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Sample records for outer surface structures

  1. Crystal structure of the infectious phenotype-associated outer surface protein BBA66 from the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Brangulis, Kalvis; Petrovskis, Ivars; Kazaks, Andris; Tars, Kaspars; Ranka, Renate

    2014-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease is transmitted to the mammalian host organisms by infected Ixodes ticks. Transfer of the spirochaetal bacteria from Ixodes ticks to the warm-blooded mammalian organism provides a challenge for the bacteria to adapt and survive in the different environmental conditions. B. burgdorferi has managed to differentially express genes in response to the encountered changes such as temperature and pH variance or metabolic rate to survive in both environments. In recent years, much interest has been turned on genes that are upregulated during the borrelial transfer to mammalian organisms as this could reveal the proteins important in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. BBA66 is one of the upregulated outer surface proteins thought to be important in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi as it has been found out that BBA66 is necessary during the transmission and propagation phase to initiate Lyme disease. As there is still little known about the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi, we have solved the crystal structure of the outer surface protein BBA66 at 2.25Å resolution. A monomer of BBA66 consists of 6 α-helices packed in a globular domain, and the overall folding is similar to the homologous proteins BBA64, BBA73, and CspA. Structure-based sequence alignment with the homologous protein BBA64 revealed that the conserved residues are mainly located inwards the core region of the protein and thus may be required to maintain the overall fold of the protein. Unlike the other homologous proteins, BBA66 has an atypically long disordered region at the N terminus thought to act as a "tether" between the structural domain and the cell surface.

  2. Wettability on Inner and Outer Surface of Single Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yutaka; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-07-19

    The surface wettability of a liquid on the inner and outer surface of single carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was experimentally investigated. Although these contact angles on both surfaces were previously studied separately, the available data are of limited help to elucidate the effect of curvature orientation (concave or convex) on wettability due to the difference in surface structure. Here, we report on the three-phase contact region and wettability on the outer surface of CNT during the dipping and withdrawing experiment of CNT into an ionic liquid. Furthermore, the wettability on the inner surface was measured using a liquid within the same CNT. Our results show that the contact angle on the outer surface of the CNT is larger than that on the flat surface and that on the inner surface is smaller than that on the flat one. These findings suggest that the surface curvature orientation has a noticeable effect on the contact angle at the nanoscale because both inner and outer surfaces expose the same graphite wall structure and the contact line tension will be negligible in this situation. The presented results are rationalized using the free energy balance of liquid on curved surfaces. PMID:27351126

  3. Outer planet probe engineering model structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smittkamp, J. A.; Gustin, W. H.; Griffin, M. W.

    1977-01-01

    A series of proof of concept structural tests was performed on an engineering model of the Outer Planets Atmospheric Entry Probe. The tests consisted of pyrotechnic shock, dynamic and static loadings. The tests partially verified the structural concept.

  4. Structure of an outer surface lipoprotein BBA64 from the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi which is critical to ensure infection after a tick bite.

    PubMed

    Brangulis, Kalvis; Tars, Kaspars; Petrovskis, Ivars; Kazaks, Andris; Ranka, Renate; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-06-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne infection caused by the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi from infected Ixodes ticks to a mammalian host during the blood meal. Previous studies have shown that the expression of B. burgdorferi surface-localized lipoproteins, which include BBA64, is up-regulated during the process of tick feeding. Although the exact function of BBA64 is not known, this lipoprotein is critical for the transmission of the spirochete from the tick salivary glands to the mammalian organism after a tick bite. Since the mechanism of development of the disease and the functions of the surface lipoproteins associated with borreliosis are still poorly understood, the crystal structure of the B. burgdorferi outer surface lipoprotein BBA64 was solved at 2.4 Å resolution in order to obtain a better insight into the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi and to promote the discovery of novel potential preventive drugs against Lyme disease. In this study, the crystal structure of BBA64 was also compared with that of the paralogous protein CspA (also referred to as BbCRASP-1, CRASP-1 or BBA68). CspA is the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein-1 of B. burgdorferi; its structure is known, but its function apparently differs from that of BBA64. It is demonstrated that unlike the homologous CspA, BBA64 does not form a homodimer. Their differences in function could be explained by divergence in their amino-acid sequences, electrostatic surface potentials and overall tertiary structures. The C-terminal part of BBA64 has a different conformation to that of CspA; the conformation of this region is essential for the proper function of CspA.

  5. The spiral structure of the outer Milky Way in hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Levine, E S; Blitz, Leo; Heiles, Carl

    2006-06-23

    We produce a detailed map of the perturbed surface density of neutral hydrogen in the outer Milky Way disk, demonstrating that the Galaxy is a non-axisymmetric multiarmed spiral. Spiral structure in the southern half of the Galaxy can be traced out to at least 25 kiloparsecs, implying a minimum radius for the gas disk. Overdensities in the surface density are coincident with regions of reduced gas thickness. The ratio of the surface density to the local median surface density is relatively constant along an arm. Logarithmic spirals can be fit to the arms with pitch angles of 20 degrees to 25 degrees .

  6. Electron beam seals outer surfaces of porous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, W. H.; Kurtz, A. D.; Kurtz, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Porous tungsten plugs provide even airflow for frictionless bearings used in air bearing supported gyros. The plugs have their outer cylindrical surface sealed by an electron beam process to ensure unidirectional airflow through their exit ends.

  7. Microwave Brightness Of Land Surfaces From Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Yann H.; Njoku, Eni G.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical model approximates microwave radiation emitted by land surfaces traveling to microwave radiometer in outer space. Applied to measurements made by Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR). Developed for interpretation of microwave imagery of Earth to obtain distributions of various chemical, physical, and biological characteristics across its surface. Intended primarily for use in mapping moisture content of soil and fraction of Earth covered by vegetation. Advanced Very-High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), provides additional information on vegetative cover, thereby making possible retrieval of soil-moisture values from SMMR measurements. Possible to monitor changes of land surface during intervals of 5 to 10 years, providing significant data for mathematical models of evolution of climate.

  8. Surface evaluation method and stamping simulation for surface deflection of automotive outer panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichijo, Naoki; Iwata, Noritoshi; Iwata, Takamichi; Mita, Taichi; Niihara, Masatomo; Tsutamori, Hideo

    2013-12-01

    In designing dies of automotive outer panels, the most difficult process is to modify surface deflection. To fabricate high-quality outer panels without modifying dies, it is important to develop an evaluation method and a numerical analysis method for surface deflection of outer panels. In this study, we have developed a new evaluation method that uses the maximum value of curvature calculated using reflecting curves in the surface. This new evaluation method made the examiner's evaluation to conform with the digital evaluation. The evaluation results with the new method shows better agreement with the sensory value than those with the conventional methods. We have proposed the new analysis method to predict surface deflection correctly. By the proposed simulation method, plastic deformation is calculated in consideration of stress in thickness direction, and restriking conditions have been examined. We have applied our methods to the fabrication of automotive outer panels, and verified that these are useful and practical.

  9. The Velocity Structure of SN 1987A's Outer Circumstellar Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A. P. S.; Heathcote, S. R.

    1997-12-01

    We present high-resolution optical spectroscopy, (obtained with the CTIO 4-meter/echelle spectrograph over many epochs between 1989 and 1997) of the circumstellar nebula of SN 1987A, including the outer rings (within 3 arcsec of the SN), the inner (equatorial) ring, and fainter features at larger radii never studied before spectroscopically. We report velocity displacements for portions of the outer rings, up to 26 km s(-1) with respect the SN centroid velocity, with blueshifted components in the location of the southern outer ring and the redshifted portions of the northern outer ring. The largest shifts are near the SN, as predicted by a model in which the outer rings are the crowns of an expanding, bipolar nebula with the inner ring at its waist. We also confirm that the inner ring shows a velocity full-width of about 13 km s(-1) , which, along with the geometry of the rings and our outer ring velocity measurements, allows us to estimate a characteristic timescale of about 20,000 y for each of the three rings, implying that all are coeval. This contrasts with measurements by others of compositional ratios in the inner versus outer rings indicating that they were, perhaps, ejected at different times from the progenitor's star's outer envelope. Additionally, we measure the velocity of low surface brightness features at larger radii indicating that circumstellar material even farther from the SN was ejected up to 400,000 y before the explosion. Finally, we note the presence of transient emission features within the circumstellar nebula and describe their behaviour, and consider what implications our observations may have for the coming transformation of this nebula into Supernova Remnant 1987A.

  10. Interacting Surfaces and Atmospheres in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DalleOre, Cristina

    1999-01-01

    The work reported here is an extension of ongoing efforts in data reduction and modeling of the spectral reflectances of several objects in the outer Solar System. In general terms, this requires an evaluation of the data obtained at the telescope, conversion of those data into geometric albedo units, and the combination of individual spectrum segments into a complete spectrum over the wavelength interval of interest. The modeling effort to produce a synthetic spectrum of a given Solar System object requires the complex refractive indices (the optical constants) of candidate surface materials, including ices, minerals, and organic solids. Those indices are primarily available only through contacts with other researchers, including colleagues at NASA Ames and at other institutions. Once obtained, the indices must be convolved with the telescopic data and then used in a computational model to produce the required synthetic spectrum for comparison with the data obtained at the telescope. In this way, we reach a convergence on the chemical composition and microstructural properties of the surfaces of objects in the outer Solar System.

  11. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  12. An Outer Arm in the Second Galactic Quadrant: Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinyu; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji; Sun, Yan; Li, Facheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The lack of arm tracers, especially remote tracers, is one of the most difficult problems preventing us from studying the structure of the Milky Way. Fortunately, with its high-sensitivity CO survey, the Milky Way Imaging Scroll Painting (MWISP) project offers such an opportunity. Since completing about one-third of its mission, an area of l = [100, 150]°, b = [‑3, 5]° has nearly been covered. The Outer arm of the Milky Way first clearly revealed its shape in the second galactic quadrant in the form of molecular gas—this is the first time that the Outer arm has been reported in such a large-scale mapping of molecular gas. Using the 115 GHz 12CO(1–0) data of MWISP at the LSR velocity ≃[‑100, ‑60] km s‑1 and in the area mentioned above, we have detected 481 molecular clouds in total, and among them 332 (about 69%) are newly detected and 457 probably belong to the Outer arm. The total mass of the detected Outer arm clouds is ˜3.1 × 106 M ⊙. Assuming that the spiral arm is a logarithmic spiral, the pitch angle is fitted as ˜13.°1. Besides combining both the CO data from MWISP and the 21 cm H i data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS), the gas distribution, warp, and thickness of the Outer arm are also studied.

  13. An Outer Arm in the Second Galactic Quadrant: Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinyu; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji; Sun, Yan; Li, Facheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhou, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The lack of arm tracers, especially remote tracers, is one of the most difficult problems preventing us from studying the structure of the Milky Way. Fortunately, with its high-sensitivity CO survey, the Milky Way Imaging Scroll Painting (MWISP) project offers such an opportunity. Since completing about one-third of its mission, an area of l = [100, 150]°, b = [-3, 5]° has nearly been covered. The Outer arm of the Milky Way first clearly revealed its shape in the second galactic quadrant in the form of molecular gas—this is the first time that the Outer arm has been reported in such a large-scale mapping of molecular gas. Using the 115 GHz 12CO(1-0) data of MWISP at the LSR velocity ≃[-100, -60] km s-1 and in the area mentioned above, we have detected 481 molecular clouds in total, and among them 332 (about 69%) are newly detected and 457 probably belong to the Outer arm. The total mass of the detected Outer arm clouds is ˜3.1 × 106 M ⊙. Assuming that the spiral arm is a logarithmic spiral, the pitch angle is fitted as ˜13.°1. Besides combining both the CO data from MWISP and the 21 cm H i data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS), the gas distribution, warp, and thickness of the Outer arm are also studied.

  14. Analysis of Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Proteins in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Bradley J.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2014-01-01

    More than 50 Helicobacter pylori genes are predicted to encode outer membrane proteins (OMPs), but there has been relatively little experimental investigation of the H. pylori cell surface proteome. In this study, we used selective biotinylation to label proteins localized to the surface of H. pylori, along with differential detergent extraction procedures to isolate proteins localized to the outer membrane. Proteins that met multiple criteria for surface-exposed outer membrane localization included known adhesins, as well as Cag proteins required for activity of the cag type IV secretion system, putative lipoproteins, and other proteins not previously recognized as cell surface components. We identified sites of nontryptic cleavage consistent with signal sequence cleavage, as well as C-terminal motifs that may be important for protein localization. A subset of surface-exposed proteins were highly susceptible to proteolysis when intact bacteria were treated with proteinase K. Most Hop and Hom OMPs were susceptible to proteolysis, whereas Hor and Hof proteins were relatively resistant. Most of the protease-susceptible OMPs contain a large protease-susceptible extracellular domain exported beyond the outer membrane and a protease-resistant domain at the C terminus with a predicted β-barrel structure. These features suggest that, similar to the secretion of the VacA passenger domain, the N-terminal domains of protease-susceptible OMPs are exported through an autotransporter pathway. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the repertoire of surface-exposed H. pylori proteins that may mediate bacterium-host interactions, as well as the cell surface topology of these proteins. PMID:24769695

  15. U(VI) reduction by diverse outer surface c-type cytochromes of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Roberto; Leavitt, Janet J; Comolli, Luis R; Csencsits, Roseann; Janot, Noemie; Flanagan, Kelly A; Gray, Arianna S; Leang, Ching; Izallalen, Mounir; Mester, Tünde; Lovley, Derek R

    2013-10-01

    Early studies with Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested that outer-surface c-type cytochromes might play a role in U(VI) reduction, but it has recently been suggested that there is substantial U(VI) reduction at the surface of the electrically conductive pili known as microbial nanowires. This phenomenon was further investigated. A strain of G. sulfurreducens, known as Aro-5, which produces pili with substantially reduced conductivity reduced U(VI) nearly as well as the wild type, as did a strain in which the gene for PilA, the structural pilin protein, was deleted. In order to reduce rates of U(VI) reduction to levels less than 20% of the wild-type rates, it was necessary to delete the genes for the five most abundant outer surface c-type cytochromes of G. sulfurreducens. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy demonstrated that whereas 83% ± 10% of the uranium associated with wild-type cells correspond to U(IV) after 4 h of incubation, with the quintuple mutant, 89% ± 10% of uranium was U(VI). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy revealed that wild-type cells did not precipitate uranium along pili as previously reported, but U(IV) was precipitated at the outer cell surface. These findings are consistent with those of previous studies, which have suggested that G. sulfurreducens requires outer-surface c-type cytochromes but not pili for the reduction of soluble extracellular electron acceptors.

  16. Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. Q.; Peng, Z. L.

    2015-08-01

    Energy structure of MHD flow coupling with outer resistance circuit is studied to illuminate qualitatively and quantitatively the energy relation of this basic MHD flow system with energy input and output. Energy structure are analytically derived based on the Navier-Stocks equations for two-dimensional fully-developed flow and generalized Ohm's Law. The influences of applied magnetic field, Hall parameter and conductivity on energy structure are discussed based on the analytical results. Associated energies in MHD flow are deduced and validated by energy conservation. These results reveal that energy structure consists of two sub structures: electrical energy structure and internal energy structure. Energy structure and its sub structures provide an integrated theoretical energy path of the MHD system. Applied magnetic field and conductivity decrease the input energy, dissipation by fluid viscosity and internal energy but increase the ratio of electrical energy to input energy, while Hall parameter has the opposite effects. These are caused by their different effects on Bulk velocity, velocity profiles, voltage and current in outer circuit. Understanding energy structure helps MHD application designers to actively adjust the allocation of different parts of energy so that it is more reasonable and desirable.

  17. Planning Assembly Of Large Truss Structures In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Mello, Luiz S. Homem; Desai, Rajiv S.

    1992-01-01

    Report dicusses developmental algorithm used in systematic planning of sequences of operations in which large truss structures assembled in outer space. Assembly sequence represented by directed graph called "assembly graph", in which each arc represents joining of two parts or subassemblies. Algorithm generates assembly graph, working backward from state of complete assembly to initial state, in which all parts disassembled. Working backward more efficient than working forward because it avoids intermediate dead ends.

  18. Crystal structure of the open state of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrE outer membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Chou, Tsung-Han; Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important strategies used by bacteria to defend against antimicrobial factors present in their environment. Mediating many cases of antibiotic resistance are transmembrane efflux pumps, composed of one or more proteins. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND) family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here describe the crystal structure of N. gonorrhoeae MtrE, the outer membrane component of the MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux system. This trimeric MtrE channel forms a vertical tunnel extending down contiguously from the outer membrane surface to the periplasmic end, indicating that our structure of MtrE depicts an open conformational state of this channel.

  19. Crystal structure of the open state of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrE outer membrane channel.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Chou, Tsung-Han; Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Do, Sylvia V; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important strategies used by bacteria to defend against antimicrobial factors present in their environment. Mediating many cases of antibiotic resistance are transmembrane efflux pumps, composed of one or more proteins. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux pump, belonging to the hydrophobic and amphiphilic efflux resistance-nodulation-cell division (HAE-RND) family, spans both the inner and outer membranes of N. gonorrhoeae and confers resistance to a variety of antibiotics and toxic compounds. We here describe the crystal structure of N. gonorrhoeae MtrE, the outer membrane component of the MtrCDE tripartite multidrug efflux system. This trimeric MtrE channel forms a vertical tunnel extending down contiguously from the outer membrane surface to the periplasmic end, indicating that our structure of MtrE depicts an open conformational state of this channel. PMID:24901251

  20. Structural Basis for Alginate Secretion Across the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    J Whitney; I Hay; C Li; P Eckford; H Robinson; M Amaya; L Wood; D Ohman; C Bear; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  1. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  2. STUDIES OF THE INNER AND OUTER PROTOPLASMIC SURFACES OF LARGE PLANT CELLS : I. PLASMOLYSIS DUE TO SALTS.

    PubMed

    Osterhout, W J

    1943-11-20

    In Nitella, Chara, Hydrodictyon, and Valonia the inner and outer non-aqueous protoplasmic surface layers can be separated by certain plasmolytic agents which penetrate the outer surface more rapidly than the inner and hence raise the osmotic pressure of the protoplasm lying between them and cause it to increase in thickness by taking up water from the central vacuole. We may therefore conclude that the two surfaces differ. This idea is confirmed by earlier electrical measurements which show that when sap is placed outside the cell the chain See PDF for Structure produces an E.M.F. of several millivolts.

  3. Estimating Relative Positions of Outer-Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balian, Harry; Breckenridge, William; Brugarolas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A computer program estimates the relative position and orientation of two structures from measurements, made by use of electronic cameras and laser range finders on one structure, of distances and angular positions of fiducial objects on the other structure. The program was written specifically for use in determining errors in the alignment of large structures deployed in outer space from a space shuttle. The program is based partly on equations for transformations among the various coordinate systems involved in the measurements and on equations that account for errors in the transformation operators. It computes a least-squares estimate of the relative position and orientation. Sequential least-squares estimates, acquired at a measurement rate of 4 Hz, are averaged by passing them through a fourth-order Butterworth filter. The program is executed in a computer aboard the space shuttle, and its position and orientation estimates are displayed to astronauts on a graphical user interface.

  4. Structure of Rotavirus Outer-Layer Protein VP7 Bound with a Neutralizing Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Scott T.; Settembre, Ethan C.; Trask, Shane D.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Harrison, Stephen C.; Dormitzer, Philip R.

    2009-06-17

    Rotavirus outer-layer protein VP7 is a principal target of protective antibodies. Removal of free calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) dissociates VP7 trimers into monomers, releasing VP7 from the virion, and initiates penetration-inducing conformational changes in the other outer-layer protein, VP4. We report the crystal structure at 3.4 angstrom resolution of VP7 bound with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The Fab binds across the outer surface of the intersubunit contact, which contains two Ca{sup 2+} sites. Mutations that escape neutralization by other antibodies suggest that the same region bears the epitopes of most neutralizing antibodies. The monovalent Fab is sufficient to neutralize infectivity. We propose that neutralizing antibodies against VP7 act by stabilizing the trimer, thereby inhibiting the uncoating trigger for VP4 rearrangement. A disulfide-linked trimer is a potential subunit immunogen.

  5. Gram-negative outer membrane vesicles: beyond the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    MASHBURN-WARREN, L.; MCLEAN, R. J. C.; WHITELEY, M.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable interest has recently mounted regarding the biological roles of Gram-negative outer membrane vesicles (MVs). The first discovery of MVs was made over four decades ago, and it is now clear that most Gram-negative bacteria produce MVs, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli as the most extensively studied. Much of our knowledge of the biological roles of MVs and mechanism of MV formation is due to T.J. Beveridge and colleagues. Beveridge pioneered the field of MV research not only by enhancing our understanding of MV function, but also through the application of a wide variety of physical, chemical, and genetic techniques to complement his elegant electron microscopy investigations. Here we review the contributions of Beveridge’s group to our understanding of MV biology. PMID:18459967

  6. Composite load bearing outer skin for an arctic structure and a method for erecting same

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Birdy, J. N.; Watt, B. J.

    1985-08-27

    The load bearing outer skin contains an inner assembly and an outer assembly. Both the inner and outer assemblies include a skin plate member which is stiffened by stiffeners welded to one side of the skin plate member. The stiffeners are located at spaced intervals from each other and are disposed substantially perpendicular to the skin plate member. The inner and outer assembly are placed substantially parallel to each other to form a composite structure having an internal cavity defined by the inner and outer plates. The stiffeners of the inner assembly and the outer assembly are disposed in the cavity at a spaced relation to each other and extend partly into the cavity. A cementitious material substantially fills the cavity thereby completing the load bearing outer skin structure. The stiffeners may be flat steel plates or may have the profile of structural shapes such as angles or T's among others.

  7. Overexpression of the waaZ Gene Leads to Modification of the Structure of the Inner Core Region of Escherichia coli Lipopolysaccharide, Truncation of the Outer Core, and Reduction of the Amount of O Polysaccharide on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Frirdich, Emilisa; Lindner, Buko; Holst, Otto; Whitfield, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The waa gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core region in Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Homologs of the waaZ gene product are encoded by the waa gene clusters of Salmonella enterica and E. coli strains with the K-12 and R2 core types. Overexpression of WaaZ in E. coli and S. enterica led to a modified LPS structure showing core truncations and (where relevant) to a reduction in the amount of O-polysaccharide side chains. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to determine the predominant LPS structures in an E. coli isolate with an R1 core (waaZ is lacking from the type R1 waa gene cluster) with a copy of the waaZ gene added on a plasmid. Novel truncated LPS structures, lacking up to 3 hexoses from the outer core, resulted from WaaZ overexpression. The truncated molecules also contained a KdoIII residue not normally found in the R1 core. PMID:12591884

  8. Hydrodynamic performance of combined cylinders structure with dual arc-shaped porous outer walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gao; Liu, Jun

    2012-11-01

    This study examines the hydrodynamic performance of short-crested wave interaction with a new porous cylindrical structure by using the scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM), which is a semi-analytical technique combining the advantages of the finite element method and the boundary element method and with its own special features as well. The cylindrical structure consists of dual arc-shaped porous outer cylinders circumscribing an impermeable inner cylinder. A central feature of the newly extended method is that two virtual outer cylinders extending the arc-shaped porous outer cylinders with the same centre are introduced and variable porous-effect parameters are also introduced for the two virtual cylinders, so that the final SBFEM equation still can be handled in a closed-form analytical manner in the radial direction and by a finite element approximation in the circumferential direction. The entire computational domain is divided into two bounded and one unbounded domains, and a variational principle formulation is used to derive the SBFEM equation in each sub-domain. The velocity potential in bounded and unbounded domains is formulated using sets of Bessel and Hankel functions respectively, and the unknown coefficients are determined from the matching conditions. The results of numerical verification show that the approach discretises only the outermost virtual cylinder with surface finite-elements and fewer elements are required to obtain very accurate results. Influences of the incident wave parameters and structural configurations on the hydrodynamics are examined.

  9. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. PMID:26621472

  10. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.

  11. A model of the dynamical structure of Earth's outer core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loper, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamical state of the outer core is quantified, assuming that the convective pattern consists of buoyant parcels which rise to the top, forcing a broad descending flow in the bulk of the outer core. This convective circulation is assumed sufficiently rapid that the outer core is close to a well-mixed adiabatic state. Small compositional deviations from this state, resulting from the secular evolution of composition as the solid inner core grows, make the descending portion of the outer core stably stratified. Thermal deviations result from the mismatch between effective volumetric heating and the divergence of conducted heat. Effective volumetric heating is the sum of secular cooling, compressional heating and Ohmic heating. Divergence of heat is negative and larger in magnitude than effective volumetric heating throughout the core, resulting in a stabilizing thermal gradient in the descending fluid which reinforces the compositional gradient. The compositional and thermal contributions to the stable stratification are of comparable magnitudes. The strength of stratification depends on the strength of the convective circulation, which is unquantified. This stratification, coupled with Coriolis and Lorentz forces, has the potential to inhibit turbulence in the descending portions of the outer core. The thermal and compositional perturbations arising from processes at the inner-core boundary and core-mantle boundary are quantified and the dynamic behavior of the rising parcels is discussed and quantified. Depending on the sign and magnitude of exchanges of heat and composition, convective motions may be inhibited or suppressed near the top of the outer core.

  12. Structure and function of outer dynein arm intermediate and light chain complex

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Toshiyuki; Abe, Tatsuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    The outer dynein arm (ODA) is a molecular complex that drives the beating motion of cilia/flagella. Chlamydomonas ODA is composed of three heavy chains (HCs), two ICs, and 11 light chains (LCs). Although the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the whole ODA complex has been investigated, the 3D configurations of the ICs and LCs are largely unknown. Here we identified the 3D positions of the two ICs and three LCs using cryo–electron tomography and structural labeling. We found that these ICs and LCs were all localized at the root of the outer-inner dynein (OID) linker, designated the ODA-Beak complex. Of interest, the coiled-coil domain of IC2 extended from the ODA-Beak to the outer surface of ODA. Furthermore, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of how the OID linker transmits signals to the ODA-Beak, by manipulating the interaction within the OID linker using a chemically induced dimerization system. We showed that the cross-linking of the OID linker strongly suppresses flagellar motility in vivo. These results suggest that the ICs and LCs of the ODA form the ODA-Beak, which may be involved in mechanosignaling from the OID linker to the HCs. PMID:26864626

  13. Detailed Structure of the Outer Disk Around HD 169142 with Polarized Light in H-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momose, Munetake; Morita, Ayaka; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; McElwain, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0.''2=r=1.''2, or 29=r=174 AU, is successfully detected. The azimuthally-averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r = 29-52 AU and r = 81.2-145 AU respectively show r-3-dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r = 40-70 AU. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at lambda = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution or with an irregular temperature distribution or with the combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r <50 AU) is derived to be =0.16 from a simple model calculation. The obtained PI image also shows small scale asymmetries in the outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and shadowing effect by a puffed up structure in the inner power-law region.

  14. Structure of the outer layers of cool standard stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaes, S.; Bauwens, E.; Decin, L.; Eriksson, K.; Raskin, G.; Butler, B.; Dowell, C. D.; Ali, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.

    2011-09-01

    Context. Among late-type red giants, an interesting change occurs in the structure of the outer atmospheric layers as one moves to later spectral types in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: a chromosphere is always present, but the coronal emission diminishes and a cool massive wind steps in. Aims: Where most studies have focussed on short-wavelength observations, this article explores the influence of the chromosphere and the wind on long-wavelength photometric measurements. The goal of this study is to assess wether a set of standard near-infrared calibration sources are fiducial calibrators in the far-infrared, beyond 50 μm. Methods: The observational spectral energy distributions were compared with the theoretical model predictions for a sample of nine K- and M-giants. The discrepancies found are explained using basic models for flux emission originating in a chromosphere or an ionised wind. Results: For seven out of nine sample stars, a clear flux excess is detected at (sub)millimetre and/or centimetre wavelengths, while only observational upper limits are obtained for the other two. The precise start of the excess depends upon the star under consideration. For six sources the flux excess starts beyond 210 μm and they can be considered as fiducial calibrators for Herschel/PACS (60-210 μm). Out of this sample, four sources show no flux excess in the Herschel/SPIRE wavelength range (200-670 μm) and are good calibration sources for this instrument as well. The flux at wavelengths shorter than ~1 mm is most likely dominated by an optically thick chromosphere, where an optically thick ionised wind is the main flux contributor at longer wavelengths. Conclusions: Although the optical to mid-infrared spectrum of the studied K- and M-type infrared standard stars is represented well by a radiative equilibrium atmospheric model, a chromosphere and/or ionised stellar wind at higher altitudes dominates the spectrum in the (sub)millimetre and centimetre wavelength ranges

  15. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules using outer surface features.

    PubMed

    Demir, Önder; Yılmaz Çamurcu, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a computer-aided detection (CAD) system was developed for the detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images. The CAD system consists of four phases, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional preprocessing phases. In the feature extraction phase, four different groups of features are extracted from volume of interests: morphological features, statistical and histogram features, statistical and histogram features of outer surface, and texture features of outer surface. The support vector machine algorithm is optimized using particle swarm optimization for classification. The CAD system provides 97.37% sensitivity, 86.38% selectivity, 88.97% accuracy and 2.7 false positive per scan using three groups of classification features. After the inclusion of outer surface texture features, classification results of the CAD system reaches 98.03% sensitivity, 87.71% selectivity, 90.12% accuracy and 2.45 false positive per scan. Experimental results demonstrate that outer surface texture features of nodule candidates are useful to increase sensitivity and decrease the number of false positives in the detection of lung nodules in computed tomography images. PMID:26405880

  16. Structure of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Singer, S J

    1982-01-01

    The cell surface is the locus for many important biochemical functions of cells and for the interactions of cells with one another and with their environment. The structure of the cell surface may be thought of as three-layered, with a central plasma membrane to which certain macromolecular components are attached on the outer face (the exoskeleton) and other components on the inner face (the membrane cytoskeleton). In the last decade, the basic molecular structure of the plasma membrane has been elucidated and can be represented by the fluid mosaic model as a first approximation. The binding of specific integral proteins of the membrane to individual peripheral proteins outside or inside the cell is most likely the basis for the three-layered structure of the cell surface. Studies of the last several years on the molecular structures of these three-layered cell surfaces of cultured normal fibroblasts and of fibroblasts transformed by oncogenic viruses are beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanisms responsible for changes in cell shape, adhesiveness, and in contact inhibition of motility associated with neoplastic transformation.

  17. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry.

  18. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry. PMID:26791981

  19. Transport rectification in nanopores with outer membranes modified with surface charges and polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-10-22

    This work reports a comprehensive theoretical study of the transport-rectification properties of cylindrical nanopores with neutral inner walls and chemically modified outer membrane. The chemical species on the two outer sides of the membrane have charges of opposite sign and can be either surface-confined species (i.e., surface charges) or polyelectrolyte brushes. The advantage of this design over other types of rectifying nanopores is that it requires controlling the composition of the outer walls of the pore (which are easy to access) rather than the inner walls, thus simplifying the fabrication process. Ion-current rectification in nanopores with charged outer walls is ascribed to applied-potential-induced changes in the ionic concentration within the pore. The rectification efficiency is studied as a function of pore length, radius, surface charge and bulk electrolyte concentration. An analytical model is derived for the case of surface-confined charges that predicts the current-potential curves in very good agreement with the numerical calculations. Neutral nanopores with polyelectrolyte-modified outer walls have two distinct advantages compared to surface-charged systems: (i) they exhibit higher rectification factors due to the large charge density immobilized by the polyelectrolyte brushes, and (ii) the applied potential deforms the polyelectrolyte chains toward the oppositely charged electrode. This deformation brings the polyelectrolyte brushes into the pore in the low conductivity state and expels them from the pore in the high conductivity regime. Calculations of the potentials of mean-force suggest that the applied-field-induced conformational changes can be used to control the translocation of cargoes larger than ions, such as proteins and nanoparticles.

  20. On the internal structure of the major satellites of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. T.; Cassen, P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and thermal evolutions of the large icy-satellites of the outer solar system are considered. It is shown (for bodies comparable in size and mass to the Galilean satellites, having sizeable mass fraction of H2O, and with meteoritic abundances of radioactive materials contained within their silicate fractions) that the crust of solid ice over a liquid mantle predicted by conductive heat-transfer calculations is unstable to large-scale solid-state convection. For appropriate material parameters, convective heat-transfer rates are sufficient to freeze a large liquid mantle on a time scale that is short compared to the lifetime of the body. It is also concluded that the ice layer is convecting at the present time. A reevaluation of previous work, using improved values for material parameters and boundary conditions, reverses earlier conclusions and implies a rigid outer crust with resulting long-term stability of surface features to creep deformation. The combination of a rigid crust with active internal convection presents the additional possibility of surface features that are produced and maintained by dynamic internal processes.

  1. Outer-sphere Pb(II) adsorbed at specific surface sites on single crystal {alpha}-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, J.R.; Towle, S.N.; Parks, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Solvated Pb(II) ions were found to adsorb as structurally well-defined outer-sphere complexes at specific sites on the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) single crystal surface, as determined by grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) measurements. The XAFS results suggest that the distance between Pb(II) adions and the alumina surface is approximately 4.2 {angstrom}. In contrast, Pb(II) adsorbs as more strongly bound inner-sphere complexes on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1102). The difference in reactivities of the two alumina surfaces has implications for modeling surface complexation reactions of contaminants in natural environments, catalysis, and compositional sector zoning of oxide crystals. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Outer-sphere Pb(II) adsorbed at specific surface sites on single crystal α-alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Towle, Steven N.; Brown, Gordon E.; Parks, George A.

    1996-01-01

    Solvated Pb(II) ions were found to adsorb as structurally well-defined outer-sphere complexes at specific sites on the α-Al2O3 (0001) single crystal surface, as determined by grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) measurements. The XAFS results suggest that the distance between Pb(II) adions and the alumina surface is approximately 4.2 Å. In contrast, Pb(II) adsorbs as more strongly bound inner-sphere complexes on α-Al2O3 (102). The difference in reactivities of the two alumina surfaces has implications for modeling surface complexation reactions of contaminants in natural environments, catalysis, and compositional sector zoning of oxide crystals.

  3. Structural biology of membrane-intrinsic β-barrel enzymes: Sentinels of the bacterial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria are replete with integral membrane proteins that exhibit antiparallel β-barrel structures, but very few of these proteins function as enzymes. In Escherichia coli, only three β-barrel enzymes are known to exist in the outer membrane; these are the phospholipase OMPLA, the protease OmpT, and the phospholipid::lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP, all of which have been characterized at the structural level. Structural details have also emerged for the outer membrane β-barrel enzyme PagL, a lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lipid A can be further modified in the outer membrane by two β-barrel enzymes of unknown structure; namely, the Salmonella enterica 3′-acyloxyacyl hydrolase LpxR, and the Rhizobium leguminosarum oxidase LpxQ, which employs O2 to convert the proximal glucosamine unit of lipid A into 2-aminogluconate. Structural biology now indicates how β-barrel enzymes can function as sentinels that remain dormant when the outer membrane permeability barrier is intact. Host immune defenses and antibiotics that perturb this barrier can directly trigger β-barrel enzymes in the outer membrane. The ensuing adaptive responses occur instantaneously and rapidly outpace other signal transduction mechanisms that similarly function to restore the outer membrane permeability barrier. PMID:17880914

  4. Multistep Kinetic Behavior of the Thermal Decomposition of Granular Sodium Percarbonate: Hindrance Effect of the Outer Surface Layer.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeshi; Nakano, Masayoshi; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2015-09-24

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal decomposition of granular sodium percarbonate (SPC), which is used as a household oxygen bleach, were studied by thermoanalytical measurements under systematically changing conditions and morphological observation of the reactant solids at different reaction stages. A physico-geometrical kinetic behavior of the reaction that occurs in a core-shell structure composed of an outer surface layer and internal aggregates of SPC crystalline particles was illustrated through detailed kinetic analyses using the kinetic deconvolution method. Simultaneously, the hazardous nature of SPC as a combustion improver was evaluated on the basis of the kinetic behavior of the thermal decomposition. It was found that the outer surface layers of the SPC granules hinder the diffusional removal of product gases generated by the thermal decomposition of the internal SPC crystalline particles. The reaction rate decelerates because of an increase in the internal gaseous pressure as the reaction advances. However, the reaction rate accelerates once crack formation occurs in the outer surface layer at the midpoint of the reaction. Therefore, the overall reaction was empirically demonstrated to consist of two overlapping reaction steps owing to the changes in the self-generated reaction conditions in the interior of the SPC granules. PMID:26372469

  5. A biophysical glance at the outer surface of the membrane transporter SGLT1.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Navneet K; Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Raja, Mobeen; Kumar, Azad; Wimmer, Barbara; Neundlinger, Isabel; Gruber, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2011-01-01

    Proteins mediating the transport of solutes across the cell membrane control the intracellular conditions in which life can occur. Because of the particular arrangement of spanning a lipid bilayer and the many conformations required for their function, transport proteins pose significant obstacles for the investigation of their structure-function relation. Crystallographic studies, if available, define the transmembrane segments in a "frozen" state and do not provide information on the dynamics of the extramembranous loops, which are similarly evolutionary conserved and thus as functionally important as the other parts of the protein. The current review presents biophysical methods that can shed light on the dynamics of transporters in the membrane. The techniques that are presented in some detail are single-molecule recognition atomic force microscopy and tryptophan scanning, which can report on the positioning of the loops and on conformational changes at the outer surface. Studies on a variety of symporters are discussed, which use gradients of sodium or protons as energy source to translocate (mainly organic) solutes against their concentration gradients into or out of the cells. Primarily, investigations of the sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 are used as examples for this biophysical approach to understand transporter function. PMID:20692230

  6. Surface charging and dust-plasma interactions at outer planet moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.

    2011-12-01

    Most large outer planet moons orbit within the magnetospheres of their parent planets, and are continuously exposed to magnetospheric plasma. Depending on the competing effects on their surfaces of photoemission, which drives them positive, and incident plasma, which tends to impart a negative potential, outer planet satellites possess a range of surface potentials which can vary significantly as a function of local time and geographic location on each body. A review is presented of the theory and simulation of surface charging, as well as the recent direct detection through electron reflectometry of a negatively-charged surface at Saturn's moon, Rhea. The same processes also affect dust particles in planetary rings and other contexts such as the plumes of gas and solid particles originating at Enceladus's south polar region and the numerous volcanic vents on Io. The processes affecting these charged grains are also reviewed, as well as the resultant effects on dust trajectories, and dust populations' sometimes significant effects on the outer planet magnetospheres within which they reside.

  7. Delineating the inner bladder surface using uniform contractions from the outer surface under variable bladder filling conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Andrew; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter; Currie, Geoffrey; Heaton, Robert; Wheat, Janelle; Milosevic, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the methods to delineate the inner bladder (IB) surface using a uniform contraction from the outer bladder (OB) surface, assuming the bladder wall (BW) is either of constant thickness, constant volume or variable volume. Methods: 14 prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy patients with 2 planning CTs were identified. For both CTs, OB was delineated using model-based segmentation. IB was delineated manually. Then, using uniform contractions from OB, the position of IB was approximated using a: 2.5-mm contraction, patient-specific contraction, patient-specific constant wall volume method and variable wall volume method. The structures created using those strategies were compared against the manual IB contours using geometric and dosimetric indices. Results: In the presence of variable bladder filling, use of a generic or patient-specific constant contraction resulted in a significant overestimation of IB volume (+12 and +13 cm3, respectively; p < 0.001) that was inversely correlated with the difference in urine volume between the scans (R2 > 0.86). Mean differences across 95% of IB surfaces were ≤2 mm for methods using either constant or variable wall volume. Mean dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences were <1 cm3 across the whole BW DVH when using the method that assumed a variable wall volume. Conclusion: The variable volume BW model provided the best approximation of the IB surface position under varying filling conditions, based on geometric and dosimetric indices. Advances in knowledge: Use of the equation derived in this research provides a quick and accurate method to delineate the hollow BW on serial imaging for the purposes of dose reconstruction. PMID:26206519

  8. Turbine airfoil with dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure

    DOEpatents

    Campbell; Christian X. , Morrison; Jay A.

    2011-12-20

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a compliant structure. The compliant structure may be configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand without limitation by the inner layer. The compliant structure may be formed from a plurality of pedestals positioned generally parallel with each other. The pedestals may include a first foot attached to a first end of the pedestal and extending in a first direction aligned with the outer layer, and may include a second foot attached to a second end of the pedestal and extending in a second direction aligned with the inner layer.

  9. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS FOR GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN THE OUTER HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Song; Ma Jun

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, we present internal surface brightness profiles, using images in the F606W and F814W filter bands observed with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, for 10 globular clusters (GCs) in the outer halo of M31. Standard King models are fitted to the profiles to derive their structural and dynamical parameters. The results show that, in general, the properties of clusters in M31 and the Milky Way fall in the same regions of parameter spaces. The outer halo GCs of M31 have larger ellipticities than most of the GCs in M31 and the Milky Way. Their large ellipticities may be due to galaxy tides coming from satellite dwarf galaxies of M31 or may be related to the apparently more vigorous accretion or merger history that M31 has experienced. The tight correlation of cluster binding energy E{sub b} with mass M{sub mod} indicates that the 'fundamental plane' does exist for clusters, regardless of their host environments, which is consistent with previous studies.

  10. Patterns of morphological variation in enamel–dentin junction and outer enamel surface of human molars

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Wataru; Yano, Wataru; Nagaoka, Tomohito; Abe, Mikiko; Ohshima, Hayato; Nakatsukasa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Tooth crown patterning is governed by the growth and folding of the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) and the following enamel deposition forms outer enamel surface (OES). We hypothesized that overall dental crown shape and covariation structure are determined by processes that configurate shape at the enamel–dentine junction (EDJ), the developmental vestige of IEE. This this hypothesis was tested by comparing patterns of morphological variation between EDJ and OES in human permanent maxillary first molar (UM1) and deciduous second molar (um2). Using geometric morphometric methods, we described morphological variation and covariation between EDJ and OES, and evaluated the strength of two components of phenotypic variability, canalization and morphological integration, in addition to the relevant evolutionary flexibility, i.e. the ability to respond to selective pressure. The strength of covariation between EDJ and OES was greater in um2 than in UM1, and the way that multiple traits covary between EDJ and OES was different between these teeth. The variability analyses showed that EDJ had less shape variation and a higher level of morphological integration than OES, which indicated that canalization and morphological integration acted as developmental constraints. These tendencies were greater in UM1 than in um2. On the other hand, EDJ and OES had a comparable level of evolvability in these teeth. Amelogenesis could play a significant role in tooth shape and covariation structure, and its influence was not constant among teeth, which may be responsible for the differences in the rate and/or period of enamel formation. PMID:24689536

  11. Structure of the outer membrane complex of a type IV secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Vidya; Fronzes, Rémi; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Cronin, Nora; Navaza, Jorge; Waksman, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Type IV secretion systems are secretion nanomachines spanning the two membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Three proteins, VirB7, VirB9, and VirB10 assemble into a 1.05 MDa core spanning the inner and outer membranes. This core consists of 14 copies of each of the proteins and forms two layers, the I and O layers, inserting in the inner and outer membrane, respectively. Here we present the crystal structure of a ~0.6 MDa outer membrane complex containing the entire O-layer. This structure is the largest determined for an outer membrane channel and is also unprecedented in being composed of three proteins. Unexpectedly, this structure identifies VirB10 as the outer membrane channel with a unique hydrophobic double helical trans-membrane region. This structure establishes VirB10 as the only known protein crossing both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Comparison of the cryo-EM and crystallographic structures point to conformational changes regulating channel opening and closing. PMID:19946264

  12. Permanent hydrophilization of outer and inner surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes using ambient air plasma generated by surface dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pavliňák, D.; Galmiz, O.; Zemánek, M.; Brablec, A.; Čech, J.; Černák, M.

    2014-10-13

    We present an atmospheric pressure ambient air plasma technique developed for technically simple treatment of inner and/or outer surfaces of plastic tubes and other hollow dielectric bodies. It is based on surface dielectric barrier discharge generating visually diffuse plasma layers along the treated dielectric surfaces using water-solution electrodes. The observed visual uniformity and measured plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures of 333 K and 2350 K indicate that the discharge can be readily applied to material surface treatment without significant thermal effect. This is exemplified by the obtained permanent surface hydrophilization of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes related to the replacement of a high fraction (more than 80%) of the surface fluorine determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A tentative explanation of the discharge mechanism based on high-speed camera observations and the discharge current and voltage of measurements is outlined.

  13. [Function of surface membrane structures in Thiobacillus thiooxidans].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, T A; Karavaĭko, G I

    1975-01-01

    The function of the surface membrane structures was studied with cytochemical techniques on ultrathin sections of Thiobacillus thiooxidans. The transport of elementary sulphur inside the cell involves the surface membrane structures, while oxidation of the sulphur to sulphuric acid takes place on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. The surface membrane structures are supposed also to participate in the primary dissolution of elementary sulphur at the site of contact of the cells with the mineral.

  14. Interaction of outer envelope proteins of Chlamydia psittaci GPIC with the HeLa cell surface.

    PubMed

    Ting, L M; Hsia, R C; Haidaris, C G; Bavoil, P M

    1995-09-01

    The chlamydial life cycle involves the intimate interaction of components of the infectious elementary body (EB) surface with receptors on the susceptible eukaryotic cell plasma membrane. We have developed an in vitro ligand binding assay system for the identification and characterization of detergent-extracted EB envelope proteins capable of binding to glutaraldehyde-fixed HeLa cell surfaces. With this assay, the developmentally regulated cysteine-rich envelope protein Omp2 of Chlamydia psittaci strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis was shown to bind specifically to HeLa cells. HeLa cells bound Omp2 selectively over other cell wall-associated proteins, including the major outer membrane protein, and the binding of Omp2 was abolished under conditions which alter its conformation. Furthermore, trypsin treatment, which reduces EB adherence, resulted in the proteolytic removal of a small terminal peptide of Omp2 at the EB surface and inactivated Omp2 in the ligand binding assay, while having a negligible effect on the major outer membrane protein. Collectively, our results suggest that Omp2 possesses the capacity to engage in a specific interaction with the host eukaryotic cell. We speculate that, since Omp2 is present only in the infectious EB form, the observed in vitro interaction may be representative of a determining step of the chlamydial pathogenic process.

  15. Surface current patterns suggested by suspended sediment distribution over the outer continental margin, Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Herman A.; Carlson, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of total suspended matter (TSM) were collected at the surface over the northern outer continental margin of the Bering Sea during the summers of 1980 and 1981. Volume concentrations of surface TSM averaged 0.6 and 1.1 mg l-1 for 1980 and 1981, respectively. Organic matter, largely plankton, made up about 65% of the near-surface TSM for both years. Distributions of TSM suggested that shelf circulation patterns were characterized either by meso- and large- scale eddies or by cross-shelf components of flow superimposed on a general northwesterly net drift. These patterns may be caused by large submarine canyons which dominate the physiography of this part of the Bering Sea continental margin. ?? 1987.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment requires understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate the electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the outer leaflet-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed the electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. The association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides. PMID:26207769

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kurt H; Gunsolus, Ian L; Kuech, Thomas R; Troiano, Julianne M; Melby, Eric S; Lohse, Samuel E; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B; Murphy, Catherine J; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M; Haynes, Christy L; Pedersen, Joel A

    2015-09-01

    Design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment requires understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate the electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the outer leaflet-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed the electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. The association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  18. One-Dimensional Electric Field Structure of an Outer Gap Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Bo; Zhang, Li

    2006-10-01

    We re-study the one-dimensional electric field structure of an outer gap accelerator by considering the physical limit of trans-field height. Inside the outer gap, the charge depletion creates a large electric field along the magnetic field lines. Electrons and/or positrons are accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies by this longitudinal electric field, and then radiate γ-ray photons by curvature radiation. The collision of these γ-rays and ambient x-ray photons further produce radiating particles, resulting in a stationary gap. We solve the structure of this longitudinal electric field together with the distributions of electrons and positrons and γ-ray photons for an aligned rotator. Our results indicate that the outer gap can extend to the light cylinder using reasonable parameters.

  19. The Design and Structure of Outer Membrane Receptors from Peroxisomes, Mitochondria, and Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Whelan, James; Vrielink, Alice

    2015-10-01

    The eukaryotic cell is defined by compartments that allow specialization of function. This compartmental structure generates a new concept in cell biology compared with the simpler prokaryotic cell structure, namely the specific targeting of proteins to intracellular compartments. Protein targeting is achieved by the action of specialized signals on proteins destined for organelles that are recognized by cognate receptors. An understanding of the specificity of targeting signal recognition leading to import requires an understanding of the receptor structures. Here, we focus on the structures of receptors of different import machineries located on the outer membrane of three organelles: peroxisomes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. This review provides an overview of the structural features of outer membrane import receptors that recognize targeting signals. Finally, we briefly discuss combinatorial approaches that might aid in understanding the structural factors mediating receptor targeting signal recognition.

  20. Surface mineralogy of Trojan asteroids and extinct comets as a proxy for the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, James R.; Cruikshank, Dale; Emery, Joshua

    2006-05-01

    We propose to use IRS to observe emission spectra a suite of Trojan asteroids and extinct Jupiter family comets (JFCs). The goals of this work are to determine their surface compositions and to gain information on their surface microstructures; both factors influence the spectra of these airless bodies in the thermal infrared region covered by IRS. Trojan asteroids and extinct JFCs are thought, on dynamical grounds, to have originated in the outer Solar System, beyond Jupiter. The small bodies that accreted in the outer Solar System carry compositional information of the contents of the solar nebula in the region where silicates, organics, and ices inherited from the interstellar medium were largely preserved because of the low temperature. Because all but a very few of the objects that presently remain in the distant Solar System (the Kuiper Belt Objects) are too small and faint for mid-IR spectroscopy, the study the Trojans and JFCs is essential to characterize the compositions of a class of object that is otherwise unobservable.

  1. Defects in the MITF(mi/mi) apical surface are associated with a failure of outer segment elongation.

    PubMed

    Bumsted, K M; Rizzolo, L J; Barnstable, C J

    2001-09-01

    The loss of MITF function in the MITF(mi/mi)mouse affects not only RPE differentiation, but also the development of rod photoreceptor outer segments. Our data indicate that opsin immunoreactivity is detected in the cell membrane and along the ONL/RPE border of developing MITF(mi/mi)rod photoreceptors and that rod outer segment morphogenesis is initiated. Although molecules associated with the outer segment continued to be expressed, outer segments did not elongate and develop stacked organized discs perpendicular to the RPE. The MITF(mi/mi)RPE also failed to form apical microvilli and lacked the apical network of the phosphoprotein ezrin seen in wild type tissue. The MITF(mi/mi)RPE basal surface was loosely organized and retained ezrin labelling which indicated some degree of differentiation. The correlation seen in our data suggest that there may be a link between the failure of the RPE apical domain to form and lack of rod outer segment elongation.

  2. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  3. Prediction of structural features and application to outer membrane protein identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renxiang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Lanqing; Yan, Feidi; Xue, Xiaoyu; Cai, Weiwen

    2015-06-01

    Protein three-dimensional (3D) structures provide insightful information in many fields of biology. One-dimensional properties derived from 3D structures such as secondary structure, residue solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles are helpful to protein function prediction, fold recognition and ab initio folding. Here, we predict various structural features with the assistance of neural network learning. Based on an independent test dataset, protein secondary structure prediction generates an overall Q3 accuracy of ~80%. Meanwhile, the prediction of relative solvent accessibility obtains the highest mean absolute error of 0.164, and prediction of residue depth achieves the lowest mean absolute error of 0.062. We further improve the outer membrane protein identification by including the predicted structural features in a scoring function using a simple profile-to-profile alignment. The results demonstrate that the accuracy of outer membrane protein identification can be improved by ~3% at a 1% false positive level when structural features are incorporated. Finally, our methods are available as two convenient and easy-to-use programs. One is PSSM-2-Features for predicting secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, residue depth and backbone torsion angles, the other is PPA-OMP for identifying outer membrane proteins from proteomes.

  4. A Miniaturized Seismometer for Surface Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.; Pike, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Seismology is a powerful tool for investigating the inner structure and dynamic processes of a planetary body. The interior structure information derived from seismic measurements is complementary to other methods of probing the subsurface (such as gravity and electromagnetics), both in terms of spatial and depth resolution and the relevant types of material properties being sensed. The propagation of seismic waves is sensitive to composition (via density and elastic parameters), temperature (via attenuation) and physical state (solid vs. liquid). In addition, the seismicity (level and distribution in space and time of seismic activity) provides information on the impact flux and tectonic forces currently active within the body. The major satellites of the outer solar system provide obvious targets for seismic investigations. In addition, small bodies, such as asteroids and comets, can also benefit from seismic measurements. We have developed an extremely small, lightweight, low-power seismometer for planetary applications which is ideally suited for use in the outer solar system. This instrument has previously been proposed and selected for use on a comet (on the Rosetta Lander, subsequently deselected for programmatic reasons) and Mars (on the NetLander mission). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshiki; Minami, Masayo; Onbe, Shin; Sakamoto, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshio; Imamura, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

  6. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site

    PubMed Central

    MIYATA, Yoshiki; MINAMI, Masayo; ONBE, Shin; SAKAMOTO, Minoru; MATSUZAKI, Hiroyuki; NAKAMURA, Toshio; IMAMURA, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 14C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis. PMID:21986315

  7. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  8. Detection of Campylobacter on the outer surface of retail broiler meat packages and from the exudate within

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work has suggested that outer surfaces of retail broiler meat packaging may be contaminated with Campylobacter presenting a potential hazard to the consumer through direct transfer or by cross contamination of other products or surfaces. The objectives of this study were to measure the pre...

  9. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; et al

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) andmore » second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.« less

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Density and Structure Govern the Extent and Distance of Nanoparticle Interaction with Actual and Model Bacterial Outer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Kuech, Thomas R.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Melby, Eric S.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Chrisler, William B.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Orr, Galya; Geiger, Franz M.; Haynes, Christy L.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2015-07-24

    We report that design of nanomedicines and nanoparticle-based antimicrobial and antifouling formulations, and assessment of the potential implications of nanoparticle release into the environment require understanding nanoparticle interaction with bacterial surfaces. Here we demonstrate electrostatically driven association of functionalized nanoparticles with lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes and find that lipopolysaccharide structure influences the extent and location of binding relative to the lipid-solution interface. By manipulating the lipopolysaccharide content in Shewanella oneidensis outer membranes, we observed electrostatically driven interaction of cationic gold nanoparticles with the lipopolysaccharide-containing leaflet. We probed this interaction by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and second harmonic generation (SHG) using solid-supported lipopolysaccharide-containing bilayers. Association of cationic nanoparticles increased with lipopolysaccharide content, while no association of anionic nanoparticles was observed. The harmonic-dependence of QCM-D measurements suggested that a population of the cationic nanoparticles was held at a distance from the outer leaflet-solution interface of bilayers containing smooth lipopolysaccharides (those bearing a long O-polysaccharide). Additionally, smooth lipopolysaccharides held the bulk of the associated cationic particles outside of the interfacial zone probed by SHG. Lastly, our results demonstrate that positively charged nanoparticles are more likely to interact with Gram-negative bacteria than are negatively charged particles, and this interaction occurs primarily through lipopolysaccharides.

  11. Origin and development of recurrent dipolar vorticity structures in the outer Ría de Vigo (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedracoba, S.; Rosón, G.; Varela, R. A.,

    2016-04-01

    Two short-range (46 MHz) Coastal Ocean Dynamics Application Radar (CODAR) SeaSonde HF were operating in the Ría de Vigo during one year between September 2012 and August 2013 to permit observations of the surface circulation in the outer region of the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain). An analysis of low-pass current and vorticity conducted over one year revealed two opposite vorticity structures in the HF radar coverage area. Simultaneously, wind stress and its curl, calculated at two meteorological stations (Cíes and Borneira) in the HF radar coverage area, were assessed to establish the main mechanisms promoting the formation of these two opposite vorticity structures. Researchers selected three periods of 58, 41.5, and 77 days within the study year in which radar and wind data were simultaneously recorded at two stations. Examining HF radar vorticity at specific grid points representing both vorticity structures reveals a greater correlation between HF radar vorticity and the y-component of wind stress at the outermost meteorological station (Cíes) for all periods (R=0.52-0.80).Only one period (1 Sep-28 Oct 2012) displayed a correlation between the vorticity and the curl wind stress calculated at these two meteorological stations (R=0.50-0.62). Once wind forcing has been reported as the main factor responsible for generating these dipolar vorticity structures at subtidal frequencies, these structures can be shown to develop in two patterns: (1) counter-clockwise and clockwise relative vorticity in the northern and southern outer ría respectively, mainly developing during the transition from upwelling to downwelling, and with a lifetime normally dependent to the duration of the subsequent downwelling/relaxation conditions; and (2) clockwise and counter-clockwise vorticity in the northern and southern outer ría respectively, mainly generated during moderate or intense upwelling events. The life span of these vorticity structures ranges from 2 to 8 days. The largest

  12. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutronmore » reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.« less

  13. Effect of Divalent Cation Removal on the Structure of Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Models

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Luke A.; Skoda, Maximilian W. A.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ciesielski, Filip; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2014-12-09

    The Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (GNB-OM) is asymmetric in its lipid composition with a phospholipid-rich inner leaflet and an outer leaflet predominantly composed of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS are polyanionic molecules, with numerous phosphate groups present in the lipid A and core oligosaccharide regions. The repulsive forces due to accumulation of the negative charges are screened and bridged by the divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) that are known to be crucial for the integrity of the bacterial OM. Indeed, chelation of divalent cations is a well-established method to permeabilize Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli. Here, we use X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XRR and NR, respectively) techniques to examine the role of calcium ions in the stability of a model GNB-OM. Using XRR we show that Ca2+ binds to the core region of the rough mutant LPS (RaLPS) films, producing more ordered structures in comparison to divalent cation free monolayers. Using recently developed solid-supported models of the GNB-OM, we study the effect of calcium removal on the asymmetry of DPPC:RaLPS bilayers. We show that without the charge screening effect of divalent cations, the LPS is forced to overcome the thermodynamically unfavorable energy barrier and flip across the hydrophobic bilayer to minimize the repulsive electrostatic forces, resulting in about 20% mixing of LPS and DPPC between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. These results reveal for the first time the molecular details behind the well-known mechanism of outer membrane stabilization by divalent cations. This confirms the relevance of the asymmetric models for future studies of outer membrane stability and antibiotic penetration.

  14. Tropical cyclone outer surface winds derived from satellite microwave sounder data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, S. Q.; Gray, W. M.; Vonder Haar, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    Upper tropospheric temperature anomalies are detected in brightness temperature data from the Nimbus 6 Scanning Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS). Brightness temperature anomalies are related to surface pressure anomalies through the radiative transfer and hydrostatic equation. Surface wind speeds at outer radii are then estimated using the gradient wind equation and a shearing parameter. The method is first tested using simulated satellite data constructed from temperature, pressure and height data recorded by aircraft reconnaissance of four hurricanes. Wind speeds in the 80-95 kPa region are estimated with 2-3 m/sec accuracy. Next, 55.45 GHz SCAMS data over eight typhoons during 1975 are used to estimate the radii of 15.4 m/sec (30 kt) and 27.5 m/sec (50 kt) winds. Accuracies of about + or - 80 and + or - 70 km, respectively, are found. It is suggested that the technique be further tested using data from the Microwave Sounding Unit on board the TIROS-N and NOAA 6 satellites.

  15. Outer Surface Protein A Protects Lyme Disease Spirochetes from Acquired Host Immunity in the Tick Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Battisti, James M.; Bono, James L.; Rosa, Patricia A.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.; Policastro, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi alters the expression of outer surface protein (osp) genes as the bacterium cycles between ticks and mammals. OspA is produced as borreliae enter the tick vector and remains a major surface antigen during midgut colonization. To elucidate the role of OspA in the vector, we created an insertional deletion of ospA in strain B31-A3. The ospA mutant infects mice when it is injected intradermally and is acquired by larval ticks fed on these mice, where it persists through the molt to the nymph stage. Bacterial survival rates in artificially infected tick larvae fed on naïve mice were compared with those in the vector fed on immune mice. The ospA mutant proliferates in larvae if it is exposed to blood from naïve mice, but it declines in density after larval feeding if the blood is from immune mice. When uninfected larvae are fed on B-cell-deficient mice infected with the ospA mutant, larvae show borrelial densities and persistence that are significantly greater than those fed on infected, immunocompetent mice. We conclude that OspA serves a critical antibody-shielding role during vector blood meal uptake from immune hosts and is not required for persistence in the tick vector. PMID:18779341

  16. Simultaneous and long-lasting hydrophilization of inner and outer wall surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes by transferring atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Faze; Song, Jinlong; Huang, Shuai; Xu, Sihao; Xia, Guangqing; Yang, Dezheng; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Plasma hydrophilization is a general method to increase the surface free energy of materials. However, only a few works about plasma modification focus on the hydrophilization of tube inner and outer walls. In this paper, we realize simultaneous and long-lasting plasma hydrophilization on the inner and outer walls of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes by atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs). Specifically, an Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to modify the PTFE tube’s outer wall and meanwhile to induce transferred He APP inside the PTFE tube to modify its inner wall surface. The optical emission spectrum (OES) shows that the plasmas contain many chemically active species, which are known as enablers for various applications. Water contact angle (WCA) measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to characterize the plasma hydrophilization. Results demonstrate that the wettability of the tube walls are well improved due to the replacement of the surface fluorine by oxygen and the change of surface roughness. The obtained hydrophilicity decreases slowly during more than 180 d aging, indicating a long-lasting hydrophilization. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of transferring APPs for surface modification of the tube’s inner and outer walls simultaneously.

  17. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Green, Janet; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Roeder, James; Kwan, Betty; Mulligan Skov, Tamitha

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  18. Xylella fastidiosa outer membrane vesicles modulate plant colonization by blocking attachment to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Michael; Zaini, Paulo A; Baccari, Clelia; Tran, Sophia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-09-16

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied intensively in recent years, primarily in their role in delivering virulence factors and antigens during pathogenesis. However, the near ubiquity of their production suggests that they may play other roles, such as responding to envelope stress or trafficking various cargoes to prevent dilution or degradation by other bacterial species. Here we show that OMVs produced by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, block its interaction with various surfaces such as the walls of xylem vessels in host plants. The release of OMVs was suppressed by the diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum-sensing system, and a X. fastidiosa ΔrpfF mutant in which quorum signaling was disrupted was both much more virulent to plants and less adhesive to glass and plant surfaces than the WT strain. The higher virulence of the ΔrpfF mutant was associated with fivefold higher numbers of OMVs recovered from xylem sap of infected plants. The frequency of attachment of X. fastidiosa to xylem vessels was 20-fold lower in the presence of OMVs than in their absence. OMV production thus is a strategy used by X. fastidiosa cells to adjust attachment to surfaces in its transition from adhesive cells capable of insect transmission to an "exploratory" lifestyle for systemic spread within the plant host which would be hindered by attachment. OMV production may contribute to the movement of other bacteria in porous environments by similarly reducing their contact with environmental constituents. PMID:25197068

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  20. Models of Organic-Rich Surfaces in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Peter Derrick

    This thesis applies light-scattering theory along with recently-measured optical constants of astronomically-interesting organic materials in an attempt to understand the surfaces of representative organic-rich bodies in the outer Solar System. any other object in the Solar System. The Centaur 5145 Pholus has a visible and near-ir spectrum redder than Its color can be reproduced by an intraparticle mixture of water ice, Titan tholin, and either astronomical silicate or polymerized hydrogen cyanide. The solar UV flux, combined with surface gardening by micrometeoroids, will convert all carbon-bearing ices to dark organic solids in the top millimeter of Kuiper Belt Objects in ~107 yrs. Initially red, further irradiation makes the surface more neutral. If impacts expose fresh ice over a large fraction of the object's surface on a similar time scale, an average red color may be retained. The color diversity observed in the Centaur and Kuiper Belt populations thus can be explained by a variation in the average exposure ages of their surfaces. The dark material on the leading hemisphere of Iapetus has a spectrum that is too generic, lacking in absorption features, to strongly constrain models of its composition; many mixtures of water ice, organics, and∨ silicates can reproduce its albedo and spectrum. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain why one hemisphere of Iapetus is extremely dark while the other hemisphere is very bright, but this thesis finds major flaws in most of them. A scheme postulating a global, several-km-thick layer of dark material covered by a layer of ice ~1-m thick, but which is excavated on the leading hemisphere, works best. Finally, the impacts of the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into Jupiter left behind dark atmospheric blemishes that may be composed of organic matter. The optical constants of the blemish aerosols-as derived by others-are near-perfect matches to Murchison organic residue. The reflectances of the initial impact

  1. Bacterial social networks: structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains.

    PubMed

    Remis, Jonathan P; Wei, Dongguang; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H Ewa; Costerton, J William; Berleman, James E; Auer, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviours, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of outer membrane vesicle chains and membrane tubes that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains, and increased abundance in biofilms compared with planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including three-dimensional (3D) focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy, we determined these structures to range between 30 and 60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactoseamine carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl outer membrane proteins known to be transferable between cells in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and therefore could provide a mechanism for the coordination of social activities.

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE ON THE STRUCTURE AND EVOLUTION OF THE OORT CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Alexia R.; Quinn, Thomas; Kaib, Nathan A.

    2013-07-01

    We study the influence of outer solar system architecture on the structural evolution of the Oort Cloud (OC) and the flux of Earth-crossing comets. In particular, we seek to quantify the role of the giant planets as ''planetary protectors''. To do so, we have run simulations in each of four different planetary mass configurations to understand the significance of each of the giant planets. Because the outer planets modify the structure of the OC throughout its formation, we integrate each simulation over the full age of the solar system. Over this time, we follow the evolution of cometary orbits from their starting point in the protoplanetary disk to their injection into the OC to their possible re-entry into the inner planetary region. We find that the overall structure of the OC, including the location of boundaries and the relative number of comets in the inner and outer parts, does not change significantly between configurations; however, as planetary mass decreases, the trapping efficiency (TE) of comets into the OC and the flux of comets into the observable region increases. We determine that those comets that evolve onto Earth-crossing orbits come primarily from the inner OC but show no preference for initial protoplanetary disk location. We also find that systems that have at least a Saturn-mass object are effective at deflecting possible Earth-crossing comets but the difference in flux between systems with and without such a planet is less than an order of magnitude. We conclude by discussing the individual roles of the planets and the implications of incorporating more realistic planetary accretion and migration scenarios into simulations, particularly on existing discrepancies between low TE and the mass of the protoplanetary disk and on determining the structural boundaries of the OC.

  3. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Islands and the outer continental shelf and slope, indicates that Holocene sediment dynamics cannot be used to explain the observed distribution of surface sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. We suggest that this pattern is relict and resulted from sediment dynamics during lower sea levels of the Pleistocene. ?? 1980.

  4. Solid organic matter in the atmosphere and on the surface of outer Solar System bodies.

    PubMed

    Khare, B N; Bakes, E L; Cruikshank, D; McKay, C P

    2001-01-01

    Many bodies in the outer Solar System display the presence of low albedo materials. These materials, evident on the surface of asteroids, comets, Kuiper Belt objects and their intermediate evolutionary step, Centaurs, are related to macromolecular carbon bearing materials such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic materials such as methanol and related light hydrocarbons, embedded in a dark, refractory, photoprocessed matrix. Many planetary rings and satellites around the outer gaseous planets display such component materials. One example, Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, whose atmosphere is comprised of around 90% molecular nitrogen N2 and less than 10% methane CH4, displays this kind of low reflectivity material in its atmospheric haze. These materials were first recorded during the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of Titan and showed up as an optically thick pinkish orange haze layer. These materials are broadly classified into a chemical group whose laboratory analogs are termed "tholins", after the Greek word for "muddy". Their analogs are produced in the laboratory via the irradiation of gas mixtures and ice mixtures by radiation simulating Solar ultraviolet (UV) photons or keV charged particles simulating particles trapped in Saturn's magnetosphere. Fair analogs of Titan tholin are produced by bombarding a 9:1 mixture of N2:CH4 with charged particles and its match to observations of both the spectrum and scattering properties of the Titan haze is very good over a wide range of wavelengths. In this paper, we describe the historical background of laboratory research on this kind of organic matter and how our laboratory investigations of Titan tholin compare. We comment on the probable existence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Titan Haze and how biological and nonbiological racemic amino acids produced from the acid hydrolysis of Titan tholins make these complex organic compounds prime candidates in the evolution of terrestrial life and

  5. Spin-glass-like freezing of inner and outer surface layers in hollow γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Iglesias, Òscar; Alonso, Javier; Phan, Manh-Huong; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2015-10-01

    Disorder among surface spins is a dominant factor in the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle systems. In this work, we examine time-dependent magnetization in high-quality, monodisperse hollow maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) with a 14.8 ± 0.5 nm outer diameter and enhanced surface-to-volume ratio. The nanoparticle ensemble exhibits spin-glass-like signatures in dc magnetic aging and memory protocols and ac magnetic susceptibility. The dynamics of the system slow near 50 K, and become frozen on experimental time scales below 20 K. Remanence curves indicate the development of magnetic irreversibility concurrent with the freezing of the spin dynamics. A strong exchange-bias effect and its training behavior point to highly frustrated surface spins that rearrange much more slowly than interior spins. Monte Carlo simulations of a hollow particle corroborate strongly disordered surface layers with complex energy landscapes that underlie both glass-like dynamics and magnetic irreversibility. Calculated hysteresis loops reveal that magnetic behavior is not identical at the inner and outer surfaces, with spins at the outer surface layer of the 15 nm hollow particles exhibiting a higher degree of frustration. Our combined experimental and simulated results shed light on the origin of spin-glass-like phenomena and the important role played by the surface spins in magnetic hollow nanostructures.

  6. Spin-glass-like freezing of inner and outer surface layers in hollow γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Iglesias, Òscar; Alonso, Javier; Phan, Manh-Huong; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2015-10-27

    Disorder among surface spins largely dominates the magnetic response of ultrafine magnetic particle systems. In this work, we examine time-dependent magnetization in high-quality, monodisperse hollow maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) with a 14.8±0.5 nm outer diameter and enhanced surface-to-volume ratio. The nanoparticle ensemble exhibits spin-glass-like signatures in dc magnetic aging and memory protocols and ac magnetic susceptibility. The dynamics of the system slow near 50 K, and becomes frozen on experimental time scales below 20 K. Remanence curves indicate the development of magnetic irreversibility concurrent with the freezing of the spin dynamics. A strong exchange-bias effect and its training behavior point tomore » highly frustrated surface spins that rearrange much more slowly than interior spins with bulk coordination. Monte Carlo simulations of a hollow particle reproducing the experimental morphology corroborate strongly disordered surface layers with complex energy landscapes that underlie both glass-like dynamics and magnetic irreversibility. Calculated hysteresis loops reveal that magnetic behavior is not identical at the inner and outer surfaces, with spins at the outer surface layer of the 15 nm hollow particles exhibiting a higher degree of frustration. Lastly, our combined experimental and simulated results shed light on the origin of spin-glass-like phenomena and the important role played by the surface spins in magnetic hollow nanostructures.« less

  7. Spin-glass-like freezing of inner and outer surface layers in hollow γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Iglesias, Òscar; Alonso, Javier; Phan, Manh-Huong; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    Disorder among surface spins is a dominant factor in the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle systems. In this work, we examine time-dependent magnetization in high-quality, monodisperse hollow maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) with a 14.8 ± 0.5 nm outer diameter and enhanced surface-to-volume ratio. The nanoparticle ensemble exhibits spin-glass-like signatures in dc magnetic aging and memory protocols and ac magnetic susceptibility. The dynamics of the system slow near 50 K, and become frozen on experimental time scales below 20 K. Remanence curves indicate the development of magnetic irreversibility concurrent with the freezing of the spin dynamics. A strong exchange-bias effect and its training behavior point to highly frustrated surface spins that rearrange much more slowly than interior spins. Monte Carlo simulations of a hollow particle corroborate strongly disordered surface layers with complex energy landscapes that underlie both glass-like dynamics and magnetic irreversibility. Calculated hysteresis loops reveal that magnetic behavior is not identical at the inner and outer surfaces, with spins at the outer surface layer of the 15 nm hollow particles exhibiting a higher degree of frustration. Our combined experimental and simulated results shed light on the origin of spin-glass-like phenomena and the important role played by the surface spins in magnetic hollow nanostructures. PMID:26503506

  8. Spin-glass-like freezing of inner and outer surface layers in hollow γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Iglesias, Òscar; Alonso, Javier; Phan, Manh-Huong; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2015-01-01

    Disorder among surface spins is a dominant factor in the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle systems. In this work, we examine time-dependent magnetization in high-quality, monodisperse hollow maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) with a 14.8 ± 0.5 nm outer diameter and enhanced surface-to-volume ratio. The nanoparticle ensemble exhibits spin-glass-like signatures in dc magnetic aging and memory protocols and ac magnetic susceptibility. The dynamics of the system slow near 50 K, and become frozen on experimental time scales below 20 K. Remanence curves indicate the development of magnetic irreversibility concurrent with the freezing of the spin dynamics. A strong exchange-bias effect and its training behavior point to highly frustrated surface spins that rearrange much more slowly than interior spins. Monte Carlo simulations of a hollow particle corroborate strongly disordered surface layers with complex energy landscapes that underlie both glass-like dynamics and magnetic irreversibility. Calculated hysteresis loops reveal that magnetic behavior is not identical at the inner and outer surfaces, with spins at the outer surface layer of the 15 nm hollow particles exhibiting a higher degree of frustration. Our combined experimental and simulated results shed light on the origin of spin-glass-like phenomena and the important role played by the surface spins in magnetic hollow nanostructures. PMID:26503506

  9. SMALL MAGNETIC LOOPS CONNECTING THE QUIET SURFACE AND THE HOT OUTER ATMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2010-05-01

    Sunspots are the most spectacular manifestation of solar magnetism, yet 99% of the solar surface remains 'quiet' at any time of the solar cycle. The quiet sun is not void of magnetic fields, though; they are organized at smaller spatial scales and evolve relatively fast, which makes them difficult to detect. Thus, although extensive quiet Sun magnetism would be a natural driver to a uniform, steady heating of the outer solar atmosphere, it is not clear what the physical processes involved would be, due to lack of observational evidence. We report on the topology and dynamics of the magnetic field in very quiet regions of the Sun from spectropolarimetric observations of the Hinode satellite, showing a continuous injection of magnetic flux with a well-organized topology of {omega}-loop from below the solar surface into the upper layers. At first stages, when the loop travels across the photosphere, it has a flattened (staple-like) geometry and a mean velocity ascent of {approx}3 km s{sup -1}. When the loop crosses the minimum temperature region, the magnetic fields at the footpoints become almost vertical and the loop topology resembles a potential field. The mean ascent velocity at chromospheric height is {approx}12 km s{sup -1}. The energy input rate of these small-scale loops in the lower boundary of the chromosphere is (at least) of 1.4 x 10{sup 6}-2.2 x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Our findings provide empirical evidence for solar magnetism as a multi-scale system, in which small-scale low-flux magnetism plays a crucial role, at least as important as active regions, coupling different layers of the solar atmosphere and being an important ingredient for chromospheric and coronal heating models.

  10. From Constructs to Crystals - Towards Structure Determination of β-barrel Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Mayclin, Stephen; Stanley, Ann M; Jao, Christine C; Buchanan, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins serve important functions in cells such as nutrient transport, motility, signaling, survival and virulence, yet constitute only ~1% percent of known structures. There are two types of membrane proteins, α-helical and β-barrel. While α-helical membrane proteins can be found in nearly all cellular membranes, β-barrel membrane proteins can only be found in the outer membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts, and Gram-negative bacteria. One common bottleneck in structural studies of membrane proteins in general is getting enough pure sample for analysis. In hopes of assisting those interested in solving the structure of their favorite β-barrel outer membrane protein (OMP), general protocols are presented for the production of target β-barrel OMPs at levels useful for structure determination by either X-ray crystallography and/or NMR spectroscopy. Here, we outline construct design for both native expression and for expression into inclusion bodies, purification using an affinity tag, and crystallization using detergent screening, bicelle, and lipidic cubic phase techniques. These protocols have been tested and found to work for most OMPs from Gram-negative bacteria; however, there are some targets, particularly for mitochondria and chloroplasts that may require other methods for expression and purification. As such, the methods here should be applicable for most projects that involve OMPs from Gram-negative bacteria, yet the expression levels and amount of purified sample will vary depending on the target OMP. PMID:27404000

  11. Structure of BamA, an essential factor in outer membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Faulstich, Michaela; Bermejo, Ivan; Rudel, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Zeth, Kornelius

    2014-06-01

    Outer membrane protein (OMP) biogenesis is an essential process for maintaining the bacterial cell envelope and involves the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) for OMP recognition, folding and assembly. In Escherichia coli this function is orchestrated by five proteins: the integral outer membrane protein BamA of the Omp85 superfamily and four associated lipoproteins. To unravel the mechanism underlying OMP folding and insertion, the structure of the E. coli BamA β-barrel and P5 domain was determined at 3 Å resolution. These data add information beyond that provided in the recently published crystal structures of BamA from Haemophilus ducreyi and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and are a valuable basis for the interpretation of pertinent functional studies. In an `open' conformation, E. coli BamA displays a significant degree of flexibility between P5 and the barrel domain, which is indicative of a multi-state function in substrate transfer. E. coli BamA is characterized by a discontinuous β-barrel with impaired β1-β16 strand interactions denoted by only two connecting hydrogen bonds and a disordered C-terminus. The 16-stranded barrel surrounds a large cavity which implies a function in OMP substrate binding and partial folding. These findings strongly support a mechanism of OMP biogenesis in which substrates are partially folded inside the barrel cavity and are subsequently released laterally into the lipid bilayer. PMID:24914988

  12. Multifunctional and Redundant Roles of Borrelia burgdorferi Outer Surface Proteins in Tissue Adhesion, Colonization, and Complement Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Jennifer A.; Coburn, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease in the U.S., with at least 25,000 cases reported to the CDC each year. B. burgdorferi is thought to enter and exit the bloodstream to achieve rapid dissemination to distal tissue sites during infection. Travel through the bloodstream requires evasion of immune surveillance and pathogen clearance in the host, a process at which B. burgdorferi is adept. B. burgdorferi encodes greater than 19 adhesive outer surface proteins many of which have been found to bind to host cells or components of the extracellular matrix. Several others bind to host complement regulatory factors, in vitro. Production of many of these adhesive proteins is tightly regulated by environmental cues, and some have been shown to aid in vascular interactions and tissue colonization, as well as survival in the blood, in vivo. Recent work has described multifaceted and redundant roles of B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins in complement component interactions and tissue targeted adhesion and colonization, distinct from their previously identified in vitro binding capabilities. Recent insights into the multifunctional roles of previously well-characterized outer surface proteins such as BBK32, DbpA, CspA, and OspC have changed the way we think about the surface proteome of these organisms during the tick–mammal life cycle. With the combination of new and old in vivo models and in vitro techniques, the field has identified distinct ligand binding domains on BBK32 and DbpA that afford tissue colonization or blood survival to B. burgdorferi. In this review, we describe the multifunctional and redundant roles of many adhesive outer surface proteins of B. burgdorferi in tissue adhesion, colonization, and bloodstream survival that, together, promote the survival of Borrelia spp. throughout maintenance in their multi-host lifestyle.

  13. Laboratory Studies of Ethane Ice Relevant to Outer Solar System Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie; Raines, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs Makemake (2045 FYg), Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. However, even though this molecule is found on several outer Solar System objects relatively little information is available about its amorphous and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System, and have heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry using mid-IR spectroscopy (2.2 - 16.6 microns). Included in our work is the meta-stable phase that exists at 35 - 55 K. These results, including newly obtained optical constants, are relevant to ground-based observational campaigns, the New Horizons mission, and supporting laboratory work. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer Solar System.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Simpson, Brent W; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Simpson, Brent W.; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370939

  16. Analyses of a steel containment vessel with an outer contact structure under severe internal overpressurization conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, V.L.

    1993-12-31

    Many Mark-I and Mark-II BWR plants are designed with a steel vessel as the primary containment. Typically, the steel containment vessel (SCV) is enclosed within a reinforced concrete shield building with only a small gap (50--90mm) separating the two structures. This paper describes finite element analyses performed to evaluate the effects of contact and friction between a steel containment vessel and an outer contact structure when the containment vessel is subjected to large internal pressures. These computations were motivated by a joint program on containment integrity involving the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories for testing model containments.

  17. Bioinspired structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-24

    Nature has evolved objects with desired functionality using commonly found materials. Nature capitalizes on hierarchical structures to achieve functionality. The understanding of the functions provided by objects and processes found in nature can guide us to produce nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes with desirable functionality. Various natural objects which provide functionality of commercial interest have been characterized to understand how a natural object provides functionality. We have modeled and fabricated structures in the lab using nature's route and developed optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, optimum structures have been fabricated using smart materials and fabrication techniques. This feature article provides an overview of four topics: Lotus effect, rose petal effect, gecko feet, and shark skin.

  18. Structural Changes of Inner and Outer Choroid in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Determined by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Shozo; Sakamoto, Taiji; Kuroiwa, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Noboru; Kawano, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Naoya; Yamashita, Takehiro; Uchino, Eisuke; Kinoshita, Takamasa; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the structural changes of the choroid in eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) by enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT). Methods A retrospective comparative study was performed at two academic institutions. Forty eyes with CSC, their fellow eyes, and 40 eyes of age-matched controls were studied. Subfoveal cross sectional EDI-OCT images were recorded, and the hypo reflective and hyperreflective areas of the inner and outer choroid in the EDI-OCT images were separately measured. The images were analyzed by a binarization method to determine the sizes of the hyporeflective and hyperreflective areas. Results In the inner choroid, the hyperreflective area was significantly larger in the CSC eyes (35,640±10,229 μm2) than the fellow eyes (22,908±8,522 μm2) and the control eyes (20,630±8,128 μm2; P<0.01 vs control for both, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In the outer choroid, the hyporeflective area was significantly larger in the CSC eyes (446,549±121,214 μm2) than the control eyes (235,680±97,352 μm2, P<0.01). The average ratio of the hyporeflective area to the total choroidal area was smaller in the CSC eyes (67.0%) than the fellow eyes (76.5%) and the control eyes (76.7%) in the inner choroid (P<0.01, both). However, the ratio was larger in the CSC eyes (75.2%) and fellow eyes (71.7%) than in the control eyes (64.7%) in the outer choroid (P<0.01, both). Conclusions The larger hyperreflective area in the inner choroid is related to the inflammation and edema of the stroma of the choroid in the acute stage of CSC. The larger hyporeflective areas in the outer choroid is due to a dilatation of the vascular lumens of the larger blood vessels. These are the essential characteristics of eyes with CSC regardless of the onset. PMID:27305042

  19. Laboratory Studies of Ethane Ice Relevant to Outer Solar System Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, R. L.; Raines, L.

    2009-09-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs Makemake (2005 FY9), Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. However, even though this molecule is found on several outer Solar System objects relatively little information is available about its amorphous and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System, and have heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry using mid-IR spectroscopy (2.2 - 16.6 microns). Included in our work is the meta-stable phase that exists at 35 - 55 K. These results, including newly obtained optical constants, are relevant to ground-based observational campaigns, the New Horizons mission, and supporting laboratory work. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer Solar System. This work was funded by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics, Planetary Atmospheres, and Outer Planets programs. LR was supported by a summer research internship at the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Goddard Center for Astrobiology.

  20. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Nature's fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5's active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  1. Outer Hair Cell Lateral Wall Structure Constrains the Mobility of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tetsuji; Hakizimana, Pierre; Wu, Siva; Hassan, Ahmed; Jacob, Stefan; Temirov, Jamshid; Fang, Jie; Mellado-Lagarde, Marcia; Gursky, Richard; Horner, Linda; Leibiger, Barbara; Leijon, Sara; Centonze, Victoria E.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Frase, Sharon; Auer, Manfred; Brownell, William E.; Fridberger, Anders; Zuo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Nature’s fastest motors are the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). These sensory cells use a membrane protein, Slc26a5 (prestin), to generate mechanical force at high frequencies, which is essential for explaining the exquisite hearing sensitivity of mammalian ears. Previous studies suggest that Slc26a5 continuously diffuses within the membrane, but how can a freely moving motor protein effectively convey forces critical for hearing? To provide direct evidence in OHCs for freely moving Slc26a5 molecules, we created a knockin mouse where Slc26a5 is fused with YFP. These mice and four other strains expressing fluorescently labeled membrane proteins were used to examine their lateral diffusion in the OHC lateral wall. All five proteins showed minimal diffusion, but did move after pharmacological disruption of membrane-associated structures with a cholesterol-depleting agent and salicylate. Thus, our results demonstrate that OHC lateral wall structure constrains the mobility of plasma membrane proteins and that the integrity of such membrane-associated structures are critical for Slc26a5’s active and structural roles. The structural constraint of membrane proteins may exemplify convergent evolution of cellular motors across species. Our findings also suggest a possible mechanism for disorders of cholesterol metabolism with hearing loss such as Niemann-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:26352669

  2. The Toms Canyon structure, New Jersey outer continental shelf: A possible late Eocene impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.; Poppe, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Toms Canyon structure [~20-22 km wide] is located on the New Jersey outer continental shelf beneath 80-100 m of water, and is buried by ~1 km of upper Eocene to Holocene sedimentary strata. The structure displays several characteristics typical of terrestrial impact craters (flat floor; upraised faulted rim: brecciated sedimentary fill), but several other characteristics are atypical (an unusually thin ejecta blanket; lack of an inner basin, peak ring, or central peak; bearing nearly completely filled with breccia). Seismostratigraphic and biostratigraphic analyses show that the structure formed during planktonic foraminiferal biochron P15 of the early to middle late Eocene. The fill unit is stratigraphically correlating with impact ejecta cored nearby at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 612 and at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 903 and 904 (22-35 km southeast of the Toms Canyon structure). The Toms Canyon fill unit also correlates with the Exmore breccia, which fills the much larger Chesapeake Bay impact crater (90-km diameter; 335 km to the southwest). On the basis of our analyses, we postulate that the Toms Canyon structure is an impact crater, formed when a cluster of relatively small meteorites approached the target site bearing ~N 50 E, and struck the sea floor obliquely.

  3. Structural characterization of outer membrane components of the type IV pili system in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Samta; Mościcka, Katarzyna B; Bos, Martine P; Pachulec, Emilia; Stuart, Marc C A; Keegstra, Wilko; Boekema, Egbert J; van der Does, Chris

    2011-01-31

    Structures of the type IV pili secretin complexes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis, embedded in outer membranes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Single particle averaging revealed additional domains not observed previously. Secretin complexes of N. gonorrhoeae showed a double ring structure with a 14-15-fold symmetry in the central ring, and a 14-fold symmetry of the peripheral ring with 7 spikes protruding. In secretin complexes of N. meningitidis, the spikes were absent and the peripheral ring was partly or completely lacking. When present, it had a 19-fold symmetry. The structures of the complexes in several pil mutants were determined. Structures obtained from the pilC1/C2 adhesin and the pilW minor pilin deletion strains were similar to wild-type, whereas deletion of the homologue of N. meningitidis PilW resulted in the absence of secretin structures. Remarkably, the pilE pilin subunit and pilP lipoprotein deletion mutants showed a change in the symmetry of the peripheral ring from 14 to 19 and loss of spikes. The pilF ATPase mutant also lost the spikes, but maintained 14-fold symmetry. These results show that secretin complexes contain previously unidentified large and flexible extra domains with a probable role in stabilization or assembly of type IV pili.

  4. The Growing Outer Epidermal Wall: Design and Physiological Role of a Composite Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, U.

    2008-01-01

    Background The cells of growing plant organs secrete an extracellular fibrous composite (the primary wall) that allows the turgid protoplasts to expand irreversibly via wall-yielding events, which are regulated by processes within the cytoplasm. The role of the epidermis in the control of stem elongation is described with special reference to the outer epidermal wall (OEW), which forms a ‘tensile skin’. Novel Facts The OEW is much thicker and less extensible than the walls of the inner tissues. Moreover, in the OEW the amount of cellulose per unit wall mass is considerably greater than in the inner tissues. Ultrastructural studies have shown that the expanding OEW is composed of a highly ordered internal and a diffuse outer half, with helicoidally organized cellulose microfibrils in the inner (load-bearing) region of this tension-stressed organ wall. The structural and mechanical backbone of the wall consists of helicoids, i.e. layers of parallel, inextensible cellulose microfibrils. These ‘plywood laminates’ contain crystalline ‘cables’ orientated in all directions with respect to the axis of elongation (isotropic material). Cessation of cell elongation is accompanied by a loss of order, i.e. the OEW is a dynamic structure. Helicoidally arranged extracellular polymers have also been found in certain bacteria, algae, fungi and animals. In the insect cuticle crystalline cutin nanofibrils form characteristic ‘OEW-like’ herringbone patterns. Conclusions Theoretical considerations, in vitro studies and computer simulations suggest that extracellular biological helicoids form by directed self-assembly of the crystalline biopolymers. This spontaneous generation of complex design ‘without an intelligent designer’ evolved independently in the protective ‘skin’ of plants, animals and many other organisms. PMID:18258808

  5. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus - the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  6. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut.

  7. Tick receptor for outer surface protein A from Ixodes ricinus — the first intrinsically disordered protein involved in vector-microbe recognition

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Lewandowski, Dominik; Szpotkowski, Kamil; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The tick receptor for outer surface protein A (TROSPA) is the only identified factor involved in tick gut colonization by various Borrelia species. TROSPA is localized in the gut epithelium and can recognize and bind the outer surface bacterial protein OspA via an unknown mechanism. Based on earlier reports and our latest observations, we considered that TROSPA would be the first identified intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) involved in the interaction between a vector and a pathogenic microbe. To verify this hypothesis, we performed structural studies of a TROSPA mutant from Ixodes ricinus using both computational and experimental approaches. Irrespective of the method used, we observed that the secondary structure content of the TROSPA polypeptide chain is low. In addition, the collected SAXS data indicated that this protein is highly extended and exists in solution as a set of numerous conformers. These features are all commonly considered hallmarks of IDPs. Taking advantage of our SAXS data, we created structural models of TROSPA and proposed a putative mechanism for the TROSPA-OspA interaction. The disordered nature of TROSPA may explain the ability of a wide spectrum of Borrelia species to colonize the tick gut. PMID:27112540

  8. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer-membrane protein OmpL32

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Azad; Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A.; Zuerner, Richard L.; Frank, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer-membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immune response. In this study, 2D gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS identified a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 protein, corresponding to ORF LIC11848, which undergoes extensive and differential methylation of glutamic acid residues. Immunofluorescence microscopy implicated LIC11848 as a surface-exposed outer-membrane protein, prompting the designation OmpL32. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of golden Syrian hamster liver and kidney sections revealed expression of OmpL32 during colonization of these organs. Identification of methylated surface-exposed outer-membrane proteins, such as OmpL32, provides a foundation for delineating the role of this post-translational modification in leptospiral virulence. PMID:22174381

  9. Design of LED refractive optics with predetermined balance of ray deflection angles between inner and outer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moiseev, Mikhail A; Byzov, Egor V; Kravchenko, Sergey V; Doskolovich, Leonid L

    2015-09-21

    To improve the optical performance of LED-based lighting devices, refractive optical elements are usually used. We propose a novel technique for the computation of free-form optical elements with two refractive surfaces generating the required illuminance or intensity distribution. The proposed approach makes it possible to control the balance of deflection angles between the inner and outer surfaces of the optical element. It has been proved that for the point light source, the maximal efficiency is obtained when each refractive surface performs exactly the half of the required ray deflection. As an example, a set of optical elements producing a uniformly illuminated square region is computed. Simulation of the computed designs with extended sources has shown that the most tolerant solutions to the size of the light source are obtained in the case when the inner surface performs 60-80% of the ray deflection, and the outer surface performs the remaining 20-40%. The influence of deflection balance on the size of the optical element is discussed. PMID:26406744

  10. Enzyme Design From the Bottom Up: An Active Nickel Electrocatalyst with a Structured Peptide Outer Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Reback, Matthew L.; Buchko, Garry W.; Kier, Brandon L.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Xiong, Yijia; Lense, Sheri; Hou, Jianbo; Roberts, John A.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-02-03

    Functional, peptide-containing metal complexes with a well-defined peptide structure have the potential to enhance molecular catalysts via an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of an active, peptide-based metal complex built upon the well characterized hydrogen production catalyst, Ni(PPh2NPh)2. The incorporated peptide maintains its B-hairpin structure when appended to the metal core, and the electrocatalytic activity of the peptide-based metal complex (~100,000 s-1) is fully retained. The combination of an active molecular catalyst with a structured peptide outer coordination sphere provides a scaffold that permits the incorporation of features of an enzyme-like outer-coordination sphere necessary to create molecular electrocatalysts with en-hanced functionality.

  11. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  12. OmpC-like porin from outer membrane of Yersinia enterocolitica: molecular structure and functional activity.

    PubMed

    Vostrikova, O P; Isaeva, M P; Likhatskaya, G N; Novikova, O D; Kim, N Yu; Khomenko, V A; Solov'eva, T F

    2013-05-01

    OmpC-like porin was isolated from the outer membrane (OM) of Yersinia enterocolitica cultured at 37°C (the "warm" variant) and its physicochemical and functional properties were studied. The amino acid sequence of OmpC porin was established, and the primary structure and transmembrane topology of this protein were analyzed in comparison with the OmpF porin isolated from Y. enterocolitica cultured at 6°C (the "cold" variant). Both porins of Y. enterocolitica had a high homology degree (65%) between themselves and with OmpC and OmpF porins from OM of Escherichia coli (58 and 76% homology, respectively). The secondary structure of OmpC and OmpF porins from OM of Y. enterocolitica consists of 16 β-strands connected by short "periplasmic" and longer "extracellular" loops with disordered structure, according to the topological model developed for porins of E. coli. The molecular structures of OmpC and OmpF porins of Y. enterocolitica have significant differences in the structure of the "extracellular" loops and in the position of one of three tryptophan residues. Using the bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) technique, pores formed by OmpC porin of Y. enterocolitica were shown to differ in electrophysiological characteristics from channels of OmpF protein of this microorganism. The isolated OmpC porin reconstructed into BLM displayed functional plasticity similarly to OmpF protein and nonspecific porins of other enterobacteria. The conductivity level of the channels formed by this protein in the BLM was regulated by value of the applied potential.

  13. Multimodal Characterization of Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Reveals Alterations in Outer Retinal Function and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, Grace E.; Stem, Maxwell S.; Kwark, Leon; Jackson, Gregory R.; Farsiu, Sina; Gardner, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    diffusely thinned RPE layers (p=0.031) compared to controls. Conclusions Patients with untreated PDR exhibit inner retinal dysfunction, as evidenced by reduced contrast sensitivity and FDP performance, accompanied by alterations in inner and outer retinal structure. PRP-treated patients had more profound changes in outer retinal structure and function. Distinguishing the effects of PDR and PRP may guide the development of restorative vision therapies for patients with advanced diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25601533

  14. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Optimal conditions for decorating outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes with RecA proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we estimated the optimal reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with RecA proteins by comparison with hybrids of RecA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). To react SWNTs with RecA proteins, we first prepared ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. The heights of the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids increased as the amount of RecA used in the reaction increased, as determined from atomic force microscopy images. We further confirmed the increasing adsorption of RecA proteins onto ssDNA on SWNT surfaces by agarose gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the combination of RecA proteins and ssDNA-SWNT hybrids forms RecA-ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. We also successfully controlled the amount of RecA adsorbed on the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids. Our results thus indicate the optimized reaction conditions for decorating the outer surface of SWNTs with RecA proteins, which is the key to the development of novel biosensors and nanomaterial-based bioelectronics.

  16. Silicene structures on silver surfaces.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Hanna; Vizzini, Sébastien; Kara, Abdelkader; Lalmi, Boubekeur; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we report on several structures of silicene, the analog of graphene for silicon, on the silver surfaces Ag(100), Ag(110) and Ag(111). Deposition of Si produces honeycomb structures on these surfaces. In particular, we present an extensive theoretical study of silicene on Ag(111) for which several recent experimental studies have been published. Different silicene structures were obtained only by varying the silicon coverage and/or its atomic arrangement. All the structures studied show that silicene is buckled, with a Si-Si nearest neighbor distance varying between 2.28 and 2.5 Å. Due to the buckling in the silicene sheet, the apparent (lateral) Si-Si distance can be as low as 1.89 Å. We also found that for a given coverage and symmetry, one may observe different scanning tunneling microscopy images corresponding to structures that differ by only a translation.

  17. Outer planet satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Paul M.

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon.

  18. Outer-sphere contributions to the electronic structure of type zero copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Kyle M; Zaballa, María-Eugenia; Sproules, Stephen; Sundararajan, Mahesh; DeBeer, Serena; Richards, John H; Vila, Alejandro J; Neese, Frank; Gray, Harry B

    2012-05-16

    Bioinorganic canon states that active-site thiolate coordination promotes rapid electron transfer (ET) to and from type 1 copper proteins. In recent work, we have found that copper ET sites in proteins also can be constructed without thiolate ligation (called "type zero" sites). Here we report multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic data together with density functional theory (DFT) and spectroscopy-oriented configuration interaction (SORCI) calculations for type zero Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin variants. Wild-type (type 1) and type zero copper centers experience virtually identical ligand fields. Moreover, O-donor covalency is enhanced in type zero centers relative that in the C112D (type 2) protein. At the same time, N-donor covalency is reduced in a similar fashion to type 1 centers. QM/MM and SORCI calculations show that the electronic structures of type zero and type 2 are intimately linked to the orientation and coordination mode of the carboxylate ligand, which in turn is influenced by outer-sphere hydrogen bonding.

  19. Bacterial Social Networks: Structure and composition of Myxococcus xanthus outer membrane vesicle chains

    PubMed Central

    Remis, Jonathan P.; Wei, Doug; Gorur, Amita; Zemla, Marcin; Haraga, Jessica; Allen, Simon; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Costerton, J. William; Berleman, James E.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary The social soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, displays a variety of complex and highly coordinated behaviors, including social motility, predatory rippling and fruiting body formation. Here we show that M. xanthus cells produce a network of outer membrane extensions in the form of vesicles and vesicle chains that interconnect cells. We observed peritrichous display of vesicles and vesicle chains and increased abundance in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. By applying a range of imaging techniques, including 3D Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM), we determined these structures to range between 30-60 nm in width and up to 5 μm in length. Purified vesicle chains consist of typical M. xanthus lipids, fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactoseamine (GalNAc) carbohydrates and a small set of cargo protein. The protein content includes CglB and Tgl membrane proteins transferred in a contact-dependent manner. Most significantly, the 3D organization of cells within biofilms indicates that cells are connected via an extensive network of membrane extensions that may connect cells at the level of the periplasmic space. Such a network would allow the transfer of membrane proteins and other molecules between cells, and likely provides a mechanism for the coordination of social activities. PMID:23848955

  20. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J.; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi in tick cell culture modulates expression of outer surface proteins A and C in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    Obonyo, M; Munderloh, U G; Fingerle, V; Wilske, B; Kurtti, T J

    1999-07-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto downregulates outer surface protein A (OspA) and upregulates outer surface protein C (OspC) during tick feeding. The switching of these proteins correlates with increased spirochetal infectivity for the mammal. We examined the effect of temperature on differential expression of OspA and OspC by B. burgdorferi cocultivated with a cell line isolated from the vector tick Ixodes scapularis. The effect of incubation at 31, 34, or 37 degrees C on expression of OspA and OspC by B. burgdorferi JMNT and N40 was analyzed by indirect fluorescent-antibody microscopy, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunoblotting. The amount of OspA relative to the amount of flagellin was highest in spirochetes cocultivated with tick cells at 31 degrees C and declined with increasing temperature in both strains. OspC production was enhanced in spirochetes cocultivated with tick cells at 37 degrees C. Spirochetes grown axenically in BSK-H medium also produced more OspC at 37 degrees C, but OspA content was not appreciably affected by temperature. Our findings indicate that temperature, along with cultivation in a tick cell culture system, plays a role in the differential expression of OspA and enhances differential expression of OspC by spirochetes.

  2. Structured surfaces on metal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkopf, Ralf; Hartung, Johannes; Kinast, Jan; Gebhardt, Andreas; Risse, Stefan; Eberhardt, Ramona

    2015-09-01

    Diamond machining of metal optics is a flexible way to manufacture structured elements on different surface geometries. Especially curved substrates such as spheres, aspheres, or freeforms in combination with structured elements enable innovative products like headlights of automobiles or spectrometers in life science or space applications. Using diamond turning, servo turning, milling, and shaping, different technologies for arbitrary geometries are available. The addressed wavelengths are typically in the near- infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) spectral range. Applying additional finishing processes, diamond machining is also used for optics applicable down to the EUV spectral range. This wide range of applications is represented in the used materials, too. However, one important material group for diamond machining is metal substrates. For diamond machining of structured surfaces, it is important to consider the microstructure of the utilized materials thoroughly. Especially amorphous materials as nickel-phosphorus alloys or fine-grained copper allow the fine structuring of refractive and diffractive structures. The paper analyzes the influence variables for diamond machining of structured surfaces and shows the use of this research for applications in the spectral range from IR to EUV.

  3. A New Outer Galaxy Molecular Cloud Catalog: Applications to Galactic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerton, C. R.; Brunt, C. M.; Pomerleau, C.

    2001-12-01

    We have generated a new molecular cloud catalog from a reprocessed version of the Five College Radio Astronomy (FCRAO) Observatory Outer Galaxy Survey (OGS) of 12CO (J=1--0) emission. The catalog has been used to develop a technique that uses the observed angular size-linewidth relation (ASLWR) as a distance indicator to molecular cloud ensembles. The new technique is a promising means to map out the large-scale structure of our Galaxy using the new high spatial dynamic range CO surveys currently available. The catalog was created using a two-stage object-identification algorithm. We first identified contiguous emission structures of a specified minimum number of pixels above a specified temperature threshold. Each structure so defined was then examined and localized emission enhancements within each structure were identified as separate objects. The resulting cloud catalog, contains basic data on 14595 objects. From the OGS we identified twenty-three cloud ensembles. For each, bisector fits to angular size vs. linewidth plots were made. The fits vary in a systematic way that allows a calibration of the fit parameters with distance to be made. Our derived distances to the ensembles are consistent with the distance to the Perseus Arm, and the accurate radial velocity measurements available from the same data are in accord with the known non-circular motions at the location of the Perseus Arm. The ASLWR method was also successfully applied to data from the Boston University/FCRAO Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) of 13CO(J=1--0) emission. Based upon our experience with the GRS and OGS, the ASLWR technique should be usable in any data set with sufficient spatial dynamic range to allow it to be properly calibrated. C.P. participated in this study through the Women in Engineering and Science (WES) program of NRC Canada. The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory is a National Facility operated by the National Research Council. The Canadian Galactic Plane Survey is a Canadian

  4. An Agrobacterium gene involved in tumorigenesis encodes an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y H; Li, L P; Hou, Q M; Pan, Shen Q

    2002-02-01

    A gene designated as aopB was identified which was involved in tumorigenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. aopB is located on the circular chromosome as a single copy. This gene shares high homology with ropB, a Rhizobium leguminosarum gene encoding an outer membrane protein. A transposon mutant CGI1 containing a gfp-tagged transposon insertion at aopB caused attenuated tumors on plants when inoculated at a low cell concentration (5x10(7) cells/ml). The mutation did not affect the bacterial growth on different media. A broad host range plasmid containing the wild type aopB could restore the tumor formation ability of CGI1 to the wild type level. When both aopB-gfp and aopB-phoA fusions were used to study the aopB gene expression, we found that the aopB gene was inducible by acidic pH but not by plant phenolic compound acetosyringone. aopB encodes a putative protein of 218 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 22.8 kDa. TnphoA transposon mutagenesis of aopB, subcellular fractionation and whole cell ELISA experiments indicated that AopB is an outer membrane protein exposed on the bacterial cell surface. It appeared that AopB was exclusively present in the outer membrane and not in other fractions. The vir gene induction assays showed that the aopB gene was not required for the expression of the Ti plasmid encoded vir genes that are essential for tumorigenesis. The C-terminal half of AopB is slightly homologous to some of the bacterial porin proteins and some of plant dehydrins. The role of AopB in Agrobacterium-plant interaction is discussed. PMID:11891052

  5. Surface, Subsurface and Atmosphere Exchanges on the Satellites of the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Giese, B.; Hurford, T. A.; Lopes, R. M.; Nimmo, F.; Postberg, F.; Retherford, K. D.; Schmidt, J.; Spencer, J. R.; Tokano, T.; Turtle, E. P.

    2010-06-01

    The surface morphology of icy moons is affected by several processes implicating exchanges between their subsurfaces and atmospheres (if any). The possible exchange of material between the subsurface and the surface is mainly determined by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere, which isolates the deep, warm and ductile ice material from the cold surface conditions. Exchanges through this layer occur only if it is sufficiently thin and/or if it is fractured owing to tectonic stresses, melt intrusion or impact cratering. If such conditions are met, cryomagma can be released, erupting fresh volatile-rich materials onto the surface. For a very few icy moons (Titan, Triton, Enceladus), the emission of gas associated with cryovolcanic activity is sufficiently large to generate an atmosphere, either long-lived or transient. For those moons, atmosphere-driven processes such as cryovolcanic plume deposition, phase transitions of condensable materials and wind interactions continuously re-shape their surfaces, and are able to transport cryovolcanically generated materials on a global scale. In this chapter, we discuss the physics of these different exchange processes and how they affect the evolution of the satellites’ surfaces.

  6. Charged-particle induced alterations of surfaces in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers calculated the plasma bombardment profiles of the surfaces of the icy Saturnian satellites in order to interpret reflection spectra and the effect of charged particles on the surfaces (mantles) of Pluto and of comets in the Oort cloud. Pluto's exposure to cosmic rays results in a slow alteration of the reflectance if the methane condensed on its surface. The UV absorbed in the atmosphere can produce precipitates. The researchers showed that, depending on the rates of the competing regolith processes and rates for replenishment of the methane, the surface can appear bright, red, or dark. Using laboratory data, they showed that the amount of darkening occurring in one orbit is small. Therefore, transport, burial, and re-exposure of organic sediments must control the reflectance, and the average reflectance is established by the radiation altered species accumulated over many orbits with the observed spatial, and possible temporal, differences in albedo due to transport. The cosmic rays, although producing changes in reflectance slowly, do so inevitably. Therefore, the fact that the surface is not dark everywhere implies that it is active and the exposure rates vs. depth into the surface of Pluto can be used to constrain turnover rates. Comets in the Oort cloud experience similar rates.

  7. OPUS – Outer Planets Unified Search with Enhanced Surface Geometry Parameters – Not Just for Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Mitchell; Showalter, Mark Robert; Ballard, Lisa; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Heather, Neil

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the massive influx of data into the PDS from a wide array of missions and instruments, finding the precise data you need has been an ongoing challenge. For remote sensing data obtained from Jupiter to Pluto, that challenge is being addressed by the Outer Planets Unified Search, more commonly known as OPUS.OPUS is a powerful search tool available at the PDS Ring-Moon Systems Node (RMS) – formerly the PDS Rings Node. While OPUS was originally designed with ring data in mind, its capabilities have been extended to include all of the targets within an instrument's field of view. OPUS provides preview images of search results, and produces a zip file for easy download of selected products, including a table of user specified metadata. For Cassini ISS and Voyager ISS we have generated and include calibrated versions of every image.Currently OPUS supports data returned by Cassini ISS, UVIS, VIMS, and CIRS (Saturn data through June 2010), New Horizons Jupiter LORRI, Galileo SSI, Voyager ISS and IRIS, and Hubble (ACS, WFC3 and WFPC2).At the RMS Node, we have developed and incorporated into OPUS detailed geometric metadata, based on the most recent SPICE kernels, for all of the bodies in the Cassini Saturn observations. This extensive set of geometric metadata is unique to the RMS Node and enables search constraints such as latitudes and longitudes (Saturn, Titan, and icy satellites), viewing and illumination geometry (phase, incidence and emission angles), and distances and resolution.Our near term plans include adding the full set of Cassini CIRS Saturn data (with enhanced geometry), New Horizons MVIC Jupiter encounter images, New Horizons LORRI and MVIC Pluto data, HST STIS observations, and Cassini and Voyager ring occultations. We also plan to develop enhanced geometric metadata for the New Horizons LORRI and MVIC instruments for both the Jupiter and the Pluto encounters.OPUS: http://pds-rings.seti.org/search/

  8. Purification and Bicelle Crystallization for Structure Determination of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein TamA.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Fabian; Hiller, Sebastian; Maier, Timm

    2015-01-01

    TamA is an Omp85 protein involved in autotransporter assembly in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. It comprises a C-terminal 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel as well as three periplasmic POTRA domains, and is a challenging target for structure determination. Here, we present a method for crystal structure determination of TamA, including recombinant expression in E. coli, detergent extraction, chromatographic purification, and bicelle crystallization in combination with seeding. As a result, crystals in space group P21212 are obtained, which diffract to 2.3 Å resolution. This protocol also serves as a template for structure determination of other outer membrane proteins, in particular of the Omp85 family.

  9. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  10. Surface hydrolysis of sphingomyelin by the outer membrane protein Rv0888 supports replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Alexander; Sun, Jim; Danilchanka, Olga; Meikle, Virginia; Rowland, Jennifer L.; Walter, Kerstin; Buck, Bradford R.; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Hölscher, Christoph; Ehrt, Sabine; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sphingomyelinases secreted by pathogenic bacteria play important roles in host-pathogen interactions ranging from interfering with phagocytosis and oxidative burst to iron acquisition. This study shows that the Mtb protein Rv0888 possesses potent sphingomyelinase activity cleaving sphingomyelin, a major lipid in eukaryotic cells, into ceramide and phosphocholine which are then utilized by Mtb as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus sources, respectively. An Mtb rv0888 deletion mutant did not grow on sphingomyelin as a sole carbon source anymore and replicated poorly in macrophages indicating that Mtb utilizes sphingomyelin during infection. Rv0888 is an unusual membrane protein with a surface-exposed C-terminal sphingomyelinase domain and a putative N-terminal channel domain that mediated glucose and phosphocholine uptake across the outer membrane in an M. smegmatis porin mutant. Hence, we propose to name Rv0888 as SpmT (sphingomyelinase of M. tuberculosis). Erythrocyte membranes contain up to 27% sphingomyelin. The finding that Rv0888 accounts for half of Mtb’s hemolysis is consistent with its sphingomyelinase activity and the observation that Rv0888 levels are increased in the presence of erythrocytes and sphingomyelin by 5- and 100-fold, respectively. Thus, Rv0888 is a novel outer membrane protein that enables Mtb to utilize sphingomyelin as a source of several essential nutrients during intracellular growth. PMID:26036301

  11. Finish ion beam treatment of the longrange cylindrical products outer surface in automatic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Volkov, N. V.; Valikov, R. A.; Yashin, A. S.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Yanin, S. N.; Asainov, O. Kh; Yurev, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The results of using of ion-beam technologies methods for finish treatment of metal products are presented. The experiments were performed at the installation ILUR-03, which allows the operation of cleaning, polishing and surface layers doping of the material of unlimited length cylindrical samples by radial Ar+ ions beam with energy up to 5 keV. The tubes from zirconium alloy E110 up to 500 mm length were used as samples for investigation. It is shown that selected automatic treatment modes reduce the surface roughness over the entire length of the samples and increase uniformity of the surface layer without observable effect on the bulk properties of material. Treatment promotes the formation of oxide films with improved defensive properties.

  12. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, James A; Whitehead, Timothy A; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion.

  13. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion. PMID:26199411

  14. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage

    SciTech Connect

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-09-16

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage.

  15. Structure of the Three N-Terminal Immunoglobulin Domains of the Highly Immunogenic Outer Capsid Protein from a T4-Like Bacteriophage▿

    PubMed Central

    Fokine, Andrei; Islam, Mohammad Z.; Zhang, Zhihong; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The head of bacteriophage T4 is decorated with 155 copies of the highly antigenic outer capsid protein (Hoc). One Hoc molecule binds near the center of each hexameric capsomer. Hoc is dispensable for capsid assembly and has been used to display pathogenic antigens on the surface of T4. Here we report the crystal structure of a protein containing the first three of four domains of Hoc from bacteriophage RB49, a close relative of T4. The structure shows an approximately linear arrangement of the protein domains. Each of these domains has an immunoglobulin-like fold, frequently found in cell attachment molecules. In addition, we report biochemical data suggesting that Hoc can bind to Escherichia coli, supporting the hypothesis that Hoc could attach the phage capsids to bacterial surfaces and perhaps also to other organisms. The capacity for such reversible adhesion probably provides survival advantages to the bacteriophage. PMID:21632759

  16. Surface Structures of Hawaiian Lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, S. K.; Walker, G. P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Surface and internal lava structures can be valid indicators of lava viscosity and rheology, provided that care is taken to identify and eliminate structures which are strain-rate-dependent. Here, a spectrum of types among Hawaiian basaltic flows is found ranging from pahoehoe to a'a, that are interpreted as marking a progression in lava viscosity and a change in rheology. The most fluid type in this spectrum is normal pahoehoe that has a smooth but commonly wrinkled or folded (ropy) surface. The next type, distinctly more viscous and probably non-Newtonian in rheology, is spiny pahoehoe which is characterized by a spinose surface and an absence of ropy structures. Preliminary studies on the long lavas of Mauna Loa indicated, perhaps surprisingly, that there is no clear-cut correlation of lava length with type in this spectrum of lavas, indicating that viscosity/yield strength of the basaltic lavas per se are not the primary controls determining flow length. Flowage of the lava through lava tubes, while it may help to account for the long flow distance of some lavas, is not a generally applicable explanation for long flow length.

  17. Native surface association of a recombinant 38-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen isolated from the Escherichia coli outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Radolf, J D; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid designated pAW305, containing a 6-kilobase insert of Treponema pallidum DNA, directed the expression of a 38-kilodalton (kDa) treponemal antigen in Escherichia coli. The 38-kDa antigen copurified with the outer membrane fraction of the E. coli cell envelope after treatment with nonionic detergents or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa antigen developed antibodies which reacted specifically with a 38-kDa T. pallidum antigen on immunoblots, and 38-kDa antisera specifically immobilized T. pallidum in a complement-dependent manner in the T. pallidum immobilization test. Antisera to the 38-kDa recombinant antigen were also used to demonstrate its native surface association on T. pallidum by immunoelectron microscopy. Images PMID:3516880

  18. An extended inner-outer factorisation algorithm based on the structure of a transfer function matrix inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Chunhui; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structure feature of the inverse of a multi-input/multi-output square transfer function matrix is explored. Instead of complicated advanced mathematical tools, we only use basic results of complex analysis in the analysing procedure. By employing the Laurent expression, an elegant structure form of the expansion is obtained for the transfer function matrix inverse. This expansion form is the key of deriving an analytical solution to the inner-outer factorisation for both stable plants and unstable plants. Different from other computation algorithm, the obtained inner-outer factorisation is given in an analytical form. The solution is exact and without approximation. Numerical examples are provided to verify the correctness of the obtained results.

  19. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  20. Outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution observed during the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 in Mohe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusha; Zhang, Bairong

    With a simple video-collecting system, the total solar eclipse on March 9, 1997 has been observed by using Panasonic NV-S88OEN video camera in Mohe. After analyzing the yellow (by adding a GG11 filter) and white coronal observation data, the outer coronal structure and relative intensity distribution outside 1.5 Rsun have been found during the solar minima.

  1. Structure, activity and interactions of the cysteine deleted analog of tachyplesin-1 with lipopolysaccharide micelle: Mechanistic insights into outer-membrane permeabilization and endotoxin neutralization.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Rathi; Mohanram, Harini; Joshi, Mangesh; Domadia, Prerna N; Torres, Jaume; Ruedl, Christiane; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2012-07-01

    Tachyplesin-1, a disulfide stabilized beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, can be found at the hemocytes of horse shoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. A cysteine deleted linear analog of tachyplesin-1 or CDT (KWFRVYRGIYRRR-NH2) contains a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity with a reduced hemolytic property. The bactericidal activity of CDT stems from selective interactions with the negatively charged lipids including LPS. In this work, CDT-LPS interactions were investigated using NMR spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy and functional assays. We found that CDT neutralized LPS and disrupted permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Zeta potential and ITC studies demonstrated charge compensation and hydrophobic interactions of CDT with the LPS-outer membrane, respectively. Secondary structure of the peptide was probed by CD and FT-IR experiments indicating beta-strands and/or beta-turn conformations in the LPS micelle. An ensemble of structures, determined in LPS micelle by NMR, revealed a beta-hairpin like topology of the CDT peptide that was typified by an extended cationic surface and a relatively shorter segment of hydrophobic region. Interestingly, at the non-polar face, residue R11 was found to be in a close proximity to the indole ring of W2, suggesting a cation-n type interactions. Further, saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR studies established intimate contacts among the aromatic and cationic residues of CDT with the LPS micelle. Fluorescence and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated that CDT imparted structural destabilization to the aggregated states of LPS. Collectively, atomic resolution structure and interactions of CDT with the outer membrane-LPS could be exploited for developing potent broad spectrum antimicrobial and anti-sepsis agents. PMID:22464970

  2. Environment on the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wolery

    2005-02-22

    This report provides supporting analysis of the conditions at which an aqueous solution can exist on the drip shield or waste package surfaces, including theoretical underpinning for the evolution of concentrated brines that could form by deliquescence or evaporation, and evaluation of the effects of acid-gas generation on brine composition. This analysis does not directly feed the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA), but supports modeling and abstraction of the in-drift chemical environment (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169863]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). It also provides analyses that may support screening of features, events, and processes, and input for response to regulatory inquiries. This report emphasizes conditions of low relative humidity (RH) that, depending on temperature and chemical conditions, may be dry or may be associated with an aqueous phase containing concentrated electrolytes. Concentrated solutions at low RH may evolve by evaporative concentration of water that seeps into emplacement drifts, or by deliquescence of dust on the waste package or drip shield surfaces. The minimum RH for occurrence of aqueous conditions is calculated for various chemical systems based on current understanding of site geochemistry and equilibrium thermodynamics. The analysis makes use of known characteristics of Yucca Mountain waters and dust from existing tunnels, laboratory data, and relevant information from the technical literature and handbooks.

  3. Synthetic HI observations of spiral structure in the outer disk in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoperskov, Sergey A.; Bertin, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    > By means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations, in a separate paper we have discussed the properties of non-axisymmetric density wave trains in the outermost regions of galaxy disks, based on the picture that self-excited global spiral modes in the bright optical stellar disk are accompanied by low-amplitude short trailing wave signals outside corotation; in the gas, such wave trains can penetrate through the outer Lindblad resonance and propagate outwards, forming prominent spiral patterns. In this paper we present the synthetic 21 cm velocity maps expected from simulated models of the outer gaseous disk, focusing on the case when the disk is dominated by a two-armed spiral pattern, but considering also other more complex situations. We discuss some aspects of the spiral pattern in the gaseous periphery of galaxy disks noted in our simulations that might be interesting to compare with specific observed cases.

  4. The periplasmic domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A can undergo a localized temperature dependent structural transition.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are surrounded by two membranes with a thin peptidoglycan (PG)-layer located in between them in the periplasmic space. The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is a 325-residue protein and it is the major protein component of the outer membrane of E. coli. Previous structure determinations have focused on the N-terminal fragment (residues 1-171) of OmpA, which forms an eight stranded transmembrane β-barrel in the outer membrane. Consequently it was suggested that OmpA is composed of two independently folded domains in which the N-terminal β-barrel traverses the outer membrane and the C-terminal domain (residues 180-325) adopts a folded structure in the periplasmic space. However, some reports have proposed that full-length OmpA can instead refold in a temperature dependent manner into a single domain forming a larger transmembrane pore. Here, we have determined the NMR solution structure of the C-terminal periplasmic domain of E. coli OmpA (OmpA(180-325)). Our structure reveals that the C-terminal domain folds independently into a stable globular structure that is homologous to the previously reported PG-associated domain of Neisseria meningitides RmpM. Our results lend credence to the two domain structure model and a PG-binding function for OmpA, and we could indeed localize the PG-binding site on the protein through NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments. On the other hand, we found no evidence for binding of OmpA(180-325) with the TonB protein. In addition, we have also expressed and purified full-length OmpA (OmpA(1-325)) to study the structure of the full-length protein in micelles and nanodiscs by NMR spectroscopy. In both membrane mimetic environments, the recombinant OmpA maintains its two domain structure that is connected through a flexible linker. A series of temperature-dependent HSQC experiments and relaxation dispersion NMR experiments detected structural destabilization in the bulge region of the

  5. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, the spontaneous spreading process after droplet contacts a solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as in printing, coating, and lubrication. In the recent years, experiments and numerical simulations have greatly progressed the understanding in the dynamic wetting particularly on ``flat'' substrates. To gain further insight into the governing physics of the dynamic wetting, we perform droplet-wetting experiments on microstructured surfaces, just a few micrometers in size, with complementary numerical simulations, and investigate the dependence of the spreading rate on the microstructure geometries and fluid properties. We reveal that the influence of microstructures can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. The systematic study is also of practical importance since structures and roughness are omnipresent and their influence on spreading rate would give us additional degrees of freedom to control the dynamic wetting. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., J.C., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A.).

  6. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  7. Vortex-like plasma flow structures observed by Cluster at the boundary of the outer radiation belt and ring current: A link between the inner and outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, Y. F.; Yang, B.; Zhang, H.; Tian, A. M.; Dunlop, M.; Fritz, T. A.; Kistler, L. M.; Korth, A.; Daly, P. W.; Pedersen, A.

    2009-10-01

    Two vortex-like plasma flow structures have been observed at the outer radiation belt and/or the ring current region on 11 April 2002, from 0415 to 0635 UT, when the Cluster fleet entered (in the Southern Hemisphere) and exited (in the Northern Hemisphere) the boundary layer of the inner magnetosphere near 2130 MLT. On 11 April 2002 during the period of interest, the solar wind speed was high, and the geomagnetic activity was moderate. These two vortices have opposite rotation directions and are characterized by bipolar signatures in the flow V x components with peak-to-peak amplitudes of about 40 km/s. The inflection points of the plasma flow coincide precisely with the local maxima of the duskward core flow V y (30 km/s) which exceed the surrounding flow by 3-4 times in magnitude for both vortices. A pair of bidirectional current sheets and bipolar electric fields (E y ) are found to be closely associated with these vortices. Whereas magnetic field disturbances are observed only in B x and B y components, the magnetic magnitude stays almost unchanged. Vortices observed both inbound and outbound at the boundary of the radiation belt at nearly the same location (L shell and latitude), suggesting they may last for more than 140 min. The scale sizes of the two vortices are about 810 km and 1138 km, respectively. Interestingly, it is found that Earth's ionospheric singly charged oxygen are precipitating in the vortex dynamic process, having energies less than 1 keV and having a strong field-aligned pitch angle distribution. These plasma flow vortices are suggested to be formed at the interface between the enhanced ionospheric outflow stream from the polar ionosphere and a sudden braking and/or azimuthal deflection of bursty bulk flows generated by the tail reconnection. These observed flow vortices provide a link among the inner magnetosphere, the tail plasma sheet, and the Earth's ionosphere by coupling magnetic shear stresses and plasma flow momentum.

  8. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet. PMID:26374054

  9. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-14

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  10. The complex structure of stars in the outer galactic disk as revealed by Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.; Schlafly, Edward F.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Morganson, Eric; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nicholas; Magnier, Eugene A.; Tonry, John L.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.; and others

    2014-08-10

    We present a panoptic view of the stellar structure in the Galactic disk's outer reaches commonly known as the Monoceros Ring, based on data from Pan-STARRS1. These observations clearly show the large extent of the stellar overdensities on both sides of the Galactic disk, extending between b = –25° and b = +35° and covering over 130° in Galactic longitude. The structure exhibits a complex morphology with both stream-like features and a sharp edge to the structure in both the north and the south. We compare this map to mock observations of two published simulations aimed at explaining such structures in the outer stellar disk, one postulating an origin as a tidal stream and the other demonstrating a scenario where the disk is strongly distorted by the accretion of a satellite. These morphological comparisons of simulations can link formation scenarios to observed structures, such as demonstrating that the distorted-disk model can produce thin density features resembling tidal streams. Although neither model produces perfect agreement with the observations—the tidal stream predicts material at larger distances that is not detected while in the distorted disk model, the midplane is warped to an excessive degree—future tuning of the models to accommodate these latest data may yield better agreement.

  11. Surface-reconstructed icosahedral structures for lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, Shaun C.; Doye, Jonathan P.

    2002-12-01

    We describe a family of icosahedral structures for lead clusters. In general, structures in this family contain a Mackay icosahedral core with a reconstructed two-shell outer-layer. This family includes the anti-Mackay icosahedra, which has a Mackay icosahedral core but with most of the surface atoms in hexagonal close-packed positions. Using a many-body glue potential for lead, we identify two icosahedral structures in this family which have the lowest energies of any known structure in the size range from 900 to 15 000 lead atoms. We show that these structures are stabilized by a feature of the many-body glue part of the interatomic potential.

  12. Magnetic structure in cool stars. XVI - Emissions from the outer atmosphere of M-type dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutten, R. G. M.; Zwaan, C.; Schrijver, C. J.; Duncan, D. K.; Mewe, R.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to emission from the outer atmospheres of M-type dwarfs in several spectral lines originating from the chromosphere, the transition-region, and the soft X-ray emission from the corona. It is shown that M-type dwarfs systematically deviate from relations between flux densities in soft X-rays and chromospheric and transition-region emission lines. The quantitative relation between the equivalent width of H-alpha and the Ca II, H, and K emission index is determined. It is suggested that the emission in the Balmer spectrum may result from back heating by coronal soft X-rays.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  14. Structure-function studies of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae major outer membrane porin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Adrienne; Seifert, H Steven

    2013-12-01

    The major outer membrane porin (PorB) expressed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae plays multiple roles during infection, in addition to its function as an outer membrane pore. We have generated a panel of mutants of N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 expressing a variety of mutant porB genes that all function as porins. We identified multiple regions of porin that are involved in its binding to the complement regulatory factors C4b-binding protein and factor H and confirmed that the ability to bind at least one factor is required for FA1090 to survive the bactericidal effects of human serum. We tested the ability of these mutants to inhibit both apoptosis and the oxidative burst in polymorphonuclear leukocytes but were unable to identify the porin domains required for either function. This study has identified nonessential porin domains and some potentially essential portions of the protein and has further expanded our understanding of the contribution of the porin domains required for complement regulation.

  15. The "Horns" of FK Comae and the Complex Structure of its Outer Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven H.; Ayres, T. R.; Kashyap, V.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a large multiwavelength campaign (COCOA-PUFS*) to explore magnetic activity in the unusual, single, rapidly rotating giant FK Comae, we have taken a time series of moderate resolution FUV spectra of the star with the COS spectrograph on HST. We find that the star has unusual, time-variable emission profiles in the chromosphere and transition region which show horn-like features. We use simple spatially inhomogeneous models to explain the variable line shapes. Modeling the lower chromospheric Cl I 1351 Å line, we find evidence for a very extended, spatial inhomogeneous outer atmosphere, likely composed of many huge "sling-shot" prominences of cooler material with embedded in a rotationally distended corona. We compare these results with hotter hotter transition region lines (Si IV) and optical spectra of the chromospheric He I D3 line. We also employ the model Cl I profiles, and data-derived empirical models, to fit the complex spectral region around the coronal Fe XXI 1354.1 Å line. We place limits on the flux of this line, and show these limits are consistent with expectations from the observed X-ray spectrum. *Campaign for Observation of the Corona and Outer Atmosphere of the Fast-rotating Star, FK Comae This work was supported by HST grant GO-12376.01-A.

  16. Lipopeptides of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface proteins induce Th1 phenotype development in alphabeta T-cell receptor transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Duarte, C; Kamradt, T

    1997-01-01

    Induction of the appropriate T helper cell (Th) subset is crucial for the resolution of infectious diseases and the prevention of immunopathology. Some pathogens preferentially induce Th1 or Th2 responses. How microorganisms influence Th phenotype development is unknown. We asked if Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete which causes Lyme arthritis, can promote a cytokine milieu in which T cells which are not specific for B. burgdorferi are induced to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Using alphabeta T-cell receptor transgenic mice as a source of T cells with a defined specificity other than for B. burgdorferi, we found that B. burgdorferi induced Th1 phenotype development in ovalbumin-specific transgenic T cells. Small synthetic lipopeptides corresponding to the N-terminal sequences of B. burgdorferi outer surface lipoproteins had similar effects. B. burgdorferi and its lipopeptides induced host cells to produce interleukin-12. When the peptides were used in delipidated form, they did not induce Th1 development. These findings may be of pathogenic importance, since it is currently assumed that a Th2-mediated antibody response is protective against B. burgdorferi. Bacteria associated with reactive arthritis, namely, Yersinia enterocolitica, Shigella flexneri, and Salmonella enteritidis, had different effects. The molecular definition of pathogen-host interactions determining cytokine production should facilitate rational therapeutic interventions directing the host response towards the desired cytokine response. Here, we describe small synthetic molecules capable of inducing Th1 phenotype development. PMID:9317013

  17. Relationship between Immunity to Borrelia burgdorferi Outer-surface Protein A (OspA) and Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Elise E.; Glickstein, Lisa J.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis may result from Borrelia burgdorferi–induced autoimmunity in affected joints. Such patients usually have certain HLA-DRB1 molecules that bind an epitope of B. burgdorferi outer-surface protein A (OspA163–175), and cellular and humoral immune responses to OspA are greater in patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis than in those with antibiotic-responsive arthritis. Recent work in a mouse model suggests that, during B. burgdorferi infection, OspA in genetically susceptible individuals stimulates a particularly strong TH1 response, which may be one of several factors that can help set the stage for a putative autoimmune response in affected joints. However, vaccination with OspA did not induce arthritis in this mouse model, and case and control comparisons in human vaccine trials did not show an increased frequency of arthritis among OspA-vaccinated individuals. Thus, a vaccine-induced immune response to OspA does not replicate the sequence of events needed in the natural infection to induce antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:21217173

  18. Enteric YaiW Is a Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Lipoprotein That Affects Sensitivity to an Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Markus F. F.; Caro-Hernandez, Paola; Tan, Karen; Runti, Giulia; Wehmeier, Silvia; Scocchi, Marco; Doerrler, William T.; Ferguson, Gail P.

    2014-01-01

    yaiW is a previously uncharacterized gene found in enteric bacteria that is of particular interest because it is located adjacent to the sbmA gene, whose bacA ortholog is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis and Brucella abortus pathogenesis. We show that yaiW is cotranscribed with sbmA in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Typhimurium strains. We present evidence that the YaiW is a palmitate-modified surface exposed outer membrane lipoprotein. Since BacA function affects the very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) modification of S. meliloti and B. abortus lipid A, we tested whether SbmA function might affect either the fatty acid modification of the YaiW lipoprotein or the fatty acid modification of enteric lipid A but found that it did not. Interestingly, we did observe that E. coli SbmA suppresses deficiencies in the VLCFA modification of the lipopolysaccharide of an S. meliloti bacA mutant despite the absence of VLCFA in E. coli. Finally, we found that both YaiW and SbmA positively affect the uptake of proline-rich Bac7 peptides, suggesting a possible connection between their cellular functions. PMID:24214946

  19. Relationship between immunity to Borrelia burgdorferi outer-surface protein A (OspA) and Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Drouin, Elise E; Glickstein, Lisa J

    2011-02-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis may result from Borrelia burgdorferi-induced autoimmunity in affected joints. Such patients usually have certain HLA-DRB1 molecules that bind an epitope of B. burgdorferi outer-surface protein A (OspA₁₆₃₋₁₇₅), and cellular and humoral immune responses to OspA are greater in patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis than in those with antibiotic-responsive arthritis. Recent work in a mouse model suggests that, during B. burgdorferi infection, OspA in genetically susceptible individuals stimulates a particularly strong T(H)1 response, which may be one of several factors that can help set the stage for a putative autoimmune response in affected joints. However, vaccination with OspA did not induce arthritis in this mouse model, and case and control comparisons in human vaccine trials did not show an increased frequency of arthritis among OspA-vaccinated individuals. Thus, a vaccine-induced immune response to OspA does not replicate the sequence of events needed in the natural infection to induce antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

  20. Thrust geometries and deep structure of the outer and lesser Himalaya, Kumaon and Garhwal (India): Implications for evolution of the Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Praveen; Mitra, Gautam

    1994-02-01

    The Kumaon-Garhwal region of the Himalaya lies near the center of the Himalayan fold-and-thrust belt. We have drawn two balanced cross sections, 100 km apart, through the Outer and Lesser Himalaya. The cross sections incorporate all the surface, well log, and earthquake seismic data currently available from the region. Two branch line maps showing trailing and leading branch lines and cutoff lines of the major thrusts in the region are also drawn. The three dimensional deep structure of the Outer and Lesser Himalaya is interpreted based on the balanced cross sections and the branch line maps. Deep structure of the Higher and Tethyan Himalaya is extrapolated based on surface geology and is subject to revision as more surface and seismic data become available from these areas. A sequential evolutionary model for the Kumaon Himalaya along the eastern (Pindari) section is proposed. According to this model, the Kumaon Himalaya evolved by an overall forelandward progression of thrusting, with some reactivation along the Munsiari thrust (MT), the Main Boundary thrust (MBT), and the Main Central thrust (MCT). We use structural, stratigraphic, and radiometric criteria to place time constraints on the motion of these thrusts. Earliest motion along the MBT may have occurred in Early-Middle Paleocene, but the main episode probably started in Late Eocene and may still be continuing. Emplacement of the MT had occurred by Middle-Late Eocene, whereas the MCT shows activity around 20 Ma, thus exhibiting break back thrusting with respect to the MT. Shortening estimates are obtained from the Pindari section. Minimum shortening in the sedimentary thrust sheets of the Outer and Lesser Himalaya is 161 km or 65%. As a first approximation, we have also restored the crystalline sheets in order to obtain shortening estimates for the entire Himalaya. Minimum shortening for the Himalaya after restoring the MCT sheet varies from 354 (76%) to 421 km (79%). These estimates were further combined

  1. Spin-glass-like freezing of inner and outer surface layers in hollow γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Iglesias, Òscar; Alonso, Javier; Phan, Manh-Huong; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2015-10-27

    Disorder among surface spins largely dominates the magnetic response of ultrafine magnetic particle systems. In this work, we examine time-dependent magnetization in high-quality, monodisperse hollow maghemite nanoparticles (NPs) with a 14.8±0.5 nm outer diameter and enhanced surface-to-volume ratio. The nanoparticle ensemble exhibits spin-glass-like signatures in dc magnetic aging and memory protocols and ac magnetic susceptibility. The dynamics of the system slow near 50 K, and becomes frozen on experimental time scales below 20 K. Remanence curves indicate the development of magnetic irreversibility concurrent with the freezing of the spin dynamics. A strong exchange-bias effect and its training behavior point to highly frustrated surface spins that rearrange much more slowly than interior spins with bulk coordination. Monte Carlo simulations of a hollow particle reproducing the experimental morphology corroborate strongly disordered surface layers with complex energy landscapes that underlie both glass-like dynamics and magnetic irreversibility. Calculated hysteresis loops reveal that magnetic behavior is not identical at the inner and outer surfaces, with spins at the outer surface layer of the 15 nm hollow particles exhibiting a higher degree of frustration. Lastly, our combined experimental and simulated results shed light on the origin of spin-glass-like phenomena and the important role played by the surface spins in magnetic hollow nanostructures.

  2. Outer Surface Protein OspC Is an Antiphagocytic Factor That Protects Borrelia burgdorferi from Phagocytosis by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Sebastian E.; Troxell, Bryan; Yang, Youyun; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Li, Hongxia; Sandusky, George E.; Condon, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Outer surface protein C (OspC) is one of the major lipoproteins expressed on the surface of Borrelia burgdorferi during tick feeding and the early phase of mammalian infection. OspC is required for B. burgdorferi to establish infection in both immunocompetent and SCID mice and has been proposed to facilitate evasion of innate immune defenses. However, the exact biological function of OspC remains elusive. In this study, we showed that the ospC-deficient spirochete could not establish infection in NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice that lack B cells, T cells, NK cells, and lytic complement. The ospC mutant also could not establish infection in anti-Ly6G-treated SCID and C3H/HeN mice (depletion of neutrophils). However, depletion of mononuclear phagocytes at the skin site of inoculation in SCID and C3H/HeN mice allowed the ospC mutant to establish infection in vivo. In phagocyte-depleted mice, the ospC mutant was able to colonize the joints and triggered neutrophilia during dissemination. Furthermore, we found that phagocytosis of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ospC mutant spirochetes by murine peritoneal macrophages and human THP-1 macrophage-like cells, but not in PMN-HL60, was significantly higher than parental wild-type B. burgdorferi strains, suggesting that OspC has an antiphagocytic property. In addition, overproduction of OspC in spirochetes also decreased the uptake of spirochetes by murine peritoneal macrophages. Together, our findings provide evidence that mononuclear phagocytes play a key role in clearance of the ospC mutant and that OspC promotes spirochetes' evasion of macrophages during early Lyme borreliosis. PMID:26438793

  3. Autotransported Serine Protease A of Neisseria meningitidis: an Immunogenic, Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane, and Secreted Protein

    PubMed Central

    Turner, David P. J.; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Several autotransporter proteins have previously been identified in Neisseria meningitidis. Using molecular features common to most members of the autotransporter family of proteins, we have identified an additional novel ca. 112-kDa autotransporter protein in the meningococcal genomic sequence data. This protein, designated autotransported serine protease A (AspA), has significant N-terminal homology to the secreted serine proteases (subtilases) from several organisms and contains a serine protease catalytic triad. The amino acid sequence of AspA is well-conserved in serogroup A, B, and C meningococci. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the AspA homologue appears to be a pseudogene. The gene encoding AspA was cloned and expressed from meningococcal strain MC58 (B15:P1.16b). Anti-AspA antibodies were detected in patients' convalescent-phase sera, suggesting that AspA is expressed in vivo during infection and is immunogenic and cross-reactive. Rabbit polyclonal monospecific anti-AspA serum was used to probe whole-cell proteins from a panel of wild-type meningococcal strains and two AspA mutant strains. Expression of the ca. 112-kDa precursor polypeptide was detected in 12 of 20 wild-type meningococcal strains examined, suggesting that AspA expression is phase variable. Immunogold electron microscopy and cellular fractionation studies showed that the AspA precursor is transported to the outer membrane and remains surface exposed. Western blot experiments confirmed that smaller, ca. 68- or 70-kDa components of AspA (AspA68 and AspA70, respectively) are then secreted into the meningococcal culture supernatant. Site-directed mutagenesis of S426 abolished secretion of both rAspA68 and rAspA70 in Escherichia coli, confirming that AspA is an autocleaved autotransporter protein. In conclusion, we characterized a novel, surface-exposed and secreted, immunogenic, meningococcal autotransporter protein. PMID:12117956

  4. Enzyme design from the bottom up: an active nickel electrocatalyst with a structured peptide outer coordination sphere.

    PubMed

    Reback, Matthew L; Buchko, Garry W; Kier, Brandon L; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Xiong, Yijia; Lense, Sheri; Hou, Jianbo; Roberts, John A S; Sorensen, Christina M; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C; Shaw, Wendy J

    2014-02-01

    Catalytic, peptide-containing metal complexes with a well-defined peptide structure have the potential to enhance molecular catalysts through an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of an active, peptide-based metal complex built upon the well-characterized hydrogen production catalyst [Ni(P(Ph)2N(Ph))2](2+) (P(Ph)2N(Ph)=1,3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane). The incorporated peptide maintains its β-hairpin structure when appended to the metal core, and the electrocatalytic activity of the peptide-based metal complex (≈100,000 s(-1)) is enhanced compared to the parent complex ([Ni(P(Ph)2N(APPA))2](2+); ≈50,500 s(-1)). The combination of an active molecular catalyst with a structured peptide provides a scaffold that permits the incorporation of features of an enzyme-like outer-coordination sphere necessary to create molecular electrocatalysts with enhanced functionality.

  5. THE STRUCTURE AND STELLAR CONTENT OF THE OUTER DISKS OF GALAXIES: A NEW VIEW FROM THE Pan-STARRS1 MEDIUM DEEP SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zheng; Thilker, David A.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Burgett, W. S.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Chambers, K. C.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of an analysis of Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey multi-band (grizy) images of a sample of 698 low-redshift disk galaxies that span broad ranges in stellar mass, star-formation rate, and bulge/disk ratio. We use population synthesis spectral energy distribution fitting techniques to explore the radial distribution of the light, color, surface mass density, mass/light ratio, and age of the stellar populations. We characterize the structure and stellar content of the galaxy disks out to radii of about twice Petrosian r {sub 90}, beyond which the halo light becomes significant. We measure normalized radial profiles for sub-samples of galaxies in three bins each of stellar mass and concentration. We also fit radial profiles to each galaxy. The majority of galaxies have down-bending radial surface brightness profiles in the bluer bands with a break radius at roughly r {sub 90}. However, they typically show single unbroken exponentials in the reddest bands and in the stellar surface mass density. We find that the mass/light ratio and stellar age radial profiles have a characteristic 'U' shape. There is a good correlation between the amplitude of the down-bend in the surface brightness profile and the rate of the increase in the M/L ratio in the outer disk. As we move from late- to early-type galaxies, the amplitude of the down-bend and the radial gradient in M/L both decrease. Our results imply a combination of stellar radial migration and suppression of recent star formation can account for the stellar populations of the outer disk.

  6. TonB induces conformational changes in surface-exposed loops of FhuA, outer membrane receptor of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    James, Karron J.; Hancock, Mark A.; Moreau, Violaine; Molina, Franck; Coulton, James W.

    2008-01-01

    FhuA, outer membrane receptor of Escherichia coli, transports hydroxamate-type siderophores into the periplasm. Cytoplasmic membrane–anchored TonB transduces energy to FhuA to facilitate siderophore transport. Because the N-terminal cork domain of FhuA occludes the C-terminal β-barrel lumen, conformational changes must occur to enable siderophore passage. To localize conformational changes at an early stage of the siderophore transport cycle, four anti-FhuA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were purified to homogeneity, and the epitopes that they recognize were determined by phage display. We mapped continuous and discontinuous epitopes to outer surface-exposed loops 3, 4, and 5 and to β-barrel strand 14. To probe for conformational changes of FhuA, surface plasmon resonance measured mAb binding to FhuA in its apo- and siderophore-bound states. Changes in binding kinetics were observed for mAbs whose epitopes were mapped to outer surface-exposed loops. Further, we measured mAb binding in the absence and presence of TonB. After forming immobilized FhuA–TonB complexes, changes in kinetics of mAb binding to FhuA were even more pronounced compared with kinetics of binding in the absence of TonB. Measurement of extrinsic fluorescence of the dye MDCC conjugated to residue 336 in outer surface-exposed loop 4 revealed 33% fluorescence quenching upon ferricrocin binding and up to 56% quenching upon TonB binding. Binding of mAbs to apo- and ferricrocin-bound FhuA complemented by fluorescence spectroscopy studies showed that their cognate epitopes on loops 3, 4, and 5 undergo conformational changes upon siderophore binding. Further, our data demonstrate that TonB binding promotes conformational changes in outer surface-exposed loops of FhuA. PMID:18653801

  7. Structurally Complex Surface of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a composite of two images of Jupiter's icy moon Europa obtained from a range of 2119 miles (3410 kilometers) by the Galileo spacecraft during its fourth orbit around Jupiter and its first close pass of Europa. The mosaic spans 11 miles by 30 miles (17 km by 49 km) and shows features as small as 230 feet (70 meters) across. This mosaic is the first very high resolution image data obtained of Europa, and has a resolution more than 50 times better than the best Voyager coverage and 500 times better than Voyager coverage in this area. The mosaic shows the surface of Europa to be structurally complex. The sun illuminates the scene from the right, revealing complex overlapping ridges and fractures in the upper and lower portions of the mosaic, and rugged, more chaotic terrain in the center. Lateral faulting is revealed where ridges show offsets along their lengths (upper left of the picture). Missing ridge segments indicate obliteration of pre-existing materials and emplacement of new terrain (center of the mosaic). Only a small number of impact craters can be seen, indicating the surface is not geologically ancient.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  8. Outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. XVIII. Electron microscopic studies on porin insertion sites and growth of cell surface of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, J; Nikaido, H

    1978-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium contains three "major proteins" or "porins" (34K, 35K, and 36K) in the outer membrane. A mutant strain producing only the 35K porin was first grown in media containing high concentrations of NaCl to "repress" the porin synthesis and then was shifted into a medium without NaCl. The newly made porin molecules were then labeled with the ferritin-coupled antibody at various times after the shift, and the samples were examined by whole-mount, freeze-etching, and thin-section electron microscopy. These experiments showed that newly inserted porins appeared as discrete patches uniformly distributed over the surface of the cell and, furthermore, that the sites of adhesion between the inner and outer membrane were most probably the pathway by which the newly made porin molecules appeared on cell surface. The 34K and 36K porins were also inserted in the same manner, since the appearance of new porins at discrete sites all over the cell surface was also observed when cells with wild-type porin phenotype were treated with unlabeled antibody to block existing antigenic sites, subsequently regrown, and labeled with the ferritin-coupled antibody. Since porins comprise a major portion of the densely packed, relatively immobile, "protein framework" of the outer membrane, these results lead us to conclude that the outer membrane grows predominantly by diffuse intercalation rather than by the zonal growth mechanism. Images PMID:355240

  9. The role of outer surface/inner bulk Brønsted acidic sites in the adsorption of a large basic molecule (simazine) on H-Y zeolite.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Filomena; Pansini, Michele; Marocco, Antonello; Bonelli, Barbara; Garrone, Edoardo; Esposito, Serena

    2015-11-21

    The simple means adopted for investigating H-Y zeolite acidity in water is the pH-dependence of the amount of a basic molecule adsorbed under isochoric conditions, a technique capable of yielding, under equilibrium conditions, an estimate of the pKa value of the involved acidic centres: the behaviour with temperature of adsorbed amounts yields instead some information on thermodynamics. Simazine (Sim, 2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine) was chosen as an adsorbate because its transverse dimension (7.5 Å) is close to the opening of the supercage in the faujasite structure of H-Y (7.4 Å). In short term measurements, Sim adsorption at 25 °C occurs only at the outer surface of H-Y particles. Two types of mildly acidic centres are present (with pKaca. 7 and ca. 8, respectively) and no strong one is observed. Previous adsorption of ammonia from the gas phase discriminates between the two. The former survives, and shows features common with the silanols of amorphous silica. The latter is suppressed: because of this and other features distinguishing this site from silanol species (e.g. the formation of dimeric Sim2H(+) species, favoured by coverage and unfavoured by temperatures of adsorption higher than ambient temperature) a candidate is an Al based site. We propose a Lewis centre coordinating a water molecule, exhibiting acidic properties. This acidic water molecule can be replaced by the stronger base ammonia, also depleting inner strong Brønsted sites. A mechanism for the generation of the two sites from surface Brønsted species is proposed. Long term adsorption measurements at 25 °C already show the onset of the interaction with inner strongly acidic Brønsted sites: because of its size, activation is required for Sim to pass the supercage openings and reach inner acidic sites. When adsorption is run at 40-50 °C, uptake is much larger and increases with temperature. Isochoric measurements suggest a pKa value of ca. 3 compatible with its marked acidic

  10. THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: SPECTRAL VARIATION ON KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E.; Glass, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. Twelve targets were re-observed with the WFC3 in the optical and NIR wavebands designed to complement those used during the first visit. Additionally, all of the observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A re-analysis of the optical and NIR color distribution reveals a bifurcated optical color distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colors and has correlated optical and NIR colors, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on five targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point-spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have a broad range of dynamical classes and absolute magnitudes, exhibit a broad range of apparent magnitude variations, and are found in both compositional classes. The spectrally variable objects with sufficiently accurate colors for spectral classification maintain their membership, belonging to the same class at both epochs. 2005 TV189 exhibits a sufficiently broad difference in color at the two epochs that span the full range of colors of the neutral class. This strongly argues that the neutral class is one single class with a broad range of colors, rather than the combination of multiple overlapping classes.

  11. Triple assembly of ZnO, large-scale hollow spherical shells with flower-like species consisting of rods grown on the outer surfaces of shells

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Yazhuo; Hu Jun; Liu Honglai; Hu Ying

    2010-03-15

    Novel large-scale hollow ZnO spherical shells were synthesized by ionic liquids assisted hydrothermal oxidization of pure zinc powder without any catalyst at a relatively low temperature of 160 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) patterns show that the shells are composed of ZnO and the structure of the shells is very unique. Textured flower-like ZnO consisting of ZnO rods is grown on the outer surfaces of shells forming a triple assembly. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra of the oxidized material show a sharp peak at 379 nm and a wider broad peak centered at 498 nm. The possible growth mechanism of the triple assembly of ZnO is discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: A proposed growth mechanism of large scale hollow ZnO. Bubbles provide the aggregation center for ionic liquids that leads to the formation of hollow Zn particle-dotted shells, buoyancy promotes shells to go upward, the breach occurs when shells are subjected to overpressure.

  12. Use of T7 RNA polymerase to direct expression of outer Surface Protein A (OspA) from the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, John J.; Lade, Barbara N.

    1991-01-01

    The OspA gene from a North American strain of the Lyme disease Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, was cloned under the control of transciption and translation signals from bacteriophage T7. Full-length OspA protein, a 273 amino acid (31kD) lipoprotein, is expressed poorly in Escherichia coli and is associated with the insoluble membrane fraction. In contrast, a truncated form of OspA lacking the amino-terminal signal sequence which normally would direct localization of the protein to the outer membrane is expressed at very high levels (less than or equal to 100 mg/liter) and is soluble. The truncated protein was purified to homogeneity and is being tested to see if it will be useful as an immunogen in a vaccine against Lyme disease. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the secondary structure and study conformational changes in the protein. Studies underway with other surface proteins from B burgdorferi and a related spirochete, B. hermsii, which causes relapsing fever, leads us to conclude that a strategy similar to that used to express the truncated OspA can provide a facile method for producing variations of Borrelia lipoproteins which are highly expressed in E. coli and soluble without exposure to detergents.

  13. Elongated Structure of the Outer-Membrane Activator of Peptidoglycan Synthesis LpoA: Implications for PBP1A Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Nicolas L.; Bougault, Catherine M.; Lodge, Adam; Derouaux, Adeline; Callens, Gilles; Egan, Alexander J.F.; Ayala, Isabel; Lewis, Richard J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial cell envelope contains the stress-bearing peptidoglycan layer, which is enlarged during cell growth and division by membrane-anchored synthases guided by cytoskeletal elements. In Escherichia coli, the major peptidoglycan synthase PBP1A requires stimulation by the outer-membrane-anchored lipoprotein LpoA. Whereas the C-terminal domain of LpoA interacts with PBP1A to stimulate its peptide crosslinking activity, little is known about the role of the N-terminal domain. Herein we report its NMR structure, which adopts an all-α-helical fold comprising a series of helix-turn-helix tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR)-like motifs. NMR spectroscopy of full-length LpoA revealed two extended flexible regions in the C-terminal domain and limited, if any, flexibility between the N- and C-terminal domains. Analytical ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering results are consistent with LpoA adopting an elongated shape, with dimensions sufficient to span from the outer membrane through the periplasm to interact with the peptidoglycan synthase PBP1A. PMID:24954617

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  15. Pyochelin enantiomers and their outer-membrane siderophore transporters in fluorescent pseudomonads: structural bases for unique enantiospecific recognition.

    PubMed

    Brillet, Karl; Reimmann, Cornelia; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Noël, Sabrina; Rognan, Didier; Schalk, Isabelle J; Cobessi, David

    2011-10-19

    Pyochelin (Pch) and enantiopyochelin (EPch) are enantiomeric siderophores, with three chiral centers, produced under iron limitation conditions by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens , respectively. After iron chelation in the extracellular medium, Pch-Fe and EPch-Fe are recognized and transported by their specific outer-membrane transporters: FptA in P. aeruginosa and FetA in P. fluorescens . Structural analysis of FetA-EPch-Fe and FptA-Pch-Fe, combined with mutagenesis and docking studies revealed the structural basis of the stereospecific recognition of these enantiomers by their respective transporters. Whereas FetA and FptA have a low sequence identity but high structural homology, the Pch and EPch binding pockets do not share any structural homology, but display similar physicochemical properties. The stereospecific recognition of both enantiomers by their corresponding transporters is imposed by the configuration of the siderophore's C4'' and C2'' chiral centers. This recognition involves specific hydrogen bonds between the Arg91 guanidinium group and EPch-Fe for FetA and between the Leu117-Leu116 main chain and Pch-Fe for FptA. FetA and FptA are the first membrane receptors to be structurally described with opposite binding enantioselectivities for their ligands, giving insights into the structural basis of their enantiospecificity. PMID:21902256

  16. Surface structures of lead deposited on Mo(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, S.; Gotoh, Y.; Nishi, T.; Mori, D.; Gonda, T.

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of lead deposited on an Mo(110) surface were studied by means of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Four kinds of surface structure were observed. Three surface structures appeared at nearly one monolayer of lead coverage at room temperature. All surface structures have large unit cells that coincide with the atomic arrangement of the molybdenum substrate. The growth modes of the Pb/Mo(110) system are the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode at room temperature and the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode at high temperatures. The epitaxial orientation relationship of the Pb/Mo(110) system is [1¯10] Pb‖[001] Mo, (111) Pb‖(110) Mo.

  17. Distinct Structural Elements Govern the Folding, Stability, and Catalysis in the Outer Membrane Enzyme PagP.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-09-01

    The outer membrane enzyme PagP is indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria and has been implicated in resistance to host immune defenses. PagP possesses an unusual structure for an integral membrane protein, with a highly dynamic barrel domain that is tilted with respect to the membrane normal. In addition, it contains an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Recent functional and structural studies have shown that these molecular factors are critical for PagP to carry out its function in the challenging environment of the bacterial outer membrane. However, the precise contributions of the N-helix to folding and stability and residues that can influence catalytic rates remain to be addressed. Here, we identify a sequence-dependent stabilizing role for the N-terminal helix of PagP in the measured thermodynamic stability of the barrel. Using chimeric barrel sequences, we show that the Escherichia coli PagP N-terminal helix confers 2-fold greater stability to the Salmonella typhimurium barrel. Further, we find that the W78F substitution in S. typhimurium causes a nearly 20-fold increase in the specific activity in vitro for the phospholipase reaction, compared to that of E. coli PagP. Here, phenylalanine serves as a key regulator of catalysis, possibly by increasing the reaction rate. Through coevolution analysis, we detect an interaction network between seemingly unrelated segments of this membrane protein. Exchanging the structural and functional features between homologous PagP enzymes from E. coli and S. typhimurium has provided us with an understanding of the molecular factors governing PagP stability and function. PMID:27525547

  18. Distinct Structural Elements Govern the Folding, Stability, and Catalysis in the Outer Membrane Enzyme PagP.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-09-01

    The outer membrane enzyme PagP is indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria and has been implicated in resistance to host immune defenses. PagP possesses an unusual structure for an integral membrane protein, with a highly dynamic barrel domain that is tilted with respect to the membrane normal. In addition, it contains an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Recent functional and structural studies have shown that these molecular factors are critical for PagP to carry out its function in the challenging environment of the bacterial outer membrane. However, the precise contributions of the N-helix to folding and stability and residues that can influence catalytic rates remain to be addressed. Here, we identify a sequence-dependent stabilizing role for the N-terminal helix of PagP in the measured thermodynamic stability of the barrel. Using chimeric barrel sequences, we show that the Escherichia coli PagP N-terminal helix confers 2-fold greater stability to the Salmonella typhimurium barrel. Further, we find that the W78F substitution in S. typhimurium causes a nearly 20-fold increase in the specific activity in vitro for the phospholipase reaction, compared to that of E. coli PagP. Here, phenylalanine serves as a key regulator of catalysis, possibly by increasing the reaction rate. Through coevolution analysis, we detect an interaction network between seemingly unrelated segments of this membrane protein. Exchanging the structural and functional features between homologous PagP enzymes from E. coli and S. typhimurium has provided us with an understanding of the molecular factors governing PagP stability and function.

  19. Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization Using Riemann Surface Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yalin; Lui, Lok Ming; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2011-01-01

    In medical imaging, parameterized 3-D surface models are useful for anatomical modeling and visualization, statistical comparisons of anatomy, and surface-based registration and signal processing. Here we introduce a parameterization method based on Riemann surface structure, which uses a special curvilinear net structure (conformal net) to partition the surface into a set of patches that can each be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable (their solutions tend to be smooth functions and the boundary conditions of the Dirichlet problem can be enforced). Conformal parameterization also helps transform partial differential equations (PDEs) that may be defined on 3-D brain surface manifolds to modified PDEs on a two-dimensional parameter domain. Since the Jacobian matrix of a conformal parameterization is diagonal, the modified PDE on the parameter domain is readily solved. To illustrate our techniques, we computed parameterizations for several types of anatomical surfaces in 3-D magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampi, and lateral ventricles. For surfaces that are topologically homeomorphic to each other and have similar geometrical structures, we show that the parameterization results are consistent and the subdivided surfaces can be matched to each other. Finally, we present an automatic sulcal landmark location algorithm by solving PDEs on cortical surfaces. The landmark detection results are used as constraints for building conformal maps between surfaces that also match explicitly defined landmarks. PMID:17679336

  20. Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

  1. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  2. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer membrane protein OmpL32

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immu...

  3. Structural characterization of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharide outer cores associated with Guillain-Barre and Miller Fisher syndromes.

    PubMed

    Godschalk, Peggy C R; Kuijf, Mark L; Li, Jianjun; St Michael, Frank; Ang, C Wim; Jacobs, Bart C; Karwaski, Marie-France; Brochu, Denis; Moterassed, Ali; Endtz, Hubert P; van Belkum, Alex; Gilbert, Michel

    2007-03-01

    Molecular mimicry between lipooligosaccharides (LOS) of Campylobacter jejuni and gangliosides in peripheral nerves plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of C. jejuni-related Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). We have analyzed the LOS outer core structures of 26 C. jejuni strains associated with GBS and its variant, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), by capillary electrophoresis coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Sixteen out of 22 (73%) GBS-associated and all 4 (100%) MFS-associated strains expressed LOS with ganglioside mimics. GM1a was the most prevalent ganglioside mimic in GBS-associated strains (10/22, 45%), and in eight of these strains, GM1a was found in combination with GD1a mimics. All seven strains isolated from patients with ophthalmoplegia (GBS or MFS) expressed disialylated (GD3 or GD1c) mimics. Three out of 22 GBS-associated strains (14%) did not express sialylated ganglioside mimics because their LOS locus lacked the genes necessary for sialylation. Three other strains (14%) did not express ganglioside mimics because of frameshift mutations in either the cstII sialyltransferase gene or the cgtB galactosyltransferase gene. It is not possible to determine if these mutations were already present during C. jejuni infection. This is the first report in which mass spectrometry combined with DNA sequence data were used to infer the LOS outer core structures of a large number of neuropathy-associated C. jejuni strains. We conclude that molecular mimicry between gangliosides and C. jejuni LOS is the presumable pathogenic mechanism in most cases of C. jejuni-related GBS. However, our findings suggest that in some cases, other mechanisms may play a role. Further examination of the disease etiology in these patients is mandatory.

  4. Microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatment, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatments, and the method and apparatus for its preparation are disclosed. The structure is prepared by sequentially subjecting a uniformly surface treated structure to atomic oxygen treatment to remove an outer layer of surface treatment to a generally uniform depth, and then surface treating the so exposed layer with another surface treating agent. The atomic oxygen/surface treatment steps may optionally be repeated, each successive time to a lesser depth, to produce a microporous structure having multilayered surface treatments. The apparatus employs at least one side arm from a main oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  5. Microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatment, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A microporous structure with layered interstitial surface treatments, and method and apparatus for preparation thereof is presented. The structure is prepared by sequentially subjecting a uniformly surface-treated structure to atomic oxygen treatment to remove an outer layer of surface treatment to a generally uniform depth, and then surface treating the so exposed layer with another surface treating agent. The atomic oxygen/surface treatment steps may optionally be repeated, each successive time to a lesser depth, to produce a microporous structure having multilayered surface treatments. The apparatus employs at least one side arm from a main atomic oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  6. The structure of SN 1987A's outer circumstellar envelope as probed by light echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin; Sugerman, Ben; Lawrence, Stephen; Kunkel, William

    2001-05-01

    We present ground-based and HST images processed by image subtraction to highlight transient reflection nebulae or ``light echoes'' of the maximum light pulse of the explosion of SN 1987A from surrounding material. Along with numerous structures already discussed elsewhere, we have found (in multiple epochs of data) a new feature opposite the SN from the mysterious ``Napoleon's Hat'' which indicates a symmetric structure due to shocks internal to the SN's red supergiant wind and probably caused by the pile-up of gas due to differential velocities within the outflow. We also show how echoes betray the ram pressure distribution of the progenitor mass loss flow. .

  7. The amazing story of semiconductor surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, C. B.

    1995-12-01

    A brief indication of the history of the determination and prediction of the structure of semiconductor surfaces is given. Only clean surfaces are considered, although adsorbate structures exhibit analogous features. Many of these surfaces are reconstructed, i.e., the symmetry of their surface structure is lower than that of the corresponding bulk lattice plane. During the 1980s and 1990s, the detailed atomic geometries of many of these structures were determined. They exhibit a wide variety of atomic motifs, many of which are not familiar from either small molecule geometries or solid state structures. Theoretical predictions exist for a few of the most heavily studied structures, but even in these cases not all the details of the structures are accepted. The enormous literature on this topic can be comprehended by recognizing that the surface regions of semiconductors constitute a new class of two dimensional chemical compounds, restricted by the requirement that they fit epitaxically on the bulk crystalline substrate. Five principles govern the formation of these compounds for clean tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors, guiding even a novice to a rudimentary understanding of the origin of the observed rich variety of surface structures. In the case of the cleavage surfaces additional scaling laws are satisfied which further buttress the concept that these surfaces are two dimensional compounds governed by coordination chemistry considerations which are distinct from those appropriate for either molecules or bulk solids.

  8. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Christopher B; Rau, Dr. Donald

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  9. [Bacterial Outer Membrane Nanovesicles: Structure, Biogenesis, Functions, and Application in Biotechnology and Medicine (Review)].

    PubMed

    Lusta, K A

    2015-01-01

    The review summarizes the comprehensive biochemical and physicochemical characteristics of extracellular membrane nanovesicles (EMN) derived from different kinds of bacteria. The EMN structure, composition, biogenesis, secretion mechanisms, formation conditions, functions, involvement in pathogenesis, and application in biotechnology and medicine are discussed.

  10. Effects of Complex Interplanetary Structures on the Dynamics of the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt During the 16-30 September 2014 Period: II) Corotating Solar Wind Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Da Silva, L. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Alves, L. R.; Jauer, P. R.; Dias Silveira, M. V.; Medeiros, C.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C.; Kanekal, S. G.; Georgiou, M.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Dal Lago, A.; Vieira, L. E. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a case study describing the dynamics of the outer radiation belt for two different solar wind conditions. First, we discuss a dropout of outer belt energetic electron fluxes corresponding to the arrival of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) followed by a corotating stream in September 2014. Second, we discuss the reformation of the outer radiation belt that began on September 22nd. We find that the arrival of the ICME and the corotating interaction region that preceded the stream cause a long-duration (many day) dropout of high-energy electrons. The recovery in radiation belt fluxes only begins when the high-speed stream begins to develop IMF Bz fluctuations and auroral activity resumes. Furthermore, during periods in which several consecutive solar wind structures appear, the first structure primes the outer radiation belt prior to the interaction of the subsequent solar wind structures with the magnetosphere. Consequently, the evolution of the outer radiation belt through the solar cycle is significantly affected by the dominant structure of each phase of the cycle. We use energetic electron and magnetic field observations provided by the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and GOES missions.

  11. Influence of the lipid membrane environment on structure and activity of the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L Miya; Yao, Yong; Plano, Gregory V; Marassi, Francesca M

    2015-02-01

    The surrounding environment has significant consequences for the structural and functional properties of membrane proteins. While native structure and function can be reconstituted in lipid bilayer membranes, the detergents used for protein solubilization are not always compatible with biological activity and, hence, not always appropriate for direct detection of ligand binding by NMR spectroscopy. Here we describe how the sample environment affects the activity of the outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) from Yersinia pestis. Although Ail adopts the correct β-barrel fold in micelles, the high detergent concentrations required for NMR structural studies are not compatible with the ligand binding functionality of the protein. We also describe preparations of Ail embedded in phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs, optimized for NMR studies and ligand binding activity assays. Ail in nanodiscs is capable of binding its human ligand fibronectin and also yields high quality NMR spectra that reflect the proper fold. Binding activity assays, developed to be performed directly with the NMR samples, show that ligand binding involves the extracellular loops of Ail. The data show that even when detergent micelles support the protein fold, detergents can interfere with activity in subtle ways.

  12. Structure of the Small Outer Capsid Protein, Soc: A Clamp for Stabilizing Capsids of T4-like Phages

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Li; Fokine, Andrei; O'Donnell, Erin; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-07-22

    Many viruses need to stabilize their capsid structure against DNA pressure and for survival in hostile environments. The 9-kDa outer capsid protein (Soc) of bacteriophage T4, which stabilizes the virus, attaches to the capsid during the final stage of maturation. There are 870 Soc molecules that act as a 'glue' between neighboring hexameric capsomers, forming a 'cage' that stabilizes the T4 capsid against extremes of pH and temperature. Here we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Soc from the bacteriophage RB69, a close relative of T4. The RB69 crystal structure and a homology model of T4 Soc were fitted into the cryoelectron microscopy reconstruction of the T4 capsid. This established the region of Soc that interacts with the major capsid protein and suggested a mechanism, verified by extensive mutational and biochemical studies, for stabilization of the capsid in which the Soc trimers act as clamps between neighboring capsomers. The results demonstrate the factors involved in stabilizing not only the capsids of T4-like bacteriophages but also many other virus capsids.

  13. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  14. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems. PMID:25347594

  15. Inner structure and outer limits: Precision QCD and electroweak tests from neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Bonnie Tamminga

    Neutrinos are both excellent probes for discovering the secrets of QCD and elusive particles continually surprising us. This thesis reports first on a proton structure measurement, specifically the extraction of the proton structure function F2 from CCFR neutrino-nucleon differential cross sections. The F2 results are in good agreement with the F2 measured in muon scattering above Q2 = 1 GeV2. Comparison of the two sets of data below Q2 = 1 GeV2, which provides information on the axial vector contribution, is discussed. The thesis also addresses the nature of neutrinos. Do neutrinos have mass? Do they have other Beyond-the-Standard-Model properties that can give us clues to their nature? Recent evidence from neutrino oscillation experiments from around the world indicate that neutrinos may oscillate between their different flavors and therefore may have mass. The MiniBooNE experiment discussed here will be able to address this oscillation phenomenon as well as other possible beyond Standard Model neutrino properties.

  16. Changes in the turbulent boundary layer structure associated with net drag reduction by outer layer manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, N.; Falco, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    A specially designed wind tunnel was used to examine the effects of tandemly arranged parallel plate manipulators (TAPPMs) on a turbulent boundary-layer structure and the associated drag. Momentum balances, as well as measurements of the local shear stress from the velocity gradient near the wall, were used to obtain the net drag and local skin friction changes. Two TAPPMs, identical except for the thickness of their plates, were used in the study. Results with .003 inch plates were a maximum net drag reduction of 10 percent at 58 beta sub o (using a momentum balance). At 20 beta sub o, simultaneous laser sheet flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry data showed that the Reynolds stress in the large eddies was significantly reduced, as were the streamwise and normal velocity components. Using space-time correlations the reductions were again identified. Furthermore, quantitative flow visualization showed that the outward normal velocity of the inner region was also significantly decreased in the region around 20 beta sub o. However, throughout the first 130 beta sub o, the measured sublayer thickness with the TAPPMs in place was 15 to 20 percent greater. The data showed that the skin friction, as well as the structure of the turbulence, was strongly modified in the first 35 beta sub o, but that they both significantly relaxed toward unmanipulated boundary layer values by 50 beta sub o.

  17. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  18. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  19. The leptospiral outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Haake, David A; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) is the front line of leptospiral interactions with their environment and the mammalian host. Unlike most invasive spirochetes, pathogenic leptospires must be able to survive in both free-living and host-adapted states. As organisms move from one set of environmental conditions to another, the OM must cope with a series of conflicting challenges. For example, the OM must be porous enough to allow nutrient uptake, yet robust enough to defend the cell against noxious substances. In the host, the OM presents a surface decorated with adhesins and receptors for attaching to, and acquiring, desirable host molecules such as the complement regulator, Factor H.Factor H. On the other hand, the OM must enable leptospires to evade detection by the host's immune system on their way from sites of invasion through the bloodstream to the protected niche of the proximal tubule. The picture that is emerging of the leptospiral OM is that, while it shares many of the characteristics of the OMs of spirochetes and Gram-negative bacteria, it is also unique and different in ways that make it of general interest to microbiologists. For example, unlike most other pathogenic spirochetes, the leptospiral OM is rich in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Leptospiral LPS is similar to that of Gram-negative bacteria but has a number of unique structural features that may explain why it is not recognized by the LPS-specific Toll-like receptor 4 of humans. As in other spirochetes, lipoproteins are major components of the leptospiral OM, though their roles are poorly understood. The functions of transmembrane outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in many cases are better understood, thanks to homologies with their Gram-negative counterparts and the emergence of improved genetic techniques. This chapter will review recent discoveries involving the leptospiral OM and its role in leptospiral physiology and pathogenesis.

  20. The structure of star clusters in the outer halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, N. R.; Mackey, A. D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Huxor, A.; Read, J. I.; Lewis, G. F.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S.; Ibata, R.; Wilkinson, M. I.; McConnachie, A. W.; Martin, N. F.; Davies, M. B.; Bridges, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    We present a structural analysis of halo star clusters in M31 based on deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging. The clusters in our sample span a range in galactocentric projected distance from 13 to 100 kpc and thus reside in rather remote environments. Ten of the clusters are classical globulars, whilst four are from the Huxor et al. population of extended, old clusters. For most clusters, contamination by M31 halo stars is slight, and so the profiles can be mapped reliably to large radial distances from their centres. We find that the extended clusters are well fit by analytic King profiles with ˜20 parsec core radii and ˜100 parsec photometric tidal radii, or by Sérsic profiles of index ˜1 (i.e. approximately exponential). Most of the classical globulars also have large photometric tidal radii in the range 50-100 parsec; however, the King profile is a less good fit in some cases, particularly at small radii. We find 60 per cent of the classical globular clusters exhibit cuspy cores which are reasonably well described by Sérsic profiles of index ˜2-6. Our analysis also reinforces the finding that luminous classical globulars, with half-light radii <10 parsec, are present out to radii of at least 100 kpc in M31, which is in contrast to the situation in the Milky Way where such clusters (other than the unusual object NGC 2419) are absent beyond 40 kpc.

  1. Analysis of Eddy Current Capabilities for the Detection of Outer Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking in Small Bore Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Phillip; Simpson, John

    2007-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for the detection of outer diameter damage in tubing and many complex aerospace structures often requires the use of an inner diameter probe due to a lack of access to the outside of the part. In small bore structures the probe size and orientation are constrained by the inner diameter of the part, complicating the optimization of the inspection technique. Detection of flaws through a significant remaining wall thickness becomes limited not only by the standard depth of penetration, but also geometrical aspects of the probe. Recently, an orthogonal eddy current probe was developed for detection of such flaws in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters. In this case, the detection of deeply buried stress corrosion cracking by an inner diameter eddy current probe was sought. Probe optimization was performed based upon the limiting spatial dimensions, flaw orientation, and required detection sensitivity. Analysis of the probe/flaw interaction was performed through the use of finite and boundary element modeling techniques. Experimental data for the flaw detection capabilities, including a probability of detection study, will be presented along with the simulation data. The results of this work have led to the successful deployment of an inspection system for the detection of stress corrosion cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters.

  2. The real reason for having a meibomian lipid layer covering the outer surface of the tear film - A review.

    PubMed

    Millar, Thomas J; Schuett, Burkhardt S

    2015-08-01

    This review critically evaluates a broad range of literature in order to show the relationship between meibum, tear lipids and the tear film lipid layer (TFLL). The relationship of meibum composition to dry eye syndrome is briefly discussed. The review also explores the interactions between aqueous and the TFLL by examining the correlations between meibomian lipids and lipids extracted from whole tears, and by considering protein adsorption to the TFLL from the aqueous. Although it is clear to the authors that a normal tear film resists evaporation, an emerging idea from the literature is that the main purpose of the TFLL is to allow the spread of the tear film and to prevent its collapse onto the ocular surface, rather than to be an evaporative blanket. Current models on the possible structure of the TFLL are also examined.

  3. The real reason for having a meibomian lipid layer covering the outer surface of the tear film - A review.

    PubMed

    Millar, Thomas J; Schuett, Burkhardt S

    2015-08-01

    This review critically evaluates a broad range of literature in order to show the relationship between meibum, tear lipids and the tear film lipid layer (TFLL). The relationship of meibum composition to dry eye syndrome is briefly discussed. The review also explores the interactions between aqueous and the TFLL by examining the correlations between meibomian lipids and lipids extracted from whole tears, and by considering protein adsorption to the TFLL from the aqueous. Although it is clear to the authors that a normal tear film resists evaporation, an emerging idea from the literature is that the main purpose of the TFLL is to allow the spread of the tear film and to prevent its collapse onto the ocular surface, rather than to be an evaporative blanket. Current models on the possible structure of the TFLL are also examined. PMID:25981748

  4. Subwavelength structured surfaces and their applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raguin, Daniel H.; Morris, G. Michael

    1993-01-01

    The term subwavelength structured (SWS) surface describes any surface that contains a subwavelength-period grating or gratings. The grating may be of any type provided the period is sufficiently fine so that, unlike conventional gratings, no diffraction orders propagate other than the zeroth orders. Because of the fine periods involved, the fabrication of such surfaces for applications in the visible and infrared portions of the spectral regime have only recently been considered. With refinements in holographic procedures and the push of the semiconductor industry for submicron lithography, production of SWS surfaces is becoming increasingly viable. The topics covered include the following: analytic approaches to analyze SWS surfaces, 1D periodic stratification and effective medium theory, design of waveplates using form birefringence, and 2D binary antireflection structured surfaces.

  5. Correlating simulated surface marks with near-surface tornado structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael I.

    Tornadoes often leave behind patterns of debris deposition, or "surface marks", which provide a direct signature of their near surface winds. The intent of this thesis is to investigate what can be learned about near-surface tornado structure and intensity through the properties of surface marks generated by simulated, debris-laden tornadoes. Earlier work showed through numerical simulations that the tornado's structure and intensity is highly sensitive to properties of the near-surface flow and can change rapidly in time for some conditions. The strongest winds often occur within tens of meters of the surface where the threat to human life and property is highest, and factors such as massive debris loadings and asymmetry of the main vortex have proven to be critical complications in some regimes. However, studying this portion of the flow in the field is problematic; while Doppler radar provides the best tornado wind field measurements, it cannot probe below about 20 m, and interpretation of Doppler data requires assumptions about tornado symmetry, steadiness in time, and correlation between scatterer and air velocities that are more uncertain near the surface. As early as 1967, Fujita proposed estimating tornado wind speeds from analysis of aerial photography and ground documentation of surface marks. A handful of studies followed but were limited by difficulties in interpreting physical origins of the marks, and little scientific attention has been paid to them since. Here, Fujita's original idea is revisited in the context of three-dimensional, large-eddy simulations of tornadoes with fully-coupled debris. In this thesis, the origins of the most prominent simulated marks are determined and compared with historical interpretations of real marks. The earlier hypothesis that cycloidal surface marks were directly correlated with the paths of individual vortices (either the main vortex or its secondary vortices, when present) is unsupported by the simulation results

  6. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record. PMID:27221593

  7. The Outer Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Kerstin

    η Carinae is surrounded by a complex circumstellar nebula ejected during more than one eruption, the great eruption in the 1840s and the second or lesser eruption in the 1890s. Beyond the well-defined edges of its famous bipolar nebula are additional nebulous features and ejecta referred to as the outer ejecta. The outer ejecta includes a variety of structures of very different sizes and morphologies distributed in a region 0.67 pc in diameter with a mass of > 2-4 M⊙. Some individual features in the outer ejecta are moving extremely fast, up to 3,200 km/s, with most of the expansion velocities between 400-900 km/s. As a consequence of these high velocities, structures in the outer ejecta interact with the surrounding medium and with each other. The strong shocks that arise from these interactions give rise to soft X-ray emission. The global expansion pattern of the outer ejecta reveals an overall bipolar distribution, giving a symmetric structure to its morphologically more irregular appearance. The long, highly collimated filaments, called strings, are particularly unusual. The material in the strings follow a Hubble-flow and appear to originate at the central star. The properties of the nebulae associated with other LBVs also are described and compared with η Car. HR Car and AG Car show similar bipolar morphologies but are much older; HR Car's nebula may be η Car's older twin. The larger, extended nebulae detected around the giant eruption LBV P Cygni, and the extended nebulosity associated with AG Car and HR Car could be either from previous eruptions or facsimiles to η Car's outer ejecta.

  8. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  9. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  10. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  11. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  12. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  13. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  14. meoA is the structural gene for outer membrane protein c of Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    van Alphen, L; Lugtenberg, B; van Boxtel, R; Hack, A M; Verhoef, C; Havekes, L

    1979-01-31

    The isolation and characterization of two mutants of Escherichia coli K12 with an altered outer membrane protein c is described. The first mutant, strain CE1151, was isolated as a bacteriophage Me1 resistant strain which contains normal levels of protein c. Mutant cells adsorbed the phage with a strongly decreased rate. Complexes of purified nonheat modified wild type protein c and wild type lipopolysaccharide inactivated phage Me1, indicating that these components are required for receptor activity for phage Me1. When wild type protein c was replaced by protein c of strain CE1151, the receptor-complex was far less active, showing that protein c of strain CE1151 is altered. The second mutant produces a protein c with a decreased electrophoretic mobility, designated as protein c. An altered apparent molecular weight was also observed for one or more fragments obtained after fragmentation of the mutant protein with cyanogen bromide, trypsin and chymotrypsin. Alteration of protein c was not accompanied by a detectable alteration in protein b or its fragments. Both mutations are located at minute 48 of the Escherichia coli K12 linkage map. The results strongly suggest that meoA is the structural gene for protein c.

  15. Individual contribution of grain outer layers and their cell wall structure to the mechanical properties of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Carole; Peyron, Stéphane; Mabille, Frédéric; Lapierre, Catherine; Bouchet, Brigitte; Abecassis, Joël; Rouau, Xavier

    2003-03-26

    The mechanical properties of wheat bran and the contribution of each constitutive tissue on overall bran properties were determined on a hard wheat (cv. Baroudeur) and a soft wheat (cv. Scipion). Manual dissection allowed three different layers to be separated from wheat bran, according to radial and longitudinal grain orientations, which were identified by confocal laser scanning microscopy as outer pericarp, an intermediate strip (comprising inner pericarp, testa, and nucellar tissue), and aleurone layer, respectively. Tissue microstructure and cell wall composition were determined. Submitted to traction tests, whole bran, intermediate, and aleurone layers demonstrated elastoplastic behavior, whereas pericarp exhibited elastic behavior. By longitudinal orientation, pericarp governed 50% bran elasticity (elastic strength and rigidity), whereas, in the opposite orientation, bran elastic properties were mostly influenced by the other tissues. Regardless of test orientation, the linear force required to bran rupture corresponded to the sum of intermediate and aleurone layer strengths. According to radial orientation, the intermediate strip governed bran extensibility, but according to longitudinal orientation, all tissues contributed until bran disruption. Tissues from both wheat cultivars behaved similarly. A structural model of wheat bran layers illustrated the detachment of pericarp from intermediate layer within radial bran strips.

  16. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Malkin, A

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereus was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.

  17. How membrane surface affects protein structure.

    PubMed

    Bychkova, V E; Basova, L V; Balobanov, V A

    2014-12-01

    The immediate environment of the negatively charged membrane surface is characterized by decreased dielectric constant and pH value. These conditions can be modeled by water-alcohol mixtures at moderately low pH. Several globular proteins were investigated under these conditions, and their conformational behavior in the presence of phospholipid membranes was determined, as well as under conditions modeling the immediate environment of the membrane surface. These proteins underwent conformational transitions from the native to a molten globule-like state. Increased flexibility of the protein structure facilitated protein functioning. Our experimental data allow understanding forces that affect the structure of a protein functioning near the membrane surface (in other words, in the membrane field). Similar conformational states are widely reported in the literature. This indicates that the negatively charged membrane surface can serve as a moderately denaturing agent in the cell. We conclude that the effect of the membrane field on the protein structure must be taken into account.

  18. Integrated geophysical and geological methods to investigate the inner and outer structures of the Quaternary Mýtina maar (W-Bohemia, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechsig, Christina; Heinicke, Jens; Mrlina, Jan; Kämpf, Horst; Nickschick, Tobias; Schmidt, Alina; Bayer, Tomáš; Günther, Thomas; Rücker, Carsten; Seidel, Elisabeth; Seidl, Michal

    2015-11-01

    The Mýtina maar is the first known Quaternary maar in the Bohemian Massif. Based on the results of Mrlina et al. (J Volcanol Geother Res 182:97-112, 2009), a multiparametric geophysical (electrical resistivity tomography, gravimetry, magnetometry, seismics) and geological/petrochemical research study had been carried out. The interpretation of the data has provided new information about the inner structure of the volcanic complex: (1) specification of the depth of post-volcanic sedimentary fill (up to ~100 m) and (2) magnetic and resistivity signs of one (or two) hidden volcanic structures interpreted as intrusions or remains of a scoria cone. The findings at the outer structure of the maar incorporate the (1) evidence of circular fracture zones outside the maar, (2) detection and distribution of volcanic ejecta and tephra-fall deposits at the surface, and (3) indications from electrical resistivity tomography and gravity data in the area between the Mýtina maar and Železná hůrka scoria cone, interpreted as a palaeovalley, filled by volcaniclastic rocks, and aligned along the strike line (NW-SE) of the Tachov fault zone. These findings are valuable contributions to extend the knowledge about structure of maar volcanoes in general. Because of ongoing active magmatic processes in the north-east part of the Cheb Basin (ca. 15-30 km north of the investigation area), the Mýtina maar-diatreme volcano and surroundings is a suitable key area for research directed to reconstruction of the palaeovolcanic evolution and assessment of possible future hazard potential in the Bohemian Massif.

  19. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale in Bureau of Land Management memorandum 3310 #43 (722) and referred to therein as part of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 98,000 square kilometres of the continental margin seaward of the 3 mile offshore limit and within the 600 metre isobath. The designated area, offshore of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Continental Shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake Plateau. The structural framework of the U.3. South Atlantic region is dominated by the Southeast Georgia Embayment --an east-plunging depression recessed into the Atlantic Coastal Plain and shelf between Cape Fear, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida. The embayment is bounded to the north by the Cape Fear Arch and to southeast by the Peninsular Arch. Refraction data indicate a minor basement(?) ridge beneath the outer shelf between 30? and 32?N at 80?W. Drill hole data also suggest a gentle fold or accretionary structure (reef?) off the east coast of Florida. Several other structural features have been identified by refraction and reflection techniques and drilling. These are the Yamacraw Uplift, Burton High, Stone Arch, and the Suwannee Channel. Gravity and magnetic anomalies within the area probably result from emplacement of magma bodies along linear features representing fundamental crustal boundaries. Of these anomalies, the most prominent, is a segment of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly which crosses the coast at Brunswick, Georgia. This anomaly has been interpreted as representing an ancient continental boundary where two formerly separate continental plates collided and were welded together. There may be as much as 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks in the Southeast Georgia Embayment out to the 600 m isobath. Basement rocks beneath the Southeast Georgia Embayment are expected to be similar to those exposed in the

  20. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  1. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  2. PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF CARBON DIOXIDE FROM CARBON SURFACES COATED WITH OXYGEN: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. E-mail: ur5n@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO{sub 2} by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O{sub 2} at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O{sub 2}-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O{sub 2} molecules. The CO{sub 2} production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 {+-} 0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} CO{sub 2} photon{sup -1}; the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} photons cm{sup -2}) since CO{sub 2} is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO{sub 2} since H{sub 2}O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO{sub 2} synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H{sub 2}O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O{sub 2} could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

  3. Generalized complex structures on Kodaira surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinzanescu, Vasile; Turcu, Oana Adela

    2010-01-01

    We compute the deformations in the sense of generalized complex structures of the standard classical complex structure on a primary Kodaira surface and we prove that the obtained family of deformations is a smooth locally complete family depending on four complex parameters. This family is the same as the extended deformations (in the sense of Kontsevich and Barannikov) in degree two, obtained by Poon using differential Gerstenhaber algebras.

  4. Slam is an outer membrane protein that is required for the surface display of lipidated virulence factors in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Yogesh; Lai, Christine Chieh-Lin; Judd, Andrew; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Shin, Hyejin Esther; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Moraes, Trevor F

    2016-01-01

    Lipoproteins decorate the surface of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, playing essential roles in immune evasion and nutrient acquisition. In Neisseria spp., the causative agents of gonorrhoea and meningococcal meningitis, surface lipoproteins (SLPs) are required for virulence and have been extensively studied as prime candidates for vaccine development. However, the machinery and mechanism that allow for the surface display of SLPs are not known. Here, we describe a transposon (Tn5)-based search for the proteins required to deliver SLPs to the surface of Neisseria meningitidis, revealing a family of proteins that we have named the surface lipoprotein assembly modulator (Slam). N. meningitidis contains two Slam proteins, each exhibiting distinct substrate preferences. The Slam proteins are sufficient to reconstitute SLP transport in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, which are otherwise unable to efficiently display these lipoproteins on their cell surface. Immunoprecipitation and domain probing experiments suggest that the SLP, TbpB, interacts with Slam during the transit process; furthermore, the membrane domain of Slam is sufficient for selectivity and proper surface display of SLPs. Rather than being a Neisseria-specific factor, our bioinformatic analysis shows that Slam can be found throughout proteobacterial genomes, indicating a conserved but until now unrecognized virulence mechanism. PMID:27572441

  5. Asymmetry in structural response of inner and outer transmembrane segments of CorA protein by a coarse-grain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Khrutto, Channarong; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Farmer, B. L.; Pandey, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    Structure of CorA protein and its inner (i.corA) and outer (o.corA) transmembrane (TM) components are investigated as a function of temperature by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. Thermal response of i.corA is found to differ considerably from that of the outer component, o.corA. Analysis of the radius of gyration reveals that the inner TM component undergoes a continuous transition from a globular conformation to a random coil structure on raising the temperature. In contrast, the outer transmembrane component exhibits an abrupt (nearly discontinuous) thermal response in a narrow range of temperature. Scaling of the structure factor shows a globular structure of i.corA at a low temperature with an effective dimension D ˜ 3 and a random coil at a high temperature with D ˜ 2. The residue distribution in o.corA is slightly sparser than that of i.corA in a narrow thermos-responsive regime. The difference in thermos-response characteristics of these components (i.corA and o.corA) may reflect their unique transmembrane functions.

  6. Structure of a bacterial cell surface decaheme electron conduit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves decaheme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outer-membrane electron transfer conduits...

  7. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 μm) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface

  8. Multi-instrument measurement campaign at Paranal in 2007. Characterization of the outer scale and the seeing of the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dali Ali, W.; Ziad, A.; Berdja, A.; Maire, J.; Borgnino, J.; Sarazin, M.; Lombardi, G.; Navarrete, J.; Vazquez Ramio, H.; Reyes, M.; Delgado, J. M.; Fuensalida, J. J.; Tokovinin, A.; Bustos, E.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: Within the framework of site qualification for the future European large telescope E-ELT, a campaign of measurements was carried out for ten nights in December 2007 at Paranal using six independent instruments. Methods: To characterize the optical turbulence, two techniques were used: the statistical analysis of the fluctuations of the angle of arrival and the scintillation of the observed objects which are, in this case, a single star for DIMM, GSM, and MASS, a double star for Cute-SCIDAR, and Moon limb for MOSP and LuSci. Results: The optical parameters measured in this campaign and presented here are the seeing, the isoplanatic angle, the coherence time, and the outer scale. We obtain a good agreement with the value measured in previous campaigns. We also extracted the vertical profile of the turbulence given by Cn2(h), and the profiles of the outer scale for the first time at Paranal. A comparison of the different results that we present here allows the determination of the energy distribution in the free atmosphere, on the ground layer as well as in the first meters above ground. This reveals a significant contribution of the surface layer to the degradation of the global seeing.

  9. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein antibodies in wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New York and Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, Megan S; Freer, Heather; Whipps, Christopher M; Wagner, Bettina

    2013-05-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi differentially exhibits outer surface proteins (Osp) on its outer membrane, and detection of particular Osp antibodies in mammals is suggestive of the infection stage. For example, OspF is typically associated with chronic infection, whereas OspC suggests early infection. A fluorescent bead-based multiplex assay was used to test sera from New York and Pennsylvania white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) for the presence of antibodies to OspA, OspC, and OspF. OspF seroprevalence was significantly greater than both OspA and OspC seroprevalence for all study sites. OspA, OspC, and OspF seroprevalences were significantly greater in Pennsylvania deer than New York deer. The regional differences in seroprevalence are believed to be attributable to a heterogeneous Ixodes scapularis distribution. While most seropositive deer were solely OspF seropositive, deer concurrently OspC and OspF seropositive were the second most commonly encountered individuals. Simultaneous detection of OspF and OspC antibodies may occur when non-infected or chronically infected deer are bitten by an infected tick within a few months of blood collection, thereby inducing production of antibodies associated with the early stages of infection with B. burgdorferi.

  10. Surface conduction in encapsulated topological gated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshko, Yury; Korzhovska, Inna; Zhao, Lukas; Arefe, Ghidewon; Konczykowski, Marcin; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2015-03-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs), the surface Dirac fermions intermix with the conducting bulk, thereby complicating access to the low-energy surface charge transport or magnetic response. The subsurface 2D states of bulk origin are vulnerable to bandbending due to surface adatoms, a band modification thought to be responsible for the `ageing' effect. To minimize this effect, we have developed an inert environment mechanical exfoliation technique to fabricate transistor-like gated structures in which prototypical binary TIs as well as ultra-low bulk carrier density ternaries (such as Bi2Te2Se) were encapsulated by thin h-BN layers, with electrical contacts made using exfoliated graphene. The effects of electrostatic tuning by the gate bias voltage on surface conductivity as a function of thickness of the TI layers and the variation with disorder will be presented. Supported by NSF-DMR-1312483, and DOD-W911NF-13-1-0159.

  11. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise Des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance.

  12. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance. PMID:27507621

  13. Assessing the temporal stability of surface functional groups introduced by plasma treatments on the outer shells of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Merenda, Andrea; Ligneris, Elise des; Sears, Kallista; Chaffraix, Thomas; Magniez, Kevin; Cornu, David; Schütz, Jürg A; Dumée, Ludovic F

    2016-01-01

    Plasma treatments are emerging as superior efficiency treatment for high surface to volume ratio materials to tune functional group densities and alter crystallinity due to their ability to interact with matter at the nanoscale. The purpose of this study is to assess for the first time the long term stability of surface functional groups introduced across the surface of carbon nanotube materials for a series of oxidative, reductive and neutral plasma treatment conditions. Both plasma duration dose matrix based exposures and time decay experiments, whereby the surface energy of the materials was evaluated periodically over a one-month period, were carried out. Although only few morphological changes across the graphitic planes of the carbon nanotubes were found under the uniform plasma treatment conditions, the time dependence of pertinent work functions, supported by Raman analysis, suggested that the density of polar groups decreased non-linearly over time prior to reaching saturation from 7 days post treatment. This work provides critical considerations on the understanding of the stability of functional groups introduced across high specific surface area nano-materials used for the design of nano-composites, adsorptive or separation systems, or sensing materials and where interfacial interactions are key to the final materials performance. PMID:27507621

  14. Bacillus atrophaeus Outer Spore Coat Assembly and Ultrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; Wheeler, K E; Pitesky, M E; Malkin, A J

    2005-11-21

    Our previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies successfully visualized native Bacillus atrophaeus spore coat ultrastructure and surface morphology. We have shown that the outer spore coat surface is formed by a crystalline array of {approx}11 nm thick rodlets, having a periodicity of {approx}8 nm. We present here further AFM ultrastructural investigations of air-dried and fully hydrated spore surface architecture. In the rodlet layer, planar and point defects, as well as domain boundaries, similar to those described for inorganic and macromolecular crystals, were identified. For several Bacillus species, rodlet structure assembly and architectural variation appear to be a consequence of species-specific nucleation and crystallization mechanisms that regulate the formation of the outer spore coat. We propose a unifying mechanism for nucleation and self-assembly of this crystalline layer on the outer spore coat surface.

  15. Disk resolved studies of the optical properties and physical nature of the surfaces of the outer planet satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Mosher, J. A.; Johnson, T. V.

    1991-01-01

    The spatially resolved albedo, color, compaction state, roughness, and constituent particle sizes of the surfaces of the satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Jupiter provide important constraints in understanding the geologic evolution and relevant exogenic processes operating in these satellite systems. Some details of observations are given.

  16. Structurally tuned iridescent surfaces inspired by nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Rassart, Marie; Vandenbem, Cédric; Welch, Victoria; Pol Vigneron, Jean; Lucas, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Iridescent surfaces exhibit vivid colours which change with the angle of incidence or viewing due to optical wave interference in the multilayer structure present at the wavelength scale underneath the surface. In nature, one can find examples of iridescent Coleoptera for which the hue changes either greatly or slightly with the angle. Because these species typically make these structures from a single biological material (usually chitin) and air or water as the low refractive index component, they have evolved by adjusting the layer thicknesses in order to display quite different iridescent aspects. Taking inspiration from this proven strategy, we have designed and fabricated periodic TiO2/SiO2 multilayer films in order to demonstrate the concept of structurally tuned iridescent surfaces. Titanium or silicon oxide layers were deposited on a glass substrate using dc reactive or RF magnetron sputtering techniques, respectively. Two structures were designed for which the period and the TiO2/SiO2 layer thickness ratio were varied in such a way that the films displayed radically different iridescent aspects: a reddish-to-greenish changing hue and a stable bluish hue. The fabricated samples were characterized through specular reflectance/transmittance measurements. Modelling of transmittance spectra using standard multilayer film theory confirmed the high quality of the twelve-period Bragg reflectors. The chromaticity coordinates, which were calculated from measured reflectance spectra taken at different angles, were in accordance with theoretical predictions.

  17. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, B.C.; Dunn, J.J.; France, L.L.; Jaing, W.; Polin, D.; Gorgone, G.; Luft, B.; Dykhuizen, D.

    1995-12-31

    Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in North America and Western Europe. As the major delayed immune response in humans, a better understanding of the major outer surface lipoproteins OspA and OspB are of much interest. These proteins have been shown to exhibit three distinct phylogenetic genotypes based on their DNA sequences. This paper describes the cloning of genomic DNA for each variant and amplification of PCR. DNA sequence data was used to derive computer driven phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences. Overproduction of variant OspAs was carried out in E. coli using a T7-based expression system. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies was carried out on the recombinant B31 PspA yielding evidence supporting a B31 protein containing 11% alpha-helix, 34% antiparallel beta-sheet, 12% parallel beta sheet.

  18. Superhydrophobic Behavior on Nano-structured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Superhydrophobic behavior is observed in natural occurrences and has been thoroughly studied over the past few years. Water repellant properties on uniform arrays of vertically aligned nano-cones were investigated to determine the highest achievable contact angle (a measure of water drop repellency), which is measured from the reference plane on which the water drop sits to the tangent line of the point at which the drop makes contact with the reference plane. At low aspect ratios (height vs. width of the nano-cones), surface tension pulls the water into the nano-cone array, resulting in a wetted surface. Higher aspect ratios reverse the effect of the surface tension, resulting in a larger contact angle that causes water drops to roll off the surface. Fiber drawing, bundling, and redrawing are used to produce the structured array glass composite surface. Triple-drawn fibers are fused together, annealed, and sliced into thin wafers. The surface of the composite glass is etched to form nano-cones through a differential etching process and then coated with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Cone aspect ratios can be varied through changes in the chemistry and concentration of the etching acid solution. Superhydrophobic behavior occurs at contact angles >150 and it is predicted and measured that optimal behavior is achieved when the aspect ratio is 4:1, which displays contact angles >=175 .

  19. Subnanosecond-laser-induced periodic surface structures on prescratched silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Motoharu; Matsuo, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were fabricated on a prescratched silicon surface by irradiation with subnanosecond laser pulses. Low-spatial-frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were observed in the central and peripheral regions; both had a period Λ close to the laser wavelength λ, and the wavevector orientation was parallel to the electric field of the laser beam. The LSFL in the peripheral region seemed to be growing, that is, expanding in length with increasing number of pulses, into the outer regions. In addition, high-spatial-frequency LIPSS, Λ ≲ λ /2, were found along the scratches, and their wavevector orientation was parallel to the scratches.

  20. Surface chemistry and structure of beryllium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Eager, M.H.; Smithwick, R.W. III; Smyrl, N.R.

    1982-02-01

    Detailed examination of nitrogen sorption isotherms related to the surface chemistry and structure of high-purity beryllium oxide and the products of alkali treatment aid in a better understanding of the topochemical problems encountered in the production of ceramic items. Details are corroborated by additional techniques: diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT); mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP); and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results correlate well with studies on other oxides when the unique thermophysical properties of this material are considered.

  1. Outer Dregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    15 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the very edge of the south polar residual cap of Mars. The bright areas, which appear somewhat like pieces of sliced Swiss cheese, are composed mainly of frozen carbon dioxide. The scarps around the edges of the carbon dioxide mesas have been retreating at a rate of roughly 3 meters (3 yards) per martian year; in this case, exposing a darker surface that lies below.

    Location near: 85.4oS, 88.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  2. Information essence of chaotic surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, Anna B.; Timashev, Serge F.; Vstovsky, Grigory V.; Kotova, Svetlana L.; Belayev, Vladimir E.

    2003-05-01

    A general phenomenological approach - a Flicker Noise Spectroscopy (FNS)- to revelation of information valuable parameters characterizing the arbitrary chaotic surfaces was develop to distinguish their patterns and describe quantitatively their functional properties. The consideration was carried out in terms of correlation lengths and additional parameters characterizing the rate of correlation links lost in the sequences of surface irregularities. The parameters are obtained by fitting the Fourier spectra and structural functions (difference moments of different orders) calculated for the digitized surface profiles using the approximations derived on the base of model representation of the profiles as the sequences of irregularities of different types ("bursts", "jumps", etc.). The method developed was applied to revelation of effects of a shungit filling agent in polypropylen matrix on the composite properties, revelation of hydrogen treatment effects on the cleavage surfaces of LiF monocrystals after their dissolution in water with quantitative evaluations of their anisotropy, analysis of activity of vacuum deposited porphyrins layers in a photosensibilized gnenration of singlet oxygen into gaseous phase. The approach elaborated can be used for developing the new control tools in nano-technologies, microelectronics, production of polymeric material with the specific surface properties, and others.

  3. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale as modified from BLM memorandum 3310 #42 (722) and referred to therein as the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 58,300 sq km of shelf beneath water depths of less than 200 m and lies chiefly within the Georges Bank basin. The oldest sediments drilled or dredged on the bordering Continental Slope are sandstone, clay, and silt of Upper Cretaceous age. In Upper Cretaceous exposures, on Marthas Vineyard and nearby New England islands, the predominant lithology appears to be clay. About 125 km northeast of the eastern tip of Georges Bank, the Shell B-93 well penetrated clays and silts of Upper and Lower Cretaceous age above dense Jurassic carbonate rocks which overlie a basement of lower Paleozoic slate, schist, quartzite, and granite. Structurally, the Georges Bank basin is a westerly trending trough which opens to the west-southwest. Post-Paleozoic sediments are more than 8 km thick in parts of the basin. Major structural features appear to be directly related to basement structures. Local anticlines, probably caused by differential compaction over basement flexures and horst blocks or by later uplift along basement faults are reflected principally in Lower Cretaceous and older sediments, though some of these features continue upward to within 0.7 of a second (about 650 m) of the seafloor. Tertiary deposits in the Georges Bank basin are probably up to a kilometre thick and are made up of poorly consolidated sand, silt, and clay. The Cretaceous section is inferred to be up to 3.5 km thick and to be mainly clastics -- shale, siltstone, calcareous shale, changing to limestone in the lowest part of the system. Jurassic rocks in the deepest part of the basin appear to be about 3.6 to 4.0 km thick and probably consist mainly of dense carbonates. Potential source rocks in the Georges Bank basin may include organic-rich Cretaceous shale and carbonaceous Jurassic limestone. By analogy with the

  4. The 3-Dimensional Inner and Outer Structure of Ejecta Around Eta Carinae as Detected by the STIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The HST/STIS instrument was used successfully to perform a complete mapping of the Homunculus nebula at two wavelength ranges including H-alpha and H-beta with a spectral resolving power of about 5000 and a spatial resolution of 0.1". The individual spectra were merged to synthesize three-dimensional data cubes that contain a set of images of Eta Car with spatial resolution of 0.10 to 0.251, sliced at velocity increment of 10 -- 30 km/s. For the first time this unique method allows us to diagnose the origin of intrinsic narrow emission structure of the nebula with high spatial and velocity resolution. Our initial analysis revealed the inner emission structure appeared to trace an elongated bipolar shell (possibly other shells as well) with a scale size of an arcsecond (i.e., "little homunculus in the Homunculus"). Furthermore, the mapping data cube revealed that the "fan" or "paddle" -- often referred as the source of peculiar blue-shifted intrinsic emissions including the Strontium cloud -- is not the source of intrinsic emissions. The fan is not even a part of the equatorial disk, but is spatially separated from the peculiar emission structure. Indeed we suggest that the fan is a surface of the Northwest lobe, possibly revealed by a blowout of the equatorial disk. We will use a number of visualization techniques (tomographic animations and simple 3-D models) to show these structures. These new results have strong impact upon future numerical modelings of the Homunculus nebula and of understanding of the evolution of the ejecta powered by the central source(s).

  5. Bioinspired, dynamic, structured surfaces for biofilm prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Alexander K.

    Bacteria primarily exist in robust, surface-associated communities known as biofilms, ubiquitous in both natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms resist a wide range of biocidal treatments and pose persistent pathogenic threats. Treatment of adherent biofilm is difficult, costly, and, in medical systems such as catheters, frequently impossible. Adding to the challenge, we have discovered that biofilm can be both impenetrable to vapors and extremely nonwetting, repelling even low surface tension commercial antimicrobials. Our study shows multiple contributing factors, including biochemical components and multiscale reentrant topography. Reliant on surface chemistry, conventional strategies for preventing biofilm only transiently affect attachment and/or are environmentally toxic. In this work, we look to Nature's antifouling solutions, such as the dynamic spiny skin of the echinoderm, and we develop a versatile surface nanofabrication platform. Our benchtop approach unites soft lithography, electrodeposition, mold deformation, and material selection to enable many degrees of freedom—material, geometric, mechanical, dynamic—that can be programmed starting from a single master structure. The mechanical properties of the bio-inspired nanostructures, verified by AFM, are precisely and rationally tunable. We examine how synthetic dynamic nanostructured surfaces control the attachment of pathogenic biofilms. The parameters governing long-range patterning of bacteria on high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanoarrays are combinatorially elucidated, and we discover that sufficiently low effective stiffness of these HAR arrays mechanoselectively inhibits ˜40% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm attachment. Inspired by the active echinoderm skin, we design and fabricate externally actuated dynamic elastomer surfaces with active surface microtopography. We extract from a large parameter space the critical topographic length scales and actuation time scales for achieving

  6. Structure and thermodynamics of surface recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Interactions of the surface glycoprotein, gp120, with the receptors of host cells define the pathogenesis of HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. gp120 is made of several disulfide-bridged loops--the amino acid sequences of some of these loops are fairly conserved whereas the rest are variable. The third variable (V3) loop has been the target of vaccine design for quite some time since this loop is involved in various steps of viral pathogenesis. However, this loop also happens to be the most variable one. The authors have carried out structural and immunological studies to determine the sequence-structure-antigenicity correlations of the HIV-1 V3 loops. This resulted in the identification of a secondary structure at the tip of the V3 loop that remains invariant in spite of the sequence variation. The authors designed a multi-valent V3-based antigen that presents multiple copies of the same tip element several times in the same structure. During the course of this project, they realized that the protective epitopes of gp120 should be judged in the context of the native structure. Therefore, the authors developed a method to obtain a model of gp120 that is consistent with all the immunology and virology data. This model is useful in choosing or designing gp120 subdomains for vaccine development.

  7. Structure and Function of RSV Surface Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Jason S.; Ray, William C.; Peeples, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The two major glycoproteins on the surface of the RSV virion, the attachment glycoprotein (G) and the fusion (F) glycoprotein, control the initial phases of infection. G targets the ciliated cells of the airways, and F causes the virion membrane to fuse with a target cell membrane. The F protein is the major target for antiviral drug development, and both G and F glycoproteins are the antigens targeted by neutralizing antibodies induced by infection. In this chapter we review the structure and function of the RSV surface glycoproteins, including recent X-ray crystallographic data of the F glycoprotein in its pre- and postfusion conformations, and discuss how this information informs antigen selection and vaccine development. PMID:24362685

  8. Surface Energy Reduction In Fibrous Monotectic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandlin, A. C.; Schaefer, R. J.

    1991-08-01

    A study has been made of the morphology of directionally solidified CuAl-Pb monotectic alloys. The structure consisted of a hexagonal array of Pb rods in a Cu-based matrix. In addition, highly curved grain boundaries in the Cu-based matrix with lens-shaped Pb fibers on the boundary and a “denuded zone” depleted of Pb rods were observed. Existence of these boundaries is shown to reduce the overall surface energy of the system leading to the formation of the highly curved grain boundaries.

  9. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  10. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOTTM). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565

  11. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-11-13

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOT(TM)). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen.

  12. Crystal structure of an antigenic outer-membrane protein from Salmonella Typhi suggests a potential antigenic loop and an efflux mechanism.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Yoshimura, Masato; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Lin, Chien-Chih; Chen, Nai-Chi; Yang, Ming-Chi; Ismail, Asma; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    ST50, an outer-membrane component of the multi-drug efflux system from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an obligatory diagnostic antigen for typhoid fever. ST50 is an excellent and unique diagnostic antigen with 95% specificity and 90% sensitivity and is used in the commercial diagnosis test kit (TYPHIDOT(TM)). The crystal structure of ST50 at a resolution of 2.98 Å reveals a trimer that forms an α-helical tunnel and a β-barrel transmembrane channel traversing the periplasmic space and outer membrane. Structural investigations suggest significant conformational variations in the extracellular loop regions, especially extracellular loop 2. This is the location of the most plausible antibody-binding domain that could be used to target the design of new antigenic epitopes for the development of better diagnostics or drugs for the treatment of typhoid fever. A molecule of the detergent n-octyl-β-D-glucoside is observed in the D-cage, which comprises three sets of Asp361 and Asp371 residues at the periplasmic entrance. These structural insights suggest a possible substrate transport mechanism in which the substrate first binds at the periplasmic entrance of ST50 and subsequently, via iris-like structural movements to open the periplasmic end, penetrates the periplasmic domain for efflux pumping of molecules, including poisonous metabolites or xenobiotics, for excretion outside the pathogen. PMID:26563565

  13. NMR structures and interactions of temporin-1Tl and temporin-1Tb with lipopolysaccharide micelles: mechanistic insights into outer membrane permeabilization and synergistic activity.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Anirban; Saravanan, Rathi; Mohanram, Harini; Mangoni, Maria L; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-07-01

    Temporins are a group of closely related short antimicrobial peptides from frog skin. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major constituent of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, plays important roles in the activity of temporins. Earlier studies have found that LPS induces oligomerization of temporin-1Tb (TB) thus preventing its translocation across the outer membrane and, as a result, reduces its activity on gram-negative bacteria. On the other hand, temporin-1Tl (TL) exhibits higher activity, presumably because of lack of such oligomerization. A synergistic mechanism was proposed, involving TL and TB in overcoming the LPS-mediated barrier. Here, to gain insights into interactions of TL and TB within LPS, we investigated the structures and interactions of TL, TB, and TL+TB in LPS micelles, using NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. In the context of LPS, TL assumes a novel antiparallel dimeric helical structure sustained by intimate packing between aromatic-aromatic and aromatic-aliphatic residues. By contrast, independent TB has populations of helical and aggregated conformations in LPS. The LPS-induced aggregated states of TB are largely destabilized in the presence of TL. Saturation transfer difference NMR studies have delineated residues of TL and TB in close contact with LPS and enhanced interactions of these two peptides with LPS, when combined together. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and (31)P NMR have pointed out the proximity of TL and TB in LPS and conformational changes of LPS, respectively. Importantly, these results provide the first structural insights into the mode of action and synergism of antimicrobial peptides at the level of the LPS-outer membrane. PMID:21586570

  14. Control of the wrinkle structure on surface-reformed poly(dimethylsiloxane) via ion-beam bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hong-Gyu; Jeong, Hae-Chang; Jung, Yoon Ho; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the surface reformation of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomers by means of ion beam bombardment for fabricating wrinkle structures. Oxidation on the PDMS surface formed a silica-like outer layer that interacted with the inner PDMS layer, leading to the formation of wrinkle structures that minimized the combined bending energy of the outer layer and stretching energy of the inner layer. In addition, we controlled the amplitude and period of the wrinkle structures by adjusting the PDMS annealing temperature. As the PDMS annealing temperature was increased, the amplitude and period of the wrinkles formed by IB irradiation changed from 604.35 to 69.01 nm and from 3.07 to 0.80 μm, respectively.

  15. Magnetoelastic surface waves in auxetic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruszewski, B.; Drzewiecki, A.; Starosta, R.

    2010-06-01

    In modern technologies searching materials of peculiar features is of a fundamental interest for many researchers and engineers. Negative Poisson's ratio materials and structures expand transversely when stretching axially. Nowadays, there is an increasing interest in the development of these novel materials called auxetics. We are interested not only in their mechanical properties, but also in their interaction with external physical fields, e.g. electromagnetic field. It is expected that magnetoelastic surface waves propagation has essential meaning in many other physical and biomechanical applications. The paper aims at investigating propagation of magnetoelastic surface waves along an auxetic elastic halfspace in the presence of an external magnetic field of various orientations related to the limiting plane. Dispersion and existence conditions of those waves have been calculated and analyzed in order to present new features of described interactions. It has occurred that the dispersion properties in the case of the Rayleigh-like magnetoelastic surface waves are significantly different for the auxetic material compared to materials of positive Poisson's ratio.

  16. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  17. An efficient bacterial surface display system based on a novel outer membrane anchoring element from the Escherichia coli protein YiaT.

    PubMed

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In a bacterial surface display system, the display of a successful recombinant protein is highly dependent on the choice of anchoring motif. In this study, we developed an efficient Escherichia coli display system using novel anchoring motifs derived from the protein YiaT. To determine the best surface-anchoring motif, full-length YiaT and two of its C-terminal truncated forms, cut at the R181 and R232 sites, were evaluated. Two industrial enzymes, a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 and an α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, were used as the target proteins for display. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy and whole-cell enzyme activity measurements confirmed the expression of the fusion proteins on the E. coli surface. Using YiaTR181 or YiaTR232 as the anchoring motif, the fusion proteins showed very high enzyme activities and did not exert any adverse effects on either cell growth or the outer membrane integrity. Additionally, these fusion proteins were suitable for displaying proteins of large molecular size in an active form. Compared with the previous anchoring motifs FadL and OprF, YiaTR181 and YiaTR232 had approximately 10-fold and 20-fold higher enzyme activities, respectively. These results suggest that YiaT can be used as an E. coli anchoring motif to efficiently display various enzymes; hence, this system could be employed in a variety of biotechnological and industrial applications.

  18. Structural insights into cardiolipin transfer from the Inner membrane to the outer membrane by PbgA in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haohao; Zhang, Zhengyu; Tang, Xiaodi; Huang, Shihai; Li, Huanyu; Peng, Bo; Dong, Changjiang

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a unique asymmetric lipid bilayer in which the outer leaflet is composed of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the inner leaflet is formed by glycerophospholipid (GPL). The OM plays a fundamental role in protecting Gram-negative bacteria from harsh environments and toxic compounds. The transport and assembly pathways for phospholipids of bacterial OM are unknown. Cardiolipin (CL) plays an important role in OM biogenesis and pathogenesis, and the inner membrane (IM) protein PbgA, containing five transmembrane domains and a globular domain in periplasm has been recently identified as a CL transporter from the IM to the OM with an unknown mechanism. Here we present the first two crystal structures of soluble periplasmic globular domain of PbgA from S. typhimurium and E. coli, which revealed that the globular domains of PbgA resemble the structures of the arylsulfatase protein family and contains a novel core hydrophobic pocket that may be responsible for binding and transporting CLs. Our structural and functional studies shed an important light on the mechanism of CL transport in Gram-negative bacteria from the IM to the OM, which offers great potential for the development of novel antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. PMID:27487745

  19. Structural insights into cardiolipin transfer from the Inner membrane to the outer membrane by PbgA in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haohao; Zhang, Zhengyu; Tang, Xiaodi; Huang, Shihai; Li, Huanyu; Peng, Bo; Dong, Changjiang

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a unique asymmetric lipid bilayer in which the outer leaflet is composed of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the inner leaflet is formed by glycerophospholipid (GPL). The OM plays a fundamental role in protecting Gram-negative bacteria from harsh environments and toxic compounds. The transport and assembly pathways for phospholipids of bacterial OM are unknown. Cardiolipin (CL) plays an important role in OM biogenesis and pathogenesis, and the inner membrane (IM) protein PbgA, containing five transmembrane domains and a globular domain in periplasm has been recently identified as a CL transporter from the IM to the OM with an unknown mechanism. Here we present the first two crystal structures of soluble periplasmic globular domain of PbgA from S. typhimurium and E. coli, which revealed that the globular domains of PbgA resemble the structures of the arylsulfatase protein family and contains a novel core hydrophobic pocket that may be responsible for binding and transporting CLs. Our structural and functional studies shed an important light on the mechanism of CL transport in Gram-negative bacteria from the IM to the OM, which offers great potential for the development of novel antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. PMID:27487745

  20. Design of a lunar surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghi, Sohrob

    The next step for manned exploration and settlement is a return to the Moon. In such a return, the most challenging task is the construction of structures for habitation, considering the Moon's hostile environment. Therefore the question is: What is the best way to erect habitable structures on the lunar surface? Given the cost associated with bringing material to the Moon, In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) is viewed by most as the basis for a successful manned exploration and settlement of the Solar system. Along these lines, we propose an advanced concept where the use of freeform fabrication technologies by autonomous mini-robots can form the basis for habitable lunar structures. Also, locally-available magnesium is proposed as the structural material. While it is one of the most pervasive metals in the regolith, magnesium has been only suggested only briefly as a viable option in the past. Therefore, a study has been conducted on magnesium and its alloys, taking into account the availability of the alloying elements on the Moon. An igloo-shaped magnesium structure, covered by sandbags of regolith shielding and supported on a sintered regolith foundation, is considered as a potential design of a lunar base, as well as the test bed for the proposed vision. Three studies are carried out: First a static analysis is conducted which proves the feasibility of the proposed material and method. Second, a thermal analysis is carried out to study the effect of the regolith shielding as well as the sensitivity of such designs to measurement uncertainties of regolith and sintered thermal properties. The lunar thermal environment is modeled for a potential site at 88º latitude in the lunar South Pole Region. Our analysis shows that the uncertainties are in an acceptable range where a three-meter thick shield is considered. Also, the required capacity of a thermal rejection system is estimated, choosing the thermal loads to be those of the Space Station modules. In the

  1. Molecular mimicry in Lyme arthritis demonstrated at the single cell level: LFA-1 alpha L is a partial agonist for outer surface protein A-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Trollmo, C; Meyer, A L; Steere, A C; Hafler, D A; Huber, B T

    2001-04-15

    Antibiotic treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease that follows infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (BB:). A marked Ab and T cell response to BB: outer surface protein A (OspA) often develops during prolonged episodes of arthritis. Furthermore, cross-reaction between the bacterial OspA and human LFA-1alpha(L) at the T cell level and the inability to detect BB: in the joint implicate an autoimmune mechanism. To analyze the nature of response to OspA and LFA-1alpha(L), we used OspA-specific T cell hybrids from DR4 transgenic mice, as well as cloned human cells specific for OspA(165-184), the immunodominant epitope, from five DRB1*0401(+) patients, using OspA-MHC class II tetramers. Although OspA(165-184) stimulated nearly all OspA-specific human T cell clones tested to proliferate and secrete IFN-gamma and IL-13, LFA-1alpha(L326-345) stimulated approximately 10% of these clones to proliferate and a greater percentage to secrete IL-13. Assays with LFA- or OspA-DR4 monomers revealed that higher concentrations of LFA-DR4 were needed to stimulate dual-reactive T cell hybrids. Our analysis at the clonal level demonstrates that human LFA-1alpha(L326-345) behaves as a partial agonist, perhaps playing a role in perpetuating symptoms of arthritis.

  2. Resistance of a vaccinia virus A34R deletion mutant to spontaneous rupture of the outer membrane of progeny virions on the surface of infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Matloob; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2007-09-30

    The extracellular form of vaccinia virus is referred to as an enveloped virion (EV) because it contains an additional lipoprotein membrane surrounding the infectious mature virion (MV) that must be discarded prior to cell fusion and entry. Most EVs adhere to the surface of the parent cell and mediate spread of the infection to adjacent cells. Here we show that some attached EVs have ruptured envelopes. Rupture was detected by fluorescence microscopy of unfixed and unpermeabilized cells using antibodies to the F13 and L1 proteins, which line the inner side of the EV membrane and the outer side of the MV membrane, respectively. The presence of ruptured EV membranes was confirmed by immunogold transmission electron microscopy. EVs with broken membranes were present on several cell lines examined including one deficient in glycosaminoglycans, which are thought to play a role in breakage of the EV membrane prior to fusion of the MV. No correlation was found between EVs with ruptured membranes and actin tail formation. Studies with several mutant viruses indicated that EV membranes lacking the A34 protein were unbroken. This result was consistent with other properties of A34R deletion mutants including resistance of the EV membrane to polyanions, small plaque formation and low infectivity that can be increased by disruption of the EV membrane by freezing and thawing.

  3. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  4. Transmission of steady and oscillatory fluid shear stress across epithelial and endothelial surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuefeng; Ganatos, Peter; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2005-03-01

    The glycocalyx on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and the microvilli and cilia on kidney epithelial cells have been modeled as surface layers with a hexagonal arrangement of structural elements. These elements have been proposed to serve a mechanosensory function in the initiation of intracellular signaling by fluid shear stress. In this paper we examine the response of these surface layers when steady or oscillating shear is applied at their outer edge. In the case of steady shear, our results show that the deflection of the structural elements is proportional to the product of the applied shear stress and their length L and inversely proportional to the natural damped vibration frequency of the structural element ωc. A fluid velocity boundary layer develops at the outer edge of the surface layers when the dimensionless Brinkman parameter α =L/√KP , where KP is the Darcy permeability, is asymptotically large. In the case of oscillating shear, we find that the motions of both the fluid and structural elements are in a quasisteady state at physiological conditions. No attenuation or phase shift of the torque is induced by the hydrodynamic drag when the applied frequency ω <ωc or ωr(=ω/ωc)<1. However, the velocity at the tips of the structural element is π /2 out of phase with the applied shear in this frequency range, due to the elastic recoil of the element. Furthermore, the fluid velocity at the tips can also be out of phase with the applied shear at large α if the closely spaced structural elements of the glycocalyx on endothelial cells or microvilli on proximal tubule cells transport substantial fluid with them.

  5. The Leptospiral Outer Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Haake, David A; Zückert, Wolfram R

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) is the front line of leptospiral interactions with their environment and the mammalian host. Unlike most invasive spirochetes, pathogenic leptospires must be able survive in both free-living and host-adapted states. As organisms move from one set of environmental conditions to another, the OM must cope with a series of conflicting challenges. For example, the OM must be porous enough to allow nutrient uptake, yet robust enough to defend the cell against noxious substances. In the host, the OM presents a surface decorated with adhesins and receptors for attaching to, and acquiring, desirable host molecules such as the complement regulator, Factor H. On the other hand, the OM must enable leptospires to evade detection by the host’s immune system on their way from sites of invasion through the bloodstream to the protected niche of the proximal tubule. The picture that is emerging of the leptospiral OM is that, while it shares many of the characteristics of the OMs of spirochetes and Gram-negative bacteria, it is also unique and different in ways that make it of general interest to microbiologists. For example, unlike most other pathogenic spirochetes, the leptospiral OM is rich in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Leptospiral LPS is similar to that of Gram-negative bacteria but has a number of unique structural features that may explain why it is not recognized by the LPS-specific Toll-like receptor 4 of humans. As in other spirochetes, lipoproteins are major components of the leptospiral OM, though their roles are poorly understood. The functions of transmembrane OMPs in many cases are better understood thanks to homologies with their Gram-negative counterparts and the emergence of improved genetic techniques. This chapter will review recent discoveries involving the leptospiral OM and its role in leptospiral physiology and pathogenesis. Readers are referred to earlier, excellent summaries related to this subject (Adler and de la Peña Moctezuma

  6. Identification of a highly cross-reactive outer surface protein B epitope among diverse geographic isolates of Borrelia spp. causing Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shoberg, R J; Jonsson, M; Sadziene, A; Bergström, S; Thomas, D D

    1994-01-01

    The outer surface lipoprotein B (OspB) of Borrelia burgdorferi is a major component of the borrelial protein profile and has been shown to be highly immunogenic in experimentally immunized and infected mammals. However, the ospB loci of different strains show considerable heterology at the nucleic acid sequence level, and the progeny of a clonal strain of B. burgdorferi exhibited OspB polymorphisms with respect to apparent molecular weights and reactivities with monoclonal antibodies. These data suggest that OspB is not a good candidate for vaccination or diagnostic purposes. The present study describes a monoclonal antibody, designated 84C, directed against a very highly conserved domain of the OspB lipoprotein. Western immunoblot analysis with 84C demonstrated reactivity in 84.2% of human, tick, and other vertebrate isolate strains examined from widely diverse geographic regions, including strains of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and two closely related species, B. garinii and B. afzelii. The 84C-binding region was delimited to a highly conserved 11-amino-acid region in the carboxyl terminus of OspB as demonstrated by (i) DNA sequence analysis of wild-type and 84C-resistant mutant ospB alleles and (ii) deletion mutagenesis of a recombinant ospB gene in Escherichia coli. Finally, the 84C epitope was demonstrated to be exposed on the borrelial surface in situ as (i) the monoclonal antibody 84C was able to agglutinate borrelias in culture and (ii) 84C-resistant escape variants were isolated. These data suggest that the potential value of OspB as a vaccine candidate or diagnostic tool be examined more closely, in the context of the 84C-reactive domain. Images PMID:7512097

  7. Lunar surface structural concepts and construction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: lunar surface structures construction research areas; lunar crane related disciplines; shortcomings of typical mobile crane in lunar base applications; candidate crane cable suspension systems; NIST six-cable suspension crane; numerical example of natural frequency; the incorporation of two new features for improved performance of the counter-balanced actively-controlled lunar crane; lunar crane pendulum mechanics; simulation results; 1/6 scale lunar crane testbed using GE robot for global manipulation; basic deployable truss approaches; bi-pantograph elevator platform; comparison of elevator platforms; perspective of bi-pantograph beam; bi-pantograph synchronously deployable tower/beam; lunar module off-loading concept; module off-loader concept packaged; starburst deployable precision reflector; 3-ring reflector deployment scheme; cross-section of packaged starburst reflector; and focal point and thickness packaging considerations.

  8. 30 CFR 75.1708 - Surface structures, fireproofing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface structures, fireproofing. 75.1708... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1708 Surface structures, fireproofing. After March 30, 1970, all structures erected on the surface within 100 feet of...

  9. Structure of the airflow above surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Weather, climate and upper ocean patterns are controlled by the exchanges of momentum, heat, mass, and energy across the ocean surface. These fluxes are, in turn, influenced by the small-scale physics at the wavy air-sea interface. We present laboratory measurements of the fine-scale airflow structure above waves, achieved in over 15 different wind-wave conditions, with wave ages Cp/u* ranging from 1.4 to 66.7 (where Cp is the peak phase speed of the waves, and u* the air friction velocity). The experiments were performed in the large (42-m long) wind-wave-current tank at University of Delaware's Air-Sea Interaction laboratory (USA). A combined Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence system was specifically developed for this study, and provided two-dimensional airflow velocity measurement as low as 100 um above the air-water interface. Starting at very low wind speeds (U10~2m/s), we directly observe coherent turbulent structures within the buffer and logarithmic layers of the airflow above the air-water interface, whereby low horizontal velocity air is ejected away from the surface, and higher velocity fluid is swept downward. Wave phase coherent quadrant analysis shows that such turbulent momentum flux events are wave-phase dependent. Airflow separation events are directly observed over young wind waves (Cp/u*<3.7) and counted using measured vorticity and surface viscous stress criteria. Detached high spanwise vorticity layers cause intense wave-coherent turbulence downwind of wave crests, as shown by wave-phase averaging of turbulent momentum fluxes. Mean wave-coherent airflow motions and fluxes also show strong phase-locked patterns, including a sheltering effect, upwind of wave crests over old mechanically generated swells (Cp/u*=31.7), and downwind of crests over young wind waves (Cp/u*=3.7). Over slightly older wind waves (Cp/u* = 6.5), the measured wave-induced airflow perturbations are qualitatively consistent with linear critical layer

  10. Along-trench variations in the seismic structure of the incoming Pacific plate at the outer rise of the northern Japan Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, Gou; Kodaira, Shuichi; Sato, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate along-trench variations in the seismic structure of the incoming oceanic plate and their effect on water transportation by the oceanic plate, we conducted a wide-angle seismic survey of a trench-parallel transect 270 km long on the outer rise of the northern Japan Trench. The resulting seismic structure models show that the central part of the transect is characterized by rough topography, thick oceanic crust, low seismic velocities, and high Vp/Vs ratios, suggesting pervasive fracturing and high water content (hydration) there. These observations are consistent with the presence of an ancient fracture zone associated with ridge propagation. The trenchward extension of this fracture zone corresponds to an area of low interplate seismicity, low seismic velocities, and high Vp/Vs ratio around the depth of the subduction interface. Our results suggest that this ancient scar on the oceanic plate influences along-trench variations in interplate seismic coupling through its effect on water transportation.

  11. Composite isogrid structures for parabolic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, Edward M. (Inventor); Boyd, Jr., William E. (Inventor); Rhodes, Marvin D. (Inventor); Dyer, Jack E. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to high stiffness parabolic structures utilizing integral reinforced grids. The parabolic structures implement the use of isogrid structures which incorporate unique and efficient orthotropic patterns for efficient stiffness and structural stability.

  12. Enceladus Jet Orientations: Effects of Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Porco, C.; DiNino, D.

    2013-12-01

    Jetting activity across the South Polar Terrain (SPT) of Enceladus is now known to erupt directly from tiger-stripe rifts and associated fracture systems. However, details of the vent conduit geometry are hidden below the icy surface. The three-dimensional orientations of the erupting jets may provide important clues. Porco et al. (2013, Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 44th, p.1775) surveyed jet locations and orientations as imaged at high resolution (< 1.3 km/pixel) by Cassini ISS from 2005 through May 2012. Ninety-eight (98) jets were identified either on the main trunks or branches of the 4 tiger-stripes. The azimuth angles of the jets are seen to vary across the SPT. Here, we use histogram analysis of the survey data to test if the jet azimuths are influenced by their placement relative to surface morphology and tectonic structures. Azimuths are measured positive counterclockwise with zero pointing along the fracture in the direction of the sub-Saturn hemisphere, and rosette histograms were binned in 30° increments. Overall, the jet azimuths are not random and only about 11% of them are co-aligned with the tiger stripe valley. There are preferred diagonal orientations between 105°-165° and again between 255°-345°. These trends are dominant along the Damascus and Baghdad tiger-stripes where more than half of the jets are found. Histograms for Cairo and Alexandria show less-distinct trends, fewer jets being measured there, but combining data from both suggests a different pattern of preferred orientations; from 45°-75° and 265°-280°. Many possible factors could affect the orientations of jets, for example, the conduit shape, the presence of obstacles like narrow medial ridges called 'shark-fins' along tiger-stripe valleys, the possibility that jets may breach the surface at some point other than the center of a tiger-stripe, and the presence of structural fabrics or mechanical weaknesses, such as patterns of cross-cutting fractures. The dominance of diagonally

  13. Structural-phase states and wear resistance of surface formed on steel by surfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kapralov, Evgenie V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Investigations of elementary and phase structure, state of defect structure and tribological characteristics of a surfacing, formed on a low carbon low-alloy steel by a welding method were carried out. It was revealed that a surfacing, formed on a steel surface is accompanied by the multilayer formation, and increases the wear resistance of the layer surfacing as determined.

  14. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  15. The Crystal Structure of OprG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa a Potential Channel for Transport of Hydrophobic Molecules across the Outer Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    D Touw; D Patel; b van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides a barrier to the passage of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the cell. The OM has embedded proteins that serve important functions in signal transduction and in the transport of molecules into the periplasm. The OmpW family of OM proteins, of which P. aeruginosa OprG is a member, is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. The biological functions of OprG and other OmpW family members are still unclear. The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides a barrier to the passage of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the cell. The OM has embedded proteins that serve important functions in signal transduction and in the transport of molecules into the periplasm. The OmpW family of OM proteins, of which P. aeruginosa OprG is a member, is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. The biological functions of OprG and other OmpW family members are still unclear. The crystal structure, together with recent biochemical data, suggests that OprG and other OmpW family members form channels that mediate the diffusion of small hydrophobic molecules across the OM by a lateral diffusion mechanism similar to that of E. coli FadL.

  16. Dominant recognition of a Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A peptide by T helper cells in patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kamradt, T; Lengl-Janssen, B; Strauss, A F; Bansal, G; Steere, A C

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study, we found that T-cell lines (TCL) from five patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis preferentially recognized Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA), but TCL from four patients with treatment-responsive arthritis only rarely recognized this protein. Dominant T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic OspA epitope is one way in which the immune response against OspA might be involved in the pathogenesis of treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we mapped the epitopes of 31 OspA-specific TCL and five T-cell clones derived from the synovial fluid or peripheral blood samples of three patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis. Although each patient's TCL recognized a broad array of OspA peptides with different individual patterns, two regions of OspA were dominantly recognized. Each patient's TCL dominantly recognized a C-terminal epitope of OspA, ranging from amino acids (aa) 214 to 233 in one patient to 244 to 263 in another, and the TCL of all three patients dominantly recognized an epitope between aa 84 and 113. These dominant regions were confirmed by clonal analysis in one patient. Thus, the region of OspA between aa 84 and 113 was the dominant T-cell epitope shared by these three patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis. If the T-cell response to OspA is involved in the pathogenesis of treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis, and epitope contained within aa 84 to 113 is a potentially arthritogenic epitope. PMID:8606091

  17. Structure and properties of polymeric composite materials during 1501 days outer space exposure at Salyut-7 orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Startsev, Oleg V.; Nikishin, Eugene F.

    1995-01-01

    Specimens of polymeric composite materials for aviation and space applications such as glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), organic fiber reinforced plastics (OFRP), and hybrid plastics (HP) based on epoxy compounds were exposed to the space environment on the surface of Salyut-7 orbital station. The space exposure lasted 1501 days as a maximum. The data relating to the change in mechanical properties, mass losses, glass transition temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient, and microstructure after various periods of exposure are given. It has been found that the change in properties is caused by the processes of binder postcuring and microerosion of the exposed surface of plastics. The phenomenon of strengthening of the surface layer of hybrid composites, due to which the nature of destruction changes at bending loads, has been revealed.

  18. Structure and properties of polymeric composite materials during 1501 days outer space exposure at Salyut-7 orbital station

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, O.V.; Nikishin, E.F.

    1995-02-01

    Specimens of polymeric composite materials for aviation and space applications such as glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), organic fiber reinforced plastics (OFRP), and hybrid plastics (HP) based on epoxy compounds were exposed to the space environment on the surface of Salyut-7 orbital station. The space exposure lasted 1501 days as a maximum. The data relating to the change in mechanical properties, mass losses, glass transition temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient, and microstructure after various periods of exposure are given. It has been found that the change in properties is caused by the processes of binder postcuring and microerosion of the exposed surface of plastics. The phenomenon of strengthening of the surface layer of hybrid composites, due to which the nature of destruction changes at bending loads, has been revealed.

  19. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis. PMID:15449605

  20. Temporal Changes in Outer Surface Proteins A and C of the Lyme Disease-Associated Spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, during the Chain of Infection in Ticks and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, Tom G.; Piesman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Lyme disease-associated spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is maintained in enzootic cycles involving Ixodes ticks and small mammals. Previous studies demonstrated that B. burgdorferi expresses outer surface protein A (OspA) but not OspC when residing in the midgut of unfed ticks. However, after ticks feed on blood, some spirochetes stop making OspA and express OspC. Our current work examined the timing and frequency of OspA and OspC expression by B. burgdorferi in infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs as they fed on uninfected mice and in uninfected I. scapularis larvae and nymphs as they first acquired spirochetes from infected mice. Smears of midguts from previously infected ticks were prepared at 12- or 24-h intervals following attachment through repletion at 96 h, and spirochetes were stained for immunofluorescence for detection of antibodies to OspA and OspC. As shown previously, prior to feeding spirochetes in nymphs expressed OspA but not OspC. During nymphal feeding, however, the proportion of spirochetes expressing OspA decreased, while spirochetes expressing OspC became detectable. In fact, spirochetes rapidly began to express OspC, with the greatest proportion of spirochetes having this protein at 48 h of attachment and then with the proportion decreasing significantly by the time that the ticks had completed feeding. In vitro cultivation of the spirochete at different temperatures showed OspC to be most abundant when the spirochetes were grown at 37°C. Yet, the synthesis of this protein waned with continuous passage at this temperature. Immunofluorescence staining of spirochetes in smears of midguts from larvae and nymphs still attached or having completed feeding on infected mice demonstrated that OspA but not OspC was produced by these spirochetes recently acquired from mice. Therefore, the temporal synthesis of OspC by spirochetes only in feeding ticks that were infected prior to the blood meal suggests that this surface protein is involved in

  1. Molecular Organization of the Nanoscale Surface Structures of the Dragonfly Hemianax papuensis Wing Epicuticle

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Elena P.; Nguyen, Song Ha; Webb, Hayden K.; Hasan, Jafar; Truong, Vi Khanh; Lamb, Robert N.; Duan, Xiaofei; Tobin, Mark J.; Mahon, Peter J.; Crawford, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular organization of the epicuticle (the outermost layer) of insect wings is vital in the formation of the nanoscale surface patterns that are responsible for bestowing remarkable functional properties. Using a combination of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques, including Synchrotron-sourced Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS), we have identified the chemical components that constitute the nanoscale structures on the surface of the wings of the dragonfly, Hemianax papuensis. The major components were identified to be fatty acids, predominantly hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid, and n-alkanes with even numbered carbon chains ranging from C14 to C30. The data obtained from XPS depth profiling, in conjunction with that obtained from GCMS analyses, enabled the location of particular classes of compounds to different regions within the epicuticle. Hexadecanoic acid was found to be a major component of the outer region of the epicuticle, which forms the surface nanostructures, and was also detected in deeper layers along with octadecanoic acid. Aliphatic compounds were detected throughout the epicuticle, and these appeared to form a third discrete layer that was separate from both the inner and outer epicuticles, which has never previously been reported. PMID:23874463

  2. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation on tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo Chunlei

    2008-09-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate the generation of periodic surface structures on a technologically important material, tungsten, at both 400 and 800 nm, despite that the table values of dielectric constants for tungsten at these two wavelengths suggest the absence of surface plasmons, a wave necessary for forming periodic structures on metals. Furthermore, we find that the structure periods formed on tungsten are significantly less than the laser wavelengths. We believe that the dielectric constants of tungsten change significantly due to intense laser pulse heating and surface structuring and roughening at nanometer scales, permitting surface plasmon excitation and periodic structure formation.

  3. The outer layers of cool, non-Mira carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    The outer layers and near circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a typical carbon star have been studied using available data from theoretical and empirical models. An attempt is made to match the density-velocity structure of the photosphere-chromosphere region to values from the radio CO observations, which arise from the outer CSE. It is concluded that the stellar atmosphere includes a relatively thin high-temperature region close to hydrostatic equilibrium and a much more extended cooler region of outflowing gas and dust. To extend the outer photosphere and chromosphere to match the mass loss density appears to require an injection of energy and momentum by some mechanism rather close to the stellar surface.

  4. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge.

  5. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail ‘neck’, are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the ‘outer ion’ site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. PMID:24120938

  6. Structure analysis of OmpC, one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of E. coli, by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.F.

    1983-07-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the structure analysis of a pore-forming membrane protein, OmpC, which is one of the major proteins in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. In order to obtain structural information it was necessary to develop a suitable technique for preparing two-dimensional crystalline arrays of this membrane protein in an unfixed, unstained and hydrated condition. Electron micrographs were recorded at exposures of less than 5 electrons/A/sup 2/ in order to avoid severe radiation damage. The resulting images were crystallographically averaged, in order to overcome the statistical limitations associated with the low electron exposures. The resulting images, which extend to a resolution of approx. 13.5 A, lend themselves to a natural interpretation that is consistent with the mass density of protein, water and lipid, prior data from 2-D and 3-D structure studies of negatively stained specimens at approx. = 20 A resolution, and published spectroscopic data on the peptide chain secondary structure.

  7. Crystal Structure of Neurotropism-Associated Variable Surface Protein 1 (VSP1) of Borrelia Turicatae

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson,C.; Yung, B.; Barbour, A.; Zuckert, W.

    2006-01-01

    Vsp surface lipoproteins are serotype-defining antigens of relapsing fever spirochetes that undergo multiphasic antigenic variation to allow bacterial persistence in spite of an immune response. Two isogenic serotypes of Borrelia turicatae strain Oz1 differ in their Vsp sequences and in disease manifestations in infected mice: Vsp1 is associated with the selection of a neurological niche, while Vsp2 is associated with blood and skin infection. We report here crystal structures of the Vsp1 dimer at 2.7 and 2.2 Angstroms. The structures confirm that relapsing fever Vsp proteins share a common helical fold with OspCs of Lyme disease-causing Borrelia. The fold features an inner stem formed by highly conserved N and C termini and an outer 'dome' formed by the variable central residues. Both Vsp1 and OspC structures possess small water-filled cavities, or pockets, that are lined largely by variable residues and are thus highly variable in shape. These features appear to signify tolerance of the Vsp-OspC fold for imperfect packing of residues at its antigenic surface. Structural comparison of Vsp1 with a homology model for Vsp2 suggests that observed differences in disease manifestation may arise in part from distinct differences in electrostatic surface properties; additional predicted positively charged surface patches on Vsp2 compared to Vsp1 may be sufficient to explain the relative propensity of Vsp2 to bind to acidic glycosaminoglycans.

  8. Chemical bonding in the outer core: high-pressure electronic structures of oxygen and sulfur in metallic iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The electronic structures of oxygen and sulfur impurities in metallic iron are investigated to determine if pressure, temperature, and composition-induced changes in bonding might affect phase equilibria along the Fe-FeS and Fe-FeO binaries. -from Authors

  9. Design of highly oleophobic cellulose surfaces from structured silicon templates.

    PubMed

    Aulin, Christian; Yun, Sang Ho; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Structured silicon surfaces, possessing hierarchical porous characteristics consisting of micrometer-sized cavities superimposed upon a network of nanometer-sized pillars or wires, have been fabricated by a plasma-etching process. These surfaces have superoleophobic properties, after being coated with fluorinated organic trichlorosilanes, on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces. By comparison with flat silicon surfaces, which are oleophilic, it has been demonstrated that a combination of low surface energy and the structured features of the plasma-etched surface is essential to prevent oil from penetrating the surface cavities and thus induce the observed macroscopic superoleophobic phenomena with very low contact-angle hysteresis and low roll-off angles. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with cellulose nanocrystals using the polyelectrolyte multilayer technique. The cellulose surfaces prepared in this way were then coated with a monolayer of fluorinated trichlorosilanes. These porous cellulose films displayed highly nonwetting properties against a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as hexadecane and decane. The wettability and chemical composition of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were characterized with contact-angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nano/microtexture features of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were also studied with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The highly oleophobic structured cellulose surfaces are very interesting model surfaces for the development of biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces in a vast array of products, including green constructions, packaging materials, protection against environmental fouling, sports, and outdoor clothing, and microfluidic systems. PMID:20356113

  10. Design of highly oleophobic cellulose surfaces from structured silicon templates.

    PubMed

    Aulin, Christian; Yun, Sang Ho; Wågberg, Lars; Lindström, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Structured silicon surfaces, possessing hierarchical porous characteristics consisting of micrometer-sized cavities superimposed upon a network of nanometer-sized pillars or wires, have been fabricated by a plasma-etching process. These surfaces have superoleophobic properties, after being coated with fluorinated organic trichlorosilanes, on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces. By comparison with flat silicon surfaces, which are oleophilic, it has been demonstrated that a combination of low surface energy and the structured features of the plasma-etched surface is essential to prevent oil from penetrating the surface cavities and thus induce the observed macroscopic superoleophobic phenomena with very low contact-angle hysteresis and low roll-off angles. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with cellulose nanocrystals using the polyelectrolyte multilayer technique. The cellulose surfaces prepared in this way were then coated with a monolayer of fluorinated trichlorosilanes. These porous cellulose films displayed highly nonwetting properties against a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as hexadecane and decane. The wettability and chemical composition of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were characterized with contact-angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nano/microtexture features of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were also studied with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The highly oleophobic structured cellulose surfaces are very interesting model surfaces for the development of biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces in a vast array of products, including green constructions, packaging materials, protection against environmental fouling, sports, and outdoor clothing, and microfluidic systems.

  11. Early and late antibody responses to full-length and truncated constructs of outer surface protein A of Borrelia burgdorferi in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R A; Leong, J M; Steere, A C

    1995-06-01

    The immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi has been reported to occur late in the course of Lyme disease. To learn when reactivity to particular epitopes of OspA develops and whether the strength of particular responses correlates with the duration of arthritis and HLA-DR specificities, we determined the IgM and IgG responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 128 patients with various manifestations of Lyme disease to full-length recombinant OspA and three OspA fragments which divided the protein approximately into thirds. Among the 10 patients who were followed serially, an early IgM response was often found to epitopes in all three fragments of OspA, sometimes accompanied by a weak IgG response, primarily to an epitope in the middle third of the protein. Months to years later, the seven patients who had prolonged or moderate episodes of arthritis developed strong IgG responses to OspA, especially to epitopes in the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments, that paralleled the course of the arthritis. In single serum samples from 128 patients, a similar pattern of IgM and IgG reactivity with OspA epitopes was seen in patients with early or late manifestations of the illness. Of the 80 patients with arthritis, 62 (78%) had IgG responses to OspA, usually with the strongest reactivity to the C-terminal fragment. In these patients, the strength of the IgG response to OspA correlated with the duration of arthritis; in HLA-DR4-positive patients, most of whom had chronic arthritis, this association was attributable to reactivity with the C-terminal fragment. Thus, patients with Lyme disease often have early responses to OspA, but those with prolonged arthritis do not develop IgG responses to certain epitopes of the protein until late in the illness. In patients with HLA-DR4, the strength of IgG reactivity with one or more epitopes in the C-terminal fragment of OspA correlates with the duration of arthritis.

  12. Humoral immune response to outer surface protein C of Borrelia burgdorferi in Lyme disease: role of the immunoglobulin M response in the serodiagnosis of early infection.

    PubMed

    Fung, B P; McHugh, G L; Leong, J M; Steere, A C

    1994-08-01

    We determined the humoral immune response to outer surface protein C (OspC) of Borrelia burgdorferi in patients with early or late manifestations of Lyme disease and investigated the use of this antigen in the serodiagnosis of early infection. The ospC gene from the low-passage human isolate 297, a North American B. burgdorferi strain, was used to make a recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-OspC fusion protein for serologic tests. This gene showed 84 to 85% nucleotide sequence identity and 76 to 79% amino acid identity with ospC of B. burgdorferi B31 and 2591. The antibody responses to MBP-OspC were determined in serial sera from 15 patients with Lyme disease who were monitored for 4 to 12 years of illness, in single-serum samples from 189 patients with early or late manifestations of the disorder, and in serum samples from 106 control patients. Early in the infection, patients with erythema migrans or meningitis commonly had weak to strong immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses to OspC and sometimes weak to moderate IgG responses. Months to years later, weak to strong IgG reactivity with this protein was often apparent in patients with arthritis, but this response was weak or absent in patients with chronic neuroborreliosis. When acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from patients with erythema migrans were tested for reactivity against MBP-OspC, the sensitivity of the IgM test was 73% and the specificity was 98%, with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or Western blotting. We conclude that the majority of patients with Lyme disease have a prominent IgM response to OspC early in the illness, which is often followed by a prominent IgG response in patients with arthritis. For the serodiagnosis of early infection, the sensitivity and specificity of IgM ELISA and Western blotting were comparable or slightly improved when MBP-OspC was used as the antigen compared with tests in which spirochetal lysates were used.

  13. Early and late antibody responses to full-length and truncated constructs of outer surface protein A of Borrelia burgdorferi in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kalish, R A; Leong, J M; Steere, A C

    1995-01-01

    The immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to outer surface protein A (OspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi has been reported to occur late in the course of Lyme disease. To learn when reactivity to particular epitopes of OspA develops and whether the strength of particular responses correlates with the duration of arthritis and HLA-DR specificities, we determined the IgM and IgG responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 128 patients with various manifestations of Lyme disease to full-length recombinant OspA and three OspA fragments which divided the protein approximately into thirds. Among the 10 patients who were followed serially, an early IgM response was often found to epitopes in all three fragments of OspA, sometimes accompanied by a weak IgG response, primarily to an epitope in the middle third of the protein. Months to years later, the seven patients who had prolonged or moderate episodes of arthritis developed strong IgG responses to OspA, especially to epitopes in the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments, that paralleled the course of the arthritis. In single serum samples from 128 patients, a similar pattern of IgM and IgG reactivity with OspA epitopes was seen in patients with early or late manifestations of the illness. Of the 80 patients with arthritis, 62 (78%) had IgG responses to OspA, usually with the strongest reactivity to the C-terminal fragment. In these patients, the strength of the IgG response to OspA correlated with the duration of arthritis; in HLA-DR4-positive patients, most of whom had chronic arthritis, this association was attributable to reactivity with the C-terminal fragment. Thus, patients with Lyme disease often have early responses to OspA, but those with prolonged arthritis do not develop IgG responses to certain epitopes of the protein until late in the illness. In patients with HLA-DR4, the strength of IgG reactivity with one or more epitopes in the C-terminal fragment of OspA correlates with the duration of arthritis

  14. Humoral immune response to outer surface protein C of Borrelia burgdorferi in Lyme disease: role of the immunoglobulin M response in the serodiagnosis of early infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B P; McHugh, G L; Leong, J M; Steere, A C

    1994-01-01

    We determined the humoral immune response to outer surface protein C (OspC) of Borrelia burgdorferi in patients with early or late manifestations of Lyme disease and investigated the use of this antigen in the serodiagnosis of early infection. The ospC gene from the low-passage human isolate 297, a North American B. burgdorferi strain, was used to make a recombinant maltose-binding protein (MBP)-OspC fusion protein for serologic tests. This gene showed 84 to 85% nucleotide sequence identity and 76 to 79% amino acid identity with ospC of B. burgdorferi B31 and 2591. The antibody responses to MBP-OspC were determined in serial sera from 15 patients with Lyme disease who were monitored for 4 to 12 years of illness, in single-serum samples from 189 patients with early or late manifestations of the disorder, and in serum samples from 106 control patients. Early in the infection, patients with erythema migrans or meningitis commonly had weak to strong immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses to OspC and sometimes weak to moderate IgG responses. Months to years later, weak to strong IgG reactivity with this protein was often apparent in patients with arthritis, but this response was weak or absent in patients with chronic neuroborreliosis. When acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from patients with erythema migrans were tested for reactivity against MBP-OspC, the sensitivity of the IgM test was 73% and the specificity was 98%, with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or Western blotting. We conclude that the majority of patients with Lyme disease have a prominent IgM response to OspC early in the illness, which is often followed by a prominent IgG response in patients with arthritis. For the serodiagnosis of early infection, the sensitivity and specificity of IgM ELISA and Western blotting were comparable or slightly improved when MBP-OspC was used as the antigen compared with tests in which spirochetal lysates were used. Images PMID:8039891

  15. Surface structure of GaAs with adsorbed Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, R. D.; Austin, R. F.

    1986-10-01

    The surface structures that result from the adsorption of Te on (100) GaAs have been shown to affect the orientation of CdTe films on GaAs. Two structures are described here. A low-temperature (6×1) surface leads to (100) film growth. At 580 °C, a new surface results which is characterized by ordering along directions 60° from [011¯] and [01¯1], and leads to (111) growth of CdTe. Both surface structure and the interaction of the group II element with the surface are believed to be important in determining the orientation of the film.

  16. Numerical analysis of the superconducting magnet outer vessel of a Maglev train by a structural and electromagnetic coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsue, H.; Demachi, K.; Miya, K.

    2001-09-01

    The harmonic magnetic field generated by the ground coils can cause vibration of the superconducting magnet, which must be reduced as it generates heat in the liquid helium temperature range. Therefore, it is important for the design of lighter magnets to exactly estimate the electromagnetic force on the superconducting magnet. Some causes of the vibration were analyzed by the structural and electromagnetic coupling FEM-BEM method.

  17. Surface structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping

    2008-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for a uranium compound USb2 taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the tetragonal USb2 crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the density of states measured by STM. Since the spacing between Sb atoms and between U atoms is the same, STM topography alone cannot unambiguously identify the surface atom species.

  18. Physics of the outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gazis, P.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Major advances in the physics of the outer heliosphere are reviewed for the 1987-1990 time frame. Emphasis is placed on five broad topics: the detailed structure of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances, the global structure of the interplanetary field, latidudinal variations and meridional flows, radial and temporal variations, and the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium. 122 refs.

  19. The structure of surface texture knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wang; Scott, Paul J.; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2005-01-01

    This research aims to create an intelligent knowledge-based system for engineering and bio-medical engineering surface texture, which will provide expert knowledge of surface texture to link surface function, specification of micro- and nano-geometry through manufacture, and verification. The intelligent knowledge base should be capable of incorporating knowledge from multiple sources (standards, books, experts, etc), adding new knowledge from these sources and still remain a coherent reliable system. A new data model based on category theory will be adopted to construct this system.

  20. Meso- and microscale structures related to post-magmatic deformation of the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheuz, P.; Kurz, W.; Ferre, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 352 aimed to drill through the entire volcanic sequence of the Bonin fore arc. Four sites were drilled, two on the outer fore arc and two on the upper trench slope. Analysis of structures within drill cores, combined with borehole and site survey seismic data, indicates that tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc is mainly post-magmatic, associated with the development of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins. Within the magmatic basement, deformation was accommodated by shear along cataclastic fault zones, and the formation of tension fractures, hybrid (tension and shear) fractures, and shear fractures. Veins commonly form by mineral filling of tension or hybrid fractures and, generally, show no or limited observable macroscale displacement along the fracture plane. The vein filling generally consists of (Low Mg-) calcite and/or various types of zeolite as well as clay. Vein frequency varies with depth but does not seem to correlate with the proximity of faults. This may indicate that these veins are genetically related to hydrothermal activity taking place shortly after magma cooling. Host-rock fragments are commonly embedded within precipitated vein material pointing to a high fluid pressure. Vein thickness varies from < 1 mm up to 15 mm. The wider veins appear to have formed in incremental steps of extension. Calcite veins tend to be purely dilational at shallow depths, but gradually evolve towards oblique tensional veins at depth, as shown by the growth of stretched calcite and/or zeolites (idiomorphic and/or stretched) with respect to vein margins. With increasing depth, the calcite grains exhibit deformation microstructures more frequently than at shallower core intervals. These microstructures include thin twinning (type I twins), increasing in width with depth (type I and type II twins), curved twins, and subgrain boundaries indicative of incipient plastic deformation.

  1. Structure of the Neisserial outer membrane protein Opa₆₀: loop flexibility essential to receptor recognition and bacterial engulfment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel A; Larsson, Per; Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Kasson, Peter M; Columbus, Linda

    2014-07-16

    The structure and dynamics of Opa proteins, which we report herein, are responsible for the receptor-mediated engulfment of Neisseria gonorrheae or Neisseria meningitidis by human cells and can offer deep understanding into the molecular recognition of pathogen-host receptor interactions. Such interactions are vital to understanding bacterial pathogenesis as well as the mechanism of foreign body entry to a human cell, which may provide insights for the development of targeted pharmaceutical delivery systems. The size and dynamics of the extracellular loops of Opa60 required a hybrid refinement approach wherein membrane and distance restraints were used to generate an initial NMR structural ensemble, which was then further refined using molecular dynamics in a DMPC bilayer. The resulting ensemble revealed that the extracellular loops, which bind host receptors, occupy compact conformations, interact with each other weakly, and are dynamic on the nanosecond time scale. We predict that this conformational sampling is critical for enabling diverse Opa loop sequences to engage a common set of receptors.

  2. Structure of the Neisserial outer membrane protein Opa₆₀: loop flexibility essential to receptor recognition and bacterial engulfment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel A; Larsson, Per; Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Kasson, Peter M; Columbus, Linda

    2014-07-16

    The structure and dynamics of Opa proteins, which we report herein, are responsible for the receptor-mediated engulfment of Neisseria gonorrheae or Neisseria meningitidis by human cells and can offer deep understanding into the molecular recognition of pathogen-host receptor interactions. Such interactions are vital to understanding bacterial pathogenesis as well as the mechanism of foreign body entry to a human cell, which may provide insights for the development of targeted pharmaceutical delivery systems. The size and dynamics of the extracellular loops of Opa60 required a hybrid refinement approach wherein membrane and distance restraints were used to generate an initial NMR structural ensemble, which was then further refined using molecular dynamics in a DMPC bilayer. The resulting ensemble revealed that the extracellular loops, which bind host receptors, occupy compact conformations, interact with each other weakly, and are dynamic on the nanosecond time scale. We predict that this conformational sampling is critical for enabling diverse Opa loop sequences to engage a common set of receptors. PMID:24813921

  3. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  4. Laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Brelet, Yohann; Forestier, Benjamin; Houard, Aurelien; Yu, Linwei; Deng, Yongkai; Jiang, Hongbing

    2013-06-24

    We report on the formation of laser-induced periodic annular surface structures on fused silica irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses. This surface morphology emerges after the disappearance of the conventional laser induced periodic surface structures, under successive laser pulse irradiation. It is independent of the laser polarization and universally observed for different focusing geometries. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the damage crater and the incident laser pulse.

  5. Free surface rise and fall due to wall turbulent structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rashidi, M.

    1996-12-20

    Turbulent structures near the wall and the the surface have been studied in open channel flows using oxygen bubble visualization techniques. Experiments indicate that the flow is dominated by the generation of wall ejections and interactions of such structures with the free surface. The ejections are seen to evolve near the wall, reach the free surface, form surface patches, roll back and mix into the bulk flow. Furthermore, there are evidence of ``horseshoe`` and ``hockeystick`` type vortices in relation to the bursting events. Measurements of surface characteristics show that the ejection-inflow events are associated with deformation of the free surface. It is seen that as ejections reach the free surface, the surface goes through a rise, whereas the surface falls when the inflowing fluid returns toward the wall. These effects are enhanced as the flow Reynolds number is increased.

  6. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF Bz component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF BZ is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION- 4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF By component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere.

  7. The Outer Limits: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Barbara R.; Biesekerski, Joan

    The Quinmester course "The Outer Limits" involves an exploration of unknown worlds, mental and physical, through fiction and nonfiction. Its purpose is to focus attention on the ongoing conquest of the frontiers of the mind, the physical world, and outer space. The subject matter includes identification and investigation of unknown worlds in the…

  8. The X-37 Hot Structure Control Surface Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Larry D.; Stephens, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal-structural testing of three hot structure control surface subcomponent test articles (STA) designed for the X-37 (Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, California) Orbital Vehicle (OV) has been completed. The test articles were subcomponents of the X-37 OV bodyflap and flaperon control surfaces.

  9. Structure of the Outer Cusp and Sources of the Cusp Precipitation during Intervals of a Horizontal IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.; Prech, L.; Simunek, J.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fedorov, A.; Stenuit, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; Savin, S.; Zelenyi, L.

    2003-01-01

    The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly penetrate into the magnetosphere. Since the main transport processes are connected with merging of the interplanetary and magnetospheric field lines: the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Orientation plays a decisive role in the formation of the high-altitude cusp. The importance of the sign of the IMF B(sub Z) component for this process was suggested about 40 years ago and later it was documented by many experimental investigations. However, situations when IMF Bz is the major IMF component are rather rare. The structure of the cusp during periods of a small IMF B(sub Z) is generally unknown, probably due to the fully 3-D nature of the interaction. The present case study reveals the importance of horizontal IMF components on the global magnetospheric configuration as well as on small-scale processes at the cusp-magnetosheath interface. We have used simultaneous measurements of several spacecraft (ISTP program) operating in different regions of interplanetary space and two closely spaced satellites (INTERBALL-1/MAGION-4) crossing the cusp-magnetosheath boundary to show the connection between the short- and large-scale phenomena. In the northern hemisphere, observations suggest a presence of two spots of cusp-like precipitation supplied by reconnection occurring simultaneously in both hemispheres. A source of this bifurcation is the positive IMF B(sub y) component further enhanced by the field draping in the magnetosheath. This magnetic field component shifts the entry point far away from the local noon but in opposite sense in either hemisphere. The cusp represents a place where the magnetosheath plasma can directly

  10. Homologous overexpression of omcZ, a gene for an outer surface c-type cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens by single-step gene replacement.

    PubMed

    Park, Insoon; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2011-10-01

    The electron transfer pathway of Geobacter sulfurreducens has been intensively studied because of its ability of electron transfer to extracellular electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) and on electrode. However, the absence of overexpression system of G. sulfurreducens is one of the main obstacles for studying the physiology of G. sulfurreducens. OmcZ, an outer membrane-related c-type cytochrome of G. sulfurrducens, was homologously overexpressed via genomic integration. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the omcZ transcript in the knock-in strain was sixfold more abundant than in the wild type. Notably, omcZ expression appears to downregulate the expression level of OmcS, another outer membrane-related c-type cytochrome of G. sulfurreducens, based on the comparisons of total protein and transcript levels. This is the first report of the successful genetic overexpression system for studying functional genomics of G. sulfurreducens.

  11. Chemical design of pH-sensitive nanovalves on the outer surface of mesoporous silicas for controlled storage and release of aromatic amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Roik, N.V. Belyakova, L.A.

    2014-07-01

    Mesoporous silicas with hexagonally arranged pore channels were synthesized in water–ethanol-ammonia solution using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as template. Directed modification of silica surface with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups was realized by postsynthetic activation of halogenoalkylsilicas, which have surface uniformly or selectively distributed 3-chloropropyl groups, with 2-aminodiphenylamine in the liquid phase. Chemical composition of silica materials was estimated by IR spectroscopy and chemical analysis of the surface products of reactions. Characteristics of porous structure of MCM-41-type silicas were determined from X-ray and low-temperature nitrogen ad-desorption measurements. Release ability of synthesized silica carriers was established on encapsulation of 4-aminobenzoic acid in pore channels and subsequent delivery at pH=6.86 and pH=1.00. It was found that N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups block pore entrances at neutral pH preventing 4-aminobenzoic acid release. At pH=1.00 repulsion of positively charged surface aromatic amino groups localized near pore orifices provides unhindered liberation of aromatic amino acid from mesoporous channels. - Graphical abstract: Blocking of pores with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups at pH=6.86 for storage of ABA and opening of pore entrances at pH=1.00 for unhindered ABA liberation. - Highlights: • Modification of MCM-41 with N-[N′-(N′-phenyl)-2-aminophenyl]-3-aminopropyl groups. • Study of release ability of synthesized silica carriers in relation to amino acid. • Controlled blocking and opening of pores by amino groups at pH change were performed. • Retention of amino acid at pH=6.86 and its liberation at pH=1.00 was proved.

  12. Near Surface Structure of Organic Semiconductor Tetracene Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Morisaki, Hazuki; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Miwa, Kazumoto; Koretsune, Takashi; Takeya, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Electric conduction in organic crystals is highly anisotropic because of the anisotropic molecular orbitals. Crystal structure governs the transfer through the overlap integral among the highest occupied (or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbitals. In case of organic devices, the place where electrons conduct is the interface. Therefore, the surface structure of organic single crystals is relevant. Surface relaxation of the structure of rubrene single crystal was firstly observed by means of surface x-ray diffraction a few years ago. This time we performed similar measurement on tetracene single crystal, whose molecular shape has large similarity with rubrene while the crystal structure is very different. Tetracene single crystal was grown by the physical vapor transport method, and the surface x-ray diffraction experiments were performed at BL-3A and 4C of the Photon Factory, KEK, Japan. Obtained electron density profile shows a large structural deformation at the surface layer of tetracene.

  13. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data

    PubMed Central

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance‐to‐surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift‐based CS‐Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. PMID:27560616

  14. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data.

    PubMed

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias

    2016-09-19

    An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance-to-surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift-based CS-Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach.

  15. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data.

    PubMed

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias

    2016-09-19

    An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance-to-surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift-based CS-Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. PMID:27560616

  16. Laser Surface Preparation and Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical prebonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  17. The Electronic Structure of Nonpolar Surfaces in Insulating Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the electronic and geometric structures of metal oxide surfaces has a key interest in many technological areas. A randomly chosen crystal surface has a high probability of being polar, unstable and containing in-gap states due to surface dangling bonds. As a result, the surface should be stabilized by passivation or reconstruction. However, do the nonpolar surfaces of ionic crystals of insulating metal oxides need the passivation or reconstruction similar to covalent crystals? We address this question by analyzing the nonpolar surfaces and their electronic structure for the common crystal structures of metal oxides. The study using periodic DFT calculations is performed for following representatives: Cu2O, ZnO, Al2O3, TiO2, V2O5, WO3, CaTiO3, Mg2SiO4. It has been shown that the nonpolar surface can be constructed out of dipole-free, charge-neutral and stoichiometric unit cells for each crystal. We demonstrate that all constructed and relaxed nonpolar surfaces of the metal oxides show a clear band gap. It should be emphasized that the constructed surfaces are neither reconstructed nor passivated. Additionally, we show a correlation between the electronic structure of the relaxed surfaces and Ewald energies calculated for the surface ions.

  18. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  19. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed. PMID:25436035

  20. Carbon Nanomaterials: Surface Structure and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansurov, Z. A.; Shabanova, T. A.; Mofa, N. N.; Glagolev, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a classification of individual nanoparticles on the basis of the form of the surface and the internal architectural packing for investigations carried out with the help of transmission electron microscopy. The investigated samples contain individual nanoparticles of seven kinds in different ratios: rounded, tubular, fibrous, fi lm, "veil," "active" particles and "particles with regular geometric contours." The classification was made on the basis of an analysis of the results of investigations of the surfaces and internal architectural packing of carbon particles obtained in different physiochemical processes (carbonization, carburizing, arc discharge, mechanochemical treatment, plasma chemistry, and in carbon-containing fl ames). For the source materials, we used waste of farming products and widely distributed mineral raw materials.

  1. Magnetospheres of the outer planets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, A.F.

    1986-12-01

    The magnetospheres of the outer planets have been shown by Voyager explorations to strongly interact with the surfaces and atmospheres of their planetary satellites and rings. In the cases of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, the processes of charged particle sputtering, neutral gas cloud formation, and rapid plasma injection from the ionization of the neutral clouds, have important implications both for the magnetospheres as a whole and for the surfaces and atmospheres of their satellites. The general methodology employed in these researches has involved comparisons of the planetary magnetospheres in order to identify common physical processes. 16 references.

  2. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  3. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.

  4. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed.more » Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.« less

  5. Surface Structure and Surface Electronic States Related to Plasma Cleaning of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaewon

    This thesis discusses the surface structure and the surface electronic states of Si and Ge(100) surfaces as well as the effects of oxidation process on the silicon oxide/Si(100) interface structure. The H-plasma exposure was performed in situ at low temperatures. The active species, produced in the H-plasma by the rf-excitation of H_2 gas, not only remove microcontaminants such as oxygen and carbon from the surface, but also passivate the surface with atomic hydrogen by satisfying the dangling bonds of the surface atoms. The surfaces were characterized by Angle Resolved UV-Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). In the case of Si(100), H-plasma exposure produced ordered H-terminated crystallographic structures with either a 2 x 1 or 1 x 1 LEED pattern. The hydride phases, found on the surfaces of the cleaned Si(100), were shown to depend on the temperature of the surface during H-plasma cleaning. The electronic states for the monohydride and dihydride phases were identified by ARUPS. When the plasma cleaned surface was annealed, the phase transition from the dihydride to monohydride was observed. The monohydride Si-H surface bond was stable up to 460^circC, and the dangling bond surface states were identified after annealing at 500^circC which was accompanied by the spectral shift. The H-terminated surface were characterized to have a flat band structure. For the Ge(100) surface, an ordered 2 x 1 monohydride phase was obtained from the surface cleaned at 180 ^circC. After plasma exposure at <=170^circC a 1 x 1 surface was observed, but the ARUPS indicated that the surface was predominantly composed of disordered monohydride structures. After annealing above the H-dissociation temperatures, the shift in the spectrum was shown to occur with the dangling bond surface states. The H-terminated surfaces were identified to be unpinned. The interface structure of silicon oxide/Si(100) was studied using ARUPS. Spectral shifts were

  6. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  7. Surface structure determination of black phosphorus using photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Luis Henrique; Barreto, Lucas; Landers, Richard; de Siervo, Abner

    2016-01-01

    The atomic structure of single-crystalline black phosphorus is studied using high-resolution synchrotron-based photoelectron diffraction (XPD). The results show that the topmost phosphorene layer in the black phosphorus is slightly displaced compared to the bulk structure and presents a small contraction in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Furthermore, the XPD results show the presence of a small buckling among the surface atoms, in agreement with previously reported scanning tunneling microscopy results. The contraction of the surface layer added to the presence of the buckling indicates a uniformity in the size of the s p3 bonds between P atoms at the surface.

  8. Beyond the surface atlas: A roadmap and gazetteer for surface symmetry and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Stephen J.; Pratt, Stephanie J.

    2007-10-01

    Throughout the development of single-crystal surface science, interest has predominantly focussed on the high-symmetry planes of crystalline materials, which typically present simple stable structures with small primitive unit cells. This concentration of effort has rapidly and substantially advanced our understanding of fundamental surface phenomena, and provides a sound basis for detailed study of more complex planes. The intense current interest in these is partly motivated by their regular arrays of steps, kinks or other low-coordination structural features, whose properties are little understood and may mimic specific highly-reactive sites on dispersed nanoparticles. Furthermore, the lower symmetry of these planes may give rise to other equally interesting properties such as intrinsic chirality, with exciting potential applications in enantioselective heterogeneous catalysis, biosensors and surface magnetism. To aid exploration of this new territory for surface science requires a depth of understanding that goes beyond the character of individual surfaces to encompass the global relationships between all possible surfaces of a given material, both in their structure and in their symmetry. In this report we present a rigorous conceptual framework for ideal crystalline surfaces within which the symmetry and structure of all possible surface orientations are described. We illustrate the versatility of our generally-applicable approach by comparing fcc, bcc and hcp materials. The entire scheme naturally derives from the very simple basis that the fundamental distinction between symmetry and structure is paramount. Where symmetry is concerned, our approach recognises that the surface is not a two-dimensional (2D) object but actually a truncated three-dimensional (3D) one. We therefore derive a symmetry scheme specifically formulated for surfaces and naturally encompassing their chirality where necessary. Our treatment of surface structure, on the other hand

  9. Theoretical estimation of surface Debye temperature of nano structured material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Bijan Kumar; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The estimation of Debye temperature (TD) exploiting phonon is very important. In this work an attempt has been made to estimate TD for solids in a simple phenomenological approach. The ultimate goal is to estimate TD for nano structured material. The objective of this present work is to extend Debye model for nano-structured material and hence to extract the contribution to surface specific heat and surface Debye temperature. An empirical relation between TD and surface Debye temperature (TDS) is proposed. Lindemann melting criterion is also extended towards nano structure. The overall results obtained are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  10. Surface structure and thermodynamics of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Wernett, P.C.; Larsen, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Our work has been the determination of the average micropore diameter of an Argonne Illinois No. 6 coal and a spherocarb sample by {sup 129}Xe NMR. {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine pore sizes and surface characteristics in zeolites. The chemical shift of {sup 129}Xe was measured as a function of pressure and the average micropore diameter was calculated using established techniques. For the spherocarb, the calculated pore diameter of 15.4 CA agrees well with the 0 manufacturer's reported value of 15{Angstrom}. The Illinois No. 6 coal gave two {sup 129}Xe peaks. Extrapolation of the pressure dependent peak gave a micropore diameter of 5.2{Angstrom}. The other peak was not pressure dependent and is tentatively assigned to Xe dissolved in the coal. The NMR chemical shift of {sup 129}Xe is a useful probe of micropore (<20 {Angstrom} diameter) size and surface characteristics. This application was developed principally by Fraissard and coworkers to determine pore size distributions and the degree of crystallinity in zeolites. The observed {sup 129}Xe NMR chemical shift can be attributed to 4 factors: (1) the number of Xe-Xe collisions; (2) the electric field established by neighboring ions' in the solid sample, found to be negligible for monovalent cations in zeolites; (3) the number of Xe-wall collisions; and (4) the nature of the interaction of Xe with the pore wall. The chemical shift due to Xe-wall collisions can be determined by extrapolation of {sup 129}Xe NMR resonances to 0 Xe pressure.

  11. Influence of surface structure and chemistry on water droplet splashing.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kerstin; Grichnik, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Water droplet splashing and aerosolization play a role in human hygiene and health systems as well as in crop culturing. Prevention or reduction of splashing can prevent transmission of diseases between animals and plants and keep technical systems such as pipe or bottling systems free of contamination. This study demonstrates to what extent the surface chemistry and structures influence the water droplet splashing behaviour. Smooth surfaces and structured replicas of Calathea zebrina (Sims) Lindl. leaves were produced. Modification of their wettability was done by coating with hydrophobizing and hydrophilizing agents. Their wetting was characterized by contact angle measurement and splashing behaviour was observed with a high-speed video camera. Hydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces generally showed fewer tendencies to splash than hydrophobic ones. Structuring amplified the underlying behaviour of the surface chemistries, increasing hydrophobic surfaces' tendency to splash and decreasing splash on hydrophilic surfaces by quickly transporting water off the impact point by capillary forces. The non-porous surface structures found in C. zebrina could easily be applied to technical products such as plastic foils or mats and coated with hydrophilizing agents to suppress splash in areas of increased hygiene requirements or wherever pooling of liquids is not desirable.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354737

  12. Influence of surface structure and chemistry on water droplet splashing.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kerstin; Grichnik, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Water droplet splashing and aerosolization play a role in human hygiene and health systems as well as in crop culturing. Prevention or reduction of splashing can prevent transmission of diseases between animals and plants and keep technical systems such as pipe or bottling systems free of contamination. This study demonstrates to what extent the surface chemistry and structures influence the water droplet splashing behaviour. Smooth surfaces and structured replicas of Calathea zebrina (Sims) Lindl. leaves were produced. Modification of their wettability was done by coating with hydrophobizing and hydrophilizing agents. Their wetting was characterized by contact angle measurement and splashing behaviour was observed with a high-speed video camera. Hydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces generally showed fewer tendencies to splash than hydrophobic ones. Structuring amplified the underlying behaviour of the surface chemistries, increasing hydrophobic surfaces' tendency to splash and decreasing splash on hydrophilic surfaces by quickly transporting water off the impact point by capillary forces. The non-porous surface structures found in C. zebrina could easily be applied to technical products such as plastic foils or mats and coated with hydrophilizing agents to suppress splash in areas of increased hygiene requirements or wherever pooling of liquids is not desirable.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  13. Surface structures of polar and non-polar metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Sara E.

    Metal oxides have long been a challenge to surface science since many traditional surface techniques are often affected by their insulating nature. In particular, high current electron beams can cause charging effects in addition to potentially desorbing surface species and damaging the surface. The development of a low current, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) system has allowed us to investigate metal oxide surfaces while significantly limiting the above mentioned complications. This low current LEED system has been used to perform a structural LEED-IV study of the reconstructed TiO2(011)-(2x1) surface. This surface is known to experience significant oxygen desorption when exposed to high current electron beams. The low current LEED system was crucial to maintain confidence in the structure found, which generally agreed with recently published models, but did not confirm one key feature. The oxygen atoms at the surface were not found to be asymmetrically bonded, which has been thought to be the cause of this surface's enhanced photocatalytic activity. We have also used the low current LEED system to investigate the polar oxide surfaces of ZnO(000 1¯) and MgO(111)-(✓3x✓3)R30°. For Zn0(000 1¯) LEED-IV structural study was combined with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the impact of hydrogen on the surface. Our results support a disordered, fractional coverage of hydrogen terminating the surface. MgO(111)-(✓3x✓3)R30° has proven to be a challenging reconstructed surface. Both LEED-IV and surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) find that previously proposed models for the surface are not a good fit to the data, so other models have been explored. The SXRD data in particular suggest that the reconstruction is more than one atomic layer deep.

  14. Imprinted and injection-molded nano-structured optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Alexander B.; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Clausen, Jeppe; Caringal, Gideon P.; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by nature, nano-textured surfaces have attracted much attention as a method to realize optical surface functionality. The moth-eye antireflective structure and the structural colors of Morpho butterflies are well- known examples used for inspiration for such biomimetic research. In this paper, nanostructured polymer surfaces suitable for up-scalable polymer replication methods, such as imprinting/embossing and injection-molding, are discussed. The limiting case of injection-moulding compatible designs is investigated. Anti-reflective polymer surfaces are realized by replication of Black Silicon (BSi) random nanostructure surfaces. The optical transmission at normal incidence is measured for wavelengths from 400 nm to 900 nm. For samples with optimized nanostructures, the reflectance is reduced by 50 % compared to samples with planar surfaces. The specular and diffusive reflection of light from polymer surfaces and their implication for creating structural colors is discussed. In the case of injection-moulding compatible designs, the maximum reflection of nano-scale textured surfaces cannot exceed the Fresnel reflection of a corresponding flat polymer surface, which is approx. 4 % for normal incidence. Diffraction gratings provide strong color reflection defined by the diffraction orders. However, the apperance varies strongly with viewing angles. Three different methods to address the strong angular-dependence of diffraction grating based structural color are discussed.

  15. Replication of Leaf Surface Structures for Light Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhongjia; Yang, Sai; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Meng; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most important hosts of natural light harvesting, foliage normally has complicated surface structures to capture solar radiances. Bio-mimicking leaf surface structures can provide novel designs of covers in photovoltaic systems. In this article, we reported on replicating leaf surface structures on poly-(methyl methacrylate) polymers to prompt harvesting efficiencies. Prepared via a double transfer process, the polymers were found to have high optical transparencies and transmission hazes, with both values exceeding 80% in some species. Benefiting from optical properties and wrinkled surfaces, the biomimetic polymers brought up to 17% gains to photovoltaic efficiencies. Through Monte-Carlo simulations of light transport, ultrahigh haze values and low reflections were attributed to lightwave guidance schemes lead by the nano- and micro-morphologies which are inherited from master leaves. Thus, leaf surface bio-mimicking can be considered as a strategic direction to design covers of light harvesting systems. PMID:26381702

  16. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a trimeric, pore-forming rare outer membrane protein of Treponema pallidum, has a bipartite domain structure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Radolf, Justin D

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178-5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprC(Fl)) forms a β-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprC(Fl) increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprC(N)), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal β-barrel (TprC(C)). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprC(C), while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host.

  17. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  18. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  19. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface.

  20. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Cohen, Bruce E.; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Milliron, Delia J.; Prendergast, David; Helms, Brett A.

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons is readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.

  1. Chemically directing d-block heterometallics to nanocrystal surfaces as molecular beacons of surface structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosen, Evelyn L.; Gilmore, Keith; Sawvel, April M.; Hammack, Aaron T.; Doris, Sean E.; Aloni, Shaul; Altoe, Virginia; Nordlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-07-28

    Our understanding of structure and bonding in nanoscale materials is incomplete without knowledge of their surface structure. Needed are better surveying capabilities responsive not only to different atoms at the surface, but also their respective coordination environments. We report here that d-block organometallics, when placed at nanocrystal surfaces through heterometallic bonds, serve as molecular beacons broadcasting local surface structure in atomic detail. This unique ability stems from their elemental specificity and the sensitivity of their d-orbital level alignment to local coordination environment, which can be assessed spectroscopically. Re-surfacing cadmium and lead chalcogenide nanocrystals with iron- or ruthenium-based molecular beacons ismore » readily accomplished with trimethylsilylated cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyls. For PbSe nanocrystals with iron-based beacons, we show how core-level X-ray spectroscopies and DFT calculations enrich our understanding of both charge and atomic reorganization at the surface when beacons are bound.« less

  2. Surface structures and surface-atom vibrations determined using photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.Q. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-07-01

    Surface structures of {radical}3 {times} {radical}3 R30{degrees} Cl/Ni(111) and c(2 {times} 2)Cl/Cu(001) were determined using low- temperature angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS), which yields both more accurate surface and near-surface structural information for deeper substrate layers. A study of surface-atom vibrations for {radical}3 {times} {radical}3 R30{degrees} Cl/Ni(111) and c(2 {times} 2)Cl/Cu(001) was made using temperature-dependent ARPEFS. A model for predicting the adsorbate vibrational anisotropy from surface structures was proposed and also successfully applied to several adsorbate systems. This model offered a simple and straightforward physical picture for understanding different types of vibrational anisotropy.

  3. Outer-membrane cytochrome-c, OmcF from Geobacter sulfurreducens: high structural similarity to an algal cytochrome c6.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Morgado, L.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. Nova de Lisboa

    2009-01-01

    Putative outer membrane c-type cytochromes have been implicated in metal ion reducing properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens. OmcF (GSU2432), OmcB (GSU2731), and OmcC (GSU2737) are three such proteins that have predicted lipid anchors. OmcF is a monoheme cytochrome, whereas OmcB and OmcC are multiheme cytochromes. Deletion of OmcF was reported to affect the expression of OmcB and OmcC in G. sulfurreducens. The OmcF deficient strain was impaired in its ability to both reduce and grow on Fe(III) citrate probably because the expression of OmcB, which is crucial for iron reduction, is low in this strain. U(VI) reduction activity of this bacterium is also lower on deletion of OmcB or OmcF. The U(VI) reduction activity is affected more by the deletion of OmcF than by the deletion of OmcB. The soluble part of OmcF (residues 20-104, referred to as OmcF{sub S} hereafter) has sequence similarity to soluble cytochromes c{sub 6} of photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria. The cytochrome c{sub 6} proteins in algae and cyanobacteria are electron transport proteins that mediate the transfer of electrons from cytochrome b{sub 6}f to photosystem I and have high reduction potentials of about +350 mV and low pI. The structures of seven cytochromes c{sub 6} have been previously determined. Further, a c{sub 6}-like cytochrome (PetJ2) of unknown function was recently identified in Synechoccus sp. PCC 7002 with a reduction potential of +148 mV and high pI. Here, we report the structure of OmcF{sub S} and its remarkable structural similarity to that of cytochrome c{sub 6} from the green alga, Monoraphidium braunii. To our knowledge, OmcF{sub S} is the first example of a cytochrome c{sub 6}-like structure from a nonphotosynthetic organism.

  4. The effect of surfaces on the domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    The second-order phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the ferromagnetic phase with domain structure in a ferromagnetic film with strong uniaxial anisotropy is studied. The easy axis is perpendicular to the surface of the film. It is assumed that the short range interactions depend on the distance to the surface. The phase diagram of the film and the form of the domain structure which occurs at the phase transition temperature are obtained.

  5. The effect of surfaces on the domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1987-12-01

    The second-order phase transition from the paramagnetic phase to the ferromagnetic phase with domain structure in a ferromagnetic film with strong uniaxial anisotropy is studied. The easy axis is perpendicular to the surface of the film. It is assumed that the short range interactions depend on the distance to the surface. The phase diagram of the film and the form of the domain structure which occurs at the phase transition temperature are obtained.

  6. Structure, composition and morphology of bioactive titanate layer on porous titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinshan; Wang, Xiaohua; Hu, Rui; Kou, Hongchao

    2014-07-01

    A bioactive coating was produced on pore surfaces of porous titanium samples by an amendatory alkali-heat treatment method. Porous titanium was prepared by powder metallurgy and its porosity and average size were 45% and 135 μm, respectively. Coating morphology, coating structure and phase constituents were examined by SEM, XPS and XRD. It was found that a micro-network structure with sizes of <200 nm mainly composed of bioactive sodium titanate and rutile phases of TiO2 covered the interior and exterior of porous titanium cells, and redundant Ca ion was detected in the titanate layer. The concentration distribution of Ti, O, Ca and Na in the coating showed a compositional gradient from the intermediate layer toward the outer surface. These compositional gradients indicate that the coating bonded to Ti substrate without a distinct interface. After immersion into the SBF solution for 3 days, a bone-like carbonate-hydroxylapatite showing a good biocompatibility was detected on the coating surface. And the redundant Ca advanced the bioactivity of the coating. Thus, the present modification is expected to allow the use of the bioactive porous titanium as artificial bones even under load-bearing conditions.

  7. Iridescent flowers? Contribution of surface structures to optical signaling.

    PubMed

    van der Kooi, Casper J; Wilts, Bodo D; Leertouwer, Hein L; Staal, Marten; Elzenga, J Theo M; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2014-07-01

    The color of natural objects depends on how they are structured and pigmented. In flowers, both the surface structure of the petals and the pigments they contain determine coloration. The aim of the present study was to assess the contribution of structural coloration, including iridescence, to overall floral coloration. We studied the reflection characteristics of flower petals of various plant species with an imaging scatterometer, which allows direct visualization of the angle dependence of the reflected light in the hemisphere above the petal. To separate the light reflected by the flower surface from the light backscattered by the components inside (e.g. the vacuoles), we also investigated surface casts. A survey among angiosperms revealed three different types of floral surface structure, each with distinct reflections. Petals with a smooth and very flat surface had mirror-like reflections and petal surfaces with cones yielded diffuse reflections. Petals with striations yielded diffraction patterns when single cells were illuminated. The iridescent signal, however, vanished when illumination similar to that found in natural conditions was applied. Pigmentary rather than structural coloration determines the optical appearance of flowers. Therefore, the hypothesized signaling by flowers with striated surfaces to attract potential pollinators presently seems untenable.

  8. Iridescent flowers? Contribution of surface structures to optical signaling.

    PubMed

    van der Kooi, Casper J; Wilts, Bodo D; Leertouwer, Hein L; Staal, Marten; Elzenga, J Theo M; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2014-07-01

    The color of natural objects depends on how they are structured and pigmented. In flowers, both the surface structure of the petals and the pigments they contain determine coloration. The aim of the present study was to assess the contribution of structural coloration, including iridescence, to overall floral coloration. We studied the reflection characteristics of flower petals of various plant species with an imaging scatterometer, which allows direct visualization of the angle dependence of the reflected light in the hemisphere above the petal. To separate the light reflected by the flower surface from the light backscattered by the components inside (e.g. the vacuoles), we also investigated surface casts. A survey among angiosperms revealed three different types of floral surface structure, each with distinct reflections. Petals with a smooth and very flat surface had mirror-like reflections and petal surfaces with cones yielded diffuse reflections. Petals with striations yielded diffraction patterns when single cells were illuminated. The iridescent signal, however, vanished when illumination similar to that found in natural conditions was applied. Pigmentary rather than structural coloration determines the optical appearance of flowers. Therefore, the hypothesized signaling by flowers with striated surfaces to attract potential pollinators presently seems untenable. PMID:24713039

  9. Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieling; Dundas, Joe; Kachalo, Sema; Ouyang, Zheng; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein functional surfaces are important for predicting protein function, understanding enzyme mechanism, and docking small compounds to proteins. As the rapid speed of accumulation of protein sequence information far exceeds that of structures, constructing accurate models of protein functional surfaces and identify their key elements become increasingly important. A promising approach is to build comparative models from sequences using known structural templates such as those obtained from structural genome projects. Here we assess how well this approach works in modeling binding surfaces. By systematically building three-dimensional comparative models of proteins using Modeller, we determine how well functional surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets on the modeled structures, and conduct a large-scale computation of similarity measurements (pocket RMSD and fraction of functional atoms captured) for 26,590 modeled enzyme protein structures. Overall, we find that when the sequence fragment of the binding surfaces has more than 45% identity to that of the tempalte protein, the modeled surfaces have on average an RMSD of 0.5 Å, and contain 48% or more of the binding surface atoms, with nearly all of the important atoms in the signatures of binding pockets captured. PMID:21541664

  10. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  11. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  12. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  13. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  14. 46 CFR 154.170 - Outer hull steel plating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer hull steel plating. 154.170 Section 154.170... Structure § 154.170 Outer hull steel plating. (a) Except as required in paragraph (b) of this section, the outer hull steel plating, including the shell and deck plating must meet the material standards of...

  15. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2006-06-01

    In the first 8 months of this grant we initiated investigations on several of the new hypothesis in the proposal. Hypothesis 1-4 deal with the mechanisms of conductivity along the length of the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens. The initial approach to evaluating these mechanisms was to attempt to measure end-to-end conductivity of the pili with lithographically-patterned electrodes in which conductive strips of graphite are placed on an insulating silicon dioxide surface. To our knowledge this is the first time that such conductivity measurements have been attempted with natural protein structures. Conductivity along the pili was measured with two methods. In the first method, the conductivity of the pili was measured by applying a voltage between the lithographic electrodes. In the second method, the voltage was applied between one lithographic electrode and the AFM tip. To date, we have not been able to consistently measure current of pili because of an inability to readily observe pili on the nanoelectrode system. Although we were able to make conductivity measurements in this manner on one attempt, we have not been able to consistently obtain appropriate preparations to consistently make such measurements. Therefore, we are evaluating strategies to modify this approach to make it more consistent.

  16. Salmonellae PhoPQ regulation of the outer membrane to resist innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Miller, Samuel I

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellae sense host cues to regulate properties important for bacterial survival and replication within host tissues. The PhoPQ two-component regulatory system senses phagosome acidification and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) to regulate the protein and lipid contents of the bacterial envelope that comprises an inner and outer membrane. PhoPQ-regulated lipid components of the outer membrane include lipopolysaccharides and glycerophospholipids. Envelope proteins regulated by PhoPQ, include: components of virulence associated secretion systems, the flagellar apparatus, membrane transport systems, and proteins that are likely structural components of the outer membrane. PhoPQ alteration of the bacterial surface results in increased bacterial resistance to CAMP and decreased detection by the innate immune system. This review details the molecular complexity of the bacterial cell envelope and highlights the outer membrane lipid bilayer as an environmentally regulated bacterial organelle.

  17. Comparative analysis of the structures of the outer membrane protein P1 genes from major clones of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Grass, S; Einhorn, M; Bailey, C; Newell, C

    1989-01-01

    P1 outer membrane proteins from Haemophilus influenzae type b are heterogeneous antigenically and with respect to apparent molecular weight in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For determination of the molecular basis for the differences in the P1 proteins, the genes for the P1 proteins from strain 1613, representative of outer membrane protein subtype 3L, and strain 8358, representative of outer membrane protein subtype 6U, were cloned, sequenced, and compared with the previously reported gene for the P1 protein from strain MinnA, a strain with the outer membrane protein subtype 1H. These prototype strains are representatives of the three major clonal families of H. influenzae type b responsible for invasive disease in diverse areas of the world. The nucleotide sequences of the P1 genes from strains 1613 and 8358 were 94 and 90% identical to the MinnA sequence, respectively. The derived amino acid sequences were 91 and 86% identical, respectively. Heterogeneity between the MinnA and 1613 proteins was largely localized to two short variable regions; the protein from strain 8538 contained a third variable region not observed in the other P1 proteins. Thus, the outer membrane protein P1 genes are highly conserved; the variable regions may code for the previously demonstrated strain-specific antigenic determinants. Images PMID:2572549

  18. Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Shuangxi; Zhang, Ping

    2014-06-07

    By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2 × 2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

  19. [Probable structural functional evolution of sensory surface of osphradia of aquatic prosobranchian molluscs].

    PubMed

    Kamardin, N N

    2014-01-01

    located on lateral surfaces and on ventral edge of petals of osphradia, near zones of cilium supportive cells. These seem to be mechanoreceptor structures tracing direction and rate of flow of liquid along osphradium. A connection of SCC with the certain modality of outer nutrition and with the way of nutrition is suggested.

  20. Self-consistent internal structure of a rotating gaseous planet and its comparison with an approximation by oblate spheroidal equidensity surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In an important paper, Roberts (1963b) studied the hydrostatic equilibrium of an isolated, self-gravitating, rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body based on a controversial assumption/approximation that all (outer and internal) equidensity surfaces are in the shape of oblate spheroids whose eccentricities are a function of the equatorial radius and whose axes of symmetry are parallel to the rotation axis. We compute the three-dimensional, finite-element, fully self-consistent, continuous solution for a rapidly rotating polytropic gaseous body with Jupiter-like parameters without making any prior assumptions about its outer shape and internal structure. Upon partially relaxing the Roberts' approximation by assuming that only the outer equidensity surface is in the shape of an oblate spheroid, we also compute a finite-element solution with the same parameters without making any prior assumptions about its internal structure. It is found that all equidensity surfaces of the fully self-consistent solution differ only slightly from the oblate spheroidal shape. It is also found that the characteristic difference between the fully self-consistent solution and the outer-spheroidal-shape solution is insignificantly small. Our results suggest that the Roberts' assumption of spheroidal equidensity surfaces represents a reasonably accurate approximation for rotating polytropic gaseous bodies with Jupiter-like parameters. The numerical accuracy of our finite-element solution is checked by an exact analytic solution based on the Green's function using the spheroidal wave function. The three different solutions in non-spherical geometries - the fully self-consistent numerical solution, the numerical solution with the outer spheroidal shape and the exact analytical solution - can also serve as a useful benchmark for other solutions based on different numerical methods.

  1. Enhanced perfume surface delivery to interfaces using surfactant surface multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Brabury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced surface delivery and retention of perfumes at interfaces are the keys to their more effective and efficient deployment in a wide range of home and personal care related formulations. It has been previously demonstrated that the addition of multivalent counterions, notably Ca(2+), induces multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface for the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl-6-benzenesulfonate, LAS-6. Neutron reflectivity, NR, measurements are reported here which demonstrate that such surfactant surface multilayer structures are a potentially promising vehicle for enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces. The data show that the incorporation of the model perfumes, phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, into the surface multilayer structure formed by LAS-6/Ca(2+) results in the surface structures being retained up to relatively high perfume mole fractions. Furthermore the amount of perfume at the surface is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude, compared to that co-adsorbed with a surfactant monolayer.

  2. Enhanced perfume surface delivery to interfaces using surfactant surface multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Brabury, Robert; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Jones, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced surface delivery and retention of perfumes at interfaces are the keys to their more effective and efficient deployment in a wide range of home and personal care related formulations. It has been previously demonstrated that the addition of multivalent counterions, notably Ca(2+), induces multilayer adsorption at the air-water interface for the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl-6-benzenesulfonate, LAS-6. Neutron reflectivity, NR, measurements are reported here which demonstrate that such surfactant surface multilayer structures are a potentially promising vehicle for enhanced delivery of perfumes to interfaces. The data show that the incorporation of the model perfumes, phenylethanol, PE, and linalool, LL, into the surface multilayer structure formed by LAS-6/Ca(2+) results in the surface structures being retained up to relatively high perfume mole fractions. Furthermore the amount of perfume at the surface is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude, compared to that co-adsorbed with a surfactant monolayer. PMID:26409782

  3. Numerical simulations of drop impact on superhydrophobic structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzetti, Davide; Larentis, Stefano; Pugno, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    During the last decade drop impact dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces has been intensively investigated because of the incredible properties of water repellency exhibited by this kind of surfaces, mostly inspired by biological examples such as Lotus leave. Thanks to the recent progress in micro-fabrication technology is possible to tailor surfaces wettability defining specific pillar-like structured surfaces. In this work, the behavior of impinging drops on these pillar-like surfaces is simulated, characterizing temporal evolution of droplets contact radius and drop maximal deformation dependence on Weber number. Numerical simulations results are compared with theoretical and experimental results guaranteeing simulation reliability. Fingering patterns obtained from drop impact has been studied obtaining a correlation between number of fingers and Weber number. Drop fragmentation pattern obtained from simulations supports the proposed correlation. Different drop impact outcomes (e.g. rebound, fragmentation) on structured superhydrophobic surfaces are simulated, focusing on the influence of micro-structured surface geometrical pattern. This investigation is relevant in order to define design rules for possible reliable non wettable surfaces. Financial support by Alta Scuola Politecnica.

  4. Micro-structured surfaces for algal biofilm growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathananthan, Suthamathy; Genin, Scott N.; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Allen, D. Grant

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that cells respond to structured surface cues that are on the micro/nanometer scale. Tissue engineering and bio-fouling fields have utilized the semiconductor device fabrication processes to make micro- and nanometer patterned surfaces to study animal cell tissue formation and to prevent algae attachment on marine surfaces respectively. In this paper we describe the use of micro-structured surfaces to study the attachment and growth of algal films. This paper gives an overview of how micro-structured surfaces are made for this purpose, how they are incorporated into a photo bioreactor and how this patterning influences the growth of an algal biofilm. Our results suggest that surface patterning with deeper V-groove patterns that are of the same size scale as the algal species has resulted in higher biomass productivity giving them a chance to embed and attach on the slope and flat surfaces whereas shallower size grooves and completely flat surfaces did not show this trend.

  5. A genetic algorithm approach in interface and surface structure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part a global optimization method is developed for the interface and surface structures optimization. Two prototype systems are chosen to be studied. One is Si[001] symmetric tilted grain boundaries and the other is Ag/Au induced Si(111) surface. It is found that Genetic Algorithm is very efficient in finding lowest energy structures in both cases. Not only existing structures in the experiments can be reproduced, but also many new structures can be predicted using Genetic Algorithm. Thus it is shown that Genetic Algorithm is a extremely powerful tool for the material structures predictions. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the explanation of an experimental observation of thermal radiation from three-dimensional tungsten photonic crystal structures. The experimental results seems astounding and confusing, yet the theoretical models in the paper revealed the physics insight behind the phenomena and can well reproduced the experimental results.

  6. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Tadich, A.; Sear, M. J.; Qi, D.; Wee, A. T. S.; Stacey, A.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of ‑0.86 ± 0.1 eV.

  7. Microplicae--Specialized Surface Structure of Epithelial Cells of Wet-Surfaced Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Asikainen, P; Sirviö, E; Mikkonen, J J W; Singh, S P; Schulten, E A J M; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Koistinen, A P; Kullaa, A M

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of the superficial cells of the oral mucosa is decorated with numerous membrane ridges, termed microplicae (MPLs). The MPL structure is typical of the epithelial surfaces that are covered with protective mucus. Cell membrane MPLs are no longer seen as passive consequences of cellular activity. The interaction between MPLs and the mucins has been demonstrated, however the role of MPL structure seen on the upper surface of the oral epithelial cells is speculative. The cell surface is of potentially great significance, as it harbors many markers for refined prognosis and targets for oral mucosal diseases and cancer therapy. With these aspects in mind, we conducted the present review of the MPL structure and function in order to form the basis for further studies of MPLs of the oral epithelial cells.

  8. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  9. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    PubMed

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  10. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    PubMed

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer. PMID:26831689

  11. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-02-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  12. Surface Structure and Wetting Characteristics of Collembola Cuticles

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Håkon; Leinaas, Hans Petter; Thaulow, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The cuticles of the arthropods Collembola (springtails) are known to be superhydrophobic, displaying such properties as water-repellence and plastron formation; overhanging surface structures have been suggested as the source of these properties. Superhydrophobicity is closely related to surface structuring and other surfaces with overhanging structures have been shown to possess robust superhydrophobic properties. In effort to correlate the wetting performance and surface structuring of the cuticles, from both a technical and evolutionary point of view, we investigated a selection of Collembola species including species from several families and covering habitats ranging from aquatic to very dry. The observed contact angles of wetting was in general larger than those predicted by the conventional models. Not all the studied Collembola were found to have superhydrophobic properties, indicating that superhydrophobicity is common, but not a universal trait in Collembola. Overhanging structures were found in some, but not all Collembola species with superhydrophobic cuticles; which leads to the conclusion that there is no direct link between overhanging surface structures and superhydrophobicity in Collembola. PMID:24498281

  13. Surface structure and wetting characteristics of Collembola cuticles.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Håkon; Leinaas, Hans Petter; Thaulow, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The cuticles of the arthropods Collembola (springtails) are known to be superhydrophobic, displaying such properties as water-repellence and plastron formation; overhanging surface structures have been suggested as the source of these properties. Superhydrophobicity is closely related to surface structuring and other surfaces with overhanging structures have been shown to possess robust superhydrophobic properties. In effort to correlate the wetting performance and surface structuring of the cuticles, from both a technical and evolutionary point of view, we investigated a selection of Collembola species including species from several families and covering habitats ranging from aquatic to very dry. The observed contact angles of wetting was in general larger than those predicted by the conventional models. Not all the studied Collembola were found to have superhydrophobic properties, indicating that superhydrophobicity is common, but not a universal trait in Collembola. Overhanging structures were found in some, but not all Collembola species with superhydrophobic cuticles; which leads to the conclusion that there is no direct link between overhanging surface structures and superhydrophobicity in Collembola. PMID:24498281

  14. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  15. Method for large-scale fabrication of atomic-scale structures on material surfaces using surface vacancies

    DOEpatents

    Lim, Chong Wee; Ohmori, Kenji; Petrov, Ivan Georgiev; Greene, Joseph E.

    2004-07-13

    A method for forming atomic-scale structures on a surface of a substrate on a large-scale includes creating a predetermined amount of surface vacancies on the surface of the substrate by removing an amount of atoms on the surface of the material corresponding to the predetermined amount of the surface vacancies. Once the surface vacancies have been created, atoms of a desired structure material are deposited on the surface of the substrate to enable the surface vacancies and the atoms of the structure material to interact. The interaction causes the atoms of the structure material to form the atomic-scale structures.

  16. The outer solar system - Perspectives for exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt is made to summarize the current knowledge about the composition and structures of outer planet atmospheres with special emphasis on Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. The nature of the substances which are responsible for the yellow coloration observed on both Jupiter and Saturn is discussed. The analysis of planetary conditions conducted shows that the outer solar system offers a variety of environments in which natural experiments in prebiotic organic synthesis must be taking place at the present time.

  17. Surface structure of CdS layer at the interface of CdS-SnO2 junction and the diagram of surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraman, I.; Lazar, I.; Caraman, M.; Rusu, D.

    2009-01-01

    The SnO2-CdS type structures with SnO2 film deposited by thermal pirolize in SnCl4-etanol solution were obtained. The CdS film with submicron thickness was obtained in cvasiclosed volume. The transversal section of the SnO2-CdS junction as well as the outer surface of the CdS film was analyzed using the electronic microscope. The density of the crystallization germs in the CdS film was about 1013cm-2. The luminescence spectrum of CdS has been examined. The existence of exciton line (n=1) in reflection and emission spectrum serves as a criteria of crystalline perfection of surface film.

  18. Structural surface investigations with low-energy backscattered electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    The development of electron spectroscopies based on inelastic scattering fine structure is driven mainly by the need for structural methods which allow the investigation of the geometrical environment of different atomic species of the surface region of the sample. The EELFS (Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure) technique, using low-kinetic-energy electrons (1000-2000 eV) in reflection geometry, has been proven a useful tool for local structural investigation of clean surfaces, thin films and chemisorbed species. The main appeal of this technique, besides its experimental accessibility, is that the data analysis follows the procedure used for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy to obtain the atomic selectivity, the radial distribution function, the coordination number and the thermal and anisotropic effects. The near-edge energy-loss feature has been used to investigate the density of empty states close to EF and it appeeal particularly sensitive for following the structural changes and for discriminating among various phases and compound formations which occur in the surface region. In this work I review some recent developments, applications and theoretical considerations of the EELFS technique to give local structural parameters and to assess the basic mechanisms which dominate the low-energy electron-surface interaction.

  19. Surface structures of Fe on Mo(1 1 0) surface investigated by RHEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Y.; Yamada, A.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    2004-10-01

    The surface structures of iron deposited on a Mo(1 1 0) surface have been investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and three kinds of surface structures were observed. Up to 1.0 ML of Fe deposition thickneeses, 1 × 1 structure appeared in all substrate temperature range from RT to 1200 °C. At thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 ML, α structure which is the commensurate structure expressed by [3 1, 0 2] in matrix notation appeared at 300-550 °C. More than 1.0 ML, the β structure appeared at 400-800 °C. The β structure is also the commensurate structure expressed by [12 0, 0 12], exhibiting the same atomic arrangement as bcc(1 1 0) surface. In the thickness range beyond 1.0 ML, Fe film grew as the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode at room temperature to 400 °C and Stranski-Krastanov growth mode from 400 to 800 °C, in which the β structure was the first monolayer.

  20. Laser-induced nanoscale superhydrophobic structures on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jagdheesh, R; Pathiraj, B; Karatay, E; Römer, G R B E; Huis in't Veld, A J

    2011-07-01

    The combination of a dual-scale (nano and micro) roughness with an inherent low-surface energy coating material is an essential factor for the development of superhydrophobic surfaces. Ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) machining/structuring is a promising technique for obtaining the dual-scale roughness. Sheets of stainless steel (AISI 304 L SS) and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were laser-machined with ultraviolet laser pulses of 6.7 ps, with different numbers of pulses per irradiated area. The surface energy of the laser-machined samples was reduced via application of a layer of perfluorinated octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS). The influence of the number of pulses per irradiated area on the geometry of the nanostructure and the wetting properties of the laser-machined structures has been studied. The results show that with an increasing number of pulses per irradiated area, the nanoscale structures tend to become predominantly microscale. The top surface of the microscale structures is seen covered with nanoscale protrusions that are most pronounced in Ti-6Al-4V. The laser-machined Ti-6Al-4V surface attained superhydrophobicity, and the improvement in the contact angle was >27% when compared to that of a nontextured surface.

  1. Truss structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, Carl S. (Inventor); Lees, Daniel A. (Inventor); McKitterick, Dennis Donald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An integrally formed three-dimensional truss structure, including molds and methods for production of same, containing outer top and bottom plane surfaces thereof comprising interconnected rod segments integrally formed at their points of intersection on the outer top and bottom surfaces, the top and bottom surfaces also integrally joined together through additional interconnected rod segments passing through an integrally formed intersection, wherein the additional interconnected rod segments passing through the integrally formed intersection form a three-dimensional continuous array of triangles.

  2. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  3. Law in Outer Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the current practice and fascinating future of legal issues involved in outer space exploration and colonization. Current space law, by necessity, addresses broad principles rather than specific incidents. Nonetheless, it covers a variety of issues including commercial development, rescue agreements, object registration,…

  4. Topographic and electronic structure of cleaved SrTiO{sub 3}(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaputra, Wattaka Skowronski, Marek; Feenstra, Randall M.

    2015-05-15

    The topographic and electronic structure of cleaved SrTiO{sub 3}(001) surfaces were studied, employing samples that either had or had not been coated with Ti on their outer surfaces prior to fracture. In both cases, SrO- and TiO{sub 2}-terminated terraces were present on the cleavage surface, enabling in situ studies on either termination. However, the samples coated with Ti prior to fracture were found to yield a rougher morphology on TiO{sub 2}-terminated terraces as well as a higher density of oxygen vacancies during an annealing (outgassing) step following the coating. The higher density of oxygen vacancies in the bulk of the Ti-coated samples also provides higher conductivity, which, in turn, improves a sensitivity of the spectroscopy and reduces the effect of tip-induced band bending. Nonetheless, similar spectral features, unique to each termination, were observed for samples both with and without the Ti coating. Notably, with moderate-temperature annealing following fracture, a strong discrete peak in the conductance spectra, arising from oxygen vacancies, was observed on the SrO-terminated terraces. This peak appears at slightly different voltages for coated and uncoated samples, signifying a possible effect of tip-induced band bending.

  5. Surface Structures on Cleaved Silicon by Cleavage Luminescence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongguang

    This paper reports on further research into the structure and properties of the cleaved surfaces of silicon, using vacuum cleavage luminescence detection methods. Results show resistance partially recovers during the cleavage process through "crack healing". When the elasticity of the parts transmitting the applied stress temporarily absorbs the initial rupture stress, the crack stops and partially re-closes until the applied force "catches up" and reapplies stress. The high resistance created by the two Schottky barriers prevents resistance recovery from mere surfaces re-contact. Instead, resistance recovery from the atom-to-atom re-closure surface healing is more likely, as expected from a Three Bond Scission Model (TBS) silicon surface structure.

  6. Long-Lived Glass Mirrors For Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Maag, Carl R.; Heggen, Philip M.

    1988-01-01

    Paper summarizes available knowledge about glass mirrors for use in outer space. Strengths and weaknesses of various types of first and second reflective surfaces identified. Second-surface glass mirrors used in outer space designed to different criteria more stringent for terrestrial mirrors. Protons, electrons, cosmic rays, meteorites, and orbiting space debris affect longevities of components. Contamination also factor in space.

  7. Critical heat flux on micro-structured zircaloy surfaces for flow boiling of water at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.; Miassoedov, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Wetzel, T.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of surface structure on critical heat flux for flow boiling of water was investigated for Zircaloy tubes in a vertical annular test section. The objectives were to find suitable surface modification processes for Zircaloy tubes and to test their critical heat flux performance in comparison to the smooth tube. Surface structures with micro-channels, porous layer, oxidized layer, and elevations in micro- and nano-scale were produced on a section of a Zircaloy cladding tube. These modified tubes were tested in an internally heated vertical annulus with a heated length of 326 mm and an inner and outer diameter of 9.5 and 18 mm. The experiments were performed with mass fluxes of 250 and 400 kg/(m{sup 2}s), outlet pressures between 120 and 300 kPa, and constant inlet subcooling enthalpy of 167 kJ/kg. Only a small influence of modified surface structures on critical heat flux was observed for the pressure of 120 kPa in the present test section geometry. However, with increasing pressure the critical heat flux could increase up to 29% using the surface structured tubes with micro-channels, porous and oxidized layers. Capillary effects and increased nucleation site density are assumed to improve the critical heat flux performance. (authors)

  8. Exploration Planetary Surface Structural Systems: Design Requirements and Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Project developed system concepts that would be necessary to establish and maintain a permanent human presence on the Lunar surface. A variety of specific system implementations were generated as a part of the scenarios, some level of system definition was completed, and masses estimated for each system. Because the architecture studies generally spawned a large number of system concepts and the studies were executed in a short amount of time, the resulting system definitions had very low design fidelity. This paper describes the development sequence required to field a particular structural system: 1) Define Requirements, 2) Develop the Design and 3) Demonstrate Compliance of the Design to all Requirements. This paper also outlines and describes in detail the information and data that are required to establish structural design requirements and outlines the information that would comprise a planetary surface system Structures Requirements document.

  9. Modeling liquid crystal bilayer structures with minimal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Enlow, J D; Enlow, R L; McGrath, K M; Tate, M W

    2004-01-22

    This paper describes a new convenient and accurate method of calculating x-ray diffraction integrated intensities from detailed cubic bilayer structures. The method is employed to investigate the structure of a particular surfactant system (didodecyldimethylammonium bromide in a solution of oil and heavy water), for which single-crystal experimental data have recently been collected. The diffracted peak intensities correlate well with theoretical structures based on mathematical minimal surfaces. Optimized electron density profiles of the bilayer are presented, providing new insight into key features of the bilayer structure.

  10. Fractal analysis of the hierarchic structure of fossil coal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A.D.; Vasilenko, T.A.; Kirillov, A.K.

    2008-05-15

    The fractal analysis is described as method of studying images of surface of fossil coal, one of the natural sorbent, with the aim of determining its structural surface heterogeneity. The deformation effect as a reduction in the dimensions of heterogeneity boundaries is considered. It is shown that the theory of nonequilibrium dynamic systems permits to assess a formation level of heterogeneities involved into a sorbent composition by means of the Hurst factor.

  11. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Boily, Jean F.; Lower, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Antibody-recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells during anaerobic growth, when Fe(III) served as the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface with hematite, while MtrC was more uniformly displayed on the bacterium’s exterior cell surface. Both cytochromes were also found associated with extracellular material.

  12. Segmentation of branching vascular structures using adaptive subdivision surface fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitslaar, Pieter H.; van't Klooster, Ronald; Staring, Marius; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van der Geest, Rob J.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for segmentation and modeling of branching vessel structures in medical images using adaptive subdivision surfaces fitting. The method starts with a rough initial skeleton model of the vessel structure. A coarse triangular control mesh consisting of hexagonal rings and dedicated bifurcation elements is constructed from this skeleton. Special attention is paid to ensure a topological sound control mesh is created around the bifurcation areas. Then, a smooth tubular surface is obtained from this coarse mesh using a standard subdivision scheme. This subdivision surface is iteratively fitted to the image. During the fitting, the target update locations of the subdivision surface are obtained using a scanline search along the surface normals, finding the maximum gradient magnitude (of the imaging data). In addition to this surface fitting framework, we propose an adaptive mesh refinement scheme. In this step the coarse control mesh topology is updated based on the current segmentation result, enabling adaptation to varying vessel lumen diameters. This enhances the robustness and flexibility of the method and reduces the amount of prior knowledge needed to create the initial skeletal model. The method was applied to publicly available CTA data from the Carotid Bifurcation Algorithm Evaluation Framework resulting in an average dice index of 89.2% with the ground truth. Application of the method to the complex vascular structure of a coronary artery tree in CTA and to MRI images were performed to show the versatility and flexibility of the proposed framework.

  13. Characterization of the B/Si surface electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R.; Yang, X.; Pianetta, P.

    1992-11-01

    High resolution angle resolved core level and valence band photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to characterize the electronic structures of the B/Si(111)-({radical}3 x {radical}3) surfaces. The results have been compared with theoretic calculations and other group III metals and Si terminated Si(111) surfaces that share the same type of surface reconstruction. We have observed a structure evolution from B-T{sub 4} to B-S{sub 5} and finally to Si- T{sub 4} as deposited boron atoms diffuse into the substrate with increasing annealing temperature. The chemically shifted component appearing in the Si 2p core level spectrum is attributed to charge transfer from the top layer Si and Si adatoms to the sublayer B-S{sub 5} atoms. For the Si/Si(111)-({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) surface, a newly discovered chemically shifted component is associated with back bond formation between the Si adatoms and the underneath Si atoms. A new emission feature has been observed in the valence band spectra unique to the B/Si(111)-({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) surface with B-S{sub 5} configuration. Thin Ge layer growth on this structure has also been performed, and we found that no epitaxial growth could be achieved and the underneath structure was little disturbed.

  14. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Wojciech; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper-manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  15. Model of evolution of surface grain structure under ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazeva, Anna G.; Kryukova, Olga N.

    2014-11-14

    Diffusion and chemical reactions in multicomponent systems play an important role in numerous technology applications. For example, surface treatment of materials and coatings by particle beam leads to chemical composition and grain structure change. To investigate the thermal-diffusion and chemical processes affecting the evolution of surface structure, the mathematical modeling is efficient addition to experiment. In this paper two-dimensional model is discussed to describe the evolution of titanium nitride coating on the iron substrate under implantation of boron and carbon. The equation for diffusion fluxes and reaction rate are obtained using Gibbs energy expansion into series with respect to concentration and their gradients.

  16. Quasicrystal surfaces: structure and growth of atomic overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H. R.; Shimoda, M.; Tsai, A. P.

    2007-05-01

    We review recent developments in surface studies of single-grain quasicrystals under ultra high-vacuum conditions, focusing on two different topics: surface structure and growth of atomic overlayers on surfaces. Quasicrystalline phases are currently used for investigation of the first topic are icosahedral (i) Al-Pd-Mn, i-Al-Cu-Fe, i-Al-Cu-Ru, i-Ag-In-Yb and decagonal (d) Al-Ni-Co, and d-Al-Cu-Co. We report the progress made with all of these phases. The second topic covers the study of single-element overlayer growth by vapor deposition.

  17. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-01-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered. PMID:24740976

  18. Surface Structure and Growth Mode of Pd Deposited on Mo(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Y.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    The surface structure and growth mode of Pd/Mo(110) have been studied using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The surface diagram of Pd on the Mo(110) substrate for deposition thickness versus substrate temperature was obtained. Four kinds of surface structures, namely α1, α2, β and γ, were observed. At less than 1 ML, α2 appeared in temperatures ranging from 400 to 1050°C and α1 appeared from RT to 400°C. α2 has a structure intermediate between those of Pd(111) and Mo(110), in which the dense direction of the layer is parallel to the [111]Mo orientation and their atomic row distances are coincident, resulting in formation of a long-period structure with a Mo surface, namely a coincident site lattice. The α1 structure is similar to the 1 × 1 structure. At more than 1.0 ML, β and γ structures appeared simultaneously in the temperature region from 500 to 950°C. However, at a high temperature region from 950 to 1050°C, the α2 structure was observed. β shows a one-dimensional ordered structure, in which Pd atoms line along [111]Mo. γ exhibits a 3 × 1 structure with the same atomic arrangement as the Mo(110) plane rotated at 70.5°. At greater than 2.0 ML, the Pd film grows in the Frank van der Merwe growth mode at a low temperature with accumulation of a Pd(111) layer, and in the Stranski Krastanov growth mode at a high temperature with two-dimensional growth of the γ structure followed by formation of flat crystallites.

  19. Nano-structured surface plasmon resonance sensor for sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Sop; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Sung-Wook; Cho, Yong-Jin

    2008-08-01

    A new nano-structured SPR sensor was devised to improve its sensitivity. Nano-scaled silica particles were used as the template to fabricate nano-structure. The surface of the silica particles was modified with thiol group and a single layer of the modified silica particles was attached on the gold or silver thin film using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method. Thereafter, gold or silver was coated on the template by an e-beam evaporator. Finally, the nano-structured surface with basin-like shape was obtained after removing the silica particles by sonication. Applying the new developed SPR sensor to a model food of alcoholic beverage, the sensitivities for the gold and silver nano-structured sensors, respectively, had 95% and 126% higher than the conventional one.

  20. Magnetism and surface structure of atomically controlled ultrathin metal films.

    SciTech Connect

    Shiratsuchi, Yu.; Yamamoto, M.; Bader, S. D.; Materials Science Division; Osaka Univ.

    2007-01-01

    We review the correlation of magnetism and surface structure in ultrathin metal films, including the tailoring of novel magnetic properties using atomic scale control of the nanostructure. We provide an overview of modern fabrication and characterization techniques used to create and explore these fascinating materials, and highlight important phenomena of interest. We also discuss techniques that control and characterize both the magnetic and structural properties on an atomic scale. Recent advances in the development and applications of these techniques allow nanomagnetism to be investigated in an unprecedented manner. A system cannot necessarily retain a two-dimensional structure as it enters the ultrathin region, but it can transform into a three-dimensional, discontinuous structure due to the Volmer-Weber growth mechanism. This structural transformation can give rise to superparamagnetism. During this evolution, competing factors such as interparticle interactions and the effective magnetic anisotropy govern the magnetic state. These magnetic parameters are influenced by the nanostructure of the film. In particular, controlling the magnetic anisotropy is critical for determining the magnetic properties. Surface effects play especially important roles in influencing both the magnitude and direction of the magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin films. By properly altering the surface structure, the strength and direction of the magnetic anisotropy are controlled via spin-orbit and/or dipole interactions.

  1. Assembly Platform For Use In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Niranjan S.; Buddington, Patricia A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes conceptual platform or framework for use in assembling other structures and spacecraft in outer space. Consists of three fixed structural beams comprising central beam and two cross beams. Robotic manipulators spaced apart on platform to provide telerobotic operation of platform by either space-station or ground crews. Platform and attached vehicles function synergistically to achieve maximum performance for intended purposes.

  2. 3D velocity structure of the outer forearc of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone; implications for the 1958 megathrust earthquake rupture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Garcia Cano, L.; Marcaillou, B.

    2013-12-01

    In 2005, we conducted an onshore-offshore 3D refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiment over the rupture zone of the 1958 subduction earthquake that occurred near the border between Colombia and Ecuador. This earthquake was part of a sequence of 3 large ruptures (1942, Mw=7.8; 1958, Mw=7.7; 1979, Mw=8.2), which successively broke from south to north the segments of the megathrust that had been ruptured in 1906 by a single, very large magnitude (8.8) earthquake. Using first arrival traveltime inversion, we constructed a well-defined Vp velocity model of the plate boundary and of the upper and lower plates, down to 25 km depth. The model reveals a 5-km thick, low velocity zone in the upper plate, located immediately above the interplate contact. Because similar low-velocity zones are commonly observed along margins made of oceanic or island-arc accreted terranes, we suggest that the low-velocity zone might result from the alteration and hydration of mafic and ultramafic rocks in the upper plate basement, rather than from hydrofracturing alone. Sediments underplated beneath the inner wedge might contribute to the low-velocity zone but it is unlikely that they are several kilometers thick. Nevertheless, fluids expelled by the compaction and dehydration of those underplated sediments possibly favor the alteration of the overlying rocks. The low-velocity zone is spatially coincident with the 1958 rupture area. Near the toe of the margin, the model shows a low velocity gradient in the outer wedge that we interpret as a zone of highly faulted and fractured rocks or of poorly consolidated sediments. This low velocity/low gradient region forms the oceanward limit of the rupture zones of both the 1958 and the 1979 earthquakes. We suggest that the two earthquake ruptures were arrested by the low velocity zone because its low rigidity contributed to dissipate most of the seismic energy and of the coseismic strain/stress. This might be the reason why the 1958

  3. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  4. Shape and surface structure of gold nanoparticles under oxidizing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongqing; Stampfl, Catherine

    2008-03-01

    We perform density-functional theory calculations to investigate the adsorption of oxygen at the Au(100) and Au(110) surfaces. For the clean surfaces, we find that the added-row (5×1)/Au(100) structure is more stable than the unreconstructed (1×1)/Au(100) surface and the missing-row (2×1)/Au(110) structure is more stable than the unreconstructed (1×1)/Au(110) surface, which is consistent with experimental results. For oxygen adsorption on Au(100), the most stable structure is predicted to be a low coverage ( ˜0.1 ML) on the added-row reconstructed surface, while for adsorption on Au(110), the most stable configuration of those considered is a (2×1) missing-row structure with 1 ML coverage of oxygen. From these results, together with those of our previous investigations into the O/Au(111) system, we use the Wulff construction to predict the nanoparticle shape as a function of oxygen chemical potential, which we correlate with pressure (p) and temperature (T) . For low values of the oxygen chemical potential ( <-0.6eV , corresponding, e.g., to p=1atm and T>600K ), the nanoparticle consists of clean (111) facets. For slightly higher values, clean (111) facets still dominate but there are small regions of (110) facets, which are covered with the (2×1)-2O reconstruction. With progressively increasing values of the chemical potential (e.g., from -0.4to-0.18eV , corresponding to, e.g., p=1atm and T=420-200K ), the (111) facets become covered with a thin oxide-like structure, and the (110) regions with the (2×1)-2O/(110) surface reconstruction become larger and finally dominate. These findings indicate that for low temperature oxidation reactions, where gold nanoparticles have been reported to be surprisingly active, such thin “surface-oxide-like” structures on the (111) and (110) surfaces could possibly play a role in the behavior of the nanogold catalysts.

  5. Protein-Induced Surface Structuring in Myelin Membrane Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Rosetti, Carla M.; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes. PMID:17905850

  6. Anomalous sea surface structures as an object of statistical topography.

    PubMed

    Klyatskin, V I; Koshel, K V

    2015-06-01

    By exploiting ideas of statistical topography, we analyze the stochastic boundary problem of emergence of anomalous high structures on the sea surface. The kinematic boundary condition on the sea surface is assumed to be a closed stochastic quasilinear equation. Applying the stochastic Liouville equation, and presuming the stochastic nature of a given hydrodynamic velocity field within the diffusion approximation, we derive an equation for a spatially single-point, simultaneous joint probability density of the surface elevation field and its gradient. An important feature of the model is that it accounts for stochastic bottom irregularities as one, but not a single, perturbation. Hence, we address the assumption of the infinitely deep ocean to obtain statistic features of the surface elevation field and the squared elevation gradient field. According to the calculations, we show that clustering in the absolute surface elevation gradient field happens with the unit probability. It results in the emergence of rare events such as anomalous high structures and deep gaps on the sea surface almost in every realization of a stochastic velocity field. PMID:26172788

  7. Surface plasmon resonance for detecting clenbuterol: Influence of monolayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman; Morita, Kinichi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance sensor equipped with a fabricated immunosensor chip is used for detecting clenbuterol in this study. Since clenbuterol is a small analyte, indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay is employed. For fabricating the immunosurface, the Au-chip was functionalized by succinimidyl-terminated alkanethiol, and the terminal N-hydroxysuccinimide group of the self-assembled monolayer was either replaced with clenbuterol or blocked with ethanolamine. Scanning tunneling microscope experiments and electrochemical measurements depicted the domain structures of the succinimide group of succinimidyl-terminated propanethiol monolayer. The surface concentration and the orientation of succinimide group was significantly dependent on the concentration of dithiobis(succinimidyl) propionate (DSP) used in fabricating the monolayer. Furthermore, the structure of monolayer significantly influenced both the surface concentration and the orientation of clenbuterol on the sensor surface. Consequently, high coverage and standing-up configuration of clenbuterol showed high affinity for clenbuterol antibody. However, high affinity constant exhibited by the sensor surface was coupled with a low sensitivity. By contrast, lowest concentration of DSP solution (0.1 mM) used in fabricating the immunosurface showed a detection sensitivity of 3 ppt - the highest reported sensitivity for clenbuterol. For regeneration the immunosurface, 0.1 M NaOH was used and the same sensor surface could be reused for performing >100 rapid immunoreaction.

  8. Structural rearrangements in self-assembled surfactant layers at surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jun

    2010-03-25

    The transition from compact to extended configuration in ionic surfactant layers under the influence of salt, surfactant surface density and temperature is studied using the classical density functional theory (cDFT). The increase in ionic strength of aqueous salt solution or in surfactant surface density leads to the transition from the hemicylindrical to the perpendicular monolayer configuration of the molecules. Although producing the same structural rearrangement in the surfactant layer the origin of the effect of salt and surface density is different. While the addition of salt increases the out-of-plane attractive interactions with the solvent, the increase in density results in the increase in the in-plane repulsion in surfactant layer. The temperature effects are subtler and are mainly manifested in the reduction of the solution structuring at elevated temperatures.

  9. Long-range surface plasmons in electrode structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Surface polaritons guided by symmetric double metal film structures are analyzed, with particular attention given to the attenuation of the two long-range modes that occur. It is found that long-range surface plasmon polariton modes do exist for double electrode structures over a limited range of material parameters. Guided by thin metal electrodes, surface plasmon polaritons can achieve millimeter plus propagation distances in the near infrared. It is pointed out that if the slab is electrooptic, then very low voltages will be needed to manipulate the waves. The fact that long-range modes exist simultaneously with junction tunnel plasmons may be of use in providing directional radiation from light-emitting junctions or the inverse process of light to electrical energy conversion.

  10. Mechanism of acoustically induced diffusional structuring of surface adatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.

    2013-11-25

    Physical mechanisms of time-averaged structuring of adatoms induced by a standing surface acoustic wave (SAW) on a solid substrate are studied. Despite some similarity with conventional mechanisms based on averaging of fast oscillation-type motion or radiation-pressure effects, we demonstrate that, for diffusional (i.e., strongly damped) adatom motion, the origin of time-averaged structuring is essentially different. The proposed analytical model and kinetic Monte–Carlo (kMC) simulations reveal several distinct structuring regimes and directly relate them to the transient modification of diffusion barriers and adiabatic temperature variations induced by SAW strains.

  11. NMR Solution Structure of the Terminal Immunoglobulin-like Domain from the Leptospira Host-Interacting Outer Membrane Protein, LigB

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A number of surface proteins specific to pathogenic strains of Leptospira have been identified. The Lig protein family has shown promise as a marker in typing leptospiral isolates for pathogenesis and as an antigen in vaccines. We used NMR spectroscopy to solve the solution structure of the twelfth immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) repeat domain from LigB (LigB-12). The fold is similar to that of other bacterial Ig-like domains and comprised mainly of β-strands that form a β-sandwich based on a Greek-key folding arrangement. Based on sequence analysis and conservation of structurally important residues, homology models for the other LigB Ig-like domains were generated. The set of LigB models illustrates the electrostatic differences between the domains as well as the possible interactions between neighboring domains. Understanding the structure of the extracellular portion of LigB and related proteins is important for developing diagnostic methods and new therapeutics directed toward leptospirosis. PMID:25068811

  12. Non-dimensional response surfaces for structural optimization with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Gerhardus

    Approximation concepts are an effective approach for alleviating some of the problems associated with the direct use of modern computerized analysis techniques in an optimization environment. Recently, response surface approximations have gained popularity as polynomial approximations that are global in nature. Response surface approximations shift the computational burden from the optimization problem to the problem of constructing the approximations, and accommodate the use of detailed analysis techniques without the need of derivative information. Additionally, response surface approximations filter out numerical noise inherent to most numerical analysis procedures, by providing a smooth approximate response function, and simplify the integration of the analysis and the optimization codes. The present dissertation investigates the use of response surface approximations in expensive structural optimization problems and aims to suggest techniques for improving both the accuracy of response surface approximations as well as the efficiency with which they are constructed. A stepped plate design problem is considered and response surface approximations are constructed for different failure mechanisms using numerical experiments conducted with a finite element analysis. Both an isotropic and a composite laminated plate, where the change in thickness is a result of internal ply drop off, are considered. The proposed methodology uses a combination of dimensional analysis, higher order response surface approximations, stepwise regression, a detailed error analysis and statistical design of experiments to improve both accuracy and efficiency. Dimensional analysis identifies variables intrinsic to the problem, and thus reduces the number of variables in the resulting response surface approximation. Stepwise regression is used to eliminate insignificant parameters from a response surface approximation and statistical design of experiments is used to identify a small set of

  13. Surface Fermi level and surface state density in GaAsSb surface intrinsic-n^+ structures by photoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuang-I.; Tsai, Jung-Tse; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Chiu, Pei-Chin; Chen, Shu-Han; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Hwang, Jenn-Shyong

    2010-03-01

    The III-V ternary semiconductor GaAsSb has recently attracted considerable attention as the base layer of the high speed heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT). Performance optimization of the HBT requires a precise determination of the surface state density and the surface Fermi level position of the GaAsSb alloy, but few such determinations have been reported. In this work, photoreflectance is employed to investigate the Fermi level pinning and the surface state density of a GaAs0.65Sb0.35 surface intrinsic-n^+ (SIN^+) structure based on the thermionic emission theory and the current-transport theory by the dependence of surface barrier height on the pump beam intensity. The surface state density is estimated as approximately 1.91 x 10^13 cm-2, and the Fermi level is located 0.63 eV below the conduction band edge at the surface. The high surface state density leads the surface Fermi level to be strongly pinned within the bandgap demonstrated by sequential etching of the intrinsic layer.

  14. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-15

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  15. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  16. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  17. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  18. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  19. UV spectral filtering by surface structured multilayer mirrors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiushi; Paardekooper, Daniel Mathijs; Zoethout, Erwin; Medvedev, V V; van de Kruijs, Robbert; Bosgra, Jeroen; Louis, Eric; Bijkerk, Fred

    2014-03-01

    A surface structured extreme ultraviolet multilayer mirror was developed showing full band suppression of UV (λ=100-400  nm) and simultaneously a high reflectance of EUV light (λ=13.5  nm). The surface structure consists of Si pyramids, which are substantially transparent for EUV but reflective for UV light. The reflected UV is filtered out by blazed diffraction, interference, and absorption. A first demonstration pyramid structure was fabricated on a multilayer by using a straightforward deposition technique. It shows an average suppression of 14 times over the whole UV range and an EUV reflectance of 56.2% at 13.5 nm. This robust scheme can be used as a spectral purity solution for all XUV sources that emit longer wavelength radiation as well. PMID:24690702

  20. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  1. Influence of pore structure on the effectiveness of a biogenic carbonate surface treatment for limestone conservation.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Willem; Leuridan, Stijn; Van Loo, Denis; Verbeken, Kim; Cnudde, Veerle; De Belie, Nele; Verstraete, Willy

    2011-10-01

    A ureolytic biodeposition treatment was applied to five types of limestone in order to investigate the effect of pore structure on the protective performance of a biogenic carbonate surface treatment. Protective performance was assessed by means of transport and degradation processes, and the penetration depth of the treatment was visualized by microtomography. Pore size governs bacterial adsorption and hence the location and amount of carbonate precipitated. This study indicated that in macroporous stone, biogenic carbonate formation occurred to a larger extent and at greater depths than in microporous stone. As a consequence, the biodeposition treatment exhibited the greatest protective performance on macroporous stone. While precipitation was limited to the outer surface of microporous stone, biogenic carbonate formation occurred at depths of greater than 2 mm for Savonnières and Euville. For Savonnières, the presence of biogenic carbonate resulted in a 20-fold decreased rate of water absorption, which resulted in increased resistance to sodium sulfate attack and to freezing and thawing. While untreated samples were completely degraded after 15 cycles of salt attack, no damage was observed in biodeposition-treated Savonnières. From this study, it is clear that biodeposition is very effective and more feasible for macroporous stones than for microporous stones. PMID:21821746

  2. Preface to the special issue of PSS on "Surfaces, atmospheres and magnetospheres of the outer planets and their satellites and ring systems: Part XI"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Atreya, S.; Castillo, J.; Mueller-Wodarg, I.; Spilker, L.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-10-01

    This issue contains original research work and reviews presented during the past year in sessions organized at several international meetings and congresses (such as those of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) or the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) among others). The manuscripts discuss recent observations and models of the atmospheres, magnetospheres and surfaces of the giant planets and their satellites, in particular from current space missions. Concepts of architecture and payload for future space missions are also presented.

  3. On surface structure and friction regulation in reptilian limbless locomotion.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, Hisham A

    2013-06-01

    One way of controlling friction and associated energy losses is to engineer a deterministic structural pattern on the surface of the rubbing parts (i.e., texture engineering). Custom texturing enhances the quality of lubrication, reduces friction, and allows the use of lubricants of lower viscosity. To date, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic texture constructs is virtually non-existent. Many engineers, therefore, study natural species to explore surface construction and to probe the role that surface topography assumes in friction control. Snakes offer rich examples of surfaces where topological features allow the optimization and control of frictional behavior. In this paper, we investigate the frictional behavior of a constrictor type reptile, Python regius. The study employed a specially designed tribo-acoustic probe capable of measuring the coefficient of friction and detecting the acoustical behavior of the skin in vivo. The results confirm the anisotropy of the frictional response of snakeskin. The coefficient of friction depends on the direction of sliding: the value in forward motion is lower than that in the converse direction. Detailed analysis of the surface metrological feature reveals that tuning frictional response in snakes originates from the hierarchical nature of surface topology combined to the profile asymmetry of the surface micro-features, and the variation of the curvature of the contacting scales at different body regions. Such a combination affords the reptile the ability to optimize the frictional response.

  4. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  5. The Red and Featureless Outer Disks of Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We present results from deep, wide-field surface photometry of three nearby (D = 4-7 Mpc) spiral galaxies: M94 (NGC 4736), M64 (NGC 4826), and M106 (NGC 4258). Our imaging reaches a limiting surface brightness of {μ }B ˜ 28-30 mag arcsec-2 and probes colors down to {μ }B ˜ 27.5 mag arcsec-2. We compare our broadband optical data to available ultraviolet and high column density H i data to better constrain the star-forming history and stellar populations of the outermost parts of each galaxy’s disk. Each galaxy has a well-defined radius beyond which little star formation occurs and the disk light appears both azimuthally smooth and red in color, suggestive of old, well-mixed stellar populations. Given the lack of ongoing star formation or blue stellar populations in these galaxies’ outer disks, the most likely mechanisms for their formation are dynamical processes such as disk heating or radial migration, rather than inside-out growth of the disks. This is also implied by the similarity in outer disk properties despite each galaxy showing distinct levels of environmental influence, from a purely isolated galaxy (M94) to one experiencing weak tidal perturbations from its satellite galaxies (M106) to a galaxy recovering from a recent merger (M64), suggesting that a variety of evolutionary histories can yield similar outer disk structure. While this suggests a common secular mechanism for outer disk formation, the large extent of these smooth, red stellar populations—which reach several disk scale lengths beyond the galaxies’ spiral structure—may challenge models of radial migration given the lack of any nonaxisymmetric forcing at such large radii.

  6. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walen, Holly

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. We choose very specific conditions: very low temperature (5 K), and very low sulfur coverage (≤ 0.1 monolayer). In this region of temperature-coverage space, which has not been examined previously for these adsorbate-metal systems, the effects of individual interactions between metals and sulfur are most apparent and can be assessed extensively with the aid of theory and modeling. Furthermore, at this temperature diffusion is minimal and relatively-mobile species can be isolated, and at low coverage the structures observed are not consumed by an extended reconstruction. The primary experimental technique is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental observations presented here---made under identical conditions---together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  7. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    PubMed

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  8. Language learners privilege structured meaning over surface frequency.

    PubMed

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Adger, David

    2014-04-22

    Although it is widely agreed that learning the syntax of natural languages involves acquiring structure-dependent rules, recent work on acquisition has nevertheless attempted to characterize the outcome of learning primarily in terms of statistical generalizations about surface distributional information. In this paper we investigate whether surface statistical knowledge or structural knowledge of English is used to infer properties of a novel language under conditions of impoverished input. We expose learners to artificial-language patterns that are equally consistent with two possible underlying grammars--one more similar to English in terms of the linear ordering of words, the other more similar on abstract structural grounds. We show that learners' grammatical inferences overwhelmingly favor structural similarity over preservation of superficial order. Importantly, the relevant shared structure can be characterized in terms of a universal preference for isomorphism in the mapping from meanings to utterances. Whereas previous empirical support for this universal has been based entirely on data from cross-linguistic language samples, our results suggest it may reflect a deep property of the human cognitive system--a property that, together with other structure-sensitive principles, constrains the acquisition of linguistic knowledge.

  9. Outer Membrane Protein A of Bovine and Ovine Isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica Is Surface Exposed and Contains Host Species-Specific Epitopes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hounsome, Jonathan D. A.; Baillie, Susan; Noofeli, Mojtaba; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Isaacs, Neil W.; Davies, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the etiological agent of pneumonic pasteurellosis of cattle and sheep; two different OmpA subclasses, OmpA1 and OmpA2, are associated with bovine and ovine isolates, respectively. These proteins differ at the distal ends of four external loops, are involved in adherence, and are likely to play important roles in host adaptation. M. haemolytica is surrounded by a polysaccharide capsule, and the degree of OmpA surface exposure is unknown. To investigate surface exposure and immune specificity of OmpA among bovine and ovine M. haemolytica isolates, recombinant proteins representing the transmembrane domain of OmpA from a bovine serotype A1 isolate (rOmpA1) and an ovine serotype A2 isolate (rOmpA2) were overexpressed, purified, and used to generate anti-rOmpA1 and anti-rOmpA2 antibodies, respectively. Immunogold electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques demonstrated that OmpA1 and OmpA2 are surface exposed, and are not masked by the polysaccharide capsule, in a selection of M. haemolytica isolates of various serotypes and grown under different growth conditions. To explore epitope specificity, anti-rOmpA1 and anti-rOmpA2 antibodies were cross-absorbed with the heterologous isolate to remove cross-reacting antibodies. These cross-absorbed antibodies were highly specific and recognized only the OmpA protein of the homologous isolate in Western blot assays. A wider examination of the binding specificities of these antibodies for M. haemolytica isolates representing different OmpA subclasses revealed that cross-absorbed anti-rOmpA1 antibodies recognized OmpA1-type proteins but not OmpA2-type proteins; conversely, cross-absorbed anti-rOmpA2 antibodies recognized OmpA2-type proteins but not OmpA1-type proteins. Our results demonstrate that OmpA1 and OmpA2 are surface exposed and could potentially bind to different receptors in cattle and sheep. PMID:21896777

  10. Surface structuring of particle laden drops using electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommersnes, P.; Fossum, J. O.

    2016-07-01

    Emulsion drops readily adsorb particles at their surfaces, which may lead to a fluid or solid layer encapsulating the drop, known as an armored drop. In this review, we discuss how electric fields can be used to manipulate colloidal surface structures, by dielectrophoretic or electro-hydrodynamic mechanisms and we also compare this to related phenomena in lipid bilayer vesicles. The phenomena discussed are important for a wide range of uses of particle laden drops, including emulsion stabilization, Janus or patchy mesocapsule-, scaffold- or other materials-production.

  11. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surfacemore » sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work on the effects of the surface structure and defects on the interaction of SO2 with CeO2 provides insights for the design of more sulfur-resistant CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  12. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.

    1998-01-01

    The Principal Investigator's responsibilities on this grant fell into two categories according to his participation. In the nomenclature work of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Owen is chair of the Task Group for the Outer Solar System. He is also a member of the IAU's Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) which is composed of the chairs of the several Task Groups plus the presidents of two IAU Commissions and several outside consultants. The WGPSN is presided over by its President, Professor Kaare Aksnes from the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway.

  13. Jupiter's outer atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    The current state of the theory of Jupiter's outer atmosphere is briefly reviewed. The similarities and dissimilarities between the terrestrial and Jovian upper atmospheres are discussed, including the interaction of the solar wind with the planetary magnetic fields. Estimates of Jovian parameters are given, including magnetosphere and auroral zone sizes, ionospheric conductivity, energy inputs, and solar wind parameters at Jupiter. The influence of the large centrifugal force on the cold plasma distribution is considered. The Jovian Van Allen belt is attributed to solar wind particles diffused in toward the planet by dynamo electric fields from ionospheric neutral winds, and the consequences of this theory are indicated.

  14. Structure of ceramic surfaces modified by ion-beam techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McHargue, C.J.; Naramoto, H.; White, C.W.; Williams, J.M.; Appleton, B.R.; Sklad, P.S.; Angelini, P.

    1982-01-01

    A wide variety of structures are produced by ion implantation in ceramics. Random (substitutional and interstitial site occupancy) solid solutions with concentrations of solute that exceed the solubility limit can be produced in Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The changes that occur during annealing are complex and sometimes unpredictable. Silicon carbide becomes amorphous in a manner analogous to Si for ion fluences that produce more than 0.2 dpa damage. Light (N) and heavy (Cr) ions produce similar results if the fluence is scaled to damage energy deposited. Because of mass differences in the ions, two damage regions are developed in TiB/sub 2/. The structure remains crystalline to very high damage levels. These structural alterations cause changes in the surface mechanical properties. Since virtually any chemical species can be implanted, one can independently control structural damage and chemical effects. When coupled with selective annealing, this technique has the potential for producing a wide range of surface structures and properties. 8 figures.

  15. Hierarchical electrohydrodynamic structures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Goldberg-Oppenheimer, Pola; Mahajan, Sumeet; Steiner, Ullrich

    2012-06-19

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a well-established spectroscopic technique that requires nanoscale metal structures to achieve high signal sensitivity. While most SERS substrates are manufactured by conventional lithographic methods, the development of a cost-effective approach to create nanostructured surfaces is a much sought-after goal in the SERS community. Here, a method is established to create controlled, self-organized, hierarchical nanostructures using electrohydrodynamic (HEHD) instabilities. The created structures are readily fine-tuned, which is an important requirement for optimizing SERS to obtain the highest enhancements. HEHD pattern formation enables the fabrication of multiscale 3D structured arrays as SERS-active platforms. Importantly, each of the HEHD-patterned individual structural units yield a considerable SERS enhancement. This enables each single unit to function as an isolated sensor. Each of the formed structures can be effectively tuned and tailored to provide high SERS enhancement, while arising from different HEHD morphologies. The HEHD fabrication of sub-micrometer architectures is straightforward and robust, providing an elegant route for high-throughput biological and chemical sensing. PMID:22488810

  16. Nanowires, Capacitors, and Other Novel Outer-Surface Components Involved in Electron Transfer to Fe(III) Oxides in Geobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-06-01

    In the past year studies have primarily focused on elucidating the role of pili in electron transport to Fe(III) oxide in Geobacter sulfurreducens. As summarized in last year's report, it was previously found that pili are specifically expressed during growth on Fe(III) oxide and that Fe(III) oxide reduction is inhibited if the gene for the structural pilin protein is deleted. However, it was also found that a pilin-deficient mutant of G. sulfurreducens could attached to Fe(III) oxide as well as wild type.

  17. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  18. Structural phases of adsorption for flexible polymers on nanocylinder surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jonathan; Vogel, Thomas; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-11-11

    By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the thermodynamic behavior of a flexible, elastic polymer model in the presence of an attractive nanocylinder. We systematically identify the structural phases that are formed by competing monomer-monomer and monomer-substrate interactions. The influence of the relative surface attraction strength on the structural phases in the hyperphase diagram, parameterized by cylinder radius and temperature, is discussed as well. In the limiting case of the infinitely large cylinder radius, our results coincide with previous outcomes of studies of polymer adsorption on planar substrates.

  19. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  20. Surface band structure of Si(111)2×1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Haneman, D.

    1995-02-01

    The surface band structures of the three-bond scission (TBS) model and the Pandey-chain (PC) model have been computed using an ab initio Hartree-Fock program crystal 92. In the case of the bulk energy bands, the method gives the correct shapes and structure but overestimates the valence-band dispersion by about 50%. For the TBS model, the calculated valence-band dispersion came out about 50% wider than measured experimentally. This would suggest that the model is consistent with optical data. In the case of the PC model, the valence-band dispersion was qualitatively similar to those of previous calculations, but the width discrepancy was large. The method overestimates the surface band gap for both TBS and PC models. The significance is discussed.

  1. Development of laminar flow control wing surface porous structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klotzsche, M.; Pearce, W.; Anderson, C.; Thelander, J.; Boronow, W.; Gallimore, F.; Brown, W.; Matsuo, T.; Christensen, J.; Primavera, G.

    1984-01-01

    It was concluded that the chordwise air collection method, which actually combines chordwise and spanwise air collection, is the best of the designs conceived up to this time for full chord laminar flow control (LFC). Its shallower ducting improved structural efficiency of the main wing box resulting in a reduction in wing weight, and it provided continuous support of the chordwise panel joints, better matching of suction and clearing airflow requirements, and simplified duct to suction source minifolding. Laminar flow control on both the upper and lower surfaces was previously reduced to LFC suction on the upper surface only, back to 85 percent chord. The study concludes that, in addition to reduced wing area and other practical advantages, this system would be lighter because of the increase in effective structural wing thickness.

  2. Modeling fine-scale soil surface structure using geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.; Brazier, R. E.; Kuhn, N. J.

    2013-04-01

    There is widespread recognition that spatially distributed information on soil surface roughness (SSR) is required for hydrological and geomorphological applications. Such information is necessary to describe variability in soil structure, which is highly heterogeneous in time and space, to parameterize hydrology and erosion models and to understand the temporal evolution of the soil surface in response to rainfall. This paper demonstrates how results from semivariogram analysis can quantify key elements of SSR for such applications. Three soil types (silt, silt loam, and silty clay) were used to show how different types of structural variance in SSR evolve during simulated rainfall events. All three soil types were progressively degraded using artificial rainfall to produce a series of roughness states. A calibrated laser profiling instrument was used to measure SSR over a 10 cm × 10 cm spatial extent, at a 2 mm resolution. These data were geostatistically analyzed in the context of aggregate breakdown and soil crusting. The results show that such processes are represented by a quantifiable decrease in sill variance, from 7.81 (control) to 0.94 (after 60 min of rainfall). Soil surface features such as soil cracks, tillage lines and erosional areas were quantified by local maxima in semivariance at a given length scale. This research demonstrates that semivariogram analysis can retrieve spatiotemporal variations in soil surface condition; in order to provide information on hydrological pathways. Consequently, geostatistically derived SSR shows strong potential for inclusion as spatial information in hydrology and erosion models to represent complex surface processes at different soil structural scales.

  3. Surface-micromachined chain for use in microelectromechanical structures

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Sr., George E.

    2001-01-01

    A surface-micromachined chain and a microelectromechanical (MEM) structure incorporating such a chain are disclosed. The surface-micromachined chain can be fabricated in place on a substrate (e.g. a silicon substrate) by depositing and patterning a plurality of alternating layers of a chain-forming material (e.g. polycrystalline silicon) and a sacrificial material (e.g. silicon dioxide or a silicate glass). The sacrificial material is then removed by etching to release the chain for movement. The chain has applications for forming various types of MEM devices which include a microengine (e.g. an electrostatic motor) connected to rotate a drive sprocket, with the surface-micromachined chain being connected between the drive sprocket and one or more driven sprockets.

  4. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-09-07

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-{sigma} bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as {pi}-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  5. Structural analysis and cross-protective efficacy of recombinant 87 kDa outer membrane protein (Omp87) of Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinendra; Yogisharadhya, Revanaiah; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan A; Viswas, K N; Shivachandra, Sathish B

    2013-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida serogroup B:2, a causative agent of haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) in cattle and buffalo especially in tropical regions of Asian and African countries, is known to possess several outer membrane proteins (OMPs) as immunogenic antigens. In the present study, omp87 gene encoding for 87 kDa OMP (Omp87) protein of P. multocida serogroup B:2 strain P52, has been amplified (∼2304 bp), cloned in to pET32a vector and over-expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli as fusion protein. The recombinant Omp87 protein (∼102 kDa) including N-terminus hexa-histidine tag was purified under denaturing condition. Immunization of mice with rOmp87 resulted in increased antigen specific IgG titres in serum and provided protection of 66.6 and 83.3% following homologous (B:2) and heterologous (A:1) challenge, respectively. A homology model of Omp87 revealed the presence of two distinct domains; N-terminal domain with four POTRA repeats in the periplasmic space and a pore forming C-terminal β-barrel domain (β1- β16) in the outer membrane of P. multocida, which belong to Omp85-TpsB transporter superfamily of OMPs. The study indicated the potential possibilities to use rOmp87 protein along with suitable adjuvant in developing subunit vaccine for haemorrhagic septicaemia and pasteurellosis in livestock.

  6. Effects of Interplanetary Structures on the Earth's Outer Radiation Belt Dynamics Observed During September 12-26, 2014: I) Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Walsh, B.; Silveira, M. D.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Tsurutani, B.; Koga, D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Solar wind variations and magnetospheric processes result in a dynamic electron population within the outer Van Allen radiation belt, where electron energies range from several 10's to several 1000's KeV . Geomagnetic storms and various solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes including convection cause both dramatic particle flux increase or decreases. Here we analyze the occurrence of a drop out of ~ 0.04 - 4.5 MeV electron fluxes measured by NASA's Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and NOAA's GOES during a magnetic cloud-driven geomagnetic storm which started at September 12, 2014. The ~3-day storm left a steady low flux of outer belt energetic electrons that lasted for twelve days (Figure 1). At higher energy levels, electron fluxes decreased by ~1 order of magnitude throughout the vast region from L* ~3 to 6.6. Simulation of a 2 MeV relativistic electron orbit, with 90◦ pitch angle, during the most compressed magnetosphere period shows that magnetopause shadowing can be responsible for the electron dropout observed at radial distances larger than ~ 6 RE). Wave-particle interaction are associated with loss occurring at L < 4. We discuss the solar wind drivers, in particular the contribution of the magnetic cloud parameters for magnetospheric dynamics during the whole period analyzed, i.e., September 13-24, 2014.

  7. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the outer fore arc of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone and implications for the 1958 megathrust earthquake rupture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Cano, Lina Constanza; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Marcaillou, Boris

    2014-02-01

    In 2005, an onshore, offshore 3-D refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiment was conducted along the convergent margin at the border between Colombia and Ecuador, over the rupture zone of the 1958, Mw 7.6 subduction earthquake. A well-defined Vp velocity model of the plate boundary and upper and lower plates was constructed, down to 25 km depth, using first arrival traveltimes inversion. The model reveals a several kilometers thick, low-velocity zone in the upper plate, located immediately above the interplate contact. This low-velocity zone might be related to alteration and fracturing of the mafic and ultramafic rocks, which composed the upper plate in this area by fluids released by the lower plate with possible contributions from sediment underplating. Near the toe of the margin, the model shows a low-velocity gradient in the outer wedge, which is interpreted as highly faulted and fractured rocks. This low-velocity/low-gradient region appears to limit the oceanward extension of the rupture zones of the 1958 and 1979 earthquakes, possibly because coseismic deformation and uplift of the outer margin wedge dissipates most of the seismic energy.

  8. Examining surface and bulk structures using combined nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Jie; Khmaladze, Alexander; Liu, Yuwei; Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Chen, Zhan

    2011-06-15

    We combined sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy in one system to examine both surface and bulk structures of materials with the same geometry and without the need to move the sample. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS) thin films were tested before and after plasma treatment. The sensitivities of SFG and CARS were tested by varying polymer film thickness and using a lipid monolayer. PMID:21685990

  9. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laughner, Jacob I.; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation. PMID:22796539

  10. Development of laminar flow control wing surface composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program beginning in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. This report documents the Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments under NAS1-16235 LFC Laminar-Flow-Control Wing Panel Structural Design And Development (WSSD); Design, manufacturing, and testing activities. An in-depth preliminary design of the baseline 1993 LFC wing was accomplished. A surface panel using the Lockheed graphite/epoxy integrated LFC wing box structural concept was designed. The concept was shown by analysis to be structurally efficient and cost effective. Critical details of the surface and surface joints were demonstrated by fabricating and testing complex, concept selection specimens. Cost of the baseline LFC aircraft was estimated and compared to the turbulent aircraft. The mission fuel weight was 21.7 percent lower for the LFC aircraft. The calculation shows that the lower fuel costs for LFC offset the higher incremental costs of LFC in less than six months.

  11. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  12. Image-based monitoring of structural damage: concrete surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, ZhiQiang; Chang, Barbara; Hutchinson, Tara C.

    2008-03-01

    Nondestructive imaging has been a widely used approach for detection of local structural damage in the engineering community. By combining image analysis methods, quantities describing the type, severity and extent of damage can be extracted within the spatial domain of images. However, the current practice of structural health monitoring requires a temporal characterization of structural damage, or some correlation of structural damage with response data. To accomplish this, one needs to consider the time scale in using any of the nondestructive imaging techniques, which in turn demands the use of spatial-temporal image analysis. In this paper, we address the temporal occurrence of cracks on the surface of concrete structural members, and attempt to monitor cracks, including their inception and propagation, using temporal image data. We assume under some conditions for objects in a pair of temporal images that only planar rigid-body motion takes place in the image domain, while cracks are treated as a type of local anomaly. The unknown motion parameters are estimated by means of a manifold-based optimization procedure, and the obtained manifold distance (MD) measure is used as a motion-invariant feature to describe the temporal occurrence of concrete cracks. Numerical analyses are conducted with the use of video clips from two laboratory experiments. It is concluded in this paper that the MD-based spatial-temporal image analysis can be an effective means for monitoring local damage of structural components that occurs and is accompanied by structural motion induced by loading.

  13. Antigenic presentation of heterologous epitopes engineered into the outer surface-exposed helix 4 loop region of human papillomavirus L1 capsomeres

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Yoshihiko; Lightfoote, Paula M; Rose, Robert C; Walsh, Edward E

    2009-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 capsid proteins can self-assemble into pentamers (capsomeres) that are immunogenic and can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Structural modelling of L1 inter-pentameric interactions predicts that helix 4 (h4) of each of the five L1 monomers project laterally and outwards from the pentamer. We sought to utilize HPV L1 capsomeres as a vaccine platform by engineering heterologous epitopes within L1 derivatives deleted for h4 domain. Results We used baculovirus – infected Trichoplusia ni cells and ultracentrifugation to synthesize and purify three 16L1 derivatives: one bearing a short deletion (amino acids 404–436) encompassing the h4 domain, and two others, each bearing a conserved neutralizing epitope of the human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein (residues 255–278 and 423–436) that was substituted for the deleted L1 h4 domain residues. Each of the three capsomere derivatives was recognized by anti-L1 antibodies, while two bearing the RSV F-derived moieties were recognized by anti-RSV F antibodies. All three L1 derivatives formed ring-like structures that were similar in morphology and size to those described for native 16L1 capsomeres. When injected into mice, each of the capsomere derivatives was immunogenic with respect to L1 protein, and immunization with chimeric L1-RSV F pentamers resulted in RSV non-neutralizing antisera that recognized purified RSV F protein in immunoblots. Conclusion HPV L1 monomers bearing heterologous epitopes within the L1 h4 region can self-assemble into capsomeres that elicit antibody response against such non-HPV encoded epitopes. Thus, the L1 h4 region can function as a novel antigen display site within the L1 pentamer, which in turn may serve as a potential vaccine template. PMID:19538743

  14. Calculations of Cleavage Processes, Surface Structures and Electronic Structure of Silicon and Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo.

    The cleavage processes, surface and step structures, and electronic structure of Si and Ge (111)2 x 1 surfaces were studied. The ab initio quantum chemistry programs KGNMOL-89 and DMol were used to study the cleavage of silicon and germanium clusters in the diamond structure. It was found that the potential energy of stretching and shearing glide planes increases much faster than for shuffle planes. The cleavage process is discussed and it is shown how glide -plane cleavage can occur, with consequences for surface structure models. The Keating strain-energy method has been applied to estimate the energies of surface and step structures on Si(111)2 x 1. Two minimum strain-energy TBS (Three -Bond Scission) model structures were obtained. Since angular strains are involved which go beyond the applicability limits of the Keating formula, a correction factor is used, derived by comparing Keating-type calculations of particular surface models of Si(111) with the results of more extensive calculations. The use of a simple correction factor gives results that agree with a calculation for the Pandey ( pi-bonded chain) model and one for the TBS model. Using this factor, a model for a 3-substep structure of the (322) step on Si is found to be quite stable, while the 2-substep structures are moderately stable. The surface band structure of the TBS and Pandey models have been computed using an ab initio HF LCAO program CRYSTAL-92. In the case of the TBS model, the results showed valence band dispersion that could be compatible with experiments. For the Pandey model, the calculated valence band dispersion seemed large. The surface band gap for both TBS and Pandey models was greatly overestimated. The significance is discussed. The surface electron density of states was calculated for the TBS model and the valence band generally matched experimental results from STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). The electron charge density of various surface regions was calculated. The

  15. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces.

    PubMed

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-02-01

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress-displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. PMID:24356124

  16. Surface structure and the optical properties of black chrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. B.; McPhedran, R. C.; Derrick, G. H.

    1985-04-01

    A new optical model is presented for solar-selective black chrome. Surface texture is shown to be the primary factor which gives thin films of black chrome a uniformly high absorptance in the visible and near-infrared regions. Internal composition of the films is a secondary influence on their optical properties. We present results consistent with experimental data obtained from films having widely varying structures and compositions, both before and after heat treatment. Our optical model does not rely on the quasistatic approximation, hitherto universally employed in theoretical studies of solar-selective black chrome. Instead, we use a rigorous diffraction formulation for doubly-periodic surfaces (bigratings). The key parameters of the surface morphology are determined from stereo-pair electronmicrographs, and are used in the bigrating model. We present the predicted variation of spectral absorptance with wavelength, as well as integrated absorptance and thermal emittance, for roughened chromium. We give results both for bare metal, and for the metal conformally overcoated either with a thin layer of Cr2O3 or with a Cr/Cr2O3 cermet. Various shapes of surface features are examined, and surface profile is shown not to be crucial in determining optical properties.

  17. Surface structures and growth modes of Ba deposited on Mo(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, S.; Gotoh, Y.

    2000-10-01

    The surface structures and growth modes of barium (Ba) on an Mo(110) surface have been investigated using a molecular beam epitaxy system equipped with a high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) apparatus. Three kinds of surface structures were observed, c(2×2), (1.6×2) and (1.5×1.8), in regions with low Ba coverage, and their phase diagram was obtained. All Ba atoms which form the c(2×2) structure coincide with Mo atoms, and the (1.6×2) and (1.5×1.8) structures with the regular triangle lattice have line coincidences with the atomic arrangement of the substrate along the [11¯0]Mo and [001]Mo directions, respectively. In the thickness range beyond 1 ML, the growth modes of the Ba-Mo(110) system were different due to the substrate temperature. The growth of the Ba-Mo(110) system is in accordance with the Frank-van der Merwe growth mode at room temperature and the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode at high temperatures.

  18. The magnetospheres of the outer planets

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on the magnetospheres of all of the outer planets including Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto is reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Particular attention is given to magnetospheric structure, plasma transport, Jovian aurora, Io and the plasma torus, Titan and its magnetospheric interactions, rings and dusty plasmas, magnetospheric convection, and satellite interactions.

  19. The processing of materials in outer space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Colling, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Zero-gravity environment may lead to fabrication of new and improved materials. According to comprehensive study of application of this promising technology to superconducting and electrical contact materials, outer space processing could improve microstructure and homogeneity of many single and multicomponent systems formed from solidification of fluid phases. New structures that are impossible to form terrestrially may also be accessible in space environment.

  20. Outer Hair Cell Electromotility and Otoacoustic Emissions*

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Outer hair cell electromotility is a rapid, force generating, length change in response to electrical stimulation. DC electrical pulses either elongate or shorten the cell and sinusoidal electrical stimulation results in mechanical oscillations at acoustic frequencies. The mechanism underlying outer hair cell electromotility is thought to be the origin of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. The ability of the cell to change its length requires that it be mechanically flexible. At the same time the structural integrity of the organ of Corti requires that the cell possess considerable compressive rigidity along its major axis. Evolution appears to have arrived at novel solutions to the mechanical requirements imposed on the outer hair cell. Segregation of cytoskeletal elements in specific intracellular domains facilitates the rapid movements. Compressive strength is provided by a unique hydraulic skeleton in which a positive hydrostatic pressure in the cytoplasm stabilizes a flexible elastic cortex with circumferential tensile strength. Cell turgor is required in order that the pressure gradients associated with the electromotile response can be communicated to the ends of the cell. A loss in turgor leads to loss of outer hair cell electromotility. Concentrations of salicylate equivalent to those that abolish spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in patients weaken the outer hair cell’s hydraulic skeleton. There is a significant diminution in the electromotile response associated with the loss in cell turgor. Aspirin’s effect on outer hair cell electromotility attests to the role of the outer hair cell in generating otoacoustic emissions and demonstrates how their physiology can influence the propagation of otoacoustic emissions. PMID:2187727

  1. Omnidirectional optical attractor in structured gap-surface plasmon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2016-03-01

    An optical attractor based on a simple and easy to fabricate structured metal-dielectric-metal (SMDM) waveguide is proposed. The structured waveguide has a variable thickness in the vicinity of an embedded microsphere and allow for adiabatic nano-focusing of gap-surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs). We show that the proposed system acts as an omnidirectional absorber across a broad spectral range. The geometrical optics approximation is used to provide a description of the ray trajectories in the system and identify the singularity of the deflection angle at the photon sphere. The analytical theory is validated by full-wave numerical simulations demonstrating adiabatic, deep sub-wavelength focusing of GSPPs and high local field enhancement. The proposed structured waveguide is an ideal candidate for the demonstration of reflection free omnidirectional absorption of GSPP in the optical and infrared frequency ranges.

  2. Omnidirectional optical attractor in structured gap-surface plasmon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A

    2016-03-22

    An optical attractor based on a simple and easy to fabricate structured metal-dielectric-metal (SMDM) waveguide is proposed. The structured waveguide has a variable thickness in the vicinity of an embedded microsphere and allow for adiabatic nano-focusing of gap-surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs). We show that the proposed system acts as an omnidirectional absorber across a broad spectral range. The geometrical optics approximation is used to provide a description of the ray trajectories in the system and identify the singularity of the deflection angle at the photon sphere. The analytical theory is validated by full-wave numerical simulations demonstrating adiabatic, deep sub-wavelength focusing of GSPPs and high local field enhancement. The proposed structured waveguide is an ideal candidate for the demonstration of reflection free omnidirectional absorption of GSPP in the optical and infrared frequency ranges.

  3. Omnidirectional optical attractor in structured gap-surface plasmon waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2016-01-01

    An optical attractor based on a simple and easy to fabricate structured metal-dielectric-metal (SMDM) waveguide is proposed. The structured waveguide has a variable thickness in the vicinity of an embedded microsphere and allow for adiabatic nano-focusing of gap-surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs). We show that the proposed system acts as an omnidirectional absorber across a broad spectral range. The geometrical optics approximation is used to provide a description of the ray trajectories in the system and identify the singularity of the deflection angle at the photon sphere. The analytical theory is validated by full-wave numerical simulations demonstrating adiabatic, deep sub-wavelength focusing of GSPPs and high local field enhancement. The proposed structured waveguide is an ideal candidate for the demonstration of reflection free omnidirectional absorption of GSPP in the optical and infrared frequency ranges. PMID:27001451

  4. Omnidirectional optical attractor in structured gap-surface plasmon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A

    2016-01-01

    An optical attractor based on a simple and easy to fabricate structured metal-dielectric-metal (SMDM) waveguide is proposed. The structured waveguide has a variable thickness in the vicinity of an embedded microsphere and allow for adiabatic nano-focusing of gap-surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs). We show that the proposed system acts as an omnidirectional absorber across a broad spectral range. The geometrical optics approximation is used to provide a description of the ray trajectories in the system and identify the singularity of the deflection angle at the photon sphere. The analytical theory is validated by full-wave numerical simulations demonstrating adiabatic, deep sub-wavelength focusing of GSPPs and high local field enhancement. The proposed structured waveguide is an ideal candidate for the demonstration of reflection free omnidirectional absorption of GSPP in the optical and infrared frequency ranges. PMID:27001451

  5. Novel Surface Structure of Te/Ge(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, O.; Walko, D. A.; Tinkham, B. P.; Bedzyk, M. J.

    2000-03-01

    Structures formed by the adsorption of Te on Ge(001) have been studied by the complementary techniques of surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD), x-ray standing waves (XSW), LEED, and AES. Two structures with qualititatively different LEED patterns, corresponding to high- and low-coverage states, are found by annealing to different temperatures. While Te atoms in the high-coverage (1×1) phase adsorb at the expected bridge sites, the low-coverage c(2×2) phase, with 0.5 ML Te, is marked by Te-Ge heterodimers. Previous XSW analysis the (004) and (022) reflections precisely located the well-ordered Te atoms, with a significant height difference of 0.07 Å between the two structures [P.F. Lyman et al., Phys. Rev. B 60, 8704 (1999)]. SXRD was used to characterize the geometry of the heterodimer and investigate the strain-induced multilayer relaxations of the subsurface Ge atoms.

  6. Investigation of Semiconductor Surface Structure by Transmission Ion Channeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, Paul Francis

    The primary thrust of this dissertation is the investigation of the composition and structure of two important surface systems on Si, and the study of how this structure evolves under the influence of ion bombardment or film growth. I have studied the initial stages of oxidation of Si immediately following removal of a surface oxide by an HF etch. I have also studied the structure of Ge deposited on clean Si(100) at low temperatures. These systems are of considerable technological interest, but were chosen because they naturally pose fundamental questions regarding physical and chemical processes at surfaces. In the study of the oxidation of Si, I have focused on the influence of the bombarding ion beam in altering the structure and composition of the surface layer. Thus, the system then provides a natural vehicle to study ion-induced chemistry. In the study of low-temperature growth of Ge, I have focused on the structure of the Ge layer and the evolution of that structure upon further deposition or upon heating. This simple system is a model one for observing strained semiconductor heteroepitaxial growth. The primary probe for these studies was transmission channeling of MeV ions. The sensitivity of this technique to correlations between the substrate and an overlayer allowed us to make the following observations. The O, Si and H bound in the thin oxide formed after an HF etch and H_2O rinse occupy preferred positions with respect to the Si matrix. Upon ion bombardment, the O further reacts with the Si (the reaction proceeds linearly with the ion fluence) and the portion of the H that is uncorrelated to the substrate is preferentially desorbed. For the case of Ge growth on Si(100)-(2 x 1) at room temperature, a substantial fraction of the Ge films is strained to occupy sites having the lattice constant of the Si substrate (pseudomorphic growth). A model for film growth is proposed in which pseudomorphic domains constitute roughly half of the Ge films up to a

  7. Surface and Internal Structure of Pristine Presolar Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, Rhonda, M.; Bernatowicz, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide is the most well-studied type of presolar grain. Isotope measurements of thousands [1,2] and structural data from over 500 individual grains have been reported [3]. The isotope data indicate that approximately 98% originated in asymptotic giant branch stars and 2% in supernovae. Although tens of different polytypes of SiC are known to form synthetically, only two polytypes have been reported for presolar grains. Daulton et al. [3] found that for SiC grains isolated from Murchison by acid treatments, 79.4% are 3C cubic beta-SiC, 2.7% are 2H hexagonal alpha-SiC, 17.1% are intergrowths of and , and 0.9% are heavily disordered. They report that the occurrence of only the and polytypes is consistent with the observed range of condensation temperatures of circumstellar dust for carbon stars. Further constraint on the formation and subsequent alteration of the grains can be obtained from studies of the surfaces and interior structure of grains in pristine form, i.e., prepared without acid treatments [4,5]. The acid treatments remove surface coatings, produce etch pits around defect sites and could remove some subgrains. Surface oxides have been predicted by theoretical modeling as a survival mechanism for SiC grains exposed to the hot oxidizing solar nebula [6]. Scanning electron microscopy studies of pristine SiC shows some evidence for the existence of oxide and organic coatings [4]. We report herein on transmission electron microscopy studies of the surface and internal structure of two pristine SiC grains, including definitive evidence of an oxide rim on one grain, and the presence of internal TiC and AlN grains.

  8. Outer atmospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    The region above the earth from about 90 km to 150 km is a major part of the upper or outer atmosphere. It is relatively unexplored, being too high for balloons or aircraft and too low for persistent orbiting spacecraft. However, the concept of a tethered subsatellite, deployed downward from an orbiting, more massive craft such as the Space Shuttle, opens the possibility of a research capability that could provide global mapping of this region. The need for research in this thick spherical shell above the earth falls into two major categories: (1) scientific data for understanding and modeling the global atmosphere and thereby determining its role in the earth system, and (2) engineering data for the design of future aerospace vehicles that will operate there. This paper presents an overview and synthesis of the currently perceived research needs and the state-of-the-art of the proposed tethered research capability.

  9. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  10. Nanoscale Engineering of Structures and Devices on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yitamben, Esmeralda

    2014-03-01

    The relentless increase in both density and speed that has characterized microelectronics, and now nanoelectronics, will require a new paradigm to continue beyond current technologies. One proposed such paradigm shift demands the ultimate control over the number and position of dopants in a device, which includes quantum information processing and variety of semiconductor device materials and architectures aimed at solving end-of-Moore's law issues. Such a work requires the development of a tool for the design of atomically precise devices on silicon and other surfaces, in hope of studying the effect of local interactions between atomic-scale structures, their microscopic behavior, and how quantum mechanical effects might influence nano-device behavior in very small structures. Demonstrations of remarkable 2D nanostructures down to single atom devices are reported here thanks to the development of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as an imaging and patterning tool. These include the formation of molecular chiral superstructures on metallic surfaces, as well as the atomic-scale depassivation of a hydrogen terminated surface with an STM, toward the incorporation of dopants in silicon. I will spend some time at the end, talking about my experience working at a national laboratory.

  11. Structure, dynamics, and surface reactions of bioactive glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Todd R.

    Three bioactive glasses (45S5, 55S4.3, and 60S3.8) have been investigated using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations in attempt to explain differences in observed macroscopic bioactivity. Bulk and surface structures and bulk dynamics have been characterized. Ion exchange and hydrolysis reactions, the first two stages in Hench's model describing the reactions of bioactive glass surfaces in vivo, have been investigated in detail. The 45S5 composition shows a much greater network fragmentation: it is suggested that this fragmentation can play a role in at least the first two stages of Hench's model for HCA formation on the surfaces of bioactive glasses. In terms of dynamic behavior, long-range diffusion was only observed for sodium. Calcium showed only jumps between adjacent sites, while phosphorus showed only local vibrations. Surface simulations show the distinct accumulation of sodium at the immediate surface for each composition. Surface channels are also shown to exist and are most evident for 45S5 glass. Results for a single ion exchange showed that the ion-exchange reaction is preferred (more exothermic) for Na+ ions near Si, rather than P. A range of reaction energies were found, due to a range of local environments, as expected for a glass surface. The average reaction energies are not significantly different among the three glass compositions. The results for bond hydrolysis on as-created surfaces show no significant differences among the three compositions for simulations involving Si-O-Si or Si-O-P. All average values are greater than zero, indicating endothermic reactions that are not favorable by themselves. However, it is shown that the hydrolysis reactions became more favorable (in fact, exothermic for 45S5 and 55S4.3) when simulated on surfaces that had already been ion-exchanged. This is significant because it gives evidence supporting Hench's proposed reaction sequence. Perhaps even more significantly, the reaction energies for hydrolysis

  12. Analysis of surface structures of major strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shang Yu; Neubauer, Franz

    2013-04-01

    Strike-slip faults commonly appear with complex fractures and deformation structures on the surface, which also reveal the 3-D geometry with variable structures at depth. The aim of our study is finding the systematic features and correlations of various surface expressions including width, length, height and angle (to the main fault trace) of individual structures like pressure ridges, sag ponds, riedel and anti-riedel faults and oversteps, and also doing a classification with these data. The variation might by caused by distinct convergence angles along strike-slip fault. We study the above mentioned properties on Altyn Tagh fault (ATF), Kunlun, San Andrea and Greendale (Darfield earthquake) faults, which are large strike-slip tectonic structures accommodating major displacement along plate boundaries. Especially the recent events of 2001 Kunlun earthquake and 2010 Darfield earthquake allow a detailed study of structures formed by a single earthquake. Along the fault valley of a 610 km segment of ATF, many large-scale pressure ridges, few pressure basins and horizontal offsets of wadi channels were found; similarly, around 20 features with large scale pressure ridges and pressure basins are found in Carrizo Plain of San Andreas fault. Surface ruptures are uncommon, and dominated by anti-riedels in the case of the Altyn fault. Interpretations show the range of length, width and height in pressure ridges located between 150 and ~6400 m, 35 and ~800 m, and 1 to ~80 m, respectively, along ATF and 255 to ~5750 m, 33 to ~800 m, 2 to ~65 m in Carrizo plain of San Andreas fault. These parameters exhibit a good correlation among each other implying a common cause. Compared with these two strike-slip faults, fault valley portions of the Greendale and Kunlun faults show more surface ruptures for instance riedel shears and anti-riedel structures, which have been caused by the last major earthquake, and also the scale of deformations along the ATF and San Andreas fault is

  13. STM study on the structures of SnSe surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang-Ui; Thi Ly, Trinh; Duong, Anh Tuan; Cho, Sunglae; Rhim, S. H.; Kim, Jungdae

    SnSe is a 2 dimensional layered material, and each layer is coupled by van deer Waals forces allowing very easy cleaving though the layer surfaces. SnSe has been studied for various potential applications because of its high stability and elemental abundance in earth. Recently, it was also reported that bulk SnSe has an excellent thermoelectric property of ZT =2.6 at 923 K along the b axis (Zhao et al., Nature 508 373 (2014)). The surface of a single crystal SnSe was studied via a home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Clear atomic images of SnSe surfaces were observed at the filled and empty state measurements, and detail atomic structures were analyzed by comparing with DFT simulations. We found that the atomic image of SnSe surfaces measured by STM is not trivial to understand. Only Sn atoms were visible on STM topographic images for the both of filled and empty state probing. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) [Nos. NRF-2013R1A1A1008724, NRF-2009-0093818, and NRF-2014R1A4A1071686].

  14. Electronic structure of BaO/W cathode surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The local electronic structure of the emissive layer of barium dispenser thermionic cathodes is investigated theoretically using the relativistic scattered-wave approach. The interaction of Ba and O with W, Os, and W-Os alloy surfaces is studied with atomic clusters modeling different absorption environments representative of B- and M-type cathodes. Ba is found to be strongly oxidized, while O and the metal substrate are in a reduced chemical state. The presence of O enhances the surface dipole and Ba binding energy relative to Ba on W. Model results for W-Os alloy substrates show only relatively small changes in Ba and O for identical geometries, but very large charge redistributions inside the substrate, which are attributed to the electronegativity difference between Os and W. If Os is present in the surface layer, the charge transfer from Ba to the substrate and the Ba binding energy increase relative to W. Explanations are offered for the improved electron emission from alloy surfaces and the different emission enhancement for different alloy substrates.

  15. Homogenization models for thin rigid structured surfaces and films.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-07-01

    A homogenization method for thin microstructured surfaces and films is presented. In both cases, sound hard materials are considered, associated with Neumann boundary conditions and the wave equation in the time domain is examined. For a structured surface, a boundary condition is obtained on an equivalent flat wall, which links the acoustic velocity to its normal and tangential derivatives (of the Myers type). For a structured film, jump conditions are obtained for the acoustic pressure and the normal velocity across an equivalent interface (of the Ventcels type). This interface homogenization is based on a matched asymptotic expansion technique, and differs slightly from the classical homogenization, which is known to fail for small structuration thicknesses. In order to get insight into what causes this failure, a two-step homogenization is proposed, mixing classical homogenization and matched asymptotic expansion. Results of the two homogenizations are analyzed in light of the associated elementary problems, which correspond to problems of fluid mechanics, namely, potential flows around rigid obstacles. PMID:27475151

  16. Homogenization models for thin rigid structured surfaces and films.

    PubMed

    Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-07-01

    A homogenization method for thin microstructured surfaces and films is presented. In both cases, sound hard materials are considered, associated with Neumann boundary conditions and the wave equation in the time domain is examined. For a structured surface, a boundary condition is obtained on an equivalent flat wall, which links the acoustic velocity to its normal and tangential derivatives (of the Myers type). For a structured film, jump conditions are obtained for the acoustic pressure and the normal velocity across an equivalent interface (of the Ventcels type). This interface homogenization is based on a matched asymptotic expansion technique, and differs slightly from the classical homogenization, which is known to fail for small structuration thicknesses. In order to get insight into what causes this failure, a two-step homogenization is proposed, mixing classical homogenization and matched asymptotic expansion. Results of the two homogenizations are analyzed in light of the associated elementary problems, which correspond to problems of fluid mechanics, namely, potential flows around rigid obstacles.

  17. Surface structure and stability of MoSx model clusters.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zeng, Tao; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun

    2005-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) computations have been carried out to study the structure and stability of MoSx clusters with the change of sulfur coverage at both Mo and S edges. DFT shows that adding sulfur to the Mo edge is always exothermic. However, deleting corner sulfur from the S edge is exothermic for 67 and 50% sulfur coverages, while deleting edge sulfur from the S edge is endothermic for 33 and 0% sulfur coverages. On the basis of the computed free energies along a wide range of H2S/H2 ratios, it is found that there are two stable structures with 33 and 50% sulfur coverages on the Mo edge by having 100% sulfur coverage on the S edge and one stable structure with 67% sulfur coverage on the S edge by having 0% sulfur coverage on the Mo edge. Under fully sulfiding atmosphere or at a very high H2S/H2 ratio, triangle MoSx structures with 100% sulfur coverage on the Mo edge are computed to be more stable than those with 100% sulfur coverage on the S edge, in agreement with the observation of scanning tunneling microscopy. In addition, the effects of cluster sizes on the surface structures are discussed.

  18. Isogeometric shape optimisation of shell structures using multiresolution subdivision surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiao; Bandara, Kosala; Cirak, Fehmi

    2016-08-01

    We introduce the isogeometric shape optimisation of thin shell structures using subdivision surfaces. Both triangular Loop and quadrilateral Catmull-Clark subdivision schemes are considered for geometry modelling and finite element analysis. A gradient-based shape optimisation technique is implemented to minimise compliance, i.e. to maximise stiffness. Different control meshes describing the same surface are used for geometry representation, optimisation and finite element analysis. The finite element analysis is performed with subdivision basis functions corresponding to a sufficiently fine control mesh. During iterative shape optimisation the geometry is updated starting from the coarsest control mesh and proceeding to increasingly finer control meshes. The proposed approach is applied to three optimisation examples, namely a catenary, a roof over a rectangular domain, and free-form architectural shell roof. The influence of the geometry description and the used subdivision scheme on the obtained optimised curved geometries are investigated in detail.

  19. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest

  20. Deformable structure registration of bladder through surface mapping.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Viswanathan, Akila; Stewart, Alexandra J; Haker, Steven; Tempany, Clare M; Chin, Lee M; Cormack, Robert A

    2006-06-01

    Cumulative dose distributions in fractionated radiation therapy depict the dose to normal tissues and therefore may permit an estimation of the risk of normal tissue complications. However, calculation of these distributions is highly challenging because of interfractional changes in the geometry of patient anatomy. This work presents an algorithm for deformable structure registration of the bladder and the verification of the accuracy of the algorithm using phantom and patient data. In this algorithm, the registration process involves conformal mapping of genus zero surfaces using finite element analysis, and guided by three control landmarks. The registration produces a correspondence between fractions of the triangular meshes used to describe the bladder surface. For validation of the algorithm, two types of balloons were inflated gradually to three times their original size, and several computerized tomography (CT) scans were taken during the process. The registration algorithm yielded a local accuracy of 4 mm along the balloon surface. The algorithm was then applied to CT data of patients receiving fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy to the vaginal cuff, with the vaginal cylinder in situ. The patients' bladder filling status was intentionally different for each fraction. The three required control landmark points were identified for the bladder based on anatomy. Out of an Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved study of 20 patients, 3 had radiographically identifiable points near the bladder surface that were used for verification of the accuracy of the registration. The verification point as seen in each fraction was compared with its predicted location based on affine as well as deformable registration. Despite the variation in bladder shape and volume, the deformable registration was accurate to 5 mm, consistently outperforming the affine registration. We conclude that the structure registration algorithm presented works with reasonable accuracy and

  1. Evaluation of multilayered pavement structures from measurements of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the thickness and stiffness of multilayered pavement structures from guided waves measured at the surface. Data is collected with a light hammer as the source and an accelerometer as receiver, generating a synthetic receiver array. The top layer properties are evaluated with a Lamb wave analysis. Multiple layers are evaluated by matching a theoretical phase velocity spectrum to the measured spectrum. So far the method has been applied to the testing of pavements, but it may also be applicable in other fields such as ultrasonic testing of coated materials. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Strategy for outer planets exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Programs Office formed a number of scientific working groups to study in depth the potential scientific return from the various candidate missions to the outer solar system. The results of these working group studies were brought together in a series of symposia to evaluate the potential outer planet missions and to discuss strategies for exploration of the outer solar system that were consistent with fiscal constraints and with anticipated spacecraft and launch vehicle capabilities. A logical, scientifically sound, and cost effective approach to exploration of the outer solar system is presented.

  3. Contaminant Organic Complexes: Their Structure and Energetics in Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel Traina; Shankar Sharma

    2005-07-12

    The Department of Energy has a goal of decontaminating an estimated 180,000 metric tons of metal wastes in various surplus facilities. Uranium (U) and other radioactive actinides and lanthanides are embedded within the mixed oxide structures of the passivity layers of corroded iron and steel. These toxic metals can be dissolved out of the surface layers by a naturally occurring bacterial siderophore called Desferrioxamine B (DFB). DFB is a trihydroxamate ligand with one amine and three hydroxamate groups, which chelates with metals through hydroxamate coordination. Complexation of DFB with U can be utilized in decontamination strategy of the passivity layers. Therefore, we have been studying reactions of uranyl U(VI) with zerovalent iron (Fe0) followed by dissolution by DFB. The objectives were to determine the structure and speciation of solution and solid phases of U and to assess the effectiveness of DVB in U dissolution.

  4. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  5. Broadband multiple responses of surface modes in quasicrystalline plasmonic structure.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haiming; Jiang, Xiangqian; Huang, Feng; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the multiple excitation of surface modes in 2D photonic quasicrystal/metal/substrate structure. An improved rigorous coupled wave analysis method that can handle the quasicrystalline structure is presented. The quasicrystalline lattice, which refers to Penrose tiling in this paper, is generated by the cut-and-project method. The normal incidence spectrum presents a broadband multiple responses property. We find that the phase matching condition determines the excitation frequency for a given incident angle, while the depth of the reflection valley depends on the incident polarization. The modes will split into several sub-modes at oblique incidence, which give rise to the appearance of more responses on the spectrum. PMID:27492782

  6. Structures and construction of nuclear power plants on lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Katsunori; Kobatake, Masuhiko; Ogawa, Sachio; Kanamori, Hiroshi; Okada, Yasuhiko; Mano, Hideyuki; Takagi, Kenji

    1991-07-01

    The best structure and construction techniques of nuclear power plants in the severe environments on the lunar surface are studied. Facility construction types (functional conditions such as stable structure, shield thickness, maintainability, safety distances, and service life), construction conditions (such as construction methods, construction equipment, number of personnel, time required for construction, external power supply, and required transportation) and construction feasibility (construction method, reactor transportation between the moon and the earth, ground excavation for installation, loading and unloading, transportation, and installation, filling up the ground, electric power supply of plant S (300 kW class) and plant L (3000 kW class)) are outlined. Items to pay attention to in construction are (1) automation and robotization of construction; (2) cost reduction by multi functional robots; and (3) methods of supplying power to robots. A precast concrete block manufacturing plant is also outlined.

  7. Outer surface protein C (OspC), but not P39, is a protective immunogen against a tick-transmitted Borrelia burgdorferi challenge: evidence for a conformational protective epitope in OspC.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, R D; Kappel, K J; Dolan, M C; Burkot, T R; Johnson, B J

    1996-06-01

    Outbred mice were immunized with the soluble fraction of a crude Escherichia coli lysate containing either recombinant outer surface protein C (OspC or P39 of Borrelia burgdorferi B31 (low passage). Following seroconversion, the mice were challenged with an infectious dose of B. burgdorferi B31 via the natural transmission mode of tick bite. Three mice immunized with P39 were not protected; however, all 12 of the recombinant OspC-immunized mice were protected from infection as assayed by culture and serology. Although OspC has been shown to be a protective immunogen against challenge with in vitro-cultured borrelia administered by needle, this study is the first to demonstrate OspC effectiveness against tick-borne spirochetes. Following feeding, all ticks still harbored B. burgdorferi, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not linked to destruction of the infectious spirochete within the tick. In a separate experiment, groups of four mice were immunized with protein fractions from B. burgdorferi B31 purified by preparative gel electrophoresis in an attempt to identify potential protective antigens. Many of these mice developed high-titer-antibody responses against OspC, but curiously the mice were susceptible to B. burgdorferi infection via tick bite. These results suggest that the protective epitope(s) on OspC is heat sensitive/conformational, a finding which has implications in vaccine development.

  8. Structure response and damage produced by airblast from surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, D.E.; Stachura, V.J.; Stagg, M.S.; Kopp, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines studied airblast from surface mining to assess its damage and annoyance potential, and to determine safe levels and appropriate measurement techniques. Research results obtained from direct measurements of airblast-produced structure responses, damage, and analysis of instrument characteristics were combined with studies of sonic booms and human response to transient overpressures. Safe levels of airblast were found to be 134 db (0.1 Hz), 133 db (2 Hz), 129 db (6 Hz), and 105 db C-slow. These four airblast levels and measurement methods are equivalent in terms of structure response, and any one could be used as a safe-level criterion. Of the four methods, only the 0.1-Hz high-pass linear method accurately measures the total airblast energy present; however, the other three were found to adequately quantify the structure response and also represent techniques that are readily available to industry. Where a single airblast measuring system must be used, the 2-Hz linear peak response is the best overall compromise. The human response and annoyance problem from airblast is probably caused primarily by wall rattling and the resulting secondary noises. Although these will not entirely be precluded by the recommended levels, they are low enough to preclude damage to residential structures and any possible human injury over the long term.

  9. Microscopically derived potential energy surfaces from mostly structural considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermamatov, M. J.; Hess, Peter O.

    2016-08-01

    A simple procedure to estimate the quadrupole Potential-Energy-Surface (PES) is presented, using mainly structural information, namely the content of the shell model space and the Pauli exclusion principle. Further microscopic properties are implicitly contained through the use of results from the Möller and Nix tables or experimental information. A mapping to the geometric potential is performed yielding the PES. The General Collective Model is used in order to obtain an estimate on the spectrum and quadrupole transitions, adjusting only the mass parameter. First, we test the conjecture on known nuclei, deriving the PES and compare them to known data. We will see that the PES approximates very well the structure expected. Having acquired a certain confidence, we predict the PES of several chain of isotopes of heavy and super-heavy nuclei and at the end we investigate the structure of nuclei in the supposed island of stability. One of the main points to show is that simple assumptions can provide already important information on the structure of nuclei outside known regions and that spectra and electromagnetic transitions can be estimated without using involved calculations and assumptions. The procedure does not allow to calculate binding energies. The method presented can be viewed as a starting point for further improvements.

  10. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  11. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag+-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Sagheer, Riffat; Bashir, Shazia; Zia, Rehana; Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman

    2016-08-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag+ ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV-Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag+-implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 1014 ions/cm2. Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  12. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  13. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  14. Micro structuration of gaas surface by wet etching: towards a specific surface behavior.

    PubMed

    Bienaime, Alex; Elie-Caille, Celine; Leblois, Therese

    2012-08-01

    Resonant microelectromechanical systems are promising devices for real time and highly sensitive measurements. The sensitivity of such sensors to additional mass loadings which can be increased thanks to the miniaturisation of devices is of prime importance for biological applications. The miniaturisation of structures passes through a photolithographic process and wet chemical etching. So, this paper presents new results on the anisotropic chemical etching of the gallium arsenide (GaAs) crystal used for this application, in several solutions. This paper focuses on the micro/nanostructuration of the sensing surface to increase the sensor sensitivity. Indeed, this active surface will be biofunctionalized to operate in biological liquid media in view of biomolecules detection. Several experimental conditions of etching bath composition, concentration and temperature were examined to obtain a large variety of geometrical surfaces topographies and roughness. According to the orientation dependence of the chemical etching process, the experiments were also performed on various GaAs crystal plates. The bath 1 H3PO4:9 H2O2:1 H2O appeared to be particularly adapted to the fabrication of the GaAs microstructured membrane: indeed, the bath is highly stable, anisotropic, and, as a function of temperature, it allows the production of a large variety of GaAs surface topographies.

  15. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location.

  16. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location. PMID:21476618

  17. Turbulent Structures and Coherence in the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träumner, K.; Damian, Th.; Stawiarski, Ch.; Wieser, A.

    2015-01-01

    Organized structures in turbulent flow fields are a well-known and still fascinating phenomenon. Although these so-called coherent structures are obvious from visual inspection, quantitative assessment is a challenge and many aspects e.g., formation mechanisms and contribution to turbulent fluxes, are discussed controversially. During the "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction" Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) from April to May 2013, an advanced dual Doppler lidar technique was used to image the horizontal wind field near the surface for approximately 300 h. A visual inspection method, as well as a two-dimensional integral length scale analysis, were performed to characterize the observations qualitatively and quantitatively. During situations with forcing due to shear, the wind fields showed characteristic patterns in the form of clearly bordered, elongated areas of enhanced or reduced wind speed, which can be associated with near-surface streaks. During calm situations with strong buoyancy forcing, open cell patterns in the horizontal divergence field were observed. The measurement technique used enables the calculation of integral length scales of both horizontal wind components in the streamwise and cross-stream directions. The individual length scales varied considerably during the observation period but were on average shorter during situations with compared to strongly stable situations. During unstable situations, which were dominated by wind fields with structures, the streamwise length scales increased with increasing wind speed, whereas the cross-stream length scales decreased. Consequently, the anisotropy increased from 1 for calm situations to values of 2-3 for wind speeds of 8-10. During neutral to stable situations, the eddies were on average quite isotropic in the horizontal plane.

  18. Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, John R

    1999-07-16

    FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

  19. Lithospheric structure of South China Sea from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Xue, M.; Le, K.; Yang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The South China Sea is one of the marginal seas of the West Pacific where the Eurasian Plate, Philippine Sea Plate, Pacific Plate and Indo-Australian Plate interact. In this study we give a 3D shear wave velocity structure of South China Sea using surface wave tomographic methods. We use earthquakes distributed on the periphery of the South China Sea and collect the earthquake data from 48 stations (IRIS stations, CDSN stations and four stations deployed in Vietnam by Tongji University) with rays up to ~ 3000. We first calculate the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode for Rayleigh waves with periods from 14 sec to 130 sec using the multiple filter technique. After getting the dispersion curve between each station-to-source pair, we conduct an inversion to get group velocity at each grid point in the rectangular region of 14° s - 34° N and 86° E - 134° E with different grid spacing of 2° × 2° and 1° × 1°. This process is done by the fast marching method as the forward step and then subspace inversion step followed. When we get the group velocity of each grid point for corresponding periods, we can extract a dispersion curve for that point. Through the surface wave inversion which uses Knopoff's calculation method for layered medium as the forward step and the damped least square method as the inversion step followed, we can get an iterative model which carries the information of shear wave velocity and layer depth for each grid point. Finally we put all the shear wave velocity structures of all points together to obtain the three-dimensional shear wave structures. With checkboard tests indicating good resolution, we find that higher group velocities persistently show up in South China Sea Basin, West Philippine Sea Basin, and Celebes Sea Basin from periods of 20 sec to 60 sec, which reflect structures down to 20 - 60 km deep. Similar high shear velocity features also show up in depth slices from 30 km to 60 km. These high shear velocity

  20. Controlling surface plasmon interference in branched silver nanowire structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2012-11-21

    Using quantum dot fluorescence imaging, we investigated the interference of surface plasmon beams in branched silver nanowire structures. Depending on the phases and polarizations of the incident light, interferences of plasmon beams modulate the plasmon propagation in the branched structures and the output light intensity in the distal ends. The interference visibility is strongly dependent on the incident polarization at the main wire terminal, and the mechanism is revealed by quantum dot fluorescence imaging of the near field distribution of propagating plasmons. The near field distribution pattern resulting from the beating of different plasmon modes plays a critical role in the plasmon interference. The overlap of the antinode in the near field pattern with the connection junction in the nanowire structure is required for a large interference visibility, since the overlap makes the electric field intensity difference of the two plasmon beams smaller. It is found that the plasmon interference is strongly dependent on the polarization of the excitation light at the main wire terminal, but weakly dependent on the polarization at the branch wire terminal.