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Sample records for overcome software brittleness

  1. Overcoming the brittleness of glass through bio-inspiration and micro-architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhalaf, M.; Dastjerdi, A. Khayer; Barthelat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Highly mineralized natural materials such as teeth or mollusk shells boast unusual combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness currently unmatched by engineering materials. While high mineral contents provide stiffness and hardness, these materials also contain weaker interfaces with intricate architectures, which can channel propagating cracks into toughening configurations. Here we report the implementation of these features into glass, using a laser engraving technique. Three-dimensional arrays of laser-generated microcracks can deflect and guide larger incoming cracks, following the concept of ‘stamp holes’. Jigsaw-like interfaces, infiltrated with polyurethane, furthermore channel cracks into interlocking configurations and pullout mechanisms, significantly enhancing energy dissipation and toughness. Compared with standard glass, which has no microstructure and is brittle, our bio-inspired glass displays built-in mechanisms that make it more deformable and 200 times tougher. This bio-inspired approach, based on carefully architectured interfaces, provides a new pathway to toughening glasses, ceramics or other hard and brittle materials.

  2. Overcoming the brittleness of glass through bio-inspiration and micro-architecture.

    PubMed

    Mirkhalaf, M; Dastjerdi, A Khayer; Barthelat, F

    2014-01-01

    Highly mineralized natural materials such as teeth or mollusk shells boast unusual combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness currently unmatched by engineering materials. While high mineral contents provide stiffness and hardness, these materials also contain weaker interfaces with intricate architectures, which can channel propagating cracks into toughening configurations. Here we report the implementation of these features into glass, using a laser engraving technique. Three-dimensional arrays of laser-generated microcracks can deflect and guide larger incoming cracks, following the concept of 'stamp holes'. Jigsaw-like interfaces, infiltrated with polyurethane, furthermore channel cracks into interlocking configurations and pullout mechanisms, significantly enhancing energy dissipation and toughness. Compared with standard glass, which has no microstructure and is brittle, our bio-inspired glass displays built-in mechanisms that make it more deformable and 200 times tougher. This bio-inspired approach, based on carefully architectured interfaces, provides a new pathway to toughening glasses, ceramics or other hard and brittle materials.

  3. Software Hang-ups and Glitches: Problems to be Faced and Overcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emard, Jean-Paul

    1983-01-01

    Provides a generalized overview of the problems that software buyers are likely to encounter and could overcome. Experiences of Online, Inc., in purchasing programs, using software documentation or manuals, and problems with software, provide examples. (EJS)

  4. Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND): Implementation of a Software Framework for Facilitated Community Website Creation by Nontechnical Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin Cynthia; Ng, Isaiah; Seid-Karbasi, Puya; Imam, Tuhina; Lee, Cheryl E; Chen, Shirley Yu; Herman, Adam; Sharma, Balraj; Johal, Gurinder; Gu, Bobby; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2013-08-06

    The Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND) provides a structured Internet interface for the sharing of information with individuals struggling with the consequences of rare developmental disorders. Large disease-impacted communities can support fundraising organizations that disseminate Web-based information through elegant websites run by professional staff. Such quality resources for families challenged by rare disorders are infrequently produced and, when available, are often dependent upon the continued efforts of a single individual. The project endeavors to create an intuitive Web-based software system that allows a volunteer with limited technical computer skills to produce a useful rare disease website in a short time period. Such a system should provide access to emerging news and research findings, facilitate community participation, present summary information about the disorder, and allow for transient management by volunteers who are likely to change periodically. The prototype portal was implemented using the WordPress software system with both existing and customized supplementary plug-in software modules. Gamification scoring features were implemented in a module, allowing editors to measure progress. The system was installed on a Linux-based computer server, accessible across the Internet through standard Web browsers. A prototype PFOND system was implemented and tested. The prototype system features a structured organization with distinct partitions for background information, recent publications, and community discussions. The software design allows volunteer editors to create a themed website, implement a limited set of topic pages, and connect the software to dynamic RSS feeds providing information about recent news or advances. The prototype was assessed by a fraction of the disease sites developed (8 out of 27), including Aarskog-Scott syndrome, Aniridia, Adams-Oliver syndrome, Cat Eye syndrome, Kabuki syndrome

  5. Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND): Implementation of a Software Framework for Facilitated Community Website Creation by Nontechnical Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Tuhina; Lee, Cheryl E; Chen, Shirley Yu; Herman, Adam; Sharma, Balraj; Johal, Gurinder; Gu, Bobby

    2013-01-01

    Background The Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND) provides a structured Internet interface for the sharing of information with individuals struggling with the consequences of rare developmental disorders. Large disease-impacted communities can support fundraising organizations that disseminate Web-based information through elegant websites run by professional staff. Such quality resources for families challenged by rare disorders are infrequently produced and, when available, are often dependent upon the continued efforts of a single individual. Objective The project endeavors to create an intuitive Web-based software system that allows a volunteer with limited technical computer skills to produce a useful rare disease website in a short time period. Such a system should provide access to emerging news and research findings, facilitate community participation, present summary information about the disorder, and allow for transient management by volunteers who are likely to change periodically. Methods The prototype portal was implemented using the WordPress software system with both existing and customized supplementary plug-in software modules. Gamification scoring features were implemented in a module, allowing editors to measure progress. The system was installed on a Linux-based computer server, accessible across the Internet through standard Web browsers. Results A prototype PFOND system was implemented and tested. The prototype system features a structured organization with distinct partitions for background information, recent publications, and community discussions. The software design allows volunteer editors to create a themed website, implement a limited set of topic pages, and connect the software to dynamic RSS feeds providing information about recent news or advances. The prototype was assessed by a fraction of the disease sites developed (8 out of 27), including Aarskog-Scott syndrome, Aniridia, Adams-Oliver syndrome

  6. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  7. Children with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Special help given to children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta (brittle bone disease) is described, including adapted equipment to allow for writing and use of a classroom assistant to aid participation in a regular classroom. (CL)

  8. Automatic attenuator upgrade for a Siemens D500 diffractometer via a generic software library to overcome hardware limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, Sina; Randau, Christian; Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    A proxy software was developed which allows the Siemens D500 x-ray diffractometer to be upgraded with add-ons that have never been officially available for it. For demonstration, we designed and integrated an automatic attenuator option and demonstrated the feasibility of our upgrade path by typical comparative x-ray measurements, which would usually saturate the x-ray detector, if no attenuator is used.

  9. [Cosmetology and brittle nails].

    PubMed

    Abimelec, P

    2000-12-15

    The knowledge of manicure techniques and nail cosmetics compositions are a prerequisite to the understanding of their potential side effects. The brittle nail syndrome is a common problem that roughly affect 20% of women. We will review the etiologic hypothesis, describe the various presentations, and suggest a treatment for this perplexing problem.

  10. Brittleness of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of mechanical properties of ceramics are summarized and the causes of their brittleness, especially the limited mobility of dislocations, are discussed. The possibility of improving the fracture toughness of ceramics and the basic research needs relating to technology, structure and mechanical properties of ceramics are stressed in connection with their possible applications in engineering at high temperature.

  11. Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presented are reviews of two computer software packages for Apple II computers; "Organic Spectroscopy," and "Videodisc Display Program" for use with "The Periodic Table Videodisc." A sample spectrograph from "Organic Spectroscopy" is included. (CW)

  12. Brittle diabetes: Psychopathology and personality.

    PubMed

    Pelizza, Lorenzo; Pupo, Simona

    The term "brittle" is used to describe an uncommon subgroup of patients with type I diabetes whose lives are disrupted by severe glycaemic instability with repeated and prolonged hospitalization. Psychosocial problems are the major perceived underlying causes of brittle diabetes. Aim of this study is a systematic psychopathological and personological assessment of patients with brittle diabetes in comparison with subjects without brittle diabetes, using specific parameters of general psychopathology and personality disorders following the multi-axial format of the current DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical manual of Mental Disorders - IV Edition - Text Revised) diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. Patients comprised 42 subjects with brittle diabetes and a case-control group of 42 subjects with stable diabetes, matched for age, gender, years of education, and diabetes duration. General psychopathology and the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders were assessed using the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Structured Clinical Interview for axis II personality Disorders (SCID-II). The comparison for SCL-90-R parameters revealed no differences in all primary symptom dimensions and in the three global distress indices between the two groups. However, patients with brittle diabetes showed higher percentages in borderline, histrionic, and narcissistic personality disorder. In this study, patients with brittle diabetes show no differences in terms of global severity of psychopathological distress and specific symptoms of axis I DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnoses in comparison with subjects without brittle diabetes. Differently, individuals with brittle diabetes are more frequently affected by specific DSM-IV-TR cluster B personality disorders.

  13. A new tablet brittleness index.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-06-01

    Brittleness is one of the important material properties that influences the success or failure of powder compaction. We have discovered that the reciprocal of diametrical elastic strain at fracture is the most suitable tablet brittleness indices (TBIs) for quantifying brittleness of pharmaceutical tablets. The new strain based TBI is supported by both theoretical considerations and a systematic statistical analysis of friability data. It is sufficiently sensitive to changes in both tablet compositions and compaction parameters. For all tested materials, it correctly shows that tablet brittleness increases with increasing tablet porosity for the same powder. In addition, TBI increases with increasing content of a brittle excipient, lactose monohydrate, in the mixtures with a plastic excipient, microcrystalline cellulose. A probability map for achieving less than 1% tablet friability at various combinations of tablet tensile strength and TBI was constructed. Data from marketed tablets validate this probability map and a TBI value of 150 is recommended as the upper limit for pharmaceutical tablets. This TBI can be calculated from the data routinely obtained during tablet diametrical breaking test, which is commonly performed for assessing tablet mechanical strength. Therefore, it is ready for adoption for quantifying tablet brittleness to guide tablet formulation development since it does not require additional experimental work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluid-driven fractures in brittle hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Niall; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a process in which fluid is injected deep underground at high pressures that can overcome the strength of the surrounding matrix. This results in an increase of surface area connected to the well bore and thus allows extraction of natural gas previously trapped in a rock formation. We experimentally study the physical mechanisms of these fluid-driven fractures in low permeability reservoirs where the leak-off of fracturing fluid is considered negligible. This is done through the use of small scale experiments on transparent and brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels. The propagation of these fractures can be split into two distinct regimes depending on whether the dominant energy dissipation mechanism is viscous flow or material toughness. We will analyse crack growth rates, crack thickness and tip shape in both regimes. Moreover, PIV techniques allow us to explore the flow dynamics within the fracture, which is crucial in predicting transport of proppants designed to prevent localisation of cracks.

  15. Dynamic failure in brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-04-01

    Failure of brittle solids within the extremes of the shock loading environment is not well understood. Recent shock-wave data on compression shear failure and tensile spall failure for selected high-strength ceramics are presented and used to examine the mechanisms of dynamic failure. Energy-based theories are used to bound the measured strength properties. A new concept of failure waves in brittle solids is explored in light of the kinetic processes of high-rate fracture. Classical failure criteria are compared with the present base of dynamic strength data on ceramics.

  16. Battling Brittle Bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The accuDEXA(R) Bone Mineral Density Assessment System, manufactured by Schick Technologies, Inc., utilizes "camera on a chip" sensor technology invented and developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Schick's accuDEXA system offers several advantages over traditional osteoporosis tests, which assess bone density loss in the hip and spine, and require specialized personnel to conduct. With accuDEXA, physicians can test the entire body's bone density at a peripheral site, such as the finger, without applying gels or having patients remove garments. Results are achieved in 30 seconds and printed out in less than a minute, compared to the estimated exam time of 15 minutes for hip and spine density analyses. Schick has also applied the CMOS APS technology to a new software product that performs dental radiography using up to 90 percent less radiation exposure than conventional X-rays. Called Computed Dental Radiography(R), the new digital imaging product utilizes an electronic sensor in place of X-ray film to generate sharp and clear images that appear on a computer screen within 3 seconds, and can be enlarged and enhanced to identify problems.

  17. Soft matter: Brittle for breakfast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    Crushing a brittle porous medium such as a box of cereal causes the grains to break up and rearrange themselves. A lattice spring model based on simple physical assumptions gives rise to behaviours that are complex enough to reproduce diverse compaction patterns.

  18. Mechanical alloying of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. M.; McDermott, B.; Koch, C. C.

    1988-12-01

    Mechanical alloying by high energy ball milling has been observed in systems with nominally brittle components. The phases formed by mechanical alloying of brittle components include solid solutions (Si + Ge → SiGe solid solution), intermetallic compounds (Mn + Bi → MnBi), and amorphous alloys (NiZr2 + Ni11Zr9 → amorphous Ni50Zr50). A key feature of possible mechanisms for mechanical alloying of brittle components is the temperature of the powders during milling. Experiments and a computer model of the kinetics of mechanical alloying were carried out in order to esti-mate the temperature effect. Temperature rises in typical powder alloys during milling in a SPEX mill were estimated to be ≤350 K using the kinetic parameters determined from the computer model. The tempering response of fresh martensite in an Fe-1.2 wt pct C alloy during milling was consistent with the maximum results of the computer model, yielding temperatures in the pow-ders of ≤575 K i.e., ΔT ≤ 300 K). Thermal activation was required for mechanical alloying of Si and Ge powder. No alloying occurred when the milling vial was cooled by liquid nitrogen. The pos-sible mechanisms responsible for material transfer during mechanical alloying of brittle components are considered.

  19. Syndromes with congenital brittle bones.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Horacio

    2004-08-31

    There is no clear definition of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The most widely used classification of OI divides the disease in four types, although it has been suggested that there may be at least 12 forms of OI. These forms have been named with numbers, eponyms or descriptive names. Some of these syndromes can actually be considered congenital forms of brittle bones resembling OI (SROI). A review of different syndromes with congenital brittle bones published in the literature is presented. Syndromes are classified in "OI" (those secondary to mutations in the type I pro-collagen genes), and "syndromes resembling OI" (those secondary to mutations other that the type I pro-collagen genes, identified or not). A definition for OI is proposed as a syndrome of congenital brittle bones secondary to mutations in the genes codifying for pro-collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2). A debate about the definition of OI and a possible clinical and prognostic classification are warranted.

  20. Syndromes with congenital brittle bones

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Horacio

    2004-01-01

    Background There is no clear definition of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The most widely used classification of OI divides the disease in four types, although it has been suggested that there may be at least 12 forms of OI. These forms have been named with numbers, eponyms or descriptive names. Some of these syndromes can actually be considered congenital forms of brittle bones resembling OI (SROI). Discussion A review of different syndromes with congenital brittle bones published in the literature is presented. Syndromes are classified in "OI" (those secondary to mutations in the type I pro-collagen genes), and "syndromes resembling OI" (those secondary to mutations other that the type I pro-collagen genes, identified or not). A definition for OI is proposed as a syndrome of congenital brittle bones secondary to mutations in the genes codifying for pro-collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2). Summary A debate about the definition of OI and a possible clinical and prognostic classification are warranted. PMID:15339338

  1. Statistical models of brittle fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.

    2006-06-01

    Recent developments in statistical models for fragmentation of brittle material are reviewed. The generic objective of these models is understanding the origin of the fragment size distributions (FSDs) that result from fracturing brittle material. Brittle fragmentation can be divided into two categories: (1) Instantaneous fragmentation for which breakup generations are not distinguishable and (2) continuous fragmentation for which generations of chronological fragment breakups can be identified. This categorization becomes obvious in mining industry applications where instantaneous fragmentation refers to blasting of rock and continuous fragmentation to the consequent crushing and grinding of the blasted rock fragments. A model of unstable cracks and crack-branch merging contains both of the FSDs usually related to instantaneous fragmentation: the scale invariant FSD with the power exponent (2-1/D) and the double exponential FSD which relates to Poisson process fragmentation. The FSDs commonly related to continuous fragmentation are: the lognormal FSD originating from uncorrelated breakup and the power-law FSD which can be modeled as a cascade of breakups. Various solutions to the generic rate equation of continuous fragmentation are briefly listed. Simulations of crushing experiments reveal that both cascade and uncorrelated fragmentations are possible, but that also a mechanism of maximizing packing density related to Apollonian packing may be relevant for slow compressive crushing.

  2. Evaluation of the brittleness of the rocks using various brittleness indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Dae-Sung; Jung, Yong-Bok; Park, Chan; Park, Eui-Seob

    2015-04-01

    In general, the rock has the feature of drastically reduced bearing capacity during the small strain by the brittle characteristic. Because brittleness is considered as both of inherent property and behavior of materials, various brittleness indices have been proposed and based on these the brittleness degrees of the rock are determined. The brittleness indices are used for evaluating the stability of brittle failure in deep mines or underground excavations, drillability evaluation in the well drilling field, sawability evaluation in the building stone field and others. In recent years there has been utilized as a descriptor of the hydraulic fracturing in shale gas and enhanced geothermal system. In this paper, we estimated the brittleness index of different types of rocks using various brittleness indices proposed by previous researchers and investigated their relationship and applicability. The commonly used brittleness index in Rock Mechanics is the ratio between uniaxial compressive strength and tensile strength. In Reservior Geomechanics, the indices using dynamic elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio calculated from well logging data are generally used. In higher brittleness or brittleness index, the rock shows the following characteristics; low values of elongation of grains, fracture failure, formation of fines and debris, a higher ratio of compressive to tensile strength, higher resilience, higher internal friction angle, formation of cracks in indentation, easy to fracture etc.. The brittleness index showed relatively good relations with rock intrinsic properties such as uniaxial compressive strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness in particular rock types. The correlation among brittleness index using geophysical logging data was shown. However, it was difficult to find a relationship of the brittleness indices between uses in traditional Rock Mechanics and Reservoir Geomechanics. Since some brittleness indices have no special meaning, a careful

  3. Metallurgical control of the ductile-brittle transition in high-strength structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr. |

    1999-08-01

    The models that have been successfully used to control the ductile-brittle transition in high strength structural steels are qualitative in nature, and address the microstructural control of the mechanisms of brittle fracture. The basic idea is incorporated in the Yoffee diagram, which dates from the 1920`s and attributes the ductile-brittle transition to the competition between deformation and fracture; the more difficult brittle fracture becomes, the lower the temperature at which ductile processes dominate. There are two important brittle fracture modes: intergranular separation and transgranular cleavage. The intergranular mode is usually due to chemical contamination, and is addressed by eliminating or gettering the contaminating species. There are also examples of brittle fracture that is due to inherent grain boundary weakness. In this case the failure mode is overcome by adding beneficial species (glue) to the grain boundary. Transgranular cleavage is made more difficult by refining the effective grain size. In high strength steel this is done by refining the prior austenite grain size, by interspersing islands of metastable austenite that transform martensitically under plastic strain, or by disrupting the crystallographic alignment of ferrite grains or martensite laths. The latter mechanism offers intriguing possibilities for future steels with exceptional toughness.

  4. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  5. Brittleness Effect on Rock Fatigue Damage Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati, Hamid Reza; Ghazvinian, Abdolhadi

    2014-09-01

    The damage evolution mechanism of rocks is one of the most important aspects in studying of rock fatigue behavior. Fatigue damage evolution of three rock types (onyx marble, sandstone and soft limestone) with different brittleness were considered in the present study. Intensive experimental tests were conducted on the chosen rock samples and acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used in some of them to monitor the fracturing process. Experimental tests indicated that brittleness strongly influences damage evolution of rocks in the course of static and dynamic loading. AE monitoring revealed that micro-crack density induced by the applied loads during different stages of the failure processes increases as rock brittleness increases. Also, results of fatigue tests on the three rock types indicated that the rock with the most induced micro-cracks during loading cycles has the least fatigue life. Furthermore, the condition of failure surfaces of the studied rocks samples, subjected to dynamic and static loading, were evaluated and it was concluded that the roughness of failure surfaces is influenced by loading types and rock brittleness. Dynamic failure surfaces were rougher than static ones and low brittle rock demonstrate a smoother failure surface compared to high brittle rock.

  6. Fracturing and brittleness index analyses of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Primarini, Mutia; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a fracture network in rocks has a crucial control on the flow behaviour of fluids. In addition, an existing network of fractures , influences the propagation of new fractures during e.g. hydraulic fracturing or during a seismic event. Understanding of the type and characteristics of the fracture network that will be formed during e.g. hydraulic fracturing is thus crucial to better predict the outcome of a hydraulic fracturing job. For this, knowledge of the rock properties is crucial. The brittleness index is often used as a rock property that can be used to predict the fracturing behaviour of a rock for e.g. hydraulic fracturing of shales. Various terminologies of the brittleness index (BI1, BI2 and BI3) exist based on mineralogy, elastic constants and stress-strain behaviour (Jin et al., 2014, Jarvie et al., 2007 and Holt et al., 2011). A maximum brittleness index of 1 predicts very good and efficient fracturing behaviour while a minimum brittleness index of 0 predicts a much more ductile shale behaviour. Here, we have performed systematic petrophysical, acoustic and geomechanical analyses on a set of shale samples from Whitby (UK) and we have determined the three different brittleness indices on each sample by performing all the analyses on each of the samples. We show that each of the three brittleness indices are very different for the same sample and as such it can be concluded that the brittleness index is not a good predictor of the fracturing behaviour of shales. The brittleness index based on the acoustic data (BI1) all lie around values of 0.5, while the brittleness index based on the stress strain data (BI2) give an average brittleness index around 0.75, whereas the mineralogy brittleness index (BI3) predict values below 0.2. This shows that by using different estimates of the brittleness index different decisions can be made for hydraulic fracturing. If we would rely on the mineralogy (BI3), the Whitby mudstone is not a suitable

  7. The anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect of the methanol extract from brittle star.

    PubMed

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Mousavi, Marzieh

    2015-04-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy is a crucial step in cancer treatment. The discovery of new anti-angiogenic compounds from marine organisms has become an attractive concept in anti-cancer therapy. Because little data correlated to the pro- and anti-angiogenic efficacies of Ophiuroidea, which include brittle star, the current study was designed to explore the anti-angiogenic potential of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo. The anti-proliferative effect of brittle star extract on A2780cp cells was examined by MTT assays, and transcriptional expression of VEGF and b-FGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. In an in vivo model, 40 fertilized Ross eggs were divided into control and three experimental groups. The experimental groups were incubated with brittle star extract at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml, and photographed by photo-stereomicroscopy. Ultimately, numbers and lengths of vessels were measured by Image J software. Data were analyzed with SPSS software (p<0.05). Results illustrated that the brittle star extract exerted a dose- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect on A2780cp cancer cells. In addition, VEGF and b-FGF expression decreased with brittle star methanol extract treatment. Macroscopic evaluations revealed significant changes in the second and third experimental group compared to controls (p<0.05). These finding revealed the anti-angiogenic effects of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo confer novel insight into the application of natural marine products in angiogenesis-related pathologies.

  8. The anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effect of the methanol extract from brittle star

    PubMed Central

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Mousavi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-angiogenic therapy is a crucial step in cancer treatment. The discovery of new anti-angiogenic compounds from marine organisms has become an attractive concept in anti-cancer therapy. Because little data correlated to the pro- and anti-angiogenic efficacies of Ophiuroidea, which include brittle star, the current study was designed to explore the anti-angiogenic potential of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The anti-proliferative effect of brittle star extract on A2780cp cells was examined by MTT assays, and transcriptional expression of VEGF and b-FGF was evaluated by RT-PCR. In an in vivo model, 40 fertilized Ross eggs were divided into control and three experimental groups. The experimental groups were incubated with brittle star extract at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml, and photographed by photo-stereomicroscopy. Ultimately, numbers and lengths of vessels were measured by Image J software. Data were analyzed with SPSS software (p<0.05). Results: Results illustrated that the brittle star extract exerted a dose- and time-dependent anti-proliferative effect on A2780cp cancer cells. In addition, VEGF and b-FGF expression decreased with brittle star methanol extract treatment. Macroscopic evaluations revealed significant changes in the second and third experimental group compared to controls (p<0.05). Conclusion: These finding revealed the anti-angiogenic effects of brittle star methanol extract in vitro and in vivo confer novel insight into the application of natural marine products in angiogenesis-related pathologies. PMID:26989740

  9. Brittle cornea, blue sclera, and red hair syndrome (the brittle cornea syndrome).

    PubMed Central

    Ticho, U; Ivry, M; Merin, S

    1980-01-01

    A syndrome of red hair, blue sclera, and brittle cornea with recurrent spontaneous perforations is presented in 2 siblings of a Tunisian Jewish family. The genetic transmission of this disorder is autosomal recessive. This is the second description of this syndrome, which should be called the 'brittle cornea syndrome'. This syndrome has so far been reported only in Tunisian Jewish families. Images PMID:7387950

  10. Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.

  11. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  12. Ductile to brittle transition in dynamic fracture of brittle bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Han, Y. N.; Han, B. S.; Wang, W. H.; Xu, X. H.; Ke, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual transition from a locally ductile to a pure brittle fracture in the dynamic fracture of brittle Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 20}Gd{sub 10} bulk metallic glass. The fractographic evolution from a dimple structure to a periodic corrugation pattern and then to the mirror zone along the crack propagation direction during the dynamic fracture process is discussed within the framework of the meniscus instability of the fracture process zone. This work might provide an important clue in understanding of the energy dissipation mechanism for dynamic crack propagation in brittle glassy materials.

  13. The gradient deformation criterion for brittle fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliev, V. D.; Morozov, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    A new fracture criterion based on the assumption that brittle fracture occurs when the strain gradient reaches its limiting value is formulated. The presence of a strain gradient at the boundary of a body's temperature drop is shown analytically. The results of an experiment with specimens under an abrupt change in temperature are presented.

  14. Precision grinding process development for brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Davis, P J; Piscotty, M A

    1999-04-01

    High performance, brittle materials are the materials of choice for many of today's engineering applications. This paper describes three separate precision grinding processes developed at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory to machine precision ceramic components. Included in the discussion of the precision processes is a variety of grinding wheel dressing, truing and profiling techniques.

  15. Brittle Books Programs. SPEC Kit 152.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill-Oldham, Jan; Walker, Gay

    This document focuses on the evaluation, bibliographic searching, replacement, preservation photocopying, and microfilming of library materials that are too brittle to handle without risking damage. To assess these activities, a SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) survey was sent to members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL),…

  16. Johanna and Tommy: Two Preschoolers in Sweden with Brittle Bones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millde, Kristina; Brodin, Jane

    Information is presented for caregivers of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and their families. Approximately five children with brittle bones are born in Sweden annually. Two main types of brittle bone disease have been identified: congenita and tarda. Typical symptoms include numerous and unexpected fractures, bluish…

  17. Overcoming: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brush, Barbara L.; Kirk, Keri; Gultekin, Laura; Baiardi, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an operational definition of overcoming as a first step in the systematic analysis of the concept. Using the method described by Walker and Avant (2005), the authors identify the attributes and characteristics of overcoming and its theoretical and practical application to nursing. Sample cases from clinical research illustrate the concept further. Further nursing research needs to test the theoretical relationships between overcoming and outcome variables. PMID:21806626

  18. Time-dependent brittle creep in Darley Dale sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2009-07-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle rock deformation is fundamental to understanding the long-term evolution and dynamics of the Earth's crust. The chemical influence of pore water promotes time-dependent deformation through stress corrosion cracking that allows rocks to deform at stresses far below their short-term failure strength. Here, we report results from a study of time-dependent brittle creep in water-saturated samples of Darley Dale sandstone (initial porosity, 13%) under triaxial stress conditions. Results from conventional creep experiments show that axial strain rate is heavily dependent on the applied differential stress. A reduction of only 10% in differential stress results in a decrease in strain rate of more than two orders of magnitude. However, natural sample variability means that multiple experiments must be performed to yield consistent results. Hence we also demonstrate that the use of stress-stepping creep experiments can successfully overcome this issue. We have used the stress-stepping technique to investigate the influence of confining pressure at effective confining pressures of 10, 30, and 50 MPa (while maintaining a constant 20 MPa pore fluid pressure). Our results demonstrate that the stress corrosion process appears to be significantly inhibited at higher effective pressures, with the creep strain rate reduced by multiple orders of magnitude. The influence of doubling the pore fluid pressure, however, while maintaining a constant effective confining pressure, is shown to influence the rate of stress corrosion within the range expected from sample variability. We discuss these results in the context of microstructural analysis, acoustic emission hypocenter locations, and fits to proposed macroscopic creep laws.

  19. Brittle crack propagation in silicon single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, M.; Hsia, K.J.; Argon, A.S. )

    1991-07-15

    Viewing the brittle-to-ductile transition of fracture in intrinsically brittle solids as a crack tip initiated critical event of either nucleation of dislocation loops from the crack tip or the motion away of such dislocations from the crack tip, experiments have been devised to measure the critical activation energy of such events by measuring the arrest temperature of cleavage cracks with different velocities in experiments that were conducted on large Si single crystals subjected to a steep temperature gradient. While such experiments can provide precise information that can be related directly to mechanisms of crack tip bifurcation behavior, they are hampered by nontrivial perturbations that must be controlled. Here in the first of a series of communications we discuss the nature of these perturbations in Si single crystals, cleaving either on the {l brace}111{r brace} or the {l brace}110{r brace} planes.

  20. Fracture in compression of brittle solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The fracture of brittle solids in monotonic compression is reviewed from both the mechanistic and phenomenological points of view. The fundamental theoretical developments based on the extension of pre-existing cracks in general multiaxial stress fields are recognized as explaining extrinsic behavior where a single crack is responsible for the final failure. In contrast, shear faulting in compression is recognized to be the result of an evolutionary localization process involving en echelon action of cracks and is termed intrinsic.

  1. Micromechanics of brittle creep in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-08-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses well below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress (“brittle creep”). Here we provide a micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990), and the crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non linear, and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt rock samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as an inflexion between those two end-member phases. The minimum strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term strain rate as a function of depth in the upper crust due to the action of the applied stresses: in this way, sub-critical cracking reduces the failure stress in a manner equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. We also investigate the competition with pressure solution in porous rocks, and show that the transition from sub

  2. Intermediate Temperature Brittleness in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Cao, Qing Ping; Wang, Xiao Dong; Zhang, Dong Xian; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Narayan, Ramasubramanian Lakshmi; Jiang, Jian-Zhong

    2017-04-01

    All metallic glasses (MGs), irrespective of their compositions, become brittle in the intermediate temperature range of 0.6-0.7 Tg However, most materials are expected to carry higher strains during deformation with increasing temperature. This behavior of MGs is explained by describing the competition between shear banding and diffusive relaxation processes, and is reminiscent of the "intermediate temperature ductility minimum" observed in polycrystalline metals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    SciTech Connect

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  4. Overcoming breastfeeding problems

    MedlinePlus

    Plugged milk ducts; Nipple soreness when breastfeeding; Breastfeeding - overcoming problems; Let-down reflex ... Breastfeeding (nursing) your baby can be a good experience for both the mother and the baby. It ...

  5. Aerogel: Tile Composites Toughen a Brittle Superinsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rasky, Daniel; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Pure aerogels, though familiar in the laboratory for decades as exotic lightweight insulators with unusual physical properties, have had limited industrial applications due to their low strength and high brittleness. Composites formed of aerogels and the ceramic fiber matrices like those used as space shuttle tiles bypass the fragility of pure aerogels and can enhance the performance of space shuttle tiles in their harsh operating environment. Using a layer of aerogel embedded in a tile may open up a wide range of applications where thermal insulation, gas convection control and mechanical strength matter.

  6. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  7. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  8. A case of brittle bone disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, M K; Hossain, M B

    2004-07-01

    Brittle bone disease--synonym, osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare genetic disorder of collagen synthesis associated with broad spectrum of musculoskeletal problem, where bones break easily. Recently we got a case of OI, whose name is Babu, 3 days old, full term bay with uneventful home delivery. The baby had multiple fractures in all the extremities with deformities with blue sclera with bilateral inguinal hernia. Other systems were found normal. On 10th day of life he was operated for inguinal hernia with satisfactory postoperative recovery and subsequently he was referred to the orthopedic department for further management.

  9. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  10. Brittle and semi-brittle behaviours of a carbonate rock: influence of water and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Regnet, J. B.; Dimanov, A.; Guéguen, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, implying differences in porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. In this study, the roles of water as a pore fluid, and of temperature, on the deformation and failure of a micritic limestone (white Tavel limestone, porosity 14.7 per cent) were investigated under triaxial stresses. For each sample, a hydrostatic load was applied up to the desired confining pressure (from 0 up to 85 MPa) at either room temperature or at 70 °C. Two pore fluid conditions were investigated at room temperature: dry and water saturated. The samples were deformed up to failure at a constant strain rate of ˜10-5 s-1. The experiments were coupled with ultrasonic wave velocity surveys to monitor crack densities. The linear trend between the axial crack density and the relative volumetric strain beyond the onset of dilatancy suggests that cracks propagate at constant aspect ratio. The decrease of ultrasonic wave velocities beyond the onset of inelastic compaction in the semi-brittle regime indicates the ongoing interplay of shear-enhanced compaction and crack development. Water has a weakening effect on the onset of dilatancy in the brittle regime, but no measurable influence on the peak strength. Temperature lowers the confining pressure at which the brittle-semi-brittle transition is observed but does not change the stress states at the onset of inelastic compaction and at the post-yield onset of dilatancy.

  11. Phase field approximation of dynamic brittle fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Alexander; Willenbücher, Adrian; Kuhn, Charlotte; Müller, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    Numerical methods that are able to predict the failure of technical structures due to fracture are important in many engineering applications. One of these approaches, the so-called phase field method, represents cracks by means of an additional continuous field variable. This strategy avoids some of the main drawbacks of a sharp interface description of cracks. For example, it is not necessary to track or model crack faces explicitly, which allows a simple algorithmic treatment. The phase field model for brittle fracture presented in Kuhn and Müller (Eng Fract Mech 77(18):3625-3634, 2010) assumes quasi-static loading conditions. However dynamic effects have a great impact on the crack growth in many practical applications. Therefore this investigation presents an extension of the quasi-static phase field model for fracture from Kuhn and Müller (Eng Fract Mech 77(18):3625-3634, 2010) to the dynamic case. First of all Hamilton's principle is applied to derive a coupled set of Euler-Lagrange equations that govern the mechanical behaviour of the body as well as the crack growth. Subsequently the model is implemented in a finite element scheme which allows to solve several test problems numerically. The numerical examples illustrate the capabilities of the developed approach to dynamic fracture in brittle materials.

  12. Brittle Destruction of Carbon Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koza, Y.; Amouroux, S.; Bazylev, B. N.; Berthe, E.; Kuehnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Penkalla, H. J.; Singheiser, L.

    Erosion mechanisms for different carbon based materials (graphite, carbon fiber composites (CFCs), Si-doped CFC) have been studied under brittle destruction under intense transient thermal loads (ELMs, plasma disruptions, VDEs) with respect to material erosion in different particle emission regimes, characterization of emitted particles, and behavior of preheated samples. Furthermore, the experimental data were compared with 3-D numerical simulation on the onset of brittle destruction. From a morphological point of view, the resulting erosion patterns on the test samples and ejected particles differ significantly for the three materials. The isotropic graphite shows a homogeneous erosion profile with flat craters, while the CFC forms no crater and only preferential erosion in localized spots in the PAN fiber area while the pitch fiber strands remain almost undamaged. The particles originating from graphite samples which have been collected on TEM grids are composed of nano sized amorphous carbon. CFCs have been the source for sub Î 1/4 m sized agglomerated fragments of crystalline carbon or silicon particles with âe 1/4 50 nm diameter. Preheating of the test samples to 500 or 800°C results in a remarkable increase of the erosion depth and weight loss compared to the samples loaded at room temperature and identical heat fluxes. In particular, melting phenomena in the Si-doped CFC materials became essential at elevated temperatures.

  13. Brittle superconducting magnets: an equivilent strain model

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Danuso, M.

    2010-08-01

    To exceed fields of 10 T in accelerator magnets, brittle superconductors like A15 Nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Al or ceramic High Temperature Superconductors have to be used. For such brittle superconductors it is not their maximum tensile yield stress that limits their structural resistance as much as strain values that provoke deformations in their delicate lattice, which in turn affect their superconducting properties. Work on the sensitivity of Nb{sub 3}Sn cables to strain has been conducted in a number of stress states, including uniaxial and multi-axial, producing usually different results. This has made the need of a constituent design criterion imperative for magnet builders. In conventional structural problems an equivalent stress model is typically used to verify mechanical soundness. In the superconducting community a simple scalar equivalent strain to be used in place of an equivalent stress would be an extremely useful tool. As is well known in fundamental mechanics, there is not one single way to reduce a multiaxial strain state as represented by a 2nd order tensor to a scalar. The conceptual experiment proposed here will help determine the best scalar representation to use in the identification of an equivalent strain model.

  14. An analysis of ductile brittle fracture transition in layered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1996-12-31

    In this study the failure of the ductile layers in laminated composite systems was studied numerically. The results indicate that similar maximum stress values develop in the ductile layers as in the fracture test of the same ductile material if the crack tip in the brittle layer is already at the interface. For nondebonding interfaces brittle behavior of the ductile layers is dependent upon the extent of the cracks and the fracture characteristic of the brittle layers.

  15. A Geometrically Nonlinear Phase Field Theory of Brittle Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    A Geometrically Nonlinear Phase Field Theory of Brittle Fracture by JD Clayton and J Knap ARL-RP-0511 October 2014...21005-5069 ARL-RP-0511 October 2014 A Geometrically Nonlinear Phase Field Theory of Brittle Fracture JD Clayton and J Knap Weapons and...Nonlinear Phase Field Theory of Brittle Fracture 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) JD Clayton

  16. NONDESTRUCTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE BRITTLE FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF CERAMIC MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CERAMIC MATERIALS , *NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING, BRITTLENESS, DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES, DIFFUSION, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, FRACTURE (MECHANICS), IMPURITIES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, RESONANCE, STRESSES, THERMAL DIFFUSION, THERMAL STRESSES

  17. Overcoming: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Brush, Barbara L; Kirk, Keri; Gultekin, Laura; Baiardi, Janet M

    2011-01-01

    Nurses often work with individuals and populations striving to improve or maintain the quality of their lives. Many, struggling from complex health and social problems, are challenged to surmount barriers to achieve this goal. The growing number of homeless families in the United States represent one such cohort. To develop an operational definition of overcoming and explicate its meaning, attributes, and characteristics as it relates to homeless families. Using the concept analysis method described by Walker and Avant, along with an extensive literature review, and sample cases pertaining to family homelessness, we delineated the defining attributes, antecedents, consequences, and empirical referents of the concept, overcoming. The results of this concept analysis, particularly the relationship of overcoming to family homelessness, provide guidance for further conceptualization and empirical testing, as well as for clinical practice. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  19. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  20. Brittle dynamic damage due to earthquake rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Harsha; Thomas, Marion

    2016-04-01

    The micromechanical damage mechanics formulated by Ashby and Sammis, 1990, and generalized by Deshpande and Evans 2008 has been extended to allow for a more generalized stress state and to incorporate an experimentally motivated new crack growth (damage evolution) law that is valid over a wide range of loading rates. This law is sensitive to both the crack tip stress field and its time derivative. Incorporating this feature produces additional strain-rate sensitivity in the constitutive response. The model is also experimentally verified by predicting the failure strength of Dionysus-Pentelicon marble over wide range of strain rates. We then implement this constitutive response to understand the role of dynamic brittle off-fault damage on earthquake ruptures. We show that off-fault damage plays an important role in asymmetry of rupture propagation and is a source of high-frequency ground motion in the near source region.

  1. Brittle to ductile transition in cleavage fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.; Berg, Q.

    1992-09-30

    The problem of interpretation of fracture transition from brittle to ductile or vice versa is the subject of study. An instrumented tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) has been developed as a definitive tool in the study of the intrinsic mechanism in single crystalline samples. In this experiment, the crack velocity is directly proportional to actuator velocity. In experiments performed on TDCB shaped Si single crystals, oriented for cleavage on either [l brace]111[r brace] or [l brace]110[r brace] planes, a number of troubling features of jerky carck extension were encountered. Evidence suggests that nucleation of dislocation loops from crack tip is easier than moving these dislocations away from crack tip. 14 refs, 1 fig.

  2. Overcoming Faculty Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaff, Jerry G.

    1978-01-01

    Teaching improvement and institutional renewal efforts often face pessimism about change, if not suspicion and resistance, but faculty teams can overcome these problems through an action-oriented but low-profile "organic" approach. The need for personal invitations by colleagues is shown. (Author/LBH)

  3. Overcoming resistance to change.

    PubMed

    McKay, L

    1993-01-01

    The pace of change in health care organizations challenges nursing administrators at all levels of management to be effective change agents. As resistance is an inevitable element in the process of planned change, inclusion of interventions to overcome resistance is critical to the change agent role. The author presents five theoretically-based strategies for reducing the levels of resistance to planned change.

  4. Overcoming the Polyester Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Dorothy

    1988-01-01

    Urges community colleges to overcome their image problem by documenting the colleges' impact on their communities. Suggests ways to determine what data should be collected, how to collect the information, and how it can be used to empower faculty, staff, and alumni to change the institution's image. (DMM)

  5. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the stable wedge test, showing negligible internal deformation and maintaining the initial surface slope upon horizontal translation over a frictional interface. Eight codes participated in the unstable wedge test that examines the evolution of a wedge by thrust formation from a subcritical state to the critical taper geometry. The critical taper is recovered, but the models show two deformation modes characterised by either mainly forward dipping thrusts or a series of thrust pop-ups. We speculate that the two modes are caused by differences in effective basal boundary friction related to different algorithms for modelling boundary friction. The third experiment examines stacking of forward thrusts that are translated upward along a backward thrust. The results of the seven codes that run this experiment show variability in deformation style, number of thrusts, thrust dip angles and surface slope. Overall, our experiments show that numerical models run with different numerical techniques can successfully simulate laboratory brittle thrust wedge models at the cm-scale. In more detail, however, we find that it is challenging to reproduce sandbox-type setups numerically, because of frictional boundary conditions and velocity discontinuities. We recommend that future numerical-analogue comparisons use simple boundary conditions and that the numerical Earth Science community defines a plasticity test to resolve the variability in model shear zones.

  6. Kinetics of the crack-tip-governed brittle to ductile transitions in intrinsically brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Argon, A.S.; Xu, G.; Ortiz, M.

    1997-12-31

    Brittle-to-ductile transitions in the fracture of intrinsically brittle solids manifest themselves in two fundamentally different forms. In the first type of solids exemplified by the BCC transition metals and some alkali halides in which dislocation mobility against the lattice resistance is governed by double kink nucleation, the corresponding fracture transition appears to be controlled by formation of dislocation embryos at crack tips. In the second type of solids exemplified by Si, and possibly all other compounds, dislocation mobility is governed not only by double kink nucleation but by kink mobility as well. In these solids the B-D transitions are known to be controlled by dislocation mobility. Here the authors report first on recent simulations of dislocation embryo formation from Mode I cracks in {alpha} {minus} Fe as generic cases of BCC transition metals, and then on a new model of the mobility controlled transitions, typically in Si. Both models find good experimental confirmation.

  7. Modeling of brittle-viscous flow using discrete particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Barabasch, Jessica; Virgo, Simon; Souche, Alban; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen; Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2017-04-01

    Many geological processes involve both viscous flow and brittle fractures, e.g. boudinage, folding and magmatic intrusions. Numerical modeling of such viscous-brittle materials poses challenges: one has to account for the discrete fracturing, the continuous viscous flow, the coupling between them, and potential pressure dependence of the flow. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is a numerical technique, widely used for studying fracture of geomaterials. However, the implementation of viscous fluid flow in discrete element models is not trivial. In this study, we model quasi-viscous fluid flow behavior using Esys-Particle software (Abe et al., 2004). We build on the methodology of Abe and Urai (2012) where a combination of elastic repulsion and dashpot interactions between the discrete particles is implemented. Several benchmarks are presented to illustrate the material properties. Here, we present extensive, systematic material tests to characterize the rheology of quasi-viscous DEM particle packing. We present two tests: a simple shear test and a channel flow test, both in 2D and 3D. In the simple shear tests, simulations were performed in a box, where the upper wall is moved with a constant velocity in the x-direction, causing shear deformation of the particle assemblage. Here, the boundary conditions are periodic on the sides, with constant forces on the upper and lower walls. In the channel flow tests, a piston pushes a sample through a channel by Poisseuille flow. For both setups, we present the resulting stress-strain relationships over a range of material parameters, confining stress and strain rate. Results show power-law dependence between stress and strain rate, with a non-linear dependence on confining force. The material is strain softening under some conditions (which). Additionally, volumetric strain can be dilatant or compactant, depending on porosity, confining pressure and strain rate. Constitutive relations are implemented in a way that limits the

  8. Modeling failure in brittle porous ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keles, Ozgur

    Brittle porous materials (BPMs) are used for battery, fuel cell, catalyst, membrane, filter, bone graft, and pharmacy applications due to the multi-functionality of their underlying porosity. However, in spite of its technological benefits the effects of porosity on BPM fracture strength and Weibull statistics are not fully understood--limiting a wider use. In this context, classical fracture mechanics was combined with two-dimensional finite element simulations not only to account for pore-pore stress interactions, but also to numerically quantify the relationship between the local pore volume fraction and fracture statistics. Simulations show that even the microstructures with the same porosity level and size of pores differ substantially in fracture strength. The maximum reliability of BPMs was shown to be limited by the underlying pore--pore interactions. Fracture strength of BMPs decreases at a faster rate under biaxial loading than under uniaxial loading. Three different types of deviation from classic Weibull behavior are identified: P-type corresponding to a positive lower tail deviation, N-type corresponding to a negative lower tail deviation, and S-type corresponding to both positive upper and lower tail deviations. Pore-pore interactions result in either P-type or N-type deviation in the limit of low porosity, whereas S-type behavior occurs when clusters of low and high fracture strengths coexist in a fracture data.

  9. Theory of friction based on brittle fracture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of friction is presented that may be more applicable to geologic materials than the classic Bowden and Tabor theory. In the model, surfaces touch at the peaks of asperities and sliding occurs when the asperities fail by brittle fracture. The coefficient of friction, ??, was calculated from the strength of asperities of certain ideal shapes; for cone-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.1 and for wedge-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.15. For actual situations which seem close to the ideal model, observed ?? was found to be very close to 0.1, even for materials such as quartz and calcite with widely differing strengths. If surface forces are present, the theory predicts that ?? should decrease with load and that it should be higher in a vacuum than in air. In the presence of a fluid film between sliding surfaces, ?? should depend on the area of the surfaces in contact. Both effects are observed. The character of wear particles produced during sliding and the way in which ?? depends on normal load, roughness, and environment lend further support to the model of friction presented here. ?? 1967 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  11. Effects of Temperature and Humidity History on Brittleness of α-Sulfonated Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Salt Crystals.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Morigaki, Atsunori; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Tobori, Norio; Aramaki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    α-Sulfonated fatty acid methyl ester salts (MES), which were made from vegetable sources, are attractive candidates for eco-friendly washing detergents because they have various special features like excellent detergency, favorable biodegradability, and high stability against enzymes. To overcome some disadvantages of powder-type detergents like caking, sorting, and dusting, we studied how temperature and humidity history, as a model for long-term storage conditions, can affect crystalline structures and reduce the brittleness of MES powder. We characterized the crystalline structure of MES grains using small-angle X-ray scattering, wide-angle X-ray scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements and determined the yield values, which measure the brittleness of MES grains, in shear stress using dynamic viscoelasticity measurements. This study confirmed that MES crystals form three pseudo-polymorphs via thermal or humidity conditioning: metastable crystals (αsubcell), anhydrous crystals (β subcell), and dihydrate crystals (β' subcell). Further, we found that the yield value increases upon phase transition from the β subcell to the β' subcell and from the β' subcell to the αsubcell. Therefore, controlling the thermal and humidity conditioning of MES grains is an effective way to decrease the brittleness of MES powders and can be used to overcome the above mentioned disadvantages of powder-type detergents in the absence of co-surfactants.

  12. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  13. Ultrasonic Apparatus for Pulverizing Brittle Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Dolgin, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2004-01-01

    The figure depicts an apparatus that pulverizes brittle material by means of a combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibration, hammering, and abrasion. The basic design of the apparatus could be specialized to be a portable version for use by a geologist in collecting powdered rock samples for analysis in the field or in a laboratory. Alternatively, a larger benchtop version could be designed for milling and mixing of precursor powders for such purposes as synthesis of ceramic and other polycrystalline materials or preparing powder samples for x-ray diffraction or x-ray fluorescence measurements to determine crystalline structures and compositions. Among the most attractive characteristics of this apparatus are its light weight and the ability to function without need for a large preload or a large power supply: It has been estimated that a portable version could have a mass <0.5 kg, would consume less than 1 W h of energy in milling a 1-cm3 volume of rock, and could operate at a preload <10 N. The basic design and principle of operation of this apparatus are similar to those of other apparatuses described in a series of prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the two most relevant being Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Deep Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. As before, vibrations are excited by means of a piezoelectric actuator, an ultrasonic horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range. As before, the ultrasonic harmonic motion of the horn drives the free-mass in a combination of ultrasonic harmonic and lower-frequency hammering motion. In this case, the free-mass is confined within a hollow cylinder that serves as a crushing chamber, and the free-mass serves as a crushing or milling tool. The hammering of the free-mass against a material sample at the lower end of the chamber grinds the sample into

  14. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last

  15. Deconvoluting complex structural histories archived in brittle fault zones.

    PubMed

    Viola, G; Scheiber, T; Fredin, O; Zwingmann, H; Margreth, A; Knies, J

    2016-11-16

    Brittle deformation can saturate the Earth's crust with faults and fractures in an apparently chaotic fashion. The details of brittle deformational histories and implications on, for example, seismotectonics and landscape, can thus be difficult to untangle. Fortunately, brittle faults archive subtle details of the stress and physical/chemical conditions at the time of initial strain localization and eventual subsequent slip(s). Hence, reading those archives offers the possibility to deconvolute protracted brittle deformation. Here we report K-Ar isotopic dating of synkinematic/authigenic illite coupled with structural analysis to illustrate an innovative approach to the high-resolution deconvolution of brittle faulting and fluid-driven alteration of a reactivated fault in western Norway. Permian extension preceded coaxial reactivation in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous fluid-related alteration with pervasive clay authigenesis. This approach represents important progress towards time-constrained structural models, where illite characterization and K-Ar analysis are a fundamental tool to date faulting and alteration in crystalline rocks.

  16. Deconvoluting complex structural histories archived in brittle fault zones

    PubMed Central

    Viola, G.; Scheiber, T.; Fredin, O.; Zwingmann, H.; Margreth, A.; Knies, J.

    2016-01-01

    Brittle deformation can saturate the Earth's crust with faults and fractures in an apparently chaotic fashion. The details of brittle deformational histories and implications on, for example, seismotectonics and landscape, can thus be difficult to untangle. Fortunately, brittle faults archive subtle details of the stress and physical/chemical conditions at the time of initial strain localization and eventual subsequent slip(s). Hence, reading those archives offers the possibility to deconvolute protracted brittle deformation. Here we report K-Ar isotopic dating of synkinematic/authigenic illite coupled with structural analysis to illustrate an innovative approach to the high-resolution deconvolution of brittle faulting and fluid-driven alteration of a reactivated fault in western Norway. Permian extension preceded coaxial reactivation in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous fluid-related alteration with pervasive clay authigenesis. This approach represents important progress towards time-constrained structural models, where illite characterization and K-Ar analysis are a fundamental tool to date faulting and alteration in crystalline rocks. PMID:27848957

  17. Deconvoluting complex structural histories archived in brittle fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, G.; Scheiber, T.; Fredin, O.; Zwingmann, H.; Margreth, A.; Knies, J.

    2016-11-01

    Brittle deformation can saturate the Earth's crust with faults and fractures in an apparently chaotic fashion. The details of brittle deformational histories and implications on, for example, seismotectonics and landscape, can thus be difficult to untangle. Fortunately, brittle faults archive subtle details of the stress and physical/chemical conditions at the time of initial strain localization and eventual subsequent slip(s). Hence, reading those archives offers the possibility to deconvolute protracted brittle deformation. Here we report K-Ar isotopic dating of synkinematic/authigenic illite coupled with structural analysis to illustrate an innovative approach to the high-resolution deconvolution of brittle faulting and fluid-driven alteration of a reactivated fault in western Norway. Permian extension preceded coaxial reactivation in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous fluid-related alteration with pervasive clay authigenesis. This approach represents important progress towards time-constrained structural models, where illite characterization and K-Ar analysis are a fundamental tool to date faulting and alteration in crystalline rocks.

  18. Phase-Transformation Ductilization of Brittle High-Entropy Alloys via Metastability Engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Hailong; Wu, Yuan; He, Junyang; ...

    2017-06-07

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) in which interesting physical, chemical, and structural properties are being continuously revealed have recently attracted extensive attention. Body-centered cubic (bcc) HEAs, particularly those based on refractory elements are promising for high-temperature application but generally fail by early cracking with limited plasticity at room temperature, which limits their malleability and widespread uses. In this paper, the “metastability-engineering” strategy is exploited in brittle bcc HEAs via tailoring the stability of the constituent phases, and transformation-induced ductility and work-hardening capability are successfully achieved. Finally, this not only sheds new insights on the development of HEAs with excellent combination of strengthmore » and ductility, but also has great implications on overcoming the long-standing strength–ductility tradeoff of metallic materials in general.« less

  19. Phase-Transformation Ductilization of Brittle High-Entropy Alloys via Metastability Engineering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hailong; Wu, Yuan; He, Junyang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiongjun; An, Ke; Wu, Wei; Lu, Zhaoping

    2017-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) in which interesting physical, chemical, and structural properties are being continuously revealed have recently attracted extensive attention. Body-centered cubic (bcc) HEAs, particularly those based on refractory elements are promising for high-temperature application but generally fail by early cracking with limited plasticity at room temperature, which limits their malleability and widespread uses. Here, the "metastability-engineering" strategy is exploited in brittle bcc HEAs via tailoring the stability of the constituent phases, and transformation-induced ductility and work-hardening capability are successfully achieved. This not only sheds new insights on the development of HEAs with excellent combination of strength and ductility, but also has great implications on overcoming the long-standing strength-ductility tradeoff of metallic materials in general. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fracture Energy-Based Brittleness Index Development and Brittleness Quantification by Pre-peak Strength Parameters in Rock Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Brittleness is a fundamental mechanical rock property critical to many civil engineering works, mining development projects and mineral exploration operations. However, rock brittleness is a concept yet to be investigated as there is not any unique criterion available, widely accepted by rock engineering community able to describe rock brittleness quantitatively. In this study, new brittleness indices were developed based on fracture strain energy quantities obtained from the complete stress-strain characteristics of rocks. In doing so, different rocks having unconfined compressive strength values ranging from 7 to 215 MPa were examined in a series of quasi-static uniaxial compression tests after properly implementing lateral-strain control in a closed-loop system to apply axial load to rock specimen. This testing method was essential to capture post-peak regime of the rocks since a combination of class I-II or class II behaviour featured post-peak stress-strain behaviour. Further analysis on the post-peak strain localisation, stress-strain characteristics and the fracture pattern causing class I-II and class II behaviour were undertaken by analysing the development of field of strains in the rocks via three-dimensional digital image correlation. Analysis of the results demonstrated that pre-peak stress-strain brittleness indices proposed solely based on pre-peak stress-strain behaviour do not show any correlation with any of pre-peak rock mechanical parameters. On the other hand, the proposed brittleness indices based on pre-peak and post-peak stress-strain relations were found to competently describe an unambiguous brittleness scale against rock deformation and strength parameters such as the elastic modulus, the crack damage stress and the peak stress relevant to represent failure process.

  1. Towards a software profession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, Edward V.

    1986-01-01

    An increasing number of programmers have attempted to change their image. They have made it plain that they wish not only to be taken seriously, but they also wish to be regarded as professionals. Many programmers now wish to referred to as software engineers. If programmers wish to be considered professionals in every sense of the word, two obstacles must be overcome: the inability to think of software as a product, and the idea that little or no skill is required to create and handle software throughout its life cycle. The steps to be taken toward professionalization are outlined along with recommendations.

  2. Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature and development of computer software. Programing, programing languages, types of software (including dynamic spreadsheets), and software of the future are among the topics considered. (JN)

  3. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  4. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. On fracture toughness evaluation for semi-brittle fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eftis, J.; Liebowitz, H.

    1975-01-01

    The existing methods of assessing the fracture toughness of materials exhibiting semi-brittle fracture are critically reviewed. The methods concern the Crack Growth Resistance (R-curve), the Crack Opening Displacement (COD), and the J-integral. An analysis of the shortcomings of the methods described makes it possible to formulate a new definition of fracture toughness appropriate to semi-brittle fracture. An improved simple experimental method for measuring fracture toughness for semi-brittle fracture is proposed which takes into account both crack growth and plastic nonlinear effects at crack front. The proposed method is shown to be free of the theoretical and experimental discrepancies encountered in the R-curve, COD, and J-integral methods.

  6. Cuttability Assessment of Selected Rocks Through Different Brittleness Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursun, Arif Emre; Gokay, M. Kemal

    2016-04-01

    Prediction of cuttability is a critical issue for successful execution of tunnel or mining excavation projects. Rock cuttability is also used to determine specific energy, which is defined as the work done by the cutting force to excavate a unit volume of yield. Specific energy is a meaningful inverse measure of cutting efficiency, since it simply states how much energy must be expended to excavate a unit volume of rock. Brittleness is a fundamental rock property and applied in drilling and rock excavation. Brittleness is one of the most crucial rock features for rock excavation. For this reason, determination of relations between cuttability and brittleness will help rock engineers. This study aims to estimate the specific energy from different brittleness values of rocks by means of simple and multiple regression analyses. In this study, rock cutting, rock property, and brittleness index tests were carried out on 24 different rock samples with different strength values, including marble, travertine, and tuff, collected from sites around Konya Province, Turkey. Four previously used brittleness concepts were evaluated in this study, denoted as B 1 (ratio of compressive to tensile strength), B 2 (ratio of the difference between compressive and tensile strength to the sum of compressive and tensile strength), B 3 (area under the stress-strain line in relation to compressive and tensile strength), and B 9 = S 20, the percentage of fines (<11.2 mm) formed in an impact test for the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) model as well as B 9p (B 9 as predicted from uniaxial compressive, Brazilian tensile, and point load strengths of rocks using multiple regression analysis). The results suggest that the proposed simple regression-based prediction models including B 3, B 9, and B 9p outperform the other models including B 1 and B 2 and can be used for more accurate and reliable estimation of specific energy.

  7. Dimensional effects in dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linna, R. P.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2005-07-01

    It has been shown previously that dynamic fragmentation of brittle D -dimensional objects in a D -dimensional space gives rise to a power-law contribution to the fragment-size distribution with a universal scaling exponent 2-1/D . We demonstrate that in fragmentation of two-dimensional brittle objects in three-dimensional space, an additional fragmentation mechanism appears, which causes scale-invariant secondary breaking of existing fragments. Due to this mechanism, the power law in the fragment-size distribution has now a scaling exponent of ˜1.17 .

  8. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; ...

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  9. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Necessary to the development and understanding of brittle fiber reinforced composites is a means to statistically describe fiber strength and strain-to-failure behavior. A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers is presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  10. Finite element model for brittle fracture and fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Delaney, Tristan J.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Lu, Cao

    2016-06-01

    A new computational model for brittle fracture and fragmentation has been developed based on finite element analysis of non-linear elasticity equations. The proposed model propagates the cracks by splitting the mesh nodes alongside the most over-strained edges based on the principal direction of strain tensor. To prevent elements from overlapping and folding under large deformations, robust geometrical constraints using the method of Lagrange multipliers have been incorporated. In conclusion, the model has been applied to 2D simulations of the formation and propagation of cracks in brittle materials, and the fracture and fragmentation of stretched and compressed materials.

  11. How Artists Overcome Creative Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Barbara

    1992-01-01

    Six practicing artists were interviewed about how they overcome creative blocks. Their responses indicated that feelings of self-doubt, fear, and depression accompany blocks but that relaxing and working on new directions and playing ideas off a supportive person helped to overcome such blocks. (DB)

  12. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure.

  13. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  14. Brittle Fracture of 2D MoSe2

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yingchao; Li, Xing; Wen, Minru; ...

    2016-11-03

    An in situ quantitative tensile testing platform is developed in this paper to enable the uniform in-plane loading of a freestanding membrane of 2D materials inside a scanning electron microscope. The in situ tensile testing reveals the brittle fracture of large-area MoSe2 crystals and measures their fracture strength for the first time.

  15. Micromechanics of Brittle Creep Under Triaxial Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water promotes time-dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail (i) at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and (ii) even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we provide a micromechanical model and experimental results describing time-dependent brittle creep of water-saturated granite under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modeled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of microcracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing-crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' law. The macroscopic strain and strain rates are then computed from the change in energy potential due to microcrack growth. They are non-linear, and compare well with complementary experimental results obtained on granite samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain) corresponds to decreasing crack growth rate , due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep with apparently constant strain rate arises as merely an inflexion between the two end-member phases.

  16. A technique for cutting brittle undisturbed lateritic soil block samples.

    PubMed

    Galvão, T Cássia de Brito; Drnevich, Vincent P; Schulze, Darrell G

    2003-05-01

    This note describes a technique for cutting undisturbed brittle block samples into smaller specimens for further geotechnical testing. This technique revealed very useful in dealing with collapsible soils, where the sampling is recommended to be done with block soil samples. A further use of this technique as an efficient way for sampling collapsible soils is proposed.

  17. Mapping the ductile-brittle transition of magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    During volcanic unrest, eruptive activity can switch rapidly from effusive to explosive. Explosive eruptions require the fragmentation of magma, in which, if deformation rate is too fast to be relaxed, magma undergoes a transition in deformation mechanism from viscous and/or ductile to brittle. Our knowledge of the deformation mechanisms of magma ascent and eruption remains, to date, poor. Many studies have constrained the glass transition (Tg) of the interstitial melt phase; yet the effect of crystals and bubbles are unresolved. During ascent, magma undergoes P-T changes which induce crystallization, thereby inducing a transition from viscous to ductile and, in some cases, to brittle deformation. Here, we explore the deformation mechanisms of magma involved in the dome-building eruptions and explosions that occurred at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) since 1998. For this purpose, we investigated the rheology of dome lavas, containing 10-45 vol.% rhyolitic interstitial melt, 55-90 vol.% crystals and 5-20 vol.% bubbles. The interstitial glass is characterized by electron microprobe and Tg is characterized using a differential scanning calorimeter and a dilatometer. The population of crystals (fraction, shape and size distribution) is described optically and quantified using ImageJ and AMOCADO. The rheological effects of crystals on the deformation of magmas are constrained via acoustic emission (AE) and uniaxial deformation experiments at temperature above Tg (900-980 °C) and at varied applied stresses (and strain rates: 10-6 to 10-2 s-1). The ratio of ductile to brittle deformation across the ductile-brittle transition is quantified using the output AE energy and optical and SEM analysis. We find that individual dome lava sample types have different mechanical responses, yielding a significant range of measured strain rates under a given temperature and applied stress. Optical analysis suggests that at low strain rates, ductile deformation is mainly controlled by the

  18. Elastic Rock Heterogeneity Controls Brittle Rock Failure during Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenbruch, C.; Shapiro, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    For interpretation and inversion of microseismic data it is important to understand, which properties of the reservoir rock control the occurrence probability of brittle rock failure and associated seismicity during hydraulic stimulation. This is especially important, when inverting for key properties like permeability and fracture conductivity. Although it became accepted that seismic events are triggered by fluid flow and the resulting perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir rock, the magnitude of stress perturbations, capable of triggering failure in rocks, can be highly variable. The controlling physical mechanism of this variability is still under discussion. We compare the occurrence of microseismic events at the Cotton Valley gas field to elastic rock heterogeneity, obtained from measurements along the treatment wells. The heterogeneity is characterized by scale invariant fluctuations of elastic properties. We observe that the elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation controls the occurrence of brittle failure. In particular, we find that the density of events is increasing with the Brittleness Index (BI) of the rock, which is defined as a combination of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. We evaluate the physical meaning of the BI. By applying geomechanical investigations we characterize the influence of fluctuating elastic properties in rocks on the probability of brittle rock failure. Our analysis is based on the computation of stress fluctuations caused by elastic heterogeneity of rocks. We find that elastic rock heterogeneity causes stress fluctuations of significant magnitude. Moreover, the stress changes necessary to open and reactivate fractures in rocks are strongly related to fluctuations of elastic moduli. Our analysis gives a physical explanation to the observed relation between elastic heterogeneity of the rock formation and the occurrence of brittle failure during hydraulic reservoir stimulations. A crucial factor for understanding

  19. Brittle, flowing structures focused on subtle crustal heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soden, A. M.; Shipton, Z. K.; Lunn, R. J.; Pytharouli, S.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Fundamental to the development of groundwater flow models are geological models that accurately account for the spatial distribution and geometrical attributes of fracture systems in three dimensions, at both seismic and sub-seismic resolution. Accurate characterization of fracture populations in crystalline rock is of particular importance, as these are the principal targets for nuclear waste repositories and enhanced geothermal systems. Fracture models are populated using average properties from site specific outcrop and borehole data, geophysical imaging and empirical scaling relationships such as the decrease of fracture density with distance from a fault surface However, host rock heterogeneity is likely to be of equal importance in influencing fracture attributes. Our study focuses on brittle structures associated with a regional NE-SW ductile shear zone in NE Brazil. Detailed field mapping shows two phases of brittle structure overprinting a ductile shear zone: 1) a brittle fault zone, which is largely "sealed" to flow, 2) a later set of open fractures. The earliest brittle fault is 1.4 - 2.6m wide zone of chaotic breccia bound by two sub-vertical fault walls. Extremely indurated breccias branching from the fault core have an orientation consistent with sinistral motion on the fault. The breccia is composed of centimeter to meter scale clasts in a fine-grained matrix. The host rock is intensely fractured by centimeter-scale fractures up to 60 m away from the fault. Veining is predominantly concentrated within 15 meters of the fault wall, and joints beyond this are unmineralised. The latest brittle deformation is represented by meter-scale open discrete fractures and fracture zones, up to 80 meters from the main fault. The fractures are unmineralised suggesting formation at relatively shallow depths. Fracture zones vary from decimeters long en echelon fractures to intensely fractured zones where the host rock is completely fragmented. This final phase of

  20. Brittleness index and seismic rock physics model for anisotropic tight-oil sandstone reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin-Rui; Huang, Jian-Ping; Li, Zhen-Chun; Yang, Qin-Yong; Sun, Qi-Xing; Cui, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Brittleness analysis becomes important when looking for sweet spots in tight-oil sandstone reservoirs. Hence, appropriate indices are required as accurate brittleness evaluation criteria. We construct a seismic rock physics model for tight-oil sandstone reservoirs with vertical fractures. Because of the complexities in lithology and pore structure and the anisotropic characteristics of tight-oil sandstone reservoirs, the proposed model is based on the solid components, pore connectivity, pore type, and fractures to better describe the sandstone reservoir microstructure. Using the model, we analyze the brittleness sensitivity of the elastic parameters in an anisotropic medium and establish a new brittleness index. We show the applicability of the proposed brittleness index for tight-oil sandstone reservoirs by considering the brittleness sensitivity, the rock physics response characteristics, and cross-plots. Compared with conventional brittleness indexes, the new brittleness index has high brittleness sensitivity and it is the highest in oil-bearing brittle zones with relatively high porosity. The results also suggest that the new brittleness index is much more sensitive to elastic properties variations, and thus can presumably better predict the brittleness characteristics of sweet spots in tight-oil sandstone reservoirs.

  1. Brittle-viscous deformation, slow slip, and tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Hillary, Graeme W. B.; Diener, Johann F. A.

    2014-06-01

    Geophysical observations have illuminated a spectrum of fault slip styles from continuous aseismic sliding to fast earthquake slip. We study exhumed intercalated lenses of oceanic crust and sedimentary rocks, deformed to high shear strains. Deformation was partitioned between fractured, rigid blocks, with lengths of tens to hundreds of meters, and surrounding metapelites characterized by interconnected phyllosilicate networks. Under inferred conditions of low effective stress at temperatures > 500°C, locally and transiently elevated shear strain rate in phyllosilicates deforming by dislocation creep can reach those needed for transient slow slip. Concurrently, increased matrix strain rate likely stimulates brittle failure in rigid lenses. The ubiquitous presence of quartz veins and microfractures within rigid material provides evidence for brittle deformation occurring coincident with viscous shearing flow. We suggest that geophysically observed tremor and slow slip may be a manifestation of strain partitioning, where deformation is accommodated viscously in a matrix enveloping rigid lenses.

  2. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  3. Comparing the Bending Stiffness Measurements of Brittle Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Andrea; McGath, Molly; McGuiggan, Patricia

    It has been estimated that one third of the paper materials in libraries are too brittle to handle. A typical paper sheet is comprised of semi-rigid cellulose fibers that are more than ten times longer than the sheet thickness and can be considered a two dimensional random fiber network. The main pathways of degradation, acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and oxidation, cause depolymerization of the cellulose chains and breaking of the intrafiber bonds. Conventional mechanical measurements of aged paper are destructive and often too severe to understand the true extent of deterioration. By comparing the roll test, folding endurance tests, tensile tests and stiffness tests of naturally aged papers with varying amounts of brittleness, we intend to show the limits of each test and relate the state of the paper degradation to the mechanical test results. We thank the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for funding this research.

  4. Dynamic patterns of compaction in brittle porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, François; Golshan, Pouya; Shen, Luming; Valdes, Julio R.; Einav, Itai

    2015-10-01

    Brittle porous media exhibit a variety of irreversible patterns during densification, including stationary and moving compaction bands in rocks, foams, cereal packs and snow. We have recently found moving compaction bands in cereal packs; similar bands have been detected in snow. However, the question of generality remains: under what conditions can brittle porous media disclose other densification patterns? Here, using a new heuristic lattice spring model undergoing repeated crushing events, we first predict the possible emergence of new types of dynamic compaction; we then discover and confirm these new patterns experimentally in compressed cereal packs. In total, we distinguish three observed compaction patterns: short-lived erratic compaction bands, multiple oscillatory propagating compaction bands reminiscent of critical phenomena near phase transitions, and diffused irreversible densification. The manifestation of these three different patterns is mapped in a phase diagram using two dimensionless groups that represent fabric collapse and external dissipation.

  5. Reliability-based failure analysis of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1989-01-01

    The reliability of brittle materials under a generalized state of stress is analyzed using the Batdorf model. The model is modified to include the reduction in shear due to the effect of the compressive stress on the microscopic crack faces. The combined effect of both surface and volume flaws is included. Due to the nature of fracture of brittle materials under compressive loading, the component is modeled as a series system in order to establish bounds on the probability of failure. A computer program was written to determine the probability of failure employing data from a finite element analysis. The analysis showed that for tensile loading a single crack will be the cause of total failure but under compressive loading a series of microscopic cracks must join together to form a dominant crack.

  6. The Brittle-Ductile Transition - A Self-Consistent Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, B.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Ord, A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth is commonly viewed as a switch between two different constitutive behaviors, plastic and viscous, and is represented in models by various formulations. We show that thermal-mechanical coupling leads to a self consistent view where the BDT emerges naturally within one constitutive framework once a critical temperature is attained. Viscous folding occurs above this temperature and brittle fracturing below. Seismic activity is maximised at the BDT. Orogenesis emerges as a thermal-mechanical decoupling near the BDT during flexing of the lithosphere with the development of "crocodile" -like structures, fold-nappe systems and far-travelled thrust sheets. For quartz- feldspar composite materials this transition lies in a critical range of 500 K to 580 K.

  7. A partial skeletal proteome of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaver, Ryan W.

    The formation of mineralized tissue was critical to the evolution and diversification of metazoans and remains functionally significant in most animal lineages. Of special importance is the protein found occluded within the mineral matrix, which facilitates the process of biomineralization and modulates the final mineral structure. These skeletal matrix proteins have well been described in several species, including the sea urchin Stronglyocentrotus purpuratus, an important model organism. Biomineralization research is limited in other echinoderm classes. This research encompasses the first description of mineral matrix proteins in a member of the echinoderm class Ophiuroidea. This work describes the skeletal matrix proteins of the brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii using bioinformatic and proteomic techniques. General characteristics of matrix protein are described and a number of candidate biomineralization related genes have been identified, cloned, and sequenced. The unique evolutionary and biochemical properties of brittle star skeletal matrix proteins are also described.

  8. Elastic-plastic-brittle transitions and avalanches in disordered media.

    PubMed

    Kale, Sohan; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2014-01-31

    A spring lattice model with the ability to simulate elastic-plastic-brittle transitions in a disordered medium is presented. The model is based on bilinear constitutive law defined at the spring level and power-law-type disorder introduced in the yield and failure limits of the springs. The key parameters of the proposed model effectively control the disorder distribution, significantly affecting the stress-strain response, the damage accumulation process, and the fracture surfaces. The model demonstrates a plastic strain avalanche behavior for perfectly plastic as well as hardening materials with a power-law distribution, in agreement with the experiments and related models. The strength of the model is in its generality and ability to interpolate between elastic-plastic hardening and elastic-brittle transitions.

  9. An electronic criterion for assessing intrinsic brittleness of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. F.; Jones, T. E.; Wu, Y.; Lu, Z. P.; Halas, S.; Durakiewicz, T.; Eberhart, M. E.

    2014-07-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are characterized by a number of remarkable physical and mechanical properties. Unfortunately, these same materials are often intrinsically brittle, which limits their utility. Consequently, considerable effort has been expended searching for correlations between the phenomenologically complex mechanical properties of metallic glasses and more basic properties, such correlations might provide insight into the structure and bonding controlling the deformation properties of BMGs. While conducting such a search, we uncovered a weak correlation between a BMG’s work function and its susceptibility to brittle behavior. We argue that the basis for this correlation is a consequence of a component of the work function – the surface dipole – and a fundamental bond property related to the shape of the charge density at a bond critical point. Together these observations suggest that simple first principle calculations might be useful in the search for tougher BMGs.

  10. An electronic criterion for assessing intrinsic brittleness of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Jones, T E; Wu, Y; Lu, Z P; Halas, S; Durakiewicz, T; Eberhart, M E

    2014-07-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are characterized by a number of remarkable physical and mechanical properties. Unfortunately, these same materials are often intrinsically brittle, which limits their utility. Consequently, considerable effort has been expended searching for correlations between the phenomenologically complex mechanical properties of metallic glasses and more basic properties, such correlations might provide insight into the structure and bonding controlling the deformation properties of BMGs. While conducting such a search, we uncovered a weak correlation between a BMG's work function and its susceptibility to brittle behavior. We argue that the basis for this correlation is a consequence of a component of the work function - the surface dipole - and a fundamental bond property related to the shape of the charge density at a bond critical point. Together these observations suggest that simple first principle calculations might be useful in the search for tougher BMGs.

  11. Curacin E from the Brittle Star Ophiocoma scolopendrina.

    PubMed

    Ueoka, Reiko; Hitora, Yuki; Ito, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Okada, Shigeru; Takada, Kentaro; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-10-28

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract of the brittle star Ophiocoma scolopendrina afforded curacin E (1), a congener of curacin A (2). Curacin A (2) is an antimitotic agent of cyanobacterial origin. The structure of curacin E was studied by interpretation of NMR data and the ECD spectrum. Curacin E has an ethylcarbonyl terminus in its side chain and inhibits the proliferation of P388 cells.

  12. Potential of carnuba wax in ameliorating brittle fracture during tableting.

    PubMed

    Uhumwangho, M U; Okor, R S; Adogah, J T

    2009-01-01

    Carnuba wax (as binder) forms hard tablets even at low compression load attributable to its high plasticity. The aim of the present study is to investigate its potential in ameliorating brittle fracture (i.e., lamination and capping) a problem often encountered during tableting. Granules of paracetamol (test drug) were made by triturating the drug powder with the melted wax or starch mucilage (20%w/v). Resulting granules were separated into different size fractions which were separately compressed into tablets with and without a centre hole (as in- built defect) using different compression loads. The tablets were evaluated for tensile strength and the data used to calculate the brittle fracture index (BFI), using the expression: BFI = 0.5(T/T(0)-1) where T0 and T are the tensile strength of tablets with and without a centre hole respectively. The BFI values were significantly lower (p<0.05) in tablets made with carnuba wax compared with tablets made with maize starch as binders. Increase in particle size of the granules or lowering of the compression load further ameliorated the brittle fracture tendency of the tablets. Using granules with the larger particle size (850microm) and applying the lowest unit of load (6 arbitrary unit on the load scale of the tableting machine) the BFI values were 0.03 (carnuba wax tablets) and 0.11 (maize starch tablets). When the conditions were reversed (i.e., a highest load, 8 units and the smallest particle size, 212microm) the BFI values now became 0.17 (carnuba wax tablets) and 0.26 (maize starch tablets). The indication is that the use of large granules and low compression loads to form tablets can further enhance the potential of carnuba wax in ameliorating brittle fracture tendency of tablets during their manufacture.

  13. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers in presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  14. Brittle Dyskinesia Following STN but not GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Ashok; Foote, Kelly D.; Oyama, Genko; Kwak, Joshua; Zeilman, Pam R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of difficult to manage dyskinesia associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS). A small subset of STN DBS patients experience troublesome dyskinesia despite optimal programming and medication adjustments. This group of patients has been referred to by some practitioners as brittle STN DBS-induced dyskinesia, drawing on comparisons with brittle diabetics experiencing severe blood sugar regulation issues and on a single description by McLellan in 1982. We sought to describe, and also to investigate how often the “brittle” phenomenon occurs in a relatively large DBS practice. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved patient database was reviewed, and all STN and globus pallidus internus (GPi) DBS patients who had surgery at the University of Florida from July 2002 to July 2012 were extracted for analysis. Results There were 179 total STN DBS patients and, of those, four STN DBS (2.2%) cases were identified as having dyskinesia that could not be managed without the induction of an “off state,” or by the precipitation of a severe dyskinesia despite vigorous stimulation and medication adjustments. Of 75 GPi DBS cases reviewed, none (0%) was identified as having brittle dyskinesia. One STN DBS patient was successfully rescued by bilateral GPi DBS. Discussion Understanding the potential risk factors for postoperative troublesome and brittle dyskinesia may have an impact on the initial surgical target selection (STN vs. GPI) in DBS therapy. Rescue GPi DBS therapy may be a viable treatment option, though more cases will be required to verify this observation. PMID:24932426

  15. Rate-dependent deformation of rocks in the brittle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Rate-dependent brittle deformation of rocks, a phenomenon relevant for long-term interseismic phases of deformation, is poorly understood quantitatively. Rate-dependence can arise from chemically-activated, subcritical crack growth, which is known to occur in the presence of aqueous fluids. Here we attempt to establish quantitative links between this small scale process and its macroscopic manifestations. We performed a series of brittle deformation experiments in porous sandstones, in creep (constant stress) and constant strain rate conditions, in order to investigate the relationship between their short- and long-term mechanical behaviors. Elastic wave velocities measurements indicate that the amount of microcracking follows the amount of inelastic strain in a trend which does not depend upon the timescale involved. The comparison of stress-strain curves between constant strain rate and creep tests allows us to define a stress difference between the two, which can be viewed as a difference in energy release rate. We empirically show that the creep strain rates are proportional to an exponential function of this stress difference. We then establish a general method to estimate empirical micromechanical functions relating the applied stresses to mode I stress intensity factors at microcrack tips, and we determine the relationship between creep strain rates and stress intensity factors in our sandstone creep experiments. We finally provide an estimate of the sub-critical crack growth law parameters, and find that they match -within the experimental errors and approximations of the method- the typical values observed in independent single crack tests. Our approach provides a comprehensive and unifying explanation for the origin and the macroscopic manifestation of time-dependent brittle deformation in brittle rocks.

  16. Displacement-length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-11-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement-distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow.

  17. Guidelines for Design and Analysis of Large, Brittle Spacecraft Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1993-01-01

    There were two related parts to this work. The first, conducted at The Aerospace Corporation was to develop and define methods for integrating the statistical theory of brittle strength with conventional finite element stress analysis, and to carry out a limited laboratory test program to illustrate the methods. The second part, separately funded at Aerojet Electronic Systems Division, was to create the finite element postprocessing program for integrating the statistical strength analysis with the structural analysis. The second part was monitored by Capt. Jeff McCann of USAF/SMC, as Special Study No.11, which authorized Aerojet to support Aerospace on this work requested by NASA. This second part is documented in Appendix A. The activity at Aerojet was guided by the Aerospace methods developed in the first part of this work. This joint work of Aerospace and Aerojet stemmed from prior related work for the Defense Support Program (DSP) Program Office, to qualify the DSP sensor main mirror and corrector lens for flight as part of a shuttle payload. These large brittle components of the DSP sensor are provided by Aerojet. This document defines rational methods for addressing the structural integrity and safety of large, brittle, payload components, which have low and variable tensile strength and can suddenly break or shatter. The methods are applicable to the evaluation and validation of such components, which, because of size and configuration restrictions, cannot be validated by direct proof test.

  18. Patterns of brittle deformation under extension on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of fractures at regular length scales is a widespread feature of Venusian tectonics. Models of lithospheric deformation under extension based on non-Newtonian viscous flow and brittle-plastic flow develop localized failure at preferred wavelengths that depend on lithospheric thickness and stratification. The characteristic wavelengths seen in rift zones and tessera can therefore provide constraints on crustal and thermal structure. Analytic solutions were obtained for growth rates in infinitesimal perturbations imposed on a one-dimensional, layered rheology. Brittle layers were approximated by perfectly-plastic, uniform strength, overlying ductile layers exhibiting thermally-activated power-law creep. This study investigates the formation of faults under finite amounts of extension, employing a finite-element approach. Our model incorporates non-linear viscous rheology and a Coulomb failure envelope. An initial perturbation in crustal thickness gives rise to necking instabilities. A small amount of velocity weakening serves to localize deformation into planar regions of high strain rate. Such planes are analogous to normal faults seen in terrestrial rift zones. These 'faults' evolve to low angle under finite extension. Fault spacing, orientation and location, and the depth to the brittle-ductile transition, depend in a complex way on lateral variations in crustal thickness. In general, we find that multiple wavelengths of deformation can arise from the interaction of crustal and mantle lithosphere.

  19. Interpreting finite element results for brittle materials in endodontic restorations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Finite element simulation has been used in last years for analysing the biomechanical performance of post-core restorations in endodontics, but results of these simulations have been interpreted in most of the works using von Mises stress criterion. However, the validity of this failure criterion for brittle materials, which are present in these restorations, is questionable. The objective of the paper is to analyse how finite element results for brittle materials of endodontic restorations should be interpreted to obtain correct conclusions about the possible failure in the restoration. Methods Different failure criteria (Von Mises, Rankine, Coulomb-Mohr, Modified Mohr and Christensen) and material strength data (diametral tensile strength and flexural strength) were considered in the study. Three finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate an endodontic restoration and two typical material tests: diametral tensile test and flexural test. Results Results showed that the Christensen criterion predicts similar results as the Von Mises criterion for ductile components, while it predicts similar results to all other criteria for brittle components. The different criteria predict different failure points for the diametral tensile test, all of them under multi-axial stress states. All criteria except Von Mises predict failure for flexural test at the same point of the specimen, with this point under uniaxial tensile stress. Conclusions From the results it is concluded that the Christensen criterion is recommended for FEM result interpretation in endodontic restorations and that the flexural test is recommended to estimate tensile strength instead of the diametral tensile test. PMID:21635759

  20. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    PubMed Central

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  1. Interpreting finite element results for brittle materials in endodontic restorations.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Antonio; Iserte-Vilar, José L; González-Lluch, Carmen

    2011-06-02

    Finite element simulation has been used in last years for analysing the biomechanical performance of post-core restorations in endodontics, but results of these simulations have been interpreted in most of the works using von Mises stress criterion. However, the validity of this failure criterion for brittle materials, which are present in these restorations, is questionable. The objective of the paper is to analyse how finite element results for brittle materials of endodontic restorations should be interpreted to obtain correct conclusions about the possible failure in the restoration. Different failure criteria (Von Mises, Rankine, Coulomb-Mohr, Modified Mohr and Christensen) and material strength data (diametral tensile strength and flexural strength) were considered in the study. Three finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate an endodontic restoration and two typical material tests: diametral tensile test and flexural test. Results showed that the Christensen criterion predicts similar results as the Von Mises criterion for ductile components, while it predicts similar results to all other criteria for brittle components. The different criteria predict different failure points for the diametral tensile test, all of them under multi-axial stress states. All criteria except Von Mises predict failure for flexural test at the same point of the specimen, with this point under uniaxial tensile stress. From the results it is concluded that the Christensen criterion is recommended for FEM result interpretation in endodontic restorations and that the flexural test is recommended to estimate tensile strength instead of the diametral tensile test.

