execute the Space Station electric power system thermal vacuum chamber testing. The SPF is located at LeRC West (formerly the Plum Brook Station), Sandusky, Ohio. The SPF is the largest space environmental chamber in the world, having an inside horizontal diameter of 100 ft. and an inside height at the top of the hemisphere of 122 ft. The vacuum system can achieve a pressure lower than 1 x 10(exp -5) Torr. The cryoshroud, cooled by gaseous nitrogen, can reach a temperature of -250 F, and is 80 ft. long x 40 ft. wide x 22 ft. high. There is access to the chamber through two 50 ft. x 50 ft. doors. Each door opens into an assembly area about 150 ft. long x 70 ft. wide x 80 ft. high. Other available facilities are offices, shop area, data acquisition system with 930 pairs of hard lines, 7 megawatts of power to chamber, 245K gal. liquid nitrogen storage, cooling tower, natural gas, service air, and cranes up to 25 tons.

  19. Langley aeronautics and space test highlights, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The role of the Langley Research Center is to perform basic and applied research necessary for the advancement of aeronautics and space flight, to generate new and advanced concepts for the accomplishment of related national goals, and to provide research advice, technological support, and assistance to other NASA installations, other government agencies, and industry. Some of the significant tests which were performed during calendar year 1983 in Langley test facilities, a number of which are unique in the world are highlighted. Both the broad range of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are illustrated.

  20. Space shuttle propellant constitutive law verification tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, James R.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Propellants Task (Task 2.0) on the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program (SPIP), a database of material properties was generated for the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) PBAN-based propellant. A parallel effort on the Propellants Task was the generation of an improved constitutive theory for the PBAN propellant suitable for use in a finite element analysis (FEA) of the RSRM. The outcome of an analysis with the improved constitutive theory would be more reliable prediction of structural margins of safety. The work described in this report was performed by Materials Laboratory personnel at Thiokol Corporation/Huntsville Division under NASA contract NAS8-39619, Mod. 3. The report documents the test procedures for the refinement and verification tests for the improved Space Shuttle RSRM propellant material model, and summarizes the resulting test data. TP-H1148 propellant obtained from mix E660411 (manufactured February 1989) which had experienced ambient igloo storage in Huntsville, Alabama since January 1990, was used for these tests.

  1. The Need to Update Policies for Science, Exploration, Use and Protection in Outer Space: Learning from Experiences of the Antarctic Treaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, Margaret; Sterns, Patricia; Tennen, Leslie

    The Outer Space Treaty and its planetary protection provisions have served the science and space communities for over four decades in protecting planetary environments from biolog-ical contamination. However, the increasing pace of planned robotic and human missions, combined with our changed understanding of habitability and planetary environments, bring new challenges to environmental stewardship beyond Earth. This presentation reviews current environmental and planetary protection policies under the Outer Space Treaty and identifies specific gaps that could be problematic for the scientific community in the years and decades ahead. A comparison of the Antarctic Treaty and the Outer Space Treaty is also useful to identify important similarities and differences in approaches to environmental protection and management. Since both treaties aim to safeguard resources for humankind and ensure peace-ful scientific exploration and cooperation, it is instructive to analyze how each Treaty and its policies have been revised over time in response to various challenges— scientific, environmen-tal, commercial and otherwise. This comparison suggests that the space science community should become proactively involved in addressing issues of preservation, protection, and use of planetary environments, whether for science exploration or other activities. Perhaps the time has come to re-evaluate our piecemeal approach to planetary management, and undertake coordinated, international planning to develop a comprehensive framework for environmental management and decision making, one that applies to all types of human activities —not just scientific.

  2. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  3. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalosky, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  4. Diagenetic patterns and pore space distribution along a platform to outer-shelf transect (Urgonian limestone, Barremian-Aptian, SE France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonide, Philippe; Fournier, François; Reijmer, John J. G.; Vonhof, Hubert; Borgomano, Jean; Dijk, Jurrien; Rosenthal, Maelle; van Goethem, Manon; Cochard, Jean; Meulenaars, Karlien

    2014-06-01

    The Urgonian limestones of Late Barremian/Early Aptian from Provence (SE, France) are characterized by the occurrence of microporous limestones at regional scale alternating with tight carbonates. This study, based on petrographical (sediment texture, facies) and diagenetical analyses (cement stratigraphy, porosity and isotope geochemistry) of more than 800 limestone samples provides insight into the parameters controlling the genesis, preservation or occlusion of microporosity along an inner platform to outer shelf transect. The tight and microporous Urgonian limestones from Provence can be grouped into 5 rock-types based on textures, associated depositional environments, porosity and pore-type, being: (1) tight inner-platform: TIP; (2) porous inner platform: PIP; (3) tight outer platform: TOP; (4) porous outer platform: POP and (5) tight outer shelf: TOS. In tight (TIP, TOP and TOS types) limestones intergranular and intragranular pore spaces were entirely occluded by early marine and/or early meteoric cementation, whereas in microporous (PIP, POP) limestones a significant fraction of the intergranular macroporosity was preserved during early and shallow burial diagenesis. Micrite neomorphism (hybrid Ostwald ripening process) occurred during meteoric shallow burial diagenesis in PIP and POP limestones during the regional Durancian Uplift event (Albian-Lower Cenomanian). This process resulted in microporosity enhancement and preservation. Circulation of meteoric fluids during exhumation produces intercrystalline microporosity enhancement and moldic porosity development. The present study documents the important role that both early diagenetic and depositional cycles and long-term tectonic processes have on pore space evolution and distribution in Mesozoic platform carbonates.

  5. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  6. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  7. International Space Station Cathode Life Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate adequate lifetime and performance capabilities of a hollow cathode for use on the International Space Station (ISS) plasma contactor system, life tests of multiple hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs) were initiated at operating conditions simulating on-orbit operation. Three HCAs are presently being tested. These HCAs are operated with a continuous 6 sccm xenon flow rate and 3 A anode current. Emission current requirements are simulated with a square waveform consisting of 50 minutes at a 2.5 A emission current and 40 minutes with no emission current. As of July 1998, these HCAs have accumulated between 1 1,700 and 14,200 hours. While there have been changes in operatin, behavior the three HCAs continue to operate stably within ISS specifications and are expected to demonstrate the required lifetime.

  8. Current Hypersonic and Space Vehicle Flight Test and Instrumentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-22

    412TW-PA-15264 CURRENT HYPERSONIC AND SPACE VEHICLE FLIGHT TEST AND INSTRUMENTATION John J. Spravka* and Timothy R. Jorris† AIR FORCE TEST...DATES COVERED (From - To) 22 – 26 July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Current Hypersonic and Space Vehicle Flight Test and Instrumentation...utility can be leveraged by a wide range of flight test programs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hypersonic, flight test, instrumentation, space access, space

  9. A New Acoustic Test Facility at Alcatel Space Test Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurat, A.; Jezequel, L.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the obsolescence of its acoustic test facility, Alcatel Space has initiated the investment of a large acoustic chamber on its test centre located in Cannes, south of France. This paper presents the main specification elaborated to design the facility, and the solution chosen : it will be located on a dedicated area of the existing test centre and will be based on technical solution already used in similar facilities over the world. The main structure consists in a chamber linked to an external envelope (concrete building) through suspension aiming at decoupling the vibration and preventing from seismic risks. The noise generation system is based on the use of Wyle modulators located on the chamber roof. Gaseous nitrogen is produced by a dedicated gas generator developed by Air-Liquide that could deliver high flow rate with accurate pressure and temperature controls. The control and acquisition system is based on existing solution implemented on the vibration facilities of the test centre. With the start of the construction in May 2004, the final acceptance tests are planned for April 2005, and the first satellites to be tested are planned for May 2005.

  10. SpaceX Test Fires Engine Prototype

    NASA Video Gallery

    One of NASA's industry partners, SpaceX, fires its new SuperDraco engine prototype in preparation for the ninth milestone to be completed under SpaceX's funded Space Act Agreement (SAA) with NASA's...

  11. Testing of tactile sensors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Lisa; Weadon, Timothy L.; Evans, Thomas; DeVallance, David B.; Sabolsky, Edward M.

    2015-03-01

    There is a need to integrate tactile sensing into robotic manipulators performing tasks in space environments, including those used to repair satellites. Integration can be achieved by embedding specialized tactile sensors. Reliable and consistent signal interpretation can be obtained by ensuring that sensors with a suitable sensing mechanism are selected based on operational demands, and that materials used within the sensors do not change structurally under vacuum and expected applied pressures, and between temperatures of -80°C to +120°C. The sensors must be able to withstand space environmental conditions and remain adequately sensitive throughout their operating life. Additionally, it is necessary to integrate the sensors into the target system with minimum disturbance while remaining responsive to applied loads. Previous work has been completed to characterize sensors within the selected temperature and pressure ranges. The current work builds on this investigation by embedding these sensors in different geometries and testing the response measured among varying configurations. Embedding material selection was aided by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) to determine stress/strain behavior for adhesives and compliant layers used to keep the sensors in place and distribute stresses evenly. Electromechanical characterization of the embedded sensor packages was conducted by using the DMA in tandem with an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR) meter. Methods for embedding the sensor packages were developed with the aid of finite element analysis and physical testing to account for specific geometrical constraints. Embedded sensor prototypes were tested within representative models of potential embedding locations to compare final embedded sensor performance.

  12. Thousands gather to watch a Space Shuttle Main Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Approximately 13,000 people fill the grounds at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center for the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. The test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anniversary celebration of the first Space Shuttle mission.

  13. Irreducible Tests for Space Mission Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    As missions extend further into space, the modeling and simulation of their every action and instruction becomes critical. The greater the distance between Earth and the spacecraft, the smaller the window for communication becomes. Therefore, through modeling and simulating the planned operations, the most efficient sequence of commands can be sent to the spacecraft. The Space Mission Sequencing Software is being developed as the next generation of sequencing software to ensure the most efficient communication to interplanetary and deep space mission spacecraft. Aside from efficiency, the software also checks to make sure that communication during a specified time is even possible, meaning that there is not a planet or moon preventing reception of a signal from Earth or that two opposing commands are being given simultaneously. In this way, the software not only models the proposed instructions to the spacecraft, but also validates the commands as well.To ensure that all spacecraft communications are sequenced properly, a timeline is used to structure the data. The created timelines are immutable and once data is as-signed to a timeline, it shall never be deleted nor renamed. This is to prevent the need for storing and filing the timelines for use by other programs. Several types of timelines can be created to accommodate different types of communications (activities, measurements, commands, states, events). Each of these timeline types requires specific parameters and all have options for additional parameters if needed. With so many combinations of parameters available, the robustness and stability of the software is a necessity. Therefore a baseline must be established to ensure the full functionality of the software and it is here where the irreducible tests come into use.

  14. “Where Do Auditory Hallucinations Come From?”—A Brain Morphometry Study of Schizophrenia Patients With Inner or Outer Space Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Plaze, Marion; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Penttilä, Jani; Januel, Dominique; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Bellivier, Franck; Andoh, Jamila; Galinowski, André; Gallarda, Thierry; Artiges, Eric; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Mangin, Jean-François; Martinot, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations are a cardinal symptom of schizophrenia. Bleuler and Kraepelin distinguished 2 main classes of hallucinations: hallucinations heard outside the head (outer space, or external, hallucinations) and hallucinations heard inside the head (inner space, or internal, hallucinations). This distinction has been confirmed by recent phenomenological studies that identified 3 independent dimensions in auditory hallucinations: language complexity, self-other misattribution, and spatial location. Brain imaging studies in schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations have already investigated language complexity and self-other misattribution, but the neural substrate of hallucination spatial location remains unknown. Magnetic resonance images of 45 right-handed patients with schizophrenia and persistent auditory hallucinations and 20 healthy right-handed subjects were acquired. Two homogeneous subgroups of patients were defined based on the hallucination spatial location: patients with only outer space hallucinations (N = 12) and patients with only inner space hallucinations (N = 15). Between-group differences were then assessed using 2 complementary brain morphometry approaches: voxel-based morphometry and sulcus-based morphometry. Convergent anatomical differences were detected between the patient subgroups in the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ). In comparison to healthy subjects, opposite deviations in white matter volumes and sulcus displacements were found in patients with inner space hallucination and patients with outer space hallucination. The current results indicate that spatial location of auditory hallucinations is associated with the rTPJ anatomy, a key region of the “where” auditory pathway. The detected tilt in the sulcal junction suggests deviations during early brain maturation, when the superior temporal sulcus and its anterior terminal branch appear and merge. PMID:19666833

  15. Sandwich module testing for space solar power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Paul

    Solar power satellites have been envisioned as a means to provide electricity for terrestrial use. The approach entails collection of solar energy in space and its wireless transmission to the earth. This potentially gives the benefit of provision of baseload power while avoiding the losses due to the day/night cycle and tropospheric effects that are associated with terrestrial solar power. Proponents have contended that the implementation of such systems could offer energy security, environmental, and technological advantages to those who would undertake their development. Among recent implementations commonly proposed for SSP, the Modular Symmetrical Concentrator and other modular concepts have received considerable attention. Each employs an array of modules for performing conversion of concentrated sunlight into microwaves or laser beams for transmission to earth. The research described herein details efforts in the development and testing of photovoltaic arrays, power electronics, microwave conversion electronics, and antennas for 2.45 GHz microwave-based “ sandwich” module prototypes. Prototypes were designed, fabricated, and subjected to the challenging conditions inherent in the space environment, including the solar concentration levels in which an array of modules might be required to operate.

  16. Teacher in Space Participants testing space food in orientation session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher in Space Participant Christa McAuliffe appears to be enjoying her first taste of space food during an orientation session in JSC's life sciences laboratory (39977); McAuliffe, left, appears to be deciding what she thinks of a piece of space food she tastes during an orientation session. Barbara R. Morgan, backup to McAuliffe, samples an apricot. Dr. C.T. Bourland, a dietician specialist, assists the two (39978); McAuliffe (left) chews on a morsel while Morgan reaches for a bite. Dr. Bourland looks on (39979).

  17. Materials Tested on the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Miria Finckenor, a materials engineer, analyzes samples in her laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The materials spent several years exposed to the harsh space env...

  18. Fourteenth Space Simulation Conference: Testing for a Permanent Presence in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences Fourteenth Space Simulation Conference, Testing for a Permanent Presence in Space, provided participants a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation, and protection, contamination, and techniques of test measurements.

  19. Fifteenth Space Simulation Conference: Support the Highway to Space Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences Fifteenth Space Simulation Conference, Support the Highway to Space Through Testing, provided participants a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and techniques of test measurements.

  20. Modal testing of the Space Station Work Package 2 elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. G.

    Finite element models of Space Station Freedom are used to calculate dynamic loads and stresses and guidance and control loop parameters. In order to verify these models, modal testing of space station hardware is required. The program consists of ground and on-orbit tests. Major launch elements and on-orbit subassemblies are tested on the ground. The on-orbit portion consists of testing the entire space station by measuring the response to patterned thruster firings.

  1. Space telescope observatory management system preliminary test and verification plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, J. S.; Kaldenbach, C. F.; Williams, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary plan for the Space Telescope Observatory Management System Test and Verification (TAV) is provided. Methodology, test scenarios, test plans and procedure formats, schedules, and the TAV organization are included. Supporting information is provided.

  2. On the prospects for testing the Dvali Gabadadze Porrati gravity model with the outer planets of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.; Giudice, G.

    2006-08-01

    The multidimensional braneworld gravity model proposed by Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati was primarily put forward to explain the observed acceleration of the expansion of the Universe without resorting to dark energy. One of the most intriguing features of such a model is that it also predicts small effects on the orbital motion of test particles, which could be tested in such a way that local measurements at Solar System scales would allow us to get information on the global properties of the Universe. Lue and Starkman derived a secular extra-perihelion ω precession of 5 × 10-4 arcsec per century, while Iorio showed that the mean longitude λ is affected by a secular precession of about 10-3 arcsec per century. Up to now, the observational efforts have focused on the dynamics of the inner planets of the Solar System whose orbits are the best known via radar ranging. Since the competing Newtonian and Einsteinian effects reduce with increasing distances, it would be possible to argue that an analysis of the orbital dynamics of the outer planets of the Solar System, with particular emphasis on Saturn because of the ongoing Cassini mission with its precision ranging instrumentation, could be helpful in evidencing the predicted new features of motion. In this paper we investigate this possibility by comparing both analytical and numerical calculations with the latest results in the planetary ephemeris field. Unfortunately, the current level of accuracy rules out this appealing possibility.

  3. SSME testing technology at the John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kynard, Mike; Dill, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    An effective capability for testing the Space Shuttle Main Engine is described. The test complex utilizes a number of sophisticated test stands, test support facilities, and control centers to conduct development testing and flight acceptance testing at both nominal and off-nominal conditions.

  4. Space shuttle orbiter vehicle star tracker test program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development model test program was written to provide guidance for essential star tracker test support to the Space Shuttle Orbiter Program. The program organization included test equipment preparation, prototype baseline/acceptance tests, prototype total performance tests, and prototype special tests. Test configurations, preparation phase, documentation, scheduling, and manpower requirements are discussed. The test program permits an early evaluation of the tracker's performance prior to completion and testing of the final flight models.

  5. ISS Update: Testing Space Station Gear

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Monica Visinsky, test coordinator for the Japanese Experiment Module ORU Transfer Interface, about testing an airlock transfer device to pass orbi...

  6. Space Launch System Begins Acoustic Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., have assembled a collection of thrusters to stand in for the various propulsion elements in a scale model version of NASA’s S...

  7. Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronstein, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, working to a 2018 launch date. Ground testing for the JWST will occur in two test campaigns, at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center. The talk describes the JWST and its optical ground testing, highlighting the roles of many of the University of Rochester Institute of Optics' alumni as well as current faculty and students.

  8. 20th Space Simulation Conference: The Changing Testing Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences' Twentieth Space Simulation Conference, "The Changing Testing Paradigm" provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme "The Changing Testing Paradigm."

  9. 20th Space Simulation Conference: The Changing Testing Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph L., III (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology's Twentieth Space Simulation Conference, "The Changing Testing Paradigm" provided participants with a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, atomic oxygen, program/system testing, dynamics testing, contamination, and materials. The papers presented at this conference and the resulting discussions carried out the conference theme "The Changing Testing Paradigm."

  10. Space Simulation, 7th. [facilities and testing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Space simulation facilities and techniques are outlined that encompass thermal scale modeling, computerized simulations, reentry materials, spacecraft contamination, solar simulation, vacuum tests, and heat transfer studies.

  11. Probability Spaces, Hilbert Spaces, and The Axioms of Test Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.

    1975-01-01

    Classical test theory findings can be derived from the concepts of conditional expectation, conditional independence, and related notions. It is shown that these concepts provide precisely the formalism needed to obtain the classical results with minimal assumptions and with greatest economy in the methods of proof. (RC)

  12. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Subpanel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, George C.; Warren, John W.; Martinell, John; Clark, John S.; Perkins, David

    1993-01-01

    On 20 Jul. 1989, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, President George Bush proclaimed his vision for manned space exploration. He stated, 'First for the coming decade, for the 1990's, Space Station Freedom, the next critical step in our space endeavors. And next, for the new century, back to the Moon. Back to the future. And this time, back to stay. And then, a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet, a manned mission to Mars.' On 2 Nov. 1989, the President approved a national space policy reaffirming the long range goal of the civil space program: to 'expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system.' And on 11 May 1990, he specified the goal of landing Astronauts on Mars by 2019, the 50th anniversary of man's first steps on the Moon. To safely and ever permanently venture beyond near Earth environment as charged by the President, mankind must bring to bear extensive new technologies. These include heavy lift launch capability from Earth to low-Earth orbit, automated space rendezvous and docking of large masses, zero gravity countermeasures, and closed loop life support systems. One technology enhancing, and perhaps enabling, the piloted Mars missions is nuclear propulsion, with great benefits over chemical propulsion. Asserting the potential benefits of nuclear propulsion, NASA has sponsored workshops in Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and has initiated a tri-agency planning process to ensure that appropriate resources are engaged to meet this exciting technical challenge. At the core of this planning process, NASA, DOE, and DOD established six Nuclear Propulsion Technical Panels in 1991 to provide groundwork for a possible tri-agency Nuclear Propulsion Program and to address the President's vision by advocating an aggressive program in nuclear propulsion. To this end the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel has focused it energies; this final report

  13. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Subpanel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, George C.; Warren, John W.; Martinell, John; Clark, John S.; Perkins, David

    1993-04-01

    On 20 Jul. 1989, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, President George Bush proclaimed his vision for manned space exploration. He stated, 'First for the coming decade, for the 1990's, Space Station Freedom, the next critical step in our space endeavors. And next, for the new century, back to the Moon. Back to the future. And this time, back to stay. And then, a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet, a manned mission to Mars.' On 2 Nov. 1989, the President approved a national space policy reaffirming the long range goal of the civil space program: to 'expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system.' And on 11 May 1990, he specified the goal of landing Astronauts on Mars by 2019, the 50th anniversary of man's first steps on the Moon. To safely and ever permanently venture beyond near Earth environment as charged by the President, mankind must bring to bear extensive new technologies. These include heavy lift launch capability from Earth to low-Earth orbit, automated space rendezvous and docking of large masses, zero gravity countermeasures, and closed loop life support systems. One technology enhancing, and perhaps enabling, the piloted Mars missions is nuclear propulsion, with great benefits over chemical propulsion. Asserting the potential benefits of nuclear propulsion, NASA has sponsored workshops in Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and has initiated a tri-agency planning process to ensure that appropriate resources are engaged to meet this exciting technical challenge. At the core of this planning process, NASA, DOE, and DOD established six Nuclear Propulsion Technical Panels in 1991 to provide groundwork for a possible tri-agency Nuclear Propulsion Program and to address the President's vision by advocating an aggressive program in nuclear propulsion. To this end the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel has focused it energies; this final report

  14. Stennis Holds Last Planned Space Shuttle Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With 520 seconds of shake, rattle and roar on July 29, 2009 NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center marked the end of an era for testing the space shuttle main engines that have powered the nation's Space Shuttle Program for nearly three decades.

  15. International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.

    2000-01-01

    Performance testing of the International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly flight hardware in the United States Laboratory during 1999 is described. The CDRA exceeded carbon dioxide performance specifications and operated flawlessly. Data from this test is presented.

  16. Space power distribution system technology. Volume 3: Test facility design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Cannady, M. D.; Cassinelli, J. E.; Farber, B. F.; Lurie, C.; Fleck, G. W.; Lepisto, J. W.; Messner, A.; Ritterman, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The AMPS test facility is a major tool in the attainment of more economical space power. The ultimate goals of the test facility, its primary functional requirements and conceptual design, and the major equipment it contains are discussed.

  17. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T,; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. To be discussed are: 1.Neutral pressures, neutral gases, and vacuum chamber sizes. 2. Electron and ion densities, plasma uniformity, sample sizes, and Debuy lengths. 3. Biasing samples versus self-generated voltages. Floating samples versus grounded. 4. Power supplies and current limits. Isolation of samples from power supplies during arcs. 5. Arc circuits. Capacitance during biased arc-threshold tests. Capacitance during sustained arcing and damage tests. Arc detection. Prevention sustained discharges during testing. 6. Real array or structure samples versus idealized samples. 7. Validity of LEO tests for GEO samples. 8. Extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests. 9. Snapover and current collection at positive sample bias. Glows at positive bias. Kapon (R) pyrolisis. 10. Trigger arc thresholds. Sustained arc thresholds. Paschen discharge during sustained arcing. 11. Testing for Paschen discharge threshold. Testing for dielectric breakdown thresholds. Testing for tether arcing. 12. Testing in very dense plasmas (ie thruster plumes). 13. Arc mitigation strategies. Charging mitigation strategies. Models. 14. Analysis of test results

  18. Prototype space erectable radiator system ground test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, Joseph P.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype heat rejecting system is being developed by NASA-JSC for possible space station applications. This modular system, the Space-Erectable Radiator System Ground Test Article (SERS-GTA) with high-capacity radiator panels, can be installed and replaced on-orbit. The design, fabrication and testing of a representative ground test article are discussed. Acceptance test data for the heat pipe radiator panel and the whiffletree clamping mechanism have been presented.

  19. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This joint mobility KC lecture included information from two papers, "A Method for and Issues Associated with the Determination of Space Suit Joint Requirements" and "Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing," as presented for the International Conference on Environmental Systems in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The first paper discusses historical joint torque testing methodologies and approaches that were tested in 2008 and 2009. The second paper discusses the testing that was completed in 2009 and 2010.

  20. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  1. 16 CFR 1509.6 - Component-spacing test method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test method. 1509.6 Section 1509.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.6 Component-spacing test method. The apex of...

  2. 16 CFR 1509.5 - Component-spacing test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Component-spacing test apparatus. 1509.5 Section 1509.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.5 Component-spacing test apparatus. (a)...

  3. 16 CFR 1509.5 - Component-spacing test apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component-spacing test apparatus. 1509.5 Section 1509.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1509.5 Component-spacing test apparatus. (a)...

  4. NASA Johnson Space Center: White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin; Kowalski, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the testing facilities and laboratories available at the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF). The mission of WSTF is to provide the expertise and infrastructure to test and evaluate spacecraft materials, components and propulsion systems that enable the safe exploration and use of space. There are nine rocket test stands in two major test areas, six altitude test stands, three ambient test stands,

  5. Launch site payload test configurations for Space Shuttle scientific payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuiling, Roelof L.; Mayer, Maynette S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the test configurations which are utilized in prelaunch testing at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for those scientific payloads which are flown in the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) Space Shuttle. A generalized view of the payload prelaunch processing is provided and the major types of payload configurations are described. The majority of the prelaunch test activity involves the verification of experiment functions, compatibility of experiment-to-carrier interfaces and payload-to-orbiter interfaces. The Shuttle's avionics system is presented as it relates to payloads. The testing of Spacelab experiments and the experiment-to-Spacelab compatibility verification is described as is the test activity for partial payloads and their experiments. Test operations which involve simulated orbiter interface verification and actual payload-to-orbiter testing are discussed. An overview of the Space Station payload processing concept is presented.

  6. Preliminary Testing of a Pressurized Space Suit and Candidate Fabrics Under Simulated Mars Dust Storm and Dust Devil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; deLeon, Pablo G.; Lee, Pascal; McCue, Terry R.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Thrasher, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In August 2009 YAP Films (Toronto) received permission from all entities involved to create a documentary film illustrating what it might be like to be on the surface of Mars in a space suit during a dust storm or in a dust devil. The science consultants on this project utilized this opportunity to collect data which could be helpful to assess the durability of current space suit construction to the Martian environment. The NDX?1 prototype planetary space suit developed at the University of North Dakota was used in this study. The suit features a hard upper torso garment, and a soft lower torso and boots assembly. On top of that, a nylon-cotton outer layer is used to protect the suit from dust. Unmanned tests were carried out in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) at the NASA Ames Research Center, with the suit pressurized to 10 kPa gauge. These tests blasted the space suit upper torso and helmet, and a collection of nine candidate outer layer fabrics, with wind-borne simulant for five different 10 minute tests under both terrestrial and Martian surface pressures. The infiltration of the dust through the outer fabric of the space suit was photographically documented. The nine fabric samples were analyzed under light and electron microscopes for abrasion damage. Manned tests were carried out at Showbiz Studios (Van Nuys, CA) with the pressure maintained at 20?2 kPa gauge. A large fan-created vortex lifted Martian dust simulant (Fullers Earth or JSC Mars?1) off of the floor, and one of the authors (Lee) wearing the NDX?1 space suit walked through it to judge both subjectively and objectively how the suit performed under these conditions. Both the procedures to scale the tests to Martian conditions and the results of the infiltration and abrasion studies will be discussed.

  7. Preliminary Testing of a Pressurized Space Suit and Candidate Fabrics Under Simulated Mars Dust Storm and Dust Devil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; deLeon, Pablo G.; Lee, Pascal; McCue, Terry R.; Hodgson, Edward W.; Thrasher, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In August 2009 YAP Films (Toronto) received permission from all entities involved to create a documentary film illustrating what it might be like to be on the surface of Mars in a space suit during a dust storm or in a dust devil. The science consultants on this project utilized this opportunity to collect data which could be helpful to assess the durability of current space suit construction to the Martian environment. The NDX-1 prototype planetary space suit developed at the University of North Dakota was used in this study. The suit features a hard upper torso garment, and a soft lower torso and boots assembly. On top of that, a nylon-cotton outer layer is used to protect the suit from dust. Unmanned tests were carried out in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) at the NASA Ames Research Center, with the suit pressurized to 10 kPa gauge. These tests blasted the space suit upper torso and helmet, and a collection of nine candidate outer layer fabrics, with wind-borne simulant for five different 10 min tests under both terrestrial and Martian surface pressures. The infiltration of the dust through the outer fabric of the space suit was photographically documented. The nine fabric samples were analyzed under light and electron microscopes for abrasion damage. Manned tests were carried out at Showbiz Studios (Van Nuys, California) with the pressure maintained at 20 2 kPa gauge. A large fan-created vortex lifted Martian dust simulant (Fullers Earth or JSC Mars-1) off of the floor, and one of the authors (Lee) wearing the NDX-1 space suit walked through it to judge both subjectively and objectively how the suit performed under these conditions. Both the procedures to scale the tests to Martian conditions and the results of the infiltration and abrasion studies will be discussed.

  8. Structure and properties of polymeric composite materials during 1501 days outer space exposure at Salyut-7 orbital station

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, O.V.; Nikishin, E.F.

    1995-02-01

    Specimens of polymeric composite materials for aviation and space applications such as glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), organic fiber reinforced plastics (OFRP), and hybrid plastics (HP) based on epoxy compounds were exposed to the space environment on the surface of Salyut-7 orbital station. The space exposure lasted 1501 days as a maximum. The data relating to the change in mechanical properties, mass losses, glass transition temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient, and microstructure after various periods of exposure are given. It has been found that the change in properties is caused by the processes of binder postcuring and microerosion of the exposed surface of plastics. The phenomenon of strengthening of the surface layer of hybrid composites, due to which the nature of destruction changes at bending loads, has been revealed.

  9. Structure and properties of polymeric composite materials during 1501 days outer space exposure at Salyut-7 orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Startsev, Oleg V.; Nikishin, Eugene F.

    1995-01-01

    Specimens of polymeric composite materials for aviation and space applications such as glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), organic fiber reinforced plastics (OFRP), and hybrid plastics (HP) based on epoxy compounds were exposed to the space environment on the surface of Salyut-7 orbital station. The space exposure lasted 1501 days as a maximum. The data relating to the change in mechanical properties, mass losses, glass transition temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient, and microstructure after various periods of exposure are given. It has been found that the change in properties is caused by the processes of binder postcuring and microerosion of the exposed surface of plastics. The phenomenon of strengthening of the surface layer of hybrid composites, due to which the nature of destruction changes at bending loads, has been revealed.

  10. THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: SPECTRAL VARIATION ON KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E.; Glass, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. Twelve targets were re-observed with the WFC3 in the optical and NIR wavebands designed to complement those used during the first visit. Additionally, all of the observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A re-analysis of the optical and NIR color distribution reveals a bifurcated optical color distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colors and has correlated optical and NIR colors, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on five targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point-spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have a broad range of dynamical classes and absolute magnitudes, exhibit a broad range of apparent magnitude variations, and are found in both compositional classes. The spectrally variable objects with sufficiently accurate colors for spectral classification maintain their membership, belonging to the same class at both epochs. 2005 TV189 exhibits a sufficiently broad difference in color at the two epochs that span the full range of colors of the neutral class. This strongly argues that the neutral class is one single class with a broad range of colors, rather than the combination of multiple overlapping classes.

  11. Manned testing in a simulated space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fender, Donna L.

    1992-11-01

    A view of the facility and operational requirements involved in performing a manned thermal vacuum test is presented. The requirements fall into two major categories. The first category deals with placing the suited crewmen in a hazardous environment and assuring their safety. The second category deals with the constraints and special requirements involved with a suited crewman operating flight hardware in a 1-G environment. Design areas that deal with man rating a chamber, including fire suppression, emergency repress, emergency power, backups, reliable instrumentation and data systems, communications, television monitoring, biomedical monitoring, material compatibilities, and equipment supporting the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) are discussed. The operational issues that are peculiar to manned testing such as test rules, test procedures, test protocol, emergency drills, availability of hyperbaric facilities, test team training and certification engineering concerns for a safe mechanical and instrumentation buildup, hazard analysis, and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis are discussed. The constraints and special requirements involved with a suited crewman operating flight hardware in a 1-G environment are addressed.

  12. Manned testing in a simulated space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fender, Donna L.

    1992-01-01

    A view of the facility and operational requirements involved in performing a manned thermal vacuum test is presented. The requirements fall into two major categories. The first category deals with placing the suited crewmen in a hazardous environment and assuring their safety. The second category deals with the constraints and special requirements involved with a suited crewman operating flight hardware in a 1-G environment. Design areas that deal with man rating a chamber, including fire suppression, emergency repress, emergency power, backups, reliable instrumentation and data systems, communications, television monitoring, biomedical monitoring, material compatibilities, and equipment supporting the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) are discussed. The operational issues that are peculiar to manned testing such as test rules, test procedures, test protocol, emergency drills, availability of hyperbaric facilities, test team training and certification engineering concerns for a safe mechanical and instrumentation buildup, hazard analysis, and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis are discussed. The constraints and special requirements involved with a suited crewman operating flight hardware in a 1-G environment are addressed.

  13. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. Discussed herein are neutral gas conditions, plasma densities and uniformity, vacuum chamber sizes, sample sizes and Debye lengths, biasing samples versus self-generated voltages, floating samples versus grounded samples, test electrical conditions, arc detection, preventing sustained discharges during testing, real samples versus idealized samples, validity of LEO tests for GEO samples, extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests, snapover, current collection, and glows at positive sample bias, Kapton pyrolysis, thresholds for trigger arcs, sustained arcs, dielectric breakdown and Paschen discharge, tether arcing and testing in very dense plasmas (i.e. thruster plumes), arc mitigation strategies, charging mitigation strategies, models, and analysis of test results. Finally, the necessity of testing will be emphasized, not to the exclusion of modeling, but as part of a complete strategy for determining when and if arcs will occur, and preventing them from occurring in space.

  14. EMC Test Challenges for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  15. EMC Test Challenges for NASAs James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  16. Simulated Space Environmental Testing on Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Dennis A.; Fogdall, Larry B.; Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail; Connell, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An exploratory program has been conducted, to irradiate some mature commercial and some experimental polymer films with radiation simulating certain Earth orbits, and to obtain data about the response of each test film's reflective and tensile properties. Protocols to conduct optimized tests were considered and developed to a "prototype" level during this program. Fifteen polymer film specimens were arranged on a specially designed test fixture. The fixture featured controlled exposure areas, and protected the ends of the samples for later gripping in tensile tests. The fixture featured controlled exposure areas, and protected the ends of the samples for later gripping in tensile tests. The fixture containing the films was installed in a clean vacuum chamber where protons, electrons and solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation could simultaneously irradiate the specimens. Near realtime UV rates were used, whereas proton and electron rates were accelerated appreciably to simulate 5 years in orbit during a two month test. Periodically, the spectral reflectance of each film was measured in situ. After the end of the irradiation, final reflectance measurements were made in situ, and solar absorptance values were derived for each specimen. These samples were then measured in air for thermal emittance and for tensile strength. Most specimens withstood the irradiation intact, but with reduced reflectance (increased solar absorptance). Thermal emittance changed slightly in several materials, as did their tensile strength and elongation at break. Conclusions are drawn about the performance of the films. Simulated testing to an expected 5 year dose of electrons and protons consistent with those expected at L2 and 0.98 AU orbits and 100 equivalent solar hours exposure.

  17. Lewis Research Center space station electric power system test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Martin, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center facilities were developed to support testing of the Space Station Electric Power System. The capabilities and plans for these facilities are described. The three facilities which are required in the Phase C/D testing, the Power Systems Facility, the Space Power Facility, and the EPS Simulation Lab, are described in detail. The responsibilities of NASA Lewis and outside groups in conducting tests are also discussed.

  18. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occurs during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological experiments on animals undergoing space flight is examined. The mouse model developed was an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to one used with rats. The study was divided into two parts. The first involved determination of which immunological parameters should be observed on animals flown during space flight or studied in the suspension model. The second involved suspending mice and determining which of those immunological parameters were altered by the suspension. Rats that were actually flown in Space Shuttle SL-3 were used to test the hypotheses.

  19. Space Shuttle stability and control test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a completely automatic flight test program to test different aspects of the Shuttle flight capability during reentries is described. Data from each flight to date has been employed to devise a sequence of maneuvers which will be keyboard-punched into the Orbiter control system by the astronauts during entry phases of flight. Details of the interaction and cooperation of the Orbiter elevons and bodyflap to provide the vehicle with latitudinal and longitudinal directional control and trim are outlined. Uncertainties predicted for the control of the Orbiter during wind tunnel testing prior to actual flights have been adjusted to actual flight data, leading to the identification of actual flight regimes which need further investigation. Maneuvers scheduled for flights 5-9 are reviewed.

  20. A High-power Electric Propulsion Test Platform in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Reed, Brian; Chavers, D. Greg; Sarmiento, Charles; Cenci, Susanna; Lemmons, Neil

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the results of the preliminary phase of a NASA design study for a facility to test high-power electric propulsion systems in space. The results of this design study are intended to provide a firm foundation for subsequent detailed design and development activities leading to the deployment of a valuable space facility. The NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate is sponsoring this design project. A team from the NASA Johnson Space Center, Glenn Research Center, the Marshall Space Flight Center and the International Space Station Program Office is conducting the project. The test facility is intended for a broad range of users including government, industry and universities. International participation is encouraged. The objectives for human and robotic exploration of space can be accomplished affordably, safely and effectively with high-power electric propulsion systems. But, as thruster power levels rise to the hundreds of kilowatts and up to megawatts, their testing will pose stringent and expensive demands on existing Earth-based vacuum facilities. These considerations and the human access to near-Earth space provided by the International Space Station (ISS) have led to a renewed interest in space testing. The ISS could provide an excellent platform for a space-based test facility with the continuous vacuum conditions of the natural space environment and no chamber walls to modify the open boundary conditions of the propulsion system exhaust. The test platform could take advantage of the continuous vacuum conditions of the natural space environment. Space testing would provide open boundary conditions without walls, micro-gravity and a realistic thermal environment. Testing on the ISS would allow for direct observation of the test unit, exhaust plume and space-plasma interactions. When necessary, intervention by on-board personnel and post-test inspection would be possible. The ISS can provide electrical power, a location for

  1. Heat pipe radiators for space. [vacuum tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    An optimized flight-weight prototype fluid-header panel (heatpipe radiator system) was tested in a vacuum environment over a wide range of coolant inlet temperatures, coolant flow rates, and environmental absorbed heat fluxes. The maximum performance of the system was determined. Results are compared with earlier data obtained on a smaller fluid-header feasibility panel, and computer predictions. Freeze-thaw tests are described and the change in thaw recovery time due to the addition of a low-freezing point feeder heat pipe is evaluated. Experimental panel fin-temperature distributions are compared with calculated results.

  2. Space Shuttle External Interference Heating Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    INSPECTION PHOTOGRAPHY WINDOWS b. Perspective of tunnel test section area Fig. 1 Tunnel C Mach 4.0 Configuration 17 TEST MODEL SUPPORT INJECTION...ght Thrust S-B 5061 VERTI CAL S’IRtrr CABLE TRAY x = 33.057 x = 36.015 d.. Aft Orb /ET Attach ’Structure Instrumentation Location Vertical Strut...Cable Tray Detail Figure 4. Continued I’V \\.D " X. = 35.035 S-B 5059 LEFT TIIRUST STRUT x = 33.0~7 e • Vertical Strut x = 36.015 Aft Orb

  3. Multi-axis transient vibration testing of space objects: Test philosophy, test facility, and control strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachenmayr, Georg

    1992-01-01

    IABG has been using various servohydraulic test facilities for many years for the reproduction of service loads and environmental loads on all kinds of test objects. For more than 15 years, a multi-axis vibration test facility has been under service, originally designed for earthquake simulation but being upgraded to the demands of space testing. First tests with the DFS/STM showed good reproduction accuracy and demonstrated the feasibility of transient vibration testing of space objects on a multi-axis hydraulic shaker. An approach to structural qualification is possible by using this test philosophy. It will be outlined and its obvious advantages over the state-of-the-art single-axis test will be demonstrated by example results. The new test technique has some special requirements to the test facility exceeding those of earthquake testing. Most important is the high reproduction accuracy demanded for a sophisticated control system. The state-of-the-art approach of analog closed-loop control circuits for each actuator combined with a static decoupling network and an off-line iterative waveform control is not able to meet all the demands. Therefore, the future over-all control system is implemented as hierarchical full digital closed-loop system on a highly parallel transputer network. The innermost layer is the digital actuator controller, the second one is the MDOF-control of the table movement. The outermost layer would be the off-line iterative waveform control, which is dedicated only to deal with the interaction of test table and test object or non-linear effects. The outline of the system will be presented.

  4. Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Testing Capability: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Crave, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Finchum, Charles; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the space environment can lead to materials degradation, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. Ground based testing is critical in predicting performance NASA/MSFC's expertise and capabilities make up the most complete SEE testing capability available.

  5. The transition of ground-based space environmental effects testing to the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaat, Stephen V.; Schaefer, Glen A.; Wallace, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the space flight program at the Center for Commercial Development of Space (CCDS)--Materials for Space Structures is to provide environmentally stable structural materials to support the continued humanization and commercialization of the space frontier. Information on environmental stability will be obtained through space exposure, evaluation, documentation, and subsequent return to the supplier of the candidate material for internal investigation. This program provides engineering and scientific service to space systems development firms and also exposes CCDS development candidate materials to space environments representative of in-flight conditions. The maintenance of a technological edge in space for NASA suggests the immediate search for space materials that maintain their structural integrity and remain environmentally stable. The materials being considered for long-lived space structures are complex, high strength/weight ratio composites. In order for these new candidate materials to qualify for use in space structures, they must undergo strenuous testing to determine their reliability and stability when subjected to the space environment. Ultraviolet radiation, atomic oxygen, debris/micrometeoroids, charged particles radiation, and thermal fatigue all influence the design of space structural materials. The investigation of these environmental interactions is the key purpose of this center. Some of the topics discussed with respect to the above information include: the Space Transportation System, mission planning, spaceborne experiments, and space flight payloads.

  6. Aerodynamic Tests of the Space Launch System for Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Victor E.; Mayle, Melody N.; Blevins, John A.; Crosby, William A.; Purinton, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Aerosciences Branch (EV33) at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been responsible for a series of wind tunnel tests on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) vehicles. The primary purpose of these tests was to obtain aerodynamic data during the ascent phase and establish databases that can be used by the Guidance, Navigation, and Mission Analysis Branch (EV42) for trajectory simulations. The paper describes the test particulars regarding models and measurements and the facilities used, as well as database preparations.

  7. Safety Assurances at Space Test Centres: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon Ruiz, Raul; O'Neil, Sean; Valls, Rafel Prades

    2010-09-01

    The European Space Agency’s(ESA) experts in quality, cleanliness and contamination control, safety, test facilities and test methods have accumulated valuable experience during the performance of dedicated audits of space test centres in Europe over a period of 10 years. This paper is limited to a summary of the safety findings and provides a valuable reference to the lessons learned, identifying opportunities for improvement in the areas of risk prevention measures associated to the safety of all test centre personnel, the test specimen, the test facilities and associated infrastructure. Through the analysis of the audit results the authors present what are the main lessons learned, and conclude how an effective safety management system will contribute to successful test campaigns and have a positive impact on the cost and schedule of space projects.

  8. Space reactor ground tests, assessment of facility needs

    SciTech Connect

    Philbin, J.S.; Wemple, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses facility requirements for previously-specified, space-reactor ground tests of operating reactor prototypes. The paper also discusses engineering development tests applicable to fully-integrated space reactors and their subsystems. The development tests were derived by considering the functions and environments that the reactor might encounter in normal or abnormal launch-to-recovery sequences. Surety (safety, safeguards, and reliability) priorities will influence the final character of both the test program and the facilities requirements. Sandia facilities suitable for conducting the above tests are the main focus of this paper.

  9. Hubble space telescope six-battery test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajak, J. A.; Bush, J. R., Jr.; Lanier, J. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A test bed for a large space power system breadboard for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was designed and built to test the system under simulated orbital conditions. A discussion of the data acquisition and control subsystems designed to provide for continuous 24 hr per day operation and a general overview of the test bed is presented. The data acquisition and control subsystems provided the necessary monitoring and protection to assure safe shutdown with protection of test articles in case of loss of power or equipment failure over the life of the test (up to 5 years).

  10. Space Power Facility-Capabilities for Space Environmental Testing Within a Single Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorge, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the current and near-term environmental test capabilities of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Sandusky, Ohio. The paper will present current and near-term capabilities for conducting electromagnetic interference and compatibility testing, base-shake sinusoidal vibration testing, reverberant acoustic testing, and thermal-vacuum testing. The paper will also present modes of transportation, handling, ambient environments, and operations within the facility to conduct those tests. The SPF is in the midst of completing and activating new or refurbished capabilities which, when completed, will provide the ability to conduct most or all required full-scale end-assembly space simulation tests at a single test location. It is envisioned that the capabilities will allow a customer to perform a wide range of space simulation tests in one facility at reasonable cost.

  11. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) testing are currently taking place at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Unique to this testing is the variety of test areas and the fact that all are located in one building. The north high bay of building 4755, the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), contains the following test areas: the Subsystem Test Area, the Comparative Test Area, the Process Material Management System (PMMS), the Core Module Simulator (CMS), the End-use Equipment Facility (EEF), and the Pre-development Operational System Test (POST) Area. This paper addresses the facility that supports these test areas and briefly describes the testing in each area. Future plans for the building and Space Station module configurations will also be discussed.

  12. Space ethics to test directed panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makukov, Maxim A.; shCherbak, Vladimir I.

    2014-10-01

    The hypothesis that Earth was intentionally seeded with life by a preceding extraterrestrial civilization is believed to be currently untestable. However, analysis of the situation where humans themselves embark on seeding other planetary systems motivated by survival and propagation of life reveals at least two ethical issues calling for specific solutions. Assuming that generally intelligence evolves ethically as it evolves technologically, the same considerations might be applied to test the hypothesis of directed panspermia: if life on Earth was seeded intentionally, the two ethical requirements are expected to be satisfied, what appears to be the case.

  13. Space Environmental Effects Testing Capability at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Craven, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the effects of the environment can lead to degradation of materials, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. In response to this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world class Space Environmental Effects (SEE) expertise and test facilities to simulate the space environment. Capabilities include multiple unique test systems comprising the most complete SEE testing capability available. These test capabilities include charged particle radiation (electrons, protons, ions), ultraviolet radiation (UV), vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV), atomic oxygen, plasma effects, space craft charging, lunar surface and planetary effects, vacuum effects, and hypervelocity impacts as well as the combination of these capabilities. In addition to the uniqueness of the individual test capabilities, MSFC is the only NASA facility where the effects of the different space environments can be tested in one location. Combined with additional analytical capabilities for pre- and post-test evaluation, MSFC is a one-stop shop for materials testing and analysis. The SEE testing and analysis are performed by a team of award winning experts nationally recognized for their contributions in the study of the effects of the space environment on materials and systems. With this broad expertise in space environmental effects and the variety of test systems and equipment available, MSFC is able to customize tests with a demonstrated ability to rapidly adapt and reconfigure systems to meet customers needs. Extensive flight experiment experience bolsters this simulation and analysis capability with a comprehensive understanding of space environmental effects.

  14. Spacing, Testing, and Feedback: Helping Students Overcome Forgetting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapler, Irina V.; Cepeda, Nicholas J.; Weston, Tina

    2012-01-01

    How can students' forgetting be reduced? The spacing effect--a promising strategy from the field of cognitive psychology--might hold some of the answers. Research has demonstrated that information is remembered two to three times better if study sessions are spaced in time rather than massed together. The testing effect is another research-based…

  15. 14. Interior view of vestibule separating rehabilitation space, testing room, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of vestibule separating rehabilitation space, testing room, and corridor to workout room looking into corridor; near center of occupied portion; view to southeast. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Mess & Administration Building, 2279 Risner Drive, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  16. Modal survey testing of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) - A Space Shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.; Driskill, T. C.; Lindell, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the modal survey test of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE), a Space Shuttle payload mounted in a Spacelab flight single pallet. The test was performed by the Dynamics Test Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, AL and run in two phases. In the first phase, an unloaded orthogrid connected to the pallet with 52 tension struts was tested. This test included 73 measurement points in three directions. In the second phase, the pallet was integrated with mass simulators mounted on the flight support structure to represent the dynamics (weight and center of gravity) of the various components comprising the LITE experiment and instrumented at 213 points in 3 directions. The test article was suspended by an air bag system to simulate a free-free boundary condition. This paper presents the results obtained from the testing and analytical model correlation efforts. The effect of the suspension system on the test article is also discussed.

  17. Modal survey testing of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) - A Space Shuttle payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.; Driskill, T. C.; Lindell, M. C.

    This paper presents the results of the modal survey test of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE), a Space Shuttle payload mounted in a Spacelab flight single pallet. The test was performed by the Dynamics Test Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, AL and run in two phases. In the first phase, an unloaded orthogrid connected to the pallet with 52 tension struts was tested. This test included 73 measurement points in three directions. In the second phase, the pallet was integrated with mass simulators mounted on the flight support structure to represent the dynamics (weight and center of gravity) of the various components comprising the LITE experiment and instrumented at 213 points in 3 directions. The test article was suspended by an air bag system to simulate a free-free boundary condition. This paper presents the results obtained from the testing and analytical model correlation efforts. The effect of the suspension system on the test article is also discussed.

  18. Radiated Susceptibility Tests in Thermal Vacuum Chambers for Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anon Cancela, Manuel; Hernandez-Gomez, Daniel; Vazquez-Pascual, Mercedes; Lopez-Sanz, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    INTA EMC Area has a wide experience in performing Radiated Susceptibility (RS) tests according to civilian, military and aeronautical standards in Mode Tuned Chambers (MTC) for national and international projects; besides, INTA has two Thermal Vacuum Chamber (TVC) facilities in service for Space Systems tests. In order to perform RS tests to Space Systems in a more realistic environment, INTA EMC Area has stablished an internal research program to develop a procedure to perform this kind of tests inside a TVC as a Mode Tuned Chamber (MTC). In this paper the results of the TVC-04 validation measurements as a MTC are presented.

  19. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  20. Partial pressure analysis in space testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilford, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    For vacuum-system or test-article analysis it is often desirable to know the species and partial pressures of the vacuum gases. Residual gas or Partial Pressure Analyzers (PPA's) are commonly used for this purpose. These are mass spectrometer-type instruments, most commonly employing quadrupole filters. These instruments can be extremely useful, but they should be used with caution. Depending on the instrument design, calibration procedures, and conditions of use, measurements made with these instruments can be accurate to within a few percent, or in error by two or more orders of magnitude. Significant sources of error can include relative gas sensitivities that differ from handbook values by an order of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with pressure by as much as two orders of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with time after exposure to chemically active gases, and the dependence of the sensitivity for one gas on the pressures of other gases. However, for most instruments, these errors can be greatly reduced with proper operating procedures and conditions of use. In this paper, data are presented illustrating performance characteristics for different instruments and gases, operating parameters are recommended to minimize some errors, and calibrations procedures are described that can detect and/or correct other errors.

  1. Space Shuttle Main Engine Debris Testing Methodology and Impact Tolerances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradl, Paul R.; Stephens, Walter

    2005-01-01

    In the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster every effort is being made to determine the susceptibility of Space Shuttle elements to debris impacts. Ice and frost debris is formed around the aft heat shield closure of the orbiter and liquid hydrogen feedlines. This debris has been observed to liberate upon lift-off of the shuttle and presents potentially dangerous conditions to the Space Shuttle Main Engine. This paper describes the testing done to determine the impact tolerance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzle coolant tubes to ice strikes originating from the launch pad or other parts of the shuttle.

  2. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system testing and development progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Pedersen, Kevin; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter

    2001-02-01

    Successful development of space fission systems will require an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. Testing can be divided into two categories, non-nuclear tests and nuclear tests. Full power nuclear tests of space fission systems are expensive, time consuming, and of limited use, even in the best of programmatic environments. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. Non-nuclear tests are affordable and timely, and the cause of component and system failures can be quickly and accurately identified, MSFC is leading a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system using non-nuclear testing. This test series is carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities. If SAFE-related nuclear tests are desired, they will have a high probability of success and can be performed at existing nuclear facilities. The paper describes the SAFE non-nuclear test series, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans. .

  3. Space Fission Propulsion Testing and Development Progress. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Pedersen, Kevin; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems will require an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. Testing can be divided into two categories, non-nuclear tests and nuclear tests. Full power nuclear tests of space fission systems we expensive, time consuming, and of limited use, even in the best of programmatic environments. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. Non-nuclear tests are affordable and timely, and the cause of component and system failures can be quickly and accurately identified. MSFC is leading a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system using non-nuclear testing. This test series is carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities. If SAFE-related nuclear tests are desired they will have a high probability of success and can be performed at existing nuclear facilities. The paper describes the SAFE non-nuclear test series, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans.

  4. Psychoacoustic Testing of Modulated Blade Spacing for Main Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan; Booth, Earl R., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Psychoacoustic testing of simulated helicopter main rotor noise is described, and the subjective results are presented. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the potential acoustic benefits of main rotors with modulated (uneven) blade spacing. Sound simulations were prepared for six main rotor configurations. A baseline 4-blade main rotor with regular blade spacing was based on the Bell Model 427 helicopter. A 5-blade main rotor with regular spacing was designed to approximate the performance of the 427, but at reduced tipspeed. Four modulated rotors - one with "optimum" spacing and three alternate configurations - were derived from the 5 bladed regular spacing rotor. The sounds were played to 2 subjects at a time, with care being taken in the speaker selection and placement to ensure that the sounds were identical for each subject. A total of 40 subjects participated. For each rotor configuration, the listeners were asked to evaluate the sounds in terms of noisiness. The test results indicate little to no "annoyance" benefit for the modulated blade spacing. In general, the subjects preferred the sound of the 5-blade regular spaced rotor over any of the modulated ones. A conclusion is that modulated blade spacing is not a promising design feature to reduce the annoyance for helicopter main rotors.

  5. Molecular markers for X-ray-insensitive differentiated cells in the Inner and outer regions of the mesenchymal space in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Machiko; Kudome-Takamatsu, Tomomi; Nishimura, Osamu; An, Yang; Kashima, Makoto; Shibata, Norito; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-09-01

    Planarian's strong regenerative ability is dependent on stem cells (called neoblasts) that are X-ray-sensitive and proliferative stem cells. In addition to neoblasts, another type of X-ray-sensitive cells was newly identified by recent research. Thus, planarian's X-ray-sensitive cells can be divided into at least two populations, Type 1 and Type 2, the latter corresponding to planarian's classically defined "neoblasts". Here, we show that Type 1 cells were distributed in the outer region (OR) immediately underneath the muscle layer at all axial levels from head to tail, while the Type 2 cells were distributed in a more internal region (IR) of the mesenchymal space at the axial levels from neck to tail. To elucidate the biological significance of these two regions, we searched for genes expressed in differentiated cells that were locate close to these X-ray-sensitive cell populations in the mesenchymal space, and identified six genes mainly expressed in the OR or IR, named OR1, OR2, OR3, IR1, IR2 and IR3. The predicted amino acid sequences of these genes suggested that differentiated cells expressing OR1, OR3, IR1, or IR2 provide Type 1 and Type 2 cells with specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments.

  6. Magnetic Testing, and Modeling, Simulation and Analysis for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghosian, Mary; Narvaez, Pablo; Herman, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation (Aerospace) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems (LMSS) participated with Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the implementation of a magnetic cleanliness program of the NASA/JPL JUNO mission. The magnetic cleanliness program was applied from early flight system development up through system level environmental testing. The JUNO magnetic cleanliness program required setting-up a specialized magnetic test facility at Lockheed Martin Space Systems for testing the flight system and a testing program with facility for testing system parts and subsystems at JPL. The magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis capability was set up and performed by Aerospace to provide qualitative and quantitative magnetic assessments of the magnetic parts, components, and subsystems prior to or in lieu of magnetic tests. Because of the sensitive nature of the fields and particles scientific measurements being conducted by the JUNO space mission to Jupiter, the imposition of stringent magnetic control specifications required a magnetic control program to ensure that the spacecraft's science magnetometers and plasma wave search coil were not magnetically contaminated by flight system magnetic interferences. With Aerospace's magnetic modeling, simulation and analysis and JPL's system modeling and testing approach, and LMSS's test support, the project achieved a cost effective approach to achieving a magnetically clean spacecraft. This paper presents lessons learned from the JUNO magnetic testing approach and Aerospace's modeling, simulation and analysis activities used to solve problems such as remnant magnetization, performance of hard and soft magnetic materials within the targeted space system in applied external magnetic fields.

  7. Collisions in outer space produced an icosahedral phase in the Khatyrka meteorite never observed previously in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bindi, Luca; Lin, Chaney; Ma, Chi; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2016-12-08

    We report the first occurrence of an icosahedral quasicrystal with composition Al62.0(8)Cu31.2(8)Fe6.8(4), outside the measured equilibrium stability field at standard pressure of the previously reported Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal (AlxCuyFez, with x between 61 and 64, y between 24 and 26, z between 12 and 13%). The new icosahedral mineral formed naturally and was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite that experienced shock metamorphism, local melting (with conditions exceeding 5 GPa and 1,200 °C in some locations), and rapid cooling, all of which likely resulted from impact-induced shock in space. This is the first example of a quasicrystal composition discovered in nature prior to being synthesized in the laboratory. The new composition was found in a grain that has a separate metal assemblage containing icosahedrite (Al63Cu24Fe13), currently the only other known naturally occurring mineral with icosahedral symmetry (though the latter composition had already been observed in the laboratory prior to its discovery in nature). The chemistry of both the icosahedral phases was characterized by electron microprobe, and the rotational symmetry was confirmed by means of electron backscatter diffraction.

  8. Collisions in outer space produced an icosahedral phase in the Khatyrka meteorite never observed previously in the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Bindi, Luca; Lin, Chaney; Ma, Chi; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first occurrence of an icosahedral quasicrystal with composition Al62.0(8)Cu31.2(8)Fe6.8(4), outside the measured equilibrium stability field at standard pressure of the previously reported Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal (AlxCuyFez, with x between 61 and 64, y between 24 and 26, z between 12 and 13%). The new icosahedral mineral formed naturally and was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite that experienced shock metamorphism, local melting (with conditions exceeding 5 GPa and 1,200 °C in some locations), and rapid cooling, all of which likely resulted from impact-induced shock in space. This is the first example of a quasicrystal composition discovered in nature prior to being synthesized in the laboratory. The new composition was found in a grain that has a separate metal assemblage containing icosahedrite (Al63Cu24Fe13), currently the only other known naturally occurring mineral with icosahedral symmetry (though the latter composition had already been observed in the laboratory prior to its discovery in nature). The chemistry of both the icosahedral phases was characterized by electron microprobe, and the rotational symmetry was confirmed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. PMID:27929519

  9. Collisions in outer space produced an icosahedral phase in the Khatyrka meteorite never observed previously in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, Luca; Lin, Chaney; Ma, Chi; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-12-01

    We report the first occurrence of an icosahedral quasicrystal with composition Al62.0(8)Cu31.2(8)Fe6.8(4), outside the measured equilibrium stability field at standard pressure of the previously reported Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal (AlxCuyFez, with x between 61 and 64, y between 24 and 26, z between 12 and 13%). The new icosahedral mineral formed naturally and was discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a recently described CV3 carbonaceous chondrite that experienced shock metamorphism, local melting (with conditions exceeding 5 GPa and 1,200 °C in some locations), and rapid cooling, all of which likely resulted from impact-induced shock in space. This is the first example of a quasicrystal composition discovered in nature prior to being synthesized in the laboratory. The new composition was found in a grain that has a separate metal assemblage containing icosahedrite (Al63Cu24Fe13), currently the only other known naturally occurring mineral with icosahedral symmetry (though the latter composition had already been observed in the laboratory prior to its discovery in nature). The chemistry of both the icosahedral phases was characterized by electron microprobe, and the rotational symmetry was confirmed by means of electron backscatter diffraction.

  10. A perspective on space exploration technology catalysis: A rationale for initiating 21st Century expansion of human civilization into outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsham, Gary A. P.

    1988-01-01

    The rationale for human exploration of space is examined. Observations of the technocatalytic potential are presented. Transferability to the terrestrial environment of 21st Century Earth is discussed. The many threats to future survival of this planet's sensitive ecosystem are also discussed in relation to the technoecological harmony that might be achievable due to the extreme demands that are naturally imposed on the development of (civilian/human) space technology. The human attempt to inhabit the inner solar system (the Moon, Mars, etc.) is proposed as the ultimate and most appropriate technology driver for the myriad of socioeconomic, ecological, and technological needs that will accompany 21st Century Earth societies.

  11. Testing of Polymer Materials on MIR Space Station and on International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhvalov, Yu. O.; Alexandrov, N. G.; Smirnova, T. N.; Milinchuk, V. K.; Klinshpont, E. R.; Ananjeva, O. A.; Pasevich, O. F.; Novikov, L. S.; Chernik, V. N.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents the results of space tests of different polymer films. The experiments were carried out aboard Mir Space Station in 1985-1999 and continued aboard the International Space Station (ISS) since 1998. Two types of polymer film samples were studied: unprotected and protected with glass filters. Upon return to Earth, the samples were analyzed using different analytical techniques and the data on mass loss, changes in thickness and changes in optical properties were obtained.

  12. An Overview of Integration and Test of the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, Michael; Becker, Neil; Bos, Brent; Davila, Pamela; Frey, Bradley; Hylan, Jason; Marsh, James; McGuffey, Douglas; Novak, Maria; Ohl, Raymond; Redman, Kevin; Sampler, Henry; Sullivan, Joseph; Walker, Ian; Wright, Geraldine; Young, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (approx.40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI) including a Guider. The SIs and Guider are mounted to a composite metering structure with outer dimensions of 2.1x2.2x1.9m. The SI and Guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a 1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are integrated and aligned to the structure under ambient, clean room conditions. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear and wavefront error, is evaluated at the operating temperature. We present an overview of the ISIM integration within the context of Observatory-level construction. We describe the integration and verification plan for the ISIM element, including an overview of our incremental verification approach, ambient mechanical integration and test plans and optical alignment and cryogenic test plans. We describe key ground support equipment and facilities.

  13. Modal Testing of Seven Shuttle Cargo Elements for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kappus, Kathy O.; Driskill, Timothy C.; Parks, Russel A.; Patterson, Alan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    From December 1996 to May 2001, the Modal and Control Dynamics Team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted modal tests on seven large elements of the International Space Station. Each of these elements has been or will be launched as a Space Shuttle payload for transport to the International Space Station (ISS). Like other Shuttle payloads, modal testing of these elements was required for verification of the finite element models used in coupled loads analyses for launch and landing. The seven modal tests included three modules - Node, Laboratory, and Airlock, and four truss segments - P6, P3/P4, S1/P1, and P5. Each element was installed and tested in the Shuttle Payload Modal Test Bed at MSFC. This unique facility can accommodate any Shuttle cargo element for modal test qualification. Flexure assemblies were utilized at each Shuttle-to-payload interface to simulate a constrained boundary in the load carrying degrees of freedom. For each element, multiple-input, multiple-output burst random modal testing was the primary approach with controlled input sine sweeps for linearity assessments. The accelerometer channel counts ranged from 252 channels to 1251 channels. An overview of these tests, as well as some lessons learned, will be provided in this paper.

  14. Thirteenth Space Simulation Conference. The Payload: Testing for Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, J. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Information on the state of the art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and test measurements and techniques are presented. Simulation of upper atmosphere oxygen was discussed. Problems and successes of retrieving and repairing orbiting spacecrafts by utilizing the shuttle are outlined.

  15. Vibration test plan for a space station heat pipe subassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, M.B.

    1987-09-29

    This test plan describes the Sundstrand portion of task two of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contract 9-x6H-8102L-1. Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a potassium liquid metal heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. The test objective is to expose the heat pipe subassembly to the random vibration environment which simulates the space shuttle launch condition. The results of the test will then be used to modify as required future designs of the heat pipe.

  16. Bigger eyes in a wider universe: The American understanding of Earth in outer space, 1893--1941

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, Jodicus Wayne

    picture industry relied upon establishing an accepted second space within the minds of their audiences. By the end of the study period, the universe accepted by most Americans was a "California Universe". It was not a discovery of pure science, but rather a cultural-scientific product of the Mount Wilson astronomers, the Pasadena community and the landscape and culture of Southern California.

  17. Space Shuttle Main Engine modal test correlation and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stec, Robert C.; Gupta, Viney K.; Chaney, Lisa; Haworth, John M.

    1993-04-01

    A cost-effective software testbed under development is described for updating and validating Finite-Element Models (FEMs) to certify large-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) STARDYNE and NASTRAN FEMs against modal test data. The long-term objectives of the testbed are to provide timely support and certification of SSME components using modal testing: certify large-scale structures such as the SSME using modal survey tests, update FEMs for model validation against test frequencies and mode shapes, verify the load factors for design loads assumed to determine structural integrity, demonstrate the Rocketdyne software testbed based on state-of-the art methods - optimization, static/dynamic reduction, sparse Lanczos solvers and iterative perturbation algorithms, and to identify future enhancements and applications for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Rocketdyne testbed "FEMOPT" developed for Space Station and SSME model certification.

  18. Identifying On-Orbit Test Targets for Space Fence Operational Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechkis, D.; Pacheco, N.; Botting, T.

    2014-09-01

    Space Fence will be an integrated system of two ground-based, S-band (2 to 4 GHz) phased-array radars located in Kwajalein and perhaps Western Australia [1]. Space Fence will cooperate with other Space Surveillance Network sensors to provide space object tracking and radar characterization data to support U.S. Strategic Command space object catalog maintenance and other space situational awareness needs. We present a rigorous statistical test design intended to test Space Fence to the letter of the program requirements as well as to characterize the system performance across the entire operational envelope. The design uses altitude, size, and inclination as independent factors in statistical tests of dependent variables (e.g., observation accuracy) linked to requirements. The analysis derives the type and number of necessary test targets. Comparing the resulting sample sizes with the number of currently known targets, we identify those areas where modelling and simulation methods are needed. Assuming hypothetical Kwajalein radar coverage and a conservative number of radar passes per object per day, we conclude that tests involving real-world space objects should take no more than 25 days to evaluate all operational requirements; almost 60 percent of the requirements can be tested in a single day and nearly 90 percent can be tested in one week or less. Reference: [1] L. Haines and P. Phu, Space Fence PDR Concept Development Phase, 2011 AMOS Conference Technical Papers.

  19. Hartmann test for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. Scott; Feinberg, Lee; Howard, Joseph; Acton, D. Scott; Whitman, Tony L.; Smith, Koby

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) end-to-end optical system will be tested in a cryogenic vacuum environment before launch at NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSC) Apollo-era, historic Chamber A thermal vacuum facility. During recent pre-test runs with a prototype "Pathfinder" telescope, the vibration in this environment was found to be challenging for the baseline test approach, which uses phase retrieval of images created by three sub-apertures of the telescope. To address the vibration, an alternate strategy implemented using classic Hartmann test principles combined with precise mirror mechanisms to provide a testing approach that is insensitive to the dynamics environment of the chamber. The measurements and sensitivities of the Hartmann approach are similar to those using phase retrieval over the original sparse aperture test. The Hartmann test concepts have been implemented on the JWST Test Bed Telescope, which provided the rationale and empirical evidence indicating that this Hartmann style approach would be valuable in supplementing the baseline test approach. This paper presents a Hartmann approach implemented during the recent Pathfinder test along with the test approach that is currently being considered for the full optical system test of JWST. Comparisons are made between the baseline phase retrieval approach and the Hartmann approach in addition to demonstrating how the two test methodologies support each other to reduce risk during the JWST full optical system test.

  20. Design of Test Support Hardware for Advanced Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, Jeffrey A.; Rhodes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    As a member of the Space Suit Assembly Development Engineering Team, I designed and built test equipment systems to support the development of the next generation of advanced space suits. During space suit testing it is critical to supply the subject with two functions: (1) cooling to remove metabolic heat, and (2) breathing air to pressurize the space suit. The objective of my first project was to design, build, and certify an improved Space Suit Cooling System for manned testing in a 1-G environment. This design had to be portable and supply a minimum cooling rate of 2500 BTU/hr. The Space Suit Cooling System is a robust, portable system that supports very high metabolic rates. It has a highly adjustable cool rate and is equipped with digital instrumentation to monitor the flowrate and critical temperatures. It can supply a variable water temperature down to 34 deg., and it can generate a maximum water flowrate of 2.5 LPM. My next project was to design and build a Breathing Air System that was capable of supply facility air to subjects wearing the Z-2 space suit. The system intakes 150 PSIG breathing air and regulates it to two operating pressures: 4.3 and 8.3 PSIG. It can also provide structural capabilities at 1.5x operating pressure: 6.6 and 13.2 PSIG, respectively. It has instrumentation to monitor flowrate, as well as inlet and outlet pressures. The system has a series of relief valves to fully protect itself in case of regulator failure. Both projects followed a similar design methodology. The first task was to perform research on existing concepts to develop a sufficient background knowledge. Then mathematical models were developed to size components and simulate system performance. Next, mechanical and electrical schematics were generated and presented at Design Reviews. After the systems were approved by the suit team, all the hardware components were specified and procured. The systems were then packaged, fabricated, and thoroughly tested. The next step

  1. Space chemical propulsion test facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especiallly encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. This paper presents an overview of the Lewis test facilities. These facilities are clustered into three test areas: the Rocket Engine Test Facilities (RETF), the Rocket Laboratory (RL), and the Cryogenic Components Laboratory (CCL).

  2. Creating and testing large space structures of high precision surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzmariashvili, Elgudja; Iacobashvili, Alexander; Beducadze, Guram

    The authors describe work on the development of large structures for use in space. This work involves development of structural classes (types), theoretical studis, systems manufacturing and full scale structure testing. Collecting solar energy in space and sending it down to Earth is of great interest to humanity because of the large need for energy on Earth. Building any large solar power station requires industry and construction engineering in space. The problem, as a whole, as well as specific parts thereof virtually always requires certain engineering support, i.e. erection of supporting, reflecting and other large-sized structures in orbit. The Institute of Transformed Structures carries out research, design manufacturing, ground testing and supply of launchable prototypes. The work is performed in an unified manner and contains several trends (categories) which define structures that can be assembled in space.

  3. Statistical Approach to the Operational Testing of Space Fence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Officer, an Orbital Analyst, and a radar signature analyst at the FPS-85 phased array radar and the FPS-79 dish radar. While at the FPS-79 he...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Space Fence will be a terrestrial-based radar designed to perform surveillance on earth- orbiting ...ensuring a reasonable test duration. We propose a rigorous statistical test design with candidate on- orbit test targets that span orbital limits defined by

  4. Space simulation testing of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magette, E.; Smith, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth radiation budget components and dynamics and the interactions of this energy cycle, which influences our climate were investigated. The satellite package was subjected to space simulation testing. The size of the spacecraft dictated that the testing be conducted in the new BRUTUS Thermal Vacuum Facility. Computer aided control (CAC), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), and residual gas analysis (RGA) monitoring are combined with rigid contamination control procedures to protect the flight hardware from anomalous and potentially destructive out of scope test environments.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) shipping container test operations at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ground crews look on as a crane lifts the 11,500 pound aluminum cap from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) shipping container in front of the Multiuse Mission Support Equipment (MMSE) Building at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC workers continue to test and checkout the container which will be used to transport the 43 foot long, 14 foot diameter telescope from Lockheed in Sunnyvale, California to KSC next year. The telescope is scheduled for launch aboard the space shuttle in November 1988. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-87PC-502.

  6. Simulated space environment tests on cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D. R.; Oman, H.

    1971-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (Cu2s - CdS) solar cells were tested under simulated space environmental conditions. Some cells were thermally cycled with illumination from a Xenon-arc solar simulator. A cycle was one hour of illumination followed immediately with one-half hour of darkness. In the light, the cells reached an equilibrium temperature of 60 C (333 K) and in the dark the cell temperature dropped to -120 C (153 K). Other cells were constantly illuminated with a Xenon-arc solar simulator. The equilibrium temperature of these cells was 55 C (328 K). The black vacuum chamber walls were cooled with liquid nitrogen to simulate a space heat sink. Chamber pressure was maintained at 0.000001 torr or less. Almost all of the solar cells tested degraded in power when exposed to a simulated space environment of either thermal cycling or constant illumination. The cells tested the longest were exposed to 10.050 thermal cycles.

  7. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  8. Thermal and Mechanical Testing of Neoprene Gloves Used in a Space Shuttle Microgravity Glove Box Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Neoprene gloves are used in a Space Shuttle Microgravity Glove Box (MGBX) experiment. In 1999, significant corrosion was observed in the work area and on the outer surface of the left glove ring. Analysis of the corrosion products showed that they contained chlorine. The Neoprene gloves used in this glove box were obtained in 1995, with a recommended shelf life of 3 years. After storage of these gloves in a cabinet drawer until 1999, significant signs of corrosion were also observed in the drawer. Mechanical and thermal properties were determined on samples cut from the finger and sleeve areas of the "good" and "bad" gloves. This data showed significant aging of the left-hand glove, particularly in the sleeve area. Thermal analysis data by DSC and TGA was complimentary to tensile data in showing this aging. However, this test data did not pinpoint the cause of the left-hand glove aging, or of the corrosion products.

  9. Measurement and Estimation of High-Vacuum Effective Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide Foam in the Temperature Range from 160 K to 370 K for Outer Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ryuichi; Tachikawa, Sumitaka; Ohmura, Takahiro; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2014-02-01

    Polyimide foam (PF) is a low-thermal conductivity and lightweight material with high resistances against heat, protons, and UV irradiation. A new thermal insulation composed of PFs and multiple aluminized films (PF-MLI) has potential to be used in outer space as an alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI). As fundamental numerical data, the effective thermal conductivity of PF in wide ranges of density and temperature need to be determined. In the present study, thermal-conductivity measurements were performed by both the periodic heating method and the guarded hot-plate method in the temperature range from 160 K to 370 K and the density range from 6.67 to 242.63 . The experiments were carried out in a vacuum and under atmospheric pressure. For confirmation of the validity of the present guarded hot-plate apparatus under atmospheric pressure, the effective thermal conductivity of the lowest-density PF was measured with the aid of the heat flow meter apparatus calibrated by the standard reference material (NIST SRM 1450c) in the temperature range from 303 K to 323 K. In order to cross-check the present experimental results, the temperature and density dependences of the effective thermal conductivity of PF were estimated by means of the lattice Boltzmann method based on a dodecahedron inner microscopic complex structure model which reflects a real 3D X-ray CT image of PF.

  10. [Biomedical results of the Space Shuttle Orbital Flight Test Program].

    PubMed

    Pool, S L; Nicogossian, A

    1984-01-01

    On July 4, 1982 the Space Shuttle Columbia landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, thus successfully completing the fourth and last in a series of Orbital Flight Tests (OFT) of the Space Transportation System (STS). The primary goal of medical operation support for the OFT was to assure the health and well-being of flight personnel during all phases of the mission. To this end, the crew health status was evaluated preflight, inflight and postflight. Biomedical flight test requirements were completed in the following areas: physiological adaptation to microgravity, cabin acoustical noise, cabin atmospheric evaluation, radiation dosimetry, crew exercise equipment evaluation and a cardiovascular deconditioning countermeasure assessment.

  11. Biomedical results of the Space Shuttle orbital flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pool, S. L.; Nicogossian, A.

    1983-01-01

    On July 4, 1982, the Space Shuttle Columbia landed at Edwards Air Force Base, CA, thus successfully completing the fourth and last in a series of Orbital Flight Tests (OFT) of the Space Transportation System (STS). The primary goal of medical operations support for the OFT was to assure the health and well-being of flight personnel during all phases of the mission. To this end, crew health status was evaluated preflight, inflight, and postflight. Biomedical flight test requirements were completed in the following areas: physiological adaptation to microgravity, cabin acoustical noise, cabin atmospheric evaluation, radiation dosimetry, crew exercise equipment evaluation, and a cardiovascular deconditioning countermeasure assessment.

  12. Test and Analysis Capabilities of the Space Environment Effects Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Edwards, D. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Schneider, T. A.; Hovater, M. A.; Hoppe, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world-class space environmental effects testing facilities to simulate the space environment. The combined environmental effects test system exposes temperature-controlled samples to simultaneous protons, high- and low-energy electrons, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. Separate chambers for studying the effects of NUV and VUV at elevated temperatures are also available. The Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility exposes samples to atomic oxygen of 5 eV energy to simulate low-Earth orbit (LEO). The LEO space plasma simulators are used to study current collection to biased spacecraft surfaces, arcing from insulators and electrical conductivity of materials. Plasma propulsion techniques are analyzed using the Marshall magnetic mirror system. The micro light gas gun simulates micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Candidate materials and hardware for spacecraft can be evaluated for durability in the space environment with a variety of analytical techniques. Mass, solar absorptance, infrared emittance, transmission, reflectance, bidirectional reflectance distribution function, and surface morphology characterization can be performed. The data from the space environmental effects testing facilities, combined with analytical results from flight experiments, enable the Environmental Effects Group to determine optimum materials for use on spacecraft.

  13. Simulated Space Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Exposure Testing for Polymer Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Pietromica, Anthony J.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Messer, Russell K.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation of wavelengths between 115 and 200 nm produced by the sun in the space environment can cause degradation to polymer films producing changes in optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. These effects are particularly important for thin polymer films being considered for ultra-lightweight space structures, because, for most polymers, VUV radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer. NASA Glenn Research Center has developed facilities and methods for long-term ground testing of polymer films to evaluate space environmental VUV radiation effects. VUV exposure can also be used as part of sequential simulated space environmental exposures to determine combined damaging effects. This paper will describe the effects of VUV on polymer films and the necessity for ground testing. Testing practices used at Glenn Research Center for VUV exposure testing will be described including characterization of the VUV radiation source used, calibration procedures traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and testing techniques for VUV exposure of polymer surfaces.

  14. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Cox, Marlon R.

    2010-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology. That testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment with both simulated and real human metabolic loads, and in both open and closed-loop configurations. The Orion ARS is designed to also support space-suited operations in a depressurized cabin, so the next step in developmental testing at JSC was to test the ARS technology in a typical closed space suit-loop environment with low-pressure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure, high-oxygen, closed-loop testing of the Orion ARS technology, and it was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in March 2009. The test investigated pressure drops and flow balancing through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors. General swing-bed performance was tested with both umbilical configurations, as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable suit atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  15. The advisability of prototypic testing for space nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.

    2005-07-01

    From October 1987 until 1993, the US Department of Defense conducted the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program. This program's objective was to design and develop a high specific impulse, high thrust-to-weight nuclear thermal rocket engine for upper stage applications. The author was the program manager for this program until 1992. Numerous analytical, programmatic and experimental results were generated during this period of time. This paper reviews the accomplishments of the program and highlights the importance of prototypic testing for all aspects of a space nuclear program so that a reliable and safe system compliant with all regulatory requirements can be effectively engineered. Specifically, the paper will recount how many non-prototypic tests we performed only to have more representative tests consistently generate different results. This was particularly true in area of direct nuclear heat generation. As nuclear tests are generally much more expensive than non-nuclear tests, programs attempt to avoid such tests in favor of less expensive non-nuclear tests. Each time this approach was followed, the SNTP program found these tests to not be verified by nuclear heated testing. Hence the author recommends that wherever possible, a spiral development approach that includes exploratory and confirmatory experimental testing be employed to ensure a viable design.

  16. Space Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Ground Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiment (FE) Project in which a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS- 128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour for STS-134, a significant ground test campaign was completed. The primary goals of the test campaign were to provide ground test data to support the planning and safety certification efforts required to fly the flight experiment as well as validation for the collected flight data. These test included Arcjet testing of the tile protuberance, aerothermal testing to determine the boundary layer transition behavior and resultant surface heating and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) testing in order to gain a better understanding of the flow field characteristics associated with the flight experiment. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project ground testing. High-level overviews of the facilities, models, test techniques and data are presented, along with a summary of the insights gained from each test.

  17. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  18. Simulation test beds for the Space Station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are respnsible for developing the electrical power system on the Space Station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  19. Simulation test beds for the space station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are responsible for developing the electrical power system on the space station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  20. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  1. Testing general relativity in space-borne and astronomical laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1989-01-01

    The current status of space-based experiments and astronomical observations designed to test the theory of general relativity is surveyed. Consideration is given to tests of post-Newtonian gravity, searches for feeble short-range forces and gravitomagnetism, improved measurements of parameterized post-Newtonian parameter values, explorations of post-Newtonian physics, tests of the Einstein equivalence principle, observational tests of post-Newtonian orbital effects, and efforts to detect quadrupole and dipole radiation damping. Recent numerical results are presented in tables.

  2. Planet 9 From Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    At the outskirts of the solar system, beyond the orbit of Neptune, lies an expansive field of icy debris known as the Kuiper belt. The orbits of the individual asteroid-like bodies within the Kuiper belt trace out highly elongated elliptical paths, and require hundreds to thousands of years to complete a single revolution around the Sun. Although the majority of the Kuiper belt's dynamical structure can be understood within the framework of the known eight-planet solar system, bodies with orbital periods longer than about 4,000 years exhibit a peculiar orbital alignment that eludes explanation. What sculpts this alignment and how is it preserved? In this talk, I will argue that the observed clustering of Kuiper belt orbits can be maintained by a distant, eccentric, Neptune-like planet, whose orbit lies in approximately the same plane as those of the distant Kuiper belt objects, but is anti-aligned with respect to those of the small bodies. In addition to accounting for the observed grouping of orbits, the existence of such a planet naturally explains other, seemingly unrelated dynamical features of the solar system.

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  4. A dynamic integrated test for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brody, S.; Weissberg, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic integrated test (DIT) has been designed to perform a final checkout of the assembled Space Shuttle vehicle at Kennedy Space Center. The fact that the vehicle is not in a laboratory environment for the test represents a significant constraint in that the use of test equipment is extremely limited, and environment models cannot be used. In essence, the DIT causes the vehicle to believe that it is flying, so that hardware and software systems are exercised much as they would be for a real flight. This technique provides a tool for verifying such items as data bus activity patterns, critical timing sequences, software and hardware moding as a function of flight parameters, absence of EMI problems and other systems interactions which cannot be tested fully in the laboratory.

  5. Space clocks to test relativiy: ACES and SAGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Peter; Salomon, Christophe; Reynaud, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Atomic clocks are an outstanding tool for the experimental verification of general relativity and more generally for fundamental astronomy (VLBI, pulsar timing, navigation, etc). Recent years have seen a rapid improvement in the performance of such clocks, promising new improved tests of relativity, in particular onboard terrestrial and interplanetary space missions. We present the scientific motivations of such tests taking the ACES Salomon et al. and SAGAS Wolf et al. (2009) projects as particular examples.

  6. Test Results for Entry Guidance Methods for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Jones, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to advanced guidance and control that have the potential for achieving the goals of significantly increasing reusable launch vehicle (or any space vehicle that enters an atmosphere) safety and reliability, and reducing the cost. This paper examines some approaches to entry guidance. An effort called Integration and Testing of Advanced Guidance and Control Technologies has recently completed a rigorous testing phase where these algorithms faced high-fidelity vehicle models and were required to perform a variety of representative tests. The algorithm developers spent substantial effort improving the algorithm performance in the testing. This paper lists the test cases used to demonstrate that the desired results are achieved, shows an automated test scoring method that greatly reduces the evaluation effort required, and displays results of the tests. Results show a significant improvement over previous guidance approaches. The two best-scoring algorithm approaches show roughly equivalent results and are ready to be applied to future vehicle concepts.

  7. Wald Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Space Object Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F Landis

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how satellite owner/operators may use sequential estimates of collision probability, along with a prior assessment of the base risk of collision, in a compound hypothesis ratio test to inform decisions concerning collision risk mitigation maneuvers. The compound hypothesis test reduces to a simple probability ratio test, which appears to be a novel result. The test satisfies tolerances related to targeted false alarm and missed detection rates. This result is independent of the method one uses to compute the probability density that one integrates to compute collision probability. A well-established test case from the literature shows that this test yields acceptable results within the constraints of a typical operational conjunction assessment decision timeline. Another example illustrates the use of the test in a practical conjunction assessment scenario based on operations of the International Space Station.

  8. Astronaut Frank Borman performing visual acuity tests in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronaut Frank Borman is seen performing visual acuity tests in space. Views include Borman looking at the camera as light shines through the capsule window (63712); Borman is using the visual acuity device and a portable mouth thermometer during his experiment (63713).

  9. Rocket Propulsion Testing at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwer, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Viewgraph presentation on the design and testing Liquid Hydrogen Barge Vaporizers at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Vaporizer Requirements; 2) Vaporizer Design; 3) LH2 # 2 Vaporizer Statistics; 4) Corrective Actions; and 5) Lessons Learned.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  11. 25th Space Simulation Conference. Environmental Testing: The Earth-Space Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation; The ESA Large Space Simulator Mechanical Ground Support Equipment for Spacecraft Testing; Temperature Stability and Control Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the Aquarius Radiometer; The Liquid Nitrogen System for Chamber A: A Change from Original Forced Flow Design to a Natural Flow (Thermo Siphon) System; Return to Mercury: A Comparison of Solar Simulation and Flight Data for the MESSENGER Spacecraft; Floating Pressure Conversion and Equipment Upgrades of Two 3.5kw, 20k, Helium Refrigerators; Affect of Air Leakage into a Thermal-Vacuum Chamber on Helium Refrigeration Heat Load; Special ISO Class 6 Cleanroom for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Project; A State-of-the-Art Contamination Effects Research and Test Facility Martian Dust Simulator; Cleanroom Design Practices and Their Influence on Particle Counts; Extra Terrestrial Environmental Chamber Design; Contamination Sources Effects Analysis (CSEA) - A Tool to Balance Cost/Schedule While Managing Facility Availability; SES and Acoustics at GSFC; HST Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Static Test; Virtual Shaker Testing: Simulation Technology Improves Vibration Test Performance; Estimating Shock Spectra: Extensions beyond GEVS; Structural Dynamic Analysis of a Spacecraft Multi-DOF Shaker Table; Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Manufacture of Cryoshroud Surfaces for Space Simulation Chambers; The New LOTIS Test Facility; Thermal Vacuum Control Systems Options for Test Facilities; Extremely High Vacuum Chamber for Low Outgassing Processing at NASA Goddard; Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier; The New Anechoic Shielded Chambers Designed for Space and Commercial Applications at LIT; Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar; Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition System; Aquarius's Instrument Science Data System (ISDS) Automated

  12. Phase 1 Space Fission Propulsion System Testing and Development Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Kapernick, Rick; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods. This test series, carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities, successfully completed a testing program with a 30 kWt core, Stirling engine, and ion engine configuration. Additionally, a 100 kWt core is in fabrication and appropriate test facilities are being reconfigured. This paper describes the current SAFE non-nuclear tests, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans.

  13. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960's to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and the modifications were funded, by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to remove dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink and, the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in the overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive

  14. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.; Bachtel, Russell; Speed, John; O'Rear, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft.) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft.) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960 s to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and modifications were funded by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope, which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to minimize dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink, and the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August of 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive

  15. Creating the Deep Space Environment for Testing the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Cerimele, Mary P.; Montz, Michael E.; Bachtel, Russell; Speed, John; O'Rear, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. It was originally designed and built in the mid 1960 s to test the Apollo Command and Service Module and several manned tests were conducted on that spacecraft, contributing to the success of the program. The chamber has been used since that time to test spacecraft active thermal control systems, Shuttle DTO, DOD, and ESA hardware in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) conditions. NASA is now moving from LEO towards exploration of locations with environments approaching those of deep space. Therefore, Chamber A has undergone major modifications to enable it to simulate these deeper space environments. Environmental requirements were driven, and modifications were funded by the James Webb Space Telescope program, and this telescope which will orbit Solar/Earth L2, will be the first test article to benefit from the chamber s new capabilities. To accommodate JWST, the Chamber A high vacuum system has been modernized, additional LN2 shrouds have been installed, the liquid nitrogen system has been modified to remove dependency on electrical power and increase its reliability, a new helium shroud/refrigeration system has been installed to create a colder more stable and uniform heat sink, and the controls have been updated to increase the level of automation and improve operator interfaces. Testing of these major modifications was conducted in August of 2012 and this initial test was very successful, with all major systems exceeding their performance requirements. This paper will outline the changes in overall environmental requirements, discuss the technical design data that was used in the decisions leading to the extensive modifications

  16. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  17. Ground Vibration Testing Options for Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Alan; Smith, Robert K.; Goggin, David; Newsom, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    New NASA launch vehicles will require development of robust systems in a fiscally-constrained environment. NASA, Department of Defense (DoD), and commercial space companies routinely conduct ground vibration tests as an essential part of math model validation and launch vehicle certification. Although ground vibration testing must be a part of the integrated test planning process, more affordable approaches must also be considered. A study evaluated several ground vibration test options for the NASA Constellation Program flight test vehicles, Orion-1 and Orion-2, which concluded that more affordable ground vibration test options are available. The motivation for ground vibration testing is supported by historical examples from NASA and DoD. The approach used in the present study employed surveys of ground vibration test subject-matter experts that provided data to qualitatively rank six test options. Twenty-five experts from NASA, DoD, and industry provided scoring and comments for this study. The current study determined that both element-level modal tests and integrated vehicle modal tests have technical merits. Both have been successful in validating structural dynamic math models of launch vehicles. However, element-level testing has less overall cost and schedule risk as compared to integrated vehicle testing. Future NASA launch vehicle development programs should anticipate that some structural dynamics testing will be necessary. Analysis alone will be inadequate to certify a crew-capable launch vehicle. At a minimum, component and element structural dynamic tests are recommended for new vehicle elements. Three viable structural dynamic test options were identified. Modal testing of the new vehicle elements and an integrated vehicle test on the mobile launcher provided the optimal trade between technical, cost, and schedule.

  18. Space Qualification Test of a-Silicon Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Lawton, R. A.; Manion, S. J.; Okuno, J. O.; Ruiz, R. P.; Vu, D. T.; Vu, D. T.; Kayali, S. A.; Jeffrey, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The basic requirements of solar cell modules for space applications are generally described in MIL-S-83576 for the specific needs of the USAF. However, the specifications of solar cells intended for use on space terrestrial applications are not well defined. Therefore, this qualifications test effort was concentrated on critical areas specific to the microseismometer probe which is intended to be included in the Mars microprobe programs. Parameters that were evaluated included performance dependence on: illuminating angles, terrestrial temperatures, lifetime, as well as impact landing conditions. Our qualification efforts were limited to these most critical areas of concern. Most of the tested solar cell modules have met the requirements of the program except the impact tests. Surprisingly, one of the two single PIN 2 x 1 amorphous solar cell modules continued to function even after the 80000G impact tests. The output power parameters, Pout, FF, Isc and Voc, of the single PIN amorphous solar cell module were found to be 3.14 mW, 0.40, 9.98 mA and 0.78 V, respectively. These parameters are good enough to consider the solar module as a possible power source for the microprobe seismometer. Some recommendations were made to improve the usefulness of the amorphous silicon solar cell modules in space terrestrial applications, based on the results obtained from the intensive short term lab test effort.

  19. Space-Based Reconfigurable Software Defined Radio Test Bed Aboard International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Lux, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) recently launched a new software defined radio research test bed to the International Space Station. The test bed, sponsored by the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Office within NASA is referred to as the SCaN Testbed. The SCaN Testbed is a highly capable communications system, composed of three software defined radios, integrated into a flight system, and mounted to the truss of the International Space Station. Software defined radios offer the future promise of in-flight reconfigurability, autonomy, and eventually cognitive operation. The adoption of software defined radios offers space missions a new way to develop and operate space transceivers for communications and navigation. Reconfigurable or software defined radios with communications and navigation functions implemented in software or VHDL (Very High Speed Hardware Description Language) provide the capability to change the functionality of the radio during development or after launch. The ability to change the operating characteristics of a radio through software once deployed to space offers the flexibility to adapt to new science opportunities, recover from anomalies within the science payload or communication system, and potentially reduce development cost and risk by adapting generic space platforms to meet specific mission requirements. The software defined radios on the SCaN Testbed are each compliant to NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture. The STRS Architecture is an open, non-proprietary architecture that defines interfaces for the connections between radio components. It provides an operating environment to abstract the communication waveform application from the underlying platform specific hardware such as digital-to-analog converters, analog-to-digital converters, oscillators, RF attenuators, automatic gain control circuits, FPGAs, general-purpose processors, etc. and the interconnections among

  20. Space Station Freedom environmental database system (FEDS) for MSFC testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Gail S.; Williams, Wendy; Chiu, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The Water Recovery Test (WRT) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the first demonstration of integrated water recovery systems for potable and hygiene water reuse as envisioned for Space Station Freedom (SSF). In order to satisfy the safety and health requirements placed on the SSF program and facilitate test data assessment, an extensive laboratory analysis database was established to provide a central archive and data retrieval function. The database is required to store analysis results for physical, chemical, and microbial parameters measured from water, air and surface samples collected at various locations throughout the test facility. The Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) was utilized to implement a secured on-line information system with the ECLSS WRT program as the foundation for this system. The database is supported on a VAX/VMS 8810 series mainframe and is accessible from the Marshall Information Network System (MINS). This paper summarizes the database requirements, system design, interfaces, and future enhancements.

  1. Space station prototype Sabatier reactor design verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusick, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A six-man, flight prototype carbon dioxide reduction subsystem for the SSP ETC/LSS (Space Station Prototype Environmental/Thermal Control and Life Support System) was developed and fabricated for the NASA-Johnson Space Center between February 1971 and October 1973. Component design verification testing was conducted on the Sabatier reactor covering design and off-design conditions as part of this development program. The reactor was designed to convert a minimum of 98 per cent hydrogen to water and methane for both six-man and two-man reactant flow conditions. Important design features of the reactor and test conditions are described. Reactor test results are presented that show design goals were achieved and off-design performance was stable.

  2. Test Results of the Modified Space Shuttle Main Engine at the Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Test Bed Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J.; Dumbacher, D.; Ise, M.; Singer, C.

    1990-01-01

    A modified space shuttle main engine (SSME), which primarily includes an enlarged throat main combustion chamber with the acoustic cavities removed and a main injector with the stability control baffles removed, was tested. This one-of-a-kind engine's design changes are being evaluated for potential incorporation in the shuttle flight program in the mid-1990's. Engine testing was initiated on September 15, 1988 and has accumulated 1,915 seconds and 19 starts. Testing is being conducted to characterize the engine system performance, combustion stability with the baffle-less injector, and both low pressure oxidizer turbopump (LPOTP) and high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) for suction performance. These test results are summarized and compared with the SSME flight configuration data base. Testing of this new generation SSME is the first product from the technology test bed (TTB). Figure test plans for the TTB include the highly instrumented flight configuration SSME and advanced liquid propulsion technology items.

  3. Testing Nonclassicality and Non-Gaussianity in Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiyong; Zhang, Junhua; Lee, Jaehak; Ji, Se-Wan; Um, Mark; Lv, Dingshun; Kim, Kihwan; Nha, Hyunchul

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically propose and experimentally demonstrate a nonclassicality test of a single-mode field in phase space, which has an analogy with the nonlocality test proposed by Banaszek and Wódkiewicz [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2009 (1999)]. Our approach to deriving the classical bound draws on the fact that the Wigner function of a coherent state is a product of two independent distributions as if the orthogonal quadratures (position and momentum) in phase space behave as local realistic variables. Our method detects every pure nonclassical Gaussian state, which can also be extended to mixed states. Furthermore, it sets a bound for all Gaussian states and their mixtures, thereby providing a criterion to detect a genuine quantum non-Gaussian state. Remarkably, our phase-space approach with invariance under Gaussian unitary operations leads to an optimized test for a given non-Gaussian state. We experimentally show how this enhanced method can manifest quantum non-Gaussianity of a state by simply choosing phase-space points appropriately, which is essentially equivalent to implementing a squeezing operation on a given state.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  5. Whole Module Offgas Test Report: Space-Xl Dragon Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    On September 26 and September 28,2012 a chemist from the JSC Toxicology Group acquired samples of air in 500 m1 evacuated canisters from the sealed Space-Xl Dragon Module. One sample was also acquired from Space-X Facility near the module at the start of the test. Samples of the module air were taken in triplicate once the module had been sealed, and then taken again in triplicate 1.98 days later. Ofthe triplicate samples, the first served as a line purge, and the last two were analyzed. The results of 5 samples are reported.

  6. Component Selection, Accelerated Testing, and Improved Modeling of AMTEC Systems for Space Power (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Suitor, J.; O'Connor, D.

    1993-01-01

    Alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) designs for space power are numerous, but selection of materials for construction of long-lived AMTEC devices has been limited to electrodes, current collectors, and the solid electrolyte. AMTEC devices with lifetimes greater than 5 years require careful selection and life testing of all hot-side components. The likely selection of a remote condensed design for initial flight test and probable use with a GPHS in AMTEC powered outer planet probes requires the device to be constructed to tolerate T greater than 1150K, as well as exposure to Na(sub (g)), and Na(sub (liq)) on the high pressure side. The temperatures involved make critical high strength and chemical resistance to Na containing Na(sub 2)O. Selection among materials which can be worked should not be driven by ease of fabricability, as high temperature stability is the critical issue. These concepts drive the selection of Mo alloys for Na(sub (liq)) containment in AMTEC cells for T to 1150K operation, as they are significantly stronger than comparable NB or Ta alloys, are less soluble in Na(sub (liq)) containing dissolved Na(sub 2)O, are workable compared to W alloys (which might be used for certain components), and are ductile at the T greater than 500K of proposed AMTEC modules in space applications.

  7. Ultraviolet Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine; Fries, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in the approach to extra-vehicular (EVA) suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete multiple EVAs under intense ultraviolet (UV) light exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising the suit's mobility. To study how the materials degrade on Mars in-situ, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) invited the Advanced Space Suit team at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) to place space suit materials on the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument's calibration target of the Mars 2020 rover. In order to select materials for the rover and understand the effects from Mars equivalent UV exposure, JSC conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials when exposed to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. To complete this testing, JSC partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to utilize their UV vacuum chambers. Materials tested were Orthofabric, polycarbonate, Teflon, Dacron, Vectran, spectra, bladder, nGimat coated Teflon, and nGimat coated Orthofabric. All samples were measured for mass, tensile strength, and chemical composition before and after radiation. Mass loss was insignificant (less than 0.5%) among the materials. Most materials loss tensile strength after radiation and became more brittle with a loss of elongation. Changes in chemical composition were seen in all radiated materials through Spectral Analysis. Results from this testing helped select the materials that will fly on the Mars 2020 rover. In addition, JSC can use this data to create a correlation to the chemical changes after radiation-which is what the rover will send back while on Mars-to the mechanical changes, such as tensile strength.

  8. Space Suit Environment Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Cox, Marlon

    2009-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In two previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads. Another paper at this year s conference discusses similar testing with real human metabolic loads, including some closed-loop testing with emergency breathing masks. The Orion ARS is designed to also support extravehicular activity operations from a depressurized cabin. The next step in developmental testing at JSC was, therefore, to test this ARS technology in a typical closed space suit loop environment with low-pressure pure oxygen inside the process loop and vacuum outside the loop. This was the first instance of low-pressure oxygen loop testing of a new Orion ARS technology, and was conducted with simulated human metabolic loads in December 2008. The test investigated pressure drops through two different styles of prototype suit umbilical connectors and general swing-bed performance with both umbilical configurations as well as with a short jumper line installed in place of the umbilicals. Other interesting results include observations on the thermal effects of swing-bed operation in a vacuum environment and a recommendation of cycle time to maintain acceptable atmospheric CO2 and moisture levels.

  9. Integration time in space experiments to test the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Pegna, R.; Shao, M.; Turyshev, S. G.; Catastini, G.; Anselmi, A.; Spero, R.; Doravari, S.; Comandi, G. L.; Lucchesi, D. M.; De Michele, A.

    2014-02-01

    The integration time required by space experiments to perform high accuracy tests of the universality of free fall and the weak equivalence principle is a crucial issue. It is inversely proportional to the square of the acceleration to be measured, which is extremely small; the duration of the mission is a severe limitation and experiments in space lack repeatability. An exceedingly long integration time can therefore rule out a mission target. We have evaluated the integration time due to thermal noise from gas damping, Johnson noise and eddy currents—which are independent of the signal frequency—and to internal damping, which is known to decrease with increasing frequency. It is found that at low frequencies thermal noise from internal damping dominates. In the "Galileo Galilei" proposed space experiment to test the equivalence principle to 10-17 the rapid rotation of the satellite (1 Hz) up-converts the signal to a frequency region where thermal noise from internal damping is lower than gas damping and only a factor 2 higher than Johnson noise, with a total integration time of 2.4 to 3.5 hours even in a very conservative estimate. With an adequate readout and additional care in reducing systematics the test could be improved by another order of magnitude, close to 10-18, requiring a hundred times longer—still affordable—integration time of 10 to 14.6 days. μSCOPE, a similar room temperature mission under construction by the French space agency to be launched in 2015, aims at a 10-15 test with an estimated integration time of 1.4 days. Space tests using cold atoms and atom interferometry have been proposed to be performed on the space station (Q-WEP, to 10-14) and on a dedicated mission (STE-QUEST, to 10-15 like μSCOPE). In this case integration is required in order to reduce single shot noise. European Space Agency funded studies report an integration time of several months and a few years respectively.

  10. A general analytical model for pumping tests in radial finite two-zone confined aquifers with Robin-type outer boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Yang, Shaw-Yang; Fen, Chiu-Shia; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This study develops a general analytical model for describing transient drawdown distribution induced by pumping at a finite-radius well in a radial two-zone confined aquifer of finite areal extent with Robin-type condition at both inner and outer boundaries. This model is also applicable to heat conduction problems for a composite hollow cylinder on the basis of the analogy between heat flow and groundwater flow. The time-domain solution of the model is derived by the methods of Laplace transform, Bromwich integral, and residue theorem. This new solution can reduce to the solution for constant-head test (CHT) or constant-rate test (CRT) problem by specifying appropriate coefficients at the Robin inner boundary condition. The solution describing the flow rate across the wellbore due to CHT is further developed by applying Darcy's law to the new solution. In addition, steady-state solutions for both CHT and CRT are also developed based on the approximation for Bessel functions with very small argument values. Many existing solutions for transient flow in homogeneous or two-zone finite aquifers with Dirichlet or no-flow condition at the outer boundary are shown to be special cases of the present solution. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis is also performed to investigate the behaviors of the wellbore flow due to CHT and the aquifer drawdown induced by CRT in response to the change in each of aquifer parameters.

  11. Space Station Freedom NiH2 cell testing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Bruce; Frate, Dave

    1994-01-01

    Testing for the Space Station Freedom Nickel Hydrogen Cell Test Program began in 1990 at Crave Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center. The program has included receipt inspection, random vibration, acceptance, characterization, and life cycle testing of Ni-H2 cells in accordance with the NASA LeRC Interagency Order C-31001-J. A total of 400 Ni-H2 cells have been received at NAVSURFWARCENDIV Crane from three separate manufacturers; Yardney Technical Products (Yardney), Eagle Picher Industries (Eagle Picher), and Gates Energy Products (Gates). Of those, 308 cells distributed among 39 packs have undergone life cycle testing under a test regime simulating low earth orbit conditions. As of 30 September 1993, there are 252 cells assembled into 32 packs still on life cycle test. Since the beginning of the program, failed cells have been detected in all phases of testing. The failures include the following; seven 65 AmpHr and 81 AmpHr Yardney cells were found to be leaking KOH on receipt, one 65 AmpHr Eagle Picher cell failed the acceptance test, one 65 AmpHr Gates cell failed during the characterization test, and six 65 AmpHr Gates cells failed the random vibration test. Of the 39 life cycle packs, testing on seven packs, 56 cells, has been suspended because of low end of discharge voltages. All of the failed life cycle packs were cycled at 60% depth of discharge.

  12. Test results of the highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.; Leopard, J. L.; Lightfoot, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Test results of a highly instrumented Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) are presented. The instrumented engine, when combined with instrumented high pressure turbopumps, contains over 750 special measurements, including flowrates, pressures, temperatures, and strains. To date, two different test series, accounting for a total of sixteen tests and 1,667 seconds, have been conducted with this engine. The first series, which utilized instrumented turbopumps, characterized the internal operating environment of the SSME for a variety of operating conditions. The second series provided system-level validation of a high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump that had been retrofitted with a fluid-film bearing in place of the usual pump-end ball bearings. Major findings from these two test series are highlighted in this paper. In addition, comparisons are made between model predictions and measured test data.

  13. Space Station CMIF extended duration metabolic control test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Extended Duration Metabolic Control Test (EMCT) was conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility. The primary objective of the EMCT was to gather performance data from a partially-closed regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system functioning under steady-state conditions. Included is a description of the EMCT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements of water and gas samples taken during the test. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and microbiological methods used in the post test laboratory analyses of the water samples is included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test, providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item. Analytical results pertaining to a system level mass balance and selected system power estimates are also included.

  14. Early Results from Solar Dynamic Space Power System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Mason, Lee S.

    1996-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built and tested a 2-kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal vacuum facility with a simulated Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum and solar flux as encountered in low-Earth orbit. The solar dynamic system includes a Brayton power conversion unit integrated with a solar receiver which is designed to store energy for continuous power operation during the eclipse phase of the orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration project and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. System testing to date has accumulated over 365 hours of power operation (ranging from 400 watts to 2.0-W(sub e)), including 187 simulated orbits, 16 ambient starts and 2 hot restarts. Data are shown for an orbital startup, transient and steady-state orbital operation and shutdown. System testing with varying insolation levels and operating speeds is discussed. The solar dynamic ground test demonstration is providing the experience and confidence toward a successful flight demonstration of the solar dynamic technologies on the Space Station Mir in 1997.

  15. Program documentation for the space environment test division post-test data reduction program (GNFLEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    The Space Environment Test Division Post-Test Data Reduction Program processes data from test history tapes generated on the Flexible Data System in the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. The program reads the tape's data base records to retrieve the item directory conversion file, the item capture file and the process link file to determine the active parameters. The desired parameter names are read in by lead cards after which the periodic data records are read to determine parameter data level changes. The data is considered to be compressed rather than full sample rate. Tabulations and/or a tape for generating plots may be output.

  16. Verification Challenges of Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a test facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas for performing dynamic verification of space structures and hardware. Some examples of past and current tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility is able to integrate a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or demating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is utilized for input to the simulation during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents many unique challenges, one particular area of interest is with respect to the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. There are many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) measurement systems available on the market, and the test facility measurement systems have evolved over time to include two separate COTS systems. The first system incorporates infra-red sensing cameras, while the second system employs a laser interferometer to determine position and orientation data. The specific technical challenges with the measurement systems in a large dynamic environment include changing thermal and humidity levels, operational area and measurement volume, dynamic tracking, and data synchronization. The facility is located in an expansive high-bay area that is occasionally exposed to outside temperature when large retractable doors at each end of the building are opened. The laser interferometer system, in particular, is vulnerable to the environmental changes in the building. The operational area of the test facility itself is sizeable, ranging from seven meters wide and five meters deep to as much as seven meters high. Both facility measurement systems have desirable measurement volumes and the accuracies vary

  17. Atmospheric reentry flight test of winged space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Yoshifumi; Akiba, Ryojiro; Hinada, Motoki; Nagatomo, Makoto

    A summary of the atmospheric reentry flight experiment of winged space vehicle is presented. The test was conducted and carried out by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Feb. 1992 in Kagoshima Space Center. It is the first Japanese atmospheric reentry flight of the controlled lifting vehicle. A prime objective of the flight is to demonstrate a high speed atmospheric entry flight capability and high-angle-of-attack flight capability in terms of aerodynamics, flight dynamics and flight control of these kind of vehicles. The launch of the winged vehicle was made by balloon and solid propellant rocket booster which was also the first trial in Japan. The vehicle accomplishes the lfight from space-equivalent condition to the atmospheric flight condition where reaction control system (RCS) attitude stabilization and aerodynamic control was used, respectively. In the flight, the vehicle's attitude was measured by both an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and an air data sensor (ADS) which were employed into an auto-pilot flight control loop. After completion of the entry transient flight, the vehicle experienced unexpected instability during the atmospheric decelerating flight; however, it recovered the attitude orientation and completed the transonic flight after that. The latest analysis shows that it is due to the ADS measurement error and the flight control gain scheduling; what happened was all understood. Some details of the test and the brief summary of the current status of the post flight analysis are presented.

  18. Space hardware compatibility tests with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Delphine; Aguila, Alexandre; Debus, Andre; Remaury, Stephanie; Nabarra, Pascale; Darbord, Jacques C.; Soufflet, Caroline; Destrez, Philippe; Coll, Patrice; Coscia, David

    The exploration of the Solar System shall comply with planetary protection requirements handled presently by the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR). The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual contamination carried by return samples or by space systems. For project teams, avoiding the biological contamination of other Solar System bodies such as Mars imposes to perform unusual tasks at technical and operational constraints point of view. The main are the reduction of bioburden on space hardware, the sterile integration of landers, the control of the biological cleanliness and the limitation of crash probability. In order to reduce the bioburden on spacecraft, the use of qualified sterilization processes may be envisaged. Since 1992 now, with the Mars96 mission, one of the most often used is the Sterrad(R) process working with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma. In the view of future Mars exploration programs, after tests performed in the frame of previous missions, a new test campaign has been performed on thermal coatings and miscellaneous materials coming from an experiment in order to assess the compatibility of space hardware and material with this sterilization process.

  19. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    A space suit's mobility is critical to an astronaut's ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. Mobility can be broken down into two parts: range of motion (ROM) and torque. These two measurements describe how the suit moves and how much force it takes to move. Two methods were chosen to define mobility requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). One method focuses on range of motion and the second method centers on joint torque. A joint torque test was conducted to determine a baseline for current advanced space suit joint torques. This test utilized the following space suits: Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), I-Suit, D-Suit, Enhanced Mobility (EM)- ACES, and Mark III (MK-III). Data was collected data from 16 different joint movements of each suit. The results were then reviewed and CSSE joint torque requirement values were selected. The focus of this paper is to discuss trends observed during data analysis.

  20. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer E.; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    A space suit s mobility is critical to an astronaut s ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. The term mobility, with respect to space suits, is defined in terms of two key components: joint range of motion and joint torque. Individually these measures describe the path which in which a joint travels and the force required to move it through that path. Previous space suits mobility requirements were defined as the collective result of these two measures and verified by the completion of discrete functional tasks. While a valid way to impose mobility requirements, such a method does necessitate a solid understanding of the operational scenarios in which the final suit will be performing. Because the Constellation space suit system requirements are being finalized with a relatively immature concept of operations, the Space Suit Element team elected to define mobility in terms of its constituent parts to increase the likelihood that the future pressure garment will be mobile enough to enable a broad scope of undefined exploration activities. The range of motion requirements were defined by measuring the ranges of motion test subjects achieved while performing a series of joint maximizing tasks in a variety of flight and prototype space suits. The definition of joint torque requirements has proved more elusive. NASA evaluated several different approaches to the problem before deciding to generate requirements based on unmanned joint torque evaluations of six different space suit configurations being articulated through 16 separate joint movements. This paper discusses the experiment design, data analysis and results, and the process used to determine the final values for the Constellation pressure garment joint torque requirements.

  1. Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betto, M.; Jørgensen, J. L.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Denver, T.

    2006-10-01

    Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the risks and the costs of the deep space missions. Navigation is the Achilles’ heel of deep space. Being performed on ground, it imposes considerable constraints on the system and the operations, it is very expensive to execute, especially when the mission lasts several years and, above all, it is not failure tolerant. Nevertheless, up to now, ground navigation has been the only possible solution. The technological breakthrough of advanced star trackers, like the micro-advanced stellar compass (μASC) might change this situation. Indeed, exploiting the capabilities of this instrument, the authors have devised a method to determine the orbit of a spacecraft autonomously, on-board and without any a priori knowledge of any kind. The solution is robust, elegant and fast. This paper presents the preliminary performances obtained during the ground tests. The results are very positive and encouraging.

  2. Advanced stellar compass deep space navigation, ground testing results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betto, M.; Jørgensen, J. L.; Jørgensen, P. S.; Denver, T.

    2003-11-01

    Deep space exploration is in the agenda of the major space agencies worldwide and at least the European Space Agency (SMART & Aurora Programs) and the American NASA (New Millennium Program) have set up programs to allow the development and the demonstration of technologies that can reduce the risks and the costs of the deep space missions. Navigation is the Achilles' heel of deep space. Being performed on ground, it imposes considerable constraints on the system and the operations, it is very expensive to execute, especially when the mission lasts several years and, above all, it is not failure tolerant. Nevertheless, up to now, ground navigation has been the only possible solution. The technological breakthrough of advanced star trackers, like the micro-Advanced Stellar Compass (μASC) might change this situation. Indeed, exploiting the capabilities of this instrument, the authors have devised a method to determine the orbit of a spacecraft autonomously, on-board and without any a-priori knowledge of any kind. The solution is robust, elegant and fast. This paper presents the preliminary performances obtained during the ground tests. The results are very positive and encouraging.

  3. Design and Testing of Space Telemetry SCA Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Handler, Louis M.; Quinn, Todd M.

    2006-01-01

    A Software Communications Architecture (SCA) Waveform for space telemetry is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The space telemetry waveform is implemented in a laboratory testbed consisting of general purpose processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), and digital-to-analog converters (DACs). The radio hardware is integrated with an SCA Core Framework and other software development tools. The waveform design is described from both the bottom-up signal processing and top-down software component perspectives. Simulations and model-based design techniques used for signal processing subsystems are presented. Testing with legacy hardware-based modems verifies proper design implementation and dynamic waveform operations. The waveform development is part of an effort by NASA to define an open architecture for space based reconfigurable transceivers. Use of the SCA as a reference has increased understanding of software defined radio architectures. However, since space requirements put a premium on size, mass, and power, the SCA may be impractical for today s space ready technology. Specific requirements for an SCA waveform and other lessons learned from this development are discussed.

  4. Deep Space 1 moves to CCAS for testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility lower Deep Space 1 onto its transporter, for movement to the Defense Satellite Communications System Processing Facility (DPF), Cape Canaveral Air Station, where it will undergo testing. At either side of the spacecraft are its solar wings, folded for launch. When fully extended, the wings measure 38.6 feet from tip to tip. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Onboard experiments include a solar-powered ion propulsion engine and software that tracks celestial bodies so the spacecraft can make its own navigation decisions without the intervention of ground controllers. The ion propulsion engine is the first non-chemical propulsion to be used as the primary means of propelling a spacecraft. Deep Space 1 will complete most of its mission objectives within the first two months, but may also do a flyby of a near-Earth asteroid, 1992 KD, in July 1999. Deep Space 1 will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7326 rocket from Launch Pad 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, in October. Delta II rockets are medium capacity expendable launch vehicles derived from the Delta family of rockets built and launched since 1960. Since then there have been more than 245 Delta launches.

  5. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel test database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data were acquired by competing contractors and NASA centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. This wind tunnel test data has been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retro-glide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings.

  6. Space station experiment definition: Advanced power system test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, H. E.; Neff, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for an advanced photovoltaic power system test bed was provided and the requirements for advanced photovoltaic power system experiments better defined. Results of this study will be used in the design efforts conducted in phase B and phase C/D of the space station program so that the test bed capabilities will be responsive to user needs. Critical PV and energy storage technologies were identified and inputs were received from the idustry (government and commercial, U.S. and international) which identified experimental requirements. These inputs were used to develop a number of different conceptual designs. Pros and cons of each were discussed and a strawman candidate identified. A preliminary evolutionary plan, which included necessary precursor activities, was established and cost estimates presented which would allow for a successful implementation to the space station in the 1994 time frame.

  7. Radiometer effect in space missions to test the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Comandi, G.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.; Catastini, G.

    2001-05-01

    Experiments to test the equivalence principle in space by testing the universality of free fall in the gravitational field of the Earth have to take into account the radiometer effect, caused by temperature differences in the residual gas inside the spacecraft as it is exposed to the infrared radiation from Earth itself. We report the results of our evaluation of this effect for the three proposed experiments currently under investigation by space agencies: μSCOPE, STEP, and GG. It is found that in μSCOPE, which operates at room temperature, and even in STEP, where the effect is greatly reduced by means of very low temperatures, the radiometer effect is a serious limitation to the achievable sensitivity. Instead, by axially spinning the whole spacecraft and with an appropriate choice of the sensitivity axes-as proposed in GG-the radiometer effect averages out and becomes unimportant even at room temperature.

  8. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2016-01-25

    We have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror features 44 actuators, has an aperture of 50 mm, and is designed to reproduce low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of μm. We assessed the space compliance by operating the mirror in thermal vacuum, and exposing it to random and sinusoidal vibrations, as well as to ionizing irradiation. Additionally, the operational life time and the laser power handling capability were tested. The mirror was successfully operated in thermal vacuum at 100 K. We report on the conducted tests and the methods used to evaluate the mirror's performance, and discuss the compliance with the demanded requirements.

  9. Determination of contamination character of materials in space technology testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, D. L.; Coulson, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    The contamination character of selected materials used in space technology testing is presented. Many of these materials contain components that become volatile in a space environment. Most previous data were limited to weight loss or vapor pressure. However, these parameters are not necessarily a direct measure of the contamination character of these materials. Selected materials were exposed to a thermal-vacuum environment, and the degree of contamination was measured by collecting the outgases from these materials on a cold test mirror surface. The degradation of reflectivity of the mirror was measured over a spectral range from 1100 A to 2.5 microns. Half the mirror's surface was also exposed to UV irradiation to determine its effects on the contaminative character of the depositing outgases. The amount of deposit per unit area was measured by microbalances mounted near the mirror; the sensor of one microbalance was UV irradiated. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to determine the composition of the outgases.

  10. Performing a Launch Depressurization Test on an Inflatable Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Patrick J.; Van Velzer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In July, 2014 JPL's Environmental Test Laboratory successfully performed a launch depressurization test on an inflatable space habitat proposed to be installed on the International Space Station. The inflatable habitat is to be launched in the SpaceX Dragon Trunk. During the launch, the unpressurized Dragon Trunk will rapidly change from ground level atmospheric pressure to the vacuum of space. Since the inflatable habitat is tightly folded during launch with multiple layers of bladder, Kevlar fabric sections, and micro-meteoroid shielding, it was not possible to analyze or simulate how the residual air pockets would behave during the launch. If the inflatable habitat does not vent adequately and expands, it could rupture the payload bay of the launch vehicle. A launch depressurization test was chosen as the best way to qualify the inflatable habitat. When stowed, the inflatable habitat measured approximately 241 cm (95 inches) in diameter by 152 cm (60 inches) high and weighed close to 1361 kg (3,000 pounds). Two vacuum chambers connected by a large vacuum line were used to perform this test. The inflatable habitat was mounted in the smaller chamber, which was 396 cm (13 feet) in diameter and 1128 cm (37 feet) high. The larger chamber, which was 823 cm (27 feet) in diameter and 2,591 cm (85 feet) high, was rough pumped and used as a vacuum reservoir. A two stage axial type compressor and ten Stokes vacuum pumps were also used during the depressurization. Opening a butterfly valve on the vacuum line, at the smaller chamber, was manually controlled so that the smaller chamber's depressurization rate matched the launch pressure profile.

  11. Reanalysis of Radiation Belt Electron Phase Space Density using the UCLA 1-D VERB code and Kalman filtering: Correlation between the inner edge of the outer radiation belt phase space density and the plasmapause location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, P. J.; Daae, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The correlation between the inner edge of the outer radiation belt phase space density (PSD) and the plasmapause location (Lpp) using reanalysis is investigated. A large data set is applied for the statistical analysis, using data from 1990-1991 from the CRRES satellite, GEO 1989, GPS-ns18 and Akebono. These data are incorporated into reanalysis by means of a Kalman filter with the UCLA 1-D VERB code. The result is a continuous radial and temporal distribution of the PSD from L*=3 to L*=7. The innovation vector of the reconstructed PSD can give us information about regions where local loss or source processes are dominating. We analyze both the PSD and the innovation vector by binning them into slots of Dst and Kp values. This has been done by finding the time for when the Dst (Kp) is within each bin-size of 20 nT (1) from 10 nT to -130 nT (1 to 8). The PSD and innovation vector was then averaged over each of those times. The result shows a good correlation between the location of the inner edge of the outer radiation belt in the PSD and the location of the plasmapause, which is consistent with previous observations. The boundary between the inner edge of the radiation belt and the Lpp becomes sharper, and the radiation belt becomes thinner, during times of high geomagnetic activity. The innovation vector shows that the inner edge of the source region also lines up well with the Lpp, and further showing a battle between losses and sources during active times. This study also illustrates how data assimilation in the radiation belts can be used to understand the underlining processes of acceleration and loss in the inner magnetosphere.

  12. Performance Testing of Lidar Components Subjected to Space Exposure in Space via MISSE 7 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    .The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment for several months. MISSE missions provide an opportunity for developing space qualifiable materials. Several laser and lidar components were sent by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) as a part of the MISSE 7 mission. The MISSE 7 module was transported to the international space station (ISS) via STS 129 mission that was launched on Nov 16, 2009. Later, the MISSE 7 module was brought back to the earth via the STS 134 that landed on June 1, 2011. The MISSE 7 module that was subjected to exposure in space environment for more than one and a half year included fiber laser, solid-state laser gain materials, detectors, and semiconductor laser diode. Performance testing of these components is now progressing. In this paper, the current progress on post-flight performance testing of a high-speed photodetector and a balanced receiver is discussed. Preliminary findings show that detector characteristics did not undergo any significant degradation.

  13. Independent Analysis of the Space Station Node Modal Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.

    1997-01-01

    With complex structures, comparison of independently derived sets of experimental modal parameters is an excellent way to increase confidence in the results. This paper presents modal identification results using the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) on frequency response functions from the modal test of the Space Station Resource Node. The Resource Node is the first U.S.-built structure for the International Space Station. The modal test was conducted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in January 1997 for the Boeing Company, who designed and built the Node. The ERA-calculated parameters are compared with independent results obtained by the MSFC test team using commercial software. There was excellent correlation of mode shapes between the two sets of results for the first 21 vibration modes of the structure up to 35 Hz. From 35 to 50 Hz, about 60 percent of 25 additional modes had excellent correlation. Natural frequencies and damping factors of most modes agreed within 0.1 Hz and 0.2 percent, respectively.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope NiH2 six battery test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Thomas H.; Lanier, J. Roy

    1991-01-01

    The primary objectives of the test are: (1) to get a better understanding of the operating characteristics of the NiH2 batteries in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electric Power Subsystem (EPS) by simulating every aspect of the expected operating environment; (2) to determine the optimum charge level and charge scheme for the NiH2 batteries in the HST EPS; (3) to predict the performance of the actual HST EPS; (4) to observe the aging characteristics of the batteries; and (5) to test different EPS anomalies before experiencing the anomalies on the actual HST.

  15. Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle OAT No. 1 Plugs in Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jevitt, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A test is described which demonstrates the compatibility of the Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle systems, the ground support equipment, and off-site support facilities by proceeding through a simulated launch countdown, liftoff, and flight. The functions of propellant loading, umbilical ejection, holddown arm release, service arm retraction, liftoff, and inflight separation are simulated. An external power source supplies transfer power to internal, and instrument unit commands are simulated by the digital command system. The test outline is presented along with a list of references, intercommunications information, radio frequency matrix, and interface control chart.

  16. High Test Peroxide Incident at Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R.; Sewell, D.; Cockrell, M.

    2001-01-01

    A renewed interest n hydrogen peroxide as a rocket engine propellant has created a void in the experience base since the last era of significant peroxide use. Advanced catalyst beds and high concentration formulations are currently being developed and tested in the propulsion community. Although peroxide has many positive attributes, there are situations where peroxide must be handled with extreme care. An incident occurred at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) in December 2000 where a significant over pressurization event damaged facility and test hardware. A description of the event and findings of the investigation board are presented and discussed.

  17. Suitport Feasibility: Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a space suit while the space suit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a space suit prototype on the second generation MMSEV cabin, and testing is planned using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. Pressurized testing will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, a suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents

  18. International Space Station Multi-Element Integrated Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filler, Russell E.; Stone, Brock R. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station offers a unique challenge for integrated testing since the entire station is not launched as an integrated vehicle. The ISS design evolved for over 10 years from the station Freedom program that was based on a "ship and shoot" approach. Ship and shoot assumed the program would accept the hardware for launch and integrate the vehicle on orbit without any ground element-to-element integrated testing. Element-to-Element powered-on integrated testing is needed to identify operational problems on the ground rather than once the hardware is on orbit. The industry is accustomed to testing an integrated vehicle and then verifying it is ready for its operational missions. These tests require ground element emulators to represent on-orbit elements. The ISS Multi-Element Integrated Tests (MEIT) are element-to-element integrated tests bringing together hardware representing several flights. The major purpose of these tests is: 1) Element-to-Element interface compatibility, 2) Systems end-to-end operability and functionality and 3) utilize on-orbit procedures with the crew and mission control center. Execution of these tests is critical since the hardware is available for only a limited period of time. Test configurations are defined which test specific interfaces or functionality. These tests develop operational confidence in the Element-to-Element interfaces and identify major problems on the ground to avoid on-orbit anomalies that could threaten mission success, element survivability or assembly activities. This paper addresses the MEIT process, configurations and lessons-learned from these tests.

  19. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Experimental Operations & Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish; MacLean, Matthew; Seaford, Mark; Holden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Test methodology and conditions are presented, and base heating results from 76 runs are reported in non-dimensional form. Regions of high heating are identified and comparisons of various configuration and conditions are highlighted. Base pressure and radiometer results are also reported.

  20. Urine Pretreatment Configuration and Test Results for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Stanley G.; Hutchens, Cindy F.; Rethke, Donald W.; Swartley, Vernon L.; Marsh, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of urine using Oxone and sulfuric acid is baselined in the International Space Station (ISS) waste water reclamation system to control odors, fix urea and control microbial growth. In addition, pretreatment is recommended for long term flight use of urine collection and two phase separation to reduce or eliminate fouling of the associated hardware and plumbing with urine precipitates. This is important for ISS application because the amount of maintenance time for cleaning and repairing hardware must be minimized. This paper describes the development of a chemical pretreatment system based on solid tablet shapes which are positioned in the urine collection hose and are dissolved by the intrained urine at the proper ratio of pretreatment to urine. Building upon the prior success of the developed and tested solid Oxone tablet a trade study was completed to confirm if a similar approach, or alternative, would be appropriate for the sulfuric acid injection method. In addition, a recommended handling and packaging approach of the solid tablets for long term, safe and convenient use on ISS was addressed. Consequently, the solid tablet concept with suitable packaging was identified as the Urine Pretreat / Prefilter Assembly (UPPA). Testing of the UPPA configuration confirmed the disolution rates and ratios required by ISS were achieved. This testing included laboratory controlled methods as well as a 'real world' test evaluation that occurred during the 150 day Stage 10 Water Recovery Test (WRT) conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  1. Development of Test Protocols for International Space Station Particulate Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert D.; Vijayakumar, R.; Agui, Juan H.

    2014-01-01

    Air quality control on the International Space Station (ISS) is a vital requirement for maintaining a clean environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of gravitational settling. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) uses a filtration system that has been in use for over 14 years and has proven to meet this challenge. The heart of this system is a traditional High- Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter configured to interface with the rest of the life support elements and provide effective cabin filtration. Over the years, the service life of these filters has been re-evaluated based on limited post-flight tests of returned filters and risk factors. On earth, a well designed and installed HEPA filter will last for several years, e.g. in industrial and research clean room applications. Test methods for evaluating these filters are being developed on the basis of established test protocols used by the industry and the military. This paper will discuss the test methods adopted and test results on prototypes of the ISS filters. The results will assist in establishing whether the service life can be extended for these filters. Results from unused filters that have been in storage will also be presented to ascertain the shelf life and performance deterioration, if any and determine if the shelf life may be extended.

  2. Space Shuttle stability and control flight test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A unique approach for obtaining vehicle aerodynamic characteristics during entry has been developed for the Space Shuttle. This is due to the high cost of Shuttle testing, the need to open constraints for operational flights, and the fact that all flight regimes are flown starting with the first flight. Because of uncertainties associated with predicted aerodynamic coefficients, nine flight conditions have been identified at which control problems could occur. A detailed test plan has been developed for testing at these conditions and is presented. Due to limited testing, precise computer initiated maneuvers are implemented. These maneuvers are designed to optimize the vehicle motion for determining aerodynamic coefficients. Special sensors and atmospheric measurements are required to provide stability and control flight data during an entire entry. The techniques employed in data reduction are proven programs developed and used at NASA/DFRC.

  3. Development of Test Protocols for International Space Station Particulate Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Green, Robert D.; Agui, Juan H.

    2015-01-01

    Air quality control on the International Space Station (ISS) is a vital requirement for maintaining a clean environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of gravitational settling. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) uses a filtration system that has been in use for over 14 years and has proven to meet this challenge. The heart of this system is a traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter configured to interface with the rest of the life support elements and provide effective cabin filtration. The filter element for this system has a non-standard cross-section with a length-to-width ratio (LW) of 6.6. A filter test setup was designed and built to meet industry testing standards. A CFD analysis was performed to initially determine the optimal duct geometry and flow configuration. Both a screen and flow straighter were added to the test duct design to improve flow uniformity and face velocity profiles were subsequently measured to confirm. Flow quality and aerosol mixing assessments show that the duct flow is satisfactory for the intended leak testing. Preliminary leak testing was performed on two different ISS filters, one with known perforations and one with limited use, and results confirmed that the testing methods and photometer instrument are sensitive enough to detect and locate compromised sections of an ISS BFE.Given the engineering constraints in designing spacecraft life support systems, it is anticipated that non-industry standard filters will be required in future designs. This work is focused on developing test protocols for testing the ISS BFE filters, but the methodology is general enough to be extended to other present and future spacecraft filters. These techniques for characterizing the test duct and perform leak testing

  4. Volcanoes in outer space and inner space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francis, P.

    1991-01-01

    AS a teenager, I spent many long, bone-chilling hours studying the Moon and the planets with a rickety, homemade telescope. After 30 years, I still recall the pain and pleasure of creeping illicitly out of the house in the small hours of the morning for the few moments of satisfaction when the boiling, bouncing image of Jupiter would come to rest momentarily in sharp focus, the Galilean satellites strung out like brilliant beads on either side of the flattened disc. For me, then, the most remarkable piece of volcanology in the last twenty years was the discovery of active volcanism on Io, one of those tiny points of light I grew to know so well, though I was never really sure which satellite was which. To be sure, flying in a helicopter over the wasteland surrounding Mount St. Helens shortly after the 1980 eruption left an indelible, visceral impression on me, as it must have done to a great many others. But the discovery of volcanism on Io was a stunning piece of pure science. 

  5. Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has three main engines that are used for lift off into orbit. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps on each engine. A main element of the pumps are the bearings supporting the main shaft that spins the turbine and pumps. These bearings must spin at high speeds, support the radial and axial thrust loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of lubrication. This paper describes the bearing testing that was done at the Marshall Space Flight Center and the results that were obtained to provide the best bearing design possible for safe and reliable engine performance.

  6. Development of improved high pressure turbine outer gas path seal components. [abradability and thermal cycling test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiembob, L. T.

    1980-01-01

    A plasma sprayed graded layered ceramic/metallic (ZrO2/CoCrAlY) seal was evaluated for JT9D turbine application by rig and engine tests. Four cyclic thermal shock rig tests were conducted during the program. Three completed 1000 simulated engine thermal cycle tests and the fourth completed 500 cycles without severe cracking or spalling. Three ceramic seals were installed in a JT9D experimental engine to evaluate the effect of the engine thermal environment on the seals. All three seals completed the test successfully without severe cracking or spalling. The three seals did have slight laminar cracks at the 85/15-40/60 ZrO2/CoCrAlY interface. The second engine test evaluated the rub capabilities of the seal. Six ceramic seals were installed in the engine with fourteen abrasive tip blades. Three of the six seals rubbed to a depth of 24 mils. Eight of the fourteen abrasive tip blades showed evidence of wear. Three of the eight blades wore a maximum of five mils. Engine rub test results demonstrated the potential of reducing turbine clearances and thereby improving engine performance by use of sprayed ceramic seals.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  9. Space Shuttle filament wound case compressive strength study. I - Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Nuismer, R. J.; Bianca, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Immediately before liftoff, ignition of the Space Shuttle main engines places a significant bending moment on the filament wound cases of the solid rocket booster motors. This results in substantial compressive loading of the aft end of the composite case which, because of attachment requirements, has a complicated design including inserted broadgoods and helical ply dropoffs. To investigate the performance of the filament wound cases during the prelaunch load environment, a comprehensive study was initiated which included both testing and analysis. The results of the test program, which included testing of several full-scale and over three hundred subscale articles, will be described. The test program began with a short development effort to establish appropriate subscale test specimens for determining the material compressive strengths. Once these were established, a more comprehensive test program was initiated to determine the effects on strength of both processing and design changes. Full-scale cases were tested in a simulated prelaunch bending environment in order to validate the analysis predictions. In all tests, special attention was given to observation of the failure sequence which involved a complex process of load transfer from the region of helical ply dropoffs to the broadgood termination region.

  10. Flow/thermal analysis with verification by testing for redesign of the Space Shuttle SRM igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of the success of the insulation j-joints in the Redesigned Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field and nozzle to case joints, the igniter joints were redesigned to incorporate j-joints in the inner and outer igniter joints. The j-joints eliminated the putty that had previously been used to block hot motor gases from reaching the gasket seals. The gasket seals required the addition of a heater during the SRM redesign to increase the dynamic response of the seals to a gap opening in the joints upon motor ignition. The igniter redesign also reduced or eliminated these gap openings thus allowing a lower launch commit temperature criterion. The flow/thermal analyses discussed in this paper are ones used to support the igniter redesign and development phase specifically including tests where motor pressure was allowed to reach the primary seals as a result of intentionally flawing the j-joints. The test data, including pressure, temperature and erosion measurements, were used to support model verification. A good correlation between analysis results and test data was found.

  11. Internship at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Cryogenic Test laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is known for hosting all of the United States manned rocket launches as well as many unmanned launches at low inclinations. Even though the Space Shuttle recently retired, they are continuing to support unmanned launches and modifying manned launch facilities. Before a rocket can be launched, it has to go through months of preparation, called processing. Pieces of a rocket and its payload may come in from anywhere in the nation or even the world. The facilities all around the center help integrate the rocket and prepare it for launch. As NASA prepares for the Space Launch System, a rocket designed to take astronauts beyond Low Earth Orbit throughout the solar system, technology development is crucial for enhancing launch capabilities at the KSC. The Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center greatly contributes to cryogenic research and technology development. The engineers and technicians that work there come up with new ways to efficiently store and transfer liquid cryogens. NASA has a great need for this research and technology development as it deals with cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for rocket fuel, as well as long term space flight applications. Additionally, in this new era of space exploration, the Cryogenics Test Laboratory works with the commercial sector. One technology development project is the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Ground Operations Demonstration Unit (GODU). LH2 GODU intends to demonstrate increased efficiency in storing and transferring liquid hydrogen during processing, loading, launch and spaceflight of a spacecraft. During the Shuttle Program, only 55% of hydrogen purchased was used by the Space Shuttle Main Engines. GODU's goal is to demonstrate that this percentage can be increased to 75%. Figure 2 shows the GODU layout when I concluded my internship. The site will include a 33,000 gallon hydrogen tank (shown in cyan) with a heat exchanger inside the hydrogen tank attached to a

  12. Improving space domain awareness through unequal-cost multiple hypothesis testing in the space surveillance telescope.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Tyler; Cain, Stephen; Jeon, Jae; Blake, Travis

    2015-06-10

    This paper investigates algorithms to improve the detection of space objects with the space surveillance telescope (SST) system. These space objects include natural objects such as asteroids and artificial satellites in Earth orbit. Using a proposed multiple hypothesis test (MHT), the detection performance is compared to the currently used algorithm as well as a matched filter and an equal-cost MHT algorithm. To compare these algorithms, a data set collected by the SST of a geosynchronous Earth orbit satellite, ANIK-F1 entering the Earth's eclipse, is utilized. It is found that an unequal-cost MHT gives increased performance over a point detector, a matched filter, and equal-cost MHT over a large range of potential intensities. Results are presented as probability of detection and receiver operating characteristic curves. In addition, the performance of the algorithm as a function of number of hypotheses used is investigated.

  13. British-Romanian-Hungarian N+N+N Workshop for Young Researchers on Plasma- and Astrophysics: from laboratory to outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballai, I.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Marcu, A.; Petrovay, K.

    2005-06-01

    The International Networking for Young Scientists (INYS), initiated and funded by the British Council, models itself on the N+N concept, where N+N refers to a workshop involving a number of researchers from the UK and an equal number of local researchers; ideally eight or more from each country. INYS is an initiative that supports the British Council's purpose of "nurturing mutually beneficial relationships with other countries", by encouraging and facilitating the mobility of, and direct contact between, young researchers (and their supervisors). It supports face-to-face meetings between young scientists and engineers from the UK and other countries, for the exchange of ideas, knowledge and information and the building of international connections that assist the innovation process. The meeting was an extended N+N workshop, where young scientist from UK, Romania and Hungary (N+N+N) got together to discuss their results, to initiate further real and virtual networking and to identy common research areas. It was the first time that Babes-Bolyai University (Cluj, Romania) has hosted such a meeting and the support by the University (Department of Physics, in particular) gives us hope that there will be other events to follow. The topic of the meeting was "Plasma- and astrophysics: from laboratory to outer space". Plasma is a gaseous state, commonly known as the fourth state of matter and it is made of electrically charged particles where the dynamics of particles is controlled by ambient magnetic fields. Plasmas make up almost 99 per cent of astrophysical objects such as galaxies, stars and supernovae. On Earth, plasmas exist naturally as lightning bolts and the bath of charged particles in the Earth's upper atmosphere. In the high-tech electronics industry, beams of artificially created plasmas engrave sophisticated patterns on computer chips. In an attempt to provide mankind with an abundant source of cheap clean energy, scientists work hard to make artificial suns

  14. Space Shuttle solid rocket motor testing for return to flight - Transient Pressure Test Article test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vibbart, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) test program, which is being conducted at a new facility at NASA-Marshall, is described. The facility is designed to test and verify the sealing capability of the redesigned solid rocket motor's (RSRM) field, igniter, and nozzle joints. The test article consists of full-scale RSRM hardware loaded with inert propellant and assembled in a short stack configuration. The test facility is described as well as test implementation, test effectiveness, and test results.

  15. Testing the equipment for the cryogenic optical test of the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Dziak, K. J.; Huguet, Jesse; Knight, J. Scott; Reis, Carl; Wilson, Erin

    2014-08-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the JWST optics are tested at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. Tens of trucks full of custom test equipment are being delivered to the JSC, in addition to the large pieces built at the Center, and the renovation of the chamber itself. The facility is tested for the thermal stability control for optical measurements and contamination control during temperature transitions. The support for the OTIS is also tested for thermal stability control, load tested in the cryogenic environment, and tested for isolation of the background vibration for the optical measurements. The Center of Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) is tested for the phasing and wavefront error (WFE) measurement of an 18 segment mirror and for cryogenic operation. A photogrammetry system is tested for metrology performance and cryogenic operation. Test mirrors for auto-collimation measurements are tested for optical performance and cryogenic operation. An assembly of optical test sources are calibrated and tested in a cryogenic environment. A Pathfinder telescope is used as a surrogate telescope for cryogenic testing of the OTIS optical test configuration. A Beam Image Analyzer (BIA) is used as a surrogate ISIM with the Pathfinder in this test. After briefly describing the OTIS optical test configuration, the paper will overview the list and configuration of significant tests of the equipment leading up to the OTIS test.

  16. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  17. Test results of Ya-21u thermionic space power system

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Soviet-made TOPAZ-II space nuclear power system unit designated Ya-21u underwent a total of 15 tests both in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR) (1989--1990) and in the US (August 1993 to March 1995) for a cumulative test/operation time of 7681 h at conditions far exceeding design limits. These tests included steady-state operation at different power levels, fast start-ups and power optimizations, and shock and vibration tests. Test results are presented and analyzed. Results indicate a gradual change in the performance parameters such as the optimum cesium pressure and optimum load voltage. The electric power and conversion efficiency of the unit at an input thermal power of 105 kW decreased from 3.7 kW (electric) and 4% in the test in the USSR to 2.13 kW (electric) and 2.3% in the last test in the US. A discussion and qualitative assessment of potential causes of the performance changes of the Ya-21u unit are given.

  18. James Webb Space Telescope primary mirror integration: testing the multiwavelength interferometer on the test bed telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olczak, Gene; Fischer, David J.; Connelly, Mark; Wells, Conrad

    2011-09-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) integration includes a center of curvature test on its 18 primary mirror segment assemblies (PMSAs). This important test is the only ground test that will demonstrate the ability to align all 18 PMSAs. Using a multi-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) integrated to the test bed telescope (TBT), a one-sixth scale model of the JWST, we verify our ability to align and phase the 18 PMSAs. In this paper we will discuss data analysis and test results when using the MWIF to align the segments of the TBT in preparation for alignment of the JWST.

  19. Ion Propulsion Development Projects in US: Space Electric Rocket Test I to Deep Space 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The historical background and characteristics of the experimental flights of ion propulsion systems and the major ground-based technology demonstrations are reviewed. The results of the first successful ion engine flight in 1964, Space Electric Rocket Test (SERT) I, which demonstrated ion beam neutralization, are discussed along with the extended operation of SERT II starting in 1970. These results together with the technologies employed on the early cesium engine flights, the applications technology satellite series, and the ground-test demonstrations, have provided the evolutionary path for the development of xenon ion thruster component technologies, control systems, and power circuit implementations. In the 1997-1999 period, the communication satellite flights using ion engine systems and the Deep Space 1 flight confirmed that these auxiliary and primary propulsion systems have advanced to a high level of flight readiness.

  20. Space Station Freedom Water Recovery test total organic carbon accountability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Michael W.; Slivon, Laurence; Sheldon, Linda; Traweek, Mary

    1991-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Water Recovery Test (WRT) addresses the concept of integrated hygiene and potable reuse water recovery systems baselined for Space Station Freedom (SSF). To assess the adequacy of water recovery system designs and the conformance of reclaimed water quality to established specifications, MSFC has initiated an extensive water characterization program. MSFC's goal is to quantitatively account for a large percentage of organic compounds present in waste and reclaimed hygiene and potable waters from the WRT and in humidity condensate from Spacelab missions. The program is coordinated into Phase A and B. Phase A's focus is qualitative and semi-quantitative. Precise quantitative analyses are not emphasized. Phase B's focus centers on a near complete quantitative characterization of all water types. Technical approaches along with Phase A and partial Phase B investigations on the compositional analysis of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Accountability are presented.

  1. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  2. IAL SPACE: A test laboratory for the ISO cryogenic payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucchiaro, A.; Henrist, M.; Macau, J. P.; Ninane, N.; Blanpain, R.

    1990-01-01

    The ESA Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite is a 3 axes pointed platform designed to make accurate pointed observations of astronomical objects and sources in the wavelength range between 2.5 and 200 microns. ISO is composed of a service module and a payload module which is a large cylindrical vacuum vessel. The vessel is in fact a cryostat (capacity of 2250 l of liquid He II) which contains the telescope and the four focal scientific instruments. The latter being cooled up to a temperature less than 4 K. The qualification of the payload requires the measurement respectively of: the image quality of the telescope through wave front error (WFE) measurements; and the optical alignment of the scientific instruments with respect to the telescope axis and the telescope focus, and this under cryogenic conditions. Consequently, since 1988, the FOCAL 5 IAL Space facility has been upgraded in order to perform the cryogenic optical tests of the ISO optical subsystems.

  3. Fire safety in space - beyond flammability testing of small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaas, Grunde; Torero, Jose L.; Eigenbrod, Christian; Niehaus, Justin; Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Legros, Guillaume; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; T`ien, James S.; Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David L.

    2015-04-01

    An international research team has been assembled to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems by testing material samples in a series of flight experiments (Saffire 1, 2, and -3) to be conducted in an Orbital Science Corporation Cygnus vehicle after it has undocked from the International Space Station (ISS). The tests will be fully automated with the data downlinked at the conclusion of the test before the Cygnus vehicle re-enters the atmosphere. The unmanned, pressurized environment in the Saffire experiments allows for the largest sample sizes ever to be tested for material flammability in microgravity, which will be based on the characteristics of flame spread over the surface of the combustible material. Furthermore, the experiments will have a duration that is unmatched in scale compared to earth based microgravity research facilities such as drop towers (about 5 s) and parabolic flights (about 20 s). In contrast to sounding rockets, the experiments offer a much larger volume, and the reduction in the oxygen concentration during the Saffire experiments will be minimal. The selection of the experimental settings for the first three Saffire experiments has been based on existing knowledge of scenarios that are relevant, yet challenging, for a spacecraft environment. Given that there is always airflow in the space station, all the experiments are conducted with flame spread in either concurrent or opposed flow, though with the flow being stopped in some tests, to simulate the alarm mode environment in the ISS and thereby also to study extinguishment. The materials have been selected based on their known performance in NASA STD-6001Test-1, and with different materials being classified as charring, thermally thin, and thermally thick. Furthermore, materials with non-uniform surfaces will be investigated.

  4. Construction and testing of a space ready rectenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alan M.

    1993-01-01

    In Feb. 1993, the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) Working Group from ISAS, Japan will launch a sounding rocket into low earth orbit to perform two activities: collect scientific information on the high power microwave-ionosphere interaction, and demonstrate microwave power transmission in space at 2.45 GHz. The SPS Working Group announced an open invitation to international agencies willing to collaborate with the Microwave Energy Transmission in Space (METS) experiment in a number of categories. Under the sponsorship of the NASA's Lewis Research Center, the Center for Space Power located at Texas A&M University joined the experiment by producing a microwave rectifying receiving antenna (rectenna). The rectenna is a special type of receiving antenna with unique properties and characteristics. The rectenna's main purpose is to efficiently convert microwave power into DC power. The rectenna is an advanced component in microwave power beaming technology developed for 2.45 GHz. The state-of-the-art rectenna for this frequency consists of dipole antennas, filter circuits, and transmission lines etched on a thin layer of Kapton film. The format of the thin film rectenna is ideally suited for space applications. Thin film rectennas have a low specific mass of approximately 1 kg/kW. The main component of the rectenna is the rectifying diode. High conversion efficiencies (90 percent) in microwave to DC power are capable with special Schottky barrier diodes correctly located in the rectenna circuitry. The theory of operation of the 2.45 GHz rectenna is explained. Experimental test results on the METS rectenna are presented. The packaging of the rectenna is also discussed to meet space qualifications.

  5. Simulated lightning test shuttle .03 scale model. [(space shuttle orbiter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lightning Attach Point tests were conducted for the space shuttle launch configuration (Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters). A series of 250 long spark tests (15 to 20 foot sparks) determined that the orbiter may be struck on the nose, windshield brow, tail and wingtips during launch but not on the main engine nozzles which have been shown to be vulnerable to lightning damage. The orbiter main engine and SRB exhaust plumes were simulated electrically with physical models coated with graded resistance paints. The tests showed that the exhaust plumes from the SRB provide additional protection for the main engine nozzles. However, the tests showed that the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS), which has also been shown to be vulnerable to lightning damage, may be struck during launch. Therefore further work is indicated in the areas of swept stroke studies on the model and on TPS panels. Further attach point testing is also indicated on the free-flying orbiter. Photographs of the test setup are shown.

  6. Space Station Freedom solar array panels plasma interaction test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Donald F.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Power System will make extensive use of photovoltaic (PV) power generation. The phase 1 power system consists of two PV power modules each capable of delivering 37.5 KW of conditioned power to the user. Each PV module consists of two solar arrays. Each solar array is made up of two solar blankets. Each solar blanket contains 82 PV panels. The PV power modules provide a 160 V nominal operating voltage. Previous research has shown that there are electrical interactions between a plasma environment and a photovoltaic power source. The interactions take two forms: parasitic current loss (occurs when the currect produced by the PV panel leaves at a high potential point and travels through the plasma to a lower potential point, effectively shorting that portion of the PV panel); and arcing (occurs when the PV panel electrically discharges into the plasma). The PV solar array panel plasma interaction test was conceived to evaluate the effects of these interactions on the Space Station Freedom type PV panels as well as to conduct further research. The test article consists of two active solar array panels in series. Each panel consists of two hundred 8 cm x 8 cm silicon solar cells. The test requirements dictated specifications in the following areas: plasma environment/plasma sheath; outgassing; thermal requirements; solar simulation; and data collection requirements.

  7. Multispectral optical telescope alignment testing for a cryogenic space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newswander, Trent; Hooser, Preston; Champagne, James

    2016-09-01

    Multispectral space telescopes with visible to long wave infrared spectral bands provide difficult alignment challenges. The visible channels require precision in alignment and stability to provide good image quality in short wavelengths. This is most often accomplished by choosing materials with near zero thermal expansion glass or ceramic mirrors metered with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) that are designed to have a matching thermal expansion. The IR channels are less sensitive to alignment but they often require cryogenic cooling for improved sensitivity with the reduced radiometric background. Finding efficient solutions to this difficult problem of maintaining good visible image quality at cryogenic temperatures has been explored with the building and testing of a telescope simulator. The telescope simulator is an onaxis ZERODUR® mirror, CFRP metered set of optics. Testing has been completed to accurately measure telescope optical element alignment and mirror figure changes in a cryogenic space simulated environment. Measured alignment error and mirror figure error test results are reported with a discussion of their impact on system optical performance.

  8. Cumulative Measurement Errors for Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Located at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a real-time, six degree-of-freedom, short range motion base simulator originally designed to simulate the relative dynamics of two bodies in space mating together (i.e., docking or berthing). The SDTS has the capability to test full scale docking and berthing systems utilizing a two body dynamic docking simulation for docking operations and a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) simulation for berthing operations. The SDTS can also be used for nonmating applications such as sensors and instruments evaluations requiring proximity or short range motion operations. The motion base is a hydraulic powered Stewart platform, capable of supporting a 3,500 lb payload with a positional accuracy of 0.03 inches. The SDTS is currently being used for the NASA Docking System testing and has been also used by other government agencies. The SDTS is also under consideration for use by commercial companies. Examples of tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility integrates a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or de-mating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is used for input during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents unique challenges, one particular area of interest involves the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. The measurement systems for the test facility have two separate functions. The first is to take static measurements of facility and test hardware to determine both the static and moving frames used in the simulation and control system. The test hardware must be measured after each configuration change to determine both sets of reference frames. The second function is to take dynamic

  9. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  10. Whole Module Offgas Test Report: Space-X Dragon Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Between 7 April and 11 April 2012 a chemist from the JSC Toxicology Group acquired samples of air in 500 ml evacuated canisters from the sealed Dragon Module at the Space-X facility at KSC. Three samples were taken of facility air (two before the test and one after the test), and a total of 9 samples were taken from the sealed module in triplicate at the following times: 0 hours, 48 hours, and 96 hours. The module contained 470 kg, which was 100% of the mass to be launched. Analytical data contained in the Toxicology Group Report (attached) show that the ambient facility air was clean except for almost 9 milligrams per cubic meter of isopropanol (IPA) in the sample taken at the end of the test. Space-X must ensure that IPA is not introduced into the module before it is sealed for launch. Other minor contaminants in the ambient air included the following: perfluoro(2-methyl)pentane and hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane. The first-acquired samples of each triplicate from the module were not analyzed. Analyses of pairs of samples that were taken during the test show excellent agreement between the pairs and a linear increase in the T-values during the 4 days of the test (figure below). The rate of increase averaged 0.124 T units per day. If the time from last purge of the module on the ground to crew first entry on orbit is 10 days, then the T value at first entry should be less than 1.2 units, which is well below the criterion of 3.0 for consideration of additional protection of the crew from offgas products. The primary contributors were as follows: trimethylsilanol (0.057), fluorotrimethylsilane (0.047), acetaldehyde (0.004), hexamethylcyclopentasiloxane (0.003), and toluene (0.002).

  11. Space Environmental Testing of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mackey, P. J.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M .R.; Yim, H.; Delaune, P. B.; Clements, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration missions to Mars and the moon may be jeopardized by dust that will adhere to surfaces of (a) Optical systems, viewports and solar panels, (b) Thermal radiators, (c) Instrumentation, and (d) Spacesuits. We have developed an active dust mitigation technology, the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, a multilayer coating that can remove dust and also prevents its accumulation Extensive testing in simulated laboratory environments and on a reduced gravity flight shows that high dust removal performance can be achieved Long duration exposure to the space environment as part of the MISSE-X payload will validate the technology for lunar missions.

  12. Accelerometer Placement for the International Space Station Node Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerometer location analysis for the modal survey test of the International Space Station Node is described. Three different approaches were utilized: (1) Guyan reduction; (2) Iterative Guyan reduction; and (3) The average driving point residue (ADPR) method. Both Guyan approaches worked well, but poor results were observed for the ADPR method. Although the iterative Guyan approach appears to provide the best set of sensor locations, it is intensive computationally, becoming impractical for large initial location sets. While this is computer dependent, it appears that initial sets larger than about 1500 degrees of freedom are impractical for the iterative technique.

  13. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  14. Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems. Laboratory Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olsen, R.; Hewett, M.

    2012-10-01

    Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

  15. The Space Station photovoltaic panels plasma interaction test program - Test plan and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Felder, Marian C.; Sater, Bernard L.; Staskus, John V.

    1990-01-01

    The plasma Interaction Test performed on two space station solar array panels is addressed. This includes a discussion of the test requirements, test plan, experimental set-up, and test results. It was found that parasitic current collection was insignificant (0.3 percent of the solar array delivered power). The measured arcing threshold ranged from -210 to -457 V with respect to the plasma potential. Furthermore, the dynamic response of the panels showed the panel time constant to range between 1 and 5 microsec, and the panel capacitance to be between .01 and .02 microF.

  16. The Space Station Photovoltaic Panels Plasma Interaction Test Program: Test plan and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Felder, Marian C.; Sater, Bernard L.; Staskus, John V.

    1989-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Test performed on two space station solar array panels is addressed. This includes a discussion of the test requirements, test plan, experimental set-up, and test results. It was found that parasitic current collection was insignificant (0.3 percent of the solar array delivered power). The measured arcing threshold ranged from -210 to -457 V with respect to the plasma potential. Furthermore, the dynamic response of the panels showed the panel time constant to range between 1 and 5 microsec, and the panel capacitance to be between .01 and .02 microF.

  17. Space station data management system - A common GSE test interface for systems testing and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Pedro A.; Dunn, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the fundamental problems and goals associated with test, verification, and flight-certification of man-rated distributed data systems. First, a summary of the characteristics of modern computer systems that affect the testing process is provided. Then, verification requirements are expressed in terms of an overall test philosophy for distributed computer systems. This test philosophy stems from previous experience that was gained with centralized systems (Apollo and the Space Shuttle), and deals directly with the new problems that verification of distributed systems may present. Finally, a description of potential hardware and software tools to help solve these problems is provided.

  18. Laboratory testing of candidate robotic applications for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Robots have potential for increasing the value of man's presence in space. Some categories with potential benefit are: (1) performing extravehicular tasks like satellite and station servicing, (2) supporting the science mission of the station by manipulating experiment tasks, and (3) performing intravehicular activities which would be boring, tedious, exacting, or otherwise unpleasant for astronauts. An important issue in space robotics is selection of an appropriate level of autonomy. In broad terms three levels of autonomy can be defined: (1) teleoperated - an operator explicitly controls robot movement; (2) telerobotic - an operator controls the robot directly, but by high-level commands, without, for example, detailed control of trajectories; and (3) autonomous - an operator supplies a single high-level command, the robot does all necessary task sequencing and planning to satisfy the command. Researchers chose three projects for their exploration of technology and implementation issues in space robots, one each of the three application areas, each with a different level of autonomy. The projects were: (1) satellite servicing - teleoperated; (2) laboratory assistant - telerobotic; and (3) on-orbit inventory manager - autonomous. These projects are described and some results of testing are summarized.

  19. Manufacturing and performance test of a 800 mm space optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krödel, Matthias R.; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi; Kume, Masami; Yui, Yukari Y.; Imai, Hiroko; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Tange, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Takao

    2009-08-01

    Next generation space telescopes, which are currently being developed in the US and Europe, require large-scale lightweight reflectors with high specific strength, high specific stiffness, low CTE, and high thermal conductivity. To meet budget constraints, they also require materials that produce surfaces suitable for polishing without expensive overcoatings. HB-Cesic® - a European and Japanese trademark of ECM - is a Hybrid Carbon-Fiber Reinforced SiC composite developed jointly by ECM and MELCO to meet these challenges. The material's mechanical performance, such as stiffness, bending strength, and fracture toughness are significantly improved compared to the classic ECM Cesic® material (type MF). Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of HB-Cesic® at cryogenic temperatures are now partly established; and excellent performance for large future space mirrors and structures are expected. This paper will present the whole manufacturing process of such a space mirror starting from the raw material preparation until the polishing of the optic including cryo testing . The letters "HB" in HB-Cesic® stand for "hybrid" to indicate that the C/C raw material is composed of a mixture of different types of chopped, short carbon-fibers.

  20. Turbopump Seal Testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard G.

    2010-01-01

    The new ARES space flight program has presented many challenges to aerospace engineers and designers. One of the areas for consideration are the seals in the turbopumps that supply cryogenic propellants to the combustion chamber in the upper stage. Heritage face seals that worked in the past might not be sufficient in the newer turbopumps with increased speeds, pressures across the seals, and loads. New seal materials, engineering designs, and analysis techniques have been developed since the early use of these heritage seals, however, rub conditions and surface degradation at the sliding contact cannot be reliably predicted. Testing is required to determine the safe operating limits and verify seal wear life over the operating range. Rocketdyne in Canoga Park California entered into a task agreement with MSFC to design, fabricate, build, test, disassemble, and inspect hardware after tests of carbon materials and wear resistant coatings. The purpose of testing would be to determine the safe operating limits, empirically iterate the design, and select the best combination of materials for face seals and mating rings. This paper summarizes the many hours and efforts of individuals and teams to get the program operating successfully and presents the test results that were obtained.

  1. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  2. Inflight exercise affects stand test responses after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Schneider, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crew members during short-duration space flights (9-16 d) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 h of landing. METHODS: Thirty crew members performed self-selected inflight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. Two subjects participated in this investigation during two different flights. A 10-min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10-15 d before launch (PRE) and within 4 h of landing (POST). Based upon their inflight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: > or = 3 times/week, HR > or = 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 11), medium (MEDex: > or = 3 times/week, HR < 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 10), or low (LOex: < or = 3 times/week, HR and duration variable, N = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, P < or = 0.05). RESULTS: There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared with PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36 +/- 5 bpm) compared with HIex or MEDex groups (25 +/- 1 bpm; 22 +/- 2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after space flight in the MEDex and HIex groups but was significantly greater in the LOex group (PRE: -9 +/- 3; POST: -19 +/- 4 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Thus, moderate to high levels of inflight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after space flight.

  3. Thermal System Upgrade of the Space Environment Simulation Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Ashok B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the refurbishing and upgrade of the thermal system for the existing thermal vacuum test facility, the Space Environment Simulator, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The chamber is the largest such facility at the center. This upgrade is the third phase of the long range upgrade of the chamber that has been underway for last few years. The first phase dealt with its vacuum system, the second phase involved the GHe subsystem. The paper describes the considerations of design philosophy options for the thermal system; approaches taken and methodology applied, in the evaluation of the remaining "life" in the chamber shrouds and related equipment by conducting special tests and studies; feasibility and extent of automation, using computer interfaces and Programmable Logic Controllers in the control system and finally, matching the old components to the new ones into an integrated, highly reliable and cost effective thermal system for the facility. This is a multi-year project just started and the paper deals mainly with the plans and approaches to implement the project successfully within schedule and costs.

  4. Rapid space hardware development through computer-automated testing

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, D.S.; Ruud, K.K.

    1997-10-01

    FORTE, the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events small satellite designed and built by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, is scheduled for launch in August, 1997. In the spirit of {open_quotes}better, cheaper, faster{close_quotes} satellites, the RF experiment hardware (receiver and trigger sub-systems) necessitated rapid prototype testing and characterization in the development of space-flight components. This was accomplished with the assembly of engineering model hardware prior to construction of flight hardware and the design of component-specific, PC-based software control libraries. Using the LabVIEW{reg_sign} graphical programming language, together with off-the-shelf PC digital I/O and GPIB interface cards, hardware control and complete automation of test equipment was possible from one PC. Because the receiver and trigger sub-systems employed complex functions for signal discrimination and transient detection, thorough validation of all functions and illumination of any faults were priorities. These methods were successful in accelerating the development and characterization of space-flight components prior to integration and allowed more complete data to be gathered than could have been accomplished without automation. Additionally, automated control of input signal sources was carried over from bench-level to system-level with the use of networked Linux workstation utilizing a GPIB interface.

  5. Preliminary analysis of accelerated space flight ionizing radiation testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stock, L. V.; Carter, D. J.; Chang, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary analysis shows that radiation dose equivalent to 30 years in the geosynchronous environment can be accumulated in a typical composite material exposed to space for 2 years or less onboard a spacecraft orbiting from perigee of 300 km out to the peak of the inner electron belt (approximately 2750 km). Future work to determine spacecraft orbits better tailored to materials accelerated testing is indicated. It is predicted that a range of 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 10th power rads would be accumulated in 3-6 mil thick epoxy/graphite exposed by a test spacecraft orbiting in the inner electron belt. This dose is equivalent to the accumulated dose that this material would be expected to have after 30 years in a geosynchronous orbit. It is anticipated that material specimens would be brought back to Earth after 2 years in the radiation environment so that space radiation effects on materials could be analyzed by laboratory methods.

  6. Functional testing of the space station plasma contactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Hamley, John A.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Soulas, George C.

    1995-03-01

    A plasma contactor system has been baselined for the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) to control the electrical potentials of surfaces to eliminate/mitigate damaging interactions with the space environment. The system represents a dual-use technology which is a direct outgrowth of the NASA electric propulsion program and, in particular, the technology development effort on ion thruster systems. The plasma contactor subsystems include a hollow cathode assembly, a power electronics unit, and an expellant management unit. Under a pre-flight development program these subsystems are being developed to the level of maturity appropriate for transfer to U.S. industry for final development. Development efforts for the hollow cathode assembly include design selection and refinement, validating its required lifetime, and quantifying the cathode performance and interface specifications. To date, cathode components have demonstrated over 10,000 hours lifetime, and a hollow cathode assembly has demonstrated over 3,000 ignitions. Additionally, preliminary integration testing of a hollow cathode assembly with a breadboard power electronics unit has been completed. This paper discusses test results and the development status of the plasma contactor subsystems for ISSA, and in particular, the hollow cathode assembly.

  7. Performance results of Grumman prototype Space Station Space Erectable Radiator System ground test articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisondo, Francine

    1990-01-01

    The paper addresses individual-radiator performance results of the prototype Space Erectable Radiator System (SERS) in both ambient and thermal vacuum environments. The radiator design utilizing a two-phase fluid loop is outlined, along with SERS design requirements, radiator panel hardware, and whiffletree clamp hardware providing a dry-contact interface of the SERS panel with the heat exchanger of the thermal bus. It is observed that throughout integrated thermal-bus tests, SERS panels managed the load demands whether interfacing with twin condensers, in parallel-flow configuration, or with shear-flow condensers, in a cross-flow configuration. It is found that the insulation losses in the integrated and stand-alone test points are approximately 2 to 6 pct. The motorized whiffletree clamp is seen as performing satisfactorily during remote operations as well as maintaining 28,800-lb force throughout the test duration without requiring further adjustments.

  8. Suitport Feasibility - Development and Test of a Suitport and Space Suit for Human Pressurized Space Suit Donning Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert M.; Mitchell, Kathryn; Allton, Charles; Ju, Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The suitport concept has been recently implemented as part of the small pressurized lunar rover (Currently the Space Exploration vehicle, or SEV) and the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) concept demonstrator vehicle. Suitport replaces or augments the traditional airlock function of a spacecraft by providing a bulkhead opening, capture mechanism, and sealing system to allow ingress and egress of a spacesuit while the spacesuit remains outside of the pressurized volume of the spacecraft. This presents significant new opportunities to EVA exploration in both microgravity and surface environments. The suitport concept will enable three main improvements in EVA by providing reductions in: pre-EVA time from hours to less than thirty minutes; airlock consumables; contamination returned to the cabin with the EVA crewmember. To date, the first generation suitport has been tested with mockup suits on the rover cabins and pressurized on a bench top engineering unit. The work on the rover cabin has helped define the operational concepts and timelines, and has demonstrated the potential of suitport to save significant amounts of crew time before and after EVAs. The work with the engineering unit has successfully demonstrated the pressurizable seal concept including the ability to seal after the introduction and removal of contamination to the sealing surfaces. Using this experience, a second generation suitport was designed. This second generation suitport has been tested with a spacesuit prototype using the pressure differentials of the spacecraft. This test will be performed using the JSC B32 Chamber B, a human rated vacuum chamber. This test will include human rated suitports, the suitport compatible prototype suit, and chamber modifications. This test will bring these three elements together in the first ever pressurized donning of a rear entry suit through a suitport. This paper presents design of a human rated second generation suitport, modifications to

  9. Johnson Space Center's Regenerative Life Support Systems Test Bed.

    PubMed

    Barta, D J; Henninger, D L

    1996-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for human testing of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. The facility supports NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The facility is comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 11 m2 growing area. The root zone in each chamber is configurable for hydroponic or solid media plant culture systems. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), is capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in a planetary surface habitat; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) operates at ambient atmospheric pressure. The air lock of the VPGC is currently being outfitted for short duration (1 to 15 day) human habitation at ambient pressures. Testing with and without human subjects will focus on 1) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; 2) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; 3) planetary resource utilization for ALS systems, in which solid substrates (simulated planetary soils or manufactured soils) are used in selected crop growth studies; 4) environmental microbiology and toxicology; 5) monitoring and control strategies; and 6) plant growth systems design. Included are descriptions of the overall design of the test facility, including discussions of the atmospheric conditioning, thermal control, lighting, and nutrient delivery systems.

  10. Johnson Space Center's Regenerative Life Support Systems Test Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, D. J.; Henninger, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support Systems (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for human testing of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. The facility supports NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) Program. The facility is comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 11 m2 growing area. The root zone in each chamber is configurable for hydroponic or solid media plant culture systems. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), is capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in a planetary surface habitat; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) operates at ambient atmospheric pressure. The air lock of the VPGC is currently being outfitted for short duration (1 to 15 day) human habitation at ambient pressures. Testing with and without human subjects will focus on 1) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; 2) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; 3) planetary resource utilization for ALS systems, in which solid substrates (simulated planetary soils or manufactured soils) are used in selected crop growth studies; 4) environmental microbiology and toxicology; 5) monitoring and control strategies; and 6) plant growth systems design. Included are descriptions of the overall design of the test facility, including discussions of the atmospheric conditioning, thermal control, lighting, and nutrient delivery systems.

  11. Modal test and analysis: Multiple tests concept for improved validation of large space structure mathematical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Kuo, C-P.; Glaser, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    For the structural dynamic analysis of large space structures, the technology in structural synthesis and the development of structural analysis software have increased the capability to predict the dynamic characteristics of the structural system. The various subsystems which comprise the system are represented by various displacement functions; the displacement functions are then combined to represent the total structure. Experience has indicated that even when subsystem mathematical models are verified by test, the mathematical representations of the total system are often in error because the mathematical model of the structural elements which are significant when loads are applied at the interconnection points are not adequately verified by test. A multiple test concept, based upon the Multiple Boundary Condition Test (MBCT), is presented which will increase the accuracy of the system mathematical model by improving the subsystem test and test/analysis correlation procedure.

  12. Universal computer test stand (recommended computer test requirements). [for space shuttle computer evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Techniques are considered which would be used to characterize areospace computers with the space shuttle application as end usage. The system level digital problems which have been encountered and documented are surveyed. From the large cross section of tests, an optimum set is recommended that has a high probability of discovering documented system level digital problems within laboratory environments. Defined is a baseline hardware, software system which is required as a laboratory tool to test aerospace computers. Hardware and software baselines and additions necessary to interface the UTE to aerospace computers for test purposes are outlined.

  13. Testing in Support of Space Fission System Development and Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Godfrey, Tom; Martin, Jim; Pearson, Boise; Webster, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    Extensive data would be required for the qualification of a fission surface power (FSP) system. The strategy for qualifying a FSP system could have a significant programmatic impact. This paper explores potential options that could be used for qualifying FSP systems, including cost-effective means for obtaining required data. three methods for obtaining qualification data are analysis, non-nuclear testing, and nuclear testing. It has been over 40 years since the US qualified a space reactor for launch. During that time, advances have been made related to all three methods. Perhaps the greatest advancement has occurred in the area of computational tools for design and analysis. Tools that have been developed, coupled with modem computers, would have a significant impact on a FSP qualification. This would be especially true for systems with materials and fuels operating well within temperature, irradiation damage, and burnup limits. The ability to perform highly realistic non-nuclear testing has also advanced throughout the past four decades. Instrumented thermal simulators were developed during the 1970s and 1980s to assist in the development, operation, and assessment of terrestrial fission systems. Instrumented thermal simulators optimized for assisting in the development, operation, and assessment of modem FSP systems have been under development (and utilized) since 1998. These thermal simulators enable heat from fission to be closely mimicked (axial power profile, radial power profile, temperature, heat flux, etc.} and extensive data to be taken from the core region. Both steady-state and transient operation can be tested. For transient testing, reactivity feedback is calculated (or measured in cold/warm criticals) based on reactor temperature and/or dimensional changes. Pin power during a transient is then calculated based on the reactivity feedback that would occur given measured values of temperature and/or dimensional change. In this way nonnuclear testing

  14. Current Trends on the Applicability of Ground Aerospace Materials Test Data to Space System Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the application of testing aerospace materials to the environment of space for flammability. Test environments include use of drop towers, and the parabolic flight to simulate the low gravity environment of space.

  15. Verification Test of Automated Robotic Assembly of Space Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary program has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to develop operational procedures for supervised autonomous assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The hardware and operations required to assemble a 102-member tetrahedral truss and attach 12 hexagonal panels were developed and evaluated. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. However, as the system matured and operations were proven, upgrades were incorporated and assessed against the baseline test results. These upgrades included the use of distributed microprocessors to control dedicated end-effector operations, machine vision guidance for strut installation, and the use of an expert system-based executive-control program. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, and a series of proposed enhancements. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly or truss structures have been encountered. The test system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  16. Environmental testing of COTS components for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2009-02-01

    Research and development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) has shown a significant promise for a variety of commercial applications. For example, accelerometers are widely used for air bags in automobiles, MEMS inkjet print heads are used for printers, gyroscopes for guidance and navigation and pressure sensors for various industrial applications. Some of the MEMS devices have potential to become the commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. Aerospace requires more sophisticated technology development to achieve significant cost savings if they could utilize COTS components in their systems. A miniature gas chromatograph instrument designed as a space station project will provide onorbit detection, identification, and quantification of potentially toxic trace volatile organic compounds in the human-supporting environment. The instrument consists of several commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) valves, pumps and sensors. This paper describes the thermal environmental requirements and protoflight/qualification thermal test results for the COTS parts at cold and hot temperature extremes. The objective of this study is to qualify several COTS components for specific thermal/dynamic environments to assess their reliability. All COTS components life tested were believed to meet the 3x mission operational life requirements. Test results will be presented.

  17. History of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip; Haluck, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is propelled into orbit by two solid rocket motors and three liquid fed main engines. After the solid motors fall away, the shuttle engines continue to run for a total time of 8 minutes. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps. A critical part of the turbopump is the main shaft that supports the drive turbine and the pump inducer and impeller. Rolling element bearings hold the shaft in place during rotation. If the bearings were to fail, the shaft would move, allowing components to rub in a liquid oxygen or hydrogen environment, which could have catastrophic results. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and axial loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of a conventional means of lubrication. The Rocketdyne built Shuttle turbopumps demonstrated their capability to perform during launches; however, the seven hour life requirement was not being met. One of the limiting factors was the bearings. In the late 1970's, an engineering team was formed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), to develop a test rig and plan for testing the Shuttle s main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. The goals of the program were to better understand the operation of bearings in a cryogenic environment and to further develop and refine existing computer models used to predict the operational limits of these bearings. In 1982, testing began in a rig named the Bearing and Seal Material Tester or BSMT as it was commonly called. The first testing investigated the thermal margin and thermal runaway limits of the HPOTP bearings. The test rig was later used to explore potential bearing improvements in the area of increased race curvatures, new cage materials for better lubrication, new wear resistant rolling element materials, and other ideas to improve wear life. The most notable improvements during this tester s time was the incorporation of silicon nitride balls and

  18. Hypertelescopes: potential science gains, current testing and prospects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the way of giant dilute telescopes, the hypertelescope is a many-aperture interferometer, which provides direct high resolution images with efficient light concentration. Pending future versions in space, a prototype terrestrial hypertelescope is under test in a high valley of the southern Alps. A moving focal gondola, suspended 101 m above small static mirrors, is driven under computer control with millimeter accuracy. The coude focus at ground level has been qualified by observing a Vega image focused by one of the mirrors and transmitted through the gondola. Upgrades under way for multi-beam interference include full autoguiding, the installation of several cameras on the gondola and adaptive optics for cophasing. Science observing is expected to begin in a few years, and other potential sites are considered for a larger meta-aperture, in the kilometer range. Future space versions, utilizing a 10-1000 km flotilla of small mirrors, are also considered and proposed to NASA and ESA, but require different technical developments.

  19. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  20. Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienz, Robert; Davis, Catherine; Weed, Michael; Guida, Peter; Gooden, Virginia; Brady, Joseph; Roma, Peter

    Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests INTRODUCTION Risk assessment of the biological consequences of living in the space radiation environment represents one of the highest priority areas of NASA radiation research. Of critical importance is the need for a risk assessment of damage to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to functional cognitive/behavioral changes during long-term space missions, and the development of effective shielding or biological countermeasures to such risks. The present research focuses on the use of an animal model that employs neurobehavioral tests identical or homologous to those currently in use in human models of risk assessment by U.S. agencies such as the Depart-ment of Defense and Federal Aviation and Federal Railroad Administrations for monitoring performance and estimating accident risks associated with such variables as fatigue and/or alcohol or drug abuse. As a first approximation for establishing human risk assessments due to exposure to space radiation, the present work provides animal performance data obtained with the rPVT (rat Psychomotor Vigilance Test), an animal analog of the human PVT that is currently employed for human risk assessments via quantification of sustained attention (e.g., 'vigilance' or 'readiness to perform' tasks). Ground-based studies indicate that radiation can induce neurobehavioral changes in rodents, including impaired performance on motor tasks and deficits in spatial learning and memory. The present study is testing the hypothesis that radiation exposure impairs motor function, performance accuracy, vigilance, motivation, and memory in adult male rats. METHODS The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) was originally developed as a human cognitive neurobe-havioral assay for tracking the temporally dynamic changes in sustained attention, and has also been used to track changes in circadian rhythm. In humans the test requires responding to a small, bright

  1. Space Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Horneck, Gerda; Klaus, David M.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The responses of microorganisms (viruses, bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and lichens) to selected factors of space (microgravity, galactic cosmic radiation, solar UV radiation, and space vacuum) were determined in space and laboratory simulation experiments. In general, microorganisms tend to thrive in the space flight environment in terms of enhanced growth parameters and a demonstrated ability to proliferate in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of antibiotics. The mechanisms responsible for the observed biological responses, however, are not yet fully understood. A hypothesized interaction of microgravity with radiation-induced DNA repair processes was experimentally refuted. The survival of microorganisms in outer space was investigated to tackle questions on the upper boundary of the biosphere and on the likelihood of interplanetary transport of microorganisms. It was found that extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was the most deleterious factor of space. Among all organisms tested, only lichens (Rhizocarpon geographicum and Xanthoria elegans) maintained full viability after 2 weeks in outer space, whereas all other test systems were inactivated by orders of magnitude. Using optical filters and spores of Bacillus subtilis as a biological UV dosimeter, it was found that the current ozone layer reduces the biological effectiveness of solar UV by 3 orders of magnitude. If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis. PMID:20197502

  2. Magnetically suspended Stirling cryogenic space refrigerator Test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, A.; Stolfi, F.; Sherman, A.; Gasser, M.

    In 1979, a project leading to the development of a Stirling type cryogenic refrigerator for spaceborne application was initiated. The refrigerator is to generate five watts of net cooling at a temperature of 65 K. An operation without maintenance for a period of five years is required. A novel approach was selected for meeting the life requirement, taking into account an electromagnetic suspension of the moving parts. The fabrication of the hardware has now been completed and the performance of the refrigerator has been measured. The present paper provides a short review of the Stirling cycle, a description of the refrigerator design, and a summary of the test results. The new refrigerator configuration contains four major features, including a purely rectilinear drive, magnetic bearings, clearance seals, and all metal/ceramic working space surfaces. The displacer and the piston are supported and guided by magnetic bearings. The magnetic bearing consists of a set of electromagnetic actuators and radial position transducers.

  3. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment ;Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space; (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  4. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  5. Results from Carbon Dioxide Washout Testing Using a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus with a Space Suit Ventilation Test Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce; Kanne, Bryan; McMillin, Summer; Vonau, Walt; Swickrath, Mike

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing an advanced portable life support system (PLSS) to meet the needs of a new NASA advanced space suit. The PLSS is one of the most critical aspects of the space suit providing the necessary oxygen, ventilation, and thermal protection for an astronaut performing a spacewalk. The ventilation subsystem in the PLSS must provide sufficient carbon dioxide (CO2) removal and ensure that the CO2 is washed away from the oronasal region of the astronaut. CO2 washout is a term used to describe the mechanism by which CO2 levels are controlled within the helmet to limit the concentration of CO2 inhaled by the astronaut. Accumulation of CO2 in the helmet or throughout the ventilation loop could cause the suited astronaut to experience hypercapnia (excessive carbon dioxide in the blood). A suited manikin test apparatus (SMTA) integrated with a space suit ventilation test loop was designed, developed, and assembled at NASA in order to experimentally validate adequate CO2 removal throughout the PLSS ventilation subsystem and to quantify CO2 washout performance under various conditions. The test results from this integrated system will be used to validate analytical models and augment human testing. This paper presents the system integration of the PLSS ventilation test loop with the SMTA including the newly developed regenerative Rapid Cycle Amine component used for CO2 removal and tidal breathing capability to emulate the human. The testing and analytical results of the integrated system are presented along with future work.

  6. THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E.

    2012-04-10

    We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

  7. Cryogenic nano-positioner development and test for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streetman, Scott; Kingsbury, Lana

    2003-03-01

    An effort has been in place at Ball Aerospace &Technologies Corp. (BATC) for over three years to develop a mechanism for precise positioning of optical elements for such applications as the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). It is desired for such a mechanism to be of low mass, to have nanometer-level positioning capability over a comparatively large range of travel, to be both ambient and cryogenically capable, and to have high strength and stiffness capabilities. The development effort has resulted in a simple 288-gram mechanism that meets these requirements, and does so with a single stepper motor and a simple control system. Performance has been verified at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures, and the mechanism design is currently being implemented on BATC's Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator program (AMSD). The current design achieves steps of less than 10 nanometers per step over more than 20mm of travel. We will present an overview of the capabilities of the mechanism, as well as a discussion of the test results achieved to date. Test results will include both ambient and cryogenic performance, hysteresis and stiffness measurement, as well as verification of single-stepping capability.

  8. Collimator equipment of the Large Optical Test Facility Vertical for testing space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Pavel A.; Gogolev, Yuri A.; Zvonkova, V. V.; Kobozev, I. R.; Ostapenko, S. V.; Malamed, Evgeny R.; Demidov, V. V.

    1995-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the collimator equipment of the large optical test facility (LOTF) 'vertical' designed for testing space telescopes. It is being created in the Research Center 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute' in Russia. The optical scheme and special structural features of the vacuum vertical-type double-mirror collimator will be covered here. This paper deals with technical data and potentials of collimator focal equipment. Estimations of the collimator thermal aberrations caused by temperature fields coming from thermal simulators are put forward.

  9. Stability Testing and Analysis of a PMAD DC Test Bed for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.

    1992-01-01

    The Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC Test Bed at the NASA Lewis Research Center is introduced. Its usefulness to the Space Station Freedom Electrical Power (EPS) development and design are discussed in context of verifying system stability. Stability criteria developed by Middlebrook and Cuk are discussed as they apply to constant power DC to DC converters exhibiting negative input impedance at low frequencies. The utility-type Secondary Subsystem is presented and each component is described. The instrumentation used to measure input and output impedance under load is defined. Test results obtained from input and output impedance measurements of test bed components are presented. It is shown that the PMAD DC Test Bed Secondary Subsystem meets the Middlebrook stability criterion for certain loading conditions.

  10. Stability testing and analysis of a PMAD dc test bed for the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.; Brush, Andrew S.

    1992-01-01

    The Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) dc Test Bed at the NASA Lewis Research Center is introduced. Its usefulness to the Space Station Freedom Electrical Power (EPS) development and design are discussed in context of verifying system stability. Stability criteria developed by Middlebrook and Cuk are discussed as they apply to constant power dc to dc converters exhibiting negative input impedance at low frequencies. The utility-type Secondary Subsystem is presented and each component is described. The instrumentation used to measure input and output impedance under load is defined. Test results obtained from input and output impedance measurements of test bed components are presented. It is shown that the PMAD dc Test Bed Secondary Subsystem meets the Middlebrook stability criterion for certain loading conditions.

  11. Utilisation of Wearable Computing for Space Programmes Test Activities Optimasation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, V.; Lazzari, D.; Alemanni, M.

    2004-08-01

    New technologies are assuming a relevant importance in the Space business domain also in the Assembly Integration and Test (AIT) activities allowing process optimization and capability that were unthinkable only few years ago. This paper has the aim to describe Alenia Spazio (ALS) gained experience on the remote interaction techniques as a results of collaborations established both on European Communities (EC) initiatives, with Alenia Aeronautica (ALA) and Politecnico of Torino (POLITO). The H/W and S/W components performances increase and costs reduction due to the home computing massive utilization (especially demanded by the games business) together with the network technology possibility (offered by the web as well as the hi-speed links and the wireless communications) allow today to re-think the traditional AIT process activities in the light of the multimedia data exchange: graphical, voice video and by sure more in the future. Aerospace business confirm its innovation vocation which in the year '80 represents the cradle of the CAD systems and today is oriented to the 3D data visualization/ interaction technologies and remote visualisation/ interaction in collaborative way on a much more user friendly bases (i.e. not for specialists). Fig. 1 collects AIT extended scenario studied and adopted by ALS in these years. ALS experimented two possibilities of remote visualization/interaction: Portable [e.g. Fig.2 Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), Wearable] and walls (e.g.VR-Lab) screens as both 2D/3D visualisation and interaction devices which could support many types of traditional (mainly based on EGSE and PDM/CAD utilisation/reports) company internal AIT applications: 1. design review support 2. facility management 3. storage management 4. personnel training 5. integration sequences definition 6. assembly and test operations follow up 7. documentation review and external access to AIT activities for remote operations (e.g. tele-testing) EGSE Portable Clean room

  12. NASA Now: Materials Science: International Space Station Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment, or MISSE, provides NASA with a means to study the effects of long-term exposure to space on various materials, computer components and electron...

  13. New vision solar system exploration missions study: Analysis of the use of biomodal space nuclear power systems to support outer solar system exploration missions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-08

    This report presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter mission s to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of a NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Concepts for microspacecraft capable of probing Jupiter`s atmosphere and exploring Titan were also developed. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive option for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination.

  14. NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program: Fiscal year 1994 - 1995 testing activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Harry T.; Hirsch, David

    1995-01-01

    The results of the testing of wire insulation materials for space applications is presented in this report. The wire insulations tested were partially fluorinated polyimide, extruded ETFE, extruded PTFE, PTFE tape, and PTFE/Kapton. The tests performed were flammability tests, odor tests, compatibility tests with aerospace fluids, offgassing tests, and thermal vacuum stability tests.

  15. Thermally Induced Vibrations of the Hubble Space Telescope's Solar Array 3 in a Test Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Early, Derrick A.; Haile, William B.; Turczyn, Mark T.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) conducted a disturbance verification test on a flight Solar Array 3 (SA3) for the Hubble Space Telescope using the ESA Large Space Simulator (LSS) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The LSS cyclically illuminated the SA3 to simulate orbital temperature changes in a vacuum environment. Data acquisition systems measured signals from force transducers and accelerometers resulting from thermally induced vibrations of the SAI The LSS with its seismic mass boundary provided an excellent background environment for this test. This paper discusses the analysis performed on the measured transient SA3 responses and provides a summary of the results.

  16. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 5 Developed to Test Advanced Solar Cell Technology Aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The testing of new technologies aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is facilitated through the use of a passive experiment container, or PEC, developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. The PEC is an aluminum suitcase approximately 2 ft square and 5 in. thick. Inside the PEC are mounted Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) plates that contain the test articles. The PEC is carried to the ISS aboard the space shuttle or a Russian resupply vehicle, where astronauts attach it to a handrail on the outer surface of the ISS and deploy the PEC, which is to say the suitcase is opened 180 deg. Typically, the PEC is left in this position for approximately 1 year, at which point astronauts close the PEC and it is returned to Earth. In the past, the PECs have contained passive experiments, principally designed to characterize the durability of materials subjected to the ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen present at the ISS orbit. The MISSE5 experiment is intended to characterize state-of-art (SOA) and beyond photovoltaic technologies.

  17. Quantum test of the equivalence principle and space-time aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; Chiow, Sheng-wey; Yu, Nan; Müller, Holger

    2016-02-01

    We describe the Quantum Test of the Equivalence principle and Space Time (QTEST), a concept for an atom interferometry mission on the International Space Station (ISS). The primary science objective of the mission is a test of Einstein’s equivalence principle with two rubidium isotope gases at a precision of better than 10-15, a 100-fold improvement over the current limit on equivalence principle violations, and over 1,000,000 fold improvement over similar quantum experiments demonstrated in laboratories. Distinct from the classical tests is the use of quantum wave packets and their expected large spatial separation in the QTEST experiment. This dual species atom interferometer experiment will also be sensitive to time-dependent equivalence principle violations that would be signatures for ultralight dark-matter particles. In addition, QTEST will be able to perform photon recoil measurements to better than 10-11 precision. This improves upon terrestrial experiments by a factor of 100, enabling an accurate test of the standard model of particle physics and contributing to mass measurement, in the proposed new international system of units (SI), with significantly improved precision. The predicted high measurement precision of QTEST comes from the microgravity environment on ISS, offering extended free fall times in a well-controlled environment. QTEST plans to use high-flux, dual-species atom sources, and advanced cooling schemes, for N > 106 non-condensed atoms of each species at temperatures below 1 nK. Suppression of systematic errors by use of symmetric interferometer configurations and rejection of common-mode errors drives the QTEST design. It uses Bragg interferometry with a single laser beam at the ‘magic’ wavelength, where the two isotopes have the same polarizability, for mitigating sensitivities to vibrations and laser noise, imaging detection for correcting cloud initial conditions and maintaining contrast, modulation of the atomic hyperfine states

  18. Johnson Space Center's regenerative life support systems test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, Donald L.; Tri, Terry O.; Barta, Daniel J.; Stahl, Randal S.

    1991-01-01

    The Regenerative Life Support System (RLSS) Test Bed at NASA's Johnson Space Center is an atmospherically closed, controlled environment facility for the evaluation of regenerative life support systems using higher plants in conjunction with physicochemical life support systems. When completed, the facility will be comprised of two large scale plant growth chambers, each with approximately 10 m(exp 2) growing area. One of the two chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), will be capable of operating at lower atmospheric pressures to evaluate a range of environments that may be used in Lunar or Martian habitats; the other chamber, the Ambient Pressure Growth Chamber (APGC) will operate at ambient atmospheric pressure. The root zone in each chamber will be configurable for hydroponic or solid state media systems. Research will focus on: (1) in situ resource utilization for CELSS systems, in which simulated lunar soils will be used in selected crop growth studies; (2) integration of biological and physicochemical air and water revitalization systems; (3) effect of atmospheric pressure on system performance; and (4) monitoring and control strategies.

  19. Predicting Material Performance in the Space Environment from Laboratory Test Data, Static Design Environments, and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Josep I.; Edwards, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Qualifying materials for use in the space environment is typically accomplished with laboratory exposures to simulated UV/EUV, atomic oxygen, and charged particle radiation environments with in-situ or subsequent measurements of material properties of interest to the particular application. Choice of environment exposure levels are derived from static design environments intended to represent either mean or extreme conditions that are anticipated to be encountered during a mission. The real space environment however is quite variable. Predictions of the on orbit performance of a material qualified to laboratory environments can be done using information on 'space weather' variations in the real environment. This presentation will first review the variability of space environments of concern for material degradation and then demonstrate techniques for using test data to predict material performance in a variety of space environments from low Earth orbit to interplanetary space using historical measurements and space weather models.

  20. Space Shuttle Main Engine instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump technology test bed testing results summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Mary E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the test results from the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) instrumented High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP). The turbopump was tested on Engine 3001, a highly instrumented engine, in an effort to characterize the turbopump and the engine system. Seven tests, for a total duration of 766 seconds, were performed over a five month time period. The testing was performed at a wide variety of engine conditions. Changes in engine mixture ratio, power level, engine inlet oxidizer pressure, engine inlet fuel pressure, and engine start sequence were made. A discussion of all the HPOTP pressure and temperature data obtained are presented with comparisons to supporting analyses made where applicable. The effect of the various engine conditions on the measured data is addressed. This paper also discusses the challenges that were overcome to obtain the data. The significant instrumentation related problems encountered during the design, fabrication, and testing of this turbopump are summarized. Only those issues that affected the data obtained or the instrumentation itself are discussed. The relevance of the data to other noninstrumented turbomachinery is outlined. Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the test series will be presented.

  1. Forward Skirt Structural Testing on the Space Launch System (SLS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrer, J. D.; Wright, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural testing was performed to evaluate heritage forward skirts from the Space Shuttle program for use on the NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program. Testing was needed because SLS ascent loads are 35% higher than Space Shuttle loads. Objectives of testing were to determine margins of safety, demonstrate reliability, and validate analytical models. Testing combined with analysis was able to show heritage forward skirts were acceptable to use on the SLS program.

  2. Creating the Thermal Environment for Safely Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Lauterbach, John; Garcia, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. The chamber was originally built to support testing of the Apollo Service and Command Module for lunar missions, but underwent major modifications to be able to test the James Webb Space Telescope in a simulated deep space environment. To date seven tests have been performed in preparation of testing the flight optics for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Each test has had a uniquie thermal profile and set of thermal requirements for cooling down and warming up, controlling contamination, and releasing condensed air. These range from temperatures from 335K to 15K, with tight uniformity and controllability for maintining thermal stability and pressure control. One unique requirement for two test was structurally proof loading hardware by creating thermal gradients at specific temperatures. This paper will discuss the thermal requirements and goals of the tests, the original requirements of the chamber thermal systems for planned operation, and how the new requirements were met by the team using the hardware, system flexiblilty, and engineering creativity. It will also discuss the mistakes and successes to meet the unique goals, especially when meeting the thermal proof load.

  3. The temperature field and heat transfer in the porthole of the Space Shuttle - Outer surface under the 3rd kind nonlinear boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Heping; Yu, Qizheng; Zhang, Jizhou

    In this paper, the transient combined heat transfer in the silicon glass porthole of Space Shuttle is studied by control volume method, ray tracing method and spectral band model. The temperature field in the silicon glass and heat flux entering the space cabin are given under the 3rd kind nonlinear boundary condition. The computational results show, if the radiation in the silicon glass is omitted, the errors for temperature fields are not too evident, but for heat flux are quite large.

  4. Space Radar Image of Raco, Michigan, ecological test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band image of seasonal changes at the ecological test site of Raco, Michigan, located south of Whitefish Bay on Lake Superior. The image is centered at about 46 degrees north latitude and 85 degrees west longitude. This image was acquired by the X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 10th, 1994, and on October 1, 1994. The areas shown in red correspond to the April 10th data; the areas in blue correspond to data acquired on October 1, 1994; green indicates the ratio of data acquired on April 10 and October 1, 1994. The area shown is 22.7 kilometers by 53 kilometers (14 miles by 33 miles). Lake Superior in the upper right was frozen in April and had small waves (ripples) on its surface in October. The land area contains mostly forests and, to a lesser extent, agricultural regions. In April the area was covered in wet snow. By October, there agricultural areas were covered with grass. Vegetation and soils were moist due to rainfalls three days before the data was acquired on October 1, 1994. The bright light green/yellow tones in the lower half of the image show the stronger reflections of the snow-covered agricultural fields. The pinkish color corresponds to the coniferous and deciduous forests. The green area represents red pines. These trees are smaller than the surrounding forest cover and allow more radar penetration. The area is green because the radar is sensing the surface, which undergoes great change from snow to grass and fern undergrowth between April and October. The bright green triangle in the upper half of the image is an old airstrip, while the modern airport can be seen on the bottom right side of the image. The Raco site is an important location for monitoring seasonal changes and future global change because it is situated at the ecological transition zone between the boreal forests and the northern temperate forests. This transitional zone is expected to be ecologically sensitive to anticipated

  5. Testing of Laser Components Subjected to Exposure in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2010-01-01

    Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) missions provide an opportunity for developing space qualifiable materials by studying the response of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment. MISSE 6 was transported to the international Space Station (ISS) via STS 123 on March 11. 2008. The astronauts successfully attached the passive experiment containers (PEC) to external handrails of the international space station (ISS) and opened up for long term exposure. After more than a year of exposure attached to the station's exterior, the PEC with several hundred material samples returned to the earth with the STS-128 space shuttle crew that was launched on shuttle Discovery from the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., on Aug. 28. Meanwhile, MISSE 7 launch is scheduled to be launched on STS 129 mission. MISSE-7 was launched on Space Shuttle mission STS-129 on Atlantis was launched on November 16, 2009. This paper will briefly review recent efforts on MISSE 6 and MISSE 7 missions at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  6. Tests of Lorentz and CPT Invariance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewes, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    I give a brief overview of recent work concerning possible signals of Lorentz violation in sensitive clock-based experiments in space. The systems under consideration include atomic clocks and electromagnetic resonators of the type planned for flight on the International Space Station.

  7. NASA's Controlled Environment Agriculture Testing for Space Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA and other space agencies have an interest in using plants for human life support in space. The plants could provide food and O2 for the humans, while removing CO2 and helping purify wastewater. Studies to date have shown that a wide range of crops can be grown in controlled environment conditions envisioned for space. Light is a critical factor both for crop productivity and system power costs, and recent improvements in LEDs make them a preferred lighting option for space. Because space systems would be tightly closed, issues such as ethylene build-up and management must be considered. Ultimately, the costs and reliability of biological life support options must be compared with more conventional life support approaches. Findings to date suggest that about 20-25 sq. meters of crops could supply the O2 for one human, while about 50 sq. meters would be required for food (dietary calories).

  8. Test of Real-Time Space Weather Predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Bala, R.

    2013-12-01

    We are testing four real-time empirical space weather prediction functions to see which has been most successful, running in real time, for the past two years. Data from the "Wing Model" (presently running at SWPC in Boulder); the "Boyle Model" have been running in real time for a number of years, with the Boyle Index given online with alerts since 2003. The "Ram Model" and the "Newell Model" (also running at Rice University) have all been providing Kp predictions in real time for one year. We are testing their relative effectiveness in predicting Kp, and also their "up time", by using their actual predictions posted in real time against the final version Kp values. The Boyle model is a neural network model with 12-hour lookback time, using the Boyle Index as the base function, and yields one-hour and three-hour ahead predictions. The Ram model is similar to the Boyle model, but adds a pressure term to the base function. The Newell model is also a 12-hour neural net, but using the Newell function as its base. The Wing model gives a one- and four-hour prediction, with the prediction time variable with the solar wind velocity. All three Rice models are available in real time at http://mms.rice.edu/realtime/forecast.html , and the Wing model at http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/wingkp/ . Early results indicate that any of the three Rice neural net predictors had a slightly better success rate in predicting Kp in real time than Wing. In the image below from August 1-7, 2013, Wing's correlation coefficient was 0.682, with three hours of missing data (shown as -1). The Boyle function's correlation coefficient was 0.782, the Ram function was 0.788 and the Newell function was 0.793. In addition, Wing's prediction has missing data more often (roughly 1% over a year of data) than the Rice predictions (roughly 0.1% over a year of data), meaning it had less reliability. All of the models could successfully predict one hour-ahead Kp, on average, to better than one step in Kp, and the

  9. 78 FR 17185 - U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Space Command... inform users of an upcoming event related to the GPS satellite constellation. U.S. Air Force Space... process L2C or L5 CNAV. U.S. Air Force Space Command ] expects to conduct one to two CNAV tests per...

  10. Sen. John C. Stennis celebrates a successful Space Shuttle Main Engine test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Sen. John C. Stennis dances a jig on top of the Test Control Center at Stennis Space Center following the successful test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine in 1978. A staunch supporter of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the senior senator from DeKalb, Miss., supported the establishment of the space center in Hancock County and spoke personally with local residents who would relocate their homes to accommodate Mississippi's entry into the space age. Stennis Space Center was named for Sen. Stennis by Executive Order of President Ronald Reagan on May 20, 1988.

  11. Space Suit Portable Life Support System Test Bed (PLSS 1.0) Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Campbell, Colin; Vogel, Matthew; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A multi-year effort has been carried out at NASA-JSC to develop an advanced extra-vehicular activity Portable Life Support System (PLSS) design intended to further the current state of the art by increasing operational flexibility, reducing consumables, and increasing robustness. Previous efforts have focused on modeling and analyzing the advanced PLSS architecture, as well as developing key enabling technologies. Like the current International Space Station Extra-vehicular Mobility Unit PLSS, the advanced PLSS comprises three subsystems required to sustain the crew during extra-vehicular activity including the Thermal, Ventilation, and Oxygen Subsystems. This multi-year effort has culminated in the construction and operation of PLSS 1.0, a test bed that simulates full functionality of the advanced PLSS design. PLSS 1.0 integrates commercial off the shelf hardware with prototype technology development components, including the primary and secondary oxygen regulators, Ventilation Subsystem fan, Rapid Cycle Amine swingbed carbon dioxide and water vapor removal device, and Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator heat rejection device. The overall PLSS 1.0 test objective was to demonstrate the capability of the Advanced PLSS to provide key life support functions including suit pressure regulation, carbon dioxide and water vapor removal, thermal control and contingency purge operations. Supplying oxygen was not one of the specific life support functions because the PLSS 1.0 test was not oxygen rated. Nitrogen was used for the working gas. Additional test objectives were to confirm PLSS technology development components performance within an integrated test bed, identify unexpected system level interactions, and map the PLSS 1.0 performance with respect to key variables such as crewmember metabolic rate and suit pressure. Successful PLSS 1.0 testing completed 168 test points over 44 days of testing and produced a large database of test results that characterize system level

  12. Forward Skirt Structural Testing on the Space Launch System (SLS) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrer, Joe; Wright, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: (a) Structural testing was performed to evaluate Space Shuttle heritage forward skirts for use on the Space Launch System (SLS) program, (b) Testing was required because SLS loads are approximately 35% greater than shuttle loads; and (c) Two forwards skirts were tested to failure.

  13. Space Station Live: Historic Vacuum Chamber to Test Webb Telescope

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot recently visited Johnson Space Center’s 400,000 cubic foot vacuum chamber, Chamber A, and spoke with Mary Cerimele, the lab manager for this historic facility.

  14. Lab Creates 'Fake Vomit' To Test Space Trash Bag

    NASA Video Gallery

    After answering the question of how the space potty works, astronaut Mike Massimino now visits a NASA lab where chemists have been working hard to develop a next-generation trash bag for future exp...

  15. Electric Propulsion Test & Evaluation Methodologies for Plasma in the Environments of Space and Testing (EP TEMPEST) (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) March 2015-April 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electric Propulsion Test & Evaluation Methodologies for Plasma...Integrity  Service  Excellence Air Force Research Laboratory Electric Propulsion Test & Evaluation Methodologies for Plasma in the Environments...of Space and Testing (EP TEMPEST) AFOSR T&E Program Review 13-17 April 2015 Dr. Daniel L. Brown In-Space Propulsion Branch (RQRS) Aerospace Systems

  16. Battery and cell testing at NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Tom; Jackson, Lorna

    1992-01-01

    An overview covering the ten cell/battery tests ongoing at MSFC are presented. The presentation is not intended to give specific test results on any test. The purpose and related program that applies to each test is acknowledged. Except for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), all are energy-stored and retrieval devices at low earth orbit (LEO) cycles.

  17. The influence of scoring targets and outer-floaters on attacking and defending team dispersion, shape and creation of space during small-sided soccer games

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Pedro; Usabiaga, Oidui; Barreira, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of altered game formats on team performances during soccer practice can be harnessed by coaches to stimulate specific tactical behaviours. The aim of the present study was to analyse the influence of using (i) small goals [SG], (ii) goalkeepers [7G] and (iii) floaters [7GF] on the dispersion, shape and available space of teams during small-sided games (SSGs). Twenty-four male soccer players were distributed into four teams composed of five players, two goalkeepers and two floaters that performed six SSG bouts of 6 min, interspersed with 6 min of passive recovery. Offensive and defensive phases were also analysed separately in order to verify the preservation of basic principles of attacking (teams more stretched to create free space) and defending (teams more compact to tie-up space) during SSGs. The variables used to characterize the collective behaviour were: length [L], width [W], team shape [Sh], and team separateness [TS]. Results revealed that the teams showed different collective behaviours depending on SSG format and a playing phase: a) L and W were higher in attack than in defence in all SSGs; b) team shapes were more elongated in defence in all SSGs except SG; c) the space separating players from their closest opponents (TS) was shorter in 7G; and d) SG and 7GF elicited greater defensive openness due to increased team width. The results suggest that manipulating task constraints, such as goal size, presence or absence of goalkeepers and floaters can be harnessed by coaches to shape distinct team tactical behaviours in SSGs while preserving the basic principles of attacking and defending. PMID:28149378

  18. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  19. Test method on infrared system range based on space compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-xing; Shi, Sheng-bing; Han, Fu-li

    2016-09-01

    Infrared thermal imaging system generates image based on infrared radiation difference between object and background and is a passive work mode. Range is important performance and necessary appraised test item in appraisal test for infrared system. In this paper, aim is carrying out infrared system range test in laboratory , simulated test ground is designed based on object equivalent, background analog, object characteristic control, air attenuation characteristic, infrared jamming analog and so on, repeatable and controllable tests are finished, problem of traditional field test method is solved.

  20. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Subpanel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.C.; Warren, J.W.; Martinell, J.; Clark, J.S.; Perkins, D.

    1993-04-01

    On 20 Jul. 1989, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, President George Bush proclaimed his vision for manned space exploration. He stated, 'First for the coming decade, for the 1990's, Space Station Freedom, the next critical step in our space endeavors. And next, for the new century, back to the Moon. Back to the future. And this time, back to stay. And then, a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet, a manned mission to Mars.' On 2 Nov. 1989, the President approved a national space policy reaffirming the long range goal of the civil space program: to 'expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system.' And on 11 May 1990, he specified the goal of landing Astronauts on Mars by 2019, the 50th anniversary of man's first steps on the Moon. To safely and ever permanently venture beyond near Earth environment as charged by the President, mankind must bring to bear extensive new technologies. These include heavy lift launch capability from Earth to low-Earth orbit, automated space rendezvous and docking of large masses, zero gravity countermeasures, and closed loop life support systems. One technology enhancing, and perhaps enabling, the piloted Mars missions is nuclear propulsion, with great benefits over chemical propulsion. Asserting the potential benefits of nuclear propulsion, NASA has sponsored workshops in Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and has initiated a tri-agency planning process to ensure that appropriate resources are engaged to meet this exciting technical challenge. At the core of this planning process, NASA, DOE, and DOD established six Nuclear Propulsion Technical Panels in 1991 to provide groundwork for a possible tri-agency Nuclear Propulsion Program and to address the President's vision by advocating an aggressive program in nuclear propulsion. To this end the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel has focused it energies.

  1. Space Shuttle Damper System for Ground Wind Load Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, G. D.; Holt, J. R.; Chang, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    An active damper system which was originally developed for a 5.5% Saturn IB/Skylab Ground Winds Model was modified and used for similar purposes in a Space Shuttle model. A second damper system which was originally used in a 3% Saturn V/Dry Workshop model was also modified and made compatible with the Space Shuttle model to serve as a back-up system. Included in this final report are descriptions of the modified damper systems and the associated control and instrumentation.

  2. SPACE LAUNCH VEHICLE FULL-SCALE DAMPING TESTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The wind study portion of testing showed that the SLV gantry tower is sufficiently stable to be used as a base for forced oscillation of the vehicle...experimental damping factors agreed reasonably well with the results of previous tests. Increased confidence in the recent SLV ground wind restrictions has been the direct result of this test.

  3. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  4. Thunderstorm Effects in Space: Technology Nanosatellite (TEST) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    memory alloy Nitinol , a nickel-titanium alloy reducing spacecraft wiring difficulties. Typically each formed into a spring. The Nitinol spring is...connectors are similar to tin, but when heat is applied it returns to its easily added. Though the use of D-subs in space is original shape. The Nitinol

  5. Preliminary plan for testing a thermionic reactor in the Plum Brook Space Power Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, F. A.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary plan is presented for testing a thermionic reactor in the Plum Brook Space Power Facility (SPF). A technical approach, cost estimate, manpower estimate, and schedule are presented to cover a 2 year full power reactor test.

  6. Non-Nuclear Testing of Space Nuclear Systems at NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, Boise J.; Aschenbrenner, Kenneth C.; Bradley, David E.; Dickens, Ricky; Emrich, William J.; Garber, Anne; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Harper, Roger T.; Martin, Jim J.; Polzin, Kurt; Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    Highly realistic non-nuclear testing can be used to investigate and resolve potential issues with space nuclear power and propulsion systems. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for systems designed with fuels and materials operating within their demonstrated nuclear performance envelope. Non-nuclear testing allows thermal hydraulic, heat transfer, structural, integration, safety, operational, performance, and other potential issues to be investigated and resolved with a greater degree of flexibility and at reduced cost and schedule compared to nuclear testing. The primary limit of non-nuclear testing is that nuclear characteristics and potential nuclear issues cannot be directly investigated. However, non-nuclear testing can be used to augment the potential benefit from any nuclear testing that may be required for space nuclear system design and development. This paper describes previous and ongoing non-nuclear testing related to space nuclear systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  7. MIA computer simulation test results report. [space shuttle avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Results of the first noise susceptibility computer simulation tests of the complete MIA receiver analytical model are presented. Computer simulation tests were conducted with both Gaussian and pulse noise inputs. The results of the Gaussian noise tests were compared to results predicted previously and were found to be in substantial agreement. The results of the pulse noise tests will be compared to the results of planned analogous tests in the Data Bus Evaluation Laboratory at a later time. The MIA computer model is considered to be fully operational at this time.

  8. Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) Experiment Completed Flight Acceptance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space--Plus (PCS+) experiment successfully completed system-level flight acceptance testing in the fall of 2003. This testing included electromagnetic interference (EMI) testing, vibration testing, and thermal testing. PCS+, an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack payload will deploy a second set of colloid samples within the PCS flight hardware system that flew on the International Space Station (ISS) from April 2001 to June 2002. PCS+ is slated to return to the ISS in late 2004 or early 2005.

  9. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Thermal Vacuum Thermal Balance Test Campaign at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, Stuart; Comber, Brian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, designed as a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope when launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments contained within the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K with radiators, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. Thermal-vacuum testing of the flight science instruments at the ISIM element level has taken place in three separate highly challenging and extremely complex thermal tests within a gaseous helium-cooled shroud inside Goddard Space Flight Centers Space Environment Simulator. Special data acquisition software was developed for these tests to monitor over 1700 flight and test sensor measurements, track over 50 gradients, component rates, and temperature limits in real time against defined constraints and limitations, and guide the complex transition from ambient to final cryogenic temperatures and back. This extremely flexible system has proven highly successful in safeguarding the nearly $2B science payload during the 3.5-month-long thermal tests. Heat flow measurement instrumentation, or Q-meters, were also specially developed for these tests. These devices provide thermal boundaries o the flight hardware while measuring instrument heat loads up to 600 mW with an estimated uncertainty of 2 mW in test, enabling accurate thermal model correlation, hardware design validation, and workmanship verification. The high accuracy heat load measurements provided first evidence of a potentially serious hardware design issue that was subsequently corrected. This paper provides an overview of the ISIM-level thermal-vacuum tests and thermal objectives; explains the thermal test configuration and thermal balances; describes special measurement instrumentation and monitoring and control software; presents key test thermal results

  10. Current and Future Rocket Propulsion Testing at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, H. M.; Rahman, S.; Gilbrech, R.

    2000-01-01

    Year 2000 has been an active one for large-scale propulsion testing at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. This paper highlights several of the current-year test programs conducted at the Stennis Space Center (SSC) including the X-33 Aerospike Engine, Ultra Low Cost Engine (ULCE) program, and the Hybrid Sounding Rocket (HYSR) program. Future directions in propulsion test are also introduced including the development of a large-scale Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) test facility.

  11. Space shuttle: Structural integrity and assessment study. [development of nondestructive test procedures for space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.; Lewis, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A study program was conducted to determine the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) requirements and to develop a preliminary nondestructive evaluation manual for the entire space shuttle vehicle. The rationale and guidelines for structural analysis and NDE requirements development are discussed. Recommendations for development of NDE technology for the orbiter thermal protection system and certain structural components are included. Recommendations to accomplish additional goals toward space shuttle inspection are presented.

  12. 16 CFR 1508.5 - Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Component spacing test method for § 1508.4(b). 1508.5 Section 1508.5 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.5 Component spacing test method...

  13. Thermal vacuum performance testing of the Space Shuttle Orbiter radiator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrend, A. F., Jr.; Chandler, G. D.; Howell, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    A space shuttle orbiter system thermal vacuum performance test was conducted at NASA-Johnson Space Center in Chamber A of the space environment simulation laboratory. The test of objective was to verify the radiator system heat rejection performance capability utilizing two development and two flight radiator panels comprising one of the two Orbiter Freon-21 coolant loops. Radiator performance over the range of expected flight conditions was as predicted, and there was no degradation of performance after extended vacuum exposure.

  14. Hydrogen depolarized cell pair definition for space station application. [performance tests of carbon dioxide removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation testing of the cell pair design of an electrochemical carbon dioxide collection subsystem was conducted. The system is proposed for use with the space station prototype. The objectives of the analytical and miscellaneous tasks in support of the test program are explained. An analysis was made of the number of cells required for the space station prototype. It was determined that 33 cell pairs would satisfy the space station prototype performance.

  15. Testing the James Webb Space Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    JWST in-process optical testing and cryogenic requirement compliance certification, verification andvalidation was probably the most difficult metrology job of our generation in astronomical optics. But, the challenge was met: by hard work of dozens of optical metrologists; development and qualification of multiple custom test setups; and several new inventions, including 4D PhaseCam and Leica Absolute Distance Meter. This paper summarizes the metrology tools, test setups and processes used to characterize the JWST primary mirror.

  16. Space Environmental Testing of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Jerry D.; Anglin, Emily J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Scheiman, David A.; Castro, Stephenie L.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells has lead NASA to investigate the potential of these devices for space power generation, Reported here is the first space environment characterization of these type of photovoltaic devices. Cells containing liquid electrolytes were exposed to simulated low-earth orbit conditions and their performance evaluated. All cells were characterized under simulated air mass zero (AMO) illumination. Complete cells were exposed to pressures less than 1 x 10(exp -7) torr for over a month, with no sign of sealant failure or electrolyte leakage. Cells from Solaronix SA were rapid thermal cycled under simulated low-earth orbit conditions. The cells were cycled 100 times from -80 C to 80 C, which is equivalent to 6 days in orbit. The best cell had a 4.6% loss in efficiency as a result of the thermal cycling,

  17. SpaceFibre: The Standard, Simulation, IP Cores and Test Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Steve; McClements, Chris; McLaren, David; Ferrer Florit, Albert; Gonzalez Villafranca, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    SpaceFibre is an emerging new standard for spacecraft on-board data-handling networks. Initially targeted to deliver multi-Gbit/s data rates for synthetic aperture radar and high-resolution, multi-spectral imaging instruments, SpaceFibre has developed into a unified network technology that integrates high bandwidth, with low latency, quality of service (QoS) and fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR). Furthermore SpaceFibre is backwards compatible with the widely used SpaceWire standard at the network level allowing simple interconnection of existing SpaceWire equipment to a SpaceFibre link or network. Developed by the University of Dundee for the European Space Agency (ESA) SpaceFibre is able to operate over fibre-optic and electrical cable and supports data rates of 2 Gbit/s in the near future and up to 5 Gbit/s long-term. Multi-laning improves the data-rate further to well over 20 Gbits/s. This paper details the current state of SpaceFibre which is now in the process of formal standardisation by the European Cooperation for Space Standardization (ECSS). It describes the SpaceFibre IP core being developed for ESA. The design of a SpaceFibre demonstration board is introduced and available SpaceFibre test and development equipment is described. The way in which several SpaceWire links can be concentrated over a single SpaceFibre link will be explained.

  18. Manufacturing and performance test of an 800-mm space optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krödel, Matthias R.; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi; Kume, Masami; Furuya, Akira; Yui, Yukari Y.; Imai, Hiroko; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Tange, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Takao; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2008-07-01

    Next generation space telescopes, which are currently being developed in the US and Europe, require large-scale light-weight reflectors with high specific strength, high specific stiffness, low CTE, and high thermal conductivity. To meet budget constraints, they also require materials that produce surfaces suitable for polishing without expensive over-coatings. HB-Cesic - a European and Japanese trademark of ECM - is a Hybrid Carbon-Fiber Reinforced SiC composite developed jointly by ECM and MELCO to meet these challenges. The material's mechanical performance, such as stiffness, bending strength, and fracture toughness are significantly improved compared to the classic ECM Cesic material (type MF). Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of HB-Cesic at cryogenic temperatures are now partly established; and excellent performance for large future space mirrors and structures are expected. This paper presents the design and manufacturing of an 800-mm mirror for space application, starting with the C/C raw material preparation to the finishing of the components, including the polishing of the mirror. The letters "HB" in HB-Cesic stand for "hybrid" to indicate that the C/C raw material is composed of a mixture of different types of chopped, short carbon-fibers.

  19. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of Space Station Freedom Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christie, Robert J.; Best, Steve R.; Myhre, Craig A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar array coupons designed for the Space Station Freedom electrical power system were subjected to hypervelocity impacts using the HYPER facility in the Space Power Institute at Auburn University and the Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Simulation Facility in the Materials and Processes Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At Auburn, the solar cells and array blanket materials received several hundred impacts from particles in the micron to 100 micron range with velocities typically ranging from 4.5 to 10.5 km/s. This fluence of particles greatly exceeds what the actual components will experience in low earth orbit. These impacts damaged less than one percent of total area of the solar cells and most of the damage was limited to the cover glass. There was no measurable loss of electrical performance. Impacts on the array blanket materials produced even less damage and the blanket materials proved to be an effective shield for the back surface of the solar cells. Using the light gas gun at MSFC, one cell of a four cell coupon was impacted by a 1/4 inch spherical aluminum projectile with a velocity of about 7 km/s. The impact created a neat hole about 3/8 inch in diameter. The cell and coupon were still functional after impact.

  20. POST: a stratospheric testbed for testing new space telescope technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, James N.; Friedman, Ed; Ford, Holland C.; Bely, Pierre Y.

    1995-06-01

    The Polar Stratospheric Telescope payload will be the prototype of a diffraction limited, large space telescope and will fly in the stratosphere to validate a number of new technologies that future large space telescopes will require. The telescope is a 6-m diameter, sparsely-filled array comprised on one 1.8-m and six 60-cm mirrors. Each mirror is a segment of an f/1.2 primary. The mirrors have an unequal spacing around the circumference which optimizes spatial coverage of the u,v plane. The mirror segments are coaligned and cophased by a combination of internal metrology and re-imaging of the pupil onto a small active mirror for the correction of piston and tilt errors. The telescope will be flown during the winter in a polar region where the tropopause is a factor of two lower than at lower latitudes, making the stratosphere accessible to tethered aerostats. The telescope is suspended approximately 100 m below a tethered aerostat flying at an altitude of about 12 km. The telescope body is stabilized gyroscopically with two reaction wheels, and fine guidance of the line of sight is provided by a fast steering mirror. The telescopes primary mirrors are at the ambient temperature of 190 to 220 K, and internal baffles and relay optics are cooled to 160 K to minimize the instrumental background in the near infrared.

  1. NASA wiring for space applications program test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Jim

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this test is to examine the mechanical and electrical properties of PFPI insulation. Some of the parameters considered during the test are: AC corona (400 Hz), wire fusing time, abrasion resistance, dynamic cut through, notch propagation, and weight loss (outgassing). In addition the degradation of the samples caused by the immature manufacturing status of the PFPI materials for wiring is considered.

  2. Design, processing, and testing of LSI arrays for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipri, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of a particular process for the fabrication of large scale integrated circuits is described. Test arrays were designed, built, and tested, and then utilized. A set of optimum dimensions for LSI arrays was generated. The arrays were applied to yield improvement through process innovation, and additional applications were suggested in the areas of yield prediction, yield modeling, and process reliability.

  3. CO2 Washout Testing of NASA Space Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Jason

    2012-01-01

    During the presentation "CO2 Washout Testing of NASA Spacesuits," Jason Norcross discussed the results of recent carbon dioxide CO2 washout testing of NASA spacesuits including the Rear Entry I-suit (REI), Enhanced Mobility Advanced Crew Escape Suit (EM-ACES), and possibly the ACES and Z-1 EVA prototype. When a spacesuit is used during ground testing, adequate CO2 washout must be provided for the suited subject. Symptoms of acute CO2 exposure depend on the partial pressure of CO2 (ppCO2) available to enter the lungs during respiration. The primary factors during ground-based testing that influence the ppCO2 level in the oronasal area include the metabolic rate of the subject and air flow through the suit. These tests were done to characterize inspired oronasal ppCO2 for a range of workloads and flow rates for which ground testing is nominally performed. During this presentation, Norcross provided descriptions of the spacesuits, test hardware, methodology, and results, as well as implications for future ground testing and verification of flight requirements.

  4. Recent Developments in Cell Vibration Testing at ABSL Space Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Sam; Thwaite, Carl

    2014-08-01

    This paper will describe vibration testing performed at ABSL in recent years on 18650 lithium-ion cells, focussing on work done to expand knowledge of the newest cells (the HCM and NL cells) under random vibration loads. COTS cells as used by ABSL are not necessarily designed for vibration tolerance, and so understanding the conditions that cause failures, and the precise failure modes, is a critical activity.The approach used for cell testing will be described, including the test setup and overall test and analysis flow. In particular, two different approaches (using fixed and resonating interfaces) will be described. The results of survival testing performed on HCM and NL cells will be presented. In addition, the damping behaviour of the HC cell will be described.

  5. Definition of ground test for verification of large space structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, G. B., III; Glaese, J. R.; Tollison, D. K.; Howsman, T. G.; Curtis, S. (Editor); Banks, B.

    1984-01-01

    Control theory and design, dynamic system modelling, and simulation of test scenarios are the main ideas discussed. The overall effort is the achievement at Marshall Space Flight Center of a successful ground test experiment of a large space structure. A simplified planar model of ground test experiment of a large space structure. A simplified planar model of ground test verification was developed. The elimination from that model of the uncontrollable rigid body modes was also examined. Also studied was the hardware/software of computation speed.

  6. Testing of 100 mK bolometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, A. G.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bhatia, R. S.; Griffin, M. J.; Maffei, B.; Nartallo, R.; Beeman, J. W.; Bock, J.; Lange, A.; DelCastillo, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and optical performance data are presented for a prototype 100 mK spider-web bolometer operating under very low photon backgrounds. These data are compared with the bolometer theory and are used to estimate the expected sensitivity of such a detector used for low background space astronomy. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of response requirements of the bolometer instruments proposed for these missions can be met by 100 mK spider-web bolometers using neutron transmutation doped germanium as the temperature sensitive element.

  7. Space processes for extended low-G testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steurer, W. H.; Kaye, S.; Gorham, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    Results of an investigation of verifying the capabilities of space processes in ground based experiments at low-g periods are presented. Limited time experiments were conducted with the processes. A valid representation of the complete process cycle was achieved at low-g periods ranging from 40 to 390 seconds. A minimum equipment inventory, is defined. A modular equipment design, adopted to assure low cost and high program flexibility, is presented as well as procedures and data established for the synthesis and definition of dedicated and mixed rocket payloads.

  8. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

    1993-01-14

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. initial results suggest that full-scale PBR, elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of {approximately}60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperature limit, average energy deposition of {approximately}100 MW/L may be achievable.

  9. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

    1993-05-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. initial results suggest that full-scale PBR, elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of {approximately}60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperature limit, average energy deposition of {approximately}100 MW/L may be achievable.

  10. Space shuttle pilot-induced-oscillation research testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    The simulation requirements for investigation of pilot-induced-oscillation (PIO) characteristics during the landing phase are discussed. Orbiters simulations and F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft tests are addressed.

  11. Proving the Space Transportation System: the Orbital Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichhardt, T.

    1982-01-01

    The main propulsion system, solid rocket boosters, external tank, orbital maneuvering system, spacecraft orbital operations (thermal tests, attitude control and remote manipulator), and return to Earth are outlined for the first four STS missions.

  12. Timing system for firing widely spaced test nuclear detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Ralph E.

    1992-01-01

    The national weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) test fire nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is spread over an area of over 1200 square miles. On each test there are hundreds of high time resolution recordings made of nuclear output waveforms and other phenomena. In order to synchronize these recordings with each other, with the nuclear device, and with offsite recordings, there is a requirement that the permanent command center and the outlying temporary firing sites be time tied to each other and to UTC to permit firing the shot at a predetermined time with an accuracy of about a microsecond. Various aspects of the test setup and timing system are discussed.

  13. Space Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experience taking Space Discovery courses that were sponsored by the United States Space Foundation (USSF). These courses examine the history of space science, theory of orbits and rocketry, the effects of living in outer space on humans, and space weather. (DDR)

  14. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  15. Isotope heat source simulator for testing of space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Smith, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A reliable isotope heat source simulator was designed for use in a Brayton power system. This simulator is composed of an electrically heated tungsten wire which is wound around a boron nitride core and enclosed in a graphite jacket. Simulator testing was performed at the expected operating temperature of the Brayton power system. Endurance testing for 5012 hours was followed by cycling the simulator temperature. The integrity of this simulator was maintained throughout testing. Alumina beads served as a diffusion barrier to prevent interaction between the tungsten heater and boron nitride core. The simulator was designed to maintain a surface temperature of 1311 to 1366 K (1900 to 2000 F) with a power input of approximately 400 watts. The design concept and the materials used in the simulator make possible man different geometries. This flexibility increases its potential use.

  16. Centaur space vehicle pressurized propellant feed system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Engine firing tests, using a full-scale flight-weight vehicle, were performed to evaluate a pressurized propellant feed system for the Centaur. The pressurant gases used were helium and hydrogen. The system was designed to replace the boost pumps currently used on Centaur. Two liquid oxygen tank pressurization modes were studied: (1) directly into the ullage and (2) below the propellant surface. Test results showed the two Centaur RL10 engines could be started and run over the range of expected flight variables. No system instabilities were encountered. Measured pressurization gas quantities agreed well with analytically predicted values.

  17. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. L.; Demchak, L. J.; Tegart, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to develop an analytical model capable of predicting the dynamic interaction forces on the Shuttle External Tank, due to large amplitude propellant slosh during RTLS separation. The report details low-g drop tower and KC-135 test programs that were conducted to investigate propellant reorientation during RTLS. In addition, the development of a nonlinear finite element slosh model (LAMPS2, two dimensional, and one LAMPS3, three dimensional) is presented. Correlation between the model and test data is presented as a verification of the modeling approach.

  18. Determination of molecular contamination performance for space chamber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The limitations of chamber tests with regard to the molecular contamination of a spacecraft undergoing vacuum test were examined. The molecular flow conditions existing in the chamber and the parameters dictating the degree of contamination were analyzed. Equations and graphs were developed to show the fraction of molecules returning to the spacecraft out of those emitted and to show other chamber flow parameters as a function of chamber and spacecraft surface molecular pumping and geometric configuration. Type and location of instruments required to measure the outgassing, the degree of contamination, and the returning flows are also discussed.

  19. Fabricating niobium test loops for the SP-100 space reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryhan, Anthony J.; Chan, Ricky C.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the successful fabrication, operation, and evaluation of a series of niobium-alloy (Nb-1 Zr and PWC-11) thermal convection loops designed to contain and circulate molten lithium at 1,350 K. These loops were used to establish the fabrication variables of significance for a nuclear power supply for space. Approximately 200 weldments were evaluated for their tendency to be attacked by lithium as a function of varying atmospheric contamination. No attack occurred for any weldment free of contamination, with or without heat treatment, and no welds accidentally deviated from purity. The threshold oxygen content for weldment attack was determined to be 170-200 ppm. Attack varied directly with weldment oxygen and nitrogen contents.

  20. Natural environment support guidelines for space shuttle tests and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, E. A.; Brown, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    All space shuttle events from launch through solid rocket booster recovery and orbiter landing are considered in terms of constraints placed on those operations by the natural environment. Thunderstorm activity is discussed as an example of a possible hazard. The activities most likely to require advanced detection and monitoring techniques are identified as those from deorbit decision to Orbiter landing. The inflexible flight plan will require the transmission of real time wind profile information below 24 km and warnings of thunderstorms or turbulence in the Orbiter flight path. Extensive aerial reconnaissance and communication facilities and procedures to permit immediate transmission of aircraft reports to the mission control authority and to the Orbiter will also be required.

  1. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to simulate the damage that meteoroids will produce in the Shuttle Orbiter leading edge structural subsystem material. The nature and extent of the damage is reported and the probability of encountering meteoroids with sufficient energy to produce such damage is discussed.

  2. Opting Out: Parents Creating Contested Spaces to Challenge Standardized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Dana; Mann, Bryan; Hlavacik, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We explore how the opt-out movement has responded to the combination of a stringent federal policy with weak and often variable implementation among the states. Gaps between federal expectations and states' understandings of just how to make NCLB's demands a reality have created policy ambiguity. Parents who oppose standardized testing have…

  3. Design and Test Requirements for Space Flight Pressurized Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-26

    establishes the baseline requirements for the design, fabrication, assembly, installation, test, inspection, operation, and maintenance of pressure systems...18 4.8 Operation and Maintenance Requirements ..................................................................... 18 4.8.1 Operating Procedure...18 4.8.2 Inspection and Maintenance

  4. Space Flight Requirements for Fiber Optic Components: Qualification Testing and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the qualification testing requirements for Fiber Optic Components used during space flight. Since most components for space flight fiber optic components are now commercial of the shelf (COTS) products, and the changes at Goddard Space Flight Center, such as short term projects, and low budgets and other changes, have made full qualification of Fiber Optic Components not only too expensive also impossible. This presentation reviews the environmental parameters, the testing and or testing requirements of some optical components on board some NASA satellites.

  5. Space Station automated systems testing/verification and the Galileo Orbiter fault protection design/verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landano, M. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of Space Station automated systems testing and verification are discussed, taking into account several program requirements. It is found that these requirements lead to a number of issues of uncertainties which require study and resolution during the Space Station definition phase. Most, if not all, of the considered uncertainties have implications for the overall testing and verification strategy adopted by the Space Station Program. A description is given of the Galileo Orbiter fault protection design/verification approach. Attention is given to a mission description, an Orbiter description, the design approach and process, the fault protection design verification approach/process, and problems of 'stress' testing.

  6. An environmental testing facility for Space Station Freedom power management and distribution hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackola, Arthur S.; Hartjen, Gary L.

    1992-11-01

    The plans for a new test facility, including new environmental test systems, which are presently under construction, and the major environmental Test Support Equipment (TSE) used therein are addressed. This all-new Rocketdyne facility will perform space simulation environmental tests on Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) hardware to Space Station Freedom (SSF) at the Engineering Model, Qualification Model, and Flight Model levels of fidelity. Testing will include Random Vibration in three axes - Thermal Vacuum, Thermal Cycling and Thermal Burn-in - as well as numerous electrical functional tests. The facility is designed to support a relatively high throughput of hardware under test, while maintaining the high standards required for a man-rated space program.

  7. Large space telescope control moment gyro test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamin, E.; Bukow, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    The underlying theory and design of test instrumentation and computer techniques used to determine the power spectral density (PSD) of the third generation gyro are described in detail. Acceptance test results on the completed instrument are presented as well as composite PSD plots. The measured RMS noise over the frequency band 0.0025 - 10 Hz was 0.012 arc seconds. Results obtained at Martin Company indicate an RMS noise of 0.009 arc seconds (0.05 - 10 Hz). The results obtained showed the TGG performance was close to the proposed LST requirements but that additional development work would be needed to reduce the TGG noise to within more desirable limits.

  8. Development and Testing of an Inflatable, Rigidizable Space Structure Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    AFIT electrodynamic vibration table, hereafter referred to as a vibe table, utilizes - unted ll erall h a feedback control system to drive...the maximum levels are reached, if problems with feedback control arise. If the system inadvertently exceeds the MEFL, and structural damage...proceeded as programmed until full EFL was tested for a full two minutes. Figure 4.8 RIGEX and CAPE Coordinate Systems The

  9. Space Shuttle Program Orbiter Approach and Landing Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The orbiter approach and landing test (ALT) reports are published to provide senior NASA management with timely information on ALT program plans and accomplishments. The ALT reports will be comprised of this pre-ALT report, ALT pre-flight memoranda, and an ALT post-flight report following each flight. The purpose of this pre-ALT report is to provide an overview of the ALT program, describing the flight vehicles involved and summarizing the planned flights.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope high speed photometer science verification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Evan E.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the HSP Science Verification (SV) tests, the status of the HSP at the end of the SV period, and the work remaining to be done. The HSP OV report (November 1991) covered all activities (OV, SV, and SAO) from launch to the completion of phase three alignment, OV 3233 performed in the 91154 SMS, on June 8, 1991. This report covers subsequent activities through May 1992.

  11. Space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, L. F.; Durney, G. P.; Case, M. C.; Kenneway, A. J., III; Wise, R. C.; Rinehart, D.; Bessette, R. J.; Pulling, R. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A pressure suit for high altitude flights, particularly space missions is reported. The suit is designed for astronauts in the Apollo space program and may be worn both inside and outside a space vehicle, as well as on the lunar surface. It comprises an integrated assembly of inner comfort liner, intermediate pressure garment, and outer thermal protective garment with removable helmet, and gloves. The pressure garment comprises an inner convoluted sealing bladder and outer fabric restraint to which are attached a plurality of cable restraint assemblies. It provides versitility in combination with improved sealing and increased mobility for internal pressures suitable for life support in the near vacuum of outer space.

  12. Ground test article for deployable space structure systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malloy, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The ground test article fabrication and assembly plan was completed by Santek Engineering, Inc. The plan was reviewed and accepted by Rockwell during an on-site visit to the Santek facility. Raw material and hardware orders were placed by Santek in July. Approximately 98% of the raw materials and 10% of the hardware deliveries have been completed. Several material and hardware substitutions were requested by Santek due to no-bid responses from suppliers or excessive costs for limited quantity items. These substitutions were evaluated and approved by Rockwell Engineering and Material and Process and are being incorporated into the drawing package. Santek started fabrication of detail parts in mid-August. Their current resource utilization is at approximately 50% of the planned eventual commitment and is increasing at a rate commensurate with the fabrication and assembly plan. At this writing, Santek's estimate of completion is 03%. During verification testing of the diagonal member joint, in a program funded by Rockwell discretionary funds, the axial load to unlock the joint was found to increase significantly after a few cycles of operation. This was attributed to galling, poor lubrication, and locking pin geometry. A change of materials, lubricant, and modification of the pin geometry reduced the unlocking load and provided repeatability after 50 cycles of operation. This new design is being implemented into the ground test article.

  13. Design, Construction and Test of a Supercapacitor Bank for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buergler, Brandon; Simon, Evelyne; Vasina, Petr; Latif, David; Diblik, Lukas; Gineste, Valery; Simcak, Marek

    2014-08-01

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors also referred to as supercapacitors offer a wide range of applications for space flight. The aim of this activity was to evaluate commercial off-the-shelf supercapacitors from different manufacturers in terms of suitability for space applications. Characterisation tests, environmental tests, life tests and abuse tests were carried out. In a second step, a bank of supercapacitors was designed, constructed and subsequentially tested in similar conditions as the individual cells. Based on the results of this work, the application of supercapacitors in future spacecrafts looks promising. The impact of supercapacitors application on system level shall be discussed and a roadmap towards further development activities shall also be outlined.

  14. Space Station Freedom environmental control and life support system phase 3 simplified integrated test detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B. C.; Carrasquillo, R. L.; Dubiel, M. Y.; Ogle, K. Y.; Perry, J. L.; Whitley, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the phase 3 simplified integrated test (SIT) conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF) in 1989 is presented. This was the first test in the phase 3 series integrated environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) tests. The basic goal of the SIT was to achieve full integration of the baseline air revitalization (AR) subsystems for Space Station Freedom. Included is a description of the SIT configuration, a performance analysis of each subsystem, results from air and water sampling, and a discussion of lessons learned from the test. Also included is a full description of the preprototype ECLSS hardware used in the test.

  15. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Carly; Vogel, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design which is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data to define set-points for control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out from 3/20/13 - 3/15/14 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the completion of PIA

  16. Space Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 2.0 Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Ian; Cox, Marlon; Meginnis, Carly; Westheimer, David; Vogel, Matt R.

    2016-01-01

    Following successful completion of the space suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) 1.0 development and testing in 2011, the second system-level prototype, PLSS 2.0, was developed in 2012 to continue the maturation of the advanced PLSS design. This advanced PLSS is intended to reduce consumables, improve reliability and robustness, and incorporate additional sensing and functional capabilities over the current Space Shuttle/International Space Station Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) PLSS. PLSS 2.0 represents the first attempt at a packaged design comprising first generation or later component prototypes and medium fidelity interfaces within a flight-like representative volume. Pre-Installation Acceptance (PIA) is carryover terminology from the Space Shuttle Program referring to the series of test sequences used to verify functionality of the EMU PLSS prior to installation into the Space Shuttle airlock for launch. As applied to the PLSS 2.0 development and testing effort, PIA testing designated the series of 27 independent test sequences devised to verify component and subsystem functionality, perform in situ instrument calibrations, generate mapping data, define set-points, evaluate control algorithms, evaluate hardware performance against advanced PLSS design requirements, and provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on evolving design requirements and performance specifications. PLSS 2.0 PIA testing was carried out in 2013 and 2014 using a variety of test configurations to perform test sequences that ranged from stand-alone component testing to system-level testing, with evaluations becoming increasingly integrated as the test series progressed. Each of the 27 test sequences was vetted independently, with verification of basic functionality required before completion. Because PLSS 2.0 design requirements were evolving concurrently with PLSS 2.0 PIA testing, the requirements were used as guidelines to assess performance during the tests; after the

  17. The CELSS Test Facility - A foundation for crop research in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, C. L.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    Under the NASA Space Biology Initiative, a CELSS Test Facility (CTF) is being planned for installation on Space Station Freedom. The CTF will be used to study the productivity of typical CELSS higher plant crops under the microgravity conditions of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). Such science studies will be supported under the CELSS Space Research Project. The CTF will be used to evaluate fundamental issues of crop productivity, such as the production rates of O2, food and transpired water, and CO2 uptake. A series of precursor tests that are essential to the development of the CTF will be flown on Space Shuttle flights. The tests will be used to validate and qualify technology concepts and to answer specific questions regarding seed germination, root/shoot orientation, water condensation and recycling, nutrient delivery, and liquid/gas phase interactions.

  18. Charge retention test experiences on Hubble Space Telescope nickel-hydrogen battery cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawrocki, Dave E.; Driscoll, J. R.; Armantrout, J. D.; Baker, R. C.; Wajsgras, H.

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) nickel-hydrogen battery module was designed by Lockheed Missile & Space Co (LMSC) and manufactured by Eagle-Picher Ind. (EPI) for the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) for the nickel-cadmium batteries originally selected for this low earth orbit mission. The design features of the HST nickel hydrogen battery are described and the results of an extended charge retention test are summarized.

  19. A study of space shuttle structural integrity test and assessment. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Poe, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The ultrasonics technique for assessing the structural integrity of the primary surface of the space shuttle vehicles is discussed and evaluated. Analysis was made of transducers, transducer coupling test structure fabrication, flaws, and ultrasonic testing. Graphs of microphone response curves from the initial noise tests, accelerometer response curves from the final noise tests, and microphone curves from the final noise tests are included along with a glossary, bibliography, and results.

  20. Payload test philosophy. [implications of STS development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arman, A.

    1979-01-01

    The implications of STS development for payload testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center are reviewed. The biggest impact of STS may be that instead of testing the entire payload, most of the testing may have to be limited to the subsystem or subassembly level. Particular consideration is given to the Goddard protoflight concept in which the test is geared to the design qualification levels, the test durations being those that are expected during the actual launch sequence.