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Sample records for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation

  1. [Development and importance of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation in German-speaking countries].

    PubMed

    Benzer, W

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a coordinated treatment approach. The interdisciplinary team aims to provide the best possible physical and psychological outcomes for patients with cardiac diseases. Patients should be enable to independently resume work and and social life. Furthermore cardiac rehabilitation wants to limit or reverse the progress of cardiac disease through sustained health-related life habits. Cardiac rehabilitation significantly contributes to long-term success based on comprehensive care of cardiac patients. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation has shown to be effective after myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting and chronic heart failure. However randomized controlled trials were performed only in Anglo-American countries. In these trials effects were observed mainly for exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programs. Because the results have been derived from different program settings they cannot simply be translated to German-speaking countries. However, several cohort studies predominantly performed in Germany also revealed effects of inpatient and outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs for German-speaking countries. The most recent results demonstrated a significant reduction of recurrent events in patients after inpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Following the current evidence concerning the effect of inpatient and outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs particularly after myocardial infarction international guidelines provide Class I (USA) and IIa (Europe) recommendation for this treatment intervention.In contrast to Anglo-American countries cardiac rehabilitation in Austria, Germany and Switzerland was established at its beginning exclusively for inpatient programs. In addition more and more outpatient programs were introduced in the last decades. Nevertheless inpatient cardiac rehabilitation is still the most common program in German-speaking countries.Future challenges of cardiac rehabilitation should not address the

  2. Receipt of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation among heart attack survivors--United States, 2005.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    Each year, approximately 865,000 persons in the United States have a myocardial infarction (i.e., heart attack). In 2007, direct and indirect costs of heart disease were estimated at approximately $277.1 billion. Cardiac rehabilitation, an essential component of recovery care after a heart attack, focuses on cardiovascular risk reduction, promoting healthy behaviors, reducing death and disability, and promoting an active lifestyle for heart attack survivors. Current guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation emphasize the importance of cardiac rehabilitation, which reduces morbidity and mortality, improves clinical outcomes, enhances psychological recovery, and decreases the risk for secondary cardiac events. To estimate the prevalence of receipt of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation among heart attack survivors in 21 states and the District of Columbia (DC), data from the 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were assessed. The results of that assessment indicated that 34.7% of BRFSS respondents who had experienced a heart attack participated in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for eligible patients after a heart attack is an essential component of care that should be incorporated into treatment plans. Increasing the number of persons who participate in cardiac rehabilitation services also can reduce health-care costs for recurrent events and reduce the burden on families and caregivers of patients with serious sequelae.

  3. A mobile phone-based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: the care assessment platform (CAP)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation programs offer effective means to prevent recurrence of a cardiac event, but poor uptake of current programs have been reported globally. Home based models are considered as a feasible alternative to avoid various barriers related to care centre based programs. This paper sets out the study design for a clinical trial seeking to test the hypothesis that these programs can be better and more efficiently supported with novel Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Methods/Design We have integrated mobile phones and web services into a comprehensive home- based care model for outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Mobile phones with a built-in accelerometer sensor are used to measure physical exercise and WellnessDiary software is used to collect information on patients' physiological risk factors and other health information. Video and teleconferencing are used for mentoring sessions aiming at behavioural modifications through goal setting. The mentors use web-portal to facilitate personal goal setting and to assess the progress of each patient in the program. Educational multimedia content are stored or transferred via messaging systems to the patients phone to be viewed on demand. We have designed a randomised controlled trial to compare the health outcomes and cost efficiency of the proposed model with a traditional community based rehabilitation program. The main outcome measure is adherence to physical exercise guidelines. Discussion The study will provide evidence on using mobile phones and web services for mentoring and self management in a home-based care model targeting sustainable behavioural modifications in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) with number ACTRN12609000251224. PMID:20109196

  4. Outpatient Pain Rehabilitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    Outpatient pain rehabilitation programs that include an interdisciplinary approach have been shown to be effective treatments for patients with chronic pain. The objectives of this article are to describe the common interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation programs available, the appropriate indications for use, the components of typical pain rehabilitation programs, the short-term and long-term success rates, the costs of attending these programs, and the significant societal costs of those patients who do not complete these programs and do not return to work. PMID:16789457

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  6. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoreson, Richard W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes rehabilitation implications associated with psychosocial factors, patient reaction, and family adjustment to coronary heart disease. Patient education and counseling must stress specific long-term care and follow-up and deal with family anxiety and depression. The rehabilitation counselor can help patients incorporate medical…

  8. [Cardiac rehabilitation in the region of Veneto].

    PubMed

    Carlon, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    In Italy there has been a progressive shifting of the legislative and fiscal activity from a national level to a regional one. In the Venetian district a series of documents, also concerning the cardiac rehabilitation, has been produced. A document elaborated in 1999 contains a detailed account of eligibility criteria for cardiac rehabilitation as well as of structural and organizational requirements. Other documents contain the updated price lists for admission episode (DRG 462) or days of stay in hospital and diurnal hospital activity, according to the type of structure which supplies the service. For outpatients, cardiac rehabilitation is identified by the code 93.36 and the ticket fare is 19,50 Euro. In the enclosure no.6 of the Sanitary Regional Plan, still under definitive approval, it is stated that for each Intensive Therapy there will be a functional connector with a cardiac rehabilitation service which, except for few Centers, will carry on its activity with outpatients. At present the regional Cardiac Rehabilitation includes 3 complex units (for in- and outpatients) and 13 simple units (for outpatients only), with a total of 3031 patients rehabilitated in 2004.

  9. Utility of the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument as an Outcome Measure in Patients Participating in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the concurrent validity of the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and to evaluate the accuracy of information obtained through self-report questionnaire versus interview formats. Methods: The study included 29 patients older than 60 years attending an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. Participants completed the LLFDI, three additional self-report criterion measures, and six performance-based tests; they completed the LLFDI a second time via interview. We used descriptive statistics, correlations, and t-tests to analyze the data. Results: All LLFDI components were correlated (rs=0.36–0.83) with the self-report criterion measures. The Function Component of the LLFDI was moderately correlated with the 6-Minute Walk Test (r=0.62), timed up-and-go (r=−0.58), walking speed (r=−0.57), and timed sit-to-stand (r=−0.56) scores. The LLFDI demonstrated a ceiling effect (10%) only in the Disability Limitation component. All LLFDI component scores obtained via self-report questionnaire were correlated with scores obtained via interview; except in a single subcategory, there was no difference between LLFDI scores obtained through self-report questionnaire and those obtained through interview. Conclusions: Results indicate that the LLFDI has appropriate validity for older patients (>60 years) with CHD and can be completed independently by patients rather than administered by clinicians. PMID:23277685

  10. [Cardiac rehabilitation in women].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Lamouchi, S; Justin, K D; Meimoun, P; Ghannem, L

    2016-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs later in life in women when compared to men (10 years later). The FAST-MI study has shown that the profile of women with CAD has changed in the past 15 years, they are younger, more obese, and usually smokers. Whatever the age at which CAD occurs in women, the prognosis tends to be worse than in men, despite a higher frequency of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with angiographically normal coronary arteries in women. In women without significant lesion at coronary angiography, the WISE study has shown abnormalities of the coronary vasomotricy. Despite its beneficial effect on morbidity and mortality, cardiac rehabilitation is underused particularly in women. Indeed, several factors do not encourage a woman to follow a cardiac rehabilitation program, even after an ACS. These factors may be cultural, domestic, familial, orthopedic, or even the fear of exercising. Therefore, physicians have to be particularly convincing in women, in order to have them participating in rehabilitation programs. Physical capacity is lower in women when compared to men. However, the weaker the physical capacity, the better the benefit of cardiac rehabilitation. Physical endurance training continuously or in interval, associated to muscle strengthening can improve the physical capacity in women. Vascular risk factors correction is also an important step for the management of women with CAD. Therapeutic education and several available workshops help women to better understand their disease and to improve their self-management when they return home. Anxiety, depression, and sexual dysfunction frequently deteriorate the quality of life of our patients. Therefore, psychological management is also essential in our departments.

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, J D

    1976-09-01

    The concept of cardiac reconditioning centers for the prevention and rehabilitation of coronary patients has been tremendously successful in Germany over the past 20 years. At least 40 such centers are located throughout the country. Physicians, nurses, and physical therapists work closely together in the various facets of the rehabilitation process. The financial backing for these facilities is primarily through governmental and regional insurance companies, whose officials are apparently convinced that in the long run supporting preventive measures is financially sound. Objective data supporting their convictions come from studies such as that of Brusis, who showed that such as that of 1,500 employees was diminished by nearly 70 percent during a two-year period after cardiac reconditioning, as compared to a similar time period before the rehabilitation experience. Subjective benefits, which are extremely difficult to quantitate in meaningful terms, were nonetheless expressed by nearly all the patients with whom I conversed. Perhaps they have experienced the same feelings that Mark Twain did when he observed that "all frets and worries and chafings sank to sleep in the presence of the benignant serenity of the Alps; the Great Spirit of the Mountains breathed his own peace upon their hurt minds and sore hearts and healed them."

  12. Cardiac Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercising are other risk factors. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Rehabilitation (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Cardiac Rehabilitation (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? (American Heart Association) - ...

  13. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    PubMed Central

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne; Foghmar, Sussie; Eichhorst, Regina; Prescott, Eva; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Gislason, Gunnar H; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Gustafsson, Ida; Thomsen, Kristian K; Boye Hansen, Lene; Hammer, Signe; Viggers, Lone; Christensen, Bo; Kvist, Birgitte; Lindström Egholm, Cecilie; May, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Study population Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward. Main variables Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year. Descriptive data Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. Conclusion The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients. PMID:27822083

  14. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines.

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Aashish S

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs are recognized as integral to the comprehensive care of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and as such are recommended as useful and effective (Class I) by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology in the treatment of patients with CHD. The term cardiac rehabilitation refers to coordinated, multifaceted interventions designed to optimize a cardiac patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning, in addition to stabilizing, slowing, or even reversing the progression of the underlying atherosclerotic processes, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality. Cardiac rehabilitation, aims at returning the patient back to normal functioning in a safe and effective manner and to enhance the psychosocial and vocational state of the patient. The program involves education, exercise, risk factor modification and counselling. A meta-analysis based on a review of 48 randomized trials that compared outcomes of exercise-based rehabilitation with usual medical care, showed a reduction of 20% in total mortality and 26% in cardiac mortality rates, with exercise-based rehabilitation compared with usual medical care. Risk stratification helps identify patients who are at increased risk for exercise-related cardiovascular events and who may require more intensive cardiac monitoring in addition to the medical supervision provided for all cardiac rehabilitation program participants. During exercise, the patients' ECG is continuously monitored through telemetry, which serves to optimize the exercise prescription and enhance safety. The safety of cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs is well established, and the occurrence of major cardiovascular events during supervised exercise is extremely low. As hospital stays decrease, cardiac rehabilitation is assuming an increasingly important role in secondary prevention. In contrast with its growing importance internationally, there are very few

  16. Current trends in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dafoe, W; Huston, P

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality and morbidity for patients with many types of cardiac disease cost-effectively, yet is generally underutilized. Rehabilitation is helpful not only for patients who have had a myocardial infarction but also for those with stable angina or congestive heart failure or those who have undergone myocardial revascularization procedures, a heart transplant or heart valve surgery. The beneficial effects of rehabilitation include a reduction in the rate of death from cardiovascular disease, improved exercise tolerance, fewer cardiac symptoms, improved lipid levels, decreased cigarette smoking, improvement in psychosocial well-being and increased likelihood of return to work. Rehabilitation involves a multidisciplinary team that focuses on education, individually tailored exercise, risk-factor modification and the optimization of functional status and mental health. Current research trends in this area include the evaluation of new secondary-prevention modalities and alternative program options, such as home-based rehabilitation. PMID:9054823

  17. Automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jane P

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive negative impact of cardiovascular disease in the United States is well documented. Although advances have been made, the campaign to reduce the occurrence, progression, and mortality continues. Determining evidence-based data is only half the battle. Implementing new and updated clinical guidelines into daily practice is a challenging task. Cardiac rehabilitation is an example of a proven intervention whose benefit is hindered through erratic implementation. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have responded to this problem by publishing the AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 Performance Measures on Cardiac Rehabilitation for Referral to and Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Services. This new national guideline recommends automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation for every eligible patient (performance measure A-1). This article offers guidance for the initiation of an automatic referral system, including individualizing your protocol with regard to electronic or paper-based order entry structures.

  18. Healing through integration: promoting wellness in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Medich, C J; Stuart, E; Chase, S K

    1997-04-01

    This case study illustrates the basic life processes, transitions, and meanings of a woman with diagnosed coronary artery disease who participated in an innovative outpatient program of cardiac rehabilitation. Data gathering and analysis were accomplished using the phenomenologic procedures outlined by Spiegelberg and van Manen. A formulated structure, healing through integration, was generated from the interpretation of case study data, as well as the data of 15 other adult patients who participated in a program of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. This structure provides a framework for nursing assessment and the implementation of relevant mind, body, social, spiritual, and behavioral interventions designed to assist individuals in integrating health-enhancing behaviors and recovery following a cardiac health crisis.

  19. Exercise-Based Oncology Rehabilitation: Leveraging the Cardiac Rehabilitation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Kim L.; Lakoski, Susan G.; Savage, Patrick D.; Kokinda, Nathan; Toth, Michael; Stevens, Diane; Woods, Kimberly; O’Brien, Patricia; Ades, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The value of exercise and rehabilitative interventions for cancer survivors is increasingly clear and oncology rehabilitation programs could provide these important interventions. However, a pathway to create oncology rehabilitation has not been delineated. Community-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs staffed by health care professionals with experience in providing rehabilitation and secondary prevention services to individuals with coronary heart disease are widely available and provide a potential model and location for oncology rehabilitation programs. Our purpose is to outline the rehabilitative needs of cancer survivors and demonstrate how oncology rehabilitation can be created using a cardiac rehabilitation model. METHODS We identify the impairments associated with cancer and its therapy that respond to rehabilitative interventions. Components of the CR model that would benefit cancer survivors are described. An example of an oncology rehabilitation program using a CR model is presented. RESULTS Cancer survivors have impairments associated with cancer and its therapy that improve with rehabilitation. Our experience demonstrates that effective rehabilitation services can be provided utilizing an existing CR infrastructure. Few adjustments to current cardiac rehabilitation models would be needed to provide oncology rehabilitation. Preliminary evidence suggests that cancer survivors participating in an oncology rehabilitation program experience improvements in psychological and physiologic parameters. CONCLUSIONS Utilizing the CR model of rehabilitative services and disease management provides a much needed mechanism to bring oncology rehabilitation to larger numbers of cancer survivors. PMID:25407596

  20. Sexual Dysfunction before and after Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Jörg; Zellweger, Michael J; Di Valentino, Marcello; Piazzalonga, Simone; Hoffmann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to assess sexual function before and after cardiac rehabilitation in relation to medical variables. Methods. Analysis of patients participating in a 12-week exercise-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (OCR) between April 1999 and December 2007. Exercise capacity (ExC) and quality of life including sexual function were assessed before and after OCR. Results. Complete data were available in 896 male patients. No sexual activity at all was indicated by 23.1% at baseline and 21.8% after OCR, no problems with sexual activity by 40.8% at baseline and 38.6% after OCR. Patients showed an increase in specific problems (erectile dysfunction and lack of orgasm) from 18% to 23% (P < .0001) during OCR. We found the following independent positive and negative predictors of sexual problems after OCR: hyperlipidemia, age, CABG, baseline ExC and improvement of ExC, subjective physical and mental capacity, and sense of affiliation. Conclusions. Sexual dysfunction is present in over half of the patients undergoing OCR with no overall improvement during OCR. Age, CABG, low exercise capacity are independent predictors of sexual dysfunction after OCR.

  1. Association between Participation in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation and Self-Reported Receipt of Lifestyle Advice from a Healthcare Provider: Results of a Population-Based Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Natalie A; Inder, Kerry J; Ewald, Ben D; James, Erica L; Bowe, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that the odds of self-reported receipt of lifestyle advice from a health care provider will be lower among outpatient cardiac rehabilitation (OCR) nonattendees and nonreferred patients compared to OCR attendees. Logistic regression was used to analyse cross-sectional data provided by 65% (4971/7678) of patients aged 20 to 84 years discharged from public hospitals with a diagnosis indicating eligibility for OCR between 2002 and 2007. Among respondents, 71% (3518) and 55% (2724) recalled advice regarding physical activity and diet, respectively, while 88% (592/674) of smokers recalled quit advice. OCR attendance was low: 36% (1764) of respondents reported attending OCR, 11% (552) did not attend following referral, and 45% (2217) did not recall being invited. The odds of recalling advice regarding physical activity and diet were significantly lower among OCR nonattendees compared to attendees (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.21, 0.56 and OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.25, 0.44, resp.) and among nonreferred respondents compared to OCR attendees (OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.07, 0.15 and OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.14, 0.22, resp.). Patients hospitalised for coronary heart disease should be referred to OCR or a suitable alternative to improve recall of lifestyle advice that will reduce the risk of further coronary events.

  2. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, David W; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    The biology of aging and the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) overlap, with the effect that CVD is endemic in the growing population of older adults. Moreover, CVD in older adults is usually complicated by age-related complexities, including multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, and other intricacies that add to the risks of ambiguous symptoms, deconditioning, iatrogenesis, falls, disability, and other challenges. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive lifestyle program that can have particular benefit for older patients with cardiovascular conditions. Although CR was originally designed primarily as an exercise training program for younger adults after a myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass surgery, it has evolved as a comprehensive lifestyle program (promoting physical activity as well as education, diet, risk reduction, and adherence) for a broader range of CVD (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and valvular heart disease). It provides a valuable opportunity to address and moderate many of the challenges pertinent for the large and growing population of older adults with CVD. Cardiac rehabilitation promotes physical function (cardiorespiratory fitness as well as strength and balance) that helps overcome disease and deconditioning as well as related vulnerabilities such as disability, frailty, and falls. Similarly, CR facilitates education, monitoring, and guidance to reduce iatrogenesis and promote adherence. Furthermore, CR fosters cognition, socialization, and independence in older patients. Yet despite all its conceptual benefits, CR is significantly underused in older populations. This review discusses benefits and the paradoxical underuse of CR, as well as evolving models of care that may achieve greater application and efficacy.

  3. 42 CFR 414.1105 - Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation... HEALTH SERVICES Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) Services § 414.1105 Payment for Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facility (CORF) services. (a) Payment under...

  4. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  5. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  6. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  7. Pharmacist's role in an interdisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation team.

    PubMed

    Packard, Kathleen; Herink, Megan; Kuhlman, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of pharmacist and pharmacy student involvement with an interdisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation program in the outpatient setting. The study included 192 patients who were seen following discharge from an acute care hospital between June 2008 and September 2010. The pharmacy team educated patients on their medications, conducted medication reconciliation, and made patient and provider interventions when appropriate. The pharmacist met with the cardiac rehabilitation team before these sessions to identify areas of focus and concern. The team met again after the sessions to reconcile medication lists and identify areas for follow-up. Of the 192 patients seen, an intervention was initiated in 157 (81.8%), for a total of 467 interventions (mean 2.43 interventions/patient). Medication reconciliation interventions not requiring a physician response comprised 79.9% of total interventions, most commonly involving an over-the-counter medication not initially reported (18%). Seventy-six patient interventions and 18 provider interventions were also made; of these, 92% of the patient interventions were accepted, and 72% of the provider interventions were accepted. The most common patient intervention was changing the administration time of a medication (36.8%), and the most common provider intervention was avoidance of a significant drug interaction (33.3%). Pharmacists can play a vital role as part of an interdisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation team to ensure proper adherence to cardiac medications and patient safety through patient education and interventions.

  8. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... heart-lung transplant. (vii) For cardiac rehabilitation only, other cardiac conditions as specified...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac...

  9. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... heart-lung transplant. (vii) For cardiac rehabilitation only, other cardiac conditions as specified...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac...

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation. A Handbook for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brammell, H. L.; And Others

    Basic information about heart disease and functional capacity assessment and its application to activity/job counseling are presented in this handbook for vocational rehabilitation counselors. Sections include the following: impact of heart disease; basic anatomy and physiology (e.g., the heart, pulmonary circulation, causes of cardiac pain, and…

  11. Legal Aspects of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, William; Herbert, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A medical model is used to examine liability issues related to cardiac rehabilitation programs. Obtaining effective informed consent from patients, standardizing policies and procedures, and exercise prescription and monitoring are among the proposed elements of a risk management model for developing safe and legally defensible programs. (IAH)

  12. Health Literacy Predicts Cardiac Knowledge Gains in Cardiac Rehabilitation Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Colleen C.; Rawson, Katherine; Hughes, Joel W.; Waechter, Donna; Rosneck, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Health literacy is increasingly recognised as a potentially important patient characteristic related to patient education efforts. We evaluated whether health literacy would predict gains in knowledge after completion of patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Method: This was a re-post observational analysis study design based on…

  13. Home- and Hospital-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise: The Important Role of Physician Recommendation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Susan L; Dunn, L Maureen; Buursma, Madison P; Clark, Jacob A; Vander Berg, Lucas; DeVon, Holli A; Tintle, Nathan L

    2016-09-02

    Exercise reduces morbidity and mortality for patients with heart disease. Despite clear guidelines and known benefits, most cardiac patients do not meet current exercise recommendations. Physician endorsement positively affects patient participation in hospital-based Phase II cardiac rehabilitation programs, yet the importance of physician recommendation for home-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise is unknown. A prospective observational design was used to examine predictors of both home-based and Phase II rehabilitation exercise in a sample of 251 patients with coronary heart disease. Regression analyses were done to examine demographic and clinical characteristics, physical functioning, and patient's report of physician recommendation for exercise. Patients with a strong physician referral, who were married and older, were more likely to participate in Phase II exercise. Increased strength of physician recommendation was the unique predictor of home-based exercise. Further research is needed to examine how health professionals can motivate cardiac patients to exercise in home and outpatient settings.

  14. Cost and effectiveness assessment of cardiac rehabilitation for dialysis patients following coronary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijian; Zhang, Rebecca; Culler, Steven; Kutner, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis patients have a high risk of cardiovascular disease. In the general population, cardiac rehabilitation is recommended as a standard component of care and is covered by Medicare for patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Previous investigation demonstrated survival benefit of cardiac rehabilitation in dialysis patients. This study investigated its impact on Medicare expenditure and its cost effectiveness. A cohort of 4,324 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who initiated chronic hemodialysis and underwent CABG between 1998 and 2004 was selected from the United States Renal Data System. Cardiac rehabilitation was defined by Current Procedural Terminology codes for monitored and nonmonitored exercise in Medicare claims data. Medicare expenditure included inpatient and outpatient claims with cost adjusted to 1998 dollars. At 42 months of follow-up after a 6-month entry period following CABG hospitalization discharge, cardiac rehabilitation at baseline was associated with higher cumulative Medicare expenditure, incurring a statistically nonsignificant increment of $2,904 (95% CI: −7,028, 11,940). During the same period, cardiac rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer cumulative lifetime, having an incremental benefit of 76 days (95% CI: 22, 129). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $13,887 per year of life saved, suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation is highly cost-effective in ESRD patients following CABG. PMID:18650790

  15. Benefits of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Heart Failure Patients According to Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Koukoui, François; Desmoulin, Franck; Lairy, Gérard; Bleinc, Dominique; Boursiquot, Ludovic; Galinier, Michel; Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on the outcome of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) assessed by functional and clinical parameters. Treatment of chronic HF requires multidisciplinary approaches with a recognized role for CR. INCARD is a French study aimed at evaluating the benefits of sustainable CR in coronary (C) and noncoronary patients (NC) treated and educated during a 24-month period of follow-up. Prospective, monocentric patients with HF underwent inpatient physical training followed by a home-based program. Evaluations were performed at inclusion, discharge, 3 months after discharge, and subsequently every 6 months over the 24 months of outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 147 HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <40 were admitted to the CR center, 63 accepted to join INCARD (29 C and 34 NC). Although the C participants C having both an echocardiographic LVEF and an initially lower peak VO2, inpatient rehabilitation improved all functional parameters. Only NC showed an improved LVEF during the first 3 months of outpatient-follow-up. The main outcome of the outpatient rehabilitation was a trend toward stabilization of clinical and laboratory parameters with no significant difference between C and NC. This study confirms the benefits of initial HF inpatient rehabilitation and encourages prolonged outpatient monitoring. The results on functional parameters suggest exercise training should be conducted regardless of the HF etiology. PMID:25700319

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the blood plasma properties of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniążek, Anna; Czepas, Jan; Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna; Pawlicki, Lucjan

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise tolerance and general function. However, its effects on blood plasma in cardiac patients remain uncertain. Our aim was to examine the effect of comprehensive CR on the oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant plasma status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after cardiac interventions. Exercise-based rehabilitation was established as ergometer training, adjusted for individual patients' physical efficiency. Training was repeated three times a week for two months. The standard biochemical (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and metabolic parameters (peak oxygen uptake [VO2] and peak workload) were determined. We assessed plasma viscosity, lipid peroxidation, carbonyl compounds levels, glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) levels and the non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma in 12 patients with CAD before and after CR. Parameters were examined before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h later. We also compared morphological and biochemical parameters of blood, as well as other parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure (resting and exercise), VO2max and peak workload (W) before and after CR. Before CR, a significant decrease in GSH concentration was observed 1 h after exercise. Conversely, after CR, GSH, and ASC levels remained unchanged immediately after exercise. However, ASC increased after CR after exercise and 1 h later in comparison to before CR. There was a significant increase in ferric reduction ability of plasma immediately after exercise after CR, when compared with before CR. CR improved several blood biochemical parameters, peak VO2, induced an increase in systolic blood pressure peak, and patients' peak workload. After CR, improvements were detected in oxidative stress parameters, except in the level of carbonyls. These changes may contribute to the increased functional heart capacity and better tolerance to exercise and

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation past, present and future: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac Rehabilitation has evolved over the past decades from a simple monitoring for the safe return to physical activities to a multidisciplinary approach that focuses on patient education, individually tailored exercise training, modification of the risk factors and the overall well-being of the cardiac patients. It has been proven to be an effective tool for the care of the patients with heart disease. Recent research in cardiac rehabilitation has demonstrated that tremendous benefits can be derived from the optimal use of cardiac rehabilitation in patients with various cardiac pathologies including ischemic heart disease, heart failure and post heart surgery. The benefits of cardiac rehabilitation include mortality reduction, symptom relief, reduction in smoking and improved exercise tolerance, risk factors modification and the overall psychosocial wellbeing. Unfortunately, cardiac rehabilitation remains considerably underutilized mainly because of referral problems and poor enrollment. The development of alternate approaches and the use of transtelephonic and other means of monitoring and surveillance will help expand the utilization of cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:24282695

  18. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Search methods We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was 1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.11 (95% CI −0.35 to 0.13), as well

  19. Alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robyn A; Conway, Aaron; Poulsen, Vanessa; Keech, Wendy; Tirimacco, Rosy; Tideman, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hospital-based model of cardiac rehabilitation faces substantial challenges, such as cost and accessibility. These challenges have led to the development of alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation in recent years. The aim of this study was to identify and critique evidence for the effectiveness of these alternative models. A total of 22 databases were searched to identify quantitative studies or systematic reviews of quantitative studies regarding the effectiveness of alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation. Included studies were appraised using a Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool and the National Health and Medical Research Council's designations for Level of Evidence. The 83 included articles described interventions in the following broad categories of alternative models of care: multifactorial individualized telehealth, internet based, telehealth focused on exercise, telehealth focused on recovery, community- or home-based, and complementary therapies. Multifactorial individualized telehealth and community- or home-based cardiac rehabilitation are effective alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation, as they have produced similar reductions in cardiovascular disease risk factors compared with hospital-based programmes. While further research is required to address the paucity of data available regarding the effectiveness of alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation in rural, remote, and culturally and linguistically diverse populations, our review indicates there is no need to rely on hospital-based strategies alone to deliver effective cardiac rehabilitation. Local healthcare systems should strive to integrate alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation, such as brief telehealth interventions tailored to individual's risk factor profiles as well as community- or home-based programmes, in order to ensure there are choices available for patients that best fit their needs, risk factor profile, and preferences.

  20. Psychosocial components of cardiac recovery and rehabilitation attendance

    PubMed Central

    King, K; Humen, D; Smith, H; Phan, C; Teo, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relations between demographic factors, specific psychosocial factors, and cardiac rehabilitation attendance.
DESIGN—Cohort, repeated measures design.
SETTING—A large tertiary care centre in western Canada
PATIENTS—304 consecutive consenting patients discharged following acute myocardial infarction and/or coronary artery bypass graft surgery.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The Jenkins self-efficacy expectation scales and activity checklists of behaviour performance for maintaining health and role resumption, modified version of the self-motivation inventory, and the shortened social support scale.
RESULTS—Those who had higher role resumption behaviour performance scores at two weeks after discharge were significantly less likely to attend cardiac rehabilitation programmes. At six months after discharge, those who attended cardiac rehabilitation demonstrated higher health maintenance self-efficacy expectation and behaviour performance scores. Health maintenance self-efficacy expectation and behaviour performance improved over time. Women reported less social support but showed greater improvement in health maintenance self-efficacy expectation. Changes in self-efficacy scores were unrelated to—but changes in health maintenance behaviour performance scores were strongly associated with—cardiac rehabilitation attendance.
CONCLUSIONS—Cardiac patients and practitioners may have misconceptions about the mandate and potential benefits of rehabilitation programmes. Patients who resumed role related activities early and more completely apparently did not see the need to "rehabilitate" while those who attended cardiac rehabilitation programmes enhanced their secondary prevention behaviours.


Keywords: self-efficacy; motivation; social support; cardiac recovery; cardiac rehabilitation PMID:11179268

  1. [Optimal rehabilitation of patients with coronary heart disease in outpatient setting].

    PubMed

    Korzhenkov, N P; Kuzichkina, S F; Shcherbakova, N A; Kukhaleishvili, N R; Iarlykov, I I

    2012-01-01

    The problem of invalid rehabilitation in Russia is an important state task and dictates necessity of design of an effective state program of primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Common global practice of medico-social model is based on complex detailed medico-social aid. Rehabilitation of postmyocardial infarction patients consists of three phases (stages): hospital posthospital (readaptation) and postreconvalescent (supportive). The program includes physical, psychological and pharmacological rehabilitation. Departments of readaptation and medico-social rehabilitation provide effective conduction of all kinds of rehabilitation. The Moscow North-East Regional Administration has a rich experience in organization of departments of readaptation and medico-social rehabilitation. The departments practice an individual approach to the patients and work in a close contact with bureaus of medico-social commission of experts. Management of patients by cardiologist, rehabilitation specialist and outpatient clinic's physicians provides uninterrupted staged rehabilitation, timely correction of pharmacotherapy, early patient referral to invasive investigations and treatment of coronary heart disease. A course of rehabilitative measures lasts 2 months. Setting up departments of medico-social rehabilitation in outpatient clinics provides more effective use of money assigned by the state for social support of invalids.

  2. Are older patients’ cardiac rehabilitation needs being met?

    PubMed Central

    Tolmie, Elizabeth P; Lindsay, Grace M; Kelly, Tim; Tolson, Debbie; Baxter, Susan; Belcher, Philip R

    2009-01-01

    Aims. The primary aim of this study was to examine the needs of older people in relation to cardiac rehabilitation and to determine if these were currently being met. A secondary aim was to compare illness representations, quality of life and anxiety and depression in groups with different levels of attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Background. Coronary heart disease accounted for over seven million cardiovascular deaths globally in 2001. Associated deaths increase with age and are highest in those older than 65. Effective cardiac rehabilitation can assist independent function and maintain health but programme uptake rates are low. We have, therefore, focussed specifically on the older patient to determine reasons for the low uptake. Design. Mixed methods. Methods. A purposive sample of 31 older men and women (≥65 years) completed three questionnaires to determine illness representations, quality of life and anxiety and depression. They then underwent a brief clinical assessment and participated in a face-to-face audio-taped interview. Results. Quantitative: Older adults, who did not attend a cardiac rehabilitation programme, had significantly poorer personal control and depression scores (p < 0·01) and lower quality of life scores than those who had attended. Few achieved recommended risk factor reduction targets. Qualitative: The three main themes identified as reflecting the views and experiences of and attendance at the cardiac rehabilitation programme were: ‘The sensible thing to do’, ‘Assessing the impact’ and ‘Nothing to gain’. Conclusions. Irrespective of level of attendance, cardiac rehabilitation programmes are not meeting the needs of many older people either in terms of risk factor reduction or programme uptake. More appropriate programmes are needed. Relevance to clinical practice. Cardiac rehabilitation nurses are ideally placed to identify the rehabilitation needs of older people. Identifying these from the older

  3. Screening for obstructive sleep apnoea in cardiac rehabilitation: A position statement from the Australian Centre for Heart Health and the Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association.

    PubMed

    Le Grande, Michael R; Neubeck, Lis; Murphy, Barbara M; McIvor, Dawn; Lynch, Dianna; McLean, Helen; Jackson, Alun C

    2016-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is highly prevalent in acute coronary syndrome patients eligible for enrolment in cardiac rehabilitation programmes. This condition is an independent predictor of increased morbidity and comorbid conditions in the general population and can lead to an increase in major adverse cardiac events such as revascularization, heart failure and hospital readmission in cardiac patients. There is convincing evidence that treatments such as continuous positive airway pressure or mandibular advancement devices can successfully treat obstructive sleep apnoea and these conditions can be improved or negated resulting in improved cardiac rehabilitation outcomes and improved health related quality of life. Given the potential benefits of obstructive sleep apnoea treatment it would make sense to screen for this condition upon entry to out-patient cardiac rehabilitation programmes. A two-stage approach to screening is recommended, where patients are initially evaluated for the probability of having obstructive sleep apnoea using a brief questionnaire (The STOP-Bang) and then followed up with objective evaluation (portable home monitor or polysomnography) where necessary. Potential barriers to further referral and treatment could be partly mitigated by the training of cardiac rehabilitation staff in sleep disorders and screening.

  4. Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Craig Velozo, PhD, OTR ...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Craig Velozo, Ph.D., PT Andrea L. Behrman, Ph.D., OTR 5e. TASK NUMBER D. Michele Basso, Ed.D., PT E-Mail

  5. Best Practices for Counseling in Cardiac Rehabilitation Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheikh, Alia I.; Marotta, Sylvia A.

    2008-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and can affect individuals of all ages, gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. This article reviews the research on psychosocial interventions in cardiac rehabilitation programs and discusses the evolving set of best practices for counselors working in a new setting with people…

  6. ECG Monitoring in Cardiac Rehabilitation: Is It Needed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenland, Philip; Pomilla, Paul V.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the controversial use of continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring as a safety measure in cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs. Little evidence substantiates its value for all patients during exercise. In the absence of empirical evidence documenting the worth of this expensive procedure, it is recommended for use with high-risk…

  7. Multidisciplinary VA Cardiac Rehabilitation: Preliminary Results and Treatment Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Susan S.; And Others

    Initial studies have suggested that a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) may improve the physical and psychological functioning of participants. However, these studies have generally addressed a relatively young group of employed adult males. Three studies were designed to target an older, generally retired Veterans Administration population for…

  8. Symptoms Versus Neurocognition as Predictors of Change in Life Skills in Schizophrenia after Outpatient Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Matthew M.; Wexler, Bruce E.; Fujimoto, Marco; Dana, S.; Shagan; Seltzer, James C.

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of literature has shown that neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia account for 20–60% of the variance in measures of outcome, and in many studies, are more closely related to outcome than symptoms (Green et al., 2000; 2004). Most of these studies have been cross-sectional, few longitudinal studies have investigated the degree to which neurocognition and symptoms predict ability to benefit from outpatient rehabilitation, and no longitudinal studies use measures of everyday life-skills that are performance-based. In the current study we investigated the relationship between five measures of neurocognitive function, crystallized verbal ability, visual sustained vigilance, verbal learning, problem-solving, and processing speed, and two measures of symptoms, total positive and negative symptoms, and change on a performance-based measure of everyday life-skills after a year of outpatient rehabilitation. Rehabilitation consisted of both psychosocial and cognitive interventions. Forty-six patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were studied. Results of a linear regression model revealed that verbal learning predicted a significant amount of the variance in change in performance-based measures of everyday life skills after outpatient rehabilitation, even when variance for all other variables in the model was accounted for. Measures of crystallized verbal ability, sustained visual vigilance, problem-solving, processing speed and symptoms were not linked to functional status change. These findings emphasize the importance of verbal learning for benefiting from psychosocial and cognitive rehabilitation interventions, and suggest the development of alternative rehabilitation strategies for those who do not benefit. PMID:18495433

  9. Executive dysfunction in chronic brain-injured patients: assessment in outpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Danielle H E; Spikman, Jacoba M; Rietveld, Antonius C M; Fasotti, Luciano

    2009-10-01

    In this study 81 chronic brain-injured patients referred for outpatient rehabilitation, who complained of executive impairments in daily life situations and were observed by proxies and therapists to have such problems, were assessed using various tests and questionnaires of executive functioning, such as the BADS and the DEX Questionnaire. The main purpose was to examine the sensitivity of these instruments in this particular group of patients. The tests and the DEX were also administered to healthy controls to investigate which of the instruments discriminate optimally between patients and controls. The results indicate that the tests as well as the questionnaires were sensitive to the executive problems of the patients. There were no significant differences between DEX ratings of patients, proxies and therapists. This suggests that patients who were eligible for outpatient rehabilitation showed relatively intact awareness into their executive problems. A specific combination of three "open-ended" tests and the DEX contributed significantly to the prediction of group membership.

  10. A Preliminary Study of Rehabilitation Needs of In-patients and Out-patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gandotra, Sachin; Paul, Sarita E.; Daniel, Mercian; Kumar, Krishan; Raj, Harsh A.; Sujeetha, B.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of needs of patients with schizophrenia permits practitioners to prioritize, formulate and implement rehabilitation goals. Negative symptoms have been shown to present greater obstacles to effective rehabilitation. The study compared the rehabilitation needs of in and out-patients with schizophrenia, and its relationship with negative symptoms. Thirty each of out patients and short term in-patients who fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia were recruited for the study. Patients currently exhibiting severe unmanageable psychoses and depression were excluded. Tools used for the study were DSM-IV-TR, Rehabilitation Needs Assessment Schedule, SANS, HDRS, BPRS, and UKU. Significant difference across the groups were observed as far as needs regarding requirement of help from a voluntary agency, employment, accommodation, leisure activities and help for family was concerned. Moreover, negative symptoms significantly correlated with rehabilitation needs among both groups of patients. The study also elicited family′s expectations of their patients regarding their rehabilitation needs. Further, the implications of the association between some negative symptoms and the felt needs of the patients in their rehabilitation were discussed. A full spectrum of functional behaviours needs to be assessed soon after patients recover from their most recent exacerbation and suitable interventions need to be planned. PMID:21224906

  11. Burn Rehabilitation Therapists Competency Tool-Version 2: An Expansion to Include Long-Term Rehabilitation and Outpatient Care.

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Forbes, Lisa; Lorello, David; Benavides, Lynne; Calvert, Catherine; Hsu, Shu-Chuan Chen; Chouinard, Annick; Godleski, Matthew; Helm, Phala; Holavanahalli, Radha K; Kemp-Offenberg, Jennifer; Ruiz, Catherine E; Shon, Rachel; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Shetler, Melinda; Suman, Oscar E; Nedelec, Bernadette

    The Burn Rehabilitation Therapist Competency Tool (BRTCT) was developed in 2011 to define core knowledge and skill sets that are central to the job performance of occupational and physical therapists working with burn patients during acute hospitalization and initial rehabilitation. It was the first national effort to provide standards that burn centers could use for the training and evaluation of a BRT performance. The American Burn Association Rehabilitation Committee recently expanded the tool to include long-term rehabilitation and outpatient care in order to more fully represent all of the stages of care in which patients with burn injury receive therapy. Thirty-six burn centers contributed competencies, 17 rehabilitation experts participated in a systematic Delphi questionnaire process, and eight representatives from seven additional burn centers validated the tool. The revised BRTCT, called the BRTCT-2, includes four new practice domains and 28 new competency statements. The expanded tool provides a common framework of standards for performance for occupational and physical therapists working with patients throughout the full spectrum of burn care.

  12. The impact of outpatient rehabilitation on quality of life in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Patti, Francesco; Ciancio, Maria Rita; Reggio, Ester; Lopes, Rossella; Palermo, Filippo; Cacopardo, Manuela; Reggio, Arturo

    2002-08-01

    It is well accepted that rehabilitative treatment can be effective in reducing disability and optimizing quality of life (QoL) of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a comprehensive outpatient rehabilitative treatment on QoL in patients suffering from MS. We selected 111 patients from a sample of 407 patients who had consecutively entered the MS Center of Catania (which is located in southern Italy) in 1998. Fifty-eight were randomly assigned to the study treatment and 53 to a waiting list (control treatment). Kurtzke's EDSS and quality of Life (QoL)were the primary endpoints. QoL was measured with the generic multi-item SF-36 scales. We also used: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression, the Tempelaar Social Experience Check-list (SET) for social activities and the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS). The study treatment group was treated for 6 consecutive weeks, 6 days a week with a comprehensive rehabilitative outpatient model. The control treatment group was in a waiting list and was trained to self-exercises at home. EDSS remained unchanged in both groups. All health related QoL domains significantly improved in the study treatment (p < 0.001 in physical functioning, role physical, bodily pain, general health, and social functioning; p < 0.05 in vitality, role emotional and mental health). FIS, SET and BDI also improved significantly after the rehabilitative treatment in the study group (p < 0.001). The results of this study confirm the effectiveness of a short comprehensive outpatient model of rehabilitative treatment in people with MS and in particular in their QoL.

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation and risk reduction: time to "rebrand and reinvigorate".

    PubMed

    Sandesara, Pratik B; Lambert, Cameron T; Gordon, Neil F; Fletcher, Gerald F; Franklin, Barry A; Wenger, Nanette K; Sperling, Laurence

    2015-02-03

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) continues to increase annually in the United States along with its associated enormous costs. A multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and risk reduction program is an essential component of ASCVD prevention and management. Despite the strong evidence for CR in the secondary prevention of ASCVD, it remains vastly underutilized due to significant barriers. The current model of CR delivery is unsustainable and needs significant improvement to provide cost-effective, patient-centered, comprehensive secondary ASCVD prevention.

  14. Development of an IRT-based Short Form to Assess Applied Cognitive Function in Outpatient Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Christine M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Coster, Wendy J.; Haley, Stephen M.; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Item response theory (IRT) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT) methods allow the development of a large calibrated item bank from which different subsets of questions can be selected for administration and scored on a common scale. Our objective was to develop an outpatient rehabilitation self-report short form for the Activity Measure for Post-Acute Care Applied Cognition item bank. Design Using data from a convenience sample of 235 rehabilitation outpatients, item content and IRT-based test information function parameters were employed in item selection. Internal consistency reliability, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC), and percent at the lowest (floor) and highest (ceiling) scores were evaluated for the short form and full item bank. Results A 15-item short form was developed. The internal consistency of the short form was 0.86. The ICC3,1 for the short form and item bank was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.94, 0.98). No floor effects were noted, and ceiling effects were 27.66 % (short form) and 26.38% (full item bank). Conclusions The Applied Cognition outpatient short form demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties and provides a bridge to IRT-based measurement for settings where point of care computing is not available. PMID:26135369

  15. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Heran, Balraj S; Chen, Jenny MH; Ebrahim, Shah; Moxham, Tiffany; Oldridge, Neil; Rees, Karen; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) worldwide is one of great concern to patients and healthcare agencies alike. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation aims to restore patients with heart disease to health. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (exercise training alone or in combination with psychosocial or educational interventions) on mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life of patients with CHD. Search methods RCTs have been identified by searching CENTRAL, HTA, and DARE (using The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009), as well as MEDLINE (1950 to December 2009), EMBASE (1980 to December 2009), CINAHL (1982 to December 2009), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to December 2009). Selection criteria Men and women of all ages who have had myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), or who have angina pectoris or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected and data extracted independently by two reviewers. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results This systematic review has allowed analysis of 47 studies randomising 10,794 patients to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation or usual care. In medium to longer term (i.e. 12 or more months follow-up) exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduced overall and cardiovascular mortality [RR 0.87 (95% CI 0.75, 0.99) and 0.74 (95% CI 0.63, 0.87), respectively], and hospital admissions [RR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51, 0.93)] in the shorter term (< 12 months follow-up) with no evidence of heterogeneity of effect across trials. Cardiac rehabilitation did not reduce the risk of total MI, CABG or PTCA. Given both the heterogeneity in outcome measures and methods of reporting findings, a meta-analysis was not undertaken for health-related quality of life. In seven out of 10 trials reporting health

  16. [First Results of Analysis of Russian Part of the European Register on Cardiac Rehabilitation EuroCaReD (European Cardiac Rehabilitation Database)].

    PubMed

    Pogosova, N V; Sokolova, O Iu; Iufereva, Iu M; Osipova, I V; Riamzina, I N

    2015-01-01

    The joint European Registry of patients with cardiovascular diseases participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs (European Cardiac Rehabilitation Database, EuroCaReD) is conducted in collaboration between the ESC and EACPR). It's main goals were to improve the routine use of cardiac rehabilitation, to develop joint standards for cardiac rehabilitation in all European countries and evidence based rehabilitation programs and to monitor any changes. In the EuroCaReD registry participated a total of 44 centers from 13 countries, including 3 centers from Russia, which enrolled 151 patients during 2010-2012. This paper is comparing the baseline demographics, clinical data and risk factors in Russian patients versus the rest of Europe. It was shown that cardiac rehabilitation patients in Russia, as in the whole cohort, are predominantly male. Elderly patients from Russia were 3 times less likely to be referred for rehabilitation than in Europe. Unlike the whole cohort Russian patients were almost never sent to rehabilitation because of heart failure or stable angina. Likewise the whole Europe Russian patients had an average of 3 cardiovascular risk factors before rehabilitation, but with some national differences in their prevalence and severity.

  17. [Heart to heart: rehabilitation of sexuality in cardiac patients].

    PubMed

    Ben-Zion, Itzhak; Shiber, Asher

    2006-05-01

    Heart disease in general and acute myocardial infarction involve sexual dysfunction caused by anxiety and by the same physiological problems that caused the heart problem, namely endothelial dysfunction. Unfortunately, many patients and their spouses hesitate to approach their doctor on issues related to their sexual concerns. Furthermore, the medical team in general and doctors in particular are irresolute in bringing up sexual issues when dealing with overall cardiac rehabilitation. Although patients can safely resume sexual activity at some point, only one in four actually return to their previous level of sexual activity. If we really want to assist in the rehabilitation of patients we have to advise them about resuming their sex life. Solving sexual problems can serve as a tool in primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of cardiac problems, as it can be used as an "arm swinger" for changing one's life habits. We urge increased research and treatment of sexual problems, in cardiac patients in general and in female patients in particular.

  18. PATHway: Decision Support in Exercise Programmes for Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Filos, Dimitris; Triantafyllidis, Andreas; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Buys, Roselien; Cornelissen, Véronique; Budts, Werner; Walsh, Deirdre; Woods, Catherine; Moran, Kieran; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitation is important for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) to improve health outcomes and quality of life. However, adherence to current exercise programmes in cardiac rehabilitation is limited. We present the design and development of a Decision Support System (DSS) for telerehabilitation, aiming to enhance exercise programmes for CVD patients through ensuring their safety, personalising the programme according to their needs and performance, and motivating them toward meeting their physical activity goals. The DSS processes data originated from a Microsoft Kinect camera, a blood pressure monitor, a heart rate sensor and questionnaires, in order to generate a highly individualised exercise programme and improve patient adherence. Initial results within the EU-funded PATHway project show the potential of our approach.

  19. Factors Affecting Length of Stay in Adult Outpatient Physical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Christina; Turgeon-Provost, Félix; Dagenais, Kristin; Roy-Mathie, Bianca; Aggban, Martina; Preuss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify factors affecting length of stay (LOS) for adults participating in outpatient physical or occupational therapy programmes. Method: A scoping review of the literature was conducted using the Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Library databases. Results: A total of 19 articles were retained from the search, and 2 additional articles were retrieved from grey literature (i.e., non-published sources). Personal factors affecting LOS are age and sex, both of which had inconsistent effects on LOS, and communication, language, physical, and cognitive difficulties, for which higher levels of function were generally associated with shorter LOS. Institutional factors affecting LOS were location, interdisciplinary communication, number of disciplines involved, and type of rehabilitation setting. Finally, two clinician-related factors—fewer treatment goals and a selection of evidence-informed treatment techniques—were associated with shorter LOS. Conclusions: Research on factors affecting adult outpatient rehabilitation LOS is limited and inconsistent. A preliminary list of LOS factors was produced, but this topic should be further explored with the collaboration of researchers and clinical institutions. PMID:27504032

  20. Tablet computers to support outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ringbaek, Thomas J.; Lavesen, Marie; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background A minicomputer (tablet) with instructions and a training diary has the potential of facilitating adherence to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Objective To evaluate the effect of adding a tablet to a classic outpatient PR programme for COPD patients. Methods A total of 115 patients participated in a 7- to 10-week outpatient PR programme in groups of 10–12 individuals. Half of the groups were assigned to PR plus a tablet (tablet group) and the other groups were assigned to PR only (controls). Primary effect parameters were endurance shuttle walk time (ESWT) and disease-specific health status (COPD Assessment Test=CAT). Results The change in ESWT was significantly better in the control group (mean 167 sec) compared with the tablet group (mean 51 sec) (p<0.01), whereas the change in CAT score did not differ significantly between the two groups (−0.6 vs. −2.3) (p=0.17). Conclusions Compared with usual PR, no significant improvements were seen in the group equipped with the tablet after 7–10 weeks of rehabilitation. Future studies should focus on long-term effects. PMID:27225598

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation and mortality reduction after myocardial infarction: the emperor's new clothes? Evidence in favour of cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Robert; Doherty, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    This piece highlights the strength of evidence in favour of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and postulates that the emperor is indeed well dressed. The reason why a single negative trial, in the UK, has caused such hullabaloo in the literature and clinical practice is examined against overwhelming evidence from over 40 positive randomised controlled trials. The lack of motivation to promote lifestyle change and the role of patients in determining outcome is also explored. To conclude, we set the scene for the final chapter of this story by outlining what needs to be done to answer the question about the real-world effectiveness of CR.

  2. Automatic Assessment of Socioeconomic Impact on Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Mireia; Subirats, Laia; Ceccaroni, Luigi; Maroto, José María; de Pablo, Carmen; Miralles, Felip

    2013-01-01

    Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) and Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs), which capture life expectancy and quality of the remaining life-years, are applied in a new method to measure socioeconomic impacts related to health. A 7-step methodology estimating the impact of health interventions based on DALYs, QALYs and functioning changes is presented. It relates the latter (1) to the EQ-5D-5L questionnaire (2) to automatically calculate the health status before and after the intervention (3). This change of status is represented as a change in quality of life when calculating QALYs gained due to the intervention (4). In order to make an economic assessment, QALYs gained are converted to DALYs averted (5). Then, by inferring the cost/DALY from the cost associated to the disability in terms of DALYs lost (6) and taking into account the cost of the action, cost savings due to the intervention are calculated (7) as an objective measure of socioeconomic impact. The methodology is implemented in Java. Cases within the framework of cardiac rehabilitation processes are analyzed and the calculations are based on 200 patients who underwent different cardiac-rehabilitation processes. Results show that these interventions result, on average, in a gain in QALYs of 0.6 and a cost savings of 8,000 €. PMID:24284349

  3. Home cardiac rehabilitation for congestive heart failure: a nursing case management approach.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, B A

    1999-01-01

    As the only major cardiovascular disease increasing in incidence and prevalence, congestive heart failure (CHF) is a major health threat. Progression of the disease often leads to severe disability and requires intensive medical and psychological management. Cardiac rehabilitation for CHF can improve a patient's functional ability, alleviate activity-related symptoms, improve quality of life, and restore and maintain physiological, psychological, and social status. The expansion of home care services and advances in technology allow cardiac rehabilitation to take place in the patient's home. Because of their training in health promotion and prevention, assessment, and coordination of services, nurses are the ideal providers of comprehensive home cardiac rehabilitation. Financially, physically, and psychologically beneficial for CHF patients and their families, home cardiac rehabilitation is also cost-effective for society. This article substantiates the benefits of home cardiac rehabilitation for patients with CHF and explains why nurses are the ideal case managers for such programs.

  4. Reference values for the incremental shuttle walk test in patients with cardiovascular disease entering exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Fernando M F; Almodhy, Meshal; Pepera, Garyfalia; Stasinopoulos, Dimitrios M; Sandercock, Gavin R H

    2017-01-01

    The incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) is used to assess functional capacity of patients entering cardiac rehabilitation. Factors such as age and sex account for a proportion of the variance in test performance in healthy individuals but there are no reference values for patients with cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to produce reference values for the ISWT. Participants were n = 548 patients referred to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation who underwent a clinical examination and performed the ISWT. We used regression to identify predictors of performance and produced centile values using the generalised additive model for location, scale and shape model. Men walked significantly further than women (395 ± 165 vs. 269 ± 118 m; t = 9.5, P < 0.001) so data were analysed separately by sex. Age (years) was the strongest predictor of performance in men (β = -5.9; 95% CI: -7.1 to -4.6 m) and women (β = -4.8; 95% CI: -6.3 to 3.3). Centile curves demonstrated a broadly linear decrease in expected ISWT values in males (25-85 years) and a more curvilinear trend in females. Patients entering cardiac rehabilitation present with highly heterogeneous ISWT values. Much of the variance in performance can be explained by patients' age and sex. Comparing absolute values with age-and sex-specific reference values may aid interpretation of ISWT performance during initial patient assessment at entry to cardiac rehabilitation.

  5. The experiences of patients undertaking a 'virtual' cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Banner, Davina; Lear, Scott; Kandola, Daman; Singer, Joel; Horvat, Dan; Bates, Joanna; Ignaszewski, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRP) are medically supervised, multidisciplinary programs that provide secondary prevention aimed at addressing risk factors and improving lifestyle behaviours for patients following an acute cardiac event. CRPs have been demonstrated to be a cost-effective and evidence-based mechanism to improve patient outcomes, but despite the known benefits of these programs, uptake remains poor. Poor attendance has been linked to many factors, but geographical accessibility is a key concern, since many CRPs are limited to hospitals in urban areas. The widespread availability of the Internet has made it possible to provide virtual health services to populations that may have previously been hard to access. This paper examines the qualitative findings from a 16-month mixed methods randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a virtual CRP (vCRP). The vCRP was revealed to be an accessible, appropriate, convenient and effective way to deliver cardiac rehabilitation services, with patients experiencing both clinical improvements and a high level of satisfaction. To understand the experience of patients undertaking the vCRP, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 22 participants. An analysis of the qualitative interviews revealed that the vCRP improved participants' access to healthcare professionals, supported them to make healthy choices, and enhanced feelings of accountability due to greater surveillance. Barriers to participation, such as computer literacy, and general perceptions of a vCRP were also examined. Further investigation into the use and long-term effectiveness of virtual programs across a broader range of healthcare settings is warranted, particularly in those with multiple chronic diseases and those located in rural and remote communities.

  6. Exercise testing in cardiac rehabilitation. Exercise prescription and beyond.

    PubMed

    Williams, M A

    2001-08-01

    The prescription of exercise, either as a part of a formal exercise training program or as a means to increase physical activity in general, has been and will remain a primary component of cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programming. Wherever possible, this prescription should be based on a recent exercise test that documents the cardiac patient's functional capacity, cardiac and hemodynamic responses to exercise, and signs and symptoms associated with exertion. Clearly the prescription of exercise and suggestions for increasing levels of physical activity must be based on accepted principles of exercise physiology and expected training responses. Nonetheless, the art of exercise prescription should guarantee flexible methodologies to meet the specific needs of each individual patient. Although the patient must accept ultimate responsibility for participation, the clinician bears the burden of continually attempting to reinforce the importance of increasing caloric expenditure and motivating patients to initiate and commit to long-term participation in a safe and appropriately designed program of exercise and increasing physical activity.

  7. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs’ exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-01-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period. PMID:28349037

  8. Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs' exercise therapy for patients undergoing cardiac surgery: National Korean Questionnaire Survey.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yong Gon; Jang, Mi Ja; Park, Won Hah; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Sung, Jidong

    2017-02-01

    Inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (ICR) has been commonly conducted after cardiac surgery in many countries, and has been reported a lots of results. However, until now, there is inadequacy of data on the status of ICR in Korea. This study described the current status of exercise therapy in ICR that is performed after cardiac surgery in Korean hospitals. Questionnaires modified by previous studies were sent to the departments of thoracic surgery of 10 hospitals in Korea. Nine replies (response rate 90%) were received. Eight nurses and one physiotherapist completed the questionnaire. Most of the education on wards after cardiac surgery was conducted by nurses. On postoperative day 1, four sites performed sitting on the edge of bed, sit to stand, up to chair, and walking in the ward. Only one site performed that exercise on postoperative day 2. One activity (stairs up and down) was performed on different days at only two sites. Patients received education preoperatively and predischarge for preventing complications and reducing muscle weakness through physical inactivity. The results of the study demonstrate that there are small variations in the general care provided by nurses after cardiac surgery. Based on the results of this research, we recommended that exercise therapy programs have to conduct by exercise specialists like exercise physiologists or physiotherapists for patients in hospitalization period.

  9. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heewon; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone’s built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone’s built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient’s HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis. PMID:27551969

  10. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Galve, Enrique; Cordero, Alberto; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Fácila, Lorenzo; Mazón, Pilar; Alegría, Eduardo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; García-Porrero, Esteban; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2015-02-01

    As in other fields, understanding of vascular risk and rehabilitation is constantly improving. The present review of recent epidemiological update shows how far we are from achieving good risk factor control: in diet and nutrition, where unhealthy and excessive societal consumption is clearly increasing the prevalence of obesity; in exercise, where it is difficult to find a balance between benefit and risk, despite systemization efforts; in smoking, where developments center on programs and policies, with the electronic cigarette seeming more like a problem than a solution; in lipids, where the transatlantic debate between guidelines is becoming a paradigm of the divergence of views in this extensively studied area; in hypertension, where a nonpharmacological alternative (renal denervation) has been undermined by the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 setback, forcing a deep reassessment; in diabetes mellitus, where the new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors and glucagon like peptide 1 analogues have contributed much new information and a glimpse of the future of diabetes treatment, and in cardiac rehabilitation, which continues to benefit from new information and communication technologies and where clinical benefit is not hindered by advanced diseases, such as heart failure. Our summary concludes with the update in elderly patients, whose treatment criteria are extrapolated from those of younger patients, with the present review clearly indicating that should not be the case.

  11. Cardiac risk stratification in cardiac rehabilitation programs: a review of protocols

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anne Kastelianne França; Barbosa, Marianne Penachini da Costa de Rezende; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda Barbosa; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2014-01-01

    Objective Gather and describe general characteristics of different protocols of risk stratification for cardiac patients undergoing exercise. Methods We conducted searches in LILACS, IBECS, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and SciELO electronic databases, using the following descriptors: Cardiovascular Disease, Rehabilitation Centers, Practice Guideline, Exercise and Risk Stratification in the past 20 years. Results Were selected eight studies addressing methods of risk stratification in patients undergoing exercise. Conclusion None of the methods described could cover every situation the patient can be subjected to; however, they are essential to exercise prescription. PMID:25140477

  12. Getting better together? Opportunities and limitations for technology-facilitated social support in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Maitland, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Social support has long been positively correlated with cardiac outcomes. However, sources of tension surrounding peer-involvement in the period following acute cardiac events are well documented. Informed by a previous study of patient perspectives of peer-involvement in cardiac rehabilitation, this paper draws from the cardiac and computing literature to provide actionable insights into how technology could be designed to promote appropriate peer-involvement and the challenges that may be faced when designing technologies to support the unsupported.

  13. The Canadian Cardiac Rehabilitation Registry: Inaugural Report on the Status of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L.; Parsons, Trisha L.; Heise, Kristal; Bacon, Simon L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. There are over 200 Cardiovascular Rehabilitation (CR) programs in Canada, providing services to more than 50,000 new patients annually. The objective of this study was to describe the impact of CR in Canada. Methods. A retrospective analysis of Canadian CR Registry data is presented. There were 12 programs participating, with 4546 CR participants. Results. The average wait time between patient referral and CR admission was 68 ± 64 days. Participants were 66.3 ± 11.5 years old, 71% male, and 82% White. The three leading referral events were coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention, and acute coronary syndrome. At discharge, data were available for ~90% of participants. Significant improvements in blood pressure (systolic pre-CR 123.5 ± 17.0, post-CR 121.5 ± 15.8 mmHg; p < .001), lipids, adiposity, and exercise capacity (peak METs pre-CR 6.5 ± 2.8, post-CR 7.2 ± 3.1; p < .001) were observed. However, target attainment for some risk factors was suboptimal. Conclusions. This report provides the first snapshot of the beneficial effects of CR in Canada. Not all patients are equally represented in these programs, however, leaving room for more referral of diverse patients. Greater attainment of risk reduction targets should be pursued. PMID:26357574

  14. Discipline and resistance: order and disorder in a cardiac rehabilitation clinic.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Elizabeth E

    2005-04-01

    The author of this article offers an analysis of cardiac rehabilitation based on fieldwork conducted in two cardiac rehabilitation clinics. Disciplinary power is exercised through confessional, disciplinary, and surveillance technologies of cardiac rehabilitation. Through her analysis, the author shows how clients adhere to but also challenge agendas of rehabilitation. Transgressing, complaining about, and clowning despite the rules and regimens of the clinic, clients actively create and negotiate the social world of the clinic. Order and disorder prevail, as the scope of the medical gaze is contingent and tenuous. The analysis reveals pleasurable and productive possibilities experienced by clients and describes enabling bodily, self, and social transformations made possible by the disciplinary, confessional, and surveillance technologies of rehabilitation.

  15. Comparison of Patient Education Methods: Effects on Knowledge of Cardiac Rehabilitation Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Julie Jepsen

    1996-01-01

    Patient education programs for persons undergoing cardiac surgery related to knowledge of cardiac rehabilitation principles were conducted with either traditional (n=49) or collaborative (n=47) educational interventions. The two methods produced similar levels of knowledge, but significant differences appeared depending on whether subjects had…

  16. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Galve, Enrique; Alegría, Eduardo; Cordero, Alberto; Fácila, Lorenzo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Mazón, Pilar; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease develops in a slow and subclinical manner over decades, only to manifest suddenly and unexpectedly. The role of prevention is crucial, both before and after clinical appearance, and there is ample evidence of the effectiveness and usefulness of the early detection of at-risk individuals and lifestyle modifications or pharmacological approaches. However, these approaches require time, perseverance, and continuous development. The present article reviews the developments in 2013 in epidemiological aspects related to prevention, includes relevant contributions in areas such as diet, weight control methods (obesity is now considered a disease), and physical activity recommendations (with warnings about the risk of strenuous exercise), deals with habit-related psychosocial factors such as smoking, provides an update on emerging issues such as genetics, addresses the links between cardiovascular disease and other pathologies such as kidney disease, summarizes the contributions of new, updated guidelines (3 of which have recently been released on topics of considerable clinical importance: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease), analyzes the pharmacological advances (largely mediocre except for promising lipid-related results), and finishes by outlining developments in the oft-neglected field of cardiac rehabilitation. This article provides a briefing on controversial issues, presents interesting and somewhat surprising developments, updates established knowledge with undoubted application in clinical practice, and sheds light on potential future contributions.

  17. Availability of Outpatient Rehabilitation Services and Barriers to Care for Vulnerable Populations after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Megan; Jimenez, Nathalia; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Willis, Margaret; Baron, Kate; Giordano, Jessica; Crawley, Deborah; Rivara, Frederick P.; Jaffe, Kenneth M.; Ebel, Beth E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore associations between English proficiency, insurance status, outpatient rehabilitation service availability and travel time for children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design We used an ecologic cross-sectional design. Data were analyzed from a cohort of 82 children with moderate to severe TBI and rehabilitation providers in Washington State. Main measures included availability and travel time to services. Results Fewer than 20% of providers accepted children with Medicaid and provided language interpretation. Mental health services were most limited. Adjusted for median household income, multilingual service availability was lowest in counties with greater language diversity; for every 10% increase in persons >5 years old speaking a language other than English at home, there was a 34% decrease in availability of multilingual services (PR=0.66; 95%; CI:0.48-0.90). Adjusted for education and Medicaid status, children from Spanish-speaking families had significantly longer travel times to services (mean=16 additional minutes to mental health; 9 to other therapies). Conclusions Children in households with limited English proficiency and Medicaid faced significant barriers in availability and proximity of outpatient rehabilitation services. Innovative service strategies are needed to equitably improve availability of rehabilitation for children with TBI. Similar studies in other regions will inform our understanding of the scope of these disparities. PMID:26259055

  18. Drive time to cardiac rehabilitation: at what point does it affect utilization?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A 30 minute drive time threshold has often been cited as indicative of accessible health services. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a chronic disease management program designed to enhance and maintain cardiovascular health, and geographic barriers to utilization are often cited. The purpose of this study was to empirically test the drive time threshold for CR utilization. Methods A prospective study, using a multi-level design of coronary artery disease outpatients nested within 97 cardiologists. Participants completed a baseline sociodemographic survey, and reported CR referral, enrollment and participation in a second survey 9 months later. CR utilization was verified with CR sites. Geographic information systems were used to generate drive times at 60, 80 and 100% of the speed limit to the closest CR site from participants' homes, to take into consideration various traffic conditions. Bivariate analysis was used to test for differences in CR referral, enrollment and degree of participation by drive time. Logistic regression was used to test drive time increments where significant differences were found. Results Drive times were generated for 1209 outpatients. Overall, CR referral was verified for 523 (43.3%) outpatients, with verified enrollment for 444 (36.7%) participating in a mean of 86.4 ± 25.7% of prescribed sessions. There were significant differences in CR referral and enrollment by drive time (ps < .01), but not degree of participation. Logistic regression analysis (ps < .001) revealed that the drive time threshold at 80% of the posted speed limit for physician referral may be 60 minutes (OR = .26, 95% CI: 0.13-0.55), and the threshold for patient CR enrollment may also be 60 minutes (OR = .11, 95% CI: 0.04-0.33). Conclusions Physicians may be taking geography into consideration when referring patients to CR. Empirical consideration also reveals that patients are significantly less likely to enroll in CR where they must drive 60 minutes or

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation delivery model for low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Sherry L; Turk-Adawi, Karam I; Contractor, Aashish; Atrey, Alison; Campbell, Norm; Derman, Wayne; Melo Ghisi, Gabriela L; Oldridge, Neil; Sarkar, Bidyut K; Yeo, Tee Joo; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Mendis, Shanthi; Oh, Paul; Hu, Dayi; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease is a global epidemic, which is largely preventable. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is demonstrated to be cost-effective and efficacious in high-income countries. CR could represent an important approach to mitigate the epidemic of cardiovascular disease in lower-resource settings. The purpose of this consensus statement was to review low-cost approaches to delivering the core components of CR, to propose a testable model of CR which could feasibly be delivered in middle-income countries. Methods A literature review regarding delivery of each core CR component, namely: (1) lifestyle risk factor management (ie, physical activity, diet, tobacco and mental health), (2) medical risk factor management (eg, lipid control, blood pressure control), (3) education for self-management and (4) return to work, in low-resource settings was undertaken. Recommendations were developed based on identified articles, using a modified GRADE approach where evidence in a low-resource setting was available, or consensus where evidence was not. Results Available data on cost of CR delivery in low-resource settings suggests it is not feasible to deliver CR in low-resource settings as is delivered in high-resource ones. Strategies which can be implemented to deliver all of the core CR components in low-resource settings were summarised in practice recommendations, and approaches to patient assessment proffered. It is suggested that CR be adapted by delivery by non-physician healthcare workers, in non-clinical settings. Conclusions Advocacy to achieve political commitment for broad delivery of adapted CR services in low-resource settings is needed. PMID:27181874

  20. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François; Heuschmann, Peter; Hoffmann, Uwe; Verschuren, Monique; Halcox, Julian; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Saner, Hugo; Wood, David; Piepoli, Massimo F; Corrà, Ugo; Benzer, Werner; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Dendale, Paul; Gaita, Dan; McGee, Hannah; Mendes, Miguel; Niebauer, Josef; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac patients after an acute event and/or with chronic heart disease deserve special attention to restore their quality of life and to maintain or improve functional capacity. They require counselling to avoid recurrence through a combination of adherence to a medication plan and adoption of a healthy lifestyle. These secondary prevention targets are included in the overall goal of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Cardiac rehabilitation can be viewed as the clinical application of preventive care by means of a professional multi-disciplinary integrated approach for comprehensive risk reduction and global long-term care of cardiac patients. The CR approach is delivered in tandem with a flexible follow-up strategy and easy access to a specialized team. To promote implementation of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation, the CR Section of the EACPR (European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation) has recently completed a Position Paper, entitled 'Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: A condition-oriented approach'. Components of multidisciplinary CR for seven clinical presentations have been addressed. Components include patient assessment, physical activity counselling, exercise training, diet/nutritional counselling, weight control management, lipid management, blood pressure monitoring, smoking cessation, and psychosocial management. Cardiac rehabilitation services are by definition multi-factorial and comprehensive, with physical activity counselling and exercise training as central components in all rehabilitation and preventive interventions. Many of the risk factor improvements occurring in CR can be mediated through exercise training programmes. This call-for-action paper presents the key components of a CR programme: physical activity counselling and exercise training. It summarizes current evidence-based best practice for the wide range of patient presentations of interest to the general cardiology community.

  1. Effect of a cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise oscillatory ventilation in Japanese patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumitake; Adachi, Hitoshi; Tomono, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Iwamatsu, Koichi; Sakuma, Masashi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Oshima, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo

    2016-10-01

    Although exercise oscillatory ventilation has emerged as a potent independent risk factor for adverse prognosis in heart failure, it is not well known whether cardiac rehabilitation can improve oscillatory ventilation. In this study, we investigated the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation before and after cardiac rehabilitation in chronic heart failure patients with exercise oscillatory ventilation. Cardiac rehabilitation (5-month program) was performed in 26 patients with chronic heart failure who showed an oscillatory ventilation pattern during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). After the 5-month rehabilitation program was completed, the patients again underwent CPX. To determine the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation, the amplitude and cycle length of the oscillations were calculated and compared with several other parameters, including biomarkers that have established prognostic value in heart failure. At baseline before cardiac rehabilitation, both oscillation amplitude (R = 0.625, P < 0.01) and cycle length (R = 0.469, P < 0.05) were positively correlated with the slope of minute ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production. Plasma BNP levels were positively correlated with amplitude (R = 0.615, P < 0.01) but not cycle length (R = 0.371). Cardiac rehabilitation decreased oscillation amplitude (P < 0.01) but failed to change cycle length. The change in amplitude was positively correlated with the change in BNP levels (R = 0.760, P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that only the change in amplitude was an independent predictor of the change in BNP levels (R = 0.717, P < 0.01). A 5-month cardiac rehabilitation program improves exercise oscillatory ventilation in chronic heart failure patients by reducing the oscillation amplitude. This effect is associated with a reduction of plasma BNP levels, potentially contributing to an improvement of heart failure.

  2. Randomised controlled trial examining the effect of an outpatient exercise training programme on haemodynamics and cardiac MR parameters of right ventricular function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: the ExPAH study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Faux, Steven G; Wong, Peter K K; Holloway, Cameron; McLachlan, Craig S; Kotlyar, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a potentially life-threatening condition characterised by elevated pulmonary artery pressure. Early stage PH patients are often asymptomatic. Disease progression is associated with impairment of right ventricular function and progressive dyspnoea. Current guidelines recommend exercise training (grade IIa, level B). However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms of improvement, intensity of supervision and optimal frequency, duration and intensity of exercise. This study will assess the effect of an outpatient rehabilitation programme on haemodynamics and cardiac right ventricular function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a subgroup of PH. Methods and analysis This randomised controlled trial involves both a major urban tertiary and smaller regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The intervention will compare an outpatient rehabilitation programme with a control group (home exercise programme). Participants will be stable on oral PAH-specific therapy. The primary outcome measure will be right ventricular ejection fraction measured by cardiac MRI. Secondary outcomes will include haemodynamics measured by right heart catheterisation, endurance, functional capacity, health-related quality of life questionnaires and biomarkers of cardiac function and inflammation. Ethics approval and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney (HREC/14/SVH/341). Results of this study will be disseminated through presentation at scientific conferences and in scientific journals. Trial registration number ACTRN12615001041549; pre-results. PMID:28167746

  3. Effects of dispositional optimism on quality of life, emotional distress and disability in Parkinson's disease outpatients under rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gison, Annalisa; Rizza, Federica; Bonassi, Stefano; Donati, Valentina; Giaquinto, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed with the aim of assessing dispositional optimism (DO) in a sample of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, in order to evaluate its association with clinical outcomes and its impact on rehabilitation. Before entering an outpatient rehabilitation program, 58 participants suffering from idiopathic PD completed the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R) to evaluate their level of DO, the WHO-5 scale to evaluate their health-related quality of life (HR-QoL), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to identify emotional distress, and the Barthel Index to evaluate their level of disability. All the measures were repeated four months later, at their discharge from the program. Disease stage and severity measures (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) were also taken into consideration. Correlations and multivariate regression analyses compared DO with the health-related variables. On admission a high level of DO was found to be associated with less severe disease, a better quality of life (QoL) and lower emotional distress, but not with level of disability (Barthel Index). Consistent results were found at discharge. The level of DO di not change after rehabilitation, while anxiety was significantly reduced, especially in subjects with low LOT-R and high HADS scores. The Barthel Index values significantly improved. At discharge, participants with high DO showed the best improvements in disability and in QoL. Effects of dispositional optimism on quality of life, emotional distress and disability in Parkinson's disease outpatients under rehabilitation In conclusion, a high level of DO was associated with QoL, HADS and UPDRS both on admission and at discharge. The level of DO remained stable after rehabilitation, while disability and anxiety were reduced. Participants with high DO generally had better QoL, and better clinical and psychological performances.

  4. Cost-utility analysis of cardiac rehabilitation after conventional heart valve surgery versus usual care.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina Birgitte; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Kjellberg, Jakob; Doherty, Patrick; Oldridge, Neil; Søgaard, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    Background While cardiac rehabilitation in patients with ischaemic heart disease and heart failure is considered cost-effective, this evidence may not be transferable to heart valve surgery patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation following heart valve surgery. Design We conducted a cost-utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial of 147 patients who had undergone heart valve surgery and were followed for 6 months. Methods Patients were randomised to cardiac rehabilitation consisting of 12 weeks of physical exercise training and monthly psycho-educational consultations or to usual care. Costs were measured from a societal perspective and quality-adjusted life years were based on the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D). Estimates were presented as means and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on bootstrapping. Costs and effect differences were presented in a cost-effectiveness plane and were transformed into net benefit and presented in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results No statistically significant differences were found in total societal costs (-1609 Euros; 95% CI: -6162 to 2942 Euros) or in quality-adjusted life years (-0.000; 95% CI -0.021 to 0.020) between groups. However, approximately 70% of the cost and effect differences were located below the x-axis in the cost-effectiveness plane, and the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves showed that the probability for cost- effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation compared to usual care is at minimum 75%, driven by a tendency towards costs savings. Conclusions Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery may not have improved health-related quality of life in this study, but is likely to be cost-effective for society, outweighing the extra costs of cardiac rehabilitation.

  5. [Rehabilitation and outpatient physiotherapy in rheumatic disease patients. Results of cross-sectional studies of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatologists].

    PubMed

    Mau, W; Müller, A

    2008-11-01

    Rehabilitation and outpatient physiotherapy were investigated from the perspectives of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and of rheumatologists. In 2007, 204 outpatients with RA and 47 with AS at the Arthritis Center in Halle, Germany, and 117 rheumatologists from all over the country participated in two questionnaire surveys. Patients and rheumatologists gave predominantly positive judgements of physiotherapy, psychological interventions, and patient education programs. However, outpatient care including these interventions was judged to be mainly limited by fixed budgets and other formal restrictions. Even though these therapeutic options are part of (primarily inpatient) rehabilitation programs, the estimate of the need for multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs varied widely among the rheumatologists. Significant objections against rehabilitation include reluctance of the patients, administrative burden for the physicians, payers' rejections, and limited choice of rehabilitation clinic. Despite major functional limitations, a substantial portion of the patients received no multidisciplinary medical rehabilitation, outpatient physiotherapy, psychological interventions, or patient education. Recommendations for the improvement of care are derived from these data.

  6. Evaluating compliance to a cardiac rehabilitation program in a private general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Vanessa; Breda, Ana Paula; Nunes, Marcos Eduardo Boquembuzo; de Matos, Luciana Diniz Nagem Janot

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Identify the primary factors that influenced the participant in our cardiovascular rehabilitation program towards missing their therapy sessions, and to correlate those factors with age, cardiovascular risk, and motivation of our population. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study with 42 patients (69.15±13.93 years) participating in the cardiac rehabilitation program at a general hospital in São Paulo, through the analysis of two scales applied during the initial evaluation: Cardiac Rehabilitation Barriers Scale and scale of the original provision. We used Spearman correlation to relate them to absenteeism, cardiovascular risk age and duration of cardiac rehabilitation. Results: The total score of barriers was 31±6 and the mean score of 1.47±0.31. The main barriers subscales were related to “travel/labor dispute” and “personal problems/family.” The percentage of absenteeism was 8.4% in the number of sessions that could be made in the month. The faults and cancellations were positively correlated with cardiovascular risk (p=0.01; r=0.4) and negatively with scale provision of baseline (p=0.03; r=-0.35) and age (p=0.02; r=-0.35). Conclusion: “Travel/labor dispute”, “personal/ family problems”, and low initial provision are the main factors absenteism in a cardiac rehabilitation program in a general hospital in São Paulo. PMID:24136752

  7. Perfectionism, Type D personality, and illness-related coping styles in cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Flett, Gordon L; Madan, Mina; Oh, Paul; Marzolini, Susan; Reitav, Jaan; Hewitt, Paul L; Sturman, Edward D

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the associations among trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, Type D personality, and illness-specific coping styles in 100 cardiac rehabilitation patients. Participants completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale, the Type D Scale-14, and the Coping with Health Injuries and Problems Scale. Correlational analyses established that emotional preoccupation coping was associated with trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, and Type D personality. Perfectionism was linked with both facets of the Type D construct (negative emotionality and social inhibition). Our results suggest that perfectionistic Type D patients have maladaptive coping with potential negative implications for their cardiac rehabilitation outcomes.

  8. Effects of a short outpatient rehabilitation treatment on disability of multiple sclerosis patients--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Patti, Francesco; Ciancio, Maria Rita; Cacopardo, Manuela; Reggio, Ester; Fiorilla, Teresa; Palermo, Filippo; Reggio, Arturo; Thompson, Alan J

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that neurorehabilitation can reduce disability or improve handicap of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a short period (6 weeks) of a tailored, individualised outpatient rehabilitation program in people with progressive MS. A randomised-controlled trial was undertaken in patients with primary and secondary progressive MS referred to the Centro Sclerosi Multipla of Catania. One hundred and eleven patients were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks with validated measures of disability (Functional Independence Measure (FIM)) and impairment (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Functional Systems Scale). Of the 111, 58 were randomly assigned to the treatment group and 53 to the control group. All patients had been previously trained in a home exercise program. Both groups were well matched for age, sex, disease duration and severity, disability and quality of life (Short Form-36). At the end of 6 weeks patients allocated to the rehabilitation treatment group showed significant improvement in their level of disability compared with the control group,while the level of impairment did not change. Thirty-two patients of the treatment group and four of the control group improved on the FIM by two or more steps at 12 weeks (p<0.0001). An improvement by 1 EDSS step occurred in only two patients of the treatment group and in one patient of the control group. Benefits were maintained for a further six weeks. This study demonstrates that a short outpatient rehabilitation treatment improves disability of MS patients, without changing their impairment and confirms the effectiveness of rehabilitation in people with MS.

  9. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  10. The Association Among Depressive Symptoms, Smoking Status and Antidepressant Use in Cardiac Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Gravely-Witte, Shannon; Stewart, Donna E.; Suskin, Neville; Grace, Sherry L.

    2010-01-01

    Both depression and smoking are highly prevalent and related to poorer outcomes in cardiac patients. In this study, the authors examined the association between depressive symptoms and smoking status, described the frequency and type of antidepressant use, and prospectively tested the effects of antidepressant use in smokers on smoking status and psychosocial outcomes. Participants comprised 1498 coronary artery disease (CAD) outpatients who completed a baseline survey which assessed depressive symptoms, current medications, and smoking status. A second survey was mailed 9 months later that assessed depressive symptoms, anxiety, insomnia, current medications and smoking status. Results showed that current and former-smokers had significantly greater depressive symptoms than non-smokers. Ten percent of patients were taking antidepressants, most frequently SSRIs, with significantly more smokers on antidepressants than former and non-smokers. At follow-up, smokers on antidepressants were less likely to have quit, had greater anxiety, depressive symptoms and insomnia than smokers not using antidepressants. This study demonstrated that smokers and quitters with CAD had greater depressive symptoms and use of antidepressants than non-smokers, but that the antidepressants utilized may not be optimizing outcomes. PMID:19504177

  11. Clinical Research in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Patrick D.; Sanderson, Bonnie K.; Brown, Todd M.; Berra, Kathy; Ades, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention (CR/SP) programs are considered standard of care and provide critically important resources for optimizing the care of cardiac patients. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the evolution of CR/SP programs from a singular exercise intervention to its current, more comprehensive multifaceted approach. Additionally, we offer perspective on critical concerns and suggest future research considerations to optimize the effectiveness and utilization of CR/SP program interventions. PMID:21946418

  12. Outpatient rehabilitation utilization and medical expenses in children aged 0-7 years with ADHD: analyses of population-based national health insurance data.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Lan-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Medical costs of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are substantial and have a large impact on the public health system. The present study presents information regarding outpatient rehabilitation care usage and medical expenditure for children with ADHD. A cross-sectional study was conducted by analyzing data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims database for the year 2009. A total of 6643 children aged 0-7 years with ADHD (ICD-9-CM codes 314.0x: attention deficit disorder, 314.00: attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity, or 314.01: attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity) who had used outpatient rehabilitation care were included in the analyses. Results showed that the mean annual rehabilitation care was 22.24 visits. Among the care users, 76% of patients were male, and 24% were female. More than half of the children with ADHD had comorbid mental illnesses as well. A logistic regression analysis of outpatient rehabilitation expenditure (low vs. high) showed that of those children with ADHD, those aged 0-2 years tended to incur more medical costs than those aged 6-7 years. Other factors such as frequency of rehabilitation visits, hospital medical setting and ownership, location of medical care setting, and types of rehabilitation were also significantly correlated with medical expenditure. The results from this study suggest that health care systems should ensure accurate diagnosis and measurement of impairment to maintain appropriate and successful management of rehabilitation needs for children with ADHD.

  13. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at lower-risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to use of either a hospital- or home-based program. Methods Secondary analysis was undertaken within a study of 1268 cardiac outpatients recruited from 97 cardiologist practices where clinical data were extracted. Participants completed a survey including the Duke Activity Status Index. They reported CR utilization in a second survey mailed 9 months later, including CR site and program model. Geographic information systems was used to determine distances and drive times to the CR site attended from patients’ homes. Results Overall, 469 (37.0%) participants attended CR at one of 41 programs. Of the 373 (79.5%) participants with complete geographic data, 43 (11.5%) reported attending home-based CR. The sole clinical difference was in activity status, where patients attending hospital-based program had lower activity status (p<.01). There were no differences in model attended based on geographic parameters including urban vs. rural dwelling or drive times (p>.05). Conclusions Only one-tenth of outpatients participated in a home-based program, and this allocation was unrelated geographic considerations. While patients should continue to be appropriately-triaged based on clinical risk to ensure safety, more targeted allocation of patients to home-based services may be warranted. This may optimize degree of participation, and potentially patient outcomes. PMID:22561240

  14. Collaboration: a solution to the challenge of conducting nursing research in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Robyn; Sadler, Leonie; Kirkness, Ann; Belshaw, Julie; Roach, Kellie; Warrington, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Clinical nurse leaders such as clinical nurse consultants are required to conduct research and incorporate outcomes of this research into their every day practice. However, undertaking research presents issues for cardiac rehabilitation clinical nurse consultants because they may have competing demands, difficulty with finding replacements and may be relatively isolated from other researchers. The solution to this situation is the formation of a collaborative research team with other cardiac rehabilitation clinical nurse consultants, with the inclusion of an experienced university academic as a mentor for the cardiac rehabilitation clinical nurse consultants working in an Area Health Service encompassing both rural and metropolitan hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. The related research project aimed to evaluate and improve the clients' knowledge and practices related to the use of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The team's experiences and suggestions for clinical nurse Leaders are presented in this paper. Essential team characteristics include having shared motivation, good communication practices, flexibility and tolerance, an effective team size, achieving success, willingness to accept challenges and an experienced mentor. The benefits of developing a collaborative team for research led by clinical nurse consultants in cardiac rehabilitation by far outweigh the time and effort involved in the process.

  15. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  16. Older Adults in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A New Strategy for Enhancing Physical Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Foy, Capri Gabrielle; Brawley, Lawrence R.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Focht, Brian C.; Norris, James L., III; Smith, Marci L.

    2002-01-01

    Contrasted the effect of a group-mediated cognitive- behavioral intervention (GMCB) versus traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CRP) upon changes in objective and self-reported physical function of older adults after 3 months of exercise therapy. Both groups improved significantly. Adults with lower function at the outset of the intervention…

  17. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Sarah J; McNamara, Keira; Tritton, Larette

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence.

  18. Process and Outcome in Cardiac Rehabilitation: An Examination of Cross-Lagged Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evon, Donna M.; Burns, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation patients improve cardiorespiratory fitness and quality of life, yet therapeutic processes that produce these changes remain unknown. A cross-lagged panel design was used to determine whether early-treatment enhancement of self-efficacy regarding abilities to change diet and exercise habits and the quality of the…

  19. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence. PMID:26381147

  20. Aerobic exercise intensity assessment and prescription in cardiac rehabilitation: a joint position statement of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mezzani, Alessandro; Hamm, Larry F; Jones, Andrew M; McBride, Patrick E; Moholdt, Trine; Stone, James A; Urhausen, Axel; Williams, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic exercise intensity prescription is a key issue in cardiac rehabilitation, being directly linked to both the amount of improvement in exercise capacity and the risk of adverse events during exercise. This joint position statement aims to provide professionals with up-to-date information regarding the identification of different exercise intensity domains, the methods of direct and indirect determination of exercise intensity for both continuous and interval aerobic training, the effects of the use of different exercise protocols on exercise intensity prescription and the indications for recommended exercise training prescription in specific cardiac patients' groups. The importance of functional evaluation through exercise testing prior to starting an aerobic training program is strongly emphasized, and ramp incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test, when available, is proposed as the gold standard for a physiologically comprehensive exercise intensity assessment and prescription. This may allow a shift from a 'range-based' to a 'threshold-based' aerobic exercise intensity prescription, which, combined with thorough clinical evaluation and exercise-related risk assessment, could maximize the benefits obtainable by the use of aerobic exercise training in cardiac rehabilitation.

  1. Standard and alternative adjunctive treatments in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Levy, J K

    1993-01-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation is the process of restoring functional abilities degraded by a serious cardiovascular event or by a surgical procedure to preempt such an event. Cardiovascular rehabilitation also includes attempts to reverse risk factors that have contributed initially to the disease process. Rehabilitation programs generally comprise disease-related educational components, supervised prescriptive physical exercise, diet counseling and modification, cessation of tobacco use, psychoeducational interventions aimed at adjustment and coping, and relaxation and stress management to lower nonexertion-related sympathetic drive. The presence of so-called coronary-prone behavior patterns can be detected, and special behavioral modifications may be indicated to mitigate these putative risk factors. This paper reviews the roles of these behavioral adjuncts in treating cardiovascular disease and its aftermath, and notes new and unusual approaches to these components of treatment, such as alternative exercises, biofeedback, yoga, and other relaxation methods. Barriers to compliance are acknowledged, and enhancement of compliance is discussed briefly.

  2. Standard and alternative adjunctive treatments in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J K

    1993-01-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation is the process of restoring functional abilities degraded by a serious cardiovascular event or by a surgical procedure to preempt such an event. Cardiovascular rehabilitation also includes attempts to reverse risk factors that have contributed initially to the disease process. Rehabilitation programs generally comprise disease-related educational components, supervised prescriptive physical exercise, diet counseling and modification, cessation of tobacco use, psychoeducational interventions aimed at adjustment and coping, and relaxation and stress management to lower nonexertion-related sympathetic drive. The presence of so-called coronary-prone behavior patterns can be detected, and special behavioral modifications may be indicated to mitigate these putative risk factors. This paper reviews the roles of these behavioral adjuncts in treating cardiovascular disease and its aftermath, and notes new and unusual approaches to these components of treatment, such as alternative exercises, biofeedback, yoga, and other relaxation methods. Barriers to compliance are acknowledged, and enhancement of compliance is discussed briefly. PMID:8219823

  3. Service and business model for technology enabled and home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Sarela, Antti; Whittaker, Frank; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs are comprehensive life-style programs aimed at preventing recurrence of a cardiac event. However, the current programs have globally significantly low levels of uptake. Home-based model can be a viable alternative to hospital-based programs. We developed and analysed a service and business model for home based cardiac rehabilitation based on personal mentoring using mobile phones and web services. We analysed the different organizational and economical aspects of setting up and running the home based program and propose a potential business model for a sustainable and viable service. The model can be extended to management of other chronic conditions to enable transition from hospital and care centre based treatments to sustainable home-based care.

  4. Does Cardiac Rehabilitation After Myocardial Infarction Favorably Affect Prognosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses the limitations of 14 randomized controlled trials of exercise rehabilitation for patients who sustained myocardial infarction. The difficulty of sampling patients and controlling the sample size is discussed and the benefits of pooled statistical evidence are considered. (JL)

  5. [Benefits of a cardiac rehabilitation program on some parameters of corporal composition].

    PubMed

    López Frías, Magdalena; Gómez Martínez, Mar; Ramírez López Frías, Mercedes; De Teresa Galván, Carlos; Díaz Castro, Javier; Nestares, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    The cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the principal reasons of morbidity and mortality in the world. The cardiac rehabilitation is a program of secondary prevention to complement the effects of the cardiological treatment with the participation of the patient in the control of their habits of life, as a way of promotion of its own cardiovascular health. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the long-term effects of a cardiac rehabilitation program on some parameters of corporal composition in patients that have attended or not, to the phase the III of the program. The study was performed in subjects that suffered a cardiovascular event and they were members of the Association of Cardiac Patients of Granada and Province. All the members were offered the possibility of forming a part of the study. Some parameters of body composition were measured and a nutritional evaluation was performed in all the subjects. The visceral and body fat and, which play a key role in the cardiovascular pathology, are lower in the patients attending to the cardiac rehabilitation program, revealing that are better predictors of the cardiovascular risk. Thanks to the nutritional advice received, an increase in healthy nutrients is observed and the subjects attending to the program feature major phase angle, indicating that they have a better state of hydration, together with a better integrity of the cell membranes and distribution of water between the compartments intra- and extracellular compartments.

  6. Structural Integration as an Adjunct to Outpatient Rehabilitation for Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Eric E.; Meleger, Alec L.; Bonato, Paolo; Wayne, Peter M.; Langevin, Helene M.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Davis, Roger B.

    2015-01-01

    Structural Integration (SI) is an alternative method of manipulation and movement education. To obtain preliminary data on feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse events (AE), 46 outpatients from Boston area with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNSLBP) were randomized to parallel treatment groups of SI plus outpatient rehabilitation (OR) versus OR alone. Feasibility data were acceptable except for low compliance with OR and lengthy recruitment time. Intent-to-treat data on effectiveness were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum, n = 23 per group. Median reductions in VAS Pain, the primary outcome, of −26 mm in SI + OR versus 0 in OR alone were not significantly different (P = 0.075). Median reductions in RMDQ, the secondary outcome, of −2 points in SI + OR versus 0 in OR alone were significantly different (P = 0.007). Neither the proportions of participants with nor the seriousness of AE were significantly different. SI as an adjunct to OR for CNSLBP is not likely to provide additional reductions in pain but is likely to augment short term improvements in disability with a low additional burden of AE. A more definitive trial is feasible, but OR compliance and recruitment might be challenging. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01322399). PMID:25945112

  7. Predictors of improvement in the 12-minute walking distance following a six-week outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Zu Wallack, R L; Patel, K; Reardon, J Z; Clark, B A; Normandin, E A

    1991-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship of clinical characteristics, pulmonary function, and exercise test data to the degree of improvement in the 12-minute walking distance (12MD) in 50 ambulatory outpatients completing a six-week pulmonary rehabilitation program. The 12MD increased by 27.7 +/- 32.5 percent, or 462 +/- 427 ft, by the end of the program. There were no significant relationships between improvement in the 12MD and age, sex, oxygen requirement, arterial blood gas levels, and pulmonary function; however, patients with a greater ventilatory reserve (1-[VEmax/MVV] x 100) had more improvement in their 12MD, both with respect to distance and percentage of increase over baseline. Additionally, patients with a lower peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and peak oxygen pulse (O2P) showed greater percentage of improvement in their 12MD. The magnitude of the initial 12MD was inversely related to its improvement, both with regard to distance (r = -0.43; r2 = 0.18; p less than 0.003) and percentage of increase (r = -0.71; r2 = 0.51; p less than 0.0001). Using stepwise regression, the combination of smaller initial 12MD and greater FEV1 was significantly predictive of improvement in the 12MD. Patients with poor performance on either a 12MD or maximal exercise test are not necessarily poor candidates for a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

  8. Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Rehabilitation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michele Basso ...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrea L. Behrman, Ph.D., P.T. D. Michele Basso , Ed.D., PT Craig Velozo, PhD, OT 5d. PROJECT...submitted by the PI, Craig Velozo (University of Florida) and Partnering PIs each, Michele Basso (Ohio State University), and Andrea Behrman (University of

  9. The Effect of Nutrition Consultation on Dietary Diversity Score of Cardiac Patients Referred to Cardiac Rehabilitation Research Center Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute during 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabani, Sepideh; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Mehrabani, Sanaz; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Sajjadi, Firouzeh; Maghroun, Maryam; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Safavi, Seyyed Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dietary diversity score (DDS) measurement was used to assessment of diet quality in different disease like cardiovascular disease. One way to improve the cardiovascular patient's ability is cardiac rehabilitation program that include exercise training, nutrition consultation and psychological treatment. No study was designed to compare the DDS before and after dietary consultation among cardiac rehabilitation patients, so this study was designed to examine this purpose. Methods: Subjects were participated in the 2-month cardiac rehabilitation program. All patients that completed the cardiac rehabilitation program and 2 dietary records (before and after nutritional counseling in cardiac rehabilitation program) enrolled in study. Kant et al method was used for scoring dietary diversity. Data were analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS version 20). Wilcoxon test were used to compare DDS score for each subgroup and pair sample T test was used to compare total DDS after and before nutrition counseling. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The differences between DDS of grain, fruit, vegetable and meat before and after nutrition counseling were not significant (P = 0.635, P = 0.423, P = 0.826, P = 0.207 respectively), but differences of DDS for dairy and total DDS before and after nutrition counseling were significant (P = 0, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Dietary diversity was increased after nutrition counseling among patients with cardiac disease. PMID:27994822

  10. Influence of cardiac rehabilitation in Primigravida with spontaneous coronary artery dissection during postpartum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The physical exercise consists of trainable physical abilities such as strength and endurance. It can be inferred that the individual cardiac patient is dependent on it as an associated therapy to the drug treatment for a rapid and lasting improvement of their overall clinical status Case presentation The patient – with Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection Postpartum period – was subjected to 21 sessions of cardiac rehabilitation. A physical evaluation was performed, before and after the treatment period, for data collection: anthropometric values, flexibility, aerobic capacity and strength of grip. Conclusion The patient had a positive response in aerobic capacity, flexibility and grip strength and the anthropometric values were kept in short term rehabilitation. PMID:24829614

  11. "I'm No Superman": Understanding Diabetic Men, Masculinity, and Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dale, Craig M; Angus, Jan E; Seto Nielsen, Lisa; Kramer-Kile, Marnie; Pritlove, Cheryl; Lapum, Jennifer; Price, Jennifer; Marzolini, Susan; Abramson, Beth; Oh, Paul; Clark, Alex

    2015-12-01

    Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs help patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) reduce their risk of recurrent cardiac illness, disability, and death. However, men with CHD and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) demonstrate lower attendance and completion of CR despite having a poor prognosis. Drawing on gender and masculinity theory, we report on a qualitative study of 16 Canadian diabetic men recently enrolled in CR. Major findings reflect two discursive positions men assumed to regain a sense of competency lost in illness: (a) working with the experts, or (b) rejection of biomedical knowledge. These positions underscore the varied and sometimes contradictory responses of seriously ill men to health guidance. Findings emphasize the priority given to the rehabilitation of a positive masculine identity. The analysis argues that gender, age, and employment status are powerful mechanisms of variable CR participation.

  12. The Affordable Care Act: new opportunities for cardiac rehabilitation in the workplace?

    PubMed

    Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross; Myers, Jonathan; Kaminsky, Leonard; Briggs, Paige; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Cahalin, Lawrence P

    2014-08-01

    Many people affected by cardiovascular disease (CVD) are working age. Employers bear a large percentage of the costs associated with CVD. Employers pay 80 times more in diagnosis and treatment than in prevention, although there is evidence that 50% to 70% of all diseases are associated with preventable health risks. As a result, the worksite is an appealing location to deliver health care.Cardiac rehabilitation has developed a track record of delivering improved outcomes for patients with CVD. Partnerships between cardiac rehabilitation providers and worksite health programs have the potential to improve referral and participation rates of employees with CVD. The current era of health reform in the United States that has been stimulated by the Affordable Care Act provides an ideal opportunity to reconsider worksite health programs as an essential partner in the health care team.

  13. Cardiac rehabilitation programs and health-related quality of life. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Alguacil Diego, Isabel María; Alonso Martín, Joaquín Jesús; Molero Sánchez, Alberto; Miangolarra Page, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the main health problem in developed countries. Prevention is presented as the most effective and efficient primary care intervention, whereas cardiac rehabilitation programs are considered the most effective of secondary prevention interventions; however, these are underused. This literature review examines the effectiveness and the levels of evidence of cardiac rehabilitation programs, their components, their development and role in developed countries, applications in different fields of research and treatment, including their psychological aspects, and their application in heart failure as a paradigm of disease care under this type of intervention. It is completed by a review of the impact of such programs on measures of health-related quality of life, describing the instruments involved in studies in recent scientific literature.

  14. Transforming cardiac rehabilitation into broad-based healthy lifestyle programs to combat noncommunicable disease.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Briggs, Paige D; Guizilini, Solange; Daugherty, John; Chan, Wai-Man; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The current incidence and prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is currently a cause for great concern on a global scale; future projections are no less disconcerting. Unhealthy lifestyle patterns are at the core of the NCD crisis; physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor nutrition and tobacco use are the primary lifestyle factors that substantially increase the risk of developing one or more NCDs. We have now come to recognize that healthy lifestyle interventions are a medical necessity that should be prescribed to all individuals. Perhaps the most well-established model for healthy lifestyle interventions in the current healthcare model is cardiac rehabilitation. To have any hope of improving the outlook for NCDs on a global scale, what is currently known as cardiac rehabilitation must transform into broad-based healthy lifestyle programing, with a shifted focus on primordial and primary prevention.

  15. Analysis of agreement between cardiac risk stratification protocols applied to participants of a center for cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana A. S.; Silva, Anne K. F.; Vanderlei, Franciele M.; Christofaro, Diego G. D.; Gonçalves, Aline F. L.; Vanderlei, Luiz C. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Cardiac risk stratification is related to the risk of the occurrence of events induced by exercise. Despite the existence of several protocols to calculate risk stratification, studies indicating that there is similarity between these protocols are still unknown. Objective To evaluate the agreement between the existing protocols on cardiac risk rating in cardiac patients. Method The records of 50 patients from a cardiac rehabilitation program were analyzed, from which the following information was extracted: age, sex, weight, height, clinical diagnosis, medical history, risk factors, associated diseases, and the results from the most recent laboratory and complementary tests performed. This information was used for risk stratification of the patients in the protocols of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Brazilian Society of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the protocol designed by Frederic J. Pashkow, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Société Française de Cardiologie, and the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the analysis of agreement between the protocols was calculated using the Kappa coefficient. Differences were considered with a significance level of 5%. Results Of the 21 analyses of agreement, 12 were considered significant between the protocols used for risk classification, with nine classified as moderate and three as low. No agreements were classified as excellent. Different proportions were observed in each risk category, with significant differences between the protocols for all risk categories. Conclusion The agreements between the protocols were considered low and moderate and the risk proportions differed between protocols. PMID:27556385

  16. Clinical benefits of a metabolic approach in the cardiac rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Romualdo; Lacalaprice, Francesca; Faccenda, Ernesto; Volpe, Loretta

    2006-09-04

    Patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation may benefit from combining trimetazidine with exercise training because both treatments produce synergic benefits on the cardiovascular system. There is evidence that trimetazidine improves left ventricular (LV) function in patients with ischemic and diabetic cardiomyopathy by shifting the cellular energy substrate reference from fatty acids to glucose oxidation, and that this effect is associated with a better outcome. Recently, results have demonstrated that trimetazidine improves radial artery endothelium-dependent relaxation related to its antioxidant properties. Similarly, exercise training has been demonstrated to improve diastolic filling and systolic function in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, in relation to enhanced perfusion and contractility of dysfunctional myocardium. Patients with viable myocardium, in theory, should have the greatest benefits because trimetazidine improves contractility of dysfunctional hibernating/stunned myocardium, whereas exercise has documented efficacy in improving endothelial vasomotor response of coronary arteries, stimulating coronary collateral circulation and small vessel growth, improving LV function, and increasing functional capacity. At present, there are no published reports about the efficacy of the combination of trimetazidine with exercise training. In this article, we discuss the rationale for using trimetazidine in cardiac rehabilitation, the identification of patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation who might benefit the most from the addition of trimetazidine to standard therapy, and the documented benefits.

  17. Observational study of the relationship between volume and outcomes using data from the National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Patrick; Harrison, Alexander S; Knapton, Mike; Dale, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an evidence-based intervention delivered by a wide range of high-volume and low-volume centres; however, the extent of volume–outcome relationship is yet to be studied. There is a lack of consensus about the effect of volume on outcomes, with evidence of mixed effects in acute and chronic care. The aim of this study is, to investigate the extent of association of outcomes in CR with patient volume. Methods Data was validated and extracted from the national audit from 2012 to 2013 for each CR centre. Volume was calculated as the total number of patients entering outpatient CR. Hierarchical multiple regression models were used to test for relationships between volume and outcomes. The outcomes included body mass index, blood pressure, psychosocial well-being, cholesterol, smoking cessation and physical activity. The analyses were adjusted for centre and patient characteristics and confounders. Results The number of patients included in the volume analysis was 48 476, derived from 178 CR centres. The average age per centre was 66 years with a 70% male distribution of patients enrolled. Regression analysis revealed no volume–outcome relationship, additionally no statistical significance existed. Conclusions Unlike cardiac surgery this study, after accounting for staffing, age, gender and comorbidity, shows no effect of volume on outcome following CR delivered by high-volume and low-volume programmes. Based on our data there is no support for centralisation of services. Our findings and methodology can be used as a benchmark for future volume–outcome relationship studies in CR. PMID:26629349

  18. Patient satisfaction with out-patient rehabilitation therapy: validity and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Se-Yeon; Ha, Ji Sun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of present study were to develop an out-patient satisfaction questionnaire to be used in health care system, from which the underlying dimensions could be derived and individual patient scores calculated, and to evaluate some of the questionnaire’s psychometric properties. [Subjects and Methods] Forty out-patient of local hospital reply both the questionnaire used in previous study and newly designed questionnaire. To identifying validity, the statistical linear relationship between the total score of the primary questionnaire and newly designed questionnaire, which were analyzed. The test-retest reliability has been investigated by using a single measure intra class correlation. [Results] The average satisfaction of the previous questionnaire were significantly correlated with newly designed questionnaire. The intra-lass correlation coefficient of the each items of newly designed questionnaire were strong. Total score of the previous questionnaire had the lowest test-retest reliability, Cronbach’ s alpha coefficient for the newly designed questionnaire score showed acceptable inter-item reliability. [Conclusion] The out-patients’ satisfaction questionnaire developed in present study, which had appropriate validity, reliability, and acceptability. PMID:28174450

  19. [Clothing and protective gear for nursing occupations from the hygienic viewpoint: consensus of the DGKH section "Hygiene in Inpatient and Outpatient Care and Rehabilitation", May 2nd 2005].

    PubMed

    2005-09-01

    Both in inpatient and outpatient care institutions often questions arise what kind of working clothes and additional protective equipment nurses have to wear in specific situations. To overcome these uncertainties, the section "Hygiene in inpatient and outpatient care and rehabilitation" of the German society for hospital hygiene (DGKH) has developed an overview, that shows which elements of working clothes and protective devices, especially gloves, should be used in the different fields of nursing practice. The comprehensive and well structured information should be considered as minimum standard for hygienic purposes.

  20. Comprehensive out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation: Treatment outcomes in early and late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Pinar; Kaymaz, Dicle; Günay, Ersin; Erdoğan, Yurdanur; Turay, Ülkü Yilmaz; Demir, Neşe; Çanak, Ebru; Sengül, Fatma; Egesel, Nurcan; Köse, Serdal Kenan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the outcomes of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to establish whether in early disease stage PR is as effective as in late stages of disease. METHODS: A total of 55 stable COPD patients, 28 with early and 27 with late disease stages, were assessed. Patients underwent a comprehensive out-patient PR program for 8 weeks. To eluciate the effects of PR and compare the level of improvement; lung function, dyspnea sensation [Medical Research Council (MRC)], body composition [body mass index (BMI), fat free mass (FFM), fat free mass index (FFMI)], exercise capacity [incremental shuttle walking test, endurance shuttle walking test], health related quality of life (HRQoL) with St. George Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, psycohological status (Hospital anxiety–depression (HAD) scale) were evaluated before and after PR. RESULTS: At the end of PR in the early disease stage group, the improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) reached a statistically significant level (P < 0.05). In both disease stages, there were no significant differences in BMI, FFM, and FFMI. The decrease in exertional dyspnea for the two groups evaluated with the modified BORG scale were not found statistically significant, though the dyspnea scores evaluated with MRC showed significant improvements (P < 0.001). HRQoL and exercise capacity were significantly improved for the two groups (P < 0.001). Psychological status evaluated with the HAD scale improved after PR (P < 0.001) both in early and late stages. Gainings in the study parameters did not differ in the early and the late disease stages. CONCLUSIONS: These results showed that patients with COPD had benefited from a comprehensive PR program in an out-patient setting regardless of disease severity. Even patients with earlier stage of disease should be referred and encouraged to participate in a PR program. PMID:21572695

  1. Home based versus centre based cardiac rehabilitation: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Anna; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Taylor, Rod S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of home based and supervised centre based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health related quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Design Systematic review. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, without language restriction, searched from 2001 to January 2008. Review methods Reference lists checked and advice sought from authors. Included randomised controlled trials that compared centre based cardiac rehabilitation with home based programmes in adults with acute myocardial infarction, angina, or heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of the identified trials and extracted data independently. Authors were contacted when possible to obtain missing information. Results 12 studies (1938 participants) were included. Most studies recruited patients with a low risk of further events after myocardial infarction or revascularisation. No difference was seen between home based and centre based cardiac rehabilitation in terms of mortality (relative risk 1.31, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity (standardised mean difference −0.11, −0.35 to 0.13), modifiable risk factors (weighted mean difference systolic blood pressure (0.58 mm Hg, −3.29 mm Hg to 4.44 mm Hg), total cholesterol (−0.13 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.05 mmol/l), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.15 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.01 mmol/l), or relative risk for proportion of smokers at follow-up (0.98, 0.73 to 1.31)), or health related quality of life, with the exception of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.06, −0.11 to −0.02) mmol/l). In the home based participants, there was evidence of superior adherence. No consistent difference was seen in the healthcare costs of the two forms

  2. Proposal of quality indicators for cardiac rehabilitation after acute coronary syndrome in Japan: a modified Delphi method and practice test

    PubMed Central

    Ohtera, Shosuke; Kanazawa, Natsuko; Ozasa, Neiko; Ueshima, Kenji; Nakayama, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Cardiac rehabilitation is underused and its quality in practice is unclear. A quality indicator is a measurable element of clinical practice performance. This study aimed to propose a set of quality indicators for cardiac rehabilitation following an acute coronary event in the Japanese population and conduct a small-size practice test to confirm feasibility and applicability of the indicators in real-world clinical practice. Design and setting This study used a modified Delphi technique (the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method), a consensus method which involves an evidence review, a face-to-face multidisciplinary panel meeting and repeated anonymous rating. Evidence to be reviewed included clinical practice guidelines available in English or Japanese and existing quality indicators. Performance of each indicator was assessed retrospectively using medical records at a university hospital in Japan. Participants 10 professionals in cardiac rehabilitation for the consensus panel. Results In the literature review, 23 clinical practice guidelines and 16 existing indicators were identified to generate potential indicators. Through the consensus-building process, a total of 30 indicators were assessed and finally 13 indicators were accepted. The practice test (n=39) revealed that 74% of patients underwent cardiac rehabilitation. Median performance of process measures was 93% (IQR 46–100%). ‘Communication with the doctor who referred the patient to cardiac rehabilitation’ and ‘continuous participation in cardiac rehabilitation’ had low performance (32% and 38%, respectively). Conclusions A modified Delphi technique identified a comprehensive set of quality indicators for cardiac rehabilitation. The single-site, small-size practice test confirmed that most of the proposed indicators were measurable in real-world clinical practice. However, some clinical processes which are not covered by national health insurance in Japan had low performance. Further

  3. Cardiac rehabilitation using the Family-Centered Empowerment Model versus home-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with myocardial infarction: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Hajiesmaieli, Mohammadreza; Kangasniemi, Mari; Alhani, Fatemah; Jelvehmoghaddam, Hosseinali; Fathi, Mohammad; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Ardehali, Seyed H; Hatamian, Sevak; Gahremani, Mehdi; Mosavinasab, Seyed M M; Rostami, Zohreh; Madani, Seyed J; Izadi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if a hybrid cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme using the Family-Centered Empowerment Model (FCEM) as compared with standard CR will improve patient quality of life, perceived stress and state anxiety of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods We conducted a randomised controlled trial in which patients received either standard home CR or CR using the FCEM strategy. Patient empowerment was measured with FCEM questionnaires preintervention and postintervention for a total of 9 assessments. Quality of life, perceived stress, and state and trait anxiety were assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), the 14-item Perceived Stress, and the 20-item State and 20-item Trait Anxiety questionnaires, respectively. Results 70 patients were randomised. Baseline characteristics were similar. Ejection fraction was significantly higher in the intervention group at measurements 2 (p=0.01) and 3 (p=0.001). Exercise tolerance measured as walking distance was significantly improved in the intervention group throughout the study. The quality of life results in the FCEM group showed significant improvement both within the group over time (p<0.0001) and when compared with control (p<0.0001). Similarly, the perceived stress and state anxiety results showed significant improvement both within the FCEM group over time (p<0.0001) and when compared with control (p<0.0001). No significant difference was found either within or between groups for trait anxiety. Conclusions The family-centred empowerment model may be an effective hybrid cardiac rehabilitation method for improving the physical and mental health of patients post-MI; however, further study is needed to validate these findings. Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT02402582. Trial registration number NCT02402582. PMID:27110376

  4. Disparities in Utilization of Outpatient Rehabilitative Care Following Hip Fracture Hospitalization With Respect to Race and Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Oghalai, Tracy U.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Kuo, Yong-fang; Wu, Helen; Grecula, Michael; Eschbach, Karl; Goodwin, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the prevalence of discharge home to self-care after hip fracture hospitalization among the elderly in 3 racial groups: whites, Hispanics, and blacks. Design Secondary data analysis. Setting US hospitals. Participants Patients (N=34,203) aged 65 and older with Medicare insurance discharged after hip fracture hospitalization between 2001 and 2005. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure Discharge home to self-care. Results Bivariate analyses showed higher rates of discharge home to self-care among minorities, 16.4% for Hispanics, 8.7% for blacks, and 5.9% for whites. Hispanics had 3-fold higher odds of being discharged home to self-care, and blacks had about 50% higher odds of being discharged home to self-care after adjusting for age, sex, Klabunde’s comorbidity index, income, year of admission, type of hip fracture, surgical stabilization procedure, and length of hospital stay. Conclusions The higher rate of discharge home to self-care among minorities underscores the risk of suboptimal outpatient rehabilitative care among minorities with hip fracture. PMID:19345769

  5. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nery, Rosane Maria; Zanini, Maurice; Ferrari, Juliana Nery; Silva, César Augusto; Farias, Leonardo Fontanive; Comel, João Carlos; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Santos, Antonio Cardoso; Stein, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard. PMID:24759952

  6. Are Ambient Ultrafine, Accumulation Mode, and Fine Particles Associated with Adverse Cardiac Responses in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Wojciech; Beckett, William; Hopke, Philip K; Oakes, David; Frampton, Mark W; Bisognano, John; Chalupa, David; Bausch, Jan; O’Shea, Karen; Wang, Yungang; Utell, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms underlying previously reported air pollution and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity associations remain poorly understood. Objectives: We examined associations between markers of pathways thought to underlie these air pollution and CV associations and ambient particle concentrations in postinfarction patients. Methods: We studied 76 patients, from June 2006 to November 2009, who participated in a 10-week cardiac rehabilitation program following a recent (within 3 months) myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Ambient ultrafine particle (UFP; 10–100 nm), accumulation mode particle (AMP; 100–500 nm), and fine particle concentrations (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) were monitored continuously. Continuous Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were made before and during supervised, graded, twice weekly, exercise sessions. A venous blood sample was collected and blood pressure was measured before sessions. Results: Using mixed effects models, we observed adverse changes in rMSSD [square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals], SDNN (standard deviation of all NN beat intervals), TpTe (time from peak to end of T-wave), heart rate turbulence, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen associated with interquartile range increases in UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at 1 or more lag times within the previous 5 days. Exposures were not associated with MeanNN, heart-rate–corrected QT interval duration (QTc), deceleration capacity, and white blood cell count was not associated with UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at any lag time. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation patients, particles were associated with subclinical decreases in parasympathetic modulation, prolongation of late repolarization duration, increased blood pressure, and systemic inflammation. It is possible that such changes could increase the risk of CV events in this susceptible population. PMID

  7. Psychological Aspects of Cardiac Care and Rehabilitation: Time to Wake Up to Sleep?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jonathan; Parenti, Giulia; Doyle, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Psychological and psychosocial factors have long been linked to cardiovascular disease. These psychosocial factors, including low socioeconomic status, social support/isolation, stress and distress, personality, and sleep disturbance increase risk of cardiovascular events and negatively impact quality of life. These factors may have direct effects on cardiovascular disease via immune or neuroendocrine pathways, or more indirect effects, by, for example, limiting adherence to recommended therapies and cardiac rehabilitation. Most psychosocial risk factors can be assessed relatively easily using standardised tools. Sleep disturbance, in particular, is gaining evidence for its importance and may be crucial to address. While the management of certain psychosocial risk factors is an ethical requirement for care and improves quality of life, unfortunately there is little evidence that such strategies impact on 'hard' endpoints such as recurrent myocardial infarction. A comprehensive biopsychosocial approach to management of these psychosocial factors is required to maximise the benefits patients derive from cardiac care.

  8. Reversible Motor Paralysis and Early Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure Receiving Left Ventricular Assist Device Therapy.

    PubMed

    Amao, Rie; Imamura, Teruhiko; Nakahara, Yasuo; Noguchi, Satoko; Kinoshita, Osamu; Yamauchi, Haruo; Ono, Minoru; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-12-02

    Advanced heart failure (HF) is sometimes complicated with brain impairment because of a microthrombosis caused by decreased left ventricular contraction or reduced brain circulation. Some patients may recover after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. However, little is known about the perioperative therapeutic strategy in patients suffering from such complications, particularly from a cardiac rehabilitation viewpoint. We report on a 58-year-old male patient with a previous history of poliomyelitis and a light paralysis in the left upper extremity, who suffered left hemiplegia with no evidence of stroke after hemodynamic deterioration. The combination therapy of perioperative cardiac rehabilitation and LVAD therapy improved his left hemiplegia as well as activities of daily living, and the patient was discharged on foot on postoperative day 72 after briefing the family on LVAD home management. Early initiation of cardiac rehabilitation before LVAD implantation may be a key for the smooth discharge and resocialization of patients suffering from brain impairment complicated with advanced HF.

  9. Universal access: but when? Treating the right patient at the right time: access to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, William; Arthur, Heather; Stokes, Helen; Morrin, Louise; Beaton, Louise

    2006-09-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society formed an Access to Care Working Group ('Working Group') in the spring of 2004. The mandate of the group was to use the best science and information to establish reasonable triage categories and safe wait times for access to common cardiovascular services and procedures. The present commentary presents the rationale for benchmarks for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services. The Working Group's search for evidence included: a full literature review of the efficacy of CR, and the factors affecting access and referral to CR; a review of existing guidelines for access to CR; and a national survey of 14 CR programs across Canada undertaken in May 2005 to solicit information on referral to, and wait times for, CR. The Working Group also reviewed the results of The Ontario Cardiac Rehabilitation Pilot Project (2002) undertaken by the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario, which reported the average and median wait times for CR. Some international agencies have formulated their own guidelines relating to the optimal wait time for the onset of CR. However, due to the limited amount of supporting literature, these guidelines have generally been formed as consensus statements. The Canadian national survey showed that few programs had guidelines for individual programs. The Cardiac Care Network of Ontario pilot project reported that the average and median times from a cardiac event to the intake into CR were 99 and 70 days, respectively. The national survey of sampled CR programs also revealed quite remarkable differences across programs in terms of the length of time between first contact to first attendance and to commencement of exercise. Programs that required a stress test before program initiation had the longest wait for exercise initiation. Some patients need to be seen within a very short time frame to prevent a marked deterioration in their medical or psychological state. In some cases, early intervention and advocacy may reduce the risk

  10. 'This is a forever project': supporting lifestyle changes in a regional Queensland community-based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation programs throughout the world have struggled for several years to attract more participants and facilitate behaviour changes in these clients. Over the past few years, there has been an increased level of attention in the role that self-efficacy and social support may play in this respect. The main aim of this study was to explore self-efficacy and social support within a regional, community-based cardiac rehabilitation program that does not adhere to traditional cardiac rehabilitation structures. Twelve participants were interviewed and two major themes emerged from the thematic analysis of the interview transcripts: making personal lifestyle changes; and supportive environment for lifestyle changes. Although this study is exploratory in nature, it has highlighted the significance of social support from within a program as opposed to participants' friends and family, the subject of most social-support research. It also contributes to the challenges others are starting to make regarding the limited timeframes associated with traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs, suggesting more time may be needed to build firmer psychosocial foundations for behaviour change after cardiac events.

  11. Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... doing things you did before. This process is rehabilitation. Rehabilitation often focuses on Physical therapy to help your ... who has had a stroke may simply want rehabilitation to be able to dress or bathe without ...

  12. The Use of Virtual World-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation to Encourage Healthy Lifestyle Choices Among Cardiac Patients: Intervention Development and Pilot Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Ray W

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite proven benefits through the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and reduction of mortality, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remains underutilized in cardiac patients. Underserved populations most affected by CVD including rural residents, low socioeconomic status patients, and racial/ethnic minorities have the lowest participation rates due to access barriers. Internet-and mobile-based lifestyle interventions have emerged as potential modalities to complement and increase accessibility to CR. An outpatient CR program using virtual world technology may provide an effective alternative to conventional CR by overcoming patient access limitations such as geographics, work schedule constraints, and transportation. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe the research protocol of a two-phased, pilot study that will assess the feasibility (Phase 1) and comparative effectiveness (Phase 2) of a virtual world-based (Second Life) CR program as an extension of a conventional CR program in achieving healthy behavioral change among post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients. We hypothesize that virtual world CR users will improve behaviors (physical activity, diet, and smoking) to a greater degree than conventional CR participants. Methods In Phase 1, we will recruit at least 10 patients enrolled in outpatient CR who were recently hospitalized for an ACS (unstable angina, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) or who recently underwent elective PCI at Mayo Clinic Hospital, Rochester Campus in Rochester, MN with at least one modifiable, lifestyle risk factor target (sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, and current smoking). Recruited patients will participate in a 12-week, virtual world health education program which will provide feedback on the feasibility, usability, and design of the intervention. During Phase 2, we will conduct a

  13. Does cardiac rehabilitation meet minimum standards: an observational study using UK national audit?

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Patrick; Salman, Ahmad; Furze, Gill; Dalal, Hasnain M; Harrison, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the extent by which programmes meet national minimum standards for the delivery of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) as part of the National Certification Programme for Cardiovascular Rehabilitation (NCP_CR). Methods The analysis used UK National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation (NACR) data extracted and validated for the period 2013–2014 set against six NCP_CR measures deemed as important for the delivery of high-quality CR programmes. Each programme that achieved a single minimum standard was given a score of 1. The range of the scoring for meeting the minimum standards is between 1 and 6. The performance of CR programmes was categorised into three groups: high (score of 5–6), middle (scores of 3–4) and low (scores of 1–2). If a programme did not meet any of the six criteria, they were considered to have failed. Results Data from 170 CR programmes revealed statistically significant differences among UK CR programmes. The principal findings were that, based on NCP_CR criteria, 30.6% were assessed as high performance with 45.9% as mid-level performance programmes, 18.2% were in the lower-level and 5.3% failed to meet any of the minimum criteria. Conclusions This study shows that high levels of performance is achievable in the era of modern cardiology and that many CR programmes are close to meeting high performance standards. However, substantial variation, below the recommended minimum standards, exists throughout the UK. National certification should be seen as a positive step to ensure that patients, irrespective of where they live, are accessing quality services. PMID:28123763

  14. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy lifestyle changes to address risk factors for cardiovascular disease. To help you adopt lifestyle changes, this program includes exercise training, education on heart-healthy living, and counseling ...

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... will help you learn how to make healthy food choices. They can help you plan a diet to help manage health problems, such as diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol. Education. Your ...

  16. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future. PMID:26247035

  17. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions.

  18. Effects of phase III cardiac rehabilitation programs on health-related quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease: Juntendo Cardiac Rehabilitation Program (J-CARP).

    PubMed

    Seki, Eriko; Watanabe, Yoshiro; Sunayama, Satoshi; Iwama, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Kazunori; Kawakami, Kazunobu; Sato, Mizue; Sato, Hiroyuki; Mokuno, Hiroshi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized controlled trial was to assess the impact of phase III comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-eight elderly males (mean age, 70 years) with CAD were stratified as the intervention group (n=20) and the control group (n=18). In the intervention group, patients participated in CR for 6 months, whereas in the control group, they received standard care. Validated questionnaires were obtained to evaluate HRQOL using the Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36 Health Status Survey (SF-36), State-trait anxiety inventory questionnaire (STAI) and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) at baseline and after 6 months. At baseline, scores of SF-36 except for general health, STAI and SDS were not different in either group. After 6 months, in the intervention group, scores of bodily pain, general health, vitality and mental health of SF-36 improved significantly compared with baseline. State anxiety scores also improved significantly (p<0.01), but SDS depression scores were not improved. In the control group, none of the parameters significantly changed. These results indicate that elderly patients with CAD should be vigorously encouraged to pursue CR even in chronic phase III.

  19. Effect of Intense Lifestyle Modification and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Psychosocial Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldana, Steven G.; Whitmer, William R.; Greenlaw, Roger; Avins, Andrew L.; Thomas, Dean; Salberg, Audrey; Greenwell, Andrea; Lipsenthal, Lee; Fellingham, Gill W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease and cardiac rehabilitation(CR) on psychosocial risk factors and quality of life in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. Participants had previously undergone a revascularization procedure. The 84 patients self-selected to participate in the Ornish Program…

  20. Developing a Cardiac Rehabilitation Education Resource for Rural Health Workers in Queensland: Reviewing the Process and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth; O'Connor-Fleming, M.; Tooth, L.; Humphries, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    A resource manual on cardiac rehabilitation education was developed for health workers providing patient education in rural and remote Queensland (Australia). A process evaluation of the manual received feedback from 5 key informants and 31 rural health care workers following a 3-month trial. Overall, feedback was positive. Recommended content…

  1. Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and Causal Attributions as Predictors of Health and Risk Factor Status after Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkimer, John C.; And Others

    Compliance with many health-promoting regimens is often poor, even among individuals with known chronic disease. Lifestyle changes recommended by cardiac rehabilitation educators are often not adopted or not maintained by clients having suffered myocardial infarction and/or coronary graft bypass surgery. Subjects were graduates (N=117) of a Phase…

  2. Expanding the Limits of Evidence-Based Medicine: A Discourse Analysis of Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Meg

    Heart attacks are the leading cause of death in the United States, and cardiac rehabilitation, a form of post-MI (myocardial infarction) education, accounts for at most 20% of improved lifestyle behavior that can effectively manage symptoms, delay or prevent subsequent attacks, and lower mortality and morbidity rates. In an attempt to improve…

  3. Heart Failure Update: Outpatient Management.

    PubMed

    Wojnowich, Katherine; Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Outpatient management of heart failure (HF) is aimed at treating symptoms and preventing hospitalizations and readmissions. Management is initiated in a stepwise approach. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system is a cornerstone of therapy and should be started, along with beta blockers, as soon as the diagnosis of HF is made. Other drugs, including diuretics, aldosterone antagonists, hydralazine, and nitrates, may be added based on symptoms and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage. Despite a great interest in and theoretical benefit of naturoceutical products in the mitigation of oxidative stress and HF progression, none has been proven to be beneficial, and concerns exist regarding their interactions with standard HF drugs. Other nonpharmacologic interventions, including sodium restriction, regular exercise, and/or cardiac rehabilitation, should be initiated at diagnosis. HF often is progressive, and clinicians should be aware of late stage management options, including implantable devices, cardiac transplantation, and hospice care.

  4. The effect of the patient-physician relationship on health-related quality of life after cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Weeger, Sebastian; Farin, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Purpose The patient-physician relationship has effects on adherence and health outcomes in chronic diseases. This prospective study investigates the effect of the patient-physician relationship on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Methods Three hundred and thirty-eight German patients filled out questionnaires at the start and end of rehabilitation and at 6 months follow-up. Patient-physician relationship variables surveyed were patient involvement (perceived involvement in care scales), trust in the physician, patient satisfaction (PHYSAT) and physician's communicative behaviour (KOVA). After adjusting for multiple confounders, hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to predict the influence of the patient-physician relationship on HRQOL after rehabilitation. We further examined clinical relevance using minimal clinically important differences (MCID). Results In the hierarchical regression analyses, 42.8-54.9% of the variance at the end of rehabilitation and 22.4-40.5% at follow-up were explained. The patient-physician variables patient satisfaction, physician's emotionally supportive communication and effective and open communication accounted for 1.4-2.6% of the variance and proved statistically and clinically significant for HRQOL change. Further predictors for better HRQOL were higher income and less trait anger. Conclusion Aspects of the patient-physician relationship are significant predictors for patients' HRQOL after rehabilitation. Rehabilitation physicians should emotionally support the patients and communicate in an effective and open manner to enhance HRQOL. Implications for rehabilitation Aspects of the patient-physician relationship have effects on adherence and clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. In this cardiac sample, the patient-physician relationship had an influence on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after inpatient rehabilitation. Rehabilitation physicians

  5. Development and Feasibility of a Smartphone, ECG and GPS Based System for Remotely Monitoring Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Worringham, Charles; Rojek, Amanda; Stewart, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its efficacy and cost-effectiveness, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is undertaken by less than one-third of clinically eligible cardiac patients in every country for which data is available. Reasons for non-participation include the unavailability of hospital-based rehabilitation programs, or excessive travel time and distance. For this reason, there have been calls for the development of more flexible alternatives. Methodology and Principal Findings We developed a system to enable walking-based cardiac rehabilitation in which the patient's single-lead ECG, heart rate, GPS-based speed and location are transmitted by a programmed smartphone to a secure server for real-time monitoring by a qualified exercise scientist. The feasibility of this approach was evaluated in 134 remotely-monitored exercise assessment and exercise sessions in cardiac patients unable to undertake hospital-based rehabilitation. Completion rates, rates of technical problems, detection of ECG changes, pre- and post-intervention six minute walk test (6 MWT), cardiac depression and Quality of Life (QOL) were key measures. The system was rated as easy and quick to use. It allowed participants to complete six weeks of exercise-based rehabilitation near their homes, worksites, or when travelling. The majority of sessions were completed without any technical problems, although periodic signal loss in areas of poor coverage was an occasional limitation. Several exercise and post-exercise ECG changes were detected. Participants showed improvements comparable to those reported for hospital-based programs, walking significantly further on the post-intervention 6 MWT, 637 m (95% CI: 565–726), than on the pre-test, 524 m (95% CI: 420–655), and reporting significantly reduced levels of cardiac depression and significantly improved physical health-related QOL. Conclusions and Significance The system provided a feasible and very flexible alternative form of supervised cardiac

  6. Comparison of Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Combined with Relaxation and Meditation Techniques on Reduction of Depression and Anxiety of Cardiovascular Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delui, Mahdy Hassanzadeh; Yari, Maliheh; khouyinezhad, Gholamreza; Amini, Maral; Bayazi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death in developed countries. Most cardiac rehabilitation programs include psychological interventions. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of rehabilitation techniques in cardiac patients including psychological-physical interventions such as Meditation and Relaxation. We enrolled 45 patients with CVD and depression. The patients were allocated to 3 groups (Relaxation, Meditation and Control). There was a significant reduction on depression, systolic blood pressure and heart rate in the Meditation group compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that meditation techniques have better outcomes in cardiac patients for improving depression, reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate than relaxation techniques. PMID:24179555

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation Enrollment and the Impact of Systematic Nursing Interventions for Postmyocardial Infarction and Stent Patients.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joan A Cebrick

    2016-08-01

    A randomized experimental design was used to determine the most effective intervention for enhancing cardiac rehabilitation (CR) enrollment for postmyocardial infarction and stent patients. The 104 subjects (70 males and 34 females; 23-87 years old) were patients with a discharge diagnosis of a myocardial infarction followed by a percutaneous coronary intervention, which included a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and the placement of one or more coronary stents. Regardless of the intervention, patients who received face-to-face nursing interventions were more likely to enroll in CR than were patients who had indirect interventions, χ(2)(3) = 32.84, p < .001. Patients who experienced an entrance interview were most likely to enroll, χ(2)(1) = 86.80, p < .001. Direct logistic regression determined that the full model was statistically significant for all predictors, χ(2)(5), 105.56, p < .001, with the strongest predictor, the entrance interview, having an odds ratio of 1.73.

  8. Comprehensive Cardiovascular Risk Reduction and Cardiac Rehabilitation in Diabetes and the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heinl, Robert E.; Dhindsa, Devinder S.; Mahlof, Elliot N.; Schultz, William M.; Ricketts, Johnathan C.; Varghese, Tina; Esmaeeli, Amirhossein; Allard-Ratick, Marc P.; Millard, Anthony J.; Kelli, Heval M.; Sandesara, Pratik B.; Eapen, Danny J.; Sperling, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity has contributed to a growing burden of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) worldwide. MetS is defined as central obesity along with associated factors such as hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. MetS and DM are associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Healthy behavioural modification is the cornerstone for reducing the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease burden in this population. Comprehensive, multi-disciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs reduce mortality and hospitalizations in patients with MetS and DM. Despite this benefit, patients with MetS and DM are less likely to attend and complete CR because of numerous barriers. Implementation of innovative CR delivery models might improve utilization of CR and cardiovascular outcomes in this high-risk population. PMID:27692115

  9. Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive program for the management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Mary; Genovese, Janet

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the major health problems found in the United States today. Medical and interventional therapies play an important role in the treatment of this chronic condition, but they create a huge economic burden on the health care system. Nonpharmacologic interventions need further exploration. This article reviews research that examined the relationship between exercise and heart failure. A variety of exercise modalities measured outcomes of functional capacity and quality of life in both supervised and nonsupervised settings. Many investigators found exercise training to be safe and to confer benefits, especially on functional capacity, quality of life, and survival. The most favorable outcomes were observed in supervised settings. Cardiac rehabilitation provides an ideal environment for safe exercise and management of the health care needs of patients with heart failure. The multidisciplinary staff is adept at providing a paced approach to activity based on individualized exercise prescriptions, education, and management of this population's many comorbidities.

  10. Efficacy of an early home-based cardiac rehabilitation program for patients after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Cai, Zekun; Xiong, Meihua; Li, Yekuo; Li, Guoying; Deng, Yu; Hau, William Kongto; Li, Shuo; Huang, Wenhua; Qiu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The effect of an early short-term home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program on ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is not yet clear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of our CR program on the improvement of myocardial function using three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) in AMI patients. Methods: Fifty-two AMI patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups after discharge: the rehabilitation group, which participated in an early, home-based CR program, and the control group, which received only usual care. All subjects in both groups underwent 3D-STE examinations of the left ventricle within 48 hours of percutaneous coronary intervention and again 4 weeks after discharge. Global longitudinal strain (GLS), global radial strain (GRS), global area strain (GAS), global circumferential strain (GCS), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and segmental strains were computed. The CR program was initially conducted with supervised inpatient training, followed by an unsupervised home-based training program during a 4-week follow-up. Results: We obtained segmental strains from 832 segments, of which 319 were defined as interventional segments, 179 as ischemic segments, and the remaining segments as normal segments. At the 4-week follow-up, when controlling for baseline values, the rehabilitation group showed significant improvements in GLS, GRS, GCS, GAS, LVEF, and in all of the segmental strains of the 3 subgroups compared with the control group (P <0.05). Conclusion: Our study suggests that an early, home-based CR program can greatly improve the ventricular function of AMI patients in a short period of time. PMID:28033254

  11. Design and methods of the Gentle Cardiac Rehabilitation Study – A behavioral study of tai chi exercise for patients not attending cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Wayne, Peter; Bock, Beth C; Dunsiger, Shira; Wu, Wen-Chih; Stabile, Loren; Yeh, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs reduce overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients with a history of acute coronary events or revascularization procedures, but only 30 % of patients enroll in CR and attrition rates reach up to 60 %. Tai chi, a mind-body practice based on light/moderate aerobic exercise accompanied by meditative components could be a possible exercise option for patients who do not attend CR. Methods/Design Sixty patients will be randomized to a “LITE ” condition (one tai chi session twice weekly for 12 weeks) or to a “PLUS” condition (one tai chi session 3 times weekly for 12 weeks, followed by maintenance classes 1–2 times weekly for an additional 12 weeks). Measurements will be conducted at baseline, 3-, 6-, and 9 months after enrollment. The primary outcome is to determine the feasibility, acceptability and safety of each dose. Secondary outcomes include estimates of effect size of each dose on accelerometry-assessed physical activity; the proportion of patients meeting current recommendations for physical activity; and measures of fitness, quality of life, body weight, and sleep. In addition, we will collect exploratory information on possible mediators (exercise self-efficacy, perceived social support, resilience, mindfulness, and depression). Conclusions Findings from this pilot study will provide preliminary indications about the usefulness of tai chi as an exercise option for patients not attending traditional CR programs. Results will also shed light on the possible mechanisms by which tai chi practice may improve overall physical activity among patients with atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. PMID:26115880

  12. Walking tests during the exercise training: specific use for the cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Casillas, J-M; Hannequin, A; Besson, D; Benaïm, S; Krawcow, C; Laurent, Y; Gremeaux, V

    2013-10-01

    Walk tests, principally the six-minute walk test (6mWT), constitute a safe, useful submaximal tool for exercise tolerance testing in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The 6mWT result reflects functional status, walking autonomy and efficacy of CR on walking endurance, which is more pronounced in patients with low functional capacity (heart failure - cardiac surgery). The 6mWT result is a strong predictor of mortality. However, clinically significant changes and reliability are still subject to debate - probably because of the ambiguity in terms of the target speed (either comfortable or brisk walking). Of the other time-based walk tests, the 2-minute-walk test is the only one applicable during CR, reserved for patients with severe disabilities by its psychometric properties. Fixed-distance tests (principally the 200m fast walk test) and incremental shuttle walking, tests explore higher levels of effort and may represent a safe and inexpensive alternative to laboratory-based tests during CR. These walking tests may be useful for personalizing prescription of training programs. However, the minimum clinically significant difference has not yet been determined. Lastly, walking tests appear to be potential useful tools in promoting physical activity and behavioural changes at home. Thus, validation of other walk tests with better psychometric properties will be necessary.

  13. Motivational processes and well-being in cardiac rehabilitation: a self-determination theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rachel Jane; Hudson, Joanne; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie; Doust, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the processes underpinning changes in psychological well-being and behavioural regulation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) patients using self-determination theory (SDT). A repeated measures design was used to identify the longitudinal relationships between SDT variables, psychological well-being and exercise behaviour during and following a structured CR programme. Participants were 389 cardiac patients (aged 36-84 years; M(age) = 64 ± 9 years; 34.3% female) referred to a 12-week-supervised CR programme. Psychological need satisfaction, behavioural regulation, health-related quality of life, physical self-worth, anxiety and depression were measured at programme entry, exit and six month post-programme. During the programme, increases in autonomy satisfaction predicted positive changes in behavioural regulation, and improvements in competence and relatedness satisfaction predicted improvements in behavioural regulation and well-being. Competence satisfaction also positively predicted habitual physical activity. Decreases in external regulation and increases in intrinsic motivation predicted improvements in physical self-worth and physical well-being, respectively. Significant longitudinal relationships were identified whereby changes during the programme predicted changes in habitual physical activity and the mental quality of life from exit to six month follow-up. Findings provide insight into the factors explaining psychological changes seen during CR. They highlight the importance of increasing patients' perceptions of psychological need satisfaction and self-determined motivation to improve well-being during the structured component of a CR programme and longer term physical activity.

  14. Gender-specific issues in cardiac rehabilitation: do women with ischaemic heart disease need specially tailored programmes?

    PubMed

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Grande, Gesine; Loewel, Hannelore; Völler, Heinz; Mittag, Oskar

    2007-04-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) has changed from a disease of middle-aged men in the late 1970s to a disease of elderly women in the 2000s. Most clinical studies during the past three decades have been conducted with men. Cardiac rehabilitation programmes were also developed with special regard to improving the rate of return to work in middle-aged men. The rehabilitation needs of older patients and women in particular have been largely neglected. The aim of this review is briefly to outline our present knowledge on gender issues in cardiac rehabilitation, and to specify barriers with regard to physical activities especially in (older) women. Coping with a cardiac event, women tend to minimize or play down the impact of their health situation and avoid burdening their social contacts. After a first cardiac event, women report greater psychological distress and lower self-efficacy and self-esteem. In addition, older age, lower exercise levels and reduced functional capacity or co-morbid conditions such as osteoporosis and urinary incontinence are barriers to physical activities in women with IHD. Recent studies on psychosocial intervention revealed less favourable results in women compared with men. These findings have not yet been well explained. This emphasizes our current lack of knowledge about the processes and determinants of successful psychosocial interventions in men and women with IHD. A large (European) trial on gender-specific coping styles, needs, and preferences of older women, and the effects of psychosocial intervention is proposed.

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation programme after transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gustavo S; Melo, Rosangela D; Deresz, Luís F; Dal Lago, Pedro; Pontes, Mauro Rn; Karsten, Marlus

    2017-05-01

    Background Aortic stenosis is a valvular heart disease characterised by fixed obstruction of the left ventricular outflow. It can be managed by surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This review aimed to describe the evidence supporting a cardiac rehabilitation programme on functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients after sAVR or TAVI. Methods The search was conducted on multiple databases from January to March 2016. All studies were eligible that evaluated the effects of a post-interventional cardiac rehabilitation programme in aortic stenosis patients. The methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis was performed separately by procedure and between procedures. The walked distance during the six-minute walk test (6MWD) and Barthel index were evaluated. The analysis was conducted in Review Manager. Results Five studies were included (292 TAVI and 570 sAVR patients). The meta-analysis showed that a cardiac rehabilitation programme was associated with a significant improvement in 6MWD (0.69 (0.47, 0.91); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.80 (0.29, 1.30); P = 0.002) after TAVI and 6MWD (0.79 (0.43, 1.15); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.93 (0.67, 1.18); P < 0.001) after sAVR. In addition, the meta-analysis showed that the cardiac rehabilitation programme promoted a similar gain in 6MWD (4.28% (-12.73, 21.29); P = 0.62) and Barthel index (-1.52 points (-4.81, 1.76); P = 0.36) after sAVR or TAVI. Conclusions The cardiac rehabilitation programme improved the functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients. Patients who underwent TAVI benefitted with a cardiac rehabilitation programme similar to sAVR patients.

  16. Degree and Direction of Change of Body Weight in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Impact on Exercise Capacity and Cardiac Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Gomadam, Pallavi S; Douglas, Christopher J; Sacrinty, Matthew T; Brady, Molly M; Paladenech, Connie C; Robinson, Killian C

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves functional capacity and reduces mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. It also improves cardiovascular risk factors and aids in weight reduction. Because of the increase in morbidly obese patients with cardiovascular disease, the prevalence of obesity and patterns of weight change in those undergoing CR merit fresh study. We studied 1,320 participants in a 12-week CR program at our academic medical center. We compared 5 categories: 69 class III obese (body mass index [BMI] ≥40) patients, 128 class II obese patients (BMI 35.0 to 39.9), 318 class I obese patients (BMI 30.0 to 34.9), 487 overweight patients (BMI 25.0 to 29.9), and 318 normal weight patients (BMI 18.5 to 24.9). Exercise capacity in METs, weight, blood pressure, and fasting lipid profile were measured before and after CR. Overall, 131 patients gained weight, 827 had no significant weight change, and 363 lost weight (176 lost 3% to 5% of their baseline weight, 161 lost 5% to 10%, and 26 lost >10%). Exercise capacity, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved in all patients. Class III obese patients had the smallest improvement in peak METs (p <0.001), but the greatest weight loss. Patients who lost >10% of their baseline weight had the greatest improvements in exercise capacity, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. In conclusion, after CR, a minority of patients lost weight. Most patients had no significant weight change and some even gained weight. The greatest loss was seen in class III obese patients. All patient groups showed improvements in exercise capacity and risk factors, regardless of the direction or degree of weight change.

  17. Perceptions of risk factors of cardiovascular disease and cardiac rehabilitation: a cross-sectional study targeting the Chinese population in the Midlands, UK

    PubMed Central

    Za, Tay; Lau, Jeff C F; Wong, Arthur C K; Wong, Alice W S; Lui, Sally; Fong, James W D; Chow, Patrick Y C; Jolly, Kate B

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To find out and explore the knowledge and opinion of Chinese people on cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Design A cross-sectional study using 14-item bilingual (Chinese and English) questionnaires that include information on demographics, health status, cardiovascular disease related knowledge and perception, and awareness and understanding of the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Setting Chinese community groups in the Midlands, UK from January to April 2008. Participants 436 questionnaires from Chinese adults over 18 were obtained. Main outcome measures Current knowledge and attitude towards cardiovascular disease and awareness of cardiac rehabilitation. Results Obesity was the most common risk factor identified by 80.7% of participants. Those originated from China had significantly less knowledge compared with subjects from other countries (p<0.001). People who have had exposure or experience of cardiac disease rated a higher risk of cardiac disease for Chinese living in the UK than people without experience. A majority (81.7%) used orthodox medicine and perceived it to be most effective against cardiac disease. Only 30% of participants were aware of cardiac rehabilitation. Conclusion The coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors of Chinese population have increased significantly in the last decade. Cardiac rehabilitation awareness was poor among the sample population of this study and language barrier is still a problem. More large studies on Chinese population assessing CAD risk should be done to provide more evidence on CAD prevention for this growing population in the Western world. PMID:27326032

  18. Prediction of oxygen consumption in cardiac rehabilitation patients performing leg ergometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, John Gershwin

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, to determine the validity of the ACSM leg ergometry equation in the prediction of steady-state oxygen consumption (VO2) in a heterogeneous population of cardiac patients. Second, to determine whether a more accurate prediction equation could be developed for use in the cardiac population. Thirty-one cardiac rehabilitation patients participated in the study of which 24 were men and 7 were women. Biometric variables (mean +/- sd) of the participants were as follows: age = 61.9 +/- 9.5 years; height = 172.6 +/- 1.6 cm; and body mass = 82.3 +/- 10.6 kg. Subjects exercised on a MonarchTM cycle ergometer at 0, 180, 360, 540 and 720 kgm ˙ min-1. The length of each stage was five minutes. Heart rate, ECG, and VO2 were continuously monitored. Blood pressure and heart rate were collected at the end of each stage. Steady state VO 2 was calculated for each stage using the average of the last two minutes. Correlation coefficients, standard error of estimate, coefficient of determination, total error, and mean bias were used to determine the accuracy of the ACSM equation (1995). The analysis found the ACSM equation to be a valid means of estimating VO2 in cardiac patients. Simple linear regression was used to develop a new equation. Regression analysis found workload to be a significant predictor of VO2. The following equation is the result: VO2 = (1.6 x kgm ˙ min-1) + 444 ml ˙ min-1. The r of the equation was .78 (p < .05) and the standard error of estimate was 211 ml ˙ min-1. Analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences between means for actual and predicted VO2 values for each equation. The analysis found the ACSM and new equation to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO2 during unloaded pedaling. Furthermore, the ACSM equation was found to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO 2 during the first loaded stage of exercise. When the accuracy of the ACSM and new equations were compared based on

  19. Myocardial work during endurance training and resistance training: a daily comparison, from workout session 1 through completion of cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jenny; Hubbard, Matthew; McCullough-Shock, Tiffany; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Strauss, Danielle; Anderson, Valerie; Lawrence, Anne; Malorzo, Emily

    2010-04-01

    Patients in cardiac rehabilitation are typically advised to complete a period of supervised endurance training before beginning resistance training. In this study, however, we compared the peak rate-pressure product (RPP, a calculated indicator of myocardial work) of patients during two types of exercise-treadmill walking and chest press-from workout session 1 through completion of cardiac rehabilitation. Twenty-one patients (4 women and 17 men, aged 35 to 70 years) were enrolled in the study; they were referred for cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, or both. The participants did treadmill walking and chest press exercises during each workout session. Peak values for heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were recorded, and the peak RPP was calculated (peak HR multiply sign in box peak SBP). Paired t tests were used to compare the data collected during the two types of exercise across 19 workout sessions. The mean peak values for HR, SBP, and RPP were lower during resistance training than during endurance training; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05), with only one exception (the SBP for session 1). Across all 19 workout sessions, the participants performed more myocardial work, as indicated by the peak RPP, during treadmill walking than during the chest press.

  20. Myocardial work during endurance training and resistance training: a daily comparison, from workout session 1 through completion of cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Matthew; McCullough-Shock, Tiffany; Simms, Kay; Cheng, Dunlei; Hartman, Julie; Strauss, Danielle; Anderson, Valerie; Lawrence, Anne; Malorzo, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Patients in cardiac rehabilitation are typically advised to complete a period of supervised endurance training before beginning resistance training. In this study, however, we compared the peak rate-pressure product (RPP, a calculated indicator of myocardial work) of patients during two types of exercise—treadmill walking and chest press—from workout session 1 through completion of cardiac rehabilitation. Twenty-one patients (4 women and 17 men, aged 35 to 70 years) were enrolled in the study; they were referred for cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, or both. The participants did treadmill walking and chest press exercises during each workout session. Peak values for heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were recorded, and the peak RPP was calculated (peak HR ⊠ peak SBP). Paired t tests were used to compare the data collected during the two types of exercise across 19 workout sessions. The mean peak values for HR, SBP, and RPP were lower during resistance training than during endurance training; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05), with only one exception (the SBP for session 1). Across all 19 workout sessions, the participants performed more myocardial work, as indicated by the peak RPP, during treadmill walking than during the chest press. PMID:20396420

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation for Women: A Systematic Review of Barriers and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Supervía, Marta; Medina-Inojosa, Jose R; Yeung, Colin; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Squires, Ray W; Pérez-Terzic, Carmen M; Brewer, LaPrincess C; Leth, Shawn E; Thomas, Randal J

    2017-03-13

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services improve various clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease, but such services are underutilized, particularly in women. The aim of this study was to identify evidence-based barriers and solutions for CR participation in women. A literature search was carried out using PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, OVID/Medline, and CINAHL to identify studies that have assessed barriers and/or solutions to CR participation. Titles and abstracts were screened, and then the full-text of articles that met study criteria were reviewed. We identified 24 studies that studied barriers to CR participation in women and 31 studies that assessed the impact of various interventions to improve CR referral, enrollment, and/or completion of CR in women. Patient-level barriers included lower education level, multiple comorbid conditions, non-English native language, lack of social support, and high burden of family responsibilities. We found support for the use of automatic referral and assisted enrollment to improve CR participation. A small number of studies suggest that incentive-based strategies, as well as home-based programs, may contribute to improving CR attendance and completion rates. A systematic approach to CR referral, including automatic CR referral, may help overcome barriers to CR referral in women and should be implemented in clinical practice. However, more studies are needed to help identify the best methods to improve CR attendance and completion of CR rates in women.

  2. Healthy Lifestyle Medicine in the Traditional Healthcare Environment-Primary Care and Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark A; Kaminsky, Leonard A

    There is unquestioned value of the need to incorporate Healthy Lifestyle Medicine (HLM) within the traditional models of healthcare. Primary care providers are well positioned to implement HLM as a routine aspect of their healthcare practice. Unfortunately, barriers for this to occur, including poor professional training in the components of HLM and limitations in the time they have available to spend with patients, result in inadequate delivery of HLM from primary care providers. Thus, new approaches for the delivery of HLM need to be developed that would allow primary care providers better, and more, opportunities to make patient referrals. Ideally, this would start with creating a culture change within communities that embraces the importance on living a healthy lifestyle. One opportunity which should be considered is expanding access to currently available options, such as cardiac rehabilitation programs and worksite wellness programs. Both types of programs already provide key elements of HLM within their existing structure. However, new models also need to be developed. Community-based HL centers comprising HL specialists including counselors, exercise physiologists, dietitians, and physical therapists, could be developed and become core locations for the promotion of HLM.

  3. Fatalism and short-termism as cultural barriers to cardiac rehabilitation among underprivileged men.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mathieu; Dumas, Alex; Stuart, Stephen A

    2013-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death and disability in Canada, and individuals of low socioeconomic status appear particularly vulnerable to such disorders. Although many health-related institutions have promoted cardiovascular health and have created cardiac rehabilitation programmes, they have not attained their desired outcomes, especially amongst socioeconomically deprived men. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's sociocultural theory, this qualitative study aims to understand the social mechanisms underpinning the lifestyles and health practices of men who had suffered a cardiovascular incident requiring hospitalisation. In all, 20 interviews were conducted with francophone men aged 40 to 65 years living in the province of Québec, Canada. The analysis strongly suggests that the respondents' living conditions and disease were significant obstacles to their adoption of a healthy lifestyle. Their despair and pessimism, apparently originating in the harshness of their financial realities, physical limitations and social networks, led them to believe that they could do little to control their lives, thereby limiting the fulfillment of any long-term ambitions. Therefore, the adoption of a habitus characterised by fatalistic and short-term perceptions of health influenced their lifestyle choices, leading them to maintain lives that were in stark contrast with the recommendations made by health promotion experts.

  4. Digital Health Intervention as an Adjunct to Cardiac Rehabilitation Reduces Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Rehospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Widmer, R Jay; Allison, Thomas G; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) following myocardial infarction is vastly underused. As such, the aim of this study was to test a digital health intervention (DHI) as an adjunct to CR. Patients undergoing standard Mayo Clinic CR were recruited prior to CR (n = 25) or after 3 months CR (n = 17). Changes in risk factors and rehospitalizations plus emergency department (ED) visits were assessed after 3 months. Patients assigned to DHI during CR had significant reductions in weight (-4.0 ± 5.2 kg, P = .001), blood pressure (-10.8 ± 13.5 mmHg, P = .0009), and the group using DHI after 3 months of CR had significant reductions in weight (-2.5 ± 3.8 kg, P = .04) and systolic BP (-12.6 ± 12.4 mmHg, P = .001) compared to the control groups. Both DHI groups also displayed significant reductions in rehospitalizations/ED visits (-37.9 %, P = 0.01 and -28 %, P = .04, respectively). This study suggests that a guideline-driven DHI CR program can augment secondary prevention strategies during usual CR by improving risk factors for repeat events.

  5. Occult peripheral artery disease is common and limits the benefit achieved in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tam, Marty C; Longenecker, Chris T; Chow, Chen; Vest, Marianne; Sukeena, Richard; Madan Mohan, Sri K; Carman, Teresa; Parikh, Sahil A; Josephson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has proven morbidity and mortality benefits in cardiovascular disease, which directly correlates with exercise performance achieved. Many patients in CR exercise at sub-optimal levels, without obvious limitations. Occult lower-extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be a determinant of diminished exercise capacity and reduced benefit obtained from traditional CR. In this prospective study of 150 consecutive patients enrolled in Phase II CR, we describe the prevalence of PAD, the utility of externally validated screening questionnaires, and the observed impact on CR outcomes. Abnormal ankle-brachial indices (ABI) (< 0.9 and >1.4) were observed in 19% of those studied. The Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire was insensitive for detecting PAD by low ABI in this population, and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire and a modified Gardner protocol demonstrated a lack of typical symptoms with low levels of activity. Importantly, at completion of traditional CR, exercise improvement measured in metabolic equivalents (METs) was worse in those with a low ABI compared to those with a normal ABI (+1.39 vs +2.41 METs, p = 0.002). In conclusion, PAD is common in patients in Phase II CR and often clinically occult. Screening based on standard questionnaires appears insensitive in this population, suggesting a need for a broad-based screening strategy with ABI measurements. In this study, undiagnosed PAD significantly attenuated improvements in exercise performance, which potentially has bearings on future clinical events.

  6. [Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Cardiology for cardiovascular disease prevention and cardiac rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Velasco, J A; Cosín, J; Maroto, J M; Muñiz, J; Casasnovas, J A; Plaza, I; Abadal, L T

    2000-08-01

    The priorities for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases should be focused on patients with established disease and high risk subjects, with individual global risk always being taken into account. The current evidence on the influence of the main risk factors are unanimous (dyslipemia, tobacco, hypertension and diabetes mellitus), being somewhat less so in cases of sedentarism, obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The evidence concerning other risk factors still remains controversial. Guidelines for the control of the different risk factors should be based on the evidence derived from both epidemiological or clinical trials. The recommendations published by several scientific societies should also be followed. There are, at present, important evidence on the efficacy of smoking cessation, the treatment of arterial hypertension and particularly on the successful control of lipid levels with lipid-lowering drugs, especially with statins. There is also evidence on the need for rigorous control of diabetic patients not only in relation to the glucose levels but also to dyslipemia. The most efficient measures for a reduction in morbidity and mortality are cessation of smoking, appropriate hypertensive therapy, a comprehensive program of cardiac rehabilitation and overall the successful control of lipid levels with statins.

  7. Psychosocial aspects in cardiac rehabilitation: From theory to practice. A position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Pogosova, Nana; Saner, Hugo; Pedersen, Susanne S; Cupples, Margaret E; McGee, Hannah; Höfer, Stefan; Doyle, Frank; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-10-01

    A large body of empirical research shows that psychosocial risk factors (PSRFs) such as low socio-economic status, social isolation, stress, type-D personality, depression and anxiety increase the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and also contribute to poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and prognosis in patients with established CHD. PSRFs may also act as barriers to lifestyle changes and treatment adherence and may moderate the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Furthermore, there appears to be a bidirectional interaction between PSRFs and the cardiovascular system. Stress, anxiety and depression affect the cardiovascular system through immune, neuroendocrine and behavioural pathways. In turn, CHD and its associated treatments may lead to distress in patients, including anxiety and depression. In clinical practice, PSRFs can be assessed with single-item screening questions, standardised questionnaires, or structured clinical interviews. Psychotherapy and medication can be considered to alleviate any PSRF-related symptoms and to enhance HRQoL, but the evidence for a definite beneficial effect on cardiac endpoints is inconclusive. A multimodal behavioural intervention, integrating counselling for PSRFs and coping with illness should be included within comprehensive CR. Patients with clinically significant symptoms of distress should be referred for psychological counselling or psychologically focused interventions and/or psychopharmacological treatment. To conclude, the success of CR may critically depend on the interdependence of the body and mind and this interaction needs to be reflected through the assessment and management of PSRFs in line with robust scientific evidence, by trained staff, integrated within the core CR team.

  8. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and secondary events in outpatients with coronary heart disease from the Heart and Soul Study

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Alexis L.; Ku, Ivy A.; Christenson, Robert H.; DeFilippi, Christopher R.; Schiller, Nelson B.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Context Levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) predict secondary cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Objectives To determine the association of hs-cTnT with structural and functional measures of heart disease and the extent to which these measures explain the relationship between hs-cTnT and secondary events. Design, Setting, and Participants We measured serum concentrations of hs-cTnT and performed exercise treadmill testing with stress echocardiography in a prospective cohort study of 984 outpatients with CHD who were enrolled between September 2000 and December 2002 and followed for a median of 8.2 years. Main Outcomes Measures Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, heart failure, or cardiovascular death), determined by review of medical records and death certificates. Results Of 984 participants, 794 (80.7%) had detectable hs-cTnT levels. At baseline, higher hs-cTnT was associated with greater inducible ischemia and with worse left ventricular ejection fraction, left atrial function, diastolic function, left ventricular mass, and treadmill exercise capacity. During follow-up, 317 participants (32.2%) experienced a cardiovascular event. After adjustment for clinical risk factors, baseline cardiac structure and function, and other biomarkers (NT-proBNP and C-reactive protein), each doubling in hs-cTnT remained associated with a 37% higher rate of cardiovascular events (HR 1.37, 95%CI 1.14, 1.65; P=0.001). Conclusions In outpatients with stable CHD, higher hs-cTnT levels were associated with multiple abnormalities of cardiac structure and function but remained independently predictive of secondary events. These findings suggest that hs-cTnT may detect an element of risk that is not captured by existing measures of cardiac disease severity. PMID:23568589

  9. Assessment and treatment of chronic work-related pain disorders in an outpatient university rehabilitation setting in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Reneman, M.F.; Dijkstra, S.J.; Jorritsma, W.; Muskee, C.; Schiphorst Preuper, H.R.; Göeken, L.N.H.

    2001-01-01

    Points of view of the assessment and treatment of chronic work-related disorders in a Dutch university rehabilitation setting are described. After a general introduction in which the basic philosophy is outlined, medical issues as well as issues regarding two treatment programs and the evaluation of functional capacity are described. The article ends with a brief description of current and future research programs.

  10. 42 CFR 410.27 - Outpatient hospital or CAH services and supplies incident to a physician or nonphysician...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... intensive cardiac rehabilitation services, direct supervision must be furnished by a doctor of medicine or... rehabilitation, and intensive cardiac rehabilitation services, direct supervision must be furnished by a...

  11. Peak Oxygen Uptake after Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a 12-Month Maintenance Program versus Usual Care

    PubMed Central

    Madssen, Erik; Arbo, Ingerid; Granøien, Ingrid; Walderhaug, Liv; Moholdt, Trine

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise capacity is a strong predictor of survival in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise capacity improves after cardiac rehabilitation exercise training, but previous studies have demonstrated a decline in peak oxygen uptake after ending a formal rehabilitation program. There is a lack of knowledge on how long-term exercise adherence can be achieved in CAD patients. We therefore assessed if a 12-month maintenance program following cardiac rehabilitation would lead to increased adherence to exercise and increased exercise capacity compared to usual care. Materials and Methods Two-centre, open, parallel randomized controlled trial with 12 months follow-up comparing usual care to a maintenance program. The maintenance program consisted of one monthly supervised high intensity interval training session, a written exercise program and exercise diary, and a maximum exercise test every third month during follow-up. Forty-nine patients (15 women) on optimal medical treatment were included following discharge from cardiac rehabilitation. The primary endpoint was change in peak oxygen uptake at follow-up; secondary endpoints were physical activity level, quality of life and blood markers of cardiovascular risk. Results There was no change in peak oxygen uptake from baseline to follow-up in either group (intervention group 27.9 (±4.7) to 28.8 (±5.6) mL·kg (-1) min (−1), control group 32.0 (±6.2) to 32.8 (±5.8) mL·kg (−1) min (−1), with no between-group difference, p = 0.22). Quality of life and blood biomarkers remained essentially unchanged, and both self-reported and measured physical activity levels were similar between groups after 12 months. Conclusions A maintenance exercise program for 12 months did not improve adherence to exercise or peak oxygen uptake in CAD patients after discharge from cardiac rehabilitation compared to usual care. This suggests that infrequent supervised high intensity interval training sessions are

  12. Prevalence of mild cognitive impairment in employable patients after acute coronary event in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, Annett; Heidler, Maria-Dorothea; Haubold, Kathrin; Schikora, Martin; Reibis, Rona; Wegscheider, Karl; Jöbges, Michael; Völler, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adequate cognitive function in patients is a prerequisite for successful implementation of patient education and lifestyle coping in comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. Although the association between cardiovascular diseases and cognitive impairments (CIs) is well known, the prevalence particularly of mild CI in CR and the characteristics of affected patients have been insufficiently investigated so far. Methods In this prospective observational study, 496 patients (54.5 ± 6.2 years, 79.8% men) with coronary artery disease following an acute coronary event (ACE) were analyzed. Patients were enrolled within 14 days of discharge from the hospital in a 3-week inpatient CR program. Patients were tested for CI using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) upon admission to and discharge from CR. Additionally, sociodemographic, clinical, and physiological variables were documented. The data were analyzed descriptively and in a multivariate stepwise backward elimination regression model with respect to CI. Results At admission to CR, the CI (MoCA score < 26) was determined in 182 patients (36.7%). Significant differences between CI and no CI groups were identified, and CI group was associated with high prevalence of smoking (65.9 vs 56.7%, P = 0.046), heavy (physically demanding) workloads (26.4 vs 17.8%, P < 0.001), sick leave longer than 1 month prior to CR (28.6 vs 18.5%, P = 0.026), reduced exercise capacity (102.5 vs 118.8 W, P = 0.006), and a shorter 6-min walking distance (401.7 vs 421.3 m, P = 0.021) compared to no CI group. The age- and education-adjusted model showed positive associations with CI only for sick leave more than 1 month prior to ACE (odds ratio [OR] 1.673, 95% confidence interval 1.07–2.79; P = 0.03) and heavy workloads (OR 2.18, 95% confidence interval 1.42–3.36; P < 0.01). Conclusion The prevalence of CI in CR was considerably high, affecting more than one-third of cardiac patients. Besides age and education

  13. Using a Combined Platform of Swarm Intelligence Algorithms and GIS to Provide Land Suitability Maps for Locating Cardiac Rehabilitation Defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    KAFFASH-CHARANDABI, Neda; SADEGHI-NIARAKI, Abolghasem; PARK, Dong-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiac arrest is a condition in which the heart is completely stopped and is not pumping any blood. Although most cardiac arrest cases are reported from homes or hospitals, about 20% occur in public areas. Therefore, these areas need to be investigated in terms of cardiac arrest incidence so that places of high incidence can be identified and cardiac rehabilitation defibrillators installed there. Methods: In order to investigate a study area in Petersburg, Pennsylvania State, and to determine appropriate places for installing defibrillators with 5-year period data, swarm intelligence algorithms were used. Moreover, the location of the defibrillators was determined based on the following five evaluation criteria: land use, altitude of the area, economic conditions, distance from hospitals and approximate areas of reported cases of cardiac arrest for public places that were created in geospatial information system (GIS). Results: The A-P HADEL algorithm results were more precise about 27.36%. The validation results indicated a wider coverage of real values and the verification results confirmed the faster and more exact optimization of the cost function in the PSO method. Conclusion: The study findings emphasize the necessity of applying optimal optimization methods along with GIS and precise selection of criteria in the selection of optimal locations for installing medical facilities because the selected algorithm and criteria dramatically affect the final responses. Meanwhile, providing land suitability maps for installing facilities across hot and risky spots has the potential to save many lives. PMID:26587471

  14. Influence of Low Peak Respiratory Exchange Ratio on Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare and analyze the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in two groups based on the peak respiratory exchange ratio (RERpeak) 1.1 values using the exercise tolerance test (ETT) results, and to investigate the reasons for early termination of ETT. Methods Patients with acute coronary syndrome who participated in CR exercise training were selected and all subjects underwent 6 weeks of CR exercise training. ETT was performed on a treadmill using a Modified Bruce Protocol before and after CR exercise training. According to the result of the first ETT, the subjects were divided into two groups: those with an RERpeak≥1.1 (n=33) and those with an RERpeak<1.1 (n=22). We investigated the reasons for ETT termination and compared the effect of CR between the groups. Results The reasons for the early termination of the first ETT in the RERpeak<1.1 group were subjective dyspnea, abnormal cardiovascular responses, leg fatigue and other problems. After a 6-week CR, the peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and ETT time increased, and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and RPP (rate pressure product) at stage 3 decreased in both the RERpeak<1.1 and RERpeak≥1.1 groups. Conclusion CR exercise training improved exercise capacity, not only in the RERpeak≥1.1 group, but also in the RERpeak<1.1 group. This means that patients with a lower exercise tolerance could also benefit from the effects of CR. Thoughtful consideration to identify the direct and indirect causes for the early termination of ETT would be necessary to improve the efficiency of CR. PMID:28119843

  15. Physical activity levels during phase IV cardiac rehabilitation in a group of male myocardial infarction patients

    PubMed Central

    Woolf-May, K; Bird, S; MacIntyre, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine physical activity levels during phase IV cardiac rehabilitation in 31 male myocardial infarction patients (median age 62, range 53–77 years). Methods: Patients recorded daily physical activity over 16 weeks in a diary. Diaries were analysed for total general physical activity (TGPA), leisure time physical activity (LTPA), and "active for life" exercise classes (AFL). Pre- and post-observation period (OP) subjects underwent a 10 m shuttle walking test (SWT) to determine changes in aerobic fitness. Rate of perceived exertion (RPE) determined exercise intensity. Estimated gross energy expenditure (EEE) was determined by a regression equation between RPE and Vo2 (l min–1) during SWT. A total of 97% of subjects were on lipid lowering medication. Results: There were no correlations between Vo2 (l min–1) and body mass, therefore kcal min–1 indicated activity intensity. There were no significant changes in physical activity patterns or in aerobic fitness. Estimated total LTPA (median 1376, range 128–3380 kcal week–1) was less than that recommended to improve aerobic fitness and/or slow progression of coronary artery disease. Sixteen subjects attended a median of 29 (range 1–46) AFL during LTPA; one way ANOVA showed these subjects worked at greater EEE (AFL, n = 16, 6.6 (standard deviation 1.4) v no-AFL, n = 15, 5.1 (1.8) EEE kcal min–1, p = 0.017). Conclusion: Physical activity was stable, but patients' EEE appeared insufficient to improve aerobic fitness or slow progression of coronary artery disease. It was suggested that the promotion of LTPA and the availability of AFL classes should be reconsidered. PMID:15728680

  16. Improving access to cardiac rehabilitation using the internet: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lear, Scott A; Singer, Joel; Banner-Lukaris, Davina; Horvat, Dan; Park, Julie E; Bates, Joanna; Ignaszewski, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is essential for secondary prevention, yet only 10%-30% of eligible patients attend as geographical proximity is a major barrier. We evaluated a 'virtual' CR program (vCRP) delivered by the Internet to patients in small urban and rural areas. In our study, in-patients (n=78) with acute coronary syndrome or post-revascularization were randomized to usual care (UC) or vCRP. The vCRP was a four-month program that included heart rate monitoring; physiologic data capture; education sessions; ask-an-expert sessions; and chat sessions with a nurse, exercise specialist and dietitian. Participants were assessed at baseline and four months, and followed for another 12 months. The primary outcome was change in maximal time on the treadmill stress test (MTT) between groups adjusted for age, sex, diabetes status and Internet use for health information. The vCRP resulted in a greater increase in MTT by 45.7 seconds (95% CI: 1.0, 90.5) compared to usual care (p=0.045). Cholesterol levels and dietary quality improved in the vCRP compared to the UC group. Participants perceived the vCRP to be an accessible, convenient and effective way to received healthcare. Eleven (30%) and 6 (18%) participants in the UC and vCRP groups, respectively, had cardiovascular-related events (p=0.275). In conclusion, the vCRP was safe and effective and resulted in sustainable risk reduction without the requirement of face-to-face visits and directly monitored exercise.

  17. Impaired Cerebrovascular Function in Coronary Artery Disease Patients and Recovery Following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Anazodo, Udunna C.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Suskin, Neville; Ssali, Tracy; Wang, Danny J. J.; St. Lawrence, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia in 34 CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume (GMV) images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate (AC), insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal, and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the AC, insula, post-central and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in GMV were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-months exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral AC, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right AC, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the AC is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26779011

  18. Behaviour change techniques in home-based cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Neil; Kee, Frank; Donnelly, Michael; Cardwell, Christopher; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes offering secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) advise healthy lifestyle behaviours, with the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) of goals and planning, feedback and monitoring, and social support recommended. More information is needed about BCT use in home-based CR to support these programmes in practice. Aim To identify and describe the use of BCTs in home-based CR programmes. Design and setting Randomised controlled trials of home-based CR between 2005 and 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE®, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Database. Method Reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility. Relevant data, including BCTs, were extracted from included studies. A meta-analysis studied risk factor change in home-based and comparator programmes. Results From 2448 studies identified, 11 of good methodological quality (10 on post-myocardial infarction, one on heart failure, 1907 patients) were included. These reported the use of 20 different BCTs. Social support (unspecified) was used in all studies and goal setting (behaviour) in 10. Of the 11 studies, 10 reported effectiveness in reducing CVD risk factors, but one study showed no improvement compared to usual care. This study differed from effective programmes in that it didn’t include BCTs that had instructions on how to perform the behaviour and monitoring, or a credible source. Conclusion Social support and goal setting were frequently used BCTs in home-based CR programmes, with the BCTs related to monitoring, instruction on how to perform the behaviour, and credible source being included in effective programmes. Further robust trials are needed to determine the relative value of different BCTs within CR programmes. PMID:27481858

  19. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a firefighter after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Sandra; Arnett, Justin K.; Kennedy, Kathleen; Franklin, Jay O.; Berbarie, Rafic F.

    2014-01-01

    Firefighters who have received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) are asked to retire or are permanently placed on restricted duty because of concerns about their being incapacitated by an ICD shock during a fire emergency. We present the case of a 40-year-old firefighter who, after surviving sudden cardiac arrest and undergoing ICD implantation, sought to demonstrate his fitness for active duty by completing a high-intensity, occupation-specific cardiac rehabilitation training program. The report details the exercise training, ICD monitoring, and stress testing that he underwent. During the post-training treadmill stress test in firefighter turnout gear, the patient reached a functional capacity of 17 metabolic equivalents (METs), exceeding the 12-MET level required for his occupation. He had no ICD shock therapy or recurrent sustained arrhythmias during stress testing or at any time during his cardiac rehabilitation stay. By presenting this case, we hope to stimulate further discussion about firefighters who have an ICD, can meet the functional capacity requirements of their occupation, and want to return to work. PMID:24982569

  20. Exercise tolerance testing in a cardiac rehabilitation setting: an exploratory study of its safety and practicality for exercise prescription and outcome data collection

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Chris; Adams, Jenny; Hartman, Julie; Lindsey, Christopher; Doler, Mike; Suhr, Janet

    2007-01-01

    An exercise test is a valuable tool that should be a part of every patient's assessment before beginning cardiac rehabilitation. We analyzed data from one exercise tolerance test used in a cardiac rehabilitation program among 103 subjects: 65 men with a mean age of 60.5 years and 38 women with a mean age of 62.4 years. Resultsindicated that, after cardiac rehabilitation, subjects had significantimprovementin maximum metabolic equivalents (an increase of 0.9, P < 0.0001), which indicates functional capacity, and an improvement in rate of perceived exertion (decrease of 1 point; not statistically significant), which indicates more tolerance at the same work level. In general, men showed more improvement than women on the various outcome measures. Further, the testing protocolwas shown to be safe. Blood pressure values did not exceed 188/86 mm Hg, and maximum heart rate did not exceed 165 beats per minute. The increased practice of exercise testing before and after cardiac rehabilitation may help expedite the development of a standardized exercise tolerance protocol to optimize patient rehabilitation and recovery and document outcomes for both individual patients and the rehabilitation program as a whole. PMID:17948105

  1. Feasibility of an exercise intervention for fatigued breast cancer patients at a community-based cardiac rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Stefanie; Fitzgeorge, Lyndsay; Unsworth, Karen; Massel, David; Suskin, Neville; Prapavessis, Harry; Sanatani, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Exercise is beneficial to quality of life after cancer treatment, yet few cancer survivors meet exercise guidelines. Our study sought to determine the feasibility of an oncology rehabilitation exercise program embedded within a cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods Patients who rated their fatigue >4/10 after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer were screened for eligibility and the outcomes were assessed (Piper Fatigue Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast [FACT-B], Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, body composition, stress test, and physical activity measurement [accelerometer]). Participants received individualized exercise prescription. Following the 16-week program, repeat assessment plus patient acceptance and satisfaction survey was completed. The primary end point was the composite of accrual rate >25%, program adherence >80%, and mean compliance with accelerometer use >80%. Results Twenty of 24 screened patients consented to the study and completed the baseline assessment. Adherence was 30.3%. Mean accelerometer use was 3.88/7 days (78%). Fatigue at baseline was rated at 4.82/10, and at 3.59 (p = 0.09) after the intervention. Overall well-being (FACT-B) score changed from 92.7 to 98.3 (p = 0.05). There were no significant changes in body composition (except for bone mineral content), aerobic exercise capacity, or activity patterns. Conclusion Although the primary outcome was not met, our study indicates that an oncology exercise rehabilitation program can be incorporated into an existing cardiac rehabilitation program. Based on feedback received, we propose that in order to achieve exercise goals, frequent, encouraging, and tailored feedback and group sessions to foster a sense of community may additionally be needed to strengthen adherence to a prescribed exercise program. PMID:28228661

  2. High-intensity, occupation-specific training in a series of firefighters during phase II cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dunlei; Berbarie, Rafic F.

    2013-01-01

    Six male firefighters who were referred to phase II cardiac rehabilitation after coronary revascularization participated in a specialized regimen of high-intensity, occupation-specific training (HIOST) that simulated firefighting tasks. During each session, the electrocardiogram, heart rate, and blood pressure were monitored, and the patients were observed for adverse symptoms. No patient had to discontinue HIOST because of adverse arrhythmias or symptoms. For physicians who must make decisions about return to work, the information collected over multiple HIOST sessions might be more thorough and conclusive than the information gained during a single treadmill exercise stress test (the recommended evaluation method). PMID:23543963

  3. The systematic development of a nursing intervention aimed at increasing enrollment in cardiac rehabilitation for acute coronary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Sylvie; D'Aoust, Louis-Xavier; Morin, Magali; Heppell, Sonia; Frasure-Smith, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of morbidity worldwide. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs can decrease recurrence of coronary events by as much as 25%, few patients engage in CR after a cardiac event. Current therapeutic procedures for ACS are provided quickly after the onset of symptoms, resulting in briefer hospital stays. Therefore, within this shorter time frame, the education of patients about ACS risk factors and their reduction presents a new nursing challenge. The purpose of this paper is to describe the systematic pathway in the development of a nursing intervention which addresses these new challenges in ACS risk factor reduction. The intervention aims to increase enrollment in CR, and enhance illness perceptions and medication adherence, while decreasing anxiety, risk factors, and emergency revisits.

  4. Patterns and determinants of functional and absolute iron deficiency in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation following heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Tramarin, Roberto; Pistuddi, Valeria; Maresca, Luigi; Pavesi, Marco; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; de Vincentiis, Carlo; Ranucci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Anaemia and iron deficiency are frequent following major surgery. The present study aims to identify the iron deficiency patterns in cardiac surgery patients at their admission to a cardiac rehabilitation programme, and to determine which perioperative risk factor(s) may be associated with functional and absolute iron deficiency. Design This was a retrospective study on prospectively collected data. Methods The patient population included 339 patients. Functional iron deficiency was defined in the presence of transferrin saturation <20% and serum ferritin ≥100 µg/l. Absolute iron deficiency was defined in the presence of serum ferritin values <100 µg/l. Results Functional iron deficiency was found in 62.9% of patients and absolute iron deficiency in 10% of the patients. At a multivariable analysis, absolute iron deficiency was significantly ( p = 0.001) associated with mechanical prosthesis mitral valve replacement (odds ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 1.9-15) and tissue valve aortic valve replacement (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11). In mitral valve surgery, mitral repair carried a significant ( p = 0.013) lower risk of absolute iron deficiency (4.4%) than mitral valve replacement with tissue valves (8.3%) or mechanical prostheses (22.5%). Postoperative outcome did not differ between patients with functional iron deficiency and patients without iron deficiency; patients with absolute iron deficiency had a significantly ( p = 0.017) longer postoperative hospital stay (median 11 days) than patients without iron deficiency (median nine days) or with functional iron deficiency (median eight days). Conclusions Absolute iron deficiency following cardiac surgery is more frequent in heart valve surgery and is associated with a prolonged hospital stay. Routine screening for iron deficiency at admission in the cardiac rehabilitation unit is suggested.

  5. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Severe Upper-Extremity Impairment after Stroke in an Outpatient Rehabilitation Setting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Jennifer; Hutchings, Lisa; Osmond, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies confirm that constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) improves upper-extremity (UE) function after stroke. Due to strict patient criteria and the intensive resources required, CIMT has been slow to become part of rehabilitation practice. Our purpose was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted experimental protocol within an outpatient clinical setting for a patient with moderate to severe UE impairment who did not meet traditional CIMT criteria. Patient Description: AJ, a 16-year-old male, experienced a left middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke due to carotid artery dissection one year before beginning CIMT. He demonstrated some proximal movement but no wrist or finger extension. He had received intensive rehabilitation for 12 months prior to beginning CIMT. Intervention: Two occupational therapists and two physiotherapists collaborated to provide CIMT task training for 6 hours daily for 2 weeks. A knitted mitten extending to the elbow restrained the less-involved UE during 90% of waking hours. Tasks were tailored to AJ's interests, with the goal of integrating his affected UE into his behavioural repertoire. Measures and Outcomes: After 2 weeks of CIMT, AJ improved in all measures (grip and lateral pinch strength, Action Research Arm Test [ARAT], and Box and Block Test) except the Chedoke McMaster Impairment Inventory. Greatest gains were seen at 6 months in the ARAT and Box and Block Test, which coincided with patient and family reports of AJ's using his arm in everyday functional tasks. Implications: Shared workload, emphasis on relevant functional tasks, and complete family participation likely influenced the success of CIMT. Our findings suggest that the strict CIMT criteria used in previous studies may exclude patients who might benefit from the treatment. Controlled trials should be undertaken to examine the effects of CIMT in patients with moderate to severe UE impairment. PMID:20145779

  6. American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Payment System Rule Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Rule Outpatient Prospective Payment System/Ambulatory Surgical ... Payment System Rule Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Rule Outpatient Prospective Payment System/Ambulatory Surgical ...

  7. Treatment patterns and risk factor control in patients with and without metabolic syndrome in cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, Anselm; Jannowitz, Christina; Karoff, Marthin; Karmann, Barbara; Horack, Martin; Völler, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Aim Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clustering of factors that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We aimed to investigate the proportion of patients with MetS in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation (CR), and to describe differences between patients with MetS compared to those without MetS with regard to (1) patient characteristics including demographics, risk factors, and comorbidities, (2) risk factor management including drug treatment, and (3) control status of risk factors at entry to CR and discharge from CR. Methods Post-hoc analysis of data from 27,904 inpatients (Transparency Registry to Objectify Guideline-Oriented Risk Factor Management registry) that underwent a CR period of about 3 weeks were analyzed descriptively in total and compared by their MetS status. Results In the total cohort, mean age was 64.3 years, (71.7% male), with no major differences between groups. Patients had been referred after a ST elevation of myocardial infarction event in 41.1% of cases, non-ST elevation of myocardial infarction in 21.8%, or angina pectoris in 16.7%. They had received a percutaneous coronary intervention in 55.1% and bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft) in 39.5%. Patients with MetS (n = 15,819) compared to those without MetS (n = 12,085) were less frequently males, and in terms of cardiac interventions, more often received coronary artery bypass surgery. Overall, statin use increased from 79.9% at entry to 95.0% at discharge (MetS: 79.7% to 95.2%). Patients with MetS compared to those without MetS received angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, oral antidiabetics, and insulin at entry and discharge more frequently, and less frequently clopidogrel and aspirin/clopidogrel combinations. Mean blood pressure was within the normal range at discharge, and did not differ substantially between groups (124/73 versus 120/72 mmHg). Overall, between entry and discharge, levels of total cholesterol, low density

  8. Exercise Telemonitoring and Telerehabilitation Compared with Traditional Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christen; Yamabayashi, Cristiane; Syed, Nafeez; Kirkham, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite exercise capacity and quality-of-life benefits, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are not easily accessed because of several barriers. A solution may be telerehabilitation (TR), in which patients exercise in their communities while they are monitored via teletechnology. However, the benefits of TR for the purposes of PR and CR have not been systematically reviewed. Objective: To determine whether the benefits of the exercise component of PR and CR using TR are comparable to usual-care (UC) programmes. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed of the Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases up to July 13, 2015. Meta-analyses were performed for peak oxygen consumption, peak workload, exercise test duration, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance using the I2 statistic and forest plots displaying standardized mean difference (SMD). Results: Of 1,431 citations found, 8 CR studies met the inclusion criteria. No differences were found in exercise outcomes between UC and TR groups for CR studies, except in exercise test duration, which slightly favoured UC (SMD 0.268, 95% CI: 0.002, 0.534, p<0.05). Only 1 PR study was included, and it showed similar improvements on the 6MWT between the UC and TR groups. Conclusion: TR for patients with cardiac conditions provided benefits similar to UC with no adverse effects reported. Similar studies of TR for patients with pulmonary conditions need to be conducted. PMID:27909373

  9. Exercise Telemonitoring and Telerehabilitation Compared with Traditional Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christen; Yamabayashi, Cristiane; Syed, Nafeez; Kirkham, Ashley; Camp, Pat G

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite exercise capacity and quality-of-life benefits, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are not easily accessed because of several barriers. A solution may be telerehabilitation (TR), in which patients exercise in their communities while they are monitored via teletechnology. However, the benefits of TR for the purposes of PR and CR have not been systematically reviewed. Objective: To determine whether the benefits of the exercise component of PR and CR using TR are comparable to usual-care (UC) programmes. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed of the Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases up to July 13, 2015. Meta-analyses were performed for peak oxygen consumption, peak workload, exercise test duration, and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance using the I(2) statistic and forest plots displaying standardized mean difference (SMD). Results: Of 1,431 citations found, 8 CR studies met the inclusion criteria. No differences were found in exercise outcomes between UC and TR groups for CR studies, except in exercise test duration, which slightly favoured UC (SMD 0.268, 95% CI: 0.002, 0.534, p<0.05). Only 1 PR study was included, and it showed similar improvements on the 6MWT between the UC and TR groups. Conclusion: TR for patients with cardiac conditions provided benefits similar to UC with no adverse effects reported. Similar studies of TR for patients with pulmonary conditions need to be conducted.

  10. Effects and costs of home-based training with telemonitoring guidance in low to moderate risk patients entering cardiac rehabilitation: The FIT@Home study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical training has beneficial effects on exercise capacity, quality of life and mortality in patients after a cardiac event or intervention and is therefore a core component of cardiac rehabilitation. However, cardiac rehabilitation uptake is low and effects tend to decrease after the initial rehabilitation period. Home-based training has the potential to increase cardiac rehabilitation uptake, and was shown to be safe and effective in improving short-term exercise capacity. Long-term effects on physical fitness and activity, however, are disappointing. Therefore, we propose a novel strategy using telemonitoring guidance based on objective training data acquired during exercise at home. In this way, we aim to improve self-management skills like self-efficacy and action planning for independent exercise and, consequently, improve long-term effectiveness with respect to physical fitness and physical activity. In addition, we aim to compare costs of this strategy with centre-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial compares a 12-week telemonitoring guided home-based training program with a regular, 12-week centre-based training program of equal duration and training intensity in low to moderate risk patients entering cardiac rehabilitation after an acute coronary syndrome or cardiac intervention. The home-based group receives three supervised training sessions before they commence training with a heart rate monitor in their home environment. Participants are instructed to train at 70-85% of their maximal heart rate for 45–60 minutes, twice a week. Patients receive individual coaching by telephone once a week, based on measured heart rate data that are shared through the internet. Primary endpoints are physical fitness and physical activity, assessed at baseline, after 12 weeks and after one year. Physical fitness is expressed as peak oxygen uptake, assessed by symptom limited exercise testing with gas exchange

  11. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  12. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  13. Effect of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery (CopenHeartVR): study protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart valve diseases are common with an estimated prevalence of 2.5% in the Western world. The number is rising due to an ageing population. Once symptomatic, heart valve diseases are potentially lethal, and heavily influence daily living and quality of life. Surgical treatment, either valve replacement or repair, remains the treatment of choice. However, post surgery, the transition to daily living may become a physical, mental and social challenge. We hypothesise that a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programme can improve physical capacity and self-assessed mental health and reduce hospitalisation and healthcare costs after heart valve surgery. Methods A randomised clinical trial, CopenHeartVR, aims to investigate whether cardiac rehabilitation in addition to usual care is superior to treatment as usual after heart valve surgery. The trial will randomly allocate 210 patients, 1:1 intervention to control group, using central randomisation, and blinded outcome assessment and statistical analyses. The intervention consists of 12 weeks of physical exercise, and a psycho-educational intervention comprising five consultations. Primary outcome is peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured by cardiopulmonary exercise testing with ventilatory gas analysis. Secondary outcome is self-assessed mental health measured by the standardised questionnaire Short Form 36. Also, long-term healthcare utilisation and mortality as well as biochemistry, echocardiography and cost-benefit will be assessed. A mixed-method design is used to evaluate qualitative and quantitative findings encompassing a survey-based study before the trial and a qualitative pre- and post-intervention study. Discussion The study is approved by the local regional Research Ethics Committee (H-1-2011-157), and the Danish Data Protection Agency (j.nr. 2007-58-0015). Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (http://NCT01558765). PMID:23782510

  14. Quality of Life and Physical Ability Changes After Hospital-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on quality of life (QOL) and physical ability in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods Patients with MI who were referred to the Cardiac Health and Rehabilitation Center 2 weeks after percutaneous coronary intervention were divided into CR and non-CR groups. The CR group performed supervised exercises 3 times a week for 2 months. QOL assessment, using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and physical ability evaluation were performed at the beginning and end of CR. Results The CR group demonstrated statistically significant improvements in physical functioning (PF), physical role functioning (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health perceptions (GH), vitality (VT), social role functioning (SF), emotional role functioning (RE), mental health (MH), physical component summary (PCS), and mental component summary (MCS). The non-CR group showed improvement in RP. Secondary outcomes, including resting heart rate (RHR), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), metabolic equivalent of task (MET), maximal exercise time (ETmax), stage 3 Borg rating of perceived exertion (3RPE), maximal Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPEmax), and stage 3 rate pressure product (3RPP), improved in the CR group. The non-CR group showed improvements in VO2max, MET, ETmax, and 3RPE. There were significant differences in improvements in PF, RP, BP, VT, SF, MH, MCS, RHR, VO2max, MET, ETmax, 3RPE, and 3RPP between the two groups. Conclusion Male patients with MI demonstrated improvements in QOL and physical ability following hospital-based CR; the impact on the mental component was greater than that on the physical component. PMID:28289644

  15. Flexibility and Strength Measures in Children Participating in a Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Barbara M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A 12-week structured rehabilitation program featuring warm-up exercises, increased aerobic exercise, cool down, and home-based continuation of exercise helped 12 children with surgically corrected congenital heart disease improve lower extremity strength and flexibility. (Author/CB)

  16. Prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications and prescription cost analysis among older cardiac patients in an outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kartik Nitinbhai; Joshi, Harsh Manishbhai; Christian, Rohan Piyushkumar; Patel, Kamlesh Prahaladbhai; Malhotra, Supriya Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in the elderly at cardiology outpatient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching hospital using Beers criteria and to find the direct cost burden of PIMs. Materials and Methods: The present study was an observational cross-sectional study. Prescriptions of the patients’ aged ≥65 years were collected from the cardiology OPD and were analyzed. PIMs were identified with the help of Beers 2012 criteria. Direct costs of prescribed drugs were calculated. Predictors (comorbid conditions, number of drugs prescribed) associated with PIM use were identified using bivariate analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was then applied to study the influence of these variables on PIM use. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 236 patients received 1443 drugs. According to Beers 2012 criteria, 29.3% patients received at least one PIM followed by two and three PIMs in 10 and 23 patients, respectively. The most commonly prescribed PIM was spironolactone in 15.7% patients followed by benzodiazepines in 15 patients. The total cost of therapy for 1 day was Indian Rupee (INR) 10,029.2 while total cost of all prescribed medications in per day was INR 42.5. Conclusions: This study showed higher use of PIMs among the elderly in cardiac OPD. It is important to improve the situation of older cardiac patients who have higher use of PIMs. In older patients, high prevalence of PIMs was associated with increased cost. The use of regular continuing medical education program by the hospital and educating and training doctors on rational prescribing will help alleviate this issue. PMID:27999470

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Interactive Multimedia Computer-based Patient Education Program in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Ng Yuen Yee; Fai, Tam Sing

    2001-01-01

    A study compared 48 cardiac patients who used an interactive multimedia computer-assisted patient education program and 48 taught by tutorial. The computer-assisted instructional method resulted in significantly better knowledge about exercise and self-management of chronic diseases. (Contains 29 references.) (JOW)

  18. Asserted and neglected issues linking evidence-based and Chinese medicines for cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Arthur de Sá; de Moura, Nathalia Gomes Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure is among the most prevalent chronic disease in adults that impacts on the quality of life of patients, which are often subjected to physical rehabilitation. Chinese medicine intervention in patients with hypertension presents promising albeit inconclusive results, mostly due to methodological issues. This paper discusses asserted and neglected issues linking evidence-based and Chinese medicines as related to systemic arterial hypertension, as well as their impact on the physical rehabilitation of those patients. On the one hand, natural history of hypertension, pulse palpation, and herbal therapy are among the asserted issues because of the scientific evidence collected about them, either in favor or against its integration to the current medical practice. On the other hand, anatomical variations of vessels and comparative physiology are among the most commonly neglected issues because previous researches on integrative medicine ignored the possible effects of these issues as related to the study’s outcome. The asserted issues highlighted in this paper stimulate the increasing use of Chinese medicine for health care and the continuity of research on integrative medicine in the cardiovascular field for rehabilitation. The neglected issues poses additional challenges that must not be overlooked in future research on this topic so that the integration of both traditional and current knowledge may be of benefit to the population with cardiovascular disease. PMID:24944759

  19. Outpatient Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outpatient Surgery Share this Page Preparing For Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Children and Anesthesia Pregnancy and Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia Awareness Obesity and Anesthesia Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery ...

  20. The prognostic effect of cardiac rehabilitation in the era of acute revascularisation and statin therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized studies – The Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study (CROS)

    PubMed Central

    Davos, Constantinos H; Doherty, Patrick; Saure, Daniel; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Salzwedel, Annett; Völler, Heinz; Jensen, Katrin; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic effect of multi-component cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in the modern era of statins and acute revascularisation remains controversial. Focusing on actual clinical practice, the aim was to evaluate the effect of CR on total mortality and other clinical endpoints after an acute coronary event. Design Structured review and meta-analysis. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), retrospective controlled cohort studies (rCCSs) and prospective controlled cohort studies (pCCSs) evaluating patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or mixed populations with coronary artery disease (CAD) were included, provided the index event was in 1995 or later. Results Out of n = 18,534 abstracts, 25 studies were identified for final evaluation (RCT: n = 1; pCCS: n = 7; rCCS: n = 17), including n = 219,702 patients (after ACS: n = 46,338; after CABG: n = 14,583; mixed populations: n = 158,781; mean follow-up: 40 months). Heterogeneity in design, biometrical assessment of results and potential confounders was evident. CCSs evaluating ACS patients showed a significantly reduced mortality for CR participants (pCCS: hazard ratio (HR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20–0.69; rCCS: HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49–0.84; odds ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.08–0.48), but the single RCT fulfilling Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study (CROS) inclusion criteria showed neutral results. CR participation was also associated with reduced mortality after CABG (rCCS: HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.54–0.70) and in mixed CAD populations. Conclusions CR participation after ACS and CABG is associated with reduced mortality even in the modern era of CAD treatment. However, the heterogeneity of study designs and CR programmes highlights the need for defining internationally accepted standards in CR delivery and scientific evaluation. PMID:27777324

  1. Short-term inspiratory muscle training potentiates the benefits of aerobic and resistance training in patients undergoing CABG in phase II cardiac rehabilitation program

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Bárbara Maria; Cardoso, Dannuey Machado; Gomes, Tiago José Nardi; dos Santos, Tamires Daros; Vicente, Marília Severo; Pereira, Sérgio Nunes; Barbosa, Viviane Acunha; de Albuquerque, Isabella Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficiency of short-term inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined aerobic and resistance exercise on respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in the phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Methods A prospective, quasi-experimental study with 24 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and were randomly assigned to two groups in the Phase II cardiac rehabilitation program: inspiratory muscle training program associated with combined training (aerobic and resistance) group (GCR + IMT, n=12) and combined training with respiratory exercises group (GCR, n=12), over a period of 12 weeks, with two sessions per week. Before and after intervention, the following measurements were obtained: maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (PImax and PEmax), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and quality of life scores. Data were compared between pre- and post-intervention at baseline and the variation between the pre- and post-phase II cardiac rehabilitation program using the Student's t-test, except the categorical variables, which were compared using the Chi-square test. Values of P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Compared to GCR, the GCR + IMT group showed larger increments in PImax (P<0.001), PEmax (P<0.001), peak VO2 (P<0.001) and quality of life scores (P<0.001). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the addition of inspiratory muscle training, even when applied for a short period, may potentiate the effects of combined aerobic and resistance training, becoming a simple and inexpensive strategy for patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and are in phase II cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:27163422

  2. Acute Physiological Responses to Short- and Long-Stage High-Intensity Interval Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tschakert, Gerhard; Kroepfl, Julia M; Mueller, Alexander; Harpf, Hanns; Harpf, Leonhard; Traninger, Heimo; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Meinitzer, Andreas; Pichlhoefer, Patriz; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Despite described benefits of aerobic high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE), the acute responses during different HIIE modes and associated health risks have only been sparsely discovered in heart disease patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the acute responses for physiological parameters, cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers, and catecholamines yielded by two different aerobic HIIE protocols compared to continuous exercise (CE) in phase III cardiac rehabilitation. Eight cardiac patients (7 with coronary heart disease, 1 with myocarditis; 7 males, 1 female; age: 63.0 ± 9.4 years; height: 1.74 ± 0.05 m; weight: 83.6 ± 8.7 kg), all but one treated with ß-blocking agents, performed a maximal symptom-limited incremental exercise test (IET) and three different exercise tests matched for mean load (Pmean) and total duration: 1) short HIIE with a peak workload duration (tpeak) of 20 s and a peak workload (Ppeak) equal to the maximum power output (Pmax) from IET; 2) long HIIE with a tpeak of 4 min, Ppeak was corresponding to the power output at 85 % of maximal heart rate (HRmax) from IET; 3) CE with a target workload equal to Pmean of both HIIE modes. Acute metabolic and peak cardiorespiratory responses were significantly higher during long HIIE compared to short HIIE and CE (p < 0.05) except HRpeak which tended to be higher in long HIIE than in short HIIE (p = 0.08). Between short HIIE and CE, no significant difference was found for any parameter. Acute responses of cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers and catecholamines didn't show any significant difference between tests (p > 0.05). All health-related variables remained in a normal range in any test except NT-proBNP, which was already elevated at baseline. Despite a high Ppeak particularly in short HIIE, both HIIE modes were as safe and as well tolerated as moderate CE in cardiac patients by using our methodological approach. Key pointsHigh-intensity interval exercise (HIIE

  3. Acute Physiological Responses to Short- and Long-Stage High-Intensity Interval Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tschakert, Gerhard; Kroepfl, Julia M.; Mueller, Alexander; Harpf, Hanns; Harpf, Leonhard; Traninger, Heimo; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Meinitzer, Andreas; Pichlhoefer, Patriz; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite described benefits of aerobic high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE), the acute responses during different HIIE modes and associated health risks have only been sparsely discovered in heart disease patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the acute responses for physiological parameters, cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers, and catecholamines yielded by two different aerobic HIIE protocols compared to continuous exercise (CE) in phase III cardiac rehabilitation. Eight cardiac patients (7 with coronary heart disease, 1 with myocarditis; 7 males, 1 female; age: 63.0 ± 9.4 years; height: 1.74 ± 0.05 m; weight: 83.6 ± 8.7 kg), all but one treated with ß-blocking agents, performed a maximal symptom-limited incremental exercise test (IET) and three different exercise tests matched for mean load (Pmean) and total duration: 1) short HIIE with a peak workload duration (tpeak) of 20 s and a peak workload (Ppeak) equal to the maximum power output (Pmax) from IET; 2) long HIIE with a tpeak of 4 min, Ppeak was corresponding to the power output at 85 % of maximal heart rate (HRmax) from IET; 3) CE with a target workload equal to Pmean of both HIIE modes. Acute metabolic and peak cardiorespiratory responses were significantly higher during long HIIE compared to short HIIE and CE (p < 0.05) except HRpeak which tended to be higher in long HIIE than in short HIIE (p = 0.08). Between short HIIE and CE, no significant difference was found for any parameter. Acute responses of cardiovascular and inflammatory biomarkers and catecholamines didn’t show any significant difference between tests (p > 0.05). All health-related variables remained in a normal range in any test except NT-proBNP, which was already elevated at baseline. Despite a high Ppeak particularly in short HIIE, both HIIE modes were as safe and as well tolerated as moderate CE in cardiac patients by using our methodological approach. Key points High-intensity interval exercise (HIIE

  4. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation: abridged Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, S A; Taylor, R S; Jolly, K; Zawada, A; Dean, S G; Cowie, A; Norton, R J; Dalal, H M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To update the Cochrane review comparing the effects of home-based and supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on mortality and morbidity, quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with heart disease. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched up to October 2014, without language restriction. Randomised trials comparing home-based and centre-based CR programmes in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation were included. Results 17 studies with 2172 patients were included. No difference was seen between home-based and centre-based CR in terms of: mortality (relative risk (RR) 0.79, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.47); cardiac events; exercise capacity (mean difference (MD) −0.10, −0.29 to 0.08); total cholesterol (MD 0.07 mmol/L, −0.24 to 0.11); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.06 mmol/L, −0.27 to 0.15); triglycerides (MD −0.16 mmol/L, −0.38 to 0.07); systolic blood pressure (MD 0.2 mm Hg, −3.4 to 3.8); smoking (RR 0.98, 0.79 to 1.21); health-related quality of life and healthcare costs. Lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD −0.07 mmol/L, −0.11 to −0.03, p=0.001) and lower diastolic blood pressure (MD −1.9 mm Hg, −0.8 to −3.0, p=0.009) were observed in centre-based participants. Home-based CR was associated with slightly higher adherence (RR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07). Conclusions Home-based and centre-based CR provide similar benefits in terms of clinical and health-related quality of life outcomes at equivalent cost for those with heart failure and following myocardial infarction and revascularisation. PMID:27738516

  5. Women's experiences of how their recovery process is promoted after a first myocardial infarction: Implications for cardiac rehabilitation care

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, Inger; Mårtensson, Jan; Fridlund, Bengt; Svedberg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background A rapid improvement in the care of myocardial infarction (MI) in the emergency services has been witnessed in recent years. There is, however, a lack of understanding of the factors involved in a successful recovery process, after the initial stages of emergency care among patients, and in particular those who are women. Both preventive and promotive perspectives should be taken into consideration for facilitating the recovery process of women after a MI. Aim To explore how women's recovery processes are promoted after a first MI. Methods A qualitative content analysis was used. Findings The women's recovery process is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. The women's possibility to approach new perspectives on life incorporates how they handle the three dimensions: behaviour, that is, women's acting and engaging in various activities; social, that is, how women receive and give support in their social environment; and psychological, that is, their way of thinking, reflecting, and appreciating life. Conclusions The personal recovery of women is a multidirectional process with a desire to develop and approach a new perspective on life. It is important for cardiac rehabilitation nurses to not only focus on lifestyle changes and social support but also on working actively with the women's inner strength in order to promote the recovery of the women. PMID:27172514

  6. Remotely Delivered Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Design and Content Development of a Novel mHealth Platform

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Nicholas; Meads, Andrew; Warren, Ian; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in traditional center-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs (exCR) is limited by accessibility barriers. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can overcome these barriers while preserving critical attributes of center-based exCR monitoring and coaching, but these opportunities have not yet been capitalized on. Objective We aimed to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform for remote delivery of exCR to any geographical location. Methods An iterative process was used to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform (REMOTE-CR) that provides real-time remote exercise monitoring and coaching, behavior change education, and social support. Results The REMOTE-CR platform comprises a commercially available smartphone and wearable sensor, custom smartphone and Web-based applications (apps), and a custom middleware. The platform allows exCR specialists to monitor patients’ exercise and provide individualized coaching in real-time, from almost any location, and provide behavior change education and social support. Intervention content incorporates Social Cognitive Theory, Self-determination Theory, and a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Exercise components are based on guidelines for clinical exercise prescription. Conclusions The REMOTE-CR platform extends the capabilities of previous telehealth exCR platforms and narrows the gap between existing center- and home-based exCR services. REMOTE-CR can complement center-based exCR by providing an alternative option for patients whose needs are not being met. Remotely monitored exCR may be more cost-effective than establishing additional center-based programs. The effectiveness and acceptability of REMOTE-CR are now being evaluated in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial. PMID:27342791

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation Between Obese and Non-obese Patients After Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on functional capacity in obese and non-obese patients who have suffered acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods Overall, 359 patients who have suffered AMI, and were referred for CR after percutaneous coronary intervention from 2010 to 2015 and underwent an exercise tolerance test before and after phase II CR were included in this study. The patients were divided into two groups: obese group with body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2 (n=170; age, 54.32±9.98 years; BMI, 27.52±2.92 kg/m2) and non-obese group with BMI <25 kg/m2 (n=189; age, 59.12±11.50 years; BMI 22.86±2.01 kg/m2). The demographic characteristics and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity of all patients were analyzed before and after CR. Results There were significant changes in resting heart rate (HRrest) before and after CR between the obese and non-obese groups (before CR, p=0.028; after CR, p=0.046), but other cardiopulmonary exercise capacity before and after CR was not different between the groups. HRrest (p<0.001), maximal metabolic equivalents (METs, p<0.001), total exercise duration (TED, p<0.001), and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, p<0.001) improved significantly in the obese and non-obese groups after CR. No difference in the change in the cardiopulmonary exercise capacity rate was detected between the groups. Conclusion CR may improve functional capacity in patients who suffered AMI regardless of their obesity. PMID:27847723

  8. Medicare and Medicaid programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; electronic reporting pilot; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities Quality Reporting Program; revision to Quality Improvement Organization regulations. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-11-15

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2013 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program, and the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program. We are continuing the electronic reporting pilot for the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, and revising the various regulations governing Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), including the secure transmittal of electronic medical information, beneficiary complaint resolution and notification processes, and technical changes. The technical changes to the QIO regulations reflect CMS' commitment to the general principles of the President's Executive Order on Regulatory Reform, Executive Order 13563 (January 18, 2011).

  9. Combining Users’ Needs With Health Behavior Models in Designing an Internet- and Mobile-Based Intervention for Physical Activity in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Internet-based physical activity interventions have great potential in supporting patients in cardiac rehabilitation. Health behavior change theories and user input are identified as important contributors in the effectiveness of the interventions, but they are rarely combined in a systematic way in the design of the interventions. Objective The aim of this study is to identify the appropriate theoretical framework, along with the needs of the users of a physical activity intervention for cardiac rehabilitation, and to combine them into an effective Internet- and mobile-based intervention. Methods We explain the theoretical framework of the intervention in a narrative overview of the existing health behavior change literature as it applies to physical activity. We also conducted a focus group with 11 participants of a cardiac rehabilitation program and used thematic analysis to identify and analyze patterns of meaning in the transcribed data. Results We chose stage-based approaches, specifically the transtheoretical model and the health action process approach as our main framework for tailoring, supplemented with other theoretical concepts such as regulatory focus within the appropriate stages. From the thematic analysis of the focus group data, we identified seven themes: (1) social, (2) motivation, (3) integration into everyday life, (4) information, (5) planning, (6) monitoring and feedback, and (7) concerns and potential problems. The final design of the intervention was based on both the theoretical review and the user input, and it is explained in detail. Conclusions We applied a combination of health behavioral theory and user input in designing our intervention. We think this is a promising design approach with the potential to combine the high efficacy of theory-based interventions with the higher perceived usefulness of interventions designed according to user input. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01223170; http

  10. The Effect of Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Training on Cardiopulmonary Function in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy With Reduced Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect and safety of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise in ischemic cardiomyopathy and to compare the results between patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and reduced LVEF. Methods Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy with LVEF <50% were included as subjects. The patients were classified into the preserved LVEF (pLVEF; LVEF 41%–49%) group and the reduced LVEF (rLVEF; LVEF ≤40%) group. Patients underwent hourly aerobic exercise training sessions with an intensity of 60%–85% of heart rate reserve, three times a week for 6 weeks. Graded exercise test and transthoracic echocardiogram were performed in all study patients before and after completion of the CR exercise program. Results After completion of the CR exercise program, both groups (pLVEF, n=30; rLVEF, n=18) showed significant increases in LVEF and VO2max. In the pLVEF group, LVEF and VO2max increased from 45.1%±4.8% to 52.5%±9.6% (p<0.001) and from 24.1±6.3 to 28.1±8.8 mL/kg/min (p=0.002), respectively. In the rLVEF group, LVEF and VO2max increased from 29.7%±7.7% to 37.6%±10.3% (p<0.001) and from 17.6±4.7 to 21.2±5.1 mL/kg/min (p<0.001), respectively. Both groups completed their exercise program safely. Conclusion In both groups, patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy who completed a 6-week supervised CR exercise program demonstrated remarkable improvements in cardiopulmonary function. This result implies that neither of the two groups showed higher efficacy in comparison to each other, but we can conclude that CR exercise in the rLVEF group was as effective and safe as that in the pLVEF group. PMID:27606271

  11. High-intensity cardiac rehabilitation training of a commercial pilot who, after percutaneous coronary intervention, wanted to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjay; Lawrence, Anne; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    After undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, a 64-year-old commercial pilot was referred to cardiac rehabilitation. His stated goals were to continue participating in a rigorous strength and conditioning program at a community workout facility and to resume working as a pilot. To help him meet those goals, we designed and implemented a regimen of high-intensity exercises, with quick transitions between a variety of tasks that are not typically included in cardiac rehabilitation programs (e.g., medicine ball throws, push-ups, dead lifts, squats, military presses, sprints, and lunges). The training was symptom limited, enabling the patient to reach extreme levels of physical exertion in a controlled, monitored setting. By studying his training data (heart rate, blood pressure, and rating of perceived exertion), we were able to give him specific recommendations for controlling his exercise intensity after graduating from our program. More than 18 months later, he continues to exercise vigorously 3 days per week and is working as a commercial pilot. PMID:26722183

  12. [Outpatient emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel; Le Nagard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The outpatient monitoring of patients sometimes involves emergency situations. In their practice, the nurses who visit the patient's home are confronted with the limits of their intervention. Faced with these delicate situations team coordination is a strength and the reactivity of the caregivers often contributes to a satisfactory outcome for the patient.

  13. Yoga based cardiac rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass surgery: One-year results on LVEF, lipid profile and psychological states – A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Nagarathna; Parachuri, Venkateshwara Rao; Swarnagowri, M.V.; Babu, Suresh; Chaku, Ritu; Kulkarni, Ravi; Bhuyan, Bhagavan; Bhargav, Hemant; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the long term effects of yoga based cardiac rehabilitation program with only physiotherapy based program as an add-on to conventional rehabilitation after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) on risk factors. Methods In this single blind prospective randomized parallel two armed active control study, 1026 patients posted for CABG at Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Bengaluru (India) were screened. Of these, 250 male participants (35–65 years) who satisfied the selection criteria and consented were randomized into two groups. Within and between group comparisons were done at three points of follow up (i.e. 6th week, 6th month, and 12th month) by using Wilcoxon's signed ranks test and Mann Whitney U test respectively. Results Yoga group had significantly (p = 0.001, Mann Whitney) better improvement in LVEF than control group in those with abnormal baseline EF (<53%) after 1 year. There was a better reduction in BMI in the yoga group (p = 0.038, between groups) in those with high baseline BMI (≥23) after 12 months. Yoga group showed significant (p = 0.008, Wilcoxon's) reduction in blood glucose at one year in those with high baseline FBS ≥110 mg/dl. There was significantly better improvement in yoga than the control group in HDL (p = 0.003), LDL (p = 0.01) and VLDL (p = 0.03) in those with abnormal baseline values. There was significantly better improvement (p = 0.02, between groups) in positive affect in yoga group. Within Yoga group, there was significant decrease in perceived stress (p = 0.001), anxiety (p = 0.001), depression (p = 0.001), and negative affect (p = 0.03) while in the control group there was reduction (p = 0.003) only in scores on anxiety. Conclusion Addition of yoga based relaxation to conventional post-CABG cardiac rehabilitation helps in better management of risk factors in those with abnormal baseline values and may help in preventing recurrence. PMID:25443601

  14. [Community-based rehabilitation and outpatient care for patients with acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in Germany: continuing support for social participation and re-integration in the neurological care system?].

    PubMed

    Reuther, P; Hendrich, A; Kringler, W; Vespo, E

    2012-12-01

    Persons with Disabilities of the United Nations: Goals of rehabilitation have to be more than functional treatment. Activation of the patient and supporting their coping and adaptive processes are necessary to achieve social participation and (re)integration into the community and in occupational life as implied by the standards of our society. Important elements of these are (1) identification of the individual patient and his/her burden during acute phase treatment or early rehabilitation (defined red-flag), (2) an individual clinical reasoning and planning of interventions and help, (3) general acceptance of the defined demands by all "players" in medical and social networks, (4) coordination and supervision of the medical and social interventions and of the assistive processes necessary in the individual environment. What seems to be needed is (5) systematic orientation to the goal of individual social participation at all levels of support, (6) cross linking, cooperation and development of the existing medical and social structures on site, (7) expansion of the legal framework and (7a) especially control of the implementation of the existing rights of social benefits and (7b) surveillance (transparency and quality management not only in the area of caregivers but also for the administration of social insurances!). The recommendations of the authors integrate systematically into the phase model of neurorehabilitation (VDR/BAR) in Germany. The focus of this work is the needs-appropriate programming of phase E, i. e., the transition between inpatient and outpatient care, between the clinical facility-oriented and the community-based (domicile-oriented, occupational-oriented) sectors, between welfare and independency.

  15. Effects of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients after percutaneous coronary intervention: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinyu; Li, Yanda; Ren, Xiaomeng; Xiong, Xingjiang; Wu, Lijun; Li, Jie; Wang, Jie; Gao, Yonghong; Shang, Hongcai; Xing, Yanwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the effect of rehabilitation exercise after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). We performed a meta-analysis to determine the effects of exercise in patients after PCI. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, the Embase database, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), China Biology Medicine (CBM), and the Wanfang Database were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The key words used for the searches were PCI, exercise, walking, jogging, Tai Chi, and yoga. Six studies with 682 patients met our inclusion criteria; we chose the primary endpoint events of cardiac death, recurrence of myocardial infarction (MI), repeated PCI, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and restenosis, and the secondary endpoint measures included recurrent angina, treadmill exercise (total exercise time, ST-segment decline, angina, and maximum exercise tolerance). The results showed that exercise was not clearly associated with reductions in cardiac death, recurrence of MI, repeated PCI, CABG, or restenosis. However, the exercise group exhibited greater improvements in recurrent angina, total exercise time, ST-segment decline, angina, and maximum exercise tolerance than did the control group. Future studies need to expand the sample size and improve the quality of reporting of RCTs. PMID:28303967

  16. Deep venous thrombosis of the neck and pulmonary embolism in patients with a central venous catheter admitted to cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery: a prospective study of 815 patients.

    PubMed

    Frizzelli, Rino; Tortelli, Ornella; Di Comite, Vincenzo; Ghirardi, Redenta; Pinzi, Claudio; Scarduelli, Cleante

    2008-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are widely used for therapeutic purposes and to measure hemodynamic variables that cannot be recorded from a peripheral vein. However, the method can involve complications. In cardiac surgery, CVCs are electively placed in the right internal jugular vein but there is little information on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in catheterized veins (CVC-related DVT) or on secondary pulmonary embolism (PE). The impact of CVC-related DVT and PE in cardiac surgery and measures to prevent PE were assessed. We used ultrasonography (US) to check the point of insertion of CVC in 815 patients in the intensive cardiac rehabilitation unit after heart surgery. In this series, 386 patients (48%) had CVC-related DVT; those already receiving anticoagulant, and considered at low risk, continued that therapy, while those taking an antiplatelet agent (aspirin 100 mg daily) but deemed at high risk of PE from the US findings were given an anticoagulant instead. Only patients with CVC-related DVT at low risk of PE continued taking aspirin. At 3 months, there were no cases of PE among patients receiving an anticoagulant, but six on antiplatelet had non-fatal PE. The prevalence of PE in the whole series of 815 patients was 0.7%. CVC-related DVT is a frequent complication of heart surgery. Anticoagulant therapy started early does not prevent thrombus formation but probably prevents PE, whereas antiplatelet gives no such protection. Sonographic screening of the CVC removal in intensive care unit may be useful for avoiding PE after CVC-related DVT.

  17. Continuous Intravenous Milrinone Therapy in Pediatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Michelle; Liebers, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Milrinone is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor with both positive inotropic and vasodilator properties. Administered as a continuous infusion, milrinone is indicated for the short-term treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite limited data supporting long-term milrinone therapy in adults with congestive heart failure, children managed as outpatients may benefit from continuous milrinone as a treatment for cardiac dysfunction, as a destination therapy for cardiac transplant, or as palliative therapy for cardiomyopathy. The aim of this article is to review the medical literature and describe a home infusion company's experience with pediatric outpatient milrinone therapy. PMID:28248808

  18. [Needs in rehabilitation and rehabilitative care of new target groups. Immigrants in psychosomatic rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Kobelt, A; Göbber, J; Petermann, F

    2011-04-01

    Treatment of patients with migration background in psychosomatic rehabilitation is gaining in importance. Cultural differences and increased barriers are considered the most important causes for the inferior effective treatment results in psychosomatic rehabilitation and a higher percentage of pensions due to impairment. We discuss perspectives in psychosomatic rehabilitation which not only focus on the migration background as the main cause for inferior effective treatment results, but place greater focus on typical barriers of this patient group. For this reason, the need for more integrative and adapted forms of psychosomatic rehabilitation becomes more evident. Psychosomatic rehabilitation can be adapted by introducing case management, psychosomatic aftercare, and outpatient information groups.

  19. Treatment of the Aged Patients at a Large Cardiac Rehabilitation Center in the Southern Brazil and Some Aspects of Their Dropout from the Therapeutic Programs

    PubMed Central

    Nesello, Pietro Felice Tomazini; Tairova, Olga; Tairova, Maria; Graciolli, Lucas; Baroni, Allan; Comparsi, Eduardo; Marchi, Thiago De

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This paper aims to assess the dropout rate in different age groups through the example of the large cardiac rehabilitation centre affiliated with the Institute of Sports Medicine, University of Caxias do Sul. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A historic cohort study comprising the following groups: Non-Old < 65 (n = 141); Young-Old 65-74 (n = 128); and Middle-Old 75-84 years old (n = 57). The exercise program lasted 48 sessions and dropout was defined as attendance of 50% of sessions or less. Logistic binominal regression was performed to assess the risk of dropout. For all analyses, a two-tailed P value of < 0.05 was used. RESULTS: The total dropout rate was 38.6%. The Young-Old and Middle-Old groups showed lower dropouts compared to Non-Old patients (p = 0.01). Young-Old has 96% less risk for dropout compared to Non-Old group (adjusted odds ratios = 1.96 [1.16–3.29]). Furthermore, patients underwent the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft showed a lower rate of dropout (p = 0.001). The absence of CABG involved three times more risk of dropout (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The Non-Old and the Middle-Old patients showed higher dropout rates compared to Young-Old. To ensure the best possible rehabilitation and to improve patients´ participation in CR, these programs should be adjusted to the needs of patients in terms of their age. PMID:28028408

  20. Is referral of postsurgical colorectal cancer survivors to cardiac rehabilitation feasible and acceptable? A pragmatic pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Gill; Adams, Richard; Campbell, Anna; Kidd, Lisa; Leslie, Stephen J; Munro, Julie; Watson, Angus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) Assess whether cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a feasible and acceptable model of rehabilitation for postsurgical colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, (2) evaluate trial procedures. This article reports the results of the first objective. Design and setting A pragmatic pilot randomised controlled trial with embedded qualitative study was conducted in 3 UK hospitals with CR facilities. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise trial parameters indicative of intervention feasibility and acceptability. Interviews and focus groups were conducted and data analysed thematically. Participants People with CRC were considered for inclusion in the trial if they were ≥18 years old, diagnosed with primary CRC and in the recovery period postsurgery (they could still be receiving adjuvant therapy). 31% (n=41) of all eligible CRC survivors consented to participate in the trial. 22 of these CRC survivors, and 8 people with cardiovascular disease (CVD), 5 CRC nurses and 6 CR clinicians participated in the qualitative study. Intervention Referral of postsurgical CRC survivors to weekly CR exercise classes and information sessions. Classes included CRC survivors and people with CVD. CR nurses and physiotherapists were given training about cancer and exercise. Results Barriers to CR were protracted recoveries from surgery, ongoing treatments and poor mobility. No adverse events were reported during the trial, suggesting that CR is safe. 62% of participants completed the intervention as per protocol and had high levels of attendance. 20 health professionals attended the cancer and exercise training course, rating it as excellent. Participants perceived that CR increased CRC survivors’ confidence and motivation to exercise, and offered peer support. CR professionals were concerned about CR capacity to accommodate cancer survivors and their ability to provide psychosocial support to this group of patients. Conclusions CR is feasible and acceptable for postsurgical

  1. The MOTIV-HEART Study: A Prospective, Randomized, Single-Blind Pilot Study of Brief Strategic Therapy and Motivational Interviewing among Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Psychological distress, biomedical parameters, and unhealthy lifestyles contribute to a poorer prognosis for cardiac disease. Public health's challenge is to motivate patients to utilize self-care. Objective: This prospective, randomized, single-blind pilot study aimed at testing the incremental efficacy of Brief Strategic Therapy (BST) combined with Motivational Interviewing (MI) in improving selected biomedical and psychological outcomes over and beyond those of the stand-alone BST in a residential Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) program. Method: Fourty-two inpatients (17 females), enrolled in a 1-month CR program, were randomly allocated into two conditions: (a) Three sessions of BST and (b) Three sessions of BST plus MI. Data were collected at baseline, discharge, and after 3 months through phone interviews. Results: At discharge, no significant between-group difference was found in any outcome variable. Changes from pre- to post-treatment within each condition showed significant improvements only in the BST group, where the level of external regulation diminished, and both the participants' self-regulation (Relative Autonomous Motivation Index, RAI) and willingness to change improved. At the 3-month follow-up, within-group analyses on responders (BST = 9; BST + MI = 11) showed a statistically significant improvement in the level of systolic blood pressure in both groups. Discussion: Findings showed no evidence of the incremental efficacy of combining BST and MI over and beyond BST alone on either selected biomedical or psychological outcomes among CR patients. Conclusions: Ends and limitations from the present pilot study should be considered and addressed in future investigations. PMID:28223950

  2. The Effect of Telephone Support Interventions on Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Patient Outcomes during Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Ahmed; Hsieh, Shuching; Wells, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation is offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and reduce the likelihood of further cardiac illness. However, patient participation remains suboptimal and the provision of high quality care to an expanding population of patients with chronic heart conditions is becoming increasingly difficult. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine the effect of telephone support interventions compared with standard post-discharge care on coronary artery disease patient outcomes. Methods The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched and randomized controlled trials that directly compared telephone interventions with standard post-discharge care in adults following a myocardial infarction or a revascularization procedure were included. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment were completed independently by two reviewers. Where appropriate, outcome data were combined and analyzed using a random effects model. For each dichotomous outcome, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived for each outcome. For continuous outcomes, weighted mean differences (WMD) and standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% CI were calculated. Results 26 studies met the inclusion criteria. No difference was observed in mortality between the telephone group and the group receiving standard care OR 1.12 (0.71, 1.77). The intervention was significantly associated with fewer hospitalizations than the comparison group OR 0.62 (0.40, 0.97). Significantly more participants in the telephone group stopped smoking OR 1.32 (1.07, 1.62); had lower systolic blood pressure WMD −0.22 (−0.40, −0.04); lower depression scores SMD −0.10 (−0.21, −0.00); and lower anxiety scores SMD −0.14 (−0.24, −0.04). However, no significant difference was observed for low-density lipoprotein levels WMD −0.10 (−0.23, 0.03). Conclusions Compared to standard post-discharge care, regular

  3. Community SES, perceived environment, and physical activity during home-based cardiac rehabilitation: is there a need to consider the urban vs. rural distinction?

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris; Rainham, Daniel; McSweeney, Jill; Spence, John; McDonnell, Lisa; Rhodes, Ryan; Reid, Robert; McGannon, Kerry; Edwards, Nancy

    2012-04-01

    Physical activity (MVPA) levels during home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remain problematic. Consequently, the present study examined the association between MVPA and urban vs. rural residential status and the perceived environment in patients attending home-based CR. A total of 280 patients completed a questionnaire assessing demographic, clinical, MVPA, and perceived environmental variables measured at baseline and 3 months later. Patient addresses were geocoded and linked to the 2006 Canadian census to establish the urban/rural distinction. Results showed that urban and rural patients had similar baseline MVPA and improvements in MVPA by 3 months. Several perceived environmental variables were significantly related to MVPA throughout home-based CR that were common and urban/rural-specific. Therefore, although there does not appear to be an urban vs. rural advantage in MVPA levels during home-based CR, there does appear to be environmental/MVPA-specific relationships specific to urban and rural patients that may warrant attention.

  4. Weather-induced ischemia and arrhythmia in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation: another difference between men and women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Alexandra; Schuh, Angela; Maetzel, Friedrich-Karl; Rückerl, Regina; Breitner, Susanne; Peters, Annette

    2008-07-01

    Given the accumulating evidence that people with underlying heart disease are a particularly vulnerable group for triggers like changing meteorological parameters, the objective of this longitudinal study was to analyze the influence of weather parameters on blood pressure, arrhythmia and ischemia in cardiovascular patients. A panel study with repeated measurements was conducted in a rehabilitation clinic in Timmendorfer Strand (Baltic Sea, Germany) with 872 cardiovascular patients. Heart rate, blood pressure and electrocardiography changes were measured during repeated bicycle ergometries. Generalized Estimating Equations were used for regression analyses of immediate, delayed and cumulative influences of the daily measured meteorological data. For men, a decrease in air temperature and in water vapor pressure doubled the risk of ST-segment depression during ergometry [odds ratio (OR) for 1 day delay: 1.88 (1.24; 2.83) for air temperature] with a delay of 1-2 days. For women, an increase of their heart rate before the start of the ergometry [same day: 4.36 beats/min (0.99; 7.74) for air temperature] and a 2- to 3-fold higher risk for ventricular ectopic beats [1 day delay: OR 2.43 (1.17; 5.05) for air temperature] was observed with an increase in temperature and water vapor pressure in almost all analyzed time-windows. The study indicates that meteorological parameters can induce changes in heart function which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events especially in susceptible, diseased individuals. The observed effect on ST-segment depression could be a link between the association of weather changes and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Mobile, Virtual Enhancements for Rehabilitation (MOVER)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-28

    these reasons , home-based and 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...services that these facilities can provide. For these reasons , home-based and outpatient rehabilitation interventions hold great potential to... reasons , remote assistance to home-based and outpatient rehabilitation is needed to enhance the recovery of our injured Warfighters. Description of the

  6. Stroke rehabilitation: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; McClure, Andrew; Pan, Cheng; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    There is a revolution underway in stroke rehabilitation. International comparative studies coupled with an impressive evidence base have provided a platform from which an ideal system for stroke rehabilitation can be envisioned. Using the concepts of structure and process of care, different systems of stroke rehabilitation can be compared and evaluated against best evidence. Two structures of care are examined: specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units and outpatient programs. Although specialized interdisciplinary stroke rehabilitation units remain the "gold standard" of care, access to them is often limited. Outpatient programs are essential to stroke rehabilitation systems of care; however, while some countries are investing in outpatient programs, others are scaling back. Even though structures of care have been shown to affect processes of care, it is the processes of care that have proven to be more influential in altering patient outcomes. Four key processes of care are examined: time to admission, intensity of therapy, task-specific therapy, and discharge planning. Within international stroke rehabilitation systems, differences in these processes have resulted in significant differences in outcomes. This allows for "real-world" comparisons of how differing processes affect patient outcomes. Those systems whose structures and processes of care best reflect current best evidence appear to achieve better outcomes.

  7. Effects of Community-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation on Body Composition and Physical Function in Individuals with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: 1.6-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Mandic, Sandra; Hodge, Claire; Stevens, Emily; Walker, Robert; Nye, Edwin R.; Body, Dianne; Barclay, Leanne; Williams, Michael J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To examine long-term changes in physical function and body composition in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients participating in ongoing community-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Design. Thirty-four individuals (69.7 ± 8.2 years; 79% men) participated in this longitudinal observational study. Baseline and follow-up assessments included incremental shuttle walk, short physical performance battery, handgrip strength, chair stands, body composition, last year physical activity, and CR attendance. Results. Participants attended 38.5 ± 30.3% sessions during 1.6 ± 0.2 year followup. A significant increase in 30-second chair stands (17.0 ± 4.7 to 19.6 ± 6.4, P < 0.001), body weight (75.8 ± 11.1 to 77.2 ± 12.1 kg, P = 0.001), and body fat (27.0 ± 9.5 to 29.1 ± 9.6%, P < 0.001) and a decline in handgrip strength (36.4 ± 9.4 to 33.0 ± 10.6 kg·f, P < 0.001) and muscle mass (40.8 ± 5.6 to 39.3 ± 5.8%, P < 0.001) were observed during followup. There was no significant change in shuttle walk duration. CR attendance was not correlated to observed changes. Conclusions. Elderly CAD patients participating in a maintenance CR program improve lower-body muscle strength but experience a decline in handgrip strength and unfavourable changes in body composition, irrespective of CR attendance. PMID:23865071

  8. A brief cookery skills intervention is no more effective than written information alone in reducing body mass index in overweight cardiac rehabilitation patients [corrected].

    PubMed

    McGorrian, Catherine; O' Hara, Mary Clare; Reid, Vivien; Minogue, Marie; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; Kelleher, Cecily

    2015-06-01

    Overweight and obesity are common health risks, but it can be difficult to effect weight change. This randomized controlled trial examined the effects of a novel Cookery skills intervention on body mass index (BMI) in overweight and obese patients with cardiovascular disease, who had previously attended a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Patients with BMI >27 kg/m(2) were randomized to either a 5-week cookery skills course with written educational materials, or to written materials only. Questionnaires on lifestyle risk factors and food frequencies were administered at baseline, 6 and 24 months. The primary outcome in an intention-to-treat analysis was a change in BMI at 6 months. Secondary outcome was a change in BMI at 24 months. Changes in macronutrient consumption were examined in both analysis of covariance and repeated measures ANOVA models. Of the 172 patients, 116 (67.4%) patients consented to participate in the study. The intervention was found to be well accepted and attended by the patients (70.5% of patients in the intervention group attended the sessions). Whilst both intervention and control groups were noted to have a small reduction in BMI, there was no significant difference between the groups. There was no significant group effect noted for any change in macronutrient consumption at 6- or 24-month follow-up. This pilot study of a novel cookery skills project was well accepted amongst this population. Although the majority of participants had a net loss in BMI, the cookery skills intervention was not associated with any change in BMI beyond that achieved by written information alone.

  9. Significance of Cardiac Rehabilitation on Visit-to-Visit Variability of Blood Pressure in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease in a 12-Month Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Fujimi, Kanta; Futami, Makito; Ueda, Yoko; Ueda, Takashi; Arimura, Tadaaki; Koyoshi, Rie; Shiga, Yuhei; Kitajima, Ken; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Visit-to-visit variability (VVV) in blood pressure (BP) has been shown to be a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the long-term effect of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with exercise training on VVV in BP has not yet been established. Therefore, we evaluated the long-term effects of CR on VVV in BP in patients with CVD. Methods Twenty-two CVD patients in a 12-month CR program who had at least six clinic visits per month to measure BP were enrolled. We determined VVV in BP expressed as the standard deviation of average BP every month for 12 months. Results The mean age was 70 ± 8 years and the body mass index was 24.4 ± 4.9 kg/m2. In addition, the percentage (%) of males, % heart failure and % ischemic heart disease were 77%, 55% and 27%, respectively. Patients who had uncontrolled BP at baseline showed a significant reduction of both systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP). VVV in SBP in the first month was significantly less than that in the last month, although there was no difference in VVV in DBP. Patients were divided into larger (L-) and smaller (S-) VVV in SBP groups according to the average value of VVV in SBP as a cut-off. The L-VVV in SBP group, but not the S-VVV in SBP group, showed a significant reduction of VVV in SBP. Conclusion Comprehensive CR may improve VVV in SBP in CVD patients who have larger VVV in SBP. PMID:28270895

  10. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life--A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack.

    PubMed

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients' particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1) receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2) being supported to find new values in life, and (3) developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients' total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting programmes and

  11. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life-A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack.

    PubMed

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients' particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1) receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2) being supported to find new values in life, and (3) developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients' total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting programmes and

  12. Effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation on functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in Brazilians assisted by public health care: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Gabriela S. S.; Ghisi, Gabriela L. M.; Grace, Sherry L.; Oh, Paul; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Britto, Raquel R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the leading burden of disease worldwide. Moreover, CVD-related death rates are considered an epidemic in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Research shows that cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participation reduces death and improves disability and quality of life. Given the growing epidemic of CVD in LMICs and the insufficient evidence about CR programs in these countries, a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) in Latin America is warranted. Objective To investigate the effects of comprehensive CR on functional capacity and cardiovascular risk factors. Method The design is a single-blinded RCT with three parallel arms: comprehensive CR (exercise + education) versus exercise-based CR versus wait-list control (no CR). The primary outcome will be measured by the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test. Secondary outcomes are risk factors (blood pressure, dyslipidemia, dysglycemia, body mass index and waist circumference); tertiary outcomes are heart health behaviors (exercise, medication adherence, diet, and smoking), knowledge, and depressive symptoms. The CR program is six months in duration. Participants randomized to exercise-based CR will receive 24 weeks of exercise classes. The comprehensive CR group will also receive 24 educational sessions, including a workbook. Every outcome will be assessed at baseline and 6-months later, and mortality will be ascertained at six months and one year. Conclusion This will be the first RCT to establish the effects of CR in Latin America. If positive, results will be used to promote broader implementation of comprehensive CR and patient access in the region and to inform a larger-scale trial powered for mortality. PMID:27849287

  13. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life—A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack

    PubMed Central

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P.; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D.; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients’ particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1) receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2) being supported to find new values in life, and (3) developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients’ total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting programmes and

  14. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  15. Paralysis: Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5pm ET. 1-800-539-7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Rehabilitation and exercise are key to ...

  16. The future of cancer rehabilitation: emerging subspecialty.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Gail L; Gerber, Lynn H; Spill, Gayle R; Paul, Kelly L

    2011-05-01

    In this article, the subject of the future for the field of cancer rehabilitation is embarked upon. Future practice innovation models must involve the appropriate and comprehensive evaluation of cancer patients' rehabilitation needs using better functional measurement tools, as well as the forging of new partnerships through the presence and initiation of physiatric coordinated rehabilitation teams, particularly during the acute phases of treatment. Partnering rehabilitation teams closely with oncology colleagues during surveillance years, through the development of outpatient survivorship clinics for diagnosis and treatment of many of cancer patients' ongoing symptoms and functional limitations, will allow for more comprehensive and coordinated follow-up cancer care. Integration of rehabilitation into palliative care and continued efforts to increase oncology's awareness and acceptance of rehabilitation benefits and expertise are needed. Future education models for medical school, residency, and postresidency training are discussed, as are future research goals to help in placing cancer rehabilitation at the forefront of acute cancer care and survivorship care.

  17. Private Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Brian T., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the expanding role of the rehabilitation counselor into private sector rehabilitation in the seven articles of this special issue. Topics cover private rehabilitation in an insurance context including forensics issues, computer applications, recent trends, services in a multiprogram private clinic, and rehabilitation counselor training.…

  18. Detection of an IncA/C plasmid encoding VIM-4 and CMY-4 β-lactamases in Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter koseri from an inpatient in a cardiac rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Caltagirone, Mariasofia; Bitar, Ibrahim; Piazza, Aurora; Spalla, Melissa; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Navarra, Antonella; Migliavacca, Roberta

    2015-07-01

    A 62-year-old patient was transferred to the cardiac rehabilitation unit of the I.R.C.C.S. Fondazione S. Maugeri after undergoing a heart transplantation at the Acute Care Hospital I.R.C.C.S. S. Matteo of Pavia. On 1 August 2013 and during hospitalization in the rehabilitation unit, Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter koseri clinical isolates were simultaneously recovered from the patient's preputial swab. Both the K. oxytoca and C. koseri strains were carbapenem- resistant by MicroScan System (Beckman Coulter). Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae had previously been reported in the same rehabilitation facility. The aim of the study was to identify the carbapenem resistance mechanisms among the enterobacterial species recovered. Phenotypic screening tests useful to detect the β-lactamases/carbapenemases were performed. Carbapenem MICs were obtained by Etest. AmpC and MBL encoding genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Conjugation assays and plasmid characterization were performed. Both of the K. oxytoca and C. koseri isolates were multi drug resistant, showing resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, three generation cephalosporins, ertapenem (K. oxytoca MIC, >32 mg/L; C. koseri MIC, 4 mg/L), imipenem (K. oxytoca MIC, 4 mg/L; C. koseri MIC, 12 mg/L), thrimethoprim sulphamethoxazole and gentamicin. Susceptibility was retained to fluoroquinolones, colistin and tigecycline. Molecular characterization confirmed the co-presence of blaCMY-4 and blaVIM-4 determinants in a 150 Kb transferable plasmid of IncA/C group. This case is the first detection in Italy of the K. oxytoca and C. koseri clinical isolates co-producing the CMY-4 and VIM-4 enzymes.

  19. Outpatient coronary angioplasty: feasible and safe.

    PubMed

    Slagboom, Ton; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Laarman, Gert Jan; van der Wieken, Ron

    2005-04-01

    This study tested the safety and feasibility of coronary angioplasty on an outpatient basis. The purpose of this approach includes cost-effectiveness and patient comfort. Six hundred forty-four patients were randomized to either transradial or transfemoral PTCA using 6 Fr equipment. Patients were triaged to outpatient management based on a predefined set of predictors of an adverse outcome in the first 24 hr after initially successful coronary angioplasty. Three hundred seventy-five patients (58%) were discharged 4-6 hr after PTCA; 42% stayed in hospital overnight. In the outpatient group, one adverse event occurred (subacute stent thrombosis 7 hr postdischarge, nonfatal myocardial infarction). There were no major vascular complications. In the hospital group, 19 patients (7%) sustained an adverse cardiac even in the first 24 hr; 1 patient died. Patients treated via the femoral route had more (minor) bleeding complications (19 patients; 6%); in 17 of these, this was the sole reason that discharge was delayed. PTCA on an outpatient basis, performed via the radial or the femoral artery with low-profile equipment, is safe and feasible in a considerable part of a routine PTCA population. A larger proportion of transradial patients can be discharged due to a reduction in (minor) bleeding complications.

  20. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration: A Position Paper from the Sport Cardiology Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S; Papadakis, M; Wilhelm, M; Drezner, J A; Harmon, K G; Alonso, J M; Heidbuchel, H; Dugmore, D; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N M; Mellwig, K-P; Carre, F; Rasmusen, H; Niebauer, J; Behr, E R; Thiene, G; Sheppard, M N; Basso, C; Corrado, D

    2016-04-01

    There are large variations in the incidence, registration methods and reported causes of sudden cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death (SCA/SCD) in competitive and recreational athletes. A crucial question is to which degree these variations are genuine or partly due to methodological incongruities. This paper discusses the uncertainties about available data and provides comprehensive suggestions for standard definitions and a guide for uniform registration parameters of SCA/SCD. The parameters include a definition of what constitutes an 'athlete', incidence calculations, enrolment of cases, the importance of gender, ethnicity and age of the athlete, as well as the type and level of sporting activity. A precise instruction for autopsy practice in the case of a SCD of athletes is given, including the role of molecular samples and evaluation of possible doping. Rational decisions about cardiac preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal.

  1. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  2. 42 CFR 485.58 - Condition of participation: Comprehensive rehabilitation program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rehabilitation program. 485.58 Section 485.58 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...: SPECIALIZED PROVIDERS Conditions of Participation: Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Facilities § 485.58 Condition of participation: Comprehensive rehabilitation program. The facility must provide a...

  3. [Rehabilitation of younger patients following total joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Kladny, B

    2007-04-01

    In the treatment of younger patients following total joint replacement there are different methods for inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. In principal medical rehabilitation of younger patients does not differ from rehabilitation of older patients. However, the rehabilitation process is not restricted by coexisting diseases. Higher demands on function and performance of the artificial joint have to be considered. Especially in younger patients education and information about use, load and sports following total joint replacement are necessary. In this context occupational rehabilitation concerning restrictions caused by the artificial joint and measures for participation in working life is of special importance.

  4. [Static and dynamic physical loads in rehabilitation of inpatients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Nekorkina, O A

    2005-01-01

    Seventy five patients with ischemic heart disease (mean age 55.3 +/- 1.3 years) entered the trial of the effects of static-dynamic exercise (SDE) on central hemodynamics (CHD) and psychophysiological status under condition of hospital rehabilitation. The patients were divided into two groups: the study group (n = 50) performed SDE, control patients (n = 25) did standard dynamic exercise (SDE). SDE did not provoke anginal or ischemic responses on ECG. A single procedure of SDE had a positive effect on myocardial contractility. A course SDE had a greater positive effect on CHD, phase structure of the cardiac cycle, psychophysiological status of the patients. Thus, SDE is safe and can be used in inpatients and outpatients with coronary heart disease.

  5. [Rehabilitation standards for follow-up treatment and rehabilitation of patients with ventricular assist device (VAD)].

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Detlev; Cordes, C; Bjarnason-Wehrens, B; Knoglinger, E; Langheim, E; Marx, R; Reiss, N; Schmidt, T; Workowski, A; Bartsch, P; Baumbach, C; Bongarth, C; Phillips, H; Radke, R; Riedel, M; Schmidt, S; Skobel, E; Toussaint, C; Glatz, J

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of ventricular assist devices (VADs) in terminal heart failure patients provides new challenges to cardiac rehabilitation physicians. Structured cardiac rehabilitation strategies are still poorly implemented for this special patient group. Clear guidance and more evidence for optimal modalities are needed. Thereby, attention has to be paid to specific aspects, such as psychological and social support and education (e.g., device management, INR self-management, drive-line care, and medication).In Germany, the post-implant treatment and rehabilitation of VAD Patients working group was founded in 2012. This working group has developed clear recommendations for the rehabilitation of VAD patients according to the available literature. All facets of VAD patients' rehabilitation are covered. The present paper is unique in Europe and represents a milestone to overcome the heterogeneity of VAD patient rehabilitation.

  6. Effect of Enhanced External Counterpulsation and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Quality of Life, Plasma Nitric Oxide, Endothelin 1 and High Sensitive CRP in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shakouri, Seyed Kazem; Razavi, Zeynab; Eslamian, Fariba; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Ghaffari, Samad

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) on plasma nitric oxide (NO), Endothelin 1 (ET1), high sensitive C-reactive protein (HSCRP) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We conducted a pilot randomized clinical trial in order to evaluate plasma NO, ET1, HSCRP and QoL before and after twenty sessions of EECP (group A) and cardiac rehabilitation (CR, group B) in 42 patients with CAD (21 in each group). Results Forty-two patients (33 male and 9 female) were included in the study. The mean age was 58.2±10 years. The mean HSCRP was 1.52±0.7 in the EECP group and it was reduced to 1.27±0.4 after intervention. The reduction in HSCRP was not statistically significant in EECP and CR groups with p=0.33 and p=0.27, respectively. There was not significant improvement of NO, ET1, and QoL in the EECP and CR groups shortly after therapy (p>0.05). Conclusion Although the short-term EECP treatment in CAD patients improved HSCRP, NO, ET1, and QoL compared with the baseline those improvements are not statistically significant. Further studies are necessary with large study groups and more sessions. PMID:25932415

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation for a skydiver after aortic valve replacement for pure aortic regurgitation and resection of the ascending aorta complicated by active infective endocarditis and heart block requiring a pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Tonja R.; DeJong, Sandra; Bilbrey, Tim; Carbone, Pasquale; Campbell, Mark; Parker, Robert D.; Lira, Alessandra; Amarante, Diogo; Schussler, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    A professional skydiver underwent aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement complicated by infective endocarditis with root abscess and pacemaker implantation. He then enrolled in the Baylor Heart and Vascular Hospital cardiac rehabilitation (CR) program as part of its specificity of testing and exercise training facility. He performed specific skydiving cardiovascular and muscular strength tests at the beginning and the end of the CR program. His pacemaker was interrogated to ascertain any arrhythmias or lead displacement over the course of the CR program. Daily exercise training was customized to match the physical demands of skydiving, including two sessions at iFLY Dallas. Upon completion of the daily exercise sessions, the patient performed a simulated free-fall drop test. He then performed a true jump at Dallas Skydive Center and subsequently traveled to Arizona for a skydiving competition, where he performed 35 true jumps with no adverse events or symptoms. This case illustrates how CR, tailored to a patient's specific needs, can aid in the return to rigorous activity.

  8. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Surya, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Inpatient, outpatient and Home rehabilitation with multidisciplinary team has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability. Individualized programs elaborated by a multidisciplinary team of experts are the key to success of rehabilitation. Family plays a big role and Family Based Rehabilitation will be important in long term rehab program in MS. PMID:26538848

  9. Psychiatric rehabilitation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Rössler, W; Drake, R E

    2017-01-19

    To describe the core elements of modern psychiatric rehabilitation. Based on selected examples we describe the discussion about values in mental health care with focus on Europe. We present outcome data from studies, which have tried to implement care structures based on this value discussion. In the second half of the 20th century, mental health care in all European and other high-income countries changed conceptually and structurally. Deinstitutionalisation reduced the number of psychiatric beds and transferred priority to outpatient care and community-based services, but community mental health programs developed differently across and within these countries. High-income countries in Europe continued to invest in costly traditional services that were neither evidence-based nor person-centered by emphasising inpatient services, sheltered group homes and sheltered workshops. We argue that evidence-based, person-centred, recovery-oriented psychiatric rehabilitation offers a parsimonious solution to developing a consensus plan for community-based care in Europe. The challenges to scaling up effective psychiatric rehabilitation services in high-income countries are not primarily a lack of resources, but rather a lack of political will and inefficient use and dysfunctional allocation of resources.

  10. Outpatient therapeutic nuclear oncology.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Harvey

    2012-05-01

    In the beginning, nuclear medicine was radionuclide therapy, which has evolved into molecular tumour-targeted control of metastatic cancer. Safe, efficacious, clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology may now be based upon accurate personalised dosimetry by quantitative gamma SPECT/CT imaging to prescribe tumoricidal activities without critical organ toxicity. Preferred therapy radionuclides possess gamma emission of modest energy and abundance to enable quantitative SPECT/CT imaging for calculation of the beta therapy dosimetry, without radiation exposure risk to hospital personnel, carers, family or members of the public. The safety of outpatient radiopharmaceutical therapy of cancer with Iodine-131, Samarium-153, Holmium-166, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 is reviewed. Measured activity release rates and radiation exposure to carers and the public are all within recommendations and guidelines of international regulatory agencies and, when permitted by local regulatory authorities allow cost-effective, safe, outpatient radionuclide therapy of cancer without isolation in hospital.

  11. Anesthesia for outpatient female sterilization.

    PubMed

    Fishburne, J I

    1983-04-01

    This issue of the Bulletin deals with the principles of anesthesia for outpatient female sterilization with emphasis on techniques for laparoscopy and minilaparotomy. General anesthesia techniques provide analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation and are particularly useful for managing the anxious patient. Disadvantages include increased expense, need for specialized equipment, and highly trained personnel, and delayed recovery. Complications, though relatively rare, can be life-threatening and include aspiration of stomach contents, hypoxia, hypercarbia, hypotension, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiorespiratory arrest, and death. There is no single preferred technique of general anesthesia, athough most anesthetists employ methods that allow rapid recovery of faculties, enabling the patient to be discharged soon after surgery. To accomplish this end, light anesthesia with sodium thiopental induction and nitrous oxide maintenance is often used. Short duration muscle relaxation with an agent such as succinylcholine supplements this technique. Other techniques include light anesthesia with inhalational anesthetic agents and the use of intravenous ketamine. Local anesthesia augmented by systemic and/or inhalational analgesia is supplanting general anesthesia techniques for laparoscopy in many locales. This approach is also particularly well-suited for minilaparotomy in developing countries, where it has achieved its greatest popularity. The local technique carries with it reduced morbidity and mortality but may not entirely relieve discomfort. The primary danger of local anesthesia is respiratory depression due to excessive narcosis and sedation. The operator must be alert to the action of the drugs and should always use the minimal effective dose. Although toxicity due to overdosage with local anesthetic drugs is occasionally experienced, allergic reactions to the amide-linkage drugs such as lidocaine or bupivacaine are exceedingly rare. For outpatient

  12. [The outpatient care in the Latium region (Italy) in 2001].

    PubMed

    Torri, C; Balducci, M; Silvestri, I; Trifelli, S; Pasquarella, A; Guasticchi, G

    2004-01-01

    The Region of Latium has been operating an Outpatient Care Information System (SIAS) since 1997 to monitor the supply of outpatient care in a territory with a population of over five million. The present work has the aim of describing the outpatient care in the region, in terms of number of facilities involved by category (public and private, operating in the regional public health system) and volume of procedures rendered to residents in 2001. Of the 971 outpatient facilities operating in hospitals and elsewhere--37% state managed and 67% private--distributed in a non-uniform manner throughout the region, the majority is concentrated in the city of Rome, which by itself accounts for 49% of its total amount of facilities, and in a lesser measure in the other provincial capitals (Viterbo, Rieti, Frosinone, Latina). In 2001, 71 million procedures were performed, comprising 17 million prescriptions, for an economic value of over 400 million Euros. The three specialties of greatest use were Lab Analysis, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, and Radiology, making up 88% of the total outpatient procedures performed within the precinct of the regional health service, in respective measures of 57%, 27%, and 4%. It is noted that the public facilities are prevalently polyspecialistic while a great number of private facilities are monospecialistic and perform procedures almost exclusively (96%) in the three specialties of greatest use. The other specialties which receive notable use are Cardiology, Eye Care, Orthopedics and Neurology. In general, the greater the number of facilities there are in either the public or private sector, the greater the level of activity in terms of procedures performed, with the exception of the area of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation where the correlation is inversely proportioned; in fact, for this specialty the public facilities, which are represented in a much greater number throughout the region, supply only 7% of the volume of activity.

  13. Stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bindawas, Saad M.; Vennu, Vishal S.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and other complications worldwide. In Saudi Arabia, stroke has become an emerging health issue leading to disability and death. However, stroke care including rehabilitation services, in Saudi Arabia lags behind developed countries. Stroke rehabilitation is an essential recovery option after stroke and should start as early as possible to avoid potential complications. The growing evidence on stroke rehabilitation effectiveness in different health care settings and outcome measures used widely are reviewed in this call to action paper. PMID:27744457

  14. [Outpatient care for urological patients].

    PubMed

    Kul'chitskiĭ, V V

    1999-01-01

    The presence of adequately equipped surgical unit in outpatient clinics provides surgical aid to more patients with urological diseases. Preoperative preparation, aseptic and antiseptic measures, local anesthesia were routine. 64 operations for phimosis, condylomatous growth of the foreskin, hydrocele, cyst of the epididymis and spermatic cord, chronic epididymitis, short frenulum of the prepuce were performed in outpatient setting. Recovery lasted as usual.

  15. Rehabilitation robotics.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H I; Volpe, B T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on rehabilitation robotics which can be used to augment the clinician's toolbox in order to deliver meaningful restorative therapy for an aging population, as well as on advances in orthotics to augment an individual's functional abilities beyond neurorestoration potential. The interest in rehabilitation robotics and orthotics is increasing steadily with marked growth in the last 10 years. This growth is understandable in view of the increased demand for caregivers and rehabilitation services escalating apace with the graying of the population. We provide an overview on improving function in people with a weak limb due to a neurological disorder who cannot properly control it to interact with the environment (orthotics); we then focus on tools to assist the clinician in promoting rehabilitation of an individual so that s/he can interact with the environment unassisted (rehabilitation robotics). We present a few clinical results occurring immediately poststroke as well as during the chronic phase that demonstrate superior gains for the upper extremity when employing rehabilitation robotics instead of usual care. These include the landmark VA-ROBOTICS multisite, randomized clinical study which demonstrates clinical gains for chronic stroke that go beyond usual care at no additional cost.

  16. Rehabilitation robotics

    PubMed Central

    KREBS, H.I.; VOLPE, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on rehabilitation robotics which can be used to augment the clinician’s toolbox in order to deliver meaningful restorative therapy for an aging population, as well as on advances in orthotics to augment an individual’s functional abilities beyond neurorestoration potential. The interest in rehabilitation robotics and orthotics is increasing steadily with marked growth in the last 10 years. This growth is understandable in view of the increased demand for caregivers and rehabilitation services escalating apace with the graying of the population. We will provide an overview on improving function in people with a weak limb due to a neurological disorder who cannot properly control it to interact with the environment (orthotics); we will then focus on tools to assist the clinician in promoting rehabilitation of an individual so that s/he can interact with the environment unassisted (rehabilitation robotics). We will present a few clinical results occurring immediately poststroke as well as during the chronic phase that demonstrate superior gains for the upper extremity when employing rehabilitation robotics instead of usual care. These include the landmark VA-ROBOTICS multisite, randomized clinical study which demonstrates clinical gains for chronic stroke that go beyond usual care at no additional cost. PMID:23312648

  17. Pulmonary Embolism Following Outpatient Vasectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Frank E.; Farooqi, Bilal; Moore, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic events have several known major risk factors such as prolonged immobilization or major surgery. Pulmonary embolism has rarely been reported after an outpatient vasectomy was completed. We present the rare case of a healthy 32-year-old Caucasian male with no known risk factors who presented with pleuritic chest pain 26 days after his outpatient vasectomy was performed. Subsequently, he was found to have a pulmonary embolism as per radiological imaging. We explore the association between outpatient vasectomies and venous thromboembolic events. A review of the literature is also included. PMID:26989373

  18. Rehabilitation of Combat-Related Injuries in the Veterans Administration: A Web of Support.

    PubMed

    Howell, Paul; Capehart, Bruce P; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs provides acute, subacute, and continuing rehabilitation for veterans using a hub-and-spoke system of hospitals and outpatient facilities. Using traumatic brain injury as an example, this commentary illustrates how this system provides interdisciplinary rehabilitative care to veterans throughout North Carolina.

  19. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity steady-state training in UK cardiac rehabilitation programmes (HIIT or MISS UK): study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Gordon; Nichols, Simon; Hamborg, Thomas; Bryning, Lucy; Tudor-Edwards, Rhiannon; Markland, David; Mercer, Jenny; Birkett, Stefan; Ennis, Stuart; Powell, Richard; Begg, Brian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Banerjee, Prithwish; Ingle, Lee; Shave, Rob; Backx, Karianne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current international guidelines for cardiac rehabilitation (CR) advocate moderate-intensity exercise training (MISS, moderate-intensity steady state). This recommendation predates significant advances in medical therapy for coronary heart disease (CHD) and may not be the most appropriate strategy for the ‘modern’ patient with CHD. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) appears to be a safe and effective alternative, resulting in greater improvements in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak). To date, HIIT trials have predominantly been proof-of-concept studies in the laboratory setting and conducted outside the UK. The purpose of this multicentre randomised controlled trial is to compare the effects of HIIT and MISS training in patients with CHD attending UK CR programmes. Methods and analysis This pragmatic study will randomly allocate 510 patients with CHD to 8 weeks of twice weekly HIIT or MISS training at 3 centres in the UK. HIIT will consist of 10 high-intensity (85–90% peak power output (PPO)) and 10 low-intensity (20–25% PPO) intervals, each lasting 1 min. MISS training will follow usual care recommendations, adhering to currently accepted UK guidelines (ie, >20 min continuous exercise at 40–70% heart rate reserve). Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, 8 weeks and 12 months. The primary outcome for the trial will be change in VO2 peak as determined by maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary measures will assess physiological, psychosocial and economic outcomes. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol V.1.0, dated 1 February 2016, was approved by the NHS Health Research Authority, East Midlands—Leicester South Research Ethics Committee (16/EM/0079). Recruitment will start in August 2016 and will be completed in June 2018. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals, presented at national and international scientific meetings and are expected to inform future national guidelines for exercise

  20. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  1. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  2. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, James A.; Emery, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    Examines three behavioral strategies in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for formal treatment for physical and psychosocial sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI): exercise therapy, Type A modification, and nonspecific psychological therapies. Concludes CR improves the quality of life among post-MI patients, but does not prolong life or significantly…

  3. Rehabilitation News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Rehabilitation news items include, among others: a midpoint review of the implementation of the World Programme of Action Concerning Disabled Persons, an international study on the impact of new technologies on employment of disabled people, and a U.S. project to investigate disability service provision and innovations in other countries. (JDD)

  4. Rehabilitation Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 40 equipment items for rehabilitation and physical therapy programs for all levels of handicapped children. Described are such items as a handygym, a suspension…

  5. Psychosocial rehabilitation activities, empowerment, and quality of community-based life for people with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuei-Ru; Shih, Ya-Wen; Chang, Chueh; Chou, Yi-Ying; Hu, Wei-Herng; Cheng, Josephjror-Serk; Yang, Chiu-Yueh; Hsieh, Chia-Jung

    2012-08-01

    Many variables influencing quality of life (QOL) for outpatients with schizophrenia have been identified from prior studies. Symptom severity, psychosocial rehabilitation activities, and empowerment have all been clearly identified as key variables. However, which variables are the most influential and important factors remains unknown; factors influencing QOL, either directly or indirectly and to what degree, need to be examined. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that empowerment is a possible mediator of how (a) psychiatric symptoms and (b) psychosocial rehabilitation activities affect QOL for outpatients with schizophrenia in the community. We used the probability proportional to size random sampling for 190 outpatients with schizophrenia at 10 community rehabilitation centers in Taipei, such that samples consisted of adults who fulfilled the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria. The instruments included the questionnaire to gather demographic and disease information, the Empowerment Scale, the Psychiatric Symptoms Scale, the psychosocial rehabilitation activity (PRA), and the Quality of Life Scale for Psychiatric Patients. Beyond descriptive statistics, correlation and structural equation models were computed. Findings showed that empowerment in outpatients with schizophrenia mediates QOL, whereas psychosocial rehabilitation activities seem to increase empowerment, which may in turn increase QOL. Psychotic symptoms seem to have a direct effect of decreasing QOL that could not be mediated by empowerment. Empowerment had a significant effect on QOL for outpatients with schizophrenia. The findings of this study support the importance of empowerment and rehabilitation activities for promoting QOL among community outpatients. We suggest that various rehabilitation programs and empowerment health education are needed to enhance QOL for schizophrenia outpatients in the community.

  6. Actual outpatient PTCA: results of the OUTCLAS pilot study.

    PubMed

    Slagboom, T; Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; van der Wieken, R; Odekerken, D

    2001-06-01

    This study tested the safety and feasibility of coronary angioplasty on an outpatient basis. The purpose of this approach includes cost-effectiveness and patient comfort. Included were 159 patients treated with balloon angioplasty or intracoronary stent placement, all performed via the radial artery with 6 French guiding catheters. Patients were selected for same-day discharge based on the absence of any adverse predictor for subacute occlusion or unfavorable clinical outcome during the first 24 hr after successful PTCA. One hundred and six (66%) patients were discharged 4-6 hr after PTCA. Stents were used in 40% of patients. There were no cardiac or vascular complications. We conclude that outpatient PTCA, performed via the radial artery, is both safe and feasible in a large part of a routine PTCA population.

  7. [Rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty of hip and knee].

    PubMed

    Jansen, E; Brienza, S; Gierasimowicz-Fontana, A; Matos, C; Reynders-Frederix-Dobre, C; HateM, S M

    2015-09-01

    Numbers of total hip and knee arthroplasties are increasing on a regular basis. Clinical pathways tend to shorten the duration of hospitalization in acute care after surgery. Therefore, the preoperative preparation of the patient and his abilities for postoperative rehabilitation should be carefully addressed. Before the surgical intervention, it is recommended that the patient receives an educational program and a physical preparation. After the surgical intervention, the patient can benefit from a home-based rehabilitation program supervised by a physiotherapist, if there were no preoperative reasons for prolonging the hospital stay and if the surgery took place without complications. Some patients may benefit from postsurgical rehabilitation in a specialized locomotor rehabilitation long-stay care unit. The indications for inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation are : two simultaneous arthroplasties, revision of a previous hip or knee arthroplasty, postsurgical complications, advanced age, comorbidities influencing the rehabilitation process, social difficulties, necessity for adaptation of the environment, insufficient or unadapted out-patient (para)medical care. The goals of the rehabilitation treatment depend on the patient's characteristics and environment, on the properties of the prosthesis and on the postsurgical complications. The functional prognosis of a total joint arthroplasty of the knee or hip is excellent, provided that there are no post-surgical complications and that the patient benefits from adequate rehabilitation therapy. The present paper describes the different phases of rehabilitation treatment and the general and specific complications of total hip and knee arthroplasties that may influence the rehabilitation outcome.

  8. Stroke rehabilitation in Canada: a work in progress.

    PubMed

    Teasell, Robert; Meyer, Matthew J; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Willems, Deb

    2009-01-01

    Stroke rehabilitation in Canada continues to function under models and practices that have changed little in the last four decades and struggles to implement new evidence-based or best practices. Ontario, Canada's largest province, has had a coordinated stroke strategy since 2000. The Ontario Stroke System has developed an extensive infrastructure of research syntheses, consensus panel recommendations, practice guidelines, standards of care, and centralized data collection across the continuum of stroke care. This has produced a solid foundation upon which an evidence-based stroke rehabilitation system can be developed. However, failure to invest in stroke rehabilitation or provide incentives to implement change has resulted in the stroke rehabilitation system and critical outcomes remaining largely unchanged. Improvements in time to admission have been countered by rising admission FIM scores such that severe stroke patients often cannot access the stroke rehabilitation system. Many stroke patients are still rehabilitated on general rehabilitation units, therapy intensities remain unacceptably low, and many outpatient programs are being reduced or even closed. Although there are pockets of innovation, the stroke rehabilitation system continues to function more according to traditional ways of practicing. The hope is that with appropriate investments and incentives, Canadians and Ontarians can build upon the existing infrastructure to ensure stroke patients receive optimal rehabilitative care based on best evidence. In the meantime, stroke rehabilitation in Canada remains a work in progress.

  9. [Effectiveness of rehabilitation with musculoskeletal diseases].

    PubMed

    Jäckel, Wilfried H; Farin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    Multidisciplinary treatment focusing on impairments, activities and participation are an important component within the therapeutic regimen in musculoskeletal conditions. In Germany, for more than 95% of the patients multidisciplinary treatment is provided as inpatient rehabilitation. According to the results of a study from the Netherlands, inpatient rehabilitation is superior to usual care in terms of decreasing disease activity and improving emotional well-being in rheumatoid arthritis. Another randomized, controlled study gives evidence that rehabilitation is more effective as compared to usual care in ankylosing spondylitis. In patients suffering from fibromyalgia, after inpatient rehabilitation, symptoms improve significantly and this is true even one year after discharge. The results of a quality management project financed by the German health insurance and including several thousand patients with musculoskeletal diseases show an improvement in physical and emotional dimensions of health status at discharge and after a six month follow-up. Recent studies comparing inpatient with outpatient rehabilitation in patients with musculoskeletal diseases provide information that both forms are equally effective. Taking into account the high number of inpatient rehabilitation procedures in Germany, more outcomes research is required urgently.

  10. [Motor rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Doménech, J; García-Aymerich, V; Juste, J; Ortiz, A

    2002-02-01

    The child's rehabilitation objectives are the same of the early intervention. The early intervention include motor approaches to facilitate the unique way of the newborn's expression: the movement and with it his holistic development. The motor approach is a classic aspect of early intervention but it is not itself early intervention. When the treatment objective is a term or preterm newborn or neonate the motor approach may be the principal method to facilitate perceptions experiences and basic habits. This intervention is not made with a specific physiotherapeutic technique. It is a sequential stimulation or development, without forget that the child must be taken as a whole. This point of view has special importance the first days of life and must be included in perinatal approach routines. In this paper we expose the work method of a Child Rehabilitation Team liked to a Newborn Unit.

  11. Using outdoor activities in cardiac recovery.

    PubMed

    McNish, Hugh

    Evidence suggests that green spaces next to hospitals can be used to promote health. This article reports on a pilot study to determine how hospital green spaces can be used for patients with cardiac problems and their rehabilitation programmes. Over a six-week period, patients spent one hour per week taking part in activities, including tai chi, photography and willow sculpting, as part of their rehabilitation programme. Patients showed improved physical health, less social isolation, a better overall mood and increased positivity. They were also more likely to choose to exercise than at the start of the rehabilitation programme, and valued the new skills and knowledge that they gained.

  12. Perspectives on rehabilitation research.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wayne A

    2010-02-01

    Gordon WA. Perspectives on rehabilitation research. The author provides his perspectives on both the methodologic and funding challenges faced by rehabilitation researchers. His concerns are conveyed about the devaluing of rehabilitation research by federal funding agencies and Congress.

  13. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  14. Rehabilitation Services Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contacts OSEP Reports & Resources RSA Welcome to RSA Rehabilitation Services Administration RSA Spotlight News Commissioner's Quarterly Newsletter ... The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services’ Rehabilitation Services Administration is proud to announce the publication ...

  15. Rehabilitation practice patterns for patients with heart failure: the Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    More countries around world have begun to use cardiac rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with chronic heart failure (HF). Asia is the largest continent in the world and, depending on its economy, culture, and beliefs, a given Asian country differs from Western countries as well as others in Asia. The cardiac rehabilitation practice patterns for patients with HF are somewhat different in Asia. In addition to the formal pattern of Western practice, it also includes special techniques and skills, such as Taiji, Qigong, and Yoga. This article describes cardiac rehabilitation patterns for patients with HF in most Asian countries and areas.

  16. Rehabilitation and transition after lung transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Burton, J H; Marshall, J M; Munro, P; Moule, W; Snell, G I; Westall, G P

    2009-01-01

    We describe the key components of an outpatient pediatric recovery and rehabilitation program set up within the adult lung transplant service at the Alfred Hospital, Melbourne. Following discharge, pediatric lung transplant recipients and their families participated in an intensive 3-month outpatient rehabilitation program. Weekly sessions included education regarding transplant issues, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy sessions. The overall aim of the program was to comprehensively address physical rehabilitation and psychosocial and educational needs. Sessions tailored to meet the individual needs of the child were presented at an appropriate cognitive level. Education sessions for both the children and parents focused on medications, identification of infection and rejection, nutrition, physiotherapy/rehabilitation, occupational roles and stress management, donor issues, psychosocial readjustment, and transition issues. Physiotherapy included a progressive aerobic and strength training program, postural reeducation, and core stability. We incorporate Age-appropriate play activities: running, dancing, jumping, ball skills, and so on. Occupational therapy sessions addressed the primary roles of patient, students, and player. Transitions such as returning to school, friends, and the community were explored. Issues discussed included adjustment to new health status, strategies to manage side effects of medications, and altered body image issues. Weekly multidisciplinary team meetings were used to discuss and plan the rehabilitation progress. School liaison and visits occurred prior to school commencement with follow-up offered to review the ongoing transition process. Both patients and parents have reported a high level of satisfaction with the rehabilitation program. We plan to formally evaluate the program in the future.

  17. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  18. An Update: The Cardiac Wellness Training Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Lorraine; Long, Patrick

    1983-01-01

    This article reports on the scope of activities and the effectiveness of a Colorado program that trained community park and recreation personnel to carry out local cardiac wellness services. Participants were trained to provide rehabilitation and fitness activities for those recovering from heart attacks or surgery and for other high-risk persons.…

  19. Simulation analysis of an outpatient services facility.

    PubMed

    Levy, J L; Watford, B A; Owen, V T

    1989-11-01

    Anderson Memorial Hospital in Anderson, South Carolina is in the process of constructing a new Outpatient Services Center. The Outpatient Services Center will combine existing outpatient services within the hospital and offsite services at the Outpatient Diagnostic Center. A simulation model of the proposed facility has been developed based on historical data. The information obtained from the simulation model includes the analysis of outpatient services utilization, patient waiting and flow times, and service area queue sizes. This information has been used to determine minimum facility design requirements, such as waiting room size, based on the expected demands.

  20. A pilot study of coronary angioplasty in outpatients.

    PubMed Central

    Laarman, G J; Kiemeneij, F; van der Wieken, L R; Tijssen, J G; Suwarganda, J S; Slagboom, T

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Is it safe to discharge patients from hospital on the same day as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)? The hypothesis tested was that careful pre and post angioplasty selection of patients can identify a group that is at very low risk of postprocedural complications and that these patients may be discharged on the day of the procedure. METHODS--63 patients undergoing limited risk coronary angioplasty of 72 lesions were studied. So that patients would be able to walk soon after PTCA miniature equipment (6 French catheters and balloon-on-a-wire devices) was passed percutaneously through the right brachial artery. After coronary angioplasty patients with angiographic evidence of dissection and/or thrombus and with complications were assigned to an inpatient group and those in whom PTCA had achieved a good angiographic result were assigned to an outpatient group. RESULTS--Two patients were excluded because the brachial approach failed, leaving 61 patients (70 lesions). After PTCA 50 patients (82%) with 57 lesions (81%) attempted were assigned to the outpatient group. No cardiac complication occurred in this subset (0%; 95% confidence interval 0 to 7%). Eleven patients (18%), in whom 13 lesions (19%) were attempted, were assigned to the inpatient group. Three of these patients (27%; 95% confidence interval 6 to 61%) had cardiac complications. Two patients needed local surgical repair after catheterisation of the brachial artery; one had a haematoma and one had a false aneurysm. CONCLUSIONS--Coronary angioplasty with miniature equipment passed through the brachial artery was a safe procedure with a high initial success rate. The results of this pilot trial suggest that with careful selection of patients before and after angioplasty PTCA can be performed safely in outpatients. PMID:8068463

  1. The development of outpatient milestones.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Donald E

    2014-06-01

    The Milestones work group sought to establish a baseline of expected competence development across the six core competencies. The subcompetencies and milestones reflect the committee's work with input from ABPN, AADPRT, and AAP. They are intended to serve not only as consistent markers of progress nationwide but also as a basis by which individual programs can build their own milestones that reflect unique qualities of any given learning environment. The Milestones work group anticipates that iterative changes will be made as the milestones are broadly implemented. In anticipating the implementation of outpatient milestones, the committee will be particularly interested to how effectively psychotherapy milestones will be captured through the combination of outpatient evaluations and other data points captured in the program director's semiannual evaluation.

  2. Standardization of Type 2 Diabetes Outpatient Expenditure with Bundled Payment Method in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guo-Chao; Luo, Yun; Li, Qian; Wu, Meng-Fan; Zhou, Zi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes among Chinese population has been increasing by years, directly leading to an average annual growth rate of 19.90% of medical expenditure. Therefore, it is urgent to work on strategies to control the growth of medical expenditure on type 2 diabetes on the basis of the reality of China. Therefore, in this study, we explored the feasibility of implementing bundled payment in China through analyzing bundled payment standards of type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Methods: This study analyzed the outpatient expenditure on type 2 diabetes with Beijing Urban Employee's Basic Medical Insurance from 2010 to 2012. Based on the analysis of outpatient expenditure and its influential factors, we adopted decision tree approach to conduct a case-mix analysis. In the end, we built a case-mix model to calculate the standard expenditure and the upper limit of each combination. Results: We found that age, job status, and whether with complication were significant factors that influence outpatient expenditure for type 2 diabetes. Through the analysis of the decision tree, we used six variables (complication, age, diabetic foot, diabetic nephropathy, cardiac-cerebrovascular disease, and neuropathy) to group the cases, and obtained 11 case-mix groups. Conclusions: We argued that it is feasible to implement bundled payment on type 2 diabetes outpatient services. Bundled payment is effective to control the increase of outpatient expenditure. Further improvements are needed for the implementation of bundled payment reimbursement standards, together with relevant policies and measures. PMID:27064041

  3. [Outpatient rheumatologic treatment in Germany].

    PubMed

    Edelmann, E

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient rheumatologic treatment in Germany is managed by rheumatologists in private practice (n = 557), by authorized rheumatism outpatient centers (n = 116), by rheumatism centers according to §116b (n = 43) and by university outpatient departments. A total number of 975 rheumatologists were registered by the end of 2012 of whom approximately 830 were active in outpatient care. With this number of rheumatologists Germany is in the middle range in comparison to eight industrial nations including the USA. This number is not sufficient to provide adequate medical care and the consequences are too long waiting times for an appointment with a rheumatologist. Statistical data of the Kassenärztliche Bundesvereinigung (KBV, National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians) showed 688,000 general insurance patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As some 68.9 % of the population are in this insurance scheme there are some 770,000 RA patients in Germany (almost 1 % of the population). One way to improve rheumatology care in spite of the lack of rheumatologists could be special agreements with the general health insurance providers to improve cooperation and division of responsibilities between rheumatologists and general practitioners, to implement patient education, tighter control and treat to target in rheumatology care. Another way could be a new treatment level called "ambulant specialist care", with no budget for medical care and no budget for the number of patients treated and therefore the chance for rheumatologists to treat more patients and have a better income. To achieve that more young doctors receive approval as a specialist in rheumatology, more chairs of rheumatology at universities and a nationwide stipendium for training assistants are needed.

  4. Rehabilitation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Biotran, or Fastex as named by Cybex, the company that manufactures it, is a force sensing system that helps physicians and physical therapists treat people with movement deficiencies. Based on NASA sensor technology, it also has applications in sports training and evaluation. Biotran provides a means of testing weight-bearing capabilities that may have been compromised by injury or disease. It also assists in the rehabilitation process by putting patients through a course of computer-directed exercises designed to improve strength and balance reaction time. The system tests and documents progress until maximum medical improvement is achieved. Lewis Research Center also assisted the company in the selection of the material used in the Biotran force sensing platforms. Biotran is currently manufactured by Cybex under the name Fastex.

  5. [Trends in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases in Germany].

    PubMed

    Mau, W; Beyer, W; Ehlebracht-König, I; Engel, J-M; Genth, E; Jäckel, W H; Lange, U; Thiele, K

    2014-03-01

    Recent Deutsche Gesellschaft für Rheumatologie (DGRh, German Society of Rheumatology) guidelines emphasized the significance of coordinated multidisciplinary care and rehabilitation of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Nationwide data from the German pension insurance funds showed that inpatient rehabilitation due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) varied by a factor of 2.6 between the different German states. From 2000 to 2012 rehabilitation measures were reduced by one third, most significantly in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Rehabilitation measures because of RA or AS were provided up to 14 times more frequently by the German statutory pension insurance scheme compared with a large compulsory health insurance which is responsible for rehabilitation measures after retirement. In rehabilitation centers with high numbers of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, higher structural and process quality were demonstrated. In 2011 a total of 40 % of RA patients in the national database of the collaborative arthritis centers showed medium or severe functional limitations. Among these disabled RA patients inpatient rehabilitation was reduced by about 50 % between 1995 and 2011. Out of all RA patients from outpatient rheumatology care with severe functional limitations 38 % had no functional restoration therapy within the previous 12 months with a high variation between rheumatologists. Experiences from other European countries may inspire German rheumatologists and other involved health professionals to initiate a wider range of rehabilitative interventions in the future.

  6. Creating an Outcomes-Based Tool for Learning Barrier Assessment in an Outpatient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Rupnow, Jana M.; Currie, Kristi A.; Procious, James K.; Adams, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    An outcomes-based assessment instrument was devised to screen patients for learning problems that would impede patient education in cardiac rehabilitation. Criteria for seven barriers were established: hearing, language, cultural, religious, vision, cognitive, emotional). Points of data collection and a rationale for collection were identified.…

  7. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  8. [Predictive and rehabilitative perspectives in heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Meyendorf, R; Dassing, M; Scherer, J; Klinner, W; Kemkes, B; Reichart, B

    1989-10-01

    27 patients who underwent heart transplantation one to five years ago, were evaluated concerning psychological and social adjustment after heart transplantation. Prior to cardiac transplantation, predictors for good rehabilitation status were absence of psychopathology, clear motivation, good social background, advanced physical debility (being bedridden as opposed to ambulatory), absence of a history of excessive alcohol consumption. Age was not found to be a predictor of outcome. Criteria for good rehabilitation status after cardiac transplantation were absence of psychopathology, good compliance, social reintegration, return to work, psychological well-being, satisfaction with the quality of life and good exercise capacity. The criteria for good rehabilitation correlate positively with the predictors specified and with each other. Psychopathology after cardiac transplantation was related to psychopathology prior to the intervention, motivation, social background, postoperative compliance, social reintegration, return to work, psychological well-being and satisfaction with the quality of life. Compliance was related with the predictors motivation, social background, history of excessive alcohol consumption, psychopathology after transplantation and return to work. Social reintegration was correlated with social background and post-transplantation psychopathology. Return to work was related to motivation, post-transplantation psychopathology and compliance. While physical well-being was not associated with the predictors except motivation, it was related to the rehabilitation factors of post-transplantation psychopathology, social reintegration, and return to work. Satisfaction with the quality of life correlated with only the rehabilitation factors of post-transplantation psychopathology and psychological well-being. Physical exercise capacity was related to psychological well-being after transplantation.

  9. [Psychosocial rehabilitation in advanced age].

    PubMed

    Haag, G

    1985-02-01

    The psychosocial rehabilitation of older persons is one of the main problems in health policy. About one quarter of the over 65-year-olds face psychic problems, without, to a large extent, receiving adequate treatment and rehabilitative care. Substantial deficits exist above all in the out-patient and non-residential service sectors. In in-patient care, existing methods for psychosocial intervention (such as psychoanalysis, behavioural, client-centered, family, Gestalt, milieu, or music and dance therapy, psychodrama, reality orientation training, or resensitization techniques) are hardly ever used. This absence of applied geronto-psychology is attributable to the shortcomings of available assessment methods, multiple methodical problems of intervention research, and--above all--to insufficient staff positions for psychosocial professions in the gerontological sector. Provision of further permanent posts for psychosocial workers; development of age-specific assessment methods; interdisciplinary and systematic interventional research; the development of ambulatory, community-based services as well as intensive support for existing self-help efforts are therefore called for.

  10. [Guidelines for psychology activities in cardiologic rehabilitation and prevention].

    PubMed

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to provide specific recommendations in regard to psychological activities in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Based on scientific evidence and clinical experience, the present guidelines are targeted for psychologists working in the field of cardiac rehabilitation and for the core component of CR, as well as for the health care providers, insurers, policy makers and consumers. In the introduction, the framework of Italian cardiac rehabilitation and psychology as well as the methodology used are defined, in accordance with the recommendations of the National Guidelines Programme of the Italian Health Ministry. The first section illustrates the educational training and structural requirements necessary for psychologists intending to work in cardiac rehabilitation, and provides a summary of the principal models of organization. Section two describes the sequence of psychological activities based on the different phases of the process of care. The chapters devoted to selection and admission of cardiac patients define the clinical conditions for which patients should be referred to the psychologist and describe the models for the first "patient-psychologist" contact. The chapter dedicated to evaluation, which aims to identify the care needs of the patient describes the instruments available to the psychologist (interview, screening tests, clinical assessment tests, quality-of-life tests) and the areas of investigation in cardiac diseases patients. The chapter on intervention analyses the different tools including educational interventions, counselling, stress management and psychotherapy evidenced by the literature and common to the different cardiac pathologies. In the chapter on follow-up, are described tools for evaluation of patient satisfaction and for planning long-term care. Section three describes the psychological characterization and the specificity of psychological interventions in different cardiac patients populations

  11. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  12. [Possibilities for rehabilitation in a county hospital].

    PubMed

    Mohr, P

    1981-01-01

    A county hospital with an infirmary surely offers the possibilities for rehabilitation as much as any other institution. Due to its manageable size, the county hospital can probably guarantee deeper personal care. The following possibilities are discussed: activating care, mental stimulation in a reality orientation program, dance and music therapy, plus the opening of the infirmary outwards, which remains a very important aspect. The rehabilitation in a county hospital can be guaranteed only by the complete cooperation between hospital internal and external medicine. An outpatient ward such as the day- and night-clinic is also a useful institution. In the future, the employment of volunteers in and outside the hospital will be of greater importance. Already now, greater efforts should be made on behalf of continued training and greater social prestige for these volunteers.

  13. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  14. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  15. Cardiac arrhythmias in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, K Y; Loke, K Y; Yip, W C; Tay, J S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical data of patients with cardiac arrhythmias managed between May 1986 and March 1988 were reviewed to determine their mode of presentation and clinical course. Of the 5,768 admissions, 62 (1.07%) patients had arrhythmias. During the same period, 21 patients were managed as outpatients with 13 being new referrals. Thirty-eight patients had undergone corrective cardiac procedures, 8 others had congenital heart lesions, 3 were associated with acquired cardiac pathology and the remaining had isolated arrhythmias. The cardiac arrhythmias were: right bundle branch block 36, premature atrial and ventricular contractions 15, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) 15, atrioventricular (AV) block 7, sinus bradycardia 3, atrial fibrillation 2, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation 2, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome without SVT 2, bradytachyarrhythmia 1. There were 3 patients with foetal SVT, one persisting till day 1. High grade AV block occurred in 2 patients post-surgically and needed pacing. Only 2 others were symptomatic. Other than the 38 patients who underwent corrective procedures (2 had balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary stenosis), 8 others had structural heart disease. There was 1 sudden death and 5 died from their primary heart disease.

  16. Dexmedetomidine, Ketamine, and Midazolam for Oral Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bill W. S.; Peskin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous sedation is frequently provided by anesthesiologists for phobic patients undergoing elective dental treatment in outpatient settings. Propofol is one of the most commonly used anesthetic agents that can result in apnea and respiratory depression, thereby posing potential difficulties with perioperative airway management. Dexmedetomidine has been utilized successfully in intravenous sedation for a wide variety of procedures and holds potential as an alternative to propofol in outpatient dental settings. However, as a single agent, it may not provide adequate depth of sedation and analgesia for oral rehabilitation. In this case report we demonstrate an effective alternative intravenous deep-sedation technique for an adult phobic patient undergoing oral rehabilitation utilizing 3 agents in combination: dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and midazolam. This combination of agents may be especially useful for those patients with a history of substance abuse, where administration of opioids may be undesirable or contraindicated. PMID:25849472

  17. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  18. Correlates of depressive symptoms in individuals attending outpatient stroke clinics.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Julianne; Rice, Danielle; McIntyre, Amanda; Viana, Ricardo; Macaluso, Steven; Teasell, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Depressive symptoms are common post-stroke. We examined stroke deficits and lifestyle factors that are independent predictors for depressive symptomology. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for patients' post-stroke who attended outpatient clinics at a hospital in Southwestern Ontario between 1 January 2014 and 30 September 2014. Demographic variables, stroke deficits, secondary stroke risk factors and disability study measures [Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)] were analyzed. Results Of the 221 outpatients who attended the stroke clinics (53% male; mean age = 65.2 ± 14.9 years; mean time post-stroke 14.6 ± 20.1 months), 202 patients were used in the final analysis. About 36% of patients (mean = 5.17 ± 5.96) reported mild to severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 5). Cognitive impairment (CI), smoking, pain and therapy enrollment (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Patients reporting CI were 4 times more likely to score highly on the PHQ-9 than those who did not report CI (OR = 4.72). While controlling for age, MoCA scores negatively related to depressive symptoms with higher PHQ-9 scores associated with lower MoCA scores (r= -0.39, p < 0.005). Conclusions High levels of depressive symptoms are common in the chronic phase post-stroke and were partially related to cognition, pain, therapy enrollment and lifestyle factors. Implications for Rehabilitation Stroke patients who report cognitive deficits, pain, tobacco use or being enrolled in therapy may experience increased depressive symptoms. A holistic perspective of disease and lifestyle factors should be considered while assessing risk of depressive symptoms in stroke patients. Patients at risk for depressive symptoms should be monitored at subsequent outpatient visits.

  19. Outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Kassira, Wrood; Namias, Nicholas

    2008-07-01

    The leading etiologies of pediatric burns are scald, thermal, and electrical injuries. The initial management of burns involves assessment of burn depth and total body surface area (TBSA) affected, a history, and physical examination. Calculation of percent of TBSA affected is an important determinant of the necessity for hospitalization versus outpatient management. Only second- and third-degree burns are included in the calculation. The criteria for outpatient management vary based on the center experience and resources. One such set of criteria in an experienced burn center includes burn affecting less than 15% TBSA, therefore not requiring fluid resuscitation; the ability to take in oral fluids, excluding serious perioral burns; no airway involvement or aspiration of hot liquid; no abuse; and dependable family able to transport the patient for clinic appointments. Once the child is ready to reenter school, the physician must discuss with the family and school staff any needs and expectations for the child, including wound care. Social reintegration can be difficult. Educating the teachers and staff of the child's appearance may help prepare the students.

  20. Advances in rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee Sien; Chew, Effie; Samuel, Geoffrey S; Tan, Yeow Leng; Kong, Keng He

    2013-10-01

    Rehabilitation medicine is the medical specialty that integrates rehabilitation as its core therapeutic modality in disability management. More than a billion people worldwide are disabled, and the World Health Organization has developed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a framework through which disability is addressed. Herein, we explore paradigm shifts in neurorehabilitation, with a focus on restoration, and provide overviews on developments in neuropharmacology, rehabilitation robotics, virtual reality, constraint-induced therapy and brain stimulation. We also discuss important issues in rehabilitation systems of care, including integrated care pathways, very early rehabilitation, early supported discharge and telerehabilitation. Finally, we highlight major new fields of rehabilitation such as spasticity management, frailty and geriatric rehabilitation, intensive care and cancer rehabilitation.

  1. Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

  2. Offender Rehabilitation Down Under

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Tony; Day, Andrew; Casey, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we offer an overview of reintegration policies in both Australia and New Zealand. We describe the rehabilitative practices of both countries, and their basis in the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model of offender rehabilitation, before outlining the recently developed Good Lives Model of offender rehabilitation. Our conclusion is that the…

  3. Strategies for boosting outpatient care profitability.

    PubMed

    Baptist, A J; Lameka, R B

    1990-02-01

    With outpatient charges approaching one-fourth of hospital revenues nationwide, healthcare providers are pressed to handle this care more efficiently and profitably. Five steps toward healthier profit margins for outpatient services involve finding ways to expand volume and market share; setting and meeting strict quality standards; studying operational efficiency; working with physicians to improve productivity; and monitoring price-cost relationships.

  4. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients’ places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey – interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey – a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing

  5. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  6. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following

  7. Outpatient treatment of adult asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Kleerup, E C; Tashkin, D P

    1995-01-01

    As a chronic disease with intermittent exacerbations, asthma is treated primarily in the outpatient setting by primary care physicians. Asthma is the result of complex and only partially understood interactions of respiratory, inflammatory, and neural cells and their mediators. The goals of asthma therapy are to prevent and relieve symptoms, allow normal activities of daily living, restore and maintain normal pulmonary function, avoid adverse effects from interventions, and minimize inconvenience and cost. These goals can be achieved through educating patients, assessing and monitoring asthma severity, avoiding or controlling asthma triggers, establishing an intervention plan for routine self-management and the management of exacerbations, and providing regular follow-up care. We present a stepped approach to asthma pharmacotherapy, emphasizing anti-inflammatory therapy--inhaled corticosteroids, cromolyn sodium, or nedocromil sodium--as a summary of recent national and international recommendations. PMID:7667983

  8. [Role of occupational rehabilitation therapy in returning to work: experimental experience].

    PubMed

    Bazzini, Giacomo; Panigazzil, Monica; Prestifilippo, Elena; Capodaglio, Edda Maria; Candura, Stefano M; Scafa, Fabrizio; Nuccio, Carla; Cortese, Giovanni; Matarrese, Maria Rosaria; Miccio, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The experimental experience is the result of combining cultural, clinical and scientific interest in rehabilitative, occupational and forensic mnedicine and in ergonomics. It deals with the rehabilitation and return at work of patients with physical disabilities caused by occupational trauma or disease. The programme described starts with a selection by INAIL and involves with an outpatient surgery inclusion. It is composed of: preliminary physical examination, functional assessment, the formulation of a rehabilitation plan and its successive implementation. At the end of the evaluation plan, there is a final assessment to identify outcome indicators and residual functional and work capacity.

  9. Parent Perspectives on Rehabilitation Services for Their Children with Disabilities: A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Joseph; Benger, Jennifer; Salls, Joyce; Marchetti, Gregory; Reed, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers have adopted a family-centered care (FCC) approach. Parent satisfaction is an indicator of the effectiveness of FCC. The purpose of this project was to describe parent perceptions of the extent to which FCC behaviors occurred in an outpatient pediatric rehabilitation facility. The Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC)-20, a…

  10. [Growing complexity of cardiologic intensive rehabilitation: motor rehabilitation resources and programs of physical training].

    PubMed

    Michelis, E; Capurro, E; Remaggi, C; Belloni, L; Griffo, R

    2002-09-01

    In the last few years the population referred to cardiac rehabilitation centers has changed profoundly: the number of survivors of acute cardiac events has increased and heart surgery is being proposed to ever greater numbers of elderly patients with frequent and greater comorbidities, which make the management of physical training programs more complex. Consequently, just as rehabilitation cardiologists have had to expand their field of analyses and professional skills and nurses have had to integrate their care protocols, physiotherapists too have had to adapt the management of motor rehabilitation programs to the various needs and problems of each patient in the different phases of recovery. The aim of this paper is to present and discuss the procedures followed in our center concerning both the mode and contents of a standard course of motor rehabilitation for patients without complications and those for patients with complications. The paper analyzes the various assessments, the training program, the instruments of control and verification of the results, and discusses the instruments of intervention in patients affected by complications such as respiratory disturbances, musculoskeletal impairment, complications arising from injury, neurological deficit and severe deconditioning. Finally, the role of the physiotherapist in the active, propositive management of a recovery program is discussed.

  11. Changes in Upper-Extremity Functional Capacity and Daily Performance During Outpatient Occupational Therapy for People With Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Doman, Caitlin A.; Waddell, Kimberly J.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explored how upper-extremity (UE) functional capacity and daily performance change during the course of outpatient rehabilitation in people with stroke. METHOD. Fifteen participants receiving outpatient occupational therapy services for UE paresis poststroke were enrolled. UE motor capacity was measured with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and UE performance was measured using bilateral, wrist-worn accelerometers. Measurements were taken at or near the start of therapy, at every 10th visit or every 30 days throughout the duration of services, and at discharge. RESULTS. Three patterns were observed: (1) increase in ARAT scores and more normalized accelerometry profiles, (2) increase in ARAT scores but no change in accelerometry profiles, and (3) no change in ARAT scores or in accelerometry profiles. CONCLUSION. UE performance in daily life was highly variable, with inconsistencies between change in UE capacity and change in UE performance. UE capacity and performance are important constructs to assess separately during rehabilitation. PMID:27089298

  12. Unexpected deaths in cardiology outpatients – what can we learn from case review?

    PubMed Central

    Kitz, Thomas Michael; Burnand, Nikki; Ortner, Astrid; Rudd, Ian G; Sampson, Rod; Rushworth, Gordon F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A proportion of cardiac patients managed at a cardiology outpatient clinic will die between clinic visits. This study aimed to identify the cause of death, to determine if case review occurred and if a formal review of such cases might be useful. Design Single-centre retrospective cohort study. Setting A remote regional centre in the North of Scotland. Participants All patients who had been removed from the cardiology outpatient clinic due to death in the community. Main outcome measures Cause of death, comorbidities and treatments were collected from hospital records and the national register of deaths. Chi-squared test and Student’s t-test were used with significance taken at the 5% level. Results Of 10,606 patients who attended the cardiology outpatient clinic, 75 (0.7%) patients died in the community. The majority (57.0%) died from a non-cardiac cause. Eleven patients (14.9%) died due to an unexpected cardiac death. A detailed case note review was undertaken. In only two (18.2%) cases was any note made as to the cause of death in the hospital records and in only one was there details of post mortem discussion between primary and secondary care. Conclusions A small proportion of patients attending a cardiology outpatient clinic died in the community. Documentation of the death in the hospital notes was very poor and evidence of post mortem communication between primary and secondary care was absent in all but one case. Better documentation and communication between primary and secondary care would seem desirable. PMID:27928509

  13. [THE STATE AND PERSPECTIVES OF DEVELOPMENT OF TRAUMATOLOGICAL ORTHOPEDIC OUT-PATIENT CARE TO POPULATION OF THE PRIVOLJSKII FEDERAL OKRUG].

    PubMed

    Norkin, I A; Baratov, A W; Andreeva, T M; Yushina, B S; Fedonnikov, A S

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of analysis ofmanpower support of specialized out-patient traumatological orthopedic care in the Privoljskii federal okrug. The manpower deficiency of traumatologist-orthopedist at the out-patient stage was established especially especially in rural area. This is cause of low indicators ofdispensary monitoring of patients with consequences of traumas and diseases of musculo-skeletal system and factual unavailability of rehabilitation care to patients of given profile. The experience oftraining and re-training of traumatologist-orthopedist is presented. The organization of hospital-substituting forms of medical service of profile patients in the Saratovskaia oblast. The directions of development of organization of specialized out-patient care to population of the region.

  14. [Burn scars: rehabilitation and skin care].

    PubMed

    Rochet, Jean-Michel; Zaoui, Affif

    2002-12-15

    Burn rehabilitation main goal is to minimize the consequences of hypertrophic scars and concomitant contractures. The treatment principles rely on the association of joint posture, continuous pressure completed with range of motion to prevent joint fusion (which happens to adults but not to children). Throughout the different treatment phases and wound evolution, reassessment is necessary to review rehabilitation goals and activities. During the acute phase the alternance of positioning is prioritized in order to keep the affected extremities in antideformity position using splint or other devices. At the rehabilitation phase, treatment is focussed on active/passive range of motion (skin posture) strengthening exercises and use of dynamic splint is introduced to correct contractures. After their discharge home, patients benefit from outpatient rehab until scar maturation (approximately 18 months). The treatment consists mainly on active/passive range of motion, scar massage, strengthening exercise and endurance retraining. Also modalities (such as thermal bath and high pressure water spray) are used to address itching problems and for scar softening. Finally, reconstructive surgery can be performed to correct excessive scarring or joint contracture for better functional or cosmetic outcome.

  15. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  16. Rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Parsons, Wendy J; Atteno, Mariangela; Ferrara, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Very little evidence was available to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation. Some data were borrowed from studies on ankylosing spondylitis. Covering certain aspects of the disease by the standard measure of functioning was difficult. However, rehabilitation was considered by the GRAPPA Group (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis), as part of treatment of axial PsA.

  17. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  18. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  19. Pulmonary rehabilitation in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Ries, Andrew L; Make, Barry J; Reilly, John J

    2008-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is an established treatment for patients with chronic lung disease. Benefits include improvement in exercise tolerance, symptoms, and quality of life, with a reduction in the use of health care resources. As an adjunct to surgical programs, such as lung volume reduction surgery, pulmonary rehabilitation plays an important role not just in preparing patients for surgery and facilitating recovery but also in selecting patients and ensuring informed choices about treatment options after optimal medical care. In the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT), subjects completed 6-10 weeks of comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation before randomization and continued rehabilitation throughout the trial, both at home and with intermittent supervision at either an NETT center or an NETT-certified satellite center. Sessions included a combination of upper and lower extremity exercise, education, and psychosocial support. Before randomization, pulmonary rehabilitation resulted in highly significant changes in exercise capacity, dyspnea, and quality of life. As expected, improvements were significantly greater in those without prior rehabilitation experience. Results for patients completing rehabilitation at satellites were similar to those at NETT centers. Prerandomization pulmonary rehabilitation had a significant effect on outcome after lung volume reduction surgery. NETT identified subgroups with differential outcome by treatment (surgical vs. nonsurgical), defined in part by postrehabilitation maximum exercise capacity. Overall, NETT demonstrated the effectiveness of pulmonary rehabilitation in improving function, symptoms, and health status in a large cohort of patients with advanced emphysema treated in a cross-section of programs in the United States.

  20. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  1. Robotics in shoulder rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sicuri, Chiara; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Merolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the last few decades, several researches have been conducted in the field of robotic rehabilitation to meet the intensive, repetitive and task-oriented training, with the goal to recover the motor function. Up to now, robotic rehabilitation studies of the upper extremity have generally focused on stroke survivors leaving less explored the field of orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. In this review we analyse the present status of robotic technologies, in order to understand which are the current indications and which may be the future perspective for their application in both neurological and orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. PMID:25332937

  2. Psychiatrists and psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Torrey, William C; Green, Ronald L; Drake, Robert E

    2005-05-01

    Interventions that focus directly on functional impairments related to mental illnesses are termed psychiatric rehabilitation. Research demonstrates that rehabilitation services are increasingly able to help adults with psychiatric disabilities achieve the functional outcomes they desire, particularly in the areas of housing and employment. To support the community lives of adults with severe mental illnesses, psychiatrists must stay current with advances in this field and know how to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation with other interventions. This article reviews the concept of psychiatric rehabilitation, current approaches in the field, the psychiatrist's role in these services, and implications for psychiatric training and continuing education.

  3. Pulseless electrical activity in cardiac arrest: electrocardiographic presentations and management considerations based on the electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Chris; Brady, William

    2012-01-01

    Pulseless electrical activity (PEA), a cardiac arrest rhythm scenario with an associated poor prognosis, is defined as cardiac electrical activity without a palpable pulse. Considering both outpatient and inpatient cardiac arrest presentations, PEA as a rhythm group has been increasing over the past 10 to 20 years with a corresponding decrease in the "shockable" rhythms, such as pulseless ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on electrocardiographic findings encountered in PEA cardiac arrest presentations with an emphasis on recognition of patients with a potential opportunity for successful resuscitation.

  4. Technology Utilization in Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.

    1986-01-01

    The use of technology in the rehabilitation of disabled individuals is hampered by the lack of financial resources, information on such technology, consumer involvement, and support services such as consumer training and product service. Federal and local money and resources plus the involvement of rehabilitation professionals are needed to…

  5. Rehabilitation of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Rehabilitation of hearing is considered in five conference papers. Two papers come from Poland: "Rehabilitation of Hearing in Children 'Deaf' in First 5 Years of Age" by D. Borkowska-Gaertig and others and "Possibilities of Hearing Improvement in Adults with Conservative Methods" by T. Bystrzanowska. Also included are…

  6. Rehabilitation Counseling Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stude, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 10-week paid summer internship for a rehabilitation counseling faculty in a state vocational rehabilitation agency is described. The benefits of the internship in relation to increasing faculty relevance in and outside the classroom are discussed, and recommendations for improving the internship are presented. (Author)

  7. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  8. The Influence of Cardiac Risk Factor Burden on Cardiac Stress Test Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Jon W.; Li, Morgan; Orazulike, Chidubem; Emerman, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest pain is the most common admission diagnosis for observation unit patients. These patients often undergo cardiac stress testing to further risk stratify for coronary artery disease (CAD). The decision of whom to stress is currently based on clinical judgment. We sought to determine the influence of cardiac risk factor burden on cardiac stress test outcome for patients tested from an observation unit, inpatient or outpatient setting. Methods We performed a retrospective observational cohort study for all patients undergoing stress testing in our institution from June 2006 through July 2007. Cardiac risk factors were collected at the time of stress testing. Risk factors were evaluated in a summative fashion using multivariate regression adjusting for age and known coronary artery disease. The model was tested for goodness of fit and collinearity and the c statistic was calculated using the receiver operating curve. Results A total of 4026 subjects were included for analysis of which 22% had known CAD. The rates of positive outcome were 89 (12.0%), 95 (12.6%), and 343 (16.9%) for the OU, outpatients, and hospitalized patients respectively. While the odds of a positive test outcome increased for additional cardiac risk factors, ROC curve analysis indicates that simply adding the number of risk factors does not add significant diagnostic value. Hospitalized patients were more likely to have a positive stress test, OR 1.41 (1.10 - 1.81). Conclusions Our study does not support basing the decision to perform a stress test on the number of cardiac risk factors.

  9. Family Nursing Therapeutic Conversations in Heart Failure Outpatient Clinics in Denmark: Nurses' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    2016-05-01

    As part of the Heart Failure Family Trial presently being conducted in Denmark, this qualitative process evaluation explored the perceptions of seven practicing cardiac nurses who offered family nursing therapeutic conversations (FNTC) to families in three heart failure outpatient clinics. FNTC were guided by the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. Data consisted of 34 case reports written by the nurses which documented the use of FNTC, including family responses to the FNTC. A focus group interview with the six of the nurses about their experience of offering FNTC was also conducted. Content analysis was performed using a combined deductive and inductive process. Nurses reported developing a distinct, closer, and more constructive relationship with the patients and their families and reported FNTC increased family bonding and strengthened family relationships. The nurses considered FNTC to be feasible interventions in the routine care provided in heart failure outpatient clinics.

  10. [Phototherapy in rehabilitation medicine].

    PubMed

    Okuni, Ikuko

    2012-07-01

    Rehabilitation can be classified into four types: medical, vocational, educational, and social rehabilitation. The goal of medical rehabilitation is to maintain and improve a patient's physical and mental capabilities. Phototherapy is an important means of treatment in rehabilitation medicine and is usually performed with ultraviolet, infrared, or laser light. Among them, laser light has been shown to have various biological effects, such as increasing blood flow, promoting wound healing, reducing inflammation, and improving immune function. Laser therapy is as important a treatment option as exercise therapy in rehabilitation medicine, and is considered to be worth evaluating as a therapeutic means to relieve pain in musculoskeletal disorders, promote healing in peripheral neuropathy, and alleviate muscle spasticity.

  11. Assessment of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Training and Practice Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Dougherty, William

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can benefit patients with a variety of balance and vestibular disorders. This expanding field requires knowledgeable and experienced therapists; however, the practice and experience of those providing this care may vary greatly. The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in training and practice patterns among practicing vestibular rehabilitation therapists. Study Design Case-controlled cohort study Setting Investigation of outpatient physical therapy and audiology practices that offer vestibular rehabilitation conducted by a tertiary academic referral center. Main Outcome Measure Questionnaire-based investigation of level of training in vestibular disorders and therapy, practice patterns of vestibular rehabilitation, and referral sources for VRT patients. Results We identified 27 subjects within the state of Kentucky who practice vestibular rehabilitation and the questionnaire response rate was 63%. Responses indicated that 53% of respondents had no training in VRT during their professional degree program. Attendance of a course requiring demonstration of competence and techniques was 24% of participants. The development of VRT certification was significantly more favored by those who attended such courses compared with those who did not (p=0.01). 50% of therapists have direct access to patients without physician referrals. Conclusions There is a wide range of educational background and training among those practicing VRT. This variability in experience may affect care provided within some communities. Certification is not necessary for the practice of VRT but the development of certification is favored among some therapists to improve standardization of practice of this important specialty. PMID:25700790

  12. Assessment of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Training and Practice Patterns.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Dougherty, William

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can benefit patients with a variety of balance and vestibular disorders. This expanding field requires knowledgeable and experienced therapists; however, the practice and experience of those providing this care may vary greatly. The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in training and practice patterns among practicing vestibular rehabilitation therapists. Case-controlled cohort study. Investigation of outpatient physical therapy and audiology practices that offer vestibular rehabilitation conducted by a tertiary academic referral center. Questionnaire-based investigation of level of training in vestibular disorders and therapy, practice patterns of vestibular rehabilitation, and referral sources for VRT patients. We identified 27 subjects within the state of Kentucky who practice vestibular rehabilitation and the questionnaire response rate was 63%. Responses indicated that 53% of respondents had no training in VRT during their professional degree program. Attendance of a course requiring demonstration of competence and techniques was 24% of participants. The development of VRT certification was significantly more favored by those who attended such courses compared with those who did not (p = 0.01). 50% of therapists have direct access to patients without physician referrals. There is a wide range of educational background and training among those practicing VRT. This variability in experience may affect care provided within some communities. Certification is not necessary for the practice of VRT but the development of certification is favored among some therapists to improve standardization of practice of this important specialty.

  13. Kinect system in home-based cardiovascular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Ágata; Gabriel, Joaquim; Melo, Cristina; Machado, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases lead to a high consumption of financial resources. An important part of the recovery process is the cardiovascular rehabilitation. This study aimed to present a new cardiovascular rehabilitation system to 11 outpatients with coronary artery disease from a Hospital in Porto, Portugal, later collecting their opinions. This system is based on a virtual reality game system, using the Kinect sensor while performing an exercise protocol which is integrated in a home-based cardiovascular rehabilitation programme, with a duration of 6 months and at the maintenance phase. The participants responded to a questionnaire asking for their opinion about the system. The results demonstrated that 91% of the participants (n = 10) enjoyed the artwork, while 100% (n = 11) agreed on the importance and usefulness of the automatic counting of the number of repetitions, moreover 64% (n = 7) reported motivation to continue performing the programme after the end of the study, and 100% (n = 11) recognized Kinect as an instrument with potential to be an asset in cardiovascular rehabilitation. Criticisms included limitations in motion capture and gesture recognition, 91% (n = 10), and the lack of home space, 27% (n = 3). According to the participants' opinions, the Kinect has the potential to be used in cardiovascular rehabilitation; however, several technical details require improvement, particularly regarding the motion capture and gesture recognition.

  14. Improving Fall Risk Factor Identification and Documentation of Risk Reduction Strategies by Rehabilitation Therapists through Continuing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnes, Michele J.

    2011-01-01

    This static group comparison study determined that an educational intervention was effective in increasing fall risk factor assessment, documentation of fall risk factors, and strategies devised to reduce fall risk factors by rehabilitation therapists for their older adult outpatients in clinics. Results showed that experimental group identified…

  15. Drug dreams in outpatients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Yee, Tonia; Perantie, Dana C; Dhanani, Nafisa; Brown, E Sherwood

    2004-03-01

    Patients with substance abuse or dependence often have dreams about alcohol or drugs during early recovery. However, the literature on drug dreams in rehabilitating patients with drug-related disorders remains limited. No data are available on drug dreams in people with substance-related disorders and other major mental illness. As part of a large study on the use of lamotrigine in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence, the frequency and nature of drug dreams, triggers for dreams, and response to the dreams during study participation were assessed in 37 outpatients for as long as 36 weeks. Altogether, 74% of participants experienced at least one drug dream during the study. Furthermore, drug dreams rapidly decreased during study participation. The presence of drug dreams at baseline did not predict mood, cocaine craving, or drug use at exit. No clear risk factors for drug dreams were identified. However, drug dreams were related to survival in the study by a negative U-shaped curve relationship in which those participants with the highest and lowest frequency of drug dreams discontinued from the study the earliest. Content of the dreams frequently included drug use or refusing to use the drug. Dreams of drug use tended to occur during the first few weeks of study participation. Most dreams were associated with triggers for drug use. The findings suggest that drug dreams are common in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence and are similar in nature to those previously reported in people with pure substance abuse.

  16. Success and safety in outpatient microlumbar discectomy.

    PubMed

    Best, Natalie M; Sasso, Rick C

    2006-07-01

    Currently, many spine surgeons perform microlumbar discectomies on an outpatient basis. Yet, it is often customary for patients to have a 1-night stay in the hospital. Many studies have shown the efficacy of microlumbar discectomy (MLD) and its preference among surgeons for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. It has also been shown to be safe, successful, and cost-effective. However, a large comprehensive study of this magnitude, gauging safety, success, and patient satisfaction for these procedures on an outpatient basis has not yet been done. One thousand three hundred seventy-seven MLD procedures have been done from 1992 to 2001 by 1 surgeon. A retrospective chart review was done on all procedures. Patients were then contacted by either telephone or mail to complete an outcome questionnaire. Seven hundred thirteen patients (53.9%) completed the questionnaire. Follow-up questionnaires were not completed due to deaths, incorrect contact information, and refused responses. Out of all MLD procedures, 55 (4.0%) were done with a hospital stay-only 24 of these (1.7%) were originally intended outpatient procedures. Of those that were done on an outpatient basis, 8.6% had a complication, including 6.4% who had a recurrent disc herniation. When asked, 81.6% said they would undergo the procedure again as an outpatient. In 82.1% the surgery's outcome was good, very good, or excellent. MLD is a routine procedure that can be performed on an outpatient basis safely, successfully, and with high patient satisfaction.

  17. Postacute Care in Cancer Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Fu, Jack B; Guo, Hong; Camp, Jennifer; Shin, Ki Y; Tu, Shi-Ming; Palmer, Lynn J; Yadav, Rajesh

    2017-02-01

    Acute care is usually associated with disease progression, treatments for cancer, and medical comorbidities. Patients with cancer may develop sudden functional deficits that require rehabilitation. Some of these patients benefit from acute rehabilitation, others benefit from subacute rehabilitation. After acute rehabilitation, continuous care for these patients has not been well described. Three studies are presented to demonstrate that cancer rehabilitation is a continuous process. Rehabilitation professionals should know how to detect fall risk, monitor symptoms, and render symptom management. Patients with cancer often require rehabilitation services during their entire disease trajectory.

  18. Introduction to rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Konin, Jeff G

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation plays an integral role when it comes to managing sports injuries in a safe and timely manner. Doing so competently allows for a greater chance of quick recovery and ultimate success on and off the field. Understanding the goals of rehabilitation and how to enhance communication between all providers who are involved with athlete care is critical to the process. The purpose of this article is to thoroughly explain the steps and critical components of a rehabilitation process designed specifically for each athlete's needs.

  19. Cardiovascular Outcomes in the Outpatient Kidney Transplant Clinic: The Framingham Risk Score Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kiberd, Bryce; Panek, Romuald

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and death in kidney transplant recipients. This study examines the Framingham risk score's ability to predict cardiac and stroke events. Because cyclosporine and tacrolimus have different cardiovascular risk profiles, these agents were also examined. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A prospective cohort evaluation of 540 patients were followed for a median of 4.7 yr in an outpatient kidney transplant clinic. Baseline Framingham risk scores were calculated and all cardiovascular outcomes were collected. Results: Rates per 100 patient-years were 1.79 for cardiac and 0.78 for stroke events. The ratio of observed-to-predicted cardiac events was 1.64-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 2.94] for the cohort, 2.74-fold higher (95% CI 1.70 to 4.24) in patients age 45 to 60 with prior cardiac disease or diabetes mellitus, but not higher in other age subgroups. Stroke was not increased above predicted. Risk scores for cardiac (c = 0.65, P = 0.003) and stroke (c = 0.71, P = 0.004) events were modest predictors. 10-yr event scores for cardiac (9.3 versus 13.5%, P < 0.001) and stroke (7.1 versus 10.0%, P = 0.002) were lower for tacrolimus compared with cyclosporine-treated patients. However observed cardiac events were higher in tacrolimus recipients (2.50, 95% CI 1.09 to 5.90) in an adjusted Cox model. Conclusions: Although risk scores are only modest predictors, patients with the highest event rates are easily identified. Treating high-risk patients with cardioprotective medications should remain a priority. PMID:18322053

  20. Consumer Involvement in Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Susan

    1976-01-01

    With the emphasis on consumer involvement in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, changes in the counseling relationship must occur. This article discusses new interaction patterns for consumer and counselor. (Author)

  1. [Dermato-oncological rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Buhles, N; Sander, C

    2005-07-01

    National insurance companies in Germany support health cures for patients with malignant tumors (malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Merkel cell tumor, malignant cutaneous lymphoma). The clinical requirements are an invasively growing tumor, problems of self-assurance, and dis-integration of the patient regarding his social and/or professional environment. The decision for a health cure is made by the treating dermatologist in the hospital. In this context, the following sociomedical criteria should be applied: impairment, disability, and handicap. Usually, rehabilitation starts after the patient is discharged from the hospital. The inpatient rehabilitation program should be performed at an institution capable of providing dermatological and psychological treatment. The dermatologist acts as a manager for the members of the rehabilitation team (psychologists, physiotherapists, social workers, and ergo-therapists). In conclusion, dermato-oncologic rehabilitation plays an important role in re-integrating the patient into his professional life to avoid retirement.

  2. Space flight rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Payne, Michael W C; Williams, David R; Trudel, Guy

    2007-07-01

    The weightless environment of space imposes specific physiologic adaptations on healthy astronauts. On return to Earth, these adaptations manifest as physical impairments that necessitate a period of rehabilitation. Physiologic changes result from unloading in microgravity and highly correlate with those seen in relatively immobile terrestrial patient populations such as spinal cord, geriatric, or deconditioned bed-rest patients. Major postflight impairments requiring rehabilitation intervention include orthostatic intolerance, bone demineralization, muscular atrophy, and neurovestibular symptoms. Space agencies are preparing for extended-duration missions, including colonization of the moon and interplanetary exploration of Mars. These longer-duration flights will result in more severe and more prolonged disability, potentially beyond the point of safe return to Earth. This paper will review and discuss existing space rehabilitation plans for major postflight impairments. Evidence-based rehabilitation interventions are imperative not only to facilitate return to Earth but also to extend the safe duration of exposure to a physiologically hostile microgravity environment.

  3. Rehabilitation of Poststroke Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Shigaki, Cheryl L.; Frey, Scott H.; Barrett, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the increasing rates of stroke and our aging population, it is critical that we continue to foster innovation in stroke rehabilitation. Although there is evidence supporting cognitive rehabilitation in stroke, the set of cognitive domains effectively addressed to date represents only a small subset of the problems experienced by stroke survivors. Further, a gap remains between investigational treatments and our evolving theories of brain function. These limitations present opportunities for improving the functional impact of stroke rehabilitation. The authors use a case example to encourage the reader to consider the evidence base for cognitive rehabilitation in stroke, focusing on four domains critical to daily life function: (1) speech and language, (2) functional memory, (3) executive function and skilled learned purposive movements, and (4) spatial-motor systems. Ultimately, they attempt to draw neuroscience and practice closer together by using translational reasoning to suggest possible new avenues for treating these disorders. PMID:25520021

  4. Rehabilitation For Independent Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forecast for Home Economics, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The focus of the homemaking program at the Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine is twofold--to retrain disabled homemakers in basic skills and to replan the patients' homes to fit their new physical needs. (Author/BP)

  5. Rehabilitation robotics: an academic engineer perspective.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Hermano I

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a retrospective review of our efforts to revolutionize the way physical medicine is practiced by developing and deploying rehabilitation robots. We present a sample of our clinical results with well over 600 stroke patients, both inpatients and outpatients. We discuss the different robots developed at our laboratory over the past 20 years and their unique characteristics. All are configured both to deliver reproducible interactive therapy and also to measure outcomes with minimal encumbrance, thus providing critical measurement tools to help unravel the key remaining question: what constitutes "best practice"? While success to date indicates that this therapeutic application of robots has opened an emerging new frontier in physical medicine and rehabilitation, the barrier to further progress lies not in developing new hardware but rather in finding the most effective way to enhance neuro-recovery. We close this manuscript discussing some of the tools required for advancing the effort beyond the present state to what we believe will be the central feature of research during the next 10 years.

  6. Nutritional rehabilitation of anorexia nervosa. Goals and dangers.

    PubMed

    Golden, Neville H; Meyer, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional rehabilitation of adolescents with anorexia nervosa is both a science and an art. The goals are to promote metabolic recovery; restore a healthy body weight; reverse the medical complications of the disorder and to improve eating behaviors and psychological functioning. Most, but not all of the medical complications are reversible with nutritional rehabilitation. Refeeding patients with anorexia nervosa results in deposition of lean body mass initially, followed by restoration of adipose tissue as treatment goal weight is approached. The major danger of nutritional rehabilitation is the refeeding syndrome, characterized by fluid and electrolyte, cardiac, hematological and neurological complications, the most serious of which is sudden unexpected death. The refeeding syndrome is most likely to occur in those who are severely malnourished. In such patients, this complication can be avoided by slow refeeding with careful monitoring of body weight, heart rate and rhythm and serum electrolytes, especially serum phosphorus. This paper reviews our clinical experience.

  7. Dental Outpatients: Health Locus of Control Correlates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista; Donham, Greg W.

    1983-01-01

    Examined relationships among specific personality variables, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales, and criterion-based ratings by staff dentists with dental outpatients (N=101). Found a consistent relationship between the perception that health is maintained by engaging in health-related behaviors and individual difference measures…

  8. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  9. [Dimensional modeling analysis for outpatient payments].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi-zhong; Guo, Yi-min

    2008-09-01

    This paper introduces a data warehouse model for outpatient payments, which is designed according to the requirements of the hospital financial management while dimensional modeling technique is combined with the analysis on the requirements. This data warehouse model can not only improve the accuracy of financial management requirements, but also greatly increase the efficiency and quality of the hospital management.

  10. [Home care rehabilitation and physiotherapy in knee prosthesis].

    PubMed

    López-Liria, R; Vega-Ramírez, Fa; Catalán-Matamoros, D; Padilla Góngora, D; Martínez-Cortés, Mc; Mesa-Ruiz, A

    2012-01-01

    This review analyzes the existing studies on home care rehabilitation and physiotherapy in patients with a knee prosthesis intervention, identifying and synthesising the results of the interventions measured in terms of muscular strength, function, extension of the joint, walking, patient's quality of life and cost of the service, compared with other alternative treatments. Nine databases have been analysed: IME, ENFISPO, CUIDEN PLUS, PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, COCHRANE library Plus and TRIP DATA BASE where 18 studies met the criteria for inclusion with information on 4,996 patients. Home care rehabilitation varies from one place to another and between studies (forms of care, application, duration, variable measures); but the idea is supported that this is as effective and acceptable as that received in an outpatients' department. It accelerates the attainment of functional achievements in the short and medium term, entailing very brief hospital stays and a reduction in costs.

  11. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  12. Final priority; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program--rehabilitation specialty areas. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2014-07-23

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years in order to fund any of the rehabilitation specialty areas listed in this notice. The specific rehabilitation specialty areas to be funded in a given year will be listed in a notice inviting applications. This priority is designed to ensure that the Department funds high-quality rehabilitation programs in the following nine rehabilitation specialty areas of national need: Rehabilitation Administration (84.129C); Rehabilitation Technology (84.129E); Vocational Evaluation and Work Adjustment (84.129F); Rehabilitation of Individuals Who Are Mentally Ill (84.129H); Rehabilitation Psychology (84.129J); Rehabilitation of Individuals Who are Blind or Have Vision Impairments (84.129P); Rehabilitation of Individuals Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (84.129Q); Job Development and Job Placement Services (84.129R); and Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (84.129W). These programs must meet rigorous standards in order to provide rehabilitation professionals the training and qualifications necessary to meet the current challenges facing State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies and related agencies and assist individuals with disabilities in achieving high-quality employment outcomes.

  13. A review of telerehabilitation for cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Frederix, Ines; Vanhees, Luc; Dendale, Paul; Goetschalckx, Kaatje

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of telerehabilitation interventions on cardiac patients. We searched for studies evaluating some form of telerehabilitation in cardiac patients. A total of 116 publications were screened initially, of which 37 publications were eligible for further review. We assessed study strength, based on the level of evidence and the quality of the intervention. The majority of the articles (70%) represented the highest level of evidence. Most interventions were of good (46%) or fair (51%) quality. Most studies evaluated the efficacy of the telerehabilitation interventions (84%), while 38% reported on feasibility and acceptance. Most studies did not include safety and/or cost-benefit analyses. Most telerehabilitation interventions (90%) employed only one or two core components of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Of the CR core components, physical activity was most frequently evaluated. Telerehabilitation appears to be a feasible and effective additional and/or alternative form of rehabilitation, compared to conventional in-hospital CR. Evaluations of telerehabilitation programmes taking into account patient safety and health economics are now required.

  14. 78 FR 12002 - Proposed Priority-National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... CFR Chapter III Proposed Priority--National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services... and Rehabilitative Services proposes a priority for the Rehabilitation Research and Training...

  15. 78 FR 38840 - Final Priority-National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... CFR Chapter III Final Priority--National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services... Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and...

  16. 78 FR 42868 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... CFR Chapter III Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services... Rehabilitative Services announces a priority for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and...

  17. 77 FR 8234 - National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Disability and Rehabilitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research... Disability and Rehabilitation Research-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program-- Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project--Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability...

  18. 78 FR 66344 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training Program--Vocational... Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long- Term Training... Program: The Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program provides financial assistance for-- (1)...

  19. 76 FR 22084 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training AGENCY: Office of... Information: Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long- Term Training notice inviting applications for new... Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program (Training...

  20. 78 FR 35808 - Proposed priority-Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training Program-Vocational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... CFR Chapter III Proposed priority--Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long- Term Training Program... and Rehabilitative Services proposes a priority under the Rehabilitation Training: Rehabilitation Long-Term Training program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal...

  1. Cardiac xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J

    1997-12-01

    Heart failure is an important medical and public health problem. Although medical therapy is effective for many people, the only definitive therapy is heart transplantation, which is limited severely by the number of donors. Mechanical devices presently are used as "bridges" to transplantation. Their widespread use may solve the donor shortage problem, but at present, mechanical devices are limited by problems related to blood clotting, power supply, and foreign body infection. Cardiac xenotransplantation using animal donors is a potential biologic solution to the donor organ shortage. The immune response, consisting of hyperacute rejection, acute vascular rejection, and cellular rejection, currently prevents clinical xenotransplantation. Advances in the solution of these problems have been made using conventional immunosuppressive drugs and newer agents whose use is based on an understanding of important steps in xenoimmunity. The most exciting approaches use tools of molecular biology to create genetically engineered donors and to induce states of donor and recipient bone marrow chimerism and tolerance in xenogeneic organ recipients. The successful future strategy may use a combination of a genetically engineered donor and a chimeric recipient with or without nonspecific immunosuppressive drugs.

  2. [Rehabilitation outcomes and return to work after psychiatric examination of work ability].

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, Susanne; Tuisku, Katinka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out the rehabilitation outcomes and predictors of return to work after psychiatric examination of work ability. Methods. The examination and one-year follow-up were performed at Helsinki University Central Hospital Psychiatric outpatient unit for the assessment of function and capacity. Results. The occupational activity, self-reported functional capacity and quality of life were enhanced. Half of the vocational rehabilitation plans were successful. Conclusions. An absence of less than 6 months and active return to work strategies at occupational health care in co-operation with psychiatrists lead to better outcomes.

  3. 77 FR 5317 - Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... 42 CFR Part 447 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... Outpatient Drugs AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... outpatient drugs to implement provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010,...

  4. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions... Services § 410.60 Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule. Except as specified in paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section, Medicare Part B pays for outpatient physical therapy services only...

  5. 42 CFR 410.60 - Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions... Services § 410.60 Outpatient physical therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule. Except as specified in paragraph (a)(3)(iii) of this section, Medicare Part B pays for outpatient physical therapy services only...

  6. Yoga in cardiac health (a review).

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Satyajit R

    2004-10-01

    This review studies the efficacy of yoga in the primary and secondary prevention of ischaemic heart disease and post-myocardial infarction patient rehabilitation. Yoga is an unconventional form of physical exercise that has been practised over a long period of time in the Indian sub-continent. It has gained immense popularity as a form of recreational activity all over the world. Its possible contributions to healthy living have been studied and many interesting revelations have been made. Benefits of yoga in the modification of cardiovascular risk factors and in the rehabilitation of the post-myocardial infarction patient are areas of significant importance. It is important to assess the practical significance and the suitability of incorporating yoga into the comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programme. Majority of the rehabilitation workers believes that incorporating nonconventional forms of physical exercise such as yoga definitely would enhance efficacy and add value. This article attempts to study the history and the science of yoga and evaluate its effects on cardiovascular health.

  7. Cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in a patient with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Callahan, M P; Pham, T; Rashbaum, I; Pineda, H; Greenspan, N

    2000-02-01

    Noonan syndrome, an autosomal dominant disease occurring with an incidence of 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 2,500 live births, is characterized by its particular cardiovascular abnormalities, including pulmonic valve stenosis, pulmonary artery stenosis, and, more rarely, septal defects and coarctation of the aorta. The case of a 20-year-old man admitted for inpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation after pulmonic valve repair, left pulmonary artery angioplasty, and pectus excavatum repair is presented. His endurance was markedly decreased, thus limiting his ability to perform activities of daily living and reducing his exercise tolerance. With participation in a comprehensive cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program, he experienced marked improvement with independence in his activities of daily living and an increase in his metabolic equivalent levels from to 2.8 to 5.4. After inpatient rehabilitation, he underwent left pulmonary stent placement before being discharged home. Subsequent outpatient cardiopulmonary rehabilitation has continued to improve significantly his overall exercise tolerance. Given that Noonan syndrome is viewed as the most common syndrome associated with congenital heart disease after Down syndrome, physiatrists must be familiar with its presentation, its associated abnormalities, and the treatment approach to optimize the patient's cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, and psychological status.

  8. 48 CFR 871.208 - Rehabilitation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rehabilitation facilities... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS LOAN GUARANTY AND VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Service 871.208 Rehabilitation facilities. Charges by...

  9. The development of an outcomes management system for acute medical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B A; Grigonis, A M; Topper, M E; Morrison, M H

    1997-01-01

    In 1993, Continental Medical Systems, Inc. (CMS), a provider of comprehensive medical rehabilitation, developed the Total Outcomes and Prediction Program (TOPP) to measure and evaluate key medical rehabilitation outcomes, quality indicators, and patient satisfaction at its 37 acute rehabilitation hospitals. The broad purposes of TOPP are to manage patient treatment, improve the cost-effectiveness of care, and provide outcomes reporting for managed care and other interested parties. The challenge was to develop a system which could measure, evaluate, and report medical rehabilitation patient outcomes in a way that could be easily understood by multiple audiences, including payers, accrediting organizations, physicians, patients and families, case managers, and CMS clinical staff. Using data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation database, CMS created descriptive outcomes reports for each hospital and for the corporation overall, including performance statistics, outcomes report cards, and quality report cards. These initial reports, as well as updates, quarterly reports, and special ad hoc requests, provide CMS corporate and hospital staff with statistically valid and reliable information to manage the outcomes of medical rehabilitation treatment. TOPP has assisted CMS with meeting accreditation standards for outcomes management and measurement and has been used in managed care contract negotiations. Future TOPP efforts will integrate resource use data, medical acuity and outcomes from acute, subacute, and outpatient rehabilitation levels into CMS' outcomes reporting system.

  10. Comprehensive oral rehabilitation with general anesthesia and prosthetic care in the primary dentition: a case report.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Gisela M; Fenton, Sanford J; Camacho-Castro, Laura; Acharya, Bhavini S; Sheinfeld, Aaron

    2010-11-01

    This case report describes the oral rehabilitation of a 5-year-old male referred by a general dentist to a pediatric dentist due to acute psychological stress to dental treatment and extensive dental caries. The patient's dental restorations and extractions were completed under general anesthesia. Maxillary and mandibular prostheses were completed in the outpatient clinical setting. The treatment plan for this child provided options to improve appearance, self-image and oral function.

  11. Reducing cardiovascular risk in spouses of cardiac patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yates, Bernice C; Rowland, Sheri; Mancuso, Kerry; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Norman, Joseph F; Shurmur, Scott; Tesina, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined risk-reducing interventions in spouses of coronary artery bypass patients. This study examined the effects of the Partners Together in Health (PaTH) intervention versus usual care on cardiovascular risk factors. Spouses in the experimental group (n = 17/group) attended cardiac rehabilitation with patients and made the same physical activity and healthy eating changes as patients. Spouses in the usual care group attended educational classes with patients. Spouses' 30-year cardiovascular risk was calculated using the Lifetime Risk Scale before and after cardiac rehabilitation (3 months), and at 6 months. Spouses in both groups significantly reduced 30-year risk scores at 3 and 6 months. Exercise was the key ingredient in lowering risk. There was a trend toward reduction in systolic blood pressure and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in both groups. Although there were no group differences, having spouses participate in cardiac rehabilitation with the patient was effective for reducing spouses' cardiovascular risk.

  12. [In-patient (early) rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Wallesch, Claus-W; Lautenschläger, Sindy

    2017-04-01

    It is difficult to develop the financing and hospital provision of interventions for early rehabilitation within the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system. In addition to a range of partially rehabilitative complex interventions, the system recognizes three main forms of early rehabilitative interventions: geriatric, neurological/neurosurgical, and interdisciplinary and others. In this article, the appropriate definitions and cost-effectiveness of these procedures are analyzed and compared. The early rehabilitative interventions are characterized by constant cooperation in the therapeutic team, especially neurological early rehabilitation through the incorporation of nursing as a therapeutic profession. Whereas geriatric and neurological early rehabilitation are reflected in the DRG system, the former provided in many general hospitals and the latter mainly in specialized institutions, interdisciplinary early rehabilitation has only occasionally been represented in the DRG system so far. If all acute in-patients who require early rehabilitation should receive such an intervention, an additional fee must be implemented for this this interdisciplinary service.

  13. Rehabilitative and Assistive Technology: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Rehabilitative and Assistive Technology: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Rehabilitative and assistive technology refers to tools, equipment, or products that can ...

  14. DBT in an outpatient forensic setting.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, L M C; Hysaj, M; Jacobs, P

    2012-01-01

    Literature shows that effective treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has become possible. However, borderline patients in forensic psychiatry do not seem to benefit from this development. In forensic psychiatry, prevention of criminal recidivism is the main focus of treatment, not core borderline problems like parasuicidal and self-destructive behavior. A dialectical behavioral treatment program for BPD was implemented in an outpatient forensic clinic in The Netherlands. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment data were collected from ten male, and nineteen female forensic BPD patients, and compared with corresponding data from fifty-eight non-forensic BPD patients. The results show that it is possible to implement dialectical behavior therapy in an outpatient forensic clinic. The data indicate that the exclusion of forensic patients, and especially female forensic patients, from evidence-based treatment is unjustified given the highly comparable clinical and etiological characteristics they share with female BPD patients from general mental health settings.

  15. Outpatient commitment and procedural due process.

    PubMed

    Player, Candice Teri-Lowe

    2015-01-01

    A large empirical literature on Kendra's Law has assessed the impact of court ordered outpatient treatment on outcomes such as treatment adherence, psychiatric hospitalization, quality of life, and treatment costs. Missing from the empirical literature, however, is a better understanding of procedural due process under Kendra's Law. Procedural due process concerns the safeguards that must be in place when governments deprive persons of their liberties, for example--notice, the right to a hearing and the right to appeal. This article reports the findings from a qualitative study of procedural due process and assisted outpatient treatment hearings under Kendra's Law. Attorneys reported significant barriers to effective advocacy on behalf of their clients. Further, despite the shift from a medical model of civil commitment to a judicial model in the 1970s, by and large judges continue to accord great deference to clinical testimony.

  16. Technology and outpatient review: a preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bergman, A; Henderson, M; Cline, J L

    1990-06-01

    Most health care utilization and cost control programs focus on inpatient care or on high-cost, catastrophic illnesses or injuries. Recently, however, Parkside Health Management Corporation has developed a utilization review program that targets treatments and high-technology procedures performed primarily in an outpatient setting, as well as specific inpatient procedures not included in other review programs. These include chiropractic, podiatric, and physical therapy treatments; cesarean section; and endoscopy, ultrasound in pregnancy, and lithotripsy. The treatments/procedures examined in this program, called Technology and Outpatient Review (TOR), account for approximately 6% of claims expenses. Bigel Institute for Health Policy researchers are evaluating a pilot test to determine TOR's effect on health care costs and utilization, appropriateness, and patient satisfaction.

  17. Outpatient laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Peter J; Latif, Abdul

    2004-11-01

    Outpatient laser ablation of the palatine tonsils under local anaesthetic is an alternative technique to capsular tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis under general anaesthetic. Laser tonsillotomy ablates up to 70% of the tonsillar tissue and is performed when patients choose not to have a conventional tonsillectomy, or are unfit for a general anaesthetic. The technique described here is an adaptation of Krespis' laser-assisted serial tonsillectomy (LAST) whereby only one sitting is required. Krespis' technique effectively eliminates recurrent tonsillitis in 96% of the cases over a 4-year follow-up period and represents the only substantial study looking at treating recurrent tonsillitis with outpatient laser ablation. This study is a retrospective postal survey of 19 patients who underwent laser tonsillar ablation under local anaesthetic for recurrent chronic tonsillitis from 1997 to 2001 and was performed in liaison with the clinical audit department at Basildon Hospital. We had a response rate of 74% and an admission rate of 0%, which compares favourably with day case tonsillectomy surgery. Of the patients, 75% did not experience further episodes of tonsillitis 12 months after the procedure and 77% of the patients were glad they had the operation. Although this technique does not completely eliminate tonsillitis, it offers an alternative for those patients who prefer a procedure that is done quickly in an outpatient setting without the additional problems of general anaesthesia, overnight hospital admission and long waiting lists.

  18. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races.

  19. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  20. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system's electrical activity in the heart.

  1. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  2. [Dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Fujishima, Ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dysphagia is a life-threatening disorder caused by many medical conditions such as stroke, neurological disorders, tumors, etc. The symptoms of dysphagia are quite variable and diagnosed by observation or through screening involving instrumental swallowing examinations such as video-fluoroscopy and video-endoscopy, to determine functional severity and treatment-prognosis. Direct- and indirect-therapy is used with and without food, respectively. Swallowing rehabilitation is very effective, and could be used in conjunction with compensatory techniques. Here we present an overview of dysphagia and swallowing rehabilitation.

  3. Challenging Developments in Rehabilitation Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mary Ball

    Rehabilitation psychology and medicine are growing rapidly and can provide rehabilitation psychologists many opportunities for the integration of psychological approaches with adjustment realities resulting from client functional limitations. This paper discusses significant developments in rehabilitation counseling in medical settings over the…

  4. Effects of exercise on inflammation in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Roca-Rodríguez, María del Mar; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; García-Almeida, Jose Manuel; Ruiz-Nava, Josefina; Alcaide-Torres, Juan; Gómez-González, Adela; Montiel-Trujillo, Angel; Tinahones-Madueño, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: a los pacientes con riesgo cardiovascular se les recomiendan programas de pérdida de peso y dieta saludable, pero la eficacia de estos programas a la hora de reducir la mortalidad es controvertida. Objetivo: examinar los efectos agudos y a largo plazo de un programa de rehabilitación cardíaca de dos meses de duración sobre las quemocinas relacionadas con la inflamación en pacientes con enfermedad cardiovascular. Diseño: estudio de cohortes prospectivo. Métodos: se estudiaron 26 pacientes con enfermedad cardiovascular inscritos en un programa de rehabilitación cardíaca basado en intervenciones nutricionales y de ejercicio. Se analizaron el estilo de vida y variables clínicas, metabólicas e inflamatorias. Resultados: 88,5% eran hombres y la edad media fue de 54,9 ± 7,8 años. Al final del programa de rehabilitación cardíaca las variables del perfil glucémico y lipídico descendieron, excepto el colesterol de lipoproteínas de alta densidad, que aumentó. Ácido úrico, interleucina-6, interleucina-1 beta, adiponectina y leptina se mantuvieron estables. Interleucina-6 correlacionó positivamente con proteína C reactiva y negativamente con glucosa en sangre. Interleucina-1 beta correlacionó positivamente con proteína C-reactiva y negativamente con las cifras de presión arterial. Encontramos correlaciones significativas entre los cambios en interleucina-6 e interleucina- 1 beta y los cambios en los equivalentes metabólicos y proteína C-reactiva, antes y después del programa de rehabilitación cardíaca. No se observaron correlaciones significativas con peso, circunferencia de cintura o masa grasa. Conclusiones: la rehabilitación cardiaca mejora las variables antropométricas, las cifras de presión arterial, así como el perfil de lípidos y los resultados de la ergometría. Sin embargo, no se observaron cambios con respecto al estado inflamatorio.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation in heart failure: a brief review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Piña, Ileana L

    2010-05-01

    The number of heart failure patients continues to increase for men and women. Our current medical therapy includes a variety of agents that can reduce morbidity and mortality. However, many patients remain limited, in part, due to deconditioning. Adding to the functional loss are the multiple hospitalizations and even recommendations from providers to maintain bed rest and avoid physical activity. The multiple studies involving conditioning and exercise for patients with heart failure have mostly shown improvements, not only in function but also in quality of life and other physiologic parameters that should be of benefit to these patients. The HF ACTION (Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training) trial, which randomized 2,231 patients to a formal prescribed exercise or control, demonstrated the safety of aerobic training in this population. The benefits on the hard end points of mortality and hospitalizations were modest but significant when adjusted for prognostic factors. The guidelines currently recommend that activity be recommended in conjunction with medical therapy. A program can be adjusted to the patient's need but should include intensity, frequency, and duration, as well as a guide to progression.

  6. [Quality in rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Jäckel, W H

    2010-12-01

    Particularly in the context of introduction of quality assurance programmes 15 years ago, "quality" became a central issue for rehabilitation, and its importance is bound to grow in the years to come. After giving a general definition of quality, this article deals more closely with 3 aspects of quality: quality development, quality assurance, and data on quality. Quality development in rehabilitation centres demands an atmosphere that supports change, encourages creativity, courage, transparency and involvement, and reduces fear. The creation of such an atmosphere is, in particular, the responsibility of a centre's management. Routine interviews regarding patient as well as employee satisfaction, and the use of strategic planning and management systems have proven successful instruments in the practice of quality development. Compared with other sectors of the health system, quality assurance in rehabilitation is marked by its comprehensive approach, intense patient orientation, scientific underpinning, and nationwide implementation. Regarding the benefits of these programmes for the health system at large, however, no clear scientific proof is available yet. Data gained from quality assurance programmes on the whole show a high amount of patient satisfaction, good quality of structures and processes as well as an improvement of the patients' health status. Between centres, however, there are marked differences of quality in a number of cases, and long-term effectiveness could be improved in some indications. Finally, suggestions are offered concerning further development of quality in rehabilitation as well as of the quality assurance programmes.

  7. Trends in Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Jack

    1977-01-01

    Discusses major potential trends in rehabilitation (identified through informal interviews with 94 individuals representing various organizations, progessions, or programs) e.g., services for the severely handicapped, return to the vocational emphasis, increased interagency cooperation, and consumer involvement. Modification of programs as a…

  8. Consumer Involvement in Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thursz, Daniel

    A new approach to rehabilitation of the disabled and disadvantaged is necessary, but the problem of how to involve consumers and how to organize groups for community action is a big one. Moreover, citizen participation cannot be a substitute for basic improvement in the quality of service. Service agencies need to be decentralized and staff…

  9. [Blindness and visual rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Matonti, F; Roux, S; Denis, D; Picaud, S; Chavane, F

    2015-02-01

    Blindness and visual impairment are a major public health problem all over the world and in all societies. A large amount of basic science and clinical research aims to rehabilitate patients and help them become more independent. Various methods are explored from cell and molecular therapy to prosthetic interfaces. We review the various treatment alternatives, describing their results and their limitations.

  10. The Juvenile Rehabilitation Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Peter W., Ed.; And Others

    This document contains several essays on topics of interest to researchers of rehabilitative efforts. The subjects covered include an historical look at chronic delinquents and their treatment programs; a review of West European programs; legal constraints on intervention; a review of evidence concerning biological contributions to criminality and…

  11. [Psychosocial rehabilitation in France].

    PubMed

    Vidon, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    For a long time in France, readaptation and reinsertion have been considered separately. While readaptation focuses on the way the patient "adapts again", reintegration looks at the place of the readaptation, the society or the group. Today, psychosocial rehabilitation encompasses both of these notions by taking into account the medical and social aspects.

  12. Acupuncture and Equine Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    le Jeune, Sarah; Henneman, Kimberly; May, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most common veterinary integrative medicine modalities. Acupuncture can greatly contribute to a rehabilitation protocol by promoting analgesia, tissue healing, and muscle strength. Acupuncture is safe, has minimal detrimental side effects, and is well tolerated by most horses.

  13. Rehabilitation Technology Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatherleigh Co., Ltd., New York, NY.

    Designed as a special continuing education program for rehabilitation professionals, this document is divided into five lessons. Lesson 1, "Technology Assessment: Determining the Needs" (Ricardo G. Cerna), includes discussion on technology assessment and determining the needs of the clients as well as different types of assistive…

  14. Rehabilitation in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Erin

    2005-01-01

    For several decades, the disability community in Russia has battled for its rights. In 1995, a disability rights law was passed that covered multiple areas, such as environmental access, education, and work. This article focuses on Russian rehabilitation philosophy and practice. It is written from a mixture of perspectives?personal experience,…

  15. Rehabilitation in Japan, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japanese Society for Rehabilitation of the Disabled, Tokyo.

    The scope of Japan's rehabilitation services for persons with disabilities is reviewed and discussed from the perspective of social and demographic change in that country. An introductory chapter on the current situation in Japan looks at characteristics of the land, the people, the government, industry and the economy, and the culture. The second…

  16. Token Economies in Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Richard T.; Nicholas, Heather

    1973-01-01

    Behavior modification has become a widely known practice in rehabilitation during the past decade. A medium of exchange or token is typically used to facilitate transactions and can be traded for backup reinforcers later on. This review of the use of token economies focuses on groups of individuals usually considered target rehabilitation…

  17. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  18. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  19. Tennis Training Sessions as a Rehabilitation Instrument for Patients after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    García, Juan P. F.; Giraldo, Víctor M. A.; Barrado, José J. G.; Casasola, César D.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the effects of a cardiac rehabilitation program based on a modification of a sport (tennis) on quality of life, on various laboratory test parameters and on an exercise stress test, and to determine if the results of this novel activity are equivalent to those of traditional programs (i.e., the use of the bicycle ergometer). The sample consisted of 79 patients with a low-risk acute coronary syndrome. They were divided into three groups: two experimental groups and one control group. One of the experimental groups used the bicycle ergometer as its main physical activity, whereas the other received training in a modified form of tennis lesson. By the end of the 3-month program, triglycerides, cholesterol LDL, cholesterol HDL, (-25 mg·dl-1 and 32.3 mg·dl-1 final, and 15.7 mg·dl-1 and 23.3 mg·dl-1 LDL final, respectively) and exercise capacity improved significantly (by 1.1 metabolic equivalents (METs) and 1.2 METs, respectively), in both experimental groups. We conclude that the application of a comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program in patients with low-risk acute coronary syndrome based on a program of modified tennis improves exercise tolerance and metabolic parameters, as well as certain physical characteristics that reduce cardiovascular risk. Key Points Cardiac rehabilitation of low risk patients with acute coronary syndrome based on a program of modified tennis produces an improvement in quality of life, lipid profiles and in exercise tolerance A cardiac rehabilitation program based on a modification of tennis produces favourable changes in various anthropometric parameters related to the reduction of cardiovascular risk The development of programs of cardiac rehabilitation based on modified versions of various sports would advantage the adherence to physical exercise. PMID:24149811

  20. Guidelines for selection of health information management software in outpatient practice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Catherine M; Emery, Lynnda J

    2010-04-01

    ABSTRACT While use of electronic medical records is not uniform across all settings, there is an increase in electronic system and software use in healthcare. This use of electronic methods to record initial and discharge evaluations and intervention for the patient is under current consideration in outpatient rehabilitation settings. Health information management professionals can offer therapists guidance on selection and use of new software. The purpose of this article is to offer suggestions on the software purchase team, exploration of vendor and software options, review of selection criteria, and software selection strategies. The article includes criteria checklists, a discussion of purchase issues, and suggests resources to assist purchase team members and therapists who contribute opinions to software selection and use.

  1. Summary of comprehensive systematic review: Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Haselkorn, Jodie K.; Hughes, Christina; Rae-Grant, Alex; Henson, Lily Jung; Bever, Christopher T.; Lo, Albert C.; Brown, Theodore R.; Kraft, George H.; Getchius, Thomas; Gronseth, Gary; Armstrong, Melissa J.; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the evidence regarding rehabilitation treatments in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We systematically searched the literature (1970–2013) and classified articles using 2004 American Academy of Neurology criteria. Results: This systematic review highlights the paucity of well-designed studies, which are needed to evaluate the available MS rehabilitative therapies. Weekly home/outpatient physical therapy (8 weeks) probably is effective for improving balance, disability, and gait (MS type unspecified, participants able to walk ≥5 meters) but probably is ineffective for improving upper extremity dexterity (1 Class I). Inpatient exercises (3 weeks) followed by home exercises (15 weeks) possibly are effective for improving disability (relapsing-remitting MS [RRMS], primary progressive MS [PPMS], secondary progressive MS [SPMS], Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] 3.0–6.5) (1 Class II). Six weeks' worth of comprehensive multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation possibly is effective for improving disability/function (PPMS, SPMS, EDSS 4.0–8.0) (1 Class II). Motor and sensory balance training or motor balance training (3 weeks) possibly is effective for improving static and dynamic balance, and motor balance training (3 weeks) possibly is effective for improving static balance (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS) (1 Class II). Breathing-enhanced upper extremity exercises (6 weeks) possibly are effective for improving timed gait and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS, mean EDSS 4.5); this change is of unclear clinical significance. This technique possibly is ineffective for improving disability (1 Class II). Inspiratory muscle training (10 weeks) possibly improves maximal inspiratory pressure (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS, EDSS 2–6.5) (1 Class II). PMID:26598432

  2. Antiplatelet resistance in outpatients with monitored adherence.

    PubMed

    Walter, Philipp N; Tsakiris, Dimitrios A; Romanens, Michel; Arnet, Isabelle; Hersberger, Kurt E

    2014-01-01

    Antiplatelet resistance with aspirin and clopidogrel has been associated with clinical, cellular and pharmacogenetic factors; and non-adherence has been considered as a major contributor to resistance in outpatients. We aimed at assessing factors to resistance when adherence to the antiplatelet drugs and all other oral solid drugs was controlled for. In a pilot study, we tested arachidonic acid and/or ADP-induced in vitro platelet aggregation of 82 outpatients with chronic aspirin and/or clopidogrel treatment before and after a one-week period of measuring the patient's adherence with the polymedication electronic monitoring system (POEMS). Resistance was found in 20% (aspirin; n = 69) and 25% (clopidogrel; n = 32) of the patients after monitored adherence. Mean platelet aggregation was not (aspirin) or non-significantly (clopidogrel) lowered when compared to baseline. Diabetes mellitus and inflammation were consistently associated with resistance to both drugs, but CYP2C19 polymorphisms could not be confirmed as predictors of clopidogrel response. Electronically compiled multidrug dosing histories allowed the concomitant intake of high-dose lipophilic statins to be identified as a risk factor of impaired response to clopidogrel and revealed that exposure to further potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) was too low for analysis. Multidrug adherence monitoring allowed thus dismissing non-adherence as a major contributor to resistance and inter-individual response variability in an outpatient setting. Additionally, it allowed analysing the impact of DDIs according to the actual exposure to the potentially interfering drugs. Further studies based on this methodology are essential to prevent misleading results due to incomplete adherence and gain additional insight into the impact of timing adherence on antiplatelet drug response.

  3. 42 CFR 410.61 - Plan of treatment requirements for outpatient rehabilitation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the occupational therapy services. (5) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a... the speech-language pathology services. (v) A registered professional nurse or a staff physician, in...-language pathologist who furnishes the services. (vi) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist,...

  4. Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Basso , Ed.D., PT Craig Velozo, PhD, OT 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...Florida) and Partnering PIs each, Michele Basso (Ohio State University), and Andrea Behrman (University of Louisville) for continued enrollment and grant

  5. 42 CFR 410.61 - Plan of treatment requirements for outpatient rehabilitation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the occupational therapy services. (5) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a... the speech-language pathology services. (v) A registered professional nurse or a staff physician, in...-language pathologist who furnishes the services. (vi) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist,...

  6. 42 CFR 410.61 - Plan of treatment requirements for outpatient rehabilitation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the occupational therapy services. (5) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a... services. (v) A registered professional nurse or a staff physician, in accordance with oral orders from the... services. (vi) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a physician assistant. (2) The...

  7. 42 CFR 410.61 - Plan of treatment requirements for outpatient rehabilitation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the occupational therapy services. (5) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a... services. (v) A registered professional nurse or a staff physician, in accordance with oral orders from the... services. (vi) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a physician assistant. (2) The...

  8. 42 CFR 410.61 - Plan of treatment requirements for outpatient rehabilitation services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the occupational therapy services. (5) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist, or a... the speech-language pathology services. (v) A registered professional nurse or a staff physician, in...-language pathologist who furnishes the services. (vi) A nurse practitioner, a clinical nurse specialist,...

  9. Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury:Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data...needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this...therapy settings. This scale uniquely detects return of normal function over time after SCI. Compensation for weakened or paralyzed muscles by

  10. Factors Affecting Length of Stay in Adult Outpatient Physical Rehabilitation: A Scoping Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Woznowski-Vu, Arthur; Da Costa, Christina; Turgeon-Provost, Félix; Dagenais, Kristin; Roy-Mathie, Bianca; Aggban, Martina; Preuss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objet: Déterminer les facteurs qui ont un effet sur la durée du séjour (DDS) chez les adultes participant à des programmes de physiothérapie ou d'ergothérapie en service externe. Méthode: On a effectué une recherche documentaire dans les bases de données Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED et Cochrane. Résultats: Au total, la recherche a produit 19 articles qui ont été retenus et deux autres ont été extraits de la littérature grise (c.-à-d. de sources non publiées). Les facteurs personnels qui ont un effet sur la DDS sont l'âge et le sexe, qui avaient tous deux des effets non uniformes sur la DDS, ainsi que la communication, la langue, les problèmes physiques et cognitifs dans le cas desquels on établissait en général un lien entre des niveaux plus élevés de fonctionnement et une DDS plus courte. Les facteurs institutionnels qui ont un effet sur la DDS sont le lieu, la communication interdisciplinaire, le nombre de disciplines en cause et le type de contexte de réadaptation. Enfin, on a établi un lien entre deux facteurs liés aux cliniciens—objectifs de traitement moins nombreux et sélection de techniques de traitement éclairées par des données probantes—et une DDS plus courte. Conclusions: La recherche sur les facteurs qui ont un effet sur la DDS en réadaptation en service externe chez les adultes est limitée et incohérente. On a produit une liste préliminaire de facteurs de la DDS, mais il faudrait explorer la question plus à fond avec la collaboration de chercheurs et d'établissements cliniques.

  11. Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and Outpatient Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    adults post-stroke, examining adaptive locomotor training in animal models and the human condition of SCI, and examining responsiveness of the...Proposal No. SC090246, Award No. W81XWH-10-1-0959 Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0959 TITLE: Responsiveness of a Neuromuscular Recovery Scale for Spinal Cord Injury: Inpatient and

  12. Barriers to the optimal rehabilitation of surgical cancer patients in the managed care environment: an administrator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Germain, Pamela

    2007-04-01

    Ensuring that surgical cancer patients obtain optimal rehabilitation care (defined here as all care provided post-operatively following cancer surgery) can be challenging because of the fragmented nature of the U.S. healthcare delivery and payment systems. In the managed care environment, surgical cancer patients' access to rehabilitation care is likely to vary by type of health insurance plan, by setting, by type of provider, and by whether care is provided in-network or out-of-network. The author of this article, who negotiates managed care contracts for the Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), gives examples of strategies used with some success by RPCI to collaborate with local payers to ensure that surgical cancer patients get optimal rehabilitation care, especially as they make the transition from hospital to outpatient care. She suggests that further collaborations of healthcare providers, payers, consumers, and policymakers are needed to help ensure optimal rehabilitation care for surgical cancer patients.

  13. [A combination of clinical medicine and social welfare activities of the Ophthalmic Rehabilitation Clinic at Juntendo University].

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Masako

    2003-12-01

    I intend to analyze in this paper tha activities of the Ophthalmic Rehabilitation Clinic at Juntendo University in order to clarify how social welfare is incorporated with medical care in rehabilitation. The patients who feel little hope of recovery often suffer a great sense of emptiness until they finally manage to rehabilitate themselves in society. The clinic was founded for them in 1964 inside the Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University. The Department has been providing consultation with the visually handicapped. The program consists of counseling, educational guidance, daily training, etc. It is quite remarkable that the rehabilitation program, in addition to the medical examination, has been introduced to the outpatients who have visual handicaps.

  14. Emerging evidence-based physical rehabilitation for Multiple Sclerosis - Towards an inventory of current content across Europe

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In Europe, theoretical approaches to physical therapy and rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis often appear significantly different. While there is general agreement that rehabilitation plays an important role in maintaining and improving function in persons with multiple sclerosis, no consensus exists on what may be the most effective approach to achieve the best possible functionality within an individual's limitations. The objective of this paper is to initiate an analysis of currently applied physical interventions for people with multiple sclerosis throughout Europe during inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation programs. A study of the content of rehabilitation may show presently performed treatment methods revealing the basic considerations that nowadays guide clinicians implicitly or explicitly in the treatment of persons with multiple sclerosis. Following this first step, comparative studies can be set up. PMID:20667079

  15. Involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Viadel, M; Cañete-Nicolás, C; Bellido-Rodriguez, C; Asensio-Pascual, P; Lera-Calatayud, G; Calabuig-Crespo, R; Leal-Cercós, C

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades there have been significant legislative changes in Spain. Society develops faster than laws, however, and new challenges have emerged. In 2004, the Spanish Association of Relatives of the Mentally Ill (FEAFES) proposed amending the existing legislation to allow for the implementation of involuntary outpatient treatment (IOT) for patients with severe mental illness. Currently, and after having made several attempts at change, there is no specific legislation governing the application of this measure. Although IOT may be implemented in local programmes, we consider legal regulation to be needed in this matter.

  16. Management of hypertension in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-09-01

    The treatment of hypertension on an outpatient basis should be approached in a systematic manner. The diagnosis of hypertension should always be verified first before treatment is initiated and, where indicated, a workup should be done. Lifestyle modifications should be considered in all patients with hypertension. Blood pressure can be brought to goal in the majority of patients if antihypertensive medications are correctly dosed or combined. As blood pressure is brought to goal in the patient with hypertension, ongoing attention should be directed to long-term adherence to therapy.

  17. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  18. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e)(1) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  19. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospice benefit: (1) Antigens. (2) Splints and casts. (3) Hepatitis B vaccine. (e)(1) Effective January 1... prospective payment system for the following: (a) Medicare Part B services furnished to hospital outpatients designated by the Secretary under this part. (b) Services designated by the Secretary that are covered...

  20. Effects of intensive physical rehabilitation on neuromuscular adaptations in adults with poststroke hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Zeeman, Peter; Jørgensen, Jørgen R; Bech-Pedersen, Daniel T; Sørensen, Janne; Kjær, Michael; Andersen, Jesper L

    2011-10-01

    Hemiparesis-disability and muscle weakness of 1 side of the body-is a common consequence of stroke. High-intensity strength training may be beneficial to regain function, but strength coaches in the field of rehabilitation need evidence-based guidelines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intensive physical rehabilitation on neuromuscular and functional adaptations in outpatients suffering from hemiparesis after stroke. A within-subject repeated-measures design with the paretic leg as the experimental leg and the nonparetic leg as the control leg was used. Eleven outpatients with hemiparesis after stroke participated in 12 weeks of intensive physical rehabilitation comprising unilateral high-intensity strength training with near-maximal loads (4-12 repetition maximum) and body weight supported treadmill training. At baseline and 12-week follow-up, the patients went through testing consisting of isokinetic muscle strength, neuromuscular activation measured with electromyography (EMG), electrically evoked muscle twitch contractile properties, and gait performance (10-m Walk Test and 6-min Walk Test). After the 12-week conditioning program, knee extensor and flexor strength increased during all contraction modes and velocities in the paretic leg. Significant increases were observed for agonist EMG amplitude at slow concentric and slow eccentric contraction. Twitch torque increased, whereas twitch time-to-peak tension remained unchanged. By contrast, no significant changes were observed in the nonparetic control leg. Gait performance increased 52-68%. In conclusion, intensive physical rehabilitation after stroke leads to clinically relevant neuromuscular improvements, leading to increased voluntary strength during a wide range of contraction modes and velocities, and improved gait velocity. Strength training coaches working in the field of rehabilitation can use this knowledge to safely and efficiently add high-intensity strength training to

  1. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  2. Same-day physical therapy consults in an outpatient neuromuscular disease physician clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pucillo, Evan M; Christensen-Mayer, Nancy; Poole, Shelly D; Whitten, Denise M; Freeman, Danielle; Bohe, Blake R; Swensen, Brandon R; Smith, A Gordon; Johnson, Nicholas E

    2016-01-01

    Background Team-based care has been shown to offer more comprehensive benefits to patients when compared to standard physician-based care alone in clinics for chronic conditions. However, apart from grant-funded multidisciplinary clinics, there are no reports on the usage of same-day physical therapy (PT) consults within a daily outpatient neuromuscular disease (NMD) physician clinic. Objective To determine the impact of same-day PT consults at the University of Utah’s outpatient Clinical Neurosciences Center. Design A qualitative assessment and survey of patient satisfaction. Methods An eight question Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant patient satisfaction survey using a 5-point Likert scale was administered. Demographic data and Press-Ganey Provider Satisfaction surveys were retrospectively collected from electronic medical records for patients receiving same-day PT encounters in the neuromuscular division over 1 year. Results Mean (standard deviation) age was 54.22 (19.81) years for 134 patient encounters, median age was 60 years, with 76 male (57%) and 58 female (43%) patients. Mean Likert score for 61 self-reported patient satisfaction surveys for same-day PT consults was 4.87 (97.4%). Press-Ganey Provider Satisfaction scores improved from 89.9% (N=287) for the year prior to 90.8% (N=320) for the corresponding year (P=0.427). A total of 46 (75.4%) patients have either never before received PT care or never before received PT care for their NMD, 67.4% of whom were male. Conclusion Same-day PT consults in an outpatient NMD physician clinic demonstrated excellent patient satisfaction and improved access to specialty care. This model could potentially be implemented in other academic medical centers to improve access to rehabilitation services for patients with NMD. PMID:27757040

  3. SEFRE: Semiexoskeleton Rehabilitation System.

    PubMed

    Chonnaparamutt, Winai; Supsi, Witsarut

    2016-01-01

    SEFRE (Shoulder-Elbow-Forearm Robotics Economic) rehabilitation system is presented in this paper. SEFRE Rehab System is composed of a robotic manipulator and an exoskeleton, so-called Forearm Supportive Mechanism (FSM). The controller of the system is developed as the Master PC consisting of five modules, that is, Intelligent Control (IC), Patient Communication (PC), Training with Game (TG), Progress Monitoring (PM), and Patient Supervision (PS). These modules support a patient to exercise with SEFRE in six modes, that is, Passive, Passive Stretching, Passive Guiding, Initiating Active, Active Assisted, and Active Resisted. To validate the advantages of the system, the preclinical trial was carried out at a national rehabilitation center. Here, the implement of the system and the preclinical results are presented as the verifications of SEFRE.

  4. [Rehabilitation and algodystrophies].

    PubMed

    Simon, L; Blotman, F; Leroux, J L; Claustre, J; Azema, M J; Brun-Meyer, M

    1982-12-01

    Based on 20 years experience, and a personal series of 272 cases of reflex dystrophy (84 cases involving upper limbs, 188 cases involving lower limbs) admitted under a rheumatology unit equipped with all the available techniques of rehabilitative medicine, the authors stress the value of well conducted functional rehabilitation which, even alone, can obtain excellent results in the treatment of this disease, whatever the stage. The authors detail the modalities of this treatment. A local intra-articular or intra-canal injection of corticosteroids permits pain-free physiotherapy. The mobilisation of the lower limb is an urgent priority. Non-aggressive physiotherapeutic techniques should be adapted to the stage and the site of reflex dystrophy. Hydrokinesitherapy and the adaptation of craft techniques to occupational therapy also play an important part.

  5. SEFRE: Semiexoskeleton Rehabilitation System

    PubMed Central

    Supsi, Witsarut

    2016-01-01

    SEFRE (Shoulder-Elbow-Forearm Robotics Economic) rehabilitation system is presented in this paper. SEFRE Rehab System is composed of a robotic manipulator and an exoskeleton, so-called Forearm Supportive Mechanism (FSM). The controller of the system is developed as the Master PC consisting of five modules, that is, Intelligent Control (IC), Patient Communication (PC), Training with Game (TG), Progress Monitoring (PM), and Patient Supervision (PS). These modules support a patient to exercise with SEFRE in six modes, that is, Passive, Passive Stretching, Passive Guiding, Initiating Active, Active Assisted, and Active Resisted. To validate the advantages of the system, the preclinical trial was carried out at a national rehabilitation center. Here, the implement of the system and the preclinical results are presented as the verifications of SEFRE. PMID:27578961

  6. Outcomes of dysphagia intervention in a pulmonary rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Anita; Tranter, Maria; Sweeney, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or chronic respiratory disease demonstrate an increased prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia as a consequence of impaired coordination between respiration and swallowing function. To date, the effect of patient education and intervention on the management of oropharyngeal dysphagia within pulmonary rehabilitation programs has not been reported or evaluated. Data were collected on participants who were enrolled in the Outpatient Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program and who received dysphagia intervention. Intervention consisted of some or all of the following: (1) a 1-hour dysphagia education program, (2) screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia, and (3) individual comprehensive oropharyngeal dysphagia assessment and management if a screening assessment was failed. A statistically significant improvement was found in participants' knowledge of dysphagia and COPD (P < 0.001). Participants' retention of this knowledge 4 days post education remained statistically significant (P < 0.001). Twenty-seven percent of participants who were screened had symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Fifty-five (53%) participants receiving further individual dysphagia assessment/management correctly completed pre/post swallowing-related quality-of-life surveys (SWAL-QOL). Statistically significant improvement was found in the following subscales: Burden of Dysphagia (P < 0.009), Physical Problems of Dysphagia (P < 0.012) and Managing Diet Options/Food Selection (P < 0.016). Dysphagia education, screening, and management in a pulmonary rehabilitation program improved participants' swallowing-related quality of life and overall self-management of chronic respiratory disease and dysphagia.

  7. Home-based rehabilitation for COPD using minimal resources: a randomised, controlled equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahal, Ajay; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Cox, Narelle S; Moore, Rosemary; Nicolson, Caroline; O'Halloran, Paul; Lahham, Aroub; Gillies, Rebecca; McDonald, Christine F

    2017-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is a cornerstone of care for COPD but uptake of traditional centre-based programmes is poor. We assessed whether home-based pulmonary rehabilitation, delivered using minimal resources, had equivalent outcomes to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods A randomised controlled equivalence trial with 12 months follow-up. Participants with stable COPD were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation by either the standard outpatient centre-based model, or a new home-based model including one home visit and seven once-weekly telephone calls from a physiotherapist. The primary outcome was change in 6 min walk distance (6MWD). Results We enrolled 166 participants to receive centre-based rehabilitation (n=86) or home-based rehabilitation (n=80). Intention-to-treat analysis confirmed non-inferiority of home-based rehabilitation for 6MWD at end-rehabilitation and the confidence interval (CI) did not rule out superiority (mean difference favouring home group 18.6 m, 95% CI −3.3 to 40.7). At 12 months the CI did not exclude inferiority (−5.1 m, −29.2 to 18.9). Between-group differences for dyspnoea-related quality of life did not rule out superiority of home-based rehabilitation at programme completion (1.6 points, −0.3 to 3.5) and groups were equivalent at 12 months (0.05 points, −2.0 to 2.1). The per-protocol analysis showed the same pattern of findings. Neither group maintained postrehabilitation gains at 12 months. Conclusions This home-based pulmonary rehabilitation model, delivered with minimal resources, produced short-term clinical outcomes that were equivalent to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Neither model was effective in maintaining gains at 12 months. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation could be considered for people with COPD who cannot access centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Trial registration number NCT01423227, clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:27672116

  8. Biofeedback in rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature relating to the biofeedback used in physical rehabilitation. The biofeedback methods used in rehabilitation are based on biomechanical measurements and measurements of the physiological systems of the body. The physiological systems of the body which can be measured to provide biofeedback are the neuromuscular system, the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system. Neuromuscular biofeedback methods include electromyography (EMG) biofeedback and real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUS) biofeedback. EMG biofeedback is the most widely investigated method of biofeedback and appears to be effective in the treatment of many musculoskeletal conditions and in post cardiovascular accident (CVA) rehabilitation. RTUS biofeedback has been demonstrated effective in the treatment of low back pain (LBP) and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Cardiovascular biofeedback methods have been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of health conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, asthma, fibromyalgia and even psychological disorders however a systematic review in this field has yet to be conducted. Similarly, the number of large scale studies examining the use of respiratory biofeedback in rehabilitation is limited. Measurements of movement, postural control and force output can be made using a number of different devices and used to deliver biomechanical biofeedback. Inertial based sensing biofeedback is the most widely researched biomechanical biofeedback method, with a number of studies showing it to be effective in improving measures of balance in a number of populations. Other types of biomechanical biofeedback include force plate systems, electrogoniometry, pressure biofeedback and camera based systems however the evidence for these is limited. Biofeedback is generally delivered using visual displays, acoustic or haptic signals, however more recently virtual reality (VR) or exergaming technology have been used as biofeedback

  9. Biofeedback in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Giggins, Oonagh M; Persson, Ulrik McCarthy; Caulfield, Brian

    2013-06-18

    This paper reviews the literature relating to the biofeedback used in physical rehabilitation. The biofeedback methods used in rehabilitation are based on biomechanical measurements and measurements of the physiological systems of the body. The physiological systems of the body which can be measured to provide biofeedback are the neuromuscular system, the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system. Neuromuscular biofeedback methods include electromyography (EMG) biofeedback and real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUS) biofeedback. EMG biofeedback is the most widely investigated method of biofeedback and appears to be effective in the treatment of many musculoskeletal conditions and in post cardiovascular accident (CVA) rehabilitation. RTUS biofeedback has been demonstrated effective in the treatment of low back pain (LBP) and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. Cardiovascular biofeedback methods have been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of health conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, asthma, fibromyalgia and even psychological disorders however a systematic review in this field has yet to be conducted. Similarly, the number of large scale studies examining the use of respiratory biofeedback in rehabilitation is limited. Measurements of movement, postural control and force output can be made using a number of different devices and used to deliver biomechanical biofeedback. Inertial based sensing biofeedback is the most widely researched biomechanical biofeedback method, with a number of studies showing it to be effective in improving measures of balance in a number of populations. Other types of biomechanical biofeedback include force plate systems, electrogoniometry, pressure biofeedback and camera based systems however the evidence for these is limited. Biofeedback is generally delivered using visual displays, acoustic or haptic signals, however more recently virtual reality (VR) or exergaming technology have been used as biofeedback

  10. [Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-07-01

    Dyspnea occurs in most cancer patients and is often associated with severe pain. Pulmonary rehabilitation has become increasingly important to improve ADL and QOL and to relieve pain that results from dyspnea. Although pulmonary rehabilitation is now provided mainly during the perioperative period, it has been recognized as an effective procedure for patients before, during, or after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is also useful for patients with advanced or terminal cancer. However, an evidence-based cancer rehabilitation procedure has to be established.

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Xin; Rice, Shawn J; Belani, Chandra P

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease with high morbidity and mortality despite targeted therapy. Symptom burden related to cancer impairs quality of life and functional status in patients with lung cancer and in survivors. Pulmonary rehabilitation has been recognized as an effective, noninvasive intervention for patients with chronic respiratory disease. It is well established that pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with chronic obstruction pulmonary disease through improved exercise capacity and symptoms. Evidence is increasing that the benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation can be applied to patients with lung cancer. Comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation has made its way as a cornerstone of integrated care for patients with lung cancer.

  12. Psychiatric rehabilitation interventions: a review.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William A

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation has become accepted by the mental health field as a legitimate field of study and practice. Over the last several decades various psychiatric rehabilitation programme models and procedures have been developed, evaluated and disseminated. At the same time the process of psychiatric rehabilitation has been specified and its underlying values and practitioner technology articulated. This review describes the psychiatric rehabilitation process and in so doing differentiates psychosocial interventions that can be classified as psychiatric rehabilitation interventions from other psychosocial interventions. Furthermore, the major psychiatric rehabilitation interventions are examined within a framework of the psychiatric rehabilitation process with a review of their evidence. The review concludes that psychiatric rehabilitation interventions are currently a mixture of evidence-based practices, promising practices and emerging methods that can be effectively tied together using the psychiatric rehabilitation process framework of helping individuals with serious mental illnesses choose, get and keep valued roles, and together with complementary treatment orientated psychosocial interventions, provide a broad strategy for facilitating recovery.

  13. Prevalence and predictors of ischemia and outcomes in outpatients with diabetes mellitus referred for single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jamieson M; Patel, Chetan A; Ali, Mohamed M; Perez, Margarita; Watson, Denny D; Beller, George A

    2013-05-01

    Background- The prevalence of ischemia and its prediction of events are unclear in outpatients with diabetes mellitus in the modern era of intensive medical management. We sought to identify the prevalence of ischemia, subsequent cardiac events, and impact of sex, stress type, and symptom status on these findings in a cohort of stable outpatients with diabetes mellitus referred for single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Methods and Results- The study cohort included 575 consecutive outpatients with diabetes mellitus who underwent quantitative, gated single-photon emission computed tomography MPI. Clinical information, stress MPI variables, and cardiac events were prospectively collected and analyzed. The study population was at intermediate risk of coronary artery disease or had known coronary artery disease (40.3%); 29% of patients were asymptomatic at the time of stress testing. Scintigraphic ischemia and significant (≥10%) left ventricular ischemia were present in 126 patients (21.9%) and 29 patients (5.0%), respectively, and <1% of patients had early revascularization. The risk of ischemia was increased >2-fold by male sex (P<0.001), but was not impacted by pharmacological stress (P=0.15) or presence of symptoms (P=0.89). During a median 4.4 years follow-up, the rate of cardiac death/nonfatal myocardial infarction was moderate at 2.6%/y (cardiac death 0.8%/y) in the total cohort, but was 5.7%/y in those with ischemia (P<0.001). Pharmacological stress predicted a higher cardiac event rate (P<0.001) but symptoms did not (P=0.55). Conclusions- This cohort of stable outpatients with diabetes mellitus referred for single-photon emission computed tomography had low rates of significant ischemia and early revascularization; an initially low cardiac event rate increased after 2 years. Independent predictors of cardiac death/nonfatal myocardial infarction were known coronary artery disease, pharmacological stress, and MPI

  14. Readmission to Acute Care Hospital during Inpatient Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Flora M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Ryser, David K.; Sommerfeld, Teri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate frequency, reasons, and factors associated with readmission to acute care (RTAC) during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for TBI rehabilitation. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) RTAC incidence, RTAC causes, rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS), and rehabilitation discharge location. Results 183 participants (9%) experienced RTAC for a total 210 episodes. 161 patients experienced 1 RTAC episode, 17 had 2, and 5 had 3. Mean days from rehabilitation admission to first RTAC was 22 days (SD 22). Mean duration in acute care during RTAC was 7 days (SD 8). 84 participants (46%) had >1 RTAC episode for medical reasons, 102 (56%) had >1 RTAC for surgical reasons, and RTAC reason was unknown for 6 (3%) participants. Most common surgical RTAC reasons were: neurosurgical (65%), pulmonary (9%), infection (5%), and orthopedic (5%); most common medical reasons were infection (26%), neurologic (23%), and cardiac (12%). Older age, history of coronary artery disease, history of congestive heart failure, acute care diagnosis of depression, craniotomy or craniectomy during acute care, and presence of dysphagia at rehabilitation admission predicted patients with RTAC. RTAC was less likely for patients with higher admission Functional Independence Measure Motor scores and education less than high school diploma. RTAC occurrence during rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer RLOS and smaller likelihood of discharge home. Conclusion(s) Approximately 9% of patients with TBI experience RTAC during inpatient rehabilitation for various medical and surgical reasons. This information may help inform interventions aimed at reducing interruptions in rehabilitation due to RTAC. RTACs were associated with longer RLOS and discharge to an institutional setting. PMID:26212405

  15. Return of Viable Cardiac Function After Sonographic Cardiac Standstill in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Katherine; Thompson, W Reid; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Su, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sonographic cardiac standstill during adult cardiac arrest is associated with failure to get return to spontaneous circulation. This report documents 3 children whose cardiac function returned after standstill with extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Sonographic cardiac standstill may not predict cardiac death in children.

  16. 50 CFR 21.31 - Rehabilitation permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association and the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council (Minimum...; or the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council: 829 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94710, http.../or mobile, and may provide less space and protection from noise and disturbance than...

  17. 50 CFR 21.31 - Rehabilitation permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... National Wildlife Rehabilitators Association and the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council (Minimum...; or the International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council: 829 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94710, http.../or mobile, and may provide less space and protection from noise and disturbance than...

  18. Medical evaluation for outpatient dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Webb, B W

    1978-05-01

    Family physicians are often consulted to evaluate medically a patient for various dental procedures. The majority of the referrals are for diseases of the cardiovascular system. General guidelines have been established at the University of Maryland Family Health Center for the evaluation of these patients. These guidelines pertain to the use of local anesthetics and prophylaxis for endocarditis, as well as to the evaluation of patients with cardiac disease, hypertension, pulmonary disease, endocrine disease, neurological disease, hepatic disease, pregnancy, and anticoagulant therapy.

  19. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  20. Creative Art Therapy Groups: A Treatment Modality for Psychiatric Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drapeau, Marie-Celine; Kronish, Neomi

    2007-01-01

    This brief report examines the benefits of a creative art therapy group program for outpatients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Included is a review of relevant treatment outcomes literature on the effectiveness of group art therapy. The authors describe the Creative Art Therapy Group Program offered to adult psychiatric outpatients that is…

  1. Bypassing the Local Rural Hospital for Outpatient Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Charles; Bellamy, Gail R.; Menachemi, Nir; Chukmaitov, Askar S.; Brooks, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the amount of local rural hospital outpatient department (HOPD) bypass for outpatient procedures. Methods: We analyzed data on colonoscopies and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed in the state of Florida over the period 1997-2004. Findings: Approximately, 53% of colonoscopy and 45% of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy…

  2. 42 CFR 482.54 - Condition of participation: Outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nonprofessional personnel available at each location where outpatient services are offered, based on the scope and... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Outpatient services. 482.54 Section 482.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  3. 42 CFR 482.54 - Condition of participation: Outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nonprofessional personnel available at each location where outpatient services are offered, based on the scope and... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Outpatient services. 482.54 Section 482.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  4. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  5. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  6. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  7. 38 CFR 17.92 - Outpatient care for research purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research purposes. 17.92 Section 17.92 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.92 Outpatient care for research purposes. Subject to the... the treatment to be rendered is part of an approved Department of Veterans Affairs research...

  8. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in...

  9. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in...

  10. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in...

  11. Smallest worthwhile effect of land-based and water-based pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Mark R.; Ferreira, Manuela L.; Spencer, Lissa M.; Herbert, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the smallest worthwhile effect of land-based and water-based pulmonary rehabilitation on 6-min walk distance among people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using a benefit–harm trade-off method, people with COPD who had completed two baseline 6-min walk tests at the commencement of outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation were presented with two scenarios: 8 weeks of land-based and 8 weeks of water-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Participants were guided through an iterative process allowing them to progressively refine their estimates of the smallest improvement due to each form of rehabilitation that would outweigh the associated costs, risks and inconvenience presented in the scenario. 100 people with COPD participated (mean±sd age 72±9 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s 54±16% predicted and baseline 6-min walk distance 377±101 m). For land-based pulmonary rehabilitation, the median smallest worthwhile effect was 20 m (95% CI 15–37 m). For water-based pulmonary rehabilitation, the median smallest worthwhile effect was 26 m (95% CI 15–33 m). These estimates did not differ significantly (p=0.10). People with COPD typically perceive that pulmonary rehabilitation would be worthwhile if it increased the 6-min walk distance by about 6%. The smallest worthwhile effects of land- and water-based pulmonary rehabilitation were similar. PMID:27730130

  12. Survey of young patients with polio and a foreign background at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, polio survivors aged under 60 years are non-native Swedes which pose new aspects and challenges to a post-polio outpatient clinic. To analyze the medical data, walking aids, occupational, and family situation in non-native polio survivors aged less than 60 years at a Swedish post-polio outpatient clinic. Retrospective data analysis. Data were retrieved from medical records at the post-polio outpatient clinic. Actual age, age at acute polio infection, walking capacity, pain, concomitant diseases, working and family situation, and ethnical origin were analyzed. Data are presented in numbers and percentage. 153 patients were included. Mean age was 45 (17-60) years, and mean age at acute polio infection was 2 (0-12) years. Paresis of the lower extremities was the most common disability. 10 % were wheelchair dependent. Pain occurred in 70 % with a mean intensity of 55 measured with the visual analog scale. Hypertension was the most common concomitant disease. Half of the polio survivors were working at least part time, and roughly half were singles. Data were comparable with data earlier published in Swedish native polio survivors. Non-native polio survivors aged under 60 years showed similarities in age at acute polio infection, paresis, prevalence, and intensity of pain when compared with native Swedish polio survivors. They were, however, younger, and were less often working and married/cohabitants than native Swedish polio survivors. The results of this study underline the importance of social and vocational rehabilitation tailoring rehabilitation suitable for polio survivors with a foreign background.

  13. A Controlled Trial of Hospital versus Home-Based Exercise in Cardiac Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Heather M.; Smith, Kelly M.; Kodis, Jennifer; McKelvie, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effect of 6-month hospital-based exercise training versus 6-month monitored home-based training in cardiac rehabilitation patients following surgery, investigating which conferred the greatest physical, quality of life, and social support benefits. Home-based training resulted in improvements in exercise performance as great as those…

  14. Evaluation of outpatient experience with vitreoretinal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, C S; Gross, J G; Abramson, I; Mazzei, W J; Freeman, W R

    1992-01-01

    The experience of 55 consecutive individuals undergoing outpatient vitreoretinal surgery was evaluated. Objective variables, including preoperative and intraoperative information, subjective postoperative pain, and discomfort were measured with a previously validated 100 mm visual analogue scale. Patients also ranked the overall experience. Average pain and discomfort scores in the recovery room were 21.8 and 22.6 and overnight were 26.7 and 30.4 (scale 0 to 100), respectively. Eighty eight per cent of subjects were satisfied with the experience. Elevated pain and discomfort scores were statistically correlated with scleral buckling, prolonged surgical or recovery room time, requirement for parenteral pain medications, and high intraocular pressure on the first postoperative visit. None of the patients needed further hospital treatment. This study suggests that vitreoretinal surgery in an appropriately selected population does not require routine inpatient care. PMID:1739718

  15. A decision-supported outpatient practice system.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R. C.; Allen, B. A.; Smith, K. C.; Arni, V. V.; Sherman, E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a Decision-supported Outpatient Practice (DOP) system developed and now in use at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. DOP is an automated ambulatory medical record system that integrates in-patient and ambulatory care data, and incorporates active and passive decision support mechanisms with a view towards improving the quality of primary care. Active decision support occurs in the form of event-driven reminders created within a remote clinical information system with its central data repository and decision support system (DSS). Novel features of DOP include patient specific health maintenance task lists calculated by the remote DSS. uses of a semantically structured controlled medical vocabulary to support clinical results review and provider data entry, and exploitation of an underlying ambulatory data model that provides for an explicit record of evolution of insight regarding patient management. Benefits, challenges, and plans are discussed. PMID:8947774

  16. Problems in outpatients with laryngeal hyperplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Goldman, N C

    1997-01-01

    The care of outpatients with epithelial hyperplastic lesions of the larynx presents problems of classification, treatment, continued surveillance and prognosis. One hundred patients who underwent microlaryngoscopy and vocal cord stripping from 1990 through 1995 were studied retrospectively with a follow-up period of 8-156 months. Twenty-eight patients with biopsy proven epithelial hyperplastic lesions were given 21 different pathological diagnoses exclusive of invasive carcinoma following 52 operative microlaryngoscopies. Prognosis was inferred and treatment commenced primarily on the basis of the pathology report. Microlaryngoscopy and stripping with and without the carbon dioxide laser, "watchful waiting," radiation therapy, and partial laryngectomy were all used as treatment modalities. Controversy remains as of choice of treatment. Encouraging the patient to discontinue smoking is an integral part of treatment; however, most patients continue to smoke. Recent changes in the United States health care delivery system present additional problems in surveillance of the patient.

  17. Outpatient management of the suicidal child.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L H

    1984-07-01

    Susceptible children may become depressed and suicidal in response to stressful social factors including loss or separation from parents, parental abuse, neglect, rejection, pressure, or a chaotic, disorganized family environment. Psychological factors that predispose children to suicidal behavior include inadequate ego-defenses to cope with feelings engendered by the adverse environmental circumstances. Often these children relate poorly to others and are excessively dependent. Outpatient management is possible if the parents are able to be appropriately supportive and protective. Intensive psychotherapy is often necessary to modify a basic depressive outlook on life and to resolve inner conflict about self-worth. The suicidal child must be helped to give up perfectionistic attitudes and to alter aggressive responses to loss and disappointment. Work with parents is important, particularly when the child's suicidal state is reactive to inappropriate parental behavior. Antidepressant drugs may prove to be a useful adjunct.

  18. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  19. [Social inequality in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Deck, R

    2008-10-01

    The association of social inequality and health is well known and well documented. Numerous studies have shown that a lower socio-economic status is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. This association is caused by various circumstances such as unfavourable work and living conditions, unhealthy life styles and risk factors and, last but not least, the access to medical care depending on socio-economic status. These aspects are correlated in various ways, at any rate they cause a higher prevalence of diseases and lower quality of life in persons with lower socio-economic status. The present article discusses the association between social inequality and medical rehabilitation, a problem which is rarely investigated in present research on social inequality and health. In our study, 911 rehabilitation patients were included. Analyses of socio-economic differences with respect to rehabilitation care address the following questions: are there differences in access to medical rehabilitation, in rehabilitation care, with respect to success of rehabilitation and satisfaction with rehabilitation? To assign patients to a social class - lower, middle and upper class - we constructed an indicator of social status based on education, occupation and income level. Our findings in a sample of rehabilitation patients are in line with the results of existing research on social inequality and health. Patients from the lower social class enter the rehabilitation care system with a poorer health state and leave it with less favourable results than patients with higher social status. However, with regard to the effect of rehabilitation care, middle class patients benefit least. It can be speculated that systematic information of patients about the aims of the rehabilitation programme and specific after care focusing on relevant aspects of daily living may reduce the disadvantages of lower class patients.

  20. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  1. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  2. Rehabilitation of basketball injuries.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Chimes, Gary P

    2006-08-01

    Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the United States and throughout the world, and therefore represents one of the most common sources of sports-related injuries. Basketball injuries should be managed by the same general rehabilitation principles as other sports injuries. Additionally, the clinician should be aware not only of general sports injuries but of those injuries most commonly seen in basketball players. By maintaining knowledge of the most common basketball injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment, the clinician can help to optimize the athlete's return to play and enjoyment of the sport.

  3. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  4. Rehabilitation of the paralyzed face.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D

    1991-06-01

    Rehabilitation for facial paralysis is a highly individualized task that relies on a complex set of physical, physiologic, social, and emotional factors. A wide range of surgical techniques exist for establishing partial rehabilitation of facial expression and motion. The facial surgeon must analyze these factors and work with the patient in a realistic approach to the problem.

  5. Rehabilitation Counseling with Deaf Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danek, Marita

    1983-01-01

    The nature and impact on educational and vocational functioning of prelingual deafness are reviewed, stereotypes are exposed, and the special needs of deaf clients in rehabilitation assessment, goal setting, service delivery, and placement are discussed. Trends in deafness rehabilitation are considered in terms of legislation, professional…

  6. Directions in Rehabilitation Counseling, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Directions in Rehabilitation Counseling, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This volume of 12 lessons--each one written by either a medical or a mental health professional--provides expert information on a variety of medical and psychological issues in rehabilitative counseling. The lessons, each of which concludes with a few multiple-choice questions, are as follows: (1) "Rehabilitation of the Seriously Mentally…

  7. Directions in Rehabilitation Counseling, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Frederic, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This volume of 12 lessons provides expert information on a variety of medical and psychological issues in rehabilitative counseling. The lessons, which may be applied toward continuing education credits, are: (1) "Integration of Psychiatric Treatment and Rehabilitation" (Jeanne Steiner, Larry Davidson, Michael A. Hoge, and Selby Jacobs);…

  8. Qualitative Research in Rehabilitation Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley-Maxwell, Cheryl; Al Hano, Ibrahim; Skivington, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative research approaches offer rehabilitation scholars and practitioners avenues into understanding the lives and experiences of people with disabilities and those people and systems with whom they interact. The methods used often parallel those used in counseling and appear to be well matched with the field of rehabilitation counseling.…

  9. Community Psychiatric Rehabilitation in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Amihay; Neumann, Micha

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the development of community-based rehabilitation services for persons with mental illness in Israel. It focuses on occupational, social, and residential community psychiatric rehabilitation services. The paper argues that service development has been slow and out of step with the philosophy and objectives of community…

  10. Statistical Prediction in Proprietary Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kurt L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Applied statistical methods to predict case expenditures for low back pain rehabilitation cases in proprietary rehabilitation. Extracted predictor variables from case records of 175 workers compensation claimants with some degree of permanent disability due to back injury. Performed several multiple regression analyses resulting in a formula that…

  11. Physical Therapy Principles in Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sparto, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of vestibular rehabilitation for persons with balance and vestibular disorders is used to improve function and decrease dizziness symptoms. Principles of a vestibular rehabilitation program are described including common exercises and outcome measures used to report change. A review of negative and positive predictive factors related to recovery is also provided. PMID:22027077

  12. Rehabilitation Technologies for Water Mains

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents on-going research work for the USEPA Research Project on “Rehabilitation of Water and Wastewater Systems.” It will compare various renewal methods (i.e. replacement, rehabilitation and repair technologies that are available in the market). The paper discusse...

  13. Setting goals for cognitive rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, I H

    1999-12-01

    Evidence for experience-dependent plasticity of the brain, including cell regeneration, means that rehabilitation can aim at reinstituting impaired cognitive function, as well as at training compensatory strategies for the lost function. New theoretical frameworks make predictions regarding the circumstances under which these two approaches should each be attempted. There has been progress over the past 6 years in designing effective rehabilitation strategies, with more of these having a strong theoretical basis in cognitive neuroscience. Basic cognitive science has generated counter-intuitive, but effective cognitive rehabilitation methods, showing that the goal of rehabilitation need not always be the most obvious one dictated by real life performance. Limb Activation Training for unilateral neglect is an example of a theoretically derived cognitive rehabilitation procedure that has now been clinically evaluated in clinical trials.

  14. The effect of an interdisciplinary rehabilitation intervention comparing HRQoL, symptom burden and physical function among patients with primary glioma: an RCT study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anders; Rosenbek Minet, Lisbeth Kirstine; Søgaard, Karen; Jarden, Jens Ole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gliomas are among the biggest challenges in neurological and oncology rehabilitation and optimising treatment is of major clinical importance in this population. Although inpatient rehabilitation among glioma patients’ results in improved functional measures, rehabilitation efforts are still not emphasised in this patient group and the literature lacks studies investigating the impact of outpatient rehabilitation. Method This protocol describes a randomised 6-week parallel group rehabilitation study investigating an outpatient interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme. The intervention consists of 6 weeks intensive physiotherapy as groups exercise in conjunction with 0–6 weeks of individual occupational therapy if a need is present. The aim of this study is to describe the design of the upcoming randomised control trial (RCT). The results of the RCT will add to the growing body of literature investigating the potential role of exercise as a supportive therapeutic intervention for a patient with cancer. Ethics and dissemination The project is approved by the Regional Scientific Ethical Committees for Southern Denmark under Project-ID: (S-20140108) and by the Danish Data Protection Agency (J. no.2008-58-0035). Dissemination will occur through presentation and findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals. The key strength of this study is its randomised design and it is the first study to investigate a standardised outpatient interdisciplinary rehabilitation programme among patients with glioma. A potential limitation is the uncertainty and risk of side effects to the concomitant treatment, which enhances the risk of dropout. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02221986. PMID:25280804

  15. Strategies for stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation after hemiplegic stroke has typically relied on the training of patients in compensatory strategies. The translation of neuroscientific research into care has led to new approaches and renewed promise for better outcomes. Improved motor control can progress with task-specific training incorporating increased use of proximal and distal movements during intensive practice of real-world activities. Functional gains are incorrectly said to plateau by 3–6 months. Many patients retain latent sensorimotor function that can be realised any time after stroke with a pulse of goal-directed therapy. The amount of practice probably best determines gains for a given level of residual movement ability. Clinicians should encourage patients to build greater strength, speed, endurance, and precision of multijoint movements on tasks that increase independence and enrich daily activity. Imaging tools may help clinicians determine the capacity of residual networks to respond to a therapeutic approach and help establish optimal dose-response curves for training. Promising adjunct approaches include practice with robotic devices or in a virtual environment, electrical stimulation to increase cortical excitability during training, and drugs to optimise molecular mechanisms for learning. Biological strategies for neural repair may augment rehabilitation in the next decade. PMID:15324721

  16. [Burns and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Rochet, J M; Hareb, F

    2002-03-01

    Necessary principles of rehabilitation for burn patient are based on empirical findings recently corroborated by discoveries about healing pathophysiology. Risks are assessable immediately from the extensive, depth and situation of the burns, problems appear only if the dermis is affected: retraction, hypertrophy and losses of substances. To cutaneous problems it is necessary to add those linked to the prolonged immobilization and to complications of the resuscitation. To be effective, re-education has to be precocious, continuously suited to cicatricial processing and to the different therapeutic steps: resuscitation, surgical treatment, processing in a re-education and rehabilitation center, steady at home and processing of the sequelae. The processing rests on the repressive cloth port 23/24 hours during more of a year, the port of orthesis of immobilization and segmental posture (to stretch the dermis permanently) and the mobilization of articulations to avoid their stiffening. The cooperation of the patient is essential, it needs the share of therapies as well as the totality of problems and difficulties met by the patient, that they are physical, psychological, social, family or occupational. The steady has to be insured by a pluridisciplinarity team during at least the two necessary years for the cicatricial maturation.

  17. Outpatient provider contact prior to unintentional opioid overdose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lewei (Allison); Bohnert, Amy; Ilgen, Mark; Pfeiffer, Paul Nelson; Ganoczy, Dara; Blow, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prescribed opioid medications are the most commonly implicated substances in unintentional overdoses. Outpatient health care encounters represent a potential opportunity to intervene to reduce opioid overdose risk. This study assessed the timing and type of outpatient provider contacts prior to overdose. Methods This study examined all adult patients nationally in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) who died from unintentional prescription opioid overdose in fiscal years 2004–2007 and used VHA services anytime within two years of their deaths (n=1,813). For those whose last treatment contact was in an outpatient setting (n=1,457), demographic, clinical and treatment characteristics were compared among patients categorized by the location of their last contact. Results 33% (N=479) of those last seen in outpatient settings were seen within one week and 62% (N=910) within one month of their overdose. A substantial proportion of patients were last seen within one month of death in mental health or substance disorder outpatient settings (30% N=438). The majority of patients did not fill an opioid prescription on their last outpatient visit prior to unintentional opioid overdose. Conclusions The majority of patients who died by unintentional overdose on prescription opioids were seen within a month of their overdose in outpatient settings. These settings may provide an opportunity to prevent patients from dying from prescription opioid overdoses, and interventions to reduce risk should not be limited to visits that resulted in an opioid prescription. PMID:26129993

  18. Electrocardiographic patch devices and contemporary wireless cardiac monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Doshi, Rahul N.; Shinbane, Jerold S.; Carlson, Steven K.; Grazette, Luanda P.; Chang, Philip M.; Sangha, Rajbir S.; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiologic derangements often coexist with disorders of the circulatory system. Capturing and diagnosing arrhythmias and conduction system disease may lead to a change in diagnosis, clinical management and patient outcomes. Standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), Holter monitors and event recorders have served as useful diagnostic tools over the last few decades. However, their shortcomings are only recently being addressed by emerging technologies. With advances in device miniaturization and wireless technologies, and changing consumer expectations, wearable “on-body” ECG patch devices have evolved to meet contemporary needs. These devices are unobtrusive and easy to use, leading to increased device wear time and diagnostic yield. While becoming the standard for detecting arrhythmias and conduction system disorders in the outpatient setting where continuous ECG monitoring in the short to medium term (days to weeks) is indicated, these cardiac devices and related digital mobile health technologies are reshaping the clinician-patient interface with important implications for future healthcare delivery. PMID:26074823

  19. Benefits of comprehensive inpatient education and discharge planning combined with outpatient support in elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cheryl; Deepak, B V; Amoateng-Adjepong, Yaw; Zarich, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Multidisciplinary disease management programs for congestive heart failure have been shown to substantially reduce readmission rates, resulting in a reduction of costs. These interventions, however, have typically included changes in medical management, making it difficult to quantitate the key elements of a successful program involving education, discharge planning, and transitional care in the outpatient setting. The investigators utilized an experienced cardiac nurse educator to coordinate a targeted inpatient congestive heart failure education program coupled with comprehensive discharge planning and immediate outpatient reinforcement through a coordinated nurse-driven home health care program. The comprehensive intervention resulted in a marked reduction in 6-month readmission rates, from 44.2% to 11.4% (p=0.01). The average total cost saving for each subject in the interventional group was $1541, based on the decreased utilization of both skilled nursing services and home health care during outpatient follow-up. The costs to implement an inpatient education program were negligible, at $158 per subject. There was no difference in discharge medications or medical management protocols that would have influenced these results.

  20. Anticoagulation Quality and Complications of using Vitamin K Antagonists in the Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Mário Augusto Cray; Krum, Lucas Kraeski; Geraldino, Juliana da Silva; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli; Gomes, Ricardo Zanetti; Reis, Elise Souza dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves or atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic events, several factors influence adherence and anticoagulation complications. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors that interfere with the quality and complications of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 100 patients, in the period from 2011 to 2014, was performed. Anticoagulation conditions in the last year, regarding the presence of complications (embolisms/bleeding) and inadequate treatment were assessed: achievement of less than 8 annual prothrombin times and International Normalized Ratio outside therapeutic target in more than 40% of prothrombin times. RESULTS: There were 31 complications (22 minor bleeding without hospitalization and 9 major complications: 7 bleeding with hospitalization and two emboli); 70 were with International Normalized Ratio outside the target in more than 40% of the tests and 36 with insufficient number of prothrombin times. Socioeconomic factors, anticoagulant type and anticoagulation reason had no relationship with complications or with inadequate treatment. There were more complications in patients with longer duration of anticoagulation (P=0.001). Women had more International Normalized Ratio outside the target range (OR 2.61, CI:1.0-6.5; P=0.04). Patients with lower number of annual prothrombin times had longer times of anticoagulation (P=0.03), less annual consultations (P=0.02) and less dose adjustments (P=0.003). Patients with longer duration of anticoagulation have more complications (P=0.001). CONCLUSION: There was a high rate of major complications and International Normalized Ratio was outside the goal. Less annual prothrombin times was related to longer duration of anticoagulation, less annual consultations and less dose adjustments. More major complications occurred in patients with longer duration of anticoagulation. PMID:27737407

  1. The PQRS-Montreal: a measure of patients' perceptions of the quality of rehabilitation services for persons with a traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Swaine, Bonnie; Dassa, Clément; Koné, Anna; Dutil, Élisabeth; Demers, Louise; Trempe, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the factorial validity, internal consistency, criterion-related and concurrent validity of the Perception of Quality of Rehabilitation Services - Montreal (PQRS-Montreal) questionnaire for persons receiving traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation services. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Seventeen facilities providing acute care and intensive inpatient and outpatient TBI adult rehabilitation. Participants Five-hundred thirty adults (GCS  =  3-15; mean age  =  41.5 ± 16.9 years) who received rehabilitation were administered the questionnaire during an interview near time of discharge. Subjects responded to the 61 PQRS-Montreal items (five-point scale of agreement) and to the Client Satisfaction Question (CSQ8). Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified three potential subscales (one- and two-factor solutions) explaining 26.1-41% of the variance (ecological approach, quality of team, service organization). The subscales' internal structures were interpretable and their internal consistency varied from 0.51 to 0.90 (Cronbach's α). Rehabilitation phase significantly and positively impacted factor scores and all factor scores were significantly and moderately correlated with CSQ8 scores. Conclusions The PQRS-Montreal possesses adequate psychometric properties supporting its use as a valid tool to measure patients' perception of the quality of TBI rehabilitation services. This tool could help guide the development and monitoring of TBI rehabilitation service delivery. Implications for Rehabilitation The importance of measuring and monitoring quality of care is increasingly important in rehabilitation. Using the experiences and perceptions of care of service users is a valid way of assessing the quality of rehabilitation services. The PQRS-Montreal has adequate psychometric properties supporting its use as a valid tool to measure patients' perception of the quality of TBI rehabilitation services

  2. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Rekha; Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001-0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  3. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mankad, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses. PMID:27600455

  4. Outpatient competence restoration: A model and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole R; Candilis, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe a model outpatient competence restoration program (OCRP) and provide data on time to restoration of adjudicative competence. METHODS: The authors tracked the process by which individuals are referred for outpatient competence restoration (OCR) by courts in the United States capital, describing the unique requirements of American law, and the avenues available for compelling adherence. Competence to stand trial is a critical gate-keeping function of the judicial and forensic communities and assures that defendants understand courtroom procedures. OCR is therefore an effort to assure fairness and protection of important legal rights. Multi-media efforts are described that educate patients and restore competence to stand trial. These include resources such as group training, use of licensed clinicians, visual aids, structured instruments, and cinema. Aggregate data from the OCRP’s previous 4 years of OCR efforts were reviewed for demographic characteristics, restoration rate, and time to restoration. Poisson regression modeling identified the differences in restoration between sequential 45-d periods after entrance into the program. RESULTS: In the past 4 years, the DC OCRP has been successful in restoring 55 of 170 participants (32%), with an average referral rate of 35 persons per year. 76% are restored after the initial 45 d in the program. Demographics of the group indicate a predominance of African-American men with a mean age of 42. Thought disorders predominate and individuals in care face misdemeanor charges 78% of the time. Poisson regression modeling of the number attaining competence during four successive 45-d periods showed a substantial difference among the time periods for the rate of attaining competence (P = 0.0011). The three time periods after 45 d each showed a significant decrease in the restoration rate when compared to the initial 0 to 45 d period - their relative rates were only 22% to 33% as high as the rate for 0-45 d (all

  5. Vulnerability of Rural Hospitals to Medicare Outpatient Payment Reform

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Penny E.; Franco, Sheila J.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Cheng, C. Michael; Evans, William N.

    1999-01-01

    Because the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 requires implementation of a Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for hospital outpatient services, the authors evaluated the potential impact of outpatient PPS on rural hospitals. Areas examined include: (1) How dependent are rural hospitals on outpatient revenue? (2) Are they more likely than urban hospitals to be vulnerable to payment reform? (3) What types of rural hospitals will be most vulnerable to reform? Using Medicare cost report data, the authors found that small size and government ownership are more common among rural than urban hospitals and are the most important determinants of vulnerability to payment reform. PMID:11481724

  6. Physician Use of Outpatient Electronic Health Records to Improve Care

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Adam; Bowes, Watson A.; Thornton, Sidney N.; Narus, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    We applied a model of usage categories of electronic health records for outpatient physicians to a large population of physicians, using an established electronic health record. This model categorizes physician users according to how extensively they adopt the various capabilities of electronic health records. We identified representative indicators from usage statistics for outpatient physician use of the HELP-2 outpatient electronic medical record, in use at Intermountain Healthcare. Using these indicators, we calculated the relative proportion of users in each category. These proportions are useful for predicting the expected benefits of electronic health record adoption. PMID:18999307

  7. Achieving cost control in the hospital outpatient department.

    PubMed

    Sulvetta, M B

    1991-01-01

    The rapid growth in outpatient expenditures and the congressional mandate for development of a prospective payment system (PPS) for these expenditures are discussed. Extension of diagnosis-related groups to outpatient care is shown to be infeasible. Alternative patient classification schemes and options for defining the unit of payment and establishing weights and rates are discussed. A PPS primarily controls price and can only address volume by defining a broad unit of payment, such as an episode of care. Therefore, adoption of a volume performance standard approach could be effective. Outpatient payment policies must be integrated with those of other ambulatory care providers.

  8. The pros and cons of outpatient breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lou, M A; Mandal, A K; Alexander, J L

    1976-06-01

    A review of the 130 breast biopsies performed on women during the past three years at the Martin Luther King, Jr, General Hospital showed that 90 were performed on outpatients and 40 on inpatients. Of the 90 outpatient procedures, 61 were under local anesthesia and 29 under general. Only three outpatient biopsy specimens were malignant and required subsequent patient admission to the hospital for mastectomy at an interval of 9 to 14 days. In all three, the axillary nodes were uninvolved. In two, no residual tumor was found in the mastectomy specimen.

  9. [Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Luis, David; Hullin, Thomas; Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are multi-system disorders in relation with mitochondrial DNA and/or nuclear DNA abnormalities. Clinical pictures are heterogeneous, involving endocrine, cardiac, neurologic or sensory systems. Cardiac involvements are morphological and electrical disturbances. Prognosis is worsened in case of cardiac impairment. Treatments are related to the type of cardiac dysfunction including medication or pacemaker implantation.

  10. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients’ sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability. PMID:25621205

  11. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined.

  12. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients' sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability.

  13. Risk factors for failure of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Barr, David A.; Ho, Antonia; Sharp, Emma; Semple, Lindsay; Seaton, R. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors for failure of outpatient antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in infective endocarditis (IE). Patients and methods We identified IE cases managed at a single centre over 12 years from a prospectively maintained database. ‘OPAT failure’ was defined as unplanned readmission or antibiotic switch due to adverse drug reaction or antibiotic resistance. We analysed patient and disease-related risk factors for OPAT failure by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. We also retrospectively collected follow-up data on adverse disease outcome (defined as IE-related death or relapse) and performed Kaplan–Meier survival analysis up to 36 months following OPAT. Results We identified 80 episodes of OPAT in IE. Failure occurred in 25/80 episodes (31.3%). On multivariate analysis, cardiac or renal failure [pooled OR 7.39 (95% CI 1.84–29.66), P = 0.005] and teicoplanin therapy [OR 8.69 (95% CI 2.01–37.47), P = 0.004] were independently associated with increased OPAT failure. OPAT failure with teicoplanin occurred despite therapeutic plasma levels. OPAT failure predicted adverse disease outcome up to 36 months (P = 0.016 log-rank test). Conclusions These data caution against selecting patients with endocarditis for OPAT in the presence of cardiac or renal failure and suggest teicoplanin therapy may be associated with suboptimal OPAT outcomes. Alternative regimens to teicoplanin in the OPAT setting should be further investigated. PMID:23475647

  14. Clinical utilization of musculoskeletal sonography involving non-physician rehabilitation providers: A scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Asai, Christina; Tsai, Julieann

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal sonography use in point-of-care physical medicine and rehabilitation is rapidly expanding, not only by physiatrists, but also by non-physician rehabilitation providers. Aim To evaluate the current range, extent and nature of literature and to identify emerging areas of evidence for the use of musculoskeletal sonography involving non-physician rehabilitation providers to guide research and clinical practice. Design Scoping Review Setting Inpatient, Outpatient, Other Population Musculoskeletal conditions Methods Five databases were searched and 578 unique abstracts were identified and screened for eligibility. Three raters independently read 68 full texts and 36 articles that reported on applied uses of sonography by non-physician rehabilitation providers were included. Results Eighteen studies described direct clinical use, primarily for outcomes measurement (n=12) or as a biofeedback intervention (n=10). Twelve laboratory studies were included that related morphology to patient reports or validated clinical interventions. Six additional studies, although not involving non-physician providers, were included as they presented potential valuable uses that were not noted in the other included studies, such as monitoring bone healing, tendon repair, and evaluation of idiopathic symptom reports or non-specific primary diagnoses. Conclusion This review indicates that non-physician rehabilitation providers use sonography for outcomes measurement and biofeedback interventions. Research is needed to evaluate effects of these uses on patient outcomes and to explore additional potential uses for clinical reasoning, treatment planning, and monitoring of tissue healing related to intervention. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact Implementation of musculoskeletal sonography by non-physician rehabilitation providers has the potential to be a critically advantageous addition to improve care. PMID:26201705

  15. Dissociative disorders and suicidality in psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Foote, Brad; Smolin, Yvette; Neft, Deborah I; Lipschitz, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Although it is common for patients with dissociative disorders to report a history of suicide attempts, there is very little data systematically comparing suicidality in patients with dissociative disorders versus patients without these disorders. The subjects in our study were 231 patients consecutively admitted to an inner-city, hospital-based outpatient psychiatric clinic. Eighty-two of these patients completed structured interviews for dissociative disorders, borderline personality disorder, and trauma history (dissociative disorders interview schedule) and for posttraumatic stress disorder and substance abuse (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV). Patients receiving a dissociative disorder diagnosis were compared with nondissociative patients on measures of self-harm and suicidality. Presence of a dissociative disorder was strongly associated with all measures of self-harm and suicidality. When we focused on patients with a history of multiple suicide attempts, significant associations were found between several diagnoses (dissociative disorder; borderline personality disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder; alcohol abuse/dependence) and multiple suicide attempter status. When these diagnoses were entered in a logistic regression, a highly significant association remained for dissociative diagnosis and multiple suicide attempter status (odds ratio, 15.09; 95% confidence interval, 2.67-85.32; p = 0.002). Dissociative disorders are commonly overlooked in studies of suicidality, but in this population they were the strongest predictor of multiple suicide attempter status.

  16. Chlamydia trachomatis cervicitis in gynecologic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Ripa, K T; Svensson, L; Mårdh, P A; Weström, L

    1978-12-01

    Symptoms suggestive of a lower genital tract infection (LGTI) are common complaints in women who consult gynecologists. Sexually transmitted microorganisms, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis, are responsible for a substantial proportion of LGTI. This study was performed to establish the frequency of LGTI caused by C trachomatis in women attending a gynecologic outpatient clinic. Of 170 women with LGTI, 32.9% harbored one or more of these organisms: C trachomatis was found in 19.3%, N gonorrhoeae in 4.7%, and T vaginalis in 25.9%. The results of the isolation studies were correlated with clinical signs and symptoms. In women under 25 years of age, chlamydial cervicitis was found significantly more often in users of oral contraceptives than in nonusers. In women not taking such drugs, cervical erosion was found more often in Chlamydia-positive than Chlamydia-negative women. Since clinical examination failed to reveal any characteristic signs in cases of chlamydial infection, it was not possible to distinguish a chlamydial from a gonococcal infection. This study also reports the successful treatment of 15 women affected by chlamydial cervicitis with doxycycline or trimethoprim sulphamethoxazole.

  17. Assessing anxious features in depressed outpatients

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Bernstein, Ira H.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Morris, David; Alpert, Jonathan; Warden, Diane; Luther, James F.; Kornstein, Susan G.; Biggs, Melanie M.; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Both the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and 30-item Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Clinician-rated (IDS-C30) contain a subscale that assesses anxious symptoms. We used classical test theory and item response theory methods to assess and compare the psychometric properties of the two anxiety subscales (HRSDANX and IDS-CANX) in a large sample (N = 3453) of outpatients with non-psychotic major depressive disorder in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. Approximately 48% of evaluable participants had at least one concurrent anxiety disorder by the self-report Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (PDSQ). The HRSDANX and IDS-CANX were highly correlated (r = 0.75) and both had moderate internal consistency given their limited number of items (HRSDANX Cronbach’s alpha = 0.48; IDS-CANX Cronbach’s alpha = 0.58). The optimal threshold for ascribing the presence/absence of anxious features was found at a total score of eight or nine for the HRSDANX and seven or eight for the IDS-CANX. It would seem beneficial to delete item 17 (loss of insight) from the HRSDANX as it negatively correlated with the scale’s total score. Both the HRSDANX and IDS-CANX subscales have acceptable psychometric properties and can be used to identify anxious features for clinical or research purposes. PMID:22057975

  18. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cogen, Fran R.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies. PMID:26472948

  19. Outpatient Management of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joni K; Cogen, Fran R

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM) continues to rise within the pediatric population. However, T1DM remains the most prevalent form diagnosed in children. It is critical that health-care professionals understand the types of diabetes diagnosed in pediatrics, especially the distinguishing features between T1DM and T2DM, to ensure proper treatment. Similar to all individuals with T1DM, lifelong administration of exogenous insulin is necessary for survival. However, children have very distinct needs and challenges compared to those in the adult diabetes population. Accordingly, treatment, goals, and age-appropriate requirements must be individually addressed. The main objectives for the treatment of pediatric T1DM include maintaining glucose levels as close to normal as possible, avoiding acute complications, and preventing long-term complications. In addition, unique to pediatrics, facilitating normal growth and development is important to comprehensive care. To achieve these goals, a careful balance of insulin therapy, medical nutrition therapy, and exercise or activity is necessary. Pharmacological treatment options consist of various insulin products aimed at mimicking prior endogenous insulin secretion while minimizing adverse effects. This review focuses on the management of pediatric T1DM in the outpatient environment, highlighting pharmacotherapy management strategies.

  20. Outpatient management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muncie, Herbert L; Yasinian, Yasmin; Oge', Linda

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 2% to 9% of patients seen in a family physician's office have alcohol dependence. These patients are at risk of developing alcohol withdrawal syndrome if they abruptly abstain from alcohol use. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome begins six to 24 hours after the last intake of alcohol, and the signs and symptoms include tremors, agitation, nausea, sweating, vomiting, hallucinations, insomnia, tachycardia, hypertension, delirium, and seizures. Treatment aims to minimize symptoms, prevent complications, and facilitate continued abstinence from alcohol. Patients with mild or moderate alcohol withdrawal syndrome can be treated as outpatients, which minimizes expense and allows for less interruption of work and family life. Patients with severe symptoms or who are at high risk of complications should receive inpatient treatment. In addition to supportive therapy, benzodiazepines, either in a fixed-dose or symptom-triggered schedule, are recommended. Medication should be given at the onset of symptoms and continued until symptoms subside. Other medications, including carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, and gabapentin, have less abuse potential but do not prevent seizures. Typically, physicians should see these patients daily until symptoms subside. Although effective treatment is an initial step in recovery, long-term success depends on facilitating the patient's entry into ongoing treatment.