  2. The effect of shockwave profile shape on dynamic brittle failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Escobedo, J. P.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.

    2012-08-01

    The role of shock wave loading profile is investigated for the failure processes in a brittle material. The dynamic damage response of ductile metals has been demonstrated to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Changing from a square to triangular (Taylor) profile with an identical peak compressive stress has been reported to increase the "spall strength" by over a factor of two and suppress damage mechanisms. The spall strength of tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) based on plate impact square-wave loading has been extensively reported in the literature. Here a triangular wave loading profile is achieved with a composite flyer plate of graded density in contrast to the square-wave loading. Counter to the strong dependence in wave profile in ductile metals, for WHA, both square and triangle wave profiles the failure is by brittle cleavage fracture with additional energy dissipation through crack branching in the more brittle tungsten particles, largely indistinguishable between wave profiles. The time for crack nucleation is negligible compared to the duration of the experiment and the crack propagation rate is limited to the sound speed as defined by the shock velocity.

  3. Low speed fracture instabilities in a brittle crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Noam; Kermode, James R.; Albaret, Tristan; Sherman, Dov; Gumbsch, Peter; Payne, Michael C.; Csányi, G. Ábor; de Vita, Alessandro

    2009-03-01

    Brittle materials under mechanical load fail by nucleation and propagation of cracks, and these cracks show well known instabilities at high crack speeds. In this work we show that new instabilities caused by the atomic structure of the crack tip can occur at low crack speeds as well [1]. Using state of the art computer simulations, we find atomic rearrangements at a silicon crack tip on the (111) cleavage plane that occur preferentially on one side of the crack, but only at low crack speeds. Experiments using a novel technique for applying low tensile loads show that real silicon cracks form distinctive features on one side of the exposed crack surface. A mesoscopic model explains how the microscopic atomic rearrangements lead to the observed macroscopic features. We present extensive results on silicon and preliminary results on other brittle materials including sapphire, diamond, and silicon carbide. We conclude that even very brittle single-crystal materials can have a complex crack tip atomic structure, and that atomic scale rearrangements can lead to macropscopic changes in crack morphology. [1] J. R. Kermode et al., Nature 455, 1224 (2008).

  4. Modeling multiscale evolution of numerous voids in shocked brittle material.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yin; Wang, Wenqiang; He, Hongliang; Lu, Tiecheng

    2014-04-01

    The influence of the evolution of numerous voids on macroscopic properties of materials is a multiscale problem that challenges computational research. A shock-wave compression model for brittle material, which can obtain both microscopic evolution and macroscopic shock properties, was developed using discrete element methods (lattice model). Using a model interaction-parameter-mapping procedure, qualitative features, as well as trends in the calculated shock-wave profiles, are shown to agree with experimental results. The shock wave splits into an elastic wave and a deformation wave in porous brittle materials, indicating significant shock plasticity. Void collapses in the deformation wave were the natural reason for volume shrinkage and deformation. However, media slippage and rotation deformations indicated by complex vortex patterns composed of relative velocity vectors were also confirmed as an important source of shock plasticity. With increasing pressure, the contribution from slippage deformation to the final plastic strain increased. Porosity was found to determine the amplitude of the elastic wave; porosity and shock stress together determine propagation speed of the deformation wave, as well as stress and strain on the final equilibrium state. Thus, shock behaviors of porous brittle material can be systematically designed for specific applications.

  5. Three-dimensional brittle shear fracturing by tensile crack interaction.

    PubMed

    Healy, David; Jones, Richard R; Holdsworth, Robert E

    2006-01-05

    Faults in brittle rock are shear fractures formed through the interaction and coalescence of many tensile microcracks. The geometry of these microcracks and their surrounding elastic stress fields control the orientation of the final shear fracture surfaces. The classic Coulomb-Mohr failure criterion predicts the development of two conjugate (bimodal) shear planes that are inclined at an acute angle to the axis of maximum compressive stress. This criterion, however, is incapable of explaining the three-dimensional polymodal fault patterns that are widely observed in rocks. Here we show that the elastic stress around tensile microcracks in three dimensions promotes a mutual interaction that produces brittle shear planes oriented obliquely to the remote principal stresses, and can therefore account for observed polymodal fault patterns. Our microcrack interaction model is based on the three-dimensional solution of Eshelby, unlike previous models that employed two-dimensional approximations. Our model predicts that shear fractures formed by the coalescence of interacting mode I cracks will be inclined at a maximum of 26 degrees to the axes of remote maximum and intermediate compression. An improved understanding of brittle shear failure in three dimensions has important implications for earthquake seismology and rock-mass stability, as well as fluid migration in fractured rocks.

  6. Transcriptome pyrosequencing of the Antarctic brittle star Ophionotus victoriae.

    PubMed

    Burns, Gavin; Thorndyke, Michael C; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2013-03-01

    Brittle stars are included within a whole range of species, which contribute to knowledge in the medically important area of tissue regeneration. All brittle stars regenerate lose limbs, but the rate at which this occurs is highly variable and species-specific. One of the slowest rates of arm regeneration reported so far is that of the Antarctic Ophionotus victoriae. Additionally, O. victoriae also has an unusual delay in the onset of regeneration of about 5months. Both processes are of interest for the areas of regeneration biology and adaptation to cold environments. One method of understanding the details of regeneration events in brittle stars is to characterise the genes involved. In the largest transcriptome study of any ophiuroid to date, we describe the results of mRNA pyrosequencing from pooled samples of regenerating arms of O. victoriae. The sequencing reads resulted in 18,000 assembled contiguous sequences of which 19% were putatively annotated by blast sequence similarity searching. We focus on the identification of major gene families and pathways with potential relevance to the regenerative processes including the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, Hox genes, the SOX gene family and the TGF beta signalling pathways. These data significantly increase the amount of ophiuroid sequences publicly available and provide candidate transcripts for the further investigation of the unusual regenerative process in this Antarctic ophiuroid.

  7. Rice BRITTLE CULM 5 (BRITTLE NODE) is Involved in Secondary Cell Wall Formation in the Sclerenchyma Tissue of Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Aohara, Tsutomu; Kotake, Toshihisa; Kaneko, Yasuko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Several brittle culm (bc) mutants known in grasses are considered excellent materials to study the process of secondary cell wall formation. The brittle phenotype of the rice bc5 (brittle node) mutant appears exclusively in the developed nodes, which is distinct from other bc mutants (bc1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7) that show the brittle phenotype in culms and leaves. To address the defects of the rice bc5 mutant in node-specific cell wall formation, we analyzed tissue morphology and cell wall composition. The bc5 mutation was found to affect the cell wall deposition of node sclerenchyma tissues at 1 week after heading, the stage at which the cell wall sugar content is reduced, in the bc5 nodes, compared with wild-type nodes. Moreover, decreased accumulation of lignin and thickness of cell walls in the sclerenchyma tissues were also observed in the bc5 nodes. The amounts of cellulose and hemicellulose were reduced to 53 and 65% of those in the wild-type plants, respectively. Sugar composition and glycosidic linkage analyses of the hemicellulose showed that the accumulation of glucuronosyl arabinoxylan in bc5 nodes was perturbed by the mutation. The bc5 locus was narrowed to an approximately 3.1 Mb region of chromosome 2, where none of the other bc genes is located. The bc5 mutation appeared to reduce the expression levels of the OsCesA genes in the nodes after heading. The results indicate that the BC5 gene regulates the development of secondary cell walls of node sclerenchyma tissues. PMID:19812064

  8. Overcoming Exclusion through Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Ian; Walshe, John

    Strategies for overcoming exclusion through adult learning were identified through case studies of 19 initiatives in the following countries: Belgium; Mexico; the Netherlands; Norway; Portugal; and the United Kingdom. The study programs involved a diverse array of formal, nonformal, and informal public sector, community, and enterprise-based…

  9. Slip transfer across fault discontinuities within granitic rock at the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.; Warren, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fault mechanics are strongly influenced by discontinuities in fault geometry and constitutive differences between the brittle and ductile regions of the lithosphere. This project uses field observations, laboratory analysis and numerical modeling to investigate deformational processes within a contractional step at the brittle-ductile transition, and in particular, how slip is transferred between faults via ductile deformation across the step. The Bear Creek field area (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is comprised of late Cretaceous biotite-hornblende granodiorite and experienced a period of faulting at the brittle-ductile transition. Abundant echelon faults in Bear Creek, some of which were seismically active, provide many textbook examples of contractional steps, which are characterized by well-developed ductile fabrics. The occurrence of hydrothermal alteration halos and hydrothermal minerals in fracture fill documents the presence of water, which we suggest played a weakening role in the constitutive behavior of the granodiorite. Furthermore, the mechanism that accomplishes slip transfer in contractional steps appears to be related to water-enhanced ductile deformation. We focus our investigation on Outcrop SG10, which features a 10cm thick aplite dike that is offset 0.45m through a contractional step between two sub-parallel left-lateral faults. Within the step, the aplite undergoes dramatic thinning (stretch ~1/10) and the granodiorite is characterized by a well-developed mylonitic foliation, in which quartz and biotite plastically flow around larger grains of feldspars, hornblende and opaque minerals. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis gives a more quantitative depiction of the active micromechanics and reveals how slip is accommodated at the crystal scale throughout the step. We use Abaqus, a commercial finite element software, to test several constitutive laws that may account for the deformation observed both macro- and microscopically throughout

  10. Mapping the brittle-ductile transition in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Marone, C.; Elsworth, D.; Saffer, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Marcellus shale is the lowest unit of Devonian age in the Hamilton Group. It is an organic-rich shale located in the Appalachian Basin and contains an estimated ~1.4 trillion cubic meters of natural gas. The majority of gas is held in matrix pore space, with vertical fractures providing additional storage and acting as primary flow pathways. However, commercial production of the gas requires the use of directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing to generate additional permeable pathways. Understanding the response of the Marcellus to stresses created by horizontal drilling and more importantly by hydraulic fracturing is critical for wide-scale commercialization of the resource. We investigated the mechanical behavior of shales from the Marcellus formation, with an emphasis on understanding controls on its rheology and brittle-ductile behavior. Although black shale is the dominant lithology of the Marcellus, interbeds of low-density organic-rich shale and limestone are also present. We conducted experiments on three lithologies: 1) true “paper shale” (fissile, finely layered) with density ρ≈2.5 g/cm3 and porosity φ=6.3%, 2) a low density (ρ≈1.45 g/cm3) organic rich shale with porosity φ=39.2% (organic subunit 1), and 3) a lower density (ρ≈1.05 g/cm3) organic rich lithology with porosity φ=50.8% (organic subunit 2). We performed experiments on cylindrical samples 25-mm in diameter and 50-mm in length in a triaxial configuration (σ1≠σ2=σ3). Samples were deformed using both gas and water as pore fluid, using a displacement rate boundary condition (velocity of 0.1 to 10 μm/s corresponding to axial strain rates of 2.07e-4 s-1 to 1.63e-2 s-1), and under confining pressures ranging from 0 to 50 MPa. Additionally, we conducted permeability experiments with water (flow through) and helium gas (pulse) at an effective confining pressure of 10 MPa. Our experiments show brittle behavior for the fissile shale unit, including a peak in differential

  11. Neogene transtensional brittle tectonics in the Lepontine D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanic, C.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J.-D.

    2009-04-01

    The Lepontine Dome is investigated regarding faulting and paleostress, which allows to constrain the late brittle deformation of this gneissic core. Its tectonic evolution under brittle conditions was determined using fault mapping and paleostress inversions. Three brittle phases were reconstructed. The older phase is a NW-SE extension restricted to the eastern parts of the Dome. The second phase (major signal) is an upper Miocene transtension with stable orogen-parallel sigma3 axes (NE-SW), which is found from the Mont-Blanc to the Bergell massifs. The late phase is a N-S extension, expressed north of the Dome, and probably linked to the current collapse of the belt. The stress fields we determine for the Lepontine Dome are very similar to the stress fields determined by Champagnac et al (2006) westward in the South-Valais area, with a major signal in orogen-parallel extension and a minor signal in orogen-perpendicular extension. In the close vicinity of the Simplon fault, Grosjean et al (2004) only reported the orogen-parallel extensional stress field. Eastward, in the Bergell area, Ciancaleoni and Marquer (2008) also found a very regular NE-SW extensional paleostress field, using similar methods. Indeed, the main paleostress field determined in the Lepontine Dome is very homogeneous from a regional viewpoint. It is largely dominated by the NE-SW brittle extension, described in the whole northwestern Alps. The Lepontine Dome also bears witness of two minor extensional signals (N-S and WNW-ESE directions of extension). The absolute dating of this orogen-parallel extensional phase is based on the occurrence of pseudotachylytes locally injected in the related fault system. Pseudotachylyte development is directly linked to frictional heating due to earthquake and faulting. The Ar/Ar dating of three pseudotachylytes samples of the Lepontine Dome provided ages in the range of 9-11 Ma ±1 (Allanic, et al., 2006). Thus, one can attribute a global 10 Ma age for the orogen

  12. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  13. On the brittle nature of rare earth pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Shriya, S.; Sapkale, R.; Varshney, Dinesh E-mail: sapkale.raju@rediffmail.com; Singh, N.; Varshney, M.

    2016-05-23

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and pressure as well temperature induced elastic properties in ReY; (Re = La, Sc, Pr; Y = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) pnictides have been performed using effective interionic interaction potential with emphasis on charge transfer interactions and covalent contribution. Estimated values of phase transition pressure and the volume discontinuity in pressure-volume phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from NaCl to CsCl structure. From the investigations of elastic constants the pressure (temperature) dependent volume collapse/expansion, second order Cauchy discrepancy, anisotropy, hardness and brittle/ductile nature of rare earth pnictides are computed.

  14. Microcrack toughening in brittle materials containing weak and strong interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sigl, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    Microcracking in brittle materials combining weak and strong interfaces is analyzed. A model for the width of the process zone and the associated toughening in terms of interface toughness, elastic moduli, thermal expansion coefficients and microstructural geometry is presented. Considerable zone widths and toughening are predicted in composites with low interface toughness, high residual stresses and high volume fraction of microcracks. The model is verified using toughness data obtained from B{sub 4}C-TiB{sub 2} composites where elemental carbon segregated to B{sub 4}C-TiB{sub 2} phase boundaries supplies weak interfaces.

  15. The challenges of numerically simulating analogue brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne; Ellis, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges form when sedimentary and crustal rocks are compressed into thrusts and folds in the foreland of an orogen or at a subduction trench. For over a century, analogue models have been used to investigate the deformation characteristics of such brittle wedges. These models predict wedge shapes that agree with analytical critical taper theory and internal deformation structures that well resemble natural observations. In a series of comparison experiments for thrust wedges, called the GeoMod2004 (1,2) and GeoMod2008 (3,4) experiments, it was shown that different numerical solution methods successfully reproduce sandbox thrust wedges. However, the GeoMod2008 benchmark also pointed to the difficulties of representing frictional boundary conditions and sharp velocity discontinuities with continuum numerical methods, in addition to the well-known challenges of numerical plasticity. Here we show how details in the numerical implementation of boundary conditions can substantially impact numerical wedge deformation. We consider experiment 1 of the GeoMod2008 brittle thrust wedge benchmarks. This experiment examines a triangular thrust wedge in the stable field of critical taper theory that should remain stable, that is, without internal deformation, when sliding over a basal frictional surface. The thrust wedge is translated by lateral displacement of a rigid mobile wall. The corner between the mobile wall and the subsurface is a velocity discontinuity. Using our finite-element code SULEC, we show how different approaches to implementing boundary friction (boundary layer or contact elements) and the velocity discontinuity (various smoothing schemes) can cause the wedge to indeed translate in a stable manner or to undergo internal deformation (which is a fail). We recommend that numerical studies of sandbox setups not only report the details of their implementation of boundary conditions, but also document the modelling attempts that

  16. What controls the strength and brittleness of shale rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, Erik; Reinicke, Andreas; Meier, Tobias; Makasi, Masline; Dresen, Georg

    2014-05-01

    With respect to the productivity of gas shales, in petroleum science the mechanical behavior of shales is often classified into rock types of high and low 'brittleness', sometimes also referred to as 'fraccability'. The term brittleness is not well defined and different definitions exist, associated with elastic properties (Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus), with strength parameters (compressive and tensile strength), frictional properties (cohesion, friction coefficient), hardness (indentation), or with the strain or energy budget (ratio of reversible to the total strain or energy, respectively). Shales containing a high amount of clay and organic matter are usually considered as less brittle. Similarly, the strength of shales is usually assumed to be low if they contain a high fraction of weak phases. We performed mechanical tests on a series of shales with different mineralogical compositions, varying porosity, and low to high maturity. Using cylindrical samples, we determined the uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength, static Young's modulus, the tensile strength, and Mode I fracture toughness. The results show that in general the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) linearly increases with increasing Young's modulus (E) and both parameters increase with decreasing porosity. However, the strength and elastic modulus is not uniquely correlated with the mineral content. For shales with a relatively low quartz and high carbonate content, UCS and E increase with increasing quartz content, whereas for shales with a relatively low amount for carbonates, but high quartz content, both parameters increase with decreasing fraction of the weak phases (clays, kerogen). In contrast, the average tensile strength of all shale-types appears to increase with increasing quartz fraction. The internal friction coefficient of all investigated shales decreases with increasing pressure and may approach rather high values (up to ≡ 1). Therefore, the mechanical strength and

  17. Nonlocal effects on dynamic damage accumulation in brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a nonlocal analysis of the dynamic damage accumulation processes in brittle solids. A nonlocal formulation of a microcrack based continuum damage model is developed and implemented into a transient dynamic finite element computer code. The code is then applied to the study of the damage accumulation process in a concrete plate with a central hole and subjected to the action of a step tensile pulse applied at opposite edges of the plate. Several finite element discretizations are used to examine the mesh size effect. Comparisons between calculated results based on local and nonlocal formulations are made and nonlocal effects are discussed.

  18. Software Program: Software Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Software Management Guidebook is twofold. First, this document defines the core products and activities required of NASA software projects. It defines life-cycle models and activity-related methods but acknowledges that no single life-cycle model is appropriate for all NASA software projects. It also acknowledges that the appropriate method for accomplishing a required activity depends on characteristics of the software project. Second, this guidebook provides specific guidance to software project managers and team leaders in selecting appropriate life cycles and methods to develop a tailored plan for a software engineering project.

  19. Proprietary software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marnock, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The protection of intellectual property by a patent, a copyright, or trade secrets is reviewed. The present and future use of computers and software are discussed, along with the governmental uses of software. The popularity of contractual agreements for sale or lease of computer programs and software services is also summarized.

  20. Micromorphic homogenization of a porous medium: elastic behavior and quasi-brittle damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütter, Geralf; Mühlich, Uwe; Kuna, Meinhard

    2015-11-01

    Today it is well known that the classical Cauchy continuum theory is insufficient to describe the deformation behavior of solids if gradients occur over distances which are comparable to the microstructure of the material. This becomes crucial e.g., for small specimens or during localization of deformation induced by material degradation (damage). Higher-order continuum approaches like micromorphic theories are established to address such problems. However, such theories require the formulation of respective constitutive laws, which account for the microstructural interactions. Especially in damage mechanics such laws are mostly formulated in a purely heuristic way, which leads to physical and numerical problems. In the present contribution, the fully micromorphic constitutive law for a porous medium is obtained in closed form by homogenization based on the minimal boundary conditions concept. It is shown that this model describes size effects of porous media like foams adequately. The model is extended toward quasi-brittle damage overcoming the physical and numerical limitations of purely heuristic approaches.

  1. Estimation Criteria for Rock Brittleness Based on Energy Analysis During the Rupturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Chi; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yu-wei; Zeng, Jia; Yang, Xin-liang; Wang, Ji-gang

    2016-12-01

    Brittleness is one of the most important mechanical properties of rock: it plays a significant role in evaluating the risk of rock bursts and in analysis of borehole-wall stability during shale gas development. Brittleness is also a critical parameter in the design of hydraulic fracturing. However, there is still no widely accepted definition of the concept of brittleness in rock mechanics. Although many criteria have been proposed to characterize rock brittleness, their applicability and reliability have yet to be verified. In this paper, the brittleness of rock under compression is defined as the ability of a rock to accumulate elastic energy during the pre-peak stage and to self-sustain fracture propagation in the post-peak stage. This ability is related to three types of energy: fracture energy, post-peak released energy and pre-peak dissipation energy. New brittleness evaluation indices B 1 and B 2 are proposed based on the stress-strain curve from the viewpoint of energy. The new indices can describe the entire transition of rock from absolute plasticity to absolute brittleness. In addition, the brittle characteristics reflected by other brittleness indices can be described, and the calculation results of B 1 and B 2 are continuous and monotonic. Triaxial compression tests on different types of rock were carried out under different confining pressures. Based on B 1 and B 2, the brittleness of different rocks shows different trends with rising confining pressure. The brittleness of red sandstone decreases with increasing confining pressure, whereas for black shale it initially increases and then decreases in a certain range of confining pressure. Granite displays a constant increasing trend. The brittleness anisotropy of black shale is discussed. The smaller the angle between the loading direction and the bedding plane, the greater the brittleness. The calculation B 1 and B 2 requires experimental data, and the values of these two indices represent only

  2. Challenges in the Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) for EGS development beyond the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Muraoka, H.; Tsuchiya, N.; Ito, H.

    2013-12-01

    Development using Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) technologies is considered to be the best solution to the problems of the localized distribution of geothermal resources. However, it is considered that a number of problems, including low water recovery rate, difficulty in design of the reservoir, and induced earthquake, would appear in Japanese EGS. These problems in the development of EGS reservoirs cannot be readily solved in Japan because they are intrinsically related to the physical characteristics and tectonic setting of the brittle rock mass. Therefore, we have initiated the Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP), which will take a multidisciplinary scientific approach, including geology, geochemistry, geophysics, water-rock interactions, rock mechanics, seismology, drilling technology, well-logging technology, and reservoir engineering. The science and technology required for the creation and control of geothermal reservoirs in superheated rocks in the ductile zone is at the frontier of modern research in most of the related disciplines. Solutions to the associated problems will not easily be found without international collaboration among researchers and engineers. For this reason, in March, 2013 we held a five-day ICDP-supported workshop in Japan to review and discuss various scientific and technological issues related to the JBBP. Throughout the discussions at the workshop on characteristics of the beyond-brittle rock mass and creation and control of EGS reservoirs in the ductile zone, it has concluded that there are two end-member reservoir models that should be considered (Fig. 1). The JBBP reservoir type-1 would be created near the top of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) and connected to pre-existing hydrothermal systems, which would increase productivity and provide sustainability. The JBBP reservoir type-2 would be hydraulically or thermally created beyond the BDT, where pre-existing fractures are less permeable, and would be hydraulically

  3. The maize brittle 1 gene encodes amyloplast membrane polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T D; Kaneko, Y

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein, formed of 56 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the maize (Zea mays L.) wild-type Brittle1 (Bt1) protein fused to the glutathione-S-transferase gene, was synthesized in Escherichia coli, and used to raise antibodies. Following affinity purification, the antibodies recognized a set of 38- to 42-kDa proteins in endosperm from wild-type Bt1 plants, as well as from brittle2, shrunken2 and sugary1 plants, but not in mutant bt1 endosperm. Bt1 proteins were not detected with the preimmune antibodies. A low level of Bt1-specific proteins was detected at 10 d after pollination (DAP) and increased to a plateau at 16 DAP. At the same time, the ratio of slow- to fast-migrating forms of the protein decreased. During endosperm fractionation by differential centrifugation and membrane sedimentation in sucrose gradients, the Bt1 proteins co-purified with the carotenoid-containing plastid membranes. They were localized to amyloplasts by electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry; most of the signal was detected at the plastid periphery. These results are consistent with predictions made from the deduced amino-acid sequence and previous in-vitro experiments that the bt1 locus encodes amyloplast membrane proteins.

  4. Self-repair of cracks in brittle material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most effective uses for self repair is in material systems that crack because the cracks can allow the repair chemical to flow into the crack damage sites in all three dimensions. In order for the repair chemical to stay in the damage site and flow along to all the crack and repair there must be enough chemical to fill the entire crack. The repair chemical must be designed appropriately for the particular crack size and total volume of cracks. In each of the three examples of self repair in crackable brittle systems, the viscosity and chemical makeup and volume of the repair chemicals used is different for each system. Further the chemical delivery system has to be designed for each application also. Test results from self repair of three brittle systems are discussed. In "Self Repair of Concrete Bridges and Infrastructure" two chemicals were used due to different placements in bridges to repair different types of cracks- surface shrinkage and shear cracks, In "Airplane Wings and Fuselage, in Graphite" the composite has very different properties than the concrete bridges. In the graphite for airplane components the chemical also had to survive the high processing temperatures. In this composite the cracks were so definite and deep and thin that the repair chemical could flow easily and repair in all layers of the composite. In "Ceramic/Composite Demonstrating Self Repair" the self repair system not only repaired the broken ceramic but also rebounded the composite to the ceramic layer

  5. Meso-scopic Densification in Brittle Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, William; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Collins, Gareth

    2013-06-01

    Particulate materials are ideally suited to shock absorbing applications due to the large amounts of energy required to deform their inherently complex meso-structure. Significant effort is being made to improve macro-scale material models to represent these atypical materials. On the long road towards achieving this capability, an important milestone would be to understand how particle densification mechanisms are affected by loading rate. In brittle particulate materials, the majority of densification is caused by particle fracture. Macro-scale quasi-static and dynamic compaction curves have been measured that show good qualitative agreement. There are, however, some differences that appear to be dependent on the loading rate that require further investigation. This study aims to investigate the difference in grain-fracture behavior between the quasi-static and shock loading response of brittle glass microsphere beds using a combination of quasi-static and dynamic loading techniques. Results from pressure-density measurements, sample recovery, and meso-scale hydrocode models (iSALE, an in-house simulation package) are discussed to explain the differences in particle densification mechanisms between the two loading rate regimes. Gratefully funded by AWE.plc.

  6. Mechanics and seismic signature of brittle deformation of serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Emmanuel C.; Brantut, Nicolas; Hansen, Lars N.; Mitchell, Thomas M.

    2017-04-01

    It is well recognised that serpentinites play a major role in subduction zone processes, such as tectonic evolution of the oceanic lithosphere, earthquake nucleation, or recycling of water in the upper mantle. However, it is not yet clearly known how and by which micromechanical process serpentinites deform, and what is their signature on seismic properties. Deformation experiments were conducted on 90%-rich antigorite polycrystalline serpentinite in the brittle field, under varying conditions of confining pressure, with simultaneous measurements of axial and radial strains, and P and S-wave velocities at various directions with respect to the applied stress. Failure, controlled-failure, and cyclic-loading tests were performed to investigate the strength, dissipation of mechanical energy, seismic signature and resulting microstructures of a suite of antigorite specimens. The brittle deformation of antigorite is mostly non-dilatant and accommodated by shear microcracks localised over a very narrow zone near the failure plane - as confirmed by microstructural observations. Antigorite serpentinites display a failure strength as high as for crystalline rocks, and a yield point occurring close to failure. Another untypical feature observed during deformation of the antigorite specimens is the spectacular absence of any wave velocity evolution, and any stress-induced anisotropy, during axial compression. Such results may have strong implications for the understanding of subduction zone dynamics, which remain to be complemented by mechanical tests conducted in the ductile regime.

  7. A generalized law for brittle deformation of Westerly granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A semiempirical constitutive law is presented for the brittle deformation of intact Westerly granite. The law can be extended to larger displacements, dominated by localized deformation, by including a displacement-weakening break-down region terminating in a frictional sliding regime often described by a rate- and state-dependent constitutive law. The intact deformation law, based on an Arrhenius type rate equation, relates inelastic strain rate to confining pressure Pc, differential stress ????, inelastic strain ??i, and temperature T. The basic form of the law for deformation prior to fault nucleation is In ????i = c - (E*/RT) + (????/a??o)sin-??(???? i/2??o) where ??o and ??o are normalization constants (dependent on confining pressure), a is rate sensitivity of stress, and ?? is a shape parameter. At room temperature, eight experimentally determined coefficients are needed to fully describe the stress-strain-strain rate response for Westerly granite from initial loading to failure. Temperature dependence requires apparent activation energy (E* ??? 90 kJ/mol) and one additional experimentally determined coefficient. The similarity between the prefailure constitutive law for intact rock and the rate- and state-dependent friction laws for frictional sliding on fracture surfaces suggests a close connection between these brittle phenomena.

  8. Cyclic fatigue of intrinsically brittle ceramics in contact with spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.K.; Jung, Y.G.; Peterson, I.M.; Lawn, B.R.

    1999-12-10

    Contact damage modes in cyclic loading with spheres are investigated in three nominally brittle ceramics, soda-lime glass, porcelain and fine-grain silicon nitride, in moist environments. Initial damage at small numbers of cycles and low loads consists of tensile-driven macroscopic cone cracks (brittle mode). Secondary damage at large numbers of cycles and high loads consists of shear-driven distributed microdamage (quasi-plastic mode), with attendant radial cracks and a new form of deeply penetrating subsidiary cone cracks. Strength tests on indented specimens are used to quantify the degree of damage. Both damage modes degrade the strength: the first, immediately after cone crack initiation, relatively slowly; the second, after development of radial cracks, much more rapidly. A fracture mechanics model describing the first mode, based on time-integration of slow growth of cone cracks, is presented. This model provides simple power-law relations for the remaining strength in terms of number of cycles and contact load for materials design. Extrapolations of these relations into the quasi-plastic region are shown to be non-conservative, highlighting the need for further understanding of the deleterious quasi-plastic mode in tougher ceramics. Comparison with static contact data indicates a strong mechanical (as opposed to chemical) component in the cyclic fatigue in the quasi-plastic region.

  9. How plasticizer makes a ductile polymer glass brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Li, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Shi-Qing

    During uniaxial extension, a polymer glass of high molecular weight is ductile at high temperatures (still below Tg) and turns brittle when the temperature is sufficiently lowered. Incorporation of small-molecular additives to polymer glasses can speed up segmental relaxation considerably. The effect of such plasticization should be to make the polymers more ductile. We examined the effect of blending a few weight percent of either triphenyl phosphate (TPP) or a mineral oil to a commercial-grade PS and PMMA. Our Instron tests show that the plasticized PS is less ductile. Specifically, at 70 oC, the original PS is ductile at an extensional rate of 0.02 s-1 whereas the PS with 4 wt. % TPP turns brittle. Mechanical spectroscopic measurements show that the alpha relaxation time is shortened by more than two orders of magnitude with 4 wt. % TPP. On the other hand, such anomalous behavior did not occur in PMMA. We need to go beyond the conventional description to rationalize these results This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859).

  10. Computer software.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, L E

    1986-10-01

    Software is the component in a computer system that permits the hardware to perform the various functions that a computer system is capable of doing. The history of software and its development can be traced to the early nineteenth century. All computer systems are designed to utilize the "stored program concept" as first developed by Charles Babbage in the 1850s. The concept was lost until the mid-1940s, when modern computers made their appearance. Today, because of the complex and myriad tasks that a computer system can perform, there has been a differentiation of types of software. There is software designed to perform specific business applications. There is software that controls the overall operation of a computer system. And there is software that is designed to carry out specialized tasks. Regardless of types, software is the most critical component of any computer system. Without it, all one has is a collection of circuits, transistors, and silicone chips.

  11. Dating brittle deformation in the Archean Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thebaud, N.; Zwingmann, H.

    2012-12-01

    Major deformation throughout the Archean Yilgarn Craton has mostly been interpreted to be Neoarchean (Blewett and Czarnota, 2007). The timing of the deformation events of the brittle/ductile deformation generally relies on dating of cross-cutting intrusions or unconformities. Proterozoic overprinting and reactivation of Archean structures in the north-western part of the Yilgarn Craton has previously been dated from direct dating of the structures and fabrics from the Narryer Terrane(Spaggiari et al., 2008). However, the brittle deformation that postdates Neoarchean brittle-ductile structures in the Yilgarn Craton have received little attention to date. In the centre of the Yilgarn Craton, the Eastern Goldfields present a well developed network of E-W trending of normal brittle faults and fractures. Typically these structures are interpreted to have developed in result of a late Neoarchean tectonic relaxation following the main Yilgarn wide E-W contraction (Blewett and Czarnota, 2007). Poorly preserved and weathered faulted rocks in the subsurface environment preclude direct dating of fault gouge. However, exposure from the underground Agnew mine, in the Agnew Wiluna greenstone belt, recently provided access to fresh fault gouge material suitable for analysis. The clay gouge was characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD methods prior to age dating indicating an authigenic origin (Zwingmann et al., 2010). K-Ar illite age data of a whole rock sample split yielded an age of 1148 ± 23 Ma, which is within error close to the <2 micron clay fraction yielding an age of 1094 ± 22 Ma (Mesoproterozoic-Stenian). Our result is the first documentation of the age of the brittle deformation that affects the Yilgarn Craton. This age is within error of the Gilles event which is an extension event that affected the whole Australian continent and is responsible for the emplacement of the Warakurna Large Igneous Province and related dolerite dykes in the Yilgarn Craton (Evins et al., 2010

  12. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  13. Micromechanisms of intergranular brittle ftacture in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitek, V.

    1991-06-01

    Grain boundaries in intermetallic compounds such as Ni3A1 are inherently brittle. The reason is usually sought in grain boundary cohesion but in metals even brittle fracture is accompanied by some local plasticity and thus not only cohesion but also dislocation mobility in the boundary region need to be studied. We first discuss here the role of an irreversible shear deformation at the crack tip during microcrack propagation assuming that these two processes are concomitant. It is shown that a pre-existing crack cannot propagate in a brittle manner once the dislocation emission occurs. However, if a microcrack nucleates during loading it can propagate concurrently with the development of the irreversible shear deformation at the crack tip. The latter is then the major energy dissipating process. In the second part of this paper we present results of atomistic studies of grain boundaries in Ni3A1 and CU3Au which suggest that substantial structural differences exist between strongly and weakly ordered L12 alloys. We discuss then the consequence of these differences for intergranular brittleness in the framework of the above model for microcrack propagation. On this basis we propose an explanation for the intrinsic intergranular brittleness in some L12 alloys and relate it directly to the strength of ordering. Les joints de grains dans les composés intermétalliques de type Ni3AI sont de nature fragile. L'origine de cette fragilité est habituellement dans la cohésion des joints de grains. Dans les métaux, cependant, même la rupture fragile est accompagnée d'une certaine déformation plastique locale, de telle sorte que non seulement la cohésion mais aussi la mobilité des dislocations près des joints doit être étudiée. Nous discutons d'abord le rôle d'une déformation en cisaillement irréversible en tête de fissure pendant la propagation de cette fissure, en supposant que les deux processus sont concomitants. Nous montrons qu'une fissure préexistante ne

  14. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Coates, C.W.; Wilson, T.J.

    1982-05-19

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composite are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  15. Research progress on ultra-precision machining technologies for soft-brittle crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hang; Wang, Xu; Guo, Dongming; Chen, Yuchuan

    2017-03-01

    Soft-brittle crystal materials are widely used in many fields, especially optics and microelectronics. However, these materials are difficult to machine through traditional machining methods because of their brittle, soft, and anisotropic nature. In this article, the characteristics and machining difficulties of soft-brittle and crystals are presented. Moreover, the latest research progress of novel machining technologies and their applications for softbrittle crystals are introduced by using some representative materials (e.g., potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)) as examples. This article reviews the research progress of soft-brittle crystals processing.

  16. Research progress on ultra-precision machining technologies for soft-brittle crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hang; Wang, Xu; Guo, Dongming; Chen, Yuchuan

    2016-12-01

    Soft-brittle crystal materials are widely used in many fields, especially optics and microelectronics. However, these materials are difficult to machine through traditional machining methods because of their brittle, soft, and anisotropic nature. In this article, the characteristics and machining difficulties of soft-brittle and crystals are presented. Moreover, the latest research progress of novel machining technologies and their applications for softbrittle crystals are introduced by using some representative materials (e.g., potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)) as examples. This article reviews the research progress of soft-brittle crystals processing.

  17. Strategies to overcome statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Agouridis, Aris P; Nair, Devaki R; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-06-01

    This editorial discusses several options to overcome statin intolerance in clinical practice. For example, switching to a different statin, changing statin dosing, using lipid-lowering drugs other than statins (e.g., ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants and fibrates, alone or in combination), or combining statins with other lipid-lowering drugs. The authors focus on the potential mechanisms involved in statin-related myopathy. New lipid-lowering drugs currently in development (e.g., cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors [anacetrapib] and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 inhibitors) inhibitors may help in the management of statin intolerance while achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets as set out by the guidelines.

  18. Testing Scientific Software: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kanewala, Upulee; Bieman, James M

    2014-10-01

    Scientific software plays an important role in critical decision making, for example making weather predictions based on climate models, and computation of evidence for research publications. Recently, scientists have had to retract publications due to errors caused by software faults. Systematic testing can identify such faults in code. This study aims to identify specific challenges, proposed solutions, and unsolved problems faced when testing scientific software. We conducted a systematic literature survey to identify and analyze relevant literature. We identified 62 studies that provided relevant information about testing scientific software. We found that challenges faced when testing scientific software fall into two main categories: (1) testing challenges that occur due to characteristics of scientific software such as oracle problems and (2) testing challenges that occur due to cultural differences between scientists and the software engineering community such as viewing the code and the model that it implements as inseparable entities. In addition, we identified methods to potentially overcome these challenges and their limitations. Finally we describe unsolved challenges and how software engineering researchers and practitioners can help to overcome them. Scientific software presents special challenges for testing. Specifically, cultural differences between scientist developers and software engineers, along with the characteristics of the scientific software make testing more difficult. Existing techniques such as code clone detection can help to improve the testing process. Software engineers should consider special challenges posed by scientific software such as oracle problems when developing testing techniques.

  19. Testing Scientific Software: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kanewala, Upulee; Bieman, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Context Scientific software plays an important role in critical decision making, for example making weather predictions based on climate models, and computation of evidence for research publications. Recently, scientists have had to retract publications due to errors caused by software faults. Systematic testing can identify such faults in code. Objective This study aims to identify specific challenges, proposed solutions, and unsolved problems faced when testing scientific software. Method We conducted a systematic literature survey to identify and analyze relevant literature. We identified 62 studies that provided relevant information about testing scientific software. Results We found that challenges faced when testing scientific software fall into two main categories: (1) testing challenges that occur due to characteristics of scientific software such as oracle problems and (2) testing challenges that occur due to cultural differences between scientists and the software engineering community such as viewing the code and the model that it implements as inseparable entities. In addition, we identified methods to potentially overcome these challenges and their limitations. Finally we describe unsolved challenges and how software engineering researchers and practitioners can help to overcome them. Conclusions Scientific software presents special challenges for testing. Specifically, cultural differences between scientist developers and software engineers, along with the characteristics of the scientific software make testing more difficult. Existing techniques such as code clone detection can help to improve the testing process. Software engineers should consider special challenges posed by scientific software such as oracle problems when developing testing techniques. PMID:25125798

  20. Software Sleuth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's need to trace mistakes to their source to try and eliminate them in the future has resulted in software known as Root Cause Analysis (RoCA). Fair, Isaac & Co., Inc. has applied RoCA software, originally developed under an SBIR contract with Kennedy, to its predictive software technology. RoCA can generate graphic reports to make analysis of problems easier and more efficient.

  1. Software safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

  2. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beezer, Robert A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews for three software packages are given. Those packages are: Linear Algebra Computer Companion; Probability and Statistics Demonstrations and Tutorials; and Math Utilities: CURVES, SURFS, AND DIFFS. (PK)

  3. Fracture toughness of brittle materials determined with chevron notch specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Bubsey, R. T.; Pierce, W. S.; Munz, D.

    1981-01-01

    Short bar, short rod, and four-point-bend chevron-notch specimens were used to determine the plane strain fracture toughness of hot-pressed silicon nitride and sintered aluminum oxide brittle ceramics. The unique advantages of this specimen type are: (1) the production of a sharp natural crack during the early stage of test loading, so that no precracking is required, and (2) the load passes through a maximum at a constant, material-independent crack length-to-width ratio for a specific geometry, so that no post-test crack measurement is required. The plane strain fracture toughness is proportional to the maximum test load and functions of the specimen geometry and elastic compliance. Although results obtained for silicon nitride are in good mutual agreement and relatively free of geometry and size effects, aluminum oxide results were affected in both these respects by the rising crack growth resistance curve of the material.

  4. High Speed Strain Measurements Surrounding Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Will; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fractures of oil and gas shales occur miles underground, below complex, layered rocks, making measurements of their dynamics, extent, or structure difficult to impossible. Rocks are heterogeneous at a wide range of length scales, and investigating how these non-uniformities affect the propagation and extent of fractures is vital to improving both the safety and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing operations. To study these effects we have developed a model system using brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels that we can fracture with fluids and observe with a fast camera. By embedding tracer particles within the gel and using laser sheet microscopy, we obtain three dimensional stress and strain maps of the zone surrounding a hydraulic fracture tip. Gels can also be set in layers or interfaces with tunable strengths or with designed heterogeneities, allowing us to understand the fundamental science of hydraulic fractures and investigate the dynamics of controllably complex materials.

  5. On Failure in Polycrystalline and Amorphous Brittle Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.

    2009-12-01

    The performance of behaviour of brittle materials depends upon discrete deformation mechanisms operating during the loading process. The critical mechanisms determining the behaviour of armour ceramics have not been isolated using traditional ballistics. It has recently become possible to measure strength histories in materials under shock. The data gained for the failed strength of the armour are shown to relate directly to the penetration measured into tiles. Further the material can be loaded and recovered for post-mortem examination. Failure is by micro-fracture that is a function of the defects and then cracking activated by plasticity mechanisms within the grains and failure at grain boundaries in the amorphous intergranular phase. Thus it is the shock-induced plastic yielding of grains at the impact face that determines the later time penetration through the tile.

  6. Composition Effect on Intrinsic Plasticity or Brittleness in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  7. Methods for assessing the structural reliability of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freiman, S. W. (Editor); Hudson, C. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Failure from contact-induced surface flaws is considered along with controlled indentation flaws for construction of toughness and fatigue master maps, fatigue properties of ceramics with natural and controlled flaws, and a statistical analysis of size and stress state effects on the strength of an alumina ceramic. Attention is also given to dynamic and static fatigue of a machinable glass ceramic, the effect of multiregion crack growth on proof testing, and a fracture mechanics analysis of defect sizes. Other topics explored are related to the effect of temperature and humidity on delayed failure of optical glass fibers, subthreshold indentation flaws in the study of fatigue properties of ultrahigh-strength glass, the lifetime prediction for hot-pressed silicon nitride at high temperatures, static fatigue in high-performance ceramics, and requirements for flexure testing of brittle materials.

  8. Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, V.C.

    1992-12-01

    This special issues on Micromechanical modelling of quasi-brittle materials behavior represents an outgrowth of presentations given at a symposium of the same title held at the 1991 ASME Applied Mechanics and Biomechanics Summer Conference at the Ohio State University. The symposium was organized to promote communication between researchers in three materials groups: rock, cementitious materials, ceramics and related composites. The enthusiastic response of both speakers and attendants at the ASME symposium convinced the organizer that it would be useful to put together a coherent volume which can reach a larger audience. It was decided that the papers individually and as a volume ought to provide a broader view, so that as much as possible, the work contained in each paper would be accessible to readers working in any of the three materials groups. Applied Mechanics Reviews presents an appropriate platform for achieving these objectives.

  9. Brittle onset of monodispersed magmatic suspensions: from spheres to spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordonnier, B.; Kaus, B.; Manga, M.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J.; Hess, K.-U.; Gottschaller, S.; Dingwell, D. B.; Burlini, L.

    2012-04-01

    This abstract describes one of the last projects engaged by Dr. Luigi Burlini. It highlights his wish to make a close link between experimental and numerical studies, and push even further our understanding of rock mechanics. His students, engaged in this study, wish to credit these results to the legacy left by him owing to his constant involvement in Science and in educating the next generation of rheologists. While he could not see this project to fruition, his constant support and help during the conception of the project made it possible. The brittle-ductile transition remains a central question of modern geology as rock failure is the main parameter in mitigating geological risks, such as, for volcanic eruptions, the transitions from effusive to explosive eruptive style. Although numerical simulations are the only way to fully understanding the physical processes involved, we are in a strong need of an experimental validation of the proposed models. We first recall some experimental results obtained under torsion and uni-axial compression on both pure melts and crystal-bearing magmas. Torsion experiments were performed at high temperature (600 to 900 degC) and high pressure (200 to 300 MPa) using a Paterson-type rock deformation apparatus (ETH Zurich). We characterized the brittle onset of two phases magmas from 0 to 65 vol% crystals. The strain-rates span 5 orders of magnitude, with a change in the behavior of the material from viscous to brittle (10^-5- 100 s^-1). The materials tested are a standard borosilicate glass (NIST717), a natural crystal bearing rhyolitic melt (Mt Unzen volcano) and a suspension of haplogranitic synthetic sample with corundum particles. To characterize the physical processes leading to failure in the experiments, we performed 2D and 3D numerical simulations on monodispersed rigid spheroids with eccentricities ranging from 10^-2 to 10^2. The model is numerically solved with Finite Elements Methods. The pre-processing, processing and

  10. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  11. Polystyrene glasses under compression: Ductile and brittle behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jianning; Lin, Panpan; Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Weiyu; Mays, Jimmy W.; Wang, Shi -Qing

    2015-09-09

    Polystyrene of different molecular weights and their binary mixtures are studied in terms of their various mechanical responses to uniaxial compression at different temperatures. PS of Mw = 25 kg/mol is completely brittle until it is above its glass transition temperature Tg. In contrast, upon incorporation of a high molecular weight component, PS mixtures turn from barely ductile a few degrees below its Tg to ductile over 40° below Tg. In the upper limit, a PS of Mw = 319 kg/mol yields and undergoes plastic flow, even at T = –70° C. Furthermore, the observed dependence of mechanical responses on molecular weight and molecular weight distribution can be adequately rationalized by the idea that yielding and plastic compression are caused by chain networking.

  12. New probability distribution for the strength of brittle fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Black, C.M.; Durham, S.D.; Lynch, J.D.; Padgett, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    Brittle fibers, used in modern fibrous composite materials, are found in many structures such as ships, airplanes, swimming pools, etc.These fibers are commonly made from materials such as boron, glass, and carbon. There can be substantial benefits in using fiber composites rather than the traditional materials such as metal and wood, including lighter weight and added stiffness. For example, seventy-five to eighty percent of a projected Grumman aircraft will be constructed from carbon fiber composites. This will reduce the weight of the structure by an estimated 26 percent (Gordon, 1988). However, the intrinsic tensile strength per unit volume of most fibers is less than that of most metals. Their strength is a function of their microstructure, the fiber length, and the number and types of flaws in the fiber. (JS)

  13. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  14. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  15. Exponential and power-law mass distributions in brittle fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Linna, R. P.; Timonen, J.; Møller, Peder Friis; Oddershede, Lene

    2004-08-01

    Generic arguments, a minimal numerical model, and fragmentation experiments with gypsum disk are used to investigate the fragment-size distribution that results from dynamic brittle fragmentation. Fragmentation is initiated by random nucleation of cracks due to material inhomogeneities, and its dynamics are pictured as a process of propagating cracks that are unstable against side-branch formation. The initial cracks and side branches both merge mutually to form fragments. The side branches have a finite penetration depth as a result of inherent damping. Generic arguments imply that close to the minimum strain (or impact energy) required for fragmentation, the number of fragments of size s scales as s-(2D-1)/Df1(-(2/λ)Ds)+f2(-s0-1(λ+s1/D)D) , where D is the Euclidean dimension of the space, λ is the penetration depth, and f1 and f2 can be approximated by exponential functions. Simulation results and experiments can both be described by this theoretical fragment-size distribution. The typical largest fragment size s0 was found to diverge at the minimum strain required for fragmentation as it is inversely related to the density of initially formed cracks. Our results also indicate that scaling of s0 close to this divergence depends on, e.g., loading conditions, and thus is not universal. At the same time, the density of fragment surface vanishes as L-1 , L being the linear dimension of the brittle solid. The results obtained provide an explanation as to why the fragment-size distributions found in nature can have two components, an exponential as well as a power-law component, with varying relative weights.

  16. Using Brittle Fragmentation Theory to represent Aerosol Mineral Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Improved estimates of dust aerosol effects upon climate require the characterization of dust mineral and chemical composition. Regional variations in soil mineral composition lead to variations in dust aerosol composition. Yet, deriving aerosol mineral content also requires knowledge of the parent soil size distribution along with the fragmentation of soil particles and aggregates during the emission process. These processes modify the size distribution and mineral abundance of the emitted aerosols compared to the parent soil. An additional challenge for modeling is that global atlases of soil texture and composition are based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates, particularly phyllosilicates, that are encountered in natural soils, drastically altering the original size distribution of the soil that is subject to wind erosion. We propose both a semi-empirical and theoretical method to constrain the size-resolved mineral composition of emitted dust aerosols based on global atlases of soil texture and composition. Our semi-empirical method re-aggregates clay phyllosilicate minerals into larger soil particle sizes and constrains the size distribution of each emitted mineral based on observed mineral distributions at the source. Our theoretical method extends Kok's brittle fragmentation theory to individual minerals. To this end we reconstruct the undisturbed size distribution for each mineral as a function of soil texture and soil type and calculate the emitted size distribution applying brittle fragmentation and assuming homogeneous fragmentation properties among the mineral aggregates. These approaches were tested within the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE. We discuss the improvements achieved and suggest future developments.

  17. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1995-12-31

    Because of its potential utilization in energy exploration and defense applications, the phenomenon of brittle fracture in solids under dynamic loads has been an ongoing topic of interest. A continuum damage model was developed to simulate rock fragmentation induced by explosive blasts for in situ oil shale retorting. The model was based on the premise that the inelastic brittle response exhibited by rock under dynamic loads is due principally to the stress-induced sub-scale cracks. Locally, the growth and interaction of these sub-scale cracks relieve portions of the material volume and reduce its capability to carry load. Globally, this effect is reflected in the degradation of the material stiffness. In this manner, the dynamic fracture process was modeled as a continuous accrual of damage, where damage is considered to be the degree of reduction of the material stiffness. Reasonable correlations between calculated and measured data were obtained by this model. Although the model has achieved some degree of success, some deficiencies have been identified over the years. For example, the adequacy of representing the compressive response by perfect plasticity was questioned. Because of the damage formulation, strain-softening and localization are natural by-products of the model. Thus, a question on mesh-size dependency has also been raised. This investigation is concerned with the improvement of the damage model in by including the Drucker-Prager model to represent compressional response and nonlocal treatment to tensile damage. The inclusion of the Drucker-Prager model allows pressure-dependent yield strength representation. Although the rate-dependent nature of the model may alleviate the mesh-size dependence problem, a nonlocal formulation was also investigated to insure mesh-size independency. This treatment is based on the nonlocal representation with local strain.

  18. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and laboratory models are often used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes at various scales in crust and lithosphere. In both approaches, the freedom in choice of simulation method, materials and their properties, and deformation laws could affect model outcomes. To assess the role of modelling method and to quantify the variability among models, we have performed a comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments. Here, we present results of 11 numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference and distinct element techniques. We present three experiments that describe shortening of a sand-like, brittle wedge. The material properties of the numerical ‘sand', the model set-up and the boundary conditions are strictly prescribed and follow the analogue setup as closely as possible. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope of 20 degrees. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain the same surface slope and do not deform. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. We show that we successfully simulate sandbox-style brittle behaviour using different numerical modelling techniques and that we obtain the same styles of deformation behaviour in numerical and laboratory experiments at similar levels of variability. The GeoMod2008 Numerical Team: Markus Albertz, Michelle Cooke, Tony Crook, David Egholm, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Yury Mishin

  19. Overcoming immunosuppression in bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Zachary Z; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Sagar, Vinay; Costa, Ricardo; Abdulkadir, Sarki A; Giles, Francis J; Carneiro, Benedito A

    2017-09-01

    Bone metastases are present in up to 70% of advanced prostate and breast cancers and occur at significant rates in a variety of other cancers. Bone metastases can be associated with significant morbidity. The establishment of bone metastasis activates several immunosuppressive mechanisms. Hence, understanding the tumor-bone microenvironment is crucial to inform the development of novel therapies. This review describes the current standard of care for patients with bone metastatic disease and novel treatment options targeting the microenvironment. Treatments reviewed include immunotherapies, cryoablation, and targeted therapies. Combinatorial treatment strategies including targeted therapies and immunotherapies show promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies to overcome the suppressive environment and improve treatment of bone metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Overcoming "the Valley of Death".

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Robin A

    2014-01-01

    On a global level there are major challenges arising from climate change, resource use and changing age demographics. These issues have created a global marketplace for novel innovative products and solutions which can help to combat and overcome these challenges which have created significant commercial opportunities for companies, particularly for small and medium size enterprises or SMEs. Companies most likely to take advantage of these opportunities will be those which can innovate in a timely manner. Innovation significantly contributes to higher productivity and economic growth, and is core to a company's competitiveness within often challenging marketplaces. However, many factors can stifle innovation. Companies can struggle to identify finance for early-stage development, the returns can be difficult to predict, and the innovation 'landscape' is often complex and unclear. This brief review describes some of the main issues with commercialising innovative ideas and provides guidance with respect to the often complicated funding landscape both on a National and European level.

  1. Overcoming obstacles: collaboration for change.

    PubMed

    Funnell, M M

    2004-10-01

    Effective diabetes care requires a partnership between prepared, proactive practice teams and informed, activated patients. Diabetes education helps to overcome many of the barriers to effective self-management by enabling people with diabetes to make informed decisions about their day-to-day self-care. Both psychosocial and health outcomes have been improved through a variety of training programmes; however, education must be coupled with ongoing self-management support if these benefits are to be sustained. The principal goal of diabetes education has undergone a major shift over the past few years--evolving from primarily didactic interventions, focused on encouraging patients to adhere to the prescribed therapy, towards more interactive learning that supports people in making informed, self-directed decisions.

  2. Overcoming challenges in improvement work.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Helen

    2013-09-01

    The Health Foundation is an independent charity working to improve healthcare in the UK, so that we have a system of the highest possible quality-safe, effective, person-centred, timely, efficient and equitable. We believe that in order to achieve this, health services need to continually improve the way they work. The Foundation conducts research and evaluation, puts ideas into practice through improvement programmes, develops leaders and shares evidence to drive wider change. The work is a focused around two priority areas: patient safety and person-centred care. The Foundation has supported work to improve services for patients with kidney disease and, in common with other quality improvement projects, there have been challenges to overcome. Awareness of these common challenges can help others to be more prepared when planning service improvements. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  3. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Presents reviews of six computer software programs for teaching science. Provides the publisher, grade level, cost, and descriptions of software, including: (1) "Recycling Logic"; (2) "Introduction to Biochemistry"; (3) "Food for Thought"; (4) "Watts in a Home"; (5) "Geology in Action"; and (6)…

  4. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Anne, Ed.; Radziemski, Cathy, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews two software packages for the Macintosh series. "Course Builder 2.0," a courseware authoring system, allows the user to create programs which stand alone and may be used independently in the classroom. "World Builder," an artificial intelligence software package, allows creative thinking, problem-solving, and…

  5. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Presents reviews of six computer software programs for teaching science. Provides the publisher, grade level, cost, and descriptions of software, including: (1) "Recycling Logic"; (2) "Introduction to Biochemistry"; (3) "Food for Thought"; (4) "Watts in a Home"; (5) "Geology in Action"; and (6)…

  6. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Anne, Ed.; Radziemski, Cathy, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews two software packages for the Macintosh series. "Course Builder 2.0," a courseware authoring system, allows the user to create programs which stand alone and may be used independently in the classroom. "World Builder," an artificial intelligence software package, allows creative thinking, problem-solving, and…

  7. Software Bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    I-Bridge is a commercial version of software developed by I-Kinetics under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The software allows users of Windows applications to gain quick, easy access to databases, programs and files on UNIX services. Information goes directly onto spreadsheets and other applications; users need not manually locate, transfer and convert data.

  8. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews six software packages for the Apple II family. Programs reviewed include "Science Courseware: Earth Science Series"; "Heat and Light"; "In Search of Space: Introduction to Model Rocketry"; "Drug Education Series: Drugs--Their Effects on You'"; "Uncertainties and Measurement"; and "Software Films: Learning about Science Series," which…

  9. Software Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwarth, P., D.

    1983-01-01

    The Common Software Module Repository (CSMR) is computerized library system with high product and service visibility to potential users. Online capabilities of system allow both librarian and user to interact with library. Librarian is responsible for maintaining information in CSMR library. User searches library to locate software modules that meet his or her current needs.

  10. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  11. Advances in molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-precision machining of hard and brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoguang; Li, Qiang; Liu, Tao; Kang, Renke; Jin, Zhuji; Guo, Dongming

    2016-12-01

    Hard and brittle materials, such as silicon, SiC, and optical glasses, are widely used in aerospace, military, integrated circuit, and other fields because of their excellent physical and chemical properties. However, these materials display poor machinability because of their hard and brittle properties. Damages such as surface micro-crack and subsurface damage often occur during machining of hard and brittle materials. Ultra-precision machining is widely used in processing hard and brittle materials to obtain nanoscale machining quality. However, the theoretical mechanism underlying this method remains unclear. This paper provides a review of present research on the molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-precision machining of hard and brittle materials. The future trends in this field are also discussed.

  12. Brittle-ductile shear zone formation in the McKim Limestone: eastern Monument Upwarp, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyum, S.; Pollard, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    The McKim Limestone is part of a regressive, marine sedimentary sequence of strata that was deposited in the Pennsylvanian to Permian periods. It is well-exposed across large portions of Raplee anticline and Comb monocline; a pair of kilometer-scale folds that mark the Monument Upwarp of the Colorado Plateau in southeastern Utah. Two conjugate sets of echelon vein arrays, with complementary echelon pressure solution seam arrays, occur as bed-perpendicular, systematic deformation features in the 1-3 m thick McKim Limestone unit. Based on large vein to vein array angles, large vein aperture to length ratios, and the presence of vein-perpendicular pressure solution seams, these structures are interpreted to have developed within localized, brittle-ductile shear zones. Topics of debate among structural geologists regarding the formation mechanism of echelon veins include the initiation mode of vein segments (tensile or shear), the relative age between shear zone initiation and vein formation, the interpretation of strain within a shear zone, and the development of sigmoidal veins as being indicative of rotation. These concepts often are founded on geometric observations and kinematic models of deformation (e.g. simple shear) that are independent of the constitutive properties of the rock, are not constrained by the equations of motion, and do not honor the boundary conditions on the vein surfaces. Here we show a more realistic representation of brittle-ductile shear zone formation by introducing numerical models that consider the mechanical properties of limestone, are constrained by the equations of motion, and explicitly define the vein surfaces and their boundary conditions. The commercial finite element software, Abaqus FEA, is used to investigate the deformed geometry of model echelon vein arrays as a function of the remotely applied stress, the initial geometry of the vein arrays, and the constitutive properties of the solid. These geometric patterns are compared

  13. Software Smarts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract with Johnson Space Center, Knowledge Based Systems Inc. (KBSI) developed an intelligent software environment for modeling and analyzing mission planning activities, simulating behavior, and, using a unique constraint propagation mechanism, updating plans with each change in mission planning activities. KBSI developed this technology into a commercial product, PROJECTLINK, a two-way bridge between PROSIm, KBSI's process modeling and simulation software and leading project management software like Microsoft Project and Primavera's SureTrak Project Manager.

  14. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six computer software packages including "Lunar Greenhouse,""Dyno-Quest,""How Weather Works,""Animal Trackers,""Personal Science Laboratory," and "The Skeletal and Muscular Systems." Availability, functional, and hardware requirements are discussed. (CW)

  15. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Eugene T., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Presents reviews by classroom teachers of software for teaching science. Includes material on the work of geologists, genetics, earth science, classification of living things, astronomy, endangered species, skeleton, drugs, and heartbeat. Provides information on availability and equipment needed. (RT)

  16. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Reviews two programs: (1) "The Weather Machine" on understanding weather and weather forecasting and (2) "The Mystery of the Hotel Victoria" on problem solving in mathematics. Presents the descriptions, advantages, and weaknesses of the software. (YP)

  17. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of four science software programs. Includes topics such as plate tectonics, laboratory experiment simulations, the human body, and light and temperature. Contains information on ordering and reviewers' comments. (ML)

  18. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are three computer software packages including "Martin Luther King, Jr.: Instant Replay of History,""Weeds to Trees," and "The New Print Shop, School Edition." Discussed are hardware requirements, costs, grade levels, availability, emphasis, strengths, and weaknesses. (CW)

  19. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews seven computer software programs that can be used in science education programs. Describes courseware which deals with muscles and bones, terminology, classifying animals without backbones, molecular structures, drugs, genetics, and shaping the earth's surface. (TW)

  20. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics and Computer Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Presents reviews of six software packages. Includes (1) "Plain Vanilla Statistics"; (2) "MathCAD 2.0"; (3) "GrFx"; (4) "Trigonometry"; (5) "Algebra II"; (6) "Algebra Drill and Practice I, II, and III." (PK)

  1. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six computer software packages including "Lunar Greenhouse,""Dyno-Quest,""How Weather Works,""Animal Trackers,""Personal Science Laboratory," and "The Skeletal and Muscular Systems." Availability, functional, and hardware requirements are discussed. (CW)

  2. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Eugene T., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Presents reviews by classroom teachers of software for teaching science. Includes material on the work of geologists, genetics, earth science, classification of living things, astronomy, endangered species, skeleton, drugs, and heartbeat. Provides information on availability and equipment needed. (RT)

  3. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews seven computer software programs that can be used in science education programs. Describes courseware which deals with muscles and bones, terminology, classifying animals without backbones, molecular structures, drugs, genetics, and shaping the earth's surface. (TW)

  4. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides reviews of six computer software programs designed for use in elementary science education programs. Provides the title, publisher, grade level, and descriptions of courseware on ant farms, drugs, genetics, beachcombing, matter, and test generation. (TW)

  5. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Reviews two programs: (1) "The Weather Machine" on understanding weather and weather forecasting and (2) "The Mystery of the Hotel Victoria" on problem solving in mathematics. Presents the descriptions, advantages, and weaknesses of the software. (YP)

  6. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of four science software programs. Includes topics such as plate tectonics, laboratory experiment simulations, the human body, and light and temperature. Contains information on ordering and reviewers' comments. (ML)

  7. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Provides reviews of four educational software packages which deal with problem solving, mathematics, history, and reading comprehension. Includes information about appropriate hardware, grade level, the publisher and purchasing. Contains comments about the strengths and weaknesses of each program. (TW)

  8. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are three computer software packages including "Martin Luther King, Jr.: Instant Replay of History,""Weeds to Trees," and "The New Print Shop, School Edition." Discussed are hardware requirements, costs, grade levels, availability, emphasis, strengths, and weaknesses. (CW)

  9. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Donna; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are seven software packages for Apple and IBM computers. Included are: "Toxicology"; "Science Corner: Space Probe"; "Alcohol and Pregnancy"; "Science Tool Kit Plus"; Computer Investigations: Plant Growth"; "Climatrolls"; and "Animal Watch: Whales." (CW)

  10. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Donna; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are seven software packages for Apple and IBM computers. Included are: "Toxicology"; "Science Corner: Space Probe"; "Alcohol and Pregnancy"; "Science Tool Kit Plus"; Computer Investigations: Plant Growth"; "Climatrolls"; and "Animal Watch: Whales." (CW)

  11. SAFOD Brittle Microstructure and Mechanics Knowledge Base (BM2KB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaie, Hassan A.; Broda Cindi, M.; Hadizadeh, Jafar; Kumar, Anuj

    2013-07-01

    Scientific drilling near Parkfield, California has established the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), which provides the solid earth community with short range geophysical and fault zone material data. The BM2KB ontology was developed in order to formalize the knowledge about brittle microstructures in the fault rocks sampled from the SAFOD cores. A knowledge base, instantiated from this domain ontology, stores and presents the observed microstructural and analytical data with respect to implications for brittle deformation and mechanics of faulting. These data can be searched on the knowledge base‧s Web interface by selecting a set of terms (classes, properties) from different drop-down lists that are dynamically populated from the ontology. In addition to this general search, a query can also be conducted to view data contributed by a specific investigator. A search by sample is done using the EarthScope SAFOD Core Viewer that allows a user to locate samples on high resolution images of core sections belonging to different runs and holes. The class hierarchy of the BM2KB ontology was initially designed using the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which was used as a visual guide to develop the ontology in OWL applying the Protégé ontology editor. Various Semantic Web technologies such as the RDF, RDFS, and OWL ontology languages, SPARQL query language, and Pellet reasoning engine, were used to develop the ontology. An interactive Web application interface was developed through Jena, a java based framework, with AJAX technology, jsp pages, and java servlets, and deployed via an Apache tomcat server. The interface allows the registered user to submit data related to their research on a sample of the SAFOD core. The submitted data, after initial review by the knowledge base administrator, are added to the extensible knowledge base and become available in subsequent queries to all types of users. The interface facilitates inference capabilities in the

  12. Semi-brittle flow of granitoid fault rocks in experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pec, Matej; Stünitz, Holger; Heilbronner, Renée.; Drury, Martyn

    2016-03-01

    Field studies and seismic data show that semi-brittle flow of fault rocks probably is the dominant deformation mechanism at the base of the seismogenic zone at the so-called frictional-viscous transition. To understand the physical and chemical processes accommodating semi-brittle flow, we have performed an experimental study on synthetic granitoid fault rocks exploring a broad parameter space (temperature, T = 300, 400, 500, and 600°C, confining pressure, Pc ≈ 300, 500, 1000, and 1500 MPa, shear strain rate, γṡ ≈ 10-3, 10-4, 10-5, and 10-6 s-1, to finite shear strains, γ = 0-5). The experiments have been carried out using a granular material with grain size smaller than 200 µm with a little H2O added (0.2 wt %). Only two experiments (performed at the fastest strain rates and lowest temperatures) have failed abruptly right after reaching peak strength (τ ~ 1400 MPa). All other samples reach high shear stresses (τ ~ 570-1600 MPa) then weaken slightly (by Δτ ~ 10-190 MPa) and continue to deform at a more or less steady state stress level. Clear temperature dependence and a weak strain rate dependence of the peak as well as steady state stress levels are observed. In order to express this relationship, the strain rate-stress sensitivity has been fit with a stress exponent, assuming γ˙ ∝ τn and yields high stress exponents (n ≈ 10-140), which decrease with increasing temperature. The microstructures show widespread comminution, strain partitioning, and localization into slip zones. The slip zones contain at first nanocrystalline and partly amorphous material. Later, during continued deformation, fully amorphous material develops in some of the slip zones. Despite the mechanical steady state conditions, the fabrics in the slip zones and outside continue to evolve and do not reach a steady state microstructure below γ = 5. Within the slip zones, the fault rock material progressively transforms from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. We

  13. Brittle-tough transitions during crack growth in toughened adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoules, Michael

    2008-03-01

    The use of structural adhesives in automotive applications relies on an effective understanding of their performance under crash conditions. In particular, there is considerable potential for mechanics-based modeling of the interaction between an adhesive layer and the adherends, to replace current empirical approaches to design. Since energy dissipation during a crash, mediated by plastic deformation of the structure, is a primary consideration for automotive applications, traditional approaches of fracture mechanics are not appropriate. Cohesive-zone models that use two fracture parameters - cohesive strength and toughness - have been shown to provide a method for quantitative mechanics analysis. Combined numerical and experimental techniques have been developed to deduce the toughness and strength parameters of adhesive layers, allowing qualitative modeling of the performance of adhesive joints. These techniques have been used to study the failure of joints, formed from a toughened adhesive and sheet metal, over a wide range of loading rates. Two fracture modes are observed: quasi-static crack growth and dynamic crack growth. The quasi-static crack growth is associated with a toughened mode of failure; the dynamic crack growth is associated with a more brittle mode of failure. The results of the experiments and analyses indicate that the fracture parameters for quasi-static crack growth in this toughened system are essentially rate independent, and that quasi-static crack growth can occur even at the highest crack velocities. Effects of rate appear to be limited to the ease with which a transition to dynamic fracture could be triggered. This transition appears to be stochastic in nature, and it does not appear to be associated with the attainment of any critical value for crack velocity or loading rate. Fracture-mechanics models exist in the literature for brittle-ductile transitions in rate-dependent polymers, which rely on rate dependent values of toughness

  14. Failure processes in soft and quasi-brittle materials with nonhomogeneous microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Daniel W.

    , coupled cohesive-friction relation and detail its formulation and implementation. In the process of this investigation, we developed a small library of cohesive elements for use with a commercially available finite element analysis software package. Additionally, in this thesis, we present a series of methods for reducing mesh dependency in two-dimensional dynamic cohesive fracture simulations of quasi-brittle materials. In this setting, cracks are only permitted to propagate along element facets, thus a poorly designed discretization of the problem domain can introduce artifacts into the fracture behavior. To reduce mesh induced artifacts, we consider unstructured polygonal finite elements. A randomly-seeded polygonal mesh leads to an isotropic discretization of the problem domain, which does not bias the direction of crack propagation. However, polygonal meshes tend to limit the possible directions a crack may travel at each node, making this discretization a poor candidate for dynamic cohesive fracture simulations. To alleviate this problem, we propose two new topological operators. The first operator we propose is adaptive element-splitting, and the second is adaptive mesh refinement. Both operators are designed to improve the ability of unstructured polygonal meshes to capture crack patterns in dynamic cohesive fracture simulations. However, we demonstrate that element-splitting is more suited to pervasive fracture problems, whereas, adaptive refinement is more suited to problems exhibiting a dominant crack. Finally, we investigate the use of geometric and constitutive design features to regularize pervasive fragmentation behavior in three-dimensions. Throughout pervasive fracture simulations, many cracks initiate, propagate, branch and coalesce simultaneously. Because of the cohesive element method's unique framework, this behavior can be captured in a regularized manner. In this investigation, unstructuring techniques are used to introduce randomness into a

  15. Reusable Software.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    overseeing reusable software, the Reusable Software Organization ( RUSO ). This author does not feel at this time that establishment of such a specific...49] have not been accompanied by establishment of RUSO -like activities. There is need, however, for assurance that functions which a RUSO might be...assurance 6. establishment and maintenance of reuse archival facilities and activities. Actual establishment of a RUSO is best dictated by size of the

  16. Experimental formation of brittle structural assemblages in oblique divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. V.; Durney, D. W.

    1992-12-01

    A series of experiments is reported in which brittle minor structures are initiated in narrow deformation zones in clay under conditions of kinematically controlled oblique divergent displacement. Nineteen settings of boundary displacement angle were used from pure wrench to pure divergence under conditions favouring either faults (dry experiments) or extension fractures (wet experiments). Pure wrench produced the well known assemblage of Riedel strike-slip faults whereas experiments in pure divergence produced conjugate arrays of normal faults and extension fractures with a dihedral angle of 30° bisected by the direction of the zone, as has been described in rift zones. Experiments with boundary displacements at intermediate settings show a continuum of structural orientations and dihedral angles between these two extremes. A boundary between assemblages dominated by strike-slip faults and extensional faults was found at a displacement angle of 45° from the deformation zone. These results are interpreted kinematically in terms of: (1) principal axes of infinitesimal incremental strain; (2) material dilatancy control on shear structure dihedral angles; and (3) whether the vertical strain in divergent wrench settings is a thickening (strike-slip assemblage) or a thinning (normal fault assemblage).

  17. Fracture toughness of brittle materials determined with chevron notch specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. L., Jr.; Bursey, R. T.; Munz, D.; Pierce, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The use of chevron-notch specimens for determining the plane strain fracture toughness (K sub Ic) of brittle materials is discussed. Three chevron-notch specimens were investigated: short bar, short rod, and four-point-bend. The dimensionless stress intensity coefficient used in computing K sub Ic is derived for the short bar specimen from the superposition of ligament-dependent and ligament-independent solutions for the straight through crack, and also from experimental compliance calibrations. Coefficients for the four-point-bend specimen were developed by the same superposition procedure, and with additional refinement using the slice model of Bluhm. Short rod specimen stress intensity coefficients were determined only by experimental compliance calibration. Performance of the three chevron-notch specimens and their stress intensity factor relations were evaluated by tests on hot-pressed silicon nitride and sintered aluminum oxide. Results obtained with the short bar and the four-point-bend specimens on silicon nitride are in good agreement and relatively free of specimen geometry and size effects within the range investigated. Results on aluminum oxide were affected by specimen size and chevron-notch geometry, believed due to a rising crack growth resistance curve for the material. Only the results for the short bar specimen are presented in detail.

  18. Brittle fracture in a periodic structure with internal potential energy

    PubMed Central

    Mishuris, Gennady S.; Slepyan, Leonid I.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a brittle fracture taking account of self-equilibrated distributed stresses existing at microlevel in the absence of external forces. To determine how the latter can affect the crack equilibrium and growth, a model of a structured linearly elastic body is introduced, consisting of two equal symmetrically arranged layers (or half-planes) connected by an interface as a prospective crack path. The interface comprises a discrete set of elastic bonds. In the initial state, the bonds are assumed to be stressed in such a way that tensile and compressive forces of the same value alternate. In the general considerations, the layers are assumed to be of an unspecified periodic structure, where such self-equilibrated stresses may also exist. A two-line chain and a lattice are examined as the specified structure. We consider the states of the body-with-a-crack under such microlevel stresses (MS) and under a combined action of the remote forces and MS. Analytical solutions to the considered problems are presented based on the introduction of a selective discrete transform. We demonstrate that MS can increase as well as decrease the crack resistance depending on the internal energy level. We also discuss different scenarios of the crack growth. PMID:24808756

  19. Brittle cornea syndrome: recognition, molecular diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by extreme corneal thinning and fragility. Corneal rupture can therefore occur either spontaneously or following minimal trauma in affected patients. Two genes, ZNF469 and PRDM5, have now been identified, in which causative pathogenic mutations collectively account for the condition in nearly all patients with BCS ascertained to date. Therefore, effective molecular diagnosis is now available for affected patients, and those at risk of being heterozygous carriers for BCS. We have previously identified mutations in ZNF469 in 14 families (in addition to 6 reported by others in the literature), and in PRDM5 in 8 families (with 1 further family now published by others). Clinical features include extreme corneal thinning with rupture, high myopia, blue sclerae, deafness of mixed aetiology with hypercompliant tympanic membranes, and variable skeletal manifestations. Corneal rupture may be the presenting feature of BCS, and it is possible that this may be incorrectly attributed to non-accidental injury. Mainstays of management include the prevention of ocular rupture by provision of protective polycarbonate spectacles, careful monitoring of visual and auditory function, and assessment for skeletal complications such as developmental dysplasia of the hip. Effective management depends upon appropriate identification of affected individuals, which may be challenging given the phenotypic overlap of BCS with other connective tissue disorders. PMID:23642083

  20. Thermal stress fracture in elastic-brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    The reported investigation shows that the assessment of the possibility of the thermal fracture of brittle materials depends upon an accurate evaluation of the thermal stresses and the determination of the resulting stress intensity factors. The stress intensity factors can be calculated in a variety of ways ranging from the very precise to approximate, but only for a limited number of geometries. The main difficulty is related to the determination of the thermal stress field because of its unusual character and its dependence upon boundary conditions at points far from the region of thermal activity. Examination of a number of examples suggests that the best visualization of the thermal stresses and any associated fracture can be made by considering the problem to be the combination of thermal and isothermal problems or by considering that the prime effect of the temperature is in the generation of thermal strains and that the thermal stresses are simply the result of the region trying to accommodate these strains.

  1. A Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology for sea ice modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansereau, Véronique; Weiss, Jérôme; Saramito, Pierre; Lattes, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    A new rheological model is developed that builds on an elasto-brittle (EB) framework used for sea ice and rock mechanics, with the intent of representing both the small elastic deformations associated with fracturing processes and the larger deformations occurring along the faults/leads once the material is highly damaged and fragmented. A viscous-like relaxation term is added to the linear-elastic constitutive law together with an effective viscosity that evolves according to the local level of damage of the material, like its elastic modulus. The coupling between the level of damage and both mechanical parameters is such that within an undamaged ice cover the viscosity is infinitely large and deformations are strictly elastic, while along highly damaged zones the elastic modulus vanishes and most of the stress is dissipated through permanent deformations. A healing mechanism is also introduced, counterbalancing the effects of damaging over large timescales. In this new model, named Maxwell-EB after the Maxwell rheology, the irreversible and reversible deformations are solved for simultaneously; hence drift velocities are defined naturally. First idealized simulations without advection show that the model reproduces the main characteristics of sea ice mechanics and deformation: strain localization, anisotropy, intermittency and associated scaling laws.

  2. Brittle cornea syndrome: recognition, molecular diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Porter, Louise F; Spencer, Helen L; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Au, Leon; Munier, Francis L; Smithson, Sarah; Suri, Mohnish; Rohrbach, Marianne; Manson, Forbes D C; Black, Graeme C M

    2013-05-04

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by extreme corneal thinning and fragility. Corneal rupture can therefore occur either spontaneously or following minimal trauma in affected patients. Two genes, ZNF469 and PRDM5, have now been identified, in which causative pathogenic mutations collectively account for the condition in nearly all patients with BCS ascertained to date. Therefore, effective molecular diagnosis is now available for affected patients, and those at risk of being heterozygous carriers for BCS. We have previously identified mutations in ZNF469 in 14 families (in addition to 6 reported by others in the literature), and in PRDM5 in 8 families (with 1 further family now published by others). Clinical features include extreme corneal thinning with rupture, high myopia, blue sclerae, deafness of mixed aetiology with hypercompliant tympanic membranes, and variable skeletal manifestations. Corneal rupture may be the presenting feature of BCS, and it is possible that this may be incorrectly attributed to non-accidental injury. Mainstays of management include the prevention of ocular rupture by provision of protective polycarbonate spectacles, careful monitoring of visual and auditory function, and assessment for skeletal complications such as developmental dysplasia of the hip. Effective management depends upon appropriate identification of affected individuals, which may be challenging given the phenotypic overlap of BCS with other connective tissue disorders.

  3. Brittle Asperities and Stick-Slip Motion: Insight from Friction Experiments along A Gabbro/Marble Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Takizawa, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Kawakata, H.

    2015-12-01

    We conduct a series of meter-scale direct shear experiments along a gabbro/marble fault interface at NIED in Japan. Unlike the transitional behavior from stick-slip to stable sliding along a marble/marble interface under 1.3 MPa normal stress and 0.01 mm/s loading rate, the gabbro/marble case shows persistent stick-slip behavior under the same loading conditions as well as under 2.6 MPa normal stress in subsequent tests. Visual observations of the damage pattern reveal quite different features between the marble/marble case and the gabbro/marble case. For the former, the generated damage typically shows a low aspect ratio between loading-parallel and loading-perpendicular directions, suggesting that some diffusional deformation is effective during slip. For the latter, intruded gabbro pieces with preferred growing direction parallel to loading are distributed on top of the marble side, showing that hard rocks like gabbro can be partially fractured off when sheared against soft rocks like marble. Strain array data show that the apparent friction before failure is high or even above 1 near locations where fractured-off gabbro pieces are later observed, confirming that intact rock strength of gabbro has to be overcome upon the onset of fracture. Although at this moment we do not fully understand the behind mechanism, we believe that the brittleness of gabbro dominates in making the difference. If true, this result will highlight the role of brittle asperities in generating stick-slip fault behavior in a surrounding ductile-like environment. An analogous natural example may be found by the role of seamount in generating earthquakes through or underneath sediments in subduction zones (Cloos, 1992). However, instead of shearing off long-wavelength feature as illustrated by Cloos (1992), our study suggests that the collective behavior of tiny pieces along a nominally flat surface may also generate unstable ruptures macroscopically.

  4. Software Tools for Software Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    Amisteant" project was commmioned to study the problems of software maintenance and to investigate the concept of bringing together a combinationof loosely...integrated tools that could improve the productivity o maintenance programmers and increase the reliability of modified programs. One area of study has...that can aid in understanding the program and modifying it. Background work for study in this area included in examination of existing software tools

  5. Software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III; Hiott, Jim; Golej, Jim; Plumb, Allan

    1993-01-01

    Today's software systems generally use obsolete technology, are not integrated properly with other software systems, and are difficult and costly to maintain. The discipline of reverse engineering is becoming prominent as organizations try to move their systems up to more modern and maintainable technology in a cost effective manner. The Johnson Space Center (JSC) created a significant set of tools to develop and maintain FORTRAN and C code during development of the space shuttle. This tool set forms the basis for an integrated environment to reengineer existing code into modern software engineering structures which are then easier and less costly to maintain and which allow a fairly straightforward translation into other target languages. The environment will support these structures and practices even in areas where the language definition and compilers do not enforce good software engineering. The knowledge and data captured using the reverse engineering tools is passed to standard forward engineering tools to redesign or perform major upgrades to software systems in a much more cost effective manner than using older technologies. The latest release of the environment was in Feb. 1992.

  6. Software reengineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Today's software systems generally use obsolete technology, are not integrated properly with other software systems, and are difficult and costly to maintain. The discipline of reverse engineering is becoming prominent as organizations try to move their systems up to more modern and maintainable technology in a cost effective manner. JSC created a significant set of tools to develop and maintain FORTRAN and C code during development of the Space Shuttle. This tool set forms the basis for an integrated environment to re-engineer existing code into modern software engineering structures which are then easier and less costly to maintain and which allow a fairly straightforward translation into other target languages. The environment will support these structures and practices even in areas where the language definition and compilers do not enforce good software engineering. The knowledge and data captured using the reverse engineering tools is passed to standard forward engineering tools to redesign or perform major upgrades to software systems in a much more cost effective manner than using older technologies. A beta vision of the environment was released in Mar. 1991. The commercial potential for such re-engineering tools is very great. CASE TRENDS magazine reported it to be the primary concern of over four hundred of the top MIS executives.

  7. Antiterrorist Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David A.

    1998-01-01

    In light of the escalation of terrorism, the Department of Defense spearheaded the development of new antiterrorist software for all Government agencies by issuing a Broad Agency Announcement to solicit proposals. This Government-wide competition resulted in a team that includes NASA Lewis Research Center's Computer Services Division, who will develop the graphical user interface (GUI) and test it in their usability lab. The team launched a program entitled Joint Sphere of Security (JSOS), crafted a design architecture (see the following figure), and is testing the interface. This software system has a state-ofthe- art, object-oriented architecture, with a main kernel composed of the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) developed by Argonne National Laboratory. DIAS will be used as the software "breadboard" for assembling the components of explosions, such as blast and collapse simulations.

  8. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  9. [Software version and medical device software supervision].

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The importance of software version in the medical device software supervision does not cause enough attention at present. First of all, the effect of software version in the medical device software supervision is discussed, and then the necessity of software version in the medical device software supervision is analyzed based on the discussion of the misunderstanding of software version. Finally the concrete suggestions on software version naming rules, software version supervision for the software in medical devices, and software version supervision scheme are proposed.

  10. Kinetic Energy associated with Dynamic Fragmentation in Brittle Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H.; Barber, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of fragments during dynamic processes associated with impulsive loads has been the subject of numerous studies ranging from shaped-charge jet break up and rock blasting to bolide impacts, and, more recently, earthquake rupture. In the latter case pulverized rocks found millimeters to tens of meters from the principal slip zone have been associated with fast, and even supershear, rupture. It has been conjectured that the transition from intact or discretely fractured host rock to pulverization is controlled by initial micro-defects and the driven impulse signal characteristics. Here we report a series of experiments where we characterize the 3D terminal velocity vectors of particles in a range of fragmented to pulverized Novaculite and Westerly Granite rock samples using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Apparatus. We accomplish this by controlling the rate of the stress ramp (a characteristic of the source time function) applied to the rock specimen and recording the impact pattern of rock fragments using a steel ring lined with a pressure-calibrated thin film surrounding the specimen. Using elastic Hertzian contact theory in conjunction with the resulting pressure distributions, we calculate the velocity of ejected particles for each experiment, allowing us to calculate approximate the normal components of kinematic energy of flying fragments. In combination with the laser particle size analysis (PSD), we show a relationship between the rate of the stress ramp and average particle size, and we refine the estimation of fracture energy during the experiments. Coupled with recently obtained data constraining the mechanical energy invested in creating new fracture surfaces, this work brings us closer to defining a complete energy budget for the brittle fragmentation process during earthquake rupture.

  11. True Triaxial Stresses and the Brittle Fracture of Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimson, Bezalel

    2006-06-01

    This paper reviews the efforts made in the last 100 years to characterize the effect of the intermediate principal stress σ 2 on brittle fracture of rocks, and on their strength criteria. The most common theories of failure in geomechanics, such as those of Coulomb, and Mohr, disregard σ 2 and are typically based on triaxial testing of cylindrical rock samples subjected to equal minimum and intermediate principal stresses (σ 3=σ 2). However, as early as 1915 Böker conducted conventional triaxial extension tests (σ 1=σ 2) on the same Carrara marble tested earlier in conventional triaxial compression by von Kármán that showed a different strength behavior. Efforts to incorporate the effect of σ 2 on rock strength continued in the second half of the last century through the work of Nadai, Drucker and Prager, Murrell, Handin, Wiebols and Cook, and others. In 1971 Mogi designed a high-capacity true triaxial testing machine, and was the first to obtain complete true triaxial strength criteria for several rocks based on experimental data. Following his pioneering work, several other laboratories developed equipment and conducted true triaxial tests revealing the extent of σ 2 effect on rock strength (e.g., Takahashi and Koide, Michelis, Smart, Wawersik). Testing equipment emulating Mogi's but considerably more compact was developed at the University of Wisconsin and used for true triaxial testing of some very strong crystalline rocks. Test results revealed three distinct compressive failure mechanisms, depending on loading mode and rock type: shear faulting resulting from extensile microcrack localization, multiple splitting along the σ 1 axis, and nondilatant shear failure. The true triaxial strength criterion for the KTB amphibolite derived from such tests was used in conjunction with logged breakout dimensions to estimate the maximum horizontal in situ stress in the KTB ultra deep scientific hole.

  12. Behavior of the brittle crust in wide plate boundary zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon H.

    1994-03-01

    In wide and active continental plate boundary zones, ductile flow in the deeper and strong parts of the lithosphere may control crustal deformation. This is likely if average resistive shear stresses on faults in the brittle crust are much less than 108 Pa and the underlying bulk effective viscosity is much greater than 1021 Pa s. In this case, a simple model of distributed deformation, referred to as the floating block model, may be useful. This treats the crust as an array of rotating and translating rigid blocks, which are floating on an underlying continuous flow with a constant rheology. The model is analyzed in detail in this paper because it has the potential to link detailed observations of crustal deformation with the large-scale flow. Crustal blocks are defined by at least two sets of faults. The kinematics of crustal deformation can be described in terms of the motions of these blocks. Both the relative motion on block boundaries (faults) and block tilting about a horizontal axis can be described in terms of the underlying flow and block rotation about a vertical axis. However, rotations about a vertical axis, which are an important component of the crustal deformation, will depend not only on the underlying flow but also on the shape, orientation and arrangement of the crustal blocks. The average rotation rate about a vertical axis, over finite rotations, will be significantly different from that predicted at any instant. Also, the rotation history is considerably complicated if, as is likely, the underlying flow field, or block shape, has changed with time. These aspects of crustal deformation are discussed with reference to real zones of active deformation in New Zealand, Greece and western North America.

  13. Forecasting the brittle failure of heterogeneous, porous geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian; Heap, Michael; Main, Ian; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    forecasting the failure of porous brittle solids that build the Earth's crust.

  14. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, C.W.; Wilson, T.J.

    1984-03-20

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composites are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component so as to provide a surface of essentially the malleable component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  15. Hydraulic fracture and toughening of a brittle layer bonded to a hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Noselli, Giovanni; Trepat, Xavier; Desimone, Antonio; Arroyo, Marino

    Brittle materials fracture under tensile or shear stress. When stress attains a critical threshold, crack propagation becomes unstable and proceeds dynamically. In the presence of several precracks, a brittle material always propagates only the weakest crack, leading to catastrophic failure. Here, we show that all these features of brittle fracture are radically modified when the material susceptible to cracking is bonded to a poroelastic medium, such as a hydrogel, a common situation in biological tissues. In particular, we show that the brittle material can fracture in compression and can resist cracking in tension, thanks to the hydraulic coupling with the hydrogel. In the case of multiple cracks, we find that localized fracture occurs when the permeability of the hydrogel is high, whereas decreased permeability leads to toughening by promoting multiple cracking. Our results may contribute to the understanding of fracture in biological tissues and provide inspiration for the design of tough, biomimetic materials.

  16. Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing and Treating Brittle Bones and Osteoporosis Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... at high risk due to low bone mass. Bone and Bone Loss Bone is living, growing tissue. ...

  17. The effect of shock-wave profile on dynamic brittle failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, J. P.; Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Cerreta, E. K.; Gray, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of shock-wave-loading profile on the failure processes in a brittle material has been investigated. Tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) specimens have been subjected to two shock-wave loading profiles with a similar peak stress of 15.4 GPa but different pulse durations. Contrary to the strong dependence of strength on wave profile observed in ductile metals, for WHA, specimens subjected to different loading profiles exhibited similar spall strength and damage evolution morphology. Post-mortem examination of recovered samples revealed that dynamic failure for both loading profiles is dominated by brittle cleavage fracture, with additional energy dissipation through crack branching in the more brittle tungsten particles. Overall, in this brittle material, all relevant damage kinetics and the spall strength are shown to be dominated by the shock peak stress, independent of pulse duration.

  18. Method for preparing surfaces of metal composites having a brittle phase for plating

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Cameron W.; Wilson, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for preparing surfaces of two-phase metal composites having relatively brittle and malleable components for plating with corrosion-resistant material. In practice of the present invention, the surfaces of the composites are etched to remove a major portion or fraction of the brittle component. The etched surface is then peened with particulates for breaking the brittle component from the surfaces and for spreading or smearing the malleable component over the surfaces. The peened surface is then chemically cleaned of residual traces of the brittle component so as to provide a surface of essentially the malleable component to which the corrosion-resistant material may be plated thereon in an adherent manner.

  19. Educational Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The third session of IT@EDU98 consisted of five papers on educational software and was chaired by Tran Van Hao (University of Education, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam). "Courseware Engineering" (Nguyen Thanh Son, Ngo Ngoc Bao Tran, Quan Thanh Tho, Nguyen Hong Lam) briefly describes the use of courseware. "Machine Discovery Theorems in Geometry: A…

  20. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are seven computer software packages for IBM and/or Apple Computers. Included are "Windows on Science: Volume 1--Physical Science"; "Science Probe--Physical Science"; "Wildlife Adventures--Grizzly Bears"; "Science Skills--Development Programs"; "The Clean Machine"; "Rock Doctor";…

  1. Software Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed is a computer software package entitled "Audubon Wildlife Adventures: Grizzly Bears" for Apple II and IBM microcomputers. Included are availability, hardware requirements, cost, and a description of the program. The murder-mystery flavor of the program is stressed in this program that focuses on illegal hunting and game…

  2. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six software packages for Apple and/or IBM computers. Included are "Autograph,""The New Game Show,""Science Probe-Earth Science,""Pollution Patrol,""Investigating Plant Growth," and "AIDS: The Investigation." Discussed are the grade level, function, availability, cost, and hardware requirements of each. (CW)

  3. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews five software packages for use with school age children. Includes "Science Toolkit Module 2: Earthquake Lab"; "Adaptations and Identification"; "Geoworld"; "Body Systems II Series: The Blood System: A Liquid of Life," all for Apple II, and "Science Courseware: Life Science/Biology" for…

  4. Reviews: Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Norma N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four computer software packages including: "The Physical Science Series: Sound" which demonstrates making waves, speed of sound, doppler effect, and human hearing; "Andromeda" depicting celestial motions in any direction; "Biology Quiz: Humans" covering chemistry, cells, viruses, and human biology; and…

  5. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews six software packages for use with school age children ranging from grade 3 to grade 12. Includes "The Microcomputer Based Lab Project: Motion, Sound"; "Genetics"; "Geologic History"; "The Microscope Simulator"; and "Wiz Works" all for Apple II and "Reading for Information: Level…

  6. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Contains evaluations of two computer software packages, "Simulation Experiments 45-48 in Epstein's Laboratory Manual for Chemistry" and "Maps and Legends--the Cartographer (Ver 3.0)." Includes a brief description, applications, and the perceived strengths and weaknesses for each package. (CW)

  7. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Norma N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes computer software for use with various age groups. Topics include activities involving temperature, simulations, earth science, the circulatory system, human body, reading in science, and ecology. Provides information on equipment needed, availability, package contents, and price. Comments of reviews are presented by classroom teachers.…

  8. Star Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloza, Brad

    2000-01-01

    Presents a collection of computer software programs designed to spark learning enthusiasm at every grade level and across the curriculum. They include Reader Rabbit's Learn to Read, Spelling Power, Mind Twister Math, Community Construction Kit, Breaking the Code, Encarta Africana 2000, Virtual Serengeti, Operation: Frog (Deluxe), and My First…

  9. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary G., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Describes three software packages: (1) "MacMendeleev"--database/graphic display for chemistry, grades 10-12, Macintosh; (2) "Geometry One: Foundations"--geometry tutorial, grades 7-12, IBM; (3) "Mathematics Exploration Toolkit"--algebra and calculus tutorial, grades 8-12, IBM. (MVL)

  10. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviewed three computer software packages for Apple II series computers. Includes "The Right Job," a career counseling program; "Zoyon Patrol," a problem-solving program; and "Adventures with Charts and Graphs: Project Zoo," a graphing, mathematics, and science skills program. Each review includes strengths, weaknesses, and suggestions for use.…

  11. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teles, Elizabeth, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are two computer software packages for Macintosh microcomputers including "Phase Portraits," an exploratory graphics tool for studying first-order planar systems; and "MacMath," a set of programs for exploring differential equations, linear algebra, and other mathematical topics. Features, ease of use, cost, availability, and hardware…

  12. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary G., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews three computer software: (1) "Elastic Lines: The Electronic Geoboard" on elementary geometry; (2) "Wildlife Adventures: Whales" on environmental science; and (3) "What Do You Do with a Broken Calculator?" on computation and problem solving. Summarizes the descriptions, strengths and weaknesses, and…

  13. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews two computer software programs: (1) "Conquering Ratios and Proportions" using a medieval theme for guided practice in identifying and forming ratios for grades 5-8, and (2) "Percent Word Problems" providing problems for finding a percentage of a number and a number from a percentage. (YP)

  14. Software reengineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Programs in use today generally have all of the function and information processing capabilities required to do their specified job. However, older programs usually use obsolete technology, are not integrated properly with other programs, and are difficult to maintain. Reengineering is becoming a prominent discipline as organizations try to move their systems to more modern and maintainable technologies. The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Software Technology Branch (STB) is researching and developing a system to support reengineering older FORTRAN programs into more maintainable forms that can also be more readily translated to a modern languages such as FORTRAN 8x, Ada, or C. This activity has led to the development of maintenance strategies for design recovery and reengineering. These strategies include a set of standards, methodologies, and the concepts for a software environment to support design recovery and reengineering. A brief description of the problem being addressed and the approach that is being taken by the STB toward providing an economic solution to the problem is provided. A statement of the maintenance problems, the benefits and drawbacks of three alternative solutions, and a brief history of the STB experience in software reengineering are followed by the STB new FORTRAN standards, methodology, and the concepts for a software environment.

  15. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Reviews of seven software packages are presented including "The Environment I: Habitats and EcoSystems; II Cycles and Interactions"; "Super Sign Maker"; "The Great Knowledge Race: Substance Abuse"; "Exploring Science: Temperature"; "Fast Food Calculator and RD Aide"; "The Human Body:…

  16. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are seven computer software packages including "Frog Dissection Lab Report,""Backyard Birds,""LEGO TC Logo,""Alcohol--Four Interactive Programs,""Windows on Science--Life Science,""Climate and Weather/Our Town Database," and "Weeds to Trees." Discussed are availability, features, strengths, and weaknesses. (CW)

  17. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are two computer software packages: "Super Solvers Midnight Rescue!" a problem-solving program for IBM PCs; and "Interactive Physics," a simulation program for the Macintosh computer. The functions of the package are discussed including strengths and weaknesses and teaching suggestions. (CW)

  18. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are seven computer software packages including "Frog Dissection Lab Report,""Backyard Birds,""LEGO TC Logo,""Alcohol--Four Interactive Programs,""Windows on Science--Life Science,""Climate and Weather/Our Town Database," and "Weeds to Trees." Discussed are availability, features, strengths, and weaknesses. (CW)

  19. Reviews: Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Norma N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four computer software packages including: "The Physical Science Series: Sound" which demonstrates making waves, speed of sound, doppler effect, and human hearing; "Andromeda" depicting celestial motions in any direction; "Biology Quiz: Humans" covering chemistry, cells, viruses, and human biology; and…

  20. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six software packages for Apple and/or IBM computers. Included are "Autograph,""The New Game Show,""Science Probe-Earth Science,""Pollution Patrol,""Investigating Plant Growth," and "AIDS: The Investigation." Discussed are the grade level, function, availability, cost, and hardware requirements of each. (CW)

  1. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    History Microcomputer Review, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews seven educational computer software packages covering such topics as presidential elections, the American Revolution, the Vietnam War, the construction of historical time lines, and general U.S. history. Also reviews a program designed to help tailor data entry files. Provides ordering information, price, and computer compatibility…

  2. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews three computer software programs: (1) "Discovery! Experiences with Scientific Reasoning"--problem solving for grades 4-12 (Apple II); (2) "Organic Stereochemistry"--a tutorial for organic chemistry for advanced secondary/college level (Apple II); and (3) "SHOW PARTNER (2.01)"--a graphics utility tool for…

  3. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Joseph C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Gives a review of four software packages including "Science Toolkit: Module 3--Body Lab" for measuring heart rate, lung capacity, and response time; "Project Zoo: Adventures with Charts and Graphs" for developing process skills; "The Body Electric" for explaining electrical activity in the body; and "M-ss-ng…

  4. Software Patents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund B.

    1994-01-01

    Outlines basic patent law information that pertains to computer software programs. Topics addressed include protection in other countries; how to obtain patents; kinds of patents; duration; classes of patentable subject matter, including machines and processes; patentability searches; experimental use prior to obtaining a patent; and patent…

  5. Statistical Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callamaras, Peter

    1983-01-01

    This buyer's guide to seven major types of statistics software packages for microcomputers reviews Edu-Ware Statistics 3.0; Financial Planning; Speed Stat; Statistics with DAISY; Human Systems Dynamics package of Stats Plus, ANOVA II, and REGRESS II; Maxistat; and Moore-Barnes' MBC Test Construction and MBC Correlation. (MBR)

  6. Star Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloza, Brad

    2000-01-01

    Presents a collection of computer software programs designed to spark learning enthusiasm at every grade level and across the curriculum. They include Reader Rabbit's Learn to Read, Spelling Power, Mind Twister Math, Community Construction Kit, Breaking the Code, Encarta Africana 2000, Virtual Serengeti, Operation: Frog (Deluxe), and My First…

  7. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are computer software packages: "Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego,""The Bio Sci Videodisc," and "Bio Sci Stacks." Included are hardware requirements, costs, emphasis, grade level, and availability. Functions of the packages are discussed including strengths and weaknesses and teaching suggestions. (CW)

  8. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Reviews of seven software packages are presented including "The Environment I: Habitats and EcoSystems; II Cycles and Interactions"; "Super Sign Maker"; "The Great Knowledge Race: Substance Abuse"; "Exploring Science: Temperature"; "Fast Food Calculator and RD Aide"; "The Human Body:…

  9. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are two computer software programs for Apple II computers on weather for upper elementary and middle school grades. "Weather" introduces the major factors (temperature, humidity, wind, and air pressure) affecting weather. "How Weather Works" uses simulation and auto-tutorial formats on sun, wind, fronts, clouds, and…

  10. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary G., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews three software packages: (1) "The Weather Machine Courseware Kit" for grades 7-12; (2) "Exploring Measurement, Time, and Money--Level I," for primary level mathematics; and (3) "Professor DOS with SmartGuide for DOS" providing an extensive tutorial covering DOS 2.1 to 4.0. Discusses the strengths and…

  11. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviewed three computer software packages for Apple II series computers. Includes "The Right Job," a career counseling program; "Zoyon Patrol," a problem-solving program; and "Adventures with Charts and Graphs: Project Zoo," a graphing, mathematics, and science skills program. Each review includes strengths, weaknesses, and suggestions for use.…

  12. Reviews, Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews two software programs for Apple series computers. Includes "Orbital Mech," a basic planetary orbital simulation for the Macintosh, and "START: Stimulus and Response Tools for Experiments in Memory, Learning, Cognition, and Perception," a program that demonstrates basic psychological principles and experiments. (CW)

  13. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaman, Daniel E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four educational software packages for Apple, IBM, and Tandy computers. Includes "How the West was One + Three x Four,""Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing,""Math and Me," and "Write On." Reviews list hardware requirements, emphasis, levels, publisher, purchase agreements, and price. Discusses the strengths…

  14. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are two computer software programs for Apple II computers on weather for upper elementary and middle school grades. "Weather" introduces the major factors (temperature, humidity, wind, and air pressure) affecting weather. "How Weather Works" uses simulation and auto-tutorial formats on sun, wind, fronts, clouds, and…

  15. Software Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 2000

    2000-01-01

    A chart of 40 alumni-development database systems provides information on vendor/Web site, address, contact/phone, software name, price range, minimum suggested workstation/suggested server, standard reports/reporting tools, minimum/maximum record capacity, and number of installed sites/client type. (DB)

  16. Software Surveyor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    1995. [7] A. Carzaniga . Siena: A Wide-Area Event Notification Service. University of Colorado Software Engineering Research Laboratory (SERL...Architecture, http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4/docs/guide/jpda/jdi/in dex.html [1] A. Carzaniga , D.S. Rosenblum, and A.L. Wolf "Design and Evaluation of a

  17. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are computer software packages: "Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego,""The Bio Sci Videodisc," and "Bio Sci Stacks." Included are hardware requirements, costs, emphasis, grade level, and availability. Functions of the packages are discussed including strengths and weaknesses and teaching suggestions. (CW)

  18. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Norma N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes computer software for use with various age groups. Topics include activities involving temperature, simulations, earth science, the circulatory system, human body, reading in science, and ecology. Provides information on equipment needed, availability, package contents, and price. Comments of reviews are presented by classroom teachers.…

  19. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics and Computer Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presented are reviews of several microcomputer software programs. Included are reviews of: (1) Microstat (Zenith); (2) MathCAD (MathSoft); (3) Discrete Mathematics (True Basic); (4) CALCULUS (True Basic); (5) Linear-Kit (John Wiley); and (6) Geometry Sensei (Broderbund). (RH)

  20. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Gary G., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews three computer software: (1) "Elastic Lines: The Electronic Geoboard" on elementary geometry; (2) "Wildlife Adventures: Whales" on environmental science; and (3) "What Do You Do with a Broken Calculator?" on computation and problem solving. Summarizes the descriptions, strengths and weaknesses, and…

  1. Development of DEM formalism to modeling the dynamic response of brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Aleksandr S.; Shilko, Eugeny V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents a numerical model of the response for brittle materials to dynamic mechanical loading and implementation of the model within the discrete element method (DEM) by the example of the movable cellular automaton method (MCA). Verification of the model was carried out using the numerical modeling of the uniaxial compression tests of concrete and sandstone samples at various strain rates. It is shown that the developed model is correct and adequately describes the behavior of brittle materials under dynamic loading.

  2. Time-dependent cracking and brittle creep in crustal rocks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.; Baud, P.

    2013-07-01

    Rock fracture under upper crustal conditions is driven not only by applied stresses, but also by time-dependent, chemically activated subcritical cracking processes. These subcritical processes are of great importance for the understanding of the mechanical behaviour of rocks over geological timescales. A macroscopic manifestation of time-dependency in the brittle field is the observation that rocks can deform and fail at constant applied stresses, a phenomenon known as brittle creep. Here, we review the available experimental evidence for brittle creep in crustal rocks, and the various models developed to explain the observations. Laboratory experiments have shown that brittle creep occurs in all major rock types, and that creep strain rates are extremely sensitive to the environmental conditions: differential stress, confining pressure, temperature and pore fluid composition. Even small changes in any of these parameters produce order of magnitude changes in creep strain rates (and times-to-failure). Three main classes of brittle creep model have been proposed to explain these observations: phenomenological, statistical, and micromechanical. Statistical and micromechanical models explain qualitatively how the increasing influence of microcrack interactions and/or the increasing accumulated damage produces the observed evolution of macroscopic deformation during brittle creep. However, no current model can predict quantitatively all of the observed features of brittle creep. Experimental data are limited by the timescale over which experiments are realistically feasible. Clearly, an extension of the range of available laboratory data to lower strain rates, and the development of new modelling approaches are needed to further improve our current understanding of time-dependent brittle deformation in rocks.

  3. Brittle Fracture Theory Predicts the Equation of Motion of Frictional Rupture Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Kammer, David S.; Bayart, Elsa; Cohen, Gil; Fineberg, Jay

    2017-03-01

    We study rupture fronts propagating along the interface separating two bodies at the onset of frictional motion via high-temporal-resolution measurements of the real contact area and strain fields. The strain measurements provide the energy flux and dissipation at the rupture tips. We show that the classical equation of motion for brittle shear cracks, derived by balancing these quantities, well describes the velocity evolution of frictional ruptures. Our results demonstrate the extensive applicability of the dynamic brittle fracture theory to friction.

  4. Determination of the ductile-brittle transition temperature from the microplastic-strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. K.; Solntsev, Yu. P.

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the determination of the tendency of cast and deformed steels to brittle fracture using the temperature dependence of the small-plastic-strain rate is studied. The temperature corresponding to the maximum in this curve is found to indicate an abrupt decrease in the steel plasticity, which makes it possible to interpret it as the ductile-brittle transition temperature depending only on the structure of a material.

  5. Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang; Braeu, Michael; Breu, Josef

    2013-02-15

    A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

  6. Brittle materials at high-loading rates: an open area of research

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Brittle materials are extensively used in many civil and military applications involving high-strain-rate loadings such as: blasting or percussive drilling of rocks, ballistic impact against ceramic armour or transparent windshields, plastic explosives used to damage or destroy concrete structures, soft or hard impacts against concrete structures and so on. With all of these applications, brittle materials are subjected to intense loadings characterized by medium to extremely high strain rates (few tens to several tens of thousands per second) leading to extreme and/or specific damage modes such as multiple fragmentation, dynamic cracking, pore collapse, shearing, mode II fracturing and/or microplasticity mechanisms in the material. Additionally, brittle materials exhibit complex features such as a strong strain-rate sensitivity and confining pressure sensitivity that justify expending greater research efforts to understand these complex features. Currently, the most popular dynamic testing techniques used for this are based on the use of split Hopkinson pressure bar methodologies and/or plate-impact testing methods. However, these methods do have some critical limitations and drawbacks when used to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. The present theme issue of Philosophical Transactions A provides an overview of the latest experimental methods and numerical tools that are currently being developed to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates’. PMID:27956517

  7. Brittle materials at high-loading rates: an open area of research.

    PubMed

    Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-28

    Brittle materials are extensively used in many civil and military applications involving high-strain-rate loadings such as: blasting or percussive drilling of rocks, ballistic impact against ceramic armour or transparent windshields, plastic explosives used to damage or destroy concrete structures, soft or hard impacts against concrete structures and so on. With all of these applications, brittle materials are subjected to intense loadings characterized by medium to extremely high strain rates (few tens to several tens of thousands per second) leading to extreme and/or specific damage modes such as multiple fragmentation, dynamic cracking, pore collapse, shearing, mode II fracturing and/or microplasticity mechanisms in the material. Additionally, brittle materials exhibit complex features such as a strong strain-rate sensitivity and confining pressure sensitivity that justify expending greater research efforts to understand these complex features. Currently, the most popular dynamic testing techniques used for this are based on the use of split Hopkinson pressure bar methodologies and/or plate-impact testing methods. However, these methods do have some critical limitations and drawbacks when used to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. The present theme issue of Philosophical Transactions A provides an overview of the latest experimental methods and numerical tools that are currently being developed to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  8. Brittleness modelling of shale gas reservoir: Case study of Pematang formation, Central Sumatera basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, A.; Iskandarsyah, Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    The Pematang formation, which is located at Central Sumatera basin become the prospective shale gas reservoir in the Kisaran area. It is shown by a large potential amount of gas and oil in place. However, there is still a lack of information about the shale properties in this field so it becomes a big challenge for developing the shale gas exploration. Based on the core and petrophysical analysis, it is shown that the formation is dominated by shale and some part is laminated by sand layers. There is a significantly large deposit of shale underneath sand layer. This paper aims to perform the brittleness modeling, which is based on the integration of geophysical and geomechanical data. In the application, the brittleness distribution map is used to delineate the brittle zone of the shale reservoir that has potential to be fractured by using an artificial hydraulic fracturing. The brittleness modeling is performed by using Statistic Linear Gaussian Simulation (SLGS) approach based on the 3D seismic data and the well log data. The brittleness map shows that the potential shale reservoir to be fractured, which is indicated by brittleness index greater than 0.5, is distributed in the eastern part and the north-eastern part of the study area at the depth range of 6308 feet to 7432 feet.

  9. Brittle materials at high-loading rates: an open area of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Brittle materials are extensively used in many civil and military applications involving high-strain-rate loadings such as: blasting or percussive drilling of rocks, ballistic impact against ceramic armour or transparent windshields, plastic explosives used to damage or destroy concrete structures, soft or hard impacts against concrete structures and so on. With all of these applications, brittle materials are subjected to intense loadings characterized by medium to extremely high strain rates (few tens to several tens of thousands per second) leading to extreme and/or specific damage modes such as multiple fragmentation, dynamic cracking, pore collapse, shearing, mode II fracturing and/or microplasticity mechanisms in the material. Additionally, brittle materials exhibit complex features such as a strong strain-rate sensitivity and confining pressure sensitivity that justify expending greater research efforts to understand these complex features. Currently, the most popular dynamic testing techniques used for this are based on the use of split Hopkinson pressure bar methodologies and/or plate-impact testing methods. However, these methods do have some critical limitations and drawbacks when used to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. The present theme issue of Philosophical Transactions A provides an overview of the latest experimental methods and numerical tools that are currently being developed to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  10. A new approach to rock brittleness and its usability at prediction of drillability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özfırat, M. Kemal; Yenice, Hayati; Şimşir, Ferhan; Yaralı, Olgay

    2016-07-01

    Rock brittleness is one of the most important issues in rock drilling and cutting. The relations between drillability and brittleness will assist engineers in excavation works. The demand for representative rock parameters related to planning of underground excavations is increasing, as these parameters constitute fundamental input for obtaining the most reliable cost and time estimates. In rock cutting mechanics, the effects of the rock and brittleness on the efficiency of drilling and excavation are examined by many researchers. In this study, 41 different rock types were tested in laboratory to investigate the relations between the drilling rate index and different brittleness values. Firstly, the relations defined in literature are tested. Strength tests are made according to International Society for Rock Mechanics standards. In addition Norwegian University of Science and Technology standards are used to determine drilling rate index. Then, a new brittleness index is proposed which is the arithmetic average of uniaxial compressive strength and tensile strength. Considering the regression analysis carried out, it was seen that the proposed formula showed good correlation for these samples handled in this study. As a result of this study, a high correlation is obtained between the proposed index and drilling rate index values (R:0.84). The results are found to be at least reliable as well as other brittleness equations given in literature.

  11. Influence of the brittle behavior of work materials on polishing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Satoshi; Gemma, Masaya; Hayashi, Keitoku; Kondo, Yasuo; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yakou, Takao; Arakawa, Susumu

    2017-09-01

    Diamond electrodeposited wire tools are frequently used to cut thin wafers from hard and brittle materials. However, microcracks sometimes appear during the slicing process. The appearance of microcracks adversely affects slicing efficiency and slicing accuracy. In this study, we examine the influence of brittle behavior on the polishing characteristics such as polishing depth and tool wear. This is the first step toward investigating the influence of the brittle behavior of work materials on slicing characteristics. Ceramics such as alumina, silicon carbide, and zirconia are used as work materials. Even with the same degree of hardness, we found that the polishing depth values were greater for materials exhibiting brittle behavior. In the polishing of high-hardness materials, abrasive grains were badly damaged during the initial stages of polishing. Damage to the abrasive paper was less in wet polishing as compared with dry polishing. Moreover, wet polishing had a greater polishing depth than dry polishing. The polishing characteristics of the brittle materials were similar to the grooving characteristics produced using wire tools; however, both these characteristics depend on the brittle behavior of the work materials. Therefore, by performing simple polishing tests, estimating the state of grooving or slicing using wire tools is possible.

  12. Software interoperability for energy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Robert J.

    2002-07-31

    This paper provides an overview of software interoperability as it relates to the energy simulation of buildings. The paper begins with a discussion of the difficulties in using sophisticated analysis tools like energy simulation at various stages in the building life cycle, and the potential for interoperability to help overcome these difficulties. An overview of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), a common data model for supporting interoperability under continuing development by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) is then given. The process of creating interoperable software is described next, followed by specific details for energy simulation tools. The paper closes with the current status of, and future plans for, the ongoing efforts to achieve software interoperability.

  13. Software Epistemology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    epistemology have focused on two contrary goals: first, small signatures that are able to identify malware that may have polymorphic presentation and...one version of a library can interoperate with another version of the same library. In the case of small signatures for malware , signatures must be...from source code or machine binaries—enables the rapid identification of known software vulnerabilities, unsafe use cases, and hidden malware in

  14. Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    MathSoft Plus 5.0 is a calculation software package for electrical engineers and computer scientists who need advanced math functionality. It incorporates SmartMath, an expert system that determines a strategy for solving difficult mathematical problems. SmartMath was the result of the integration into Mathcad of CLIPS, a NASA-developed shell for creating expert systems. By using CLIPS, MathSoft, Inc. was able to save the time and money involved in writing the original program.

  15. Dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials: analytical mechanics-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drugan, W. J.

    2001-06-01

    Two analytical mechanics-based models of dynamic fragmentation in brittle materials are proposed and solved to predict fragment size and time to fragmentation onset in terms of fundamental material properties and the applied strain rate. Previous widely adopted analytical models of dynamic fragmentation are based on relatively simple energy balance arguments, and assume that the fragmentation event occurs instantaneously. The present models account for the actual time-varying dynamic deformation that occurs prior to fragmentation onset. One of the models treats the fragmenting material as initially flaw-free, and determines the minimum fragment size predicted by a dynamic instability analysis. The second model accounts for initial flaw spacing (which may correlate physically with, for example, grain size), and a dynamic instability analysis is employed to determine which flaws become critical. The fragment size predictions of the present models and two previous energy-based models are found to agree at extremely high strain rates (≈5×10 7/s for dense alumina), but the present, more realistic analysis indicates that the regime of validity of the energy-based models is rather restricted. The predictions of the present models are also shown to agree with those of a recent numerical finite element simulation of dynamic fragmentation which applies to a lower strain rate regime. Comparisons of the two new models show that if a material contains initial flaws whose spacing is smaller than the predicted fragment size of an equivalent "unflawed" material, the fragment size of the preflawed material will be smaller in general, but usually not as small as the initial flaw spacing. The analysis also permits determination of the evolution of the strain rate distribution in a prospective fragment before and after fragmentation initiation; results are presented for some example cases. Finally, closed-form analytical results are derived for minimum fragment size and time to

  16. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the control of elastic-brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Christopher; Robertson, Robert; Wall, Richard; Steele, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    At volcanoes reawakening after long repose, patterns of unrest normally reflect the elastic-brittle deformation of crust above a magma reservoir. Local fault movements, detected as volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, increase in number with surface deformation, at first approximately exponentially and then linearly. The trends describe how crustal behaviour evolves from quasi-elastic deformation under an increasing stress to inelastic deformation under a constant stress. They have been quantified and verified against experiments for deformation in compression [1]. We have extended the analysis to extensional deformation. The results agree well with field data for crust being stretched by a pressurizing magmatic system [2]. They also provide new criteria for enhancing the definitions of alert levels and preferred times to eruption. The VT-deformation sequence is a field proxy for changes in deformation with applied stress. The transition from quasi-elastic to inelastic behaviour is characterised in extension by the ratio of differential failure stress SF to tensile strength σT. Unrest data from at least basaltic to andesitic stratovolcanoes, as well as large calderas, yield preferred values for SF/σT ≤ 4, coinciding with the range for tensile failure expected from established theoretical constraints (from Mohr-Coulomb-Griffiths failure). We thus associate the transition with the approach to tensile rupture at the wall of a pressurized magma reservoir. In particular, values of about 2 are consistent with the rupture of a cylindrical reservoir, such as a closed conduit within a volcanic edifice, whereas values of about 3 suggest an approximately spherical reservoir, such as may exist at deeper levels. The onset of inelastic behaviour reflects the emergence of self-accelerating crack growth under a constant stress. Applied to forecasting eruptions, it provides a new and objective criterion for raising alert levels during an emergency; it yields the classic linear

  17. The mechanics of brittle fracture and faulting on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Elissa I.

    The surface of Venus exhibits all types of brittle fracture and faulting at all scales. The fractures often exhibit characteristic patterns indicative of the mechanical processes responsible for their formation. In this dissertation I investigate two types of fracture patterns: (1) radial fracture systems related to the emplacement of subsurface dikes, and (2) secondary fractures associated with strike-slip faulting. This work combines detailed structural mapping based on Magellan data with two- and three-dimensional boundary element models of fracture processes to explain the observed deformation and place it in the framework of global tectonics on Venus. I describe two radial fracture systems and compare their geometry to analytical models of dike emplacement from a central magma chamber to constrain the stress fields acting at the time of their formation. Two-dimensional numerical models were implemented to consider the effects of dike initiation, propagation, and interaction. I propose that the stress perturbation around a dike can control the spacing between dikes, and the magnitude of this perturbation is related to the three-dimensional dike shape. Using three-dimensional boundary element models of the stress field around a tabular dike, I determine the relationship between dike aspect ratio (height/length) and spacing. Dike spacing increases as the aspect ratio increases; this relationship is used to infer the height of subsurface dikes. For the analysis of secondary fractures associated with strike-slip faulting, I investigate the spatial and temporal relationships between a ridge belt and an extensive fracture system along the belt boundary in Lavinia Planitia, Venus. I propose that the fractures formed as the result of right-lateral shear localized along the ridge belt, which acted as a pre-existing weak zone hundreds of kilometers long. First-order models of the ridge belt as a crack-like fault plane indicate that the localization and orientation of the

  18. Analysis of the progressive failure of brittle matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.

    1995-01-01

    This report investigates two of the most common modes of localized failures, namely, periodic fiber-bridged matrix cracks and transverse matrix cracks. A modification of Daniels' bundle theory is combined with Weibull's weakest link theory to model the statistical distribution of the periodic matrix cracking strength for an individual layer. Results of the model predictions are compared with experimental data from the open literature. Extensions to the model are made to account for possible imperfections within the layer (i.e., nonuniform fiber lengths, irregular crack spacing, and degraded in-situ fiber properties), and the results of these studies are presented. A generalized shear-lag analysis is derived which is capable of modeling the development of transverse matrix cracks in material systems having a general multilayer configuration and under states of full in-plane load. A method for computing the effective elastic properties for the damaged layer at the global level is detailed based upon the solution for the effects of the damage at the local level. This methodology is general in nature and is therefore also applicable to (0(sub m)/90(sub n))(sub s) systems. The characteristic stress-strain response for more general cases is shown to be qualitatively correct (experimental data is not available for a quantitative evaluation), and the damage evolution is recorded in terms of the matrix crack density as a function of the applied strain. Probabilistic effects are introduced to account for the statistical nature of the material strengths, thus allowing cumulative distribution curves for the probability of failure to be generated for each of the example laminates. Additionally, Oh and Finney's classic work on fracture location in brittle materials is extended and combined with the shear-lag analysis. The result is an analytical form for predicting the probability density function for the location of the next transverse crack occurrence within a crack bounded

  19. Know Your Software Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Doug

    1986-01-01

    Advice on how to find the best software for institutional needs is presented. Purchasing prewritten software, acquiring custom-written software, and improving ready-made software are discussed. Questions to ask before buying software are provided. (MLW)

  20. Space Station Software Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S. (Editor); Beskenis, S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Issues in the development of software for the Space Station are discussed. Software acquisition and management, software development environment, standards, information system support for software developers, and a future software advisory board are addressed.

  1. Brittle frictional mountain building: 2. Thermal structure and heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Terence D.; Dahlen, F. A.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes a simple thermal model of an actively deforming critically tapered fold-and-thrust belt. The model determines the steady state temperature distribution and heat flow, as well as the pressure-temperature-time histories of rocks that outcrop at the surface. The main parameters controlling the thermal structure are the accretion and erosion rates, the undisturbed geothermal gradient at the toe, and the amount of frictional heating. Both shear heating on the decollement fault and internal strain heating within the deforming brittle wedge are incorporated in a mechanically consistent manner, and they dominate the effect of radiogenic heating, except in fold-and-thrust belts with significantly overpressured pore fluids. The mean stresses, temperatures, and surface heat flow all increase with an increase in the basal and internal coefficients of friction, and this dependence is used to constrain the level of friction on the decollement fault beneath the steady state fold-and-thrust belt in Taiwan. Rocks outcropping in the core of the Central Mountain Range of Taiwan experience maximum theoretical temperatures in excess of 400° C and maximum mean pressures in excess of 500 MPa if the coefficient of basal friction is μb = 0.5. Qualitatively, these conditions are in good agreement with the observed high greenschist facies metamorphism. The theoretical surface heat flow, which increases from 95 mW/m2 at the front of the fold-and-thrust belt to 240 mW/m2 at the rear, is in excellent agreement with the results of a recent geothermal survey of Taiwan, and theoretical cooling histories are in good agreement with fission track and other geochronologic studies. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that sliding on the basal decollement fault beneath Taiwan is governed by a coefficient of friction in the range of typical laboratory measurements, μb = 0.5 ± 0.2. Approximately 35% of the total surface heat flux of 3 GW is heat conducted into

  2. Software Innovation in a Mission Critical Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Operating in mission-critical environments requires trusted solutions, and the preference for "tried and true" approaches presents a potential barrier to infusing innovation into mission-critical systems. This presentation explores opportunities to overcome this barrier in the software domain. It outlines specific areas of innovation in software development achieved by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering Directorate in support of NASA's major human spaceflight programs, including International Space Station, Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (Orion), and Commercial Crew Programs. Software engineering teams at JSC work with hardware developers, mission planners, and system operators to integrate flight vehicles, habitats, robotics, and other spacecraft elements for genuinely mission critical applications. The innovations described, including the use of NASA Core Flight Software and its associated software tool chain, can lead to software that is more affordable, more reliable, better modelled, more flexible, more easily maintained, better tested, and enabling of automation.

  3. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  4. Experimental demonstration of a semi-brittle origin for crustal strain transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reber, J. E.; Lavier, L. L.; Hayman, N. W.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic motions that give rise to destructive earthquakes and enigmatic transient slip events are commonly explained by friction laws that describe slip on fault surfaces and gouge-filled zones. Friction laws with the added effects of pore fluid pressure, shear heating, and chemical reactions as currently applied do not take into account that over a wide range of pressure and temperature conditions rocks deform following a complex mixed brittle-ductile rheology. In semi-brittle materials, such as polymineralic rocks, elasto-plastic and visco-elastic defamation can be observed simultaneously in different phases of the material. Field observations of such semi-brittle rocks at the mesoscale have shown that for a given range of composition, temperature, and pressure, the formation of fluid-filled brittle fractures and veins can precede and accompany the development of localized ductile flow. We propose that the coexistence of brittle and viscous behavior controls some of the physical characteristics of strain transients and slow slip events. Here we present results from shear experiments on semi-brittle rock analogues investigating the effect of yield stress on fracture propagation and connection, and how this can lead to reoccurring strain transients. During the experiments we monitor the evolution of fractures and flow as well as the force development in the system. We show that the nature of localized slip and flow in semi-brittle materials depends on the initiation and formation of mode I and II fractures and does not involve frictional behavior, supporting an alternative mechanism for the development of tectonic strain transients.

  5. Benchmarking the Sandbox: Quantitative Comparisons of Numerical and Analogue Models of Brittle Wedge Dynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.; Schreurs, G.; Geomod2008 Team

    2010-12-01

    When numerical and analogue models are used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes in crust and lithosphere, they face specific challenges related to, among others, large contrasts in material properties, the heterogeneous character of continental lithosphere, the presence of a free surface, the occurrence of large deformations including viscous flow and offset on shear zones, and the observation that several deformation mechanisms may be active simultaneously. These pose specific demands on numerical software and laboratory models. By combining the two techniques, we can utilize the strengths of each individual method and test the model-independence of our results. We can perhaps even consider our findings to be more robust if we find similar-to-same results irrespective of the modeling method that was used. To assess the role of modeling method and to quantify the variability among models with identical setups, we have performed a direct comparison of results of 11 numerical codes and 15 analogue experiments. We present three experiments that describe shortening of brittle wedges and that resemble setups frequently used by especially analogue modelers. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain their surface slope and do not show internal deformation. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. All models show similar cross-sectional evolutions that demonstrate reproducibility to first order. However

  6. Overcoming Resistance to Training: A Nonconfrontive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipshitz, Raanan; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Three groups of strategies for overcoming trainee resistance are (1) preventing (distracting, assuming a "one-down" position, baiting, preempting, linking); (2) circumventing (refraining, disengaging); and (3) using resistance (treating it as substantive agreement). (SK)

  7. Software Prototyping

    PubMed Central

    Del Fiol, Guilherme; Hanseler, Haley; Crouch, Barbara Insley; Cummins, Mollie R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Health information exchange (HIE) between Poison Control Centers (PCCs) and Emergency Departments (EDs) could improve care of poisoned patients. However, PCC information systems are not designed to facilitate HIE with EDs; therefore, we are developing specialized software to support HIE within the normal workflow of the PCC using user-centered design and rapid prototyping. Objective To describe the design of an HIE dashboard and the refinement of user requirements through rapid prototyping. Methods Using previously elicited user requirements, we designed low-fidelity sketches of designs on paper with iterative refinement. Next, we designed an interactive high-fidelity prototype and conducted scenario-based usability tests with end users. Users were asked to think aloud while accomplishing tasks related to a case vignette. After testing, the users provided feedback and evaluated the prototype using the System Usability Scale (SUS). Results Survey results from three users provided useful feedback that was then incorporated into the design. After achieving a stable design, we used the prototype itself as the specification for development of the actual software. Benefits of prototyping included having 1) subject-matter experts heavily involved with the design; 2) flexibility to make rapid changes, 3) the ability to minimize software development efforts early in the design stage; 4) rapid finalization of requirements; 5) early visualization of designs; 6) and a powerful vehicle for communication of the design to the programmers. Challenges included 1) time and effort to develop the prototypes and case scenarios; 2) no simulation of system performance; 3) not having all proposed functionality available in the final product; and 4) missing needed data elements in the PCC information system. PMID:27081404

  8. Software Surrogate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, Blackboard Technology received a NASA Phase I SBIR award entitled "A Blackboard-Based Framework for Mixed-Initiative, Crewed- Space-System Applications." This research continued in Phase II at JSC, where a generic architecture was developed in which a software surrogate serves as the operator's representative in the fast-paced realm of nearly autonomous, intelligent systems. This SBIR research effort addressed the need to support human-operator monitoring and intervention with intelligent systems such as those being developed for NASA's crewed space program.

  9. Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    General Purpose Boundary Element Solution Technology (GPBEST) software employs the boundary element method of mechanical engineering analysis, as opposed to finite element. It is, according to one of its developers, 10 times faster in data preparation and more accurate than other methods. Its use results in less expensive products because the time between design and manufacturing is shortened. A commercial derivative of a NASA-developed computer code, it is marketed by Best Corporation to solve problems in stress analysis, heat transfer, fluid analysis and yielding and cracking of solids. Other applications include designing tractor and auto parts, household appliances and acoustic analysis.

  10. Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Various NASA Small Business Innovation Research grants from Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Ames Research Center were used to develop the 'kernel' of COMCO's modeling and simulation software, the PHLEX finite element code. NASA needed it to model designs of flight vehicles; one of many customized commercial applications is UNISIM, a PHLEX-based code for analyzing underground flows in oil reservoirs for Texaco, Inc. COMCO's products simulate a computational mechanics problem, estimate the solution's error and produce the optimal hp-adapted mesh for the accuracy the user chooses. The system is also used as a research or training tool in universities and in mechanical design in industrial corporations.

  11. The viscous to brittle transition in eruptions of clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Diana; Scheu, Bettina; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Kennedy, Ben; Jolly, Art; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    solid-like behaviour is a viscous to brittle transition and occurs between a kaolin mass fraction of 0.48 and 0.65, which is consistent with previous observations of the liquid and plastic rheological limits, respectively. We find that a Stokes' number balances the timescale of flow with the timescale of particle motion opposing flow. We suggest that the transition from regime 1 to regime 2 occurs when the relative velocity between the ejected material and the gas phase increases and the Stokes' number exceeds 1, leading to decoupling and shear-stresses at the ejected fluid interfaces. A capillary number characterizes the transition from elongated liquid structures (regime 2) to individual droplets (regime 3) in the liquid-dominated system when the relative velocity drops to a value at which surface tension can restore the droplets to spherical. Our results emphasize that the different rheology of muddy material exhibit different characteristic eruption styles and offers a way to classify them.

  12. Quantitative comparisons of analogue models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido

    2010-05-01

    Analogue model experiments are widely used to gain insights into the evolution of geological structures. In this study, we present a direct comparison of experimental results of 14 analogue modelling laboratories using prescribed set-ups. A quantitative analysis of the results will document the variability among models and will allow an appraisal of reproducibility and limits of interpretation. This has direct implications for comparisons between structures in analogue models and natural field examples. All laboratories used the same frictional analogue materials (quartz and corundum sand) and prescribed model-building techniques (sieving and levelling). Although each laboratory used its own experimental apparatus, the same type of self-adhesive foil was used to cover the base and all the walls of the experimental apparatus in order to guarantee identical boundary conditions (i.e. identical shear stresses at the base and walls). Three experimental set-ups using only brittle frictional materials were examined. In each of the three set-ups the model was shortened by a vertical wall, which moved with respect to the fixed base and the three remaining sidewalls. The minimum width of the model (dimension parallel to mobile wall) was also prescribed. In the first experimental set-up, a quartz sand wedge with a surface slope of ˜20° was pushed by a mobile wall. All models conformed to the critical taper theory, maintained a stable surface slope and did not show internal deformation. In the next two experimental set-ups, a horizontal sand pack consisting of alternating quartz sand and corundum sand layers was shortened from one side by the mobile wall. In one of the set-ups a thin rigid sheet covered part of the model base and was attached to the mobile wall (i.e. a basal velocity discontinuity distant from the mobile wall). In the other set-up a basal rigid sheet was absent and the basal velocity discontinuity was located at the mobile wall. In both types of experiments

  13. The evolution of fabric with displacement in natural brittle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittempergher, S.; Di Toro, G.; Gratier, J.; Aretusini, S.; Boullier-Bertrand, A.

    2011-12-01

    and titanite in the foliation planes. The cataclasites are cemented by pervasive precipitation of K-feldspar plagues and idiomorphic, randomly oriented, epidote and chlorite. We conclude that the textures of these small displacement (< 500 mm) faults are controlled by brittle processes (fracture propagation and cataclastic comminution) similar to those reproduced in friction experiments performed on granite gouge (e.g., Beeler et al., 1996; Logan, 2007). Then progressively, stress driven fluid-rock reactions develop as fracturing and grain size reduction allows the kinetics of these reactions to be more efficient and fracture interconnection allows fluid infiltration. Healing of microfractures and fault rock cementation caused a rapid posteismic recovery of fault strength. References Beeler, N.M., Tullis, T.E., Blanpied, L., Weeks, J.D., 1996. Frictional behaviour of large displacement experimental faults. Journal of Geophysical Research 101, B4, 8697-8715. Logan, J.M., 2007. The progression from damage to localization of displacement observed in laboratory testing of porous rocks, in Lewis, H., and Couples, G.D. (eds.) The relationship between damage and localization. Geological Society of London Special Publication 289, 75-87.

  14. Strength/Brittleness Classification of Igneous Intact Rocks Based on Basic Physical and Dynamic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aligholi, Saeed; Lashkaripour, Gholam Reza; Ghafoori, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This paper sheds further light on the fundamental relationships between simple methods, rock strength, and brittleness of igneous rocks. In particular, the relationship between mechanical (point load strength index I s(50) and brittleness value S 20), basic physical (dry density and porosity), and dynamic properties (P-wave velocity and Schmidt rebound values) for a wide range of Iranian igneous rocks is investigated. First, 30 statistical models (including simple and multiple linear regression analyses) were built to identify the relationships between mechanical properties and simple methods. The results imply that rocks with different Schmidt hardness (SH) rebound values have different physicomechanical properties or relations. Second, using these results, it was proved that dry density, P-wave velocity, and SH rebound value provide a fine complement to mechanical properties classification of rock materials. Further, a detailed investigation was conducted on the relationships between mechanical and simple tests, which are established with limited ranges of P-wave velocity and dry density. The results show that strength values decrease with the SH rebound value. In addition, there is a systematic trend between dry density, P-wave velocity, rebound hardness, and brittleness value of the studied rocks, and rocks with medium hardness have a higher brittleness value. Finally, a strength classification chart and a brittleness classification table are presented, providing reliable and low-cost methods for the classification of igneous rocks.

  15. Software system safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uber, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Software itself is not hazardous, but since software and hardware share common interfaces there is an opportunity for software to create hazards. Further, these software systems are complex, and proven methods for the design, analysis, and measurement of software safety are not yet available. Some past software failures, future NASA software trends, software engineering methods, and tools and techniques for various software safety analyses are reviewed. Recommendations to NASA are made based on this review.

  16. Software management tools: Lessons learned from use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifer, D. J.; Valett, J.; Knight, J.; Wenneson, G.

    1985-01-01

    Experience in inserting software project planning tools into more than 100 projects producing mission critical software are discussed. The problems the software project manager faces are listed along with methods and tools available to handle them. Experience is reported with the Project Manager's Workstation (PMW) and the SoftCost-R cost estimating package. Finally, the results of a survey, which looked at what could be done in the future to overcome the problems experienced and build a set of truly useful tools, are presented.

  17. An influence of normal stress and pore pressure on the conditions and dynamics of shear crack propagation in brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilko, Evgeny V.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of the influence of crack-normal stress on the shear strength of the brittle material with initial crack and the geometrical condition of acceleration of dynamically growing crack towards the longitudinal wave speed. We considered elastic-brittle permeable materials with nanoscale pore size. We have shown that pore fluid in nanoporous brittle materials influences mainly the condition of shear crack propagation transition from conventional sub-Rayleigh regime to supershear one. The results of the study make it possible to assess the ability of initial cracks in brittle materials to develop in supershear regime under the condition of confined longitudinal shear.

  18. Analytical model of brittle destruction based on hypothesis of scale similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Arakcheev, A. S. Lotov, K. V.

    2012-08-15

    The size distribution of dust particles in thermonuclear (fusion) devices is closely described by a power law, which may be related to the brittle destruction of materials. The hypothesis of scale similarity leads to the conclusion that the size distribution of particles formed as a result of a brittle destruction is described by a power law with the exponent -{alpha} that can range from -4 to -1. The model of brittle destruction is described in terms of the fractal geometry, and the distribution exponent is expressed via the fractal dimension of packing. Under additional assumptions, it is possible to refine the {alpha} value and, vice versa, to determine the type of destruction using the measured size distribution of particles.

  19. Sometimes two arms are enough--an unusual life-stage in brittle stars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea).

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Sabine; Alme, Øydis

    2015-08-03

    Off West Africa (Angola-Morocco), benthos samples were collected in the years 2005-2012. These contained 124 specimens of brittle stars with two long arms and three extremely short or absent arms and an elongated, narrow disc. These unusual brittle stars, as well as 33 specimens with five fully developed arms, were identified as Amphiura ungulata. The specimens with unequal arms were juvenile stages, whereas adults had five equal arms. The large number of specimens with unequal arms suggests that this condition is not the result of damage and regeneration, but a normal growth pattern in this species. This study documents the morphology by SEM, amends the species description, and discusses possible explanations for the evolution of this condition. Although brittle star species with unequal arm growth have been reported, this is an extreme case that was unknown before this study.

  20. Simulation study on the avalanche process of the mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Xia, Hui; Han, Kui

    2016-01-01

    The mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model is an extension model based on the classical fiber bundle model to describe the nonbrittle failure process of some hierarchical structure materials such as spider silk. In order to explore the breaking dynamic properties of the hierarchical structure materials in short-range correlation, the mixed brittle-plastic fiber bundle model in local load sharing condition is detailed and numerically studied. The impacts of the proportion of plastic fibers and the plastic strength of a single plastic fiber on the macroscopic constitutive behavior, the avalanche size distribution and the step number of the external load increasing are investigated, respectively. The numerical results show that the insert of plastic fibers will hinder the brittle fracture process; as a result, both the macroscopic mechanical natures and the statistical properties of fracture are significantly influenced.

  1. Unusual case of globe perforation: the brittle cornea without systemic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shilpa Ajit; Uppapalli, Shalomith; More, Pranav; Deshpande, Madan

    2016-10-07

    Brittle cornea syndrome is a rare generalised connective tissue disorder with ocular features like keratoglobus or keratoconus, severe corneal thinning and a high risk of perforation. Various authors in different case reports and case series have brought out the fact that brittle cornea is a disorder with characteristic systemic manifestations such as deafness, joint hypermobility, hyperelasticity of skin, kyphoscoliosis and dental abnormalities alongwith ophthalmic features. We report a case of globe perforation following trivial trauma, in an individual with brittle cornea without any extraocular manifestations, posing a challenge in the diagnosis and dilemma in surgical repair of cornea, restoration of globe integrity and visual rehabilitation. The absence of systemic manifestations decreased the index of suspicion and led to a surprise in the theatre-a point this case emphasised.

  2. Study on electroplating technology of diamond tools for machining hard and brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Chen, Jian Hua; Sun, Li Peng; Wang, Yue

    2016-10-01

    With the development of the high speed cutting, the ultra-precision machining and ultrasonic vibration technique in processing hard and brittle material , the requirement of cutting tools is becoming higher and higher. As electroplated diamond tools have distinct advantages, such as high adaptability, high durability, long service life and good dimensional stability, the cutting tools are effective and extensive used in grinding hard and brittle materials. In this paper, the coating structure of electroplating diamond tool is described. The electroplating process flow is presented, and the influence of pretreatment on the machining quality is analyzed. Through the experimental research and summary, the reasonable formula of the electrolyte, the electroplating technologic parameters and the suitable sanding method were determined. Meanwhile, the drilling experiment on glass-ceramic shows that the electroplating process can effectively improve the cutting performance of diamond tools. It has laid a good foundation for further improving the quality and efficiency of the machining of hard and brittle materials.

  3. A theoretical derivation of the dilatancy equation for brittle rocks based on Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Huang, Houxu; Wang, Mingyang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the micro-cracks in the brittle rocks are assumed to be penny shaped and evenly distributed; the damage and dilatancy of the brittle rocks is attributed to the growth and expansion of numerous micro-cracks under the local tensile stress. A single crack's behaviour under the local tensile stress is generalized to all cracks based on the distributed damage mechanics. The relationship between the local tensile stress and the external loading is derived based on the Maxwell model. The damage factor corresponding to the external loading is represented using the p-alpha (p-α) model. A dilatancy equation that can build up a link between the external loading and the rock dilatancy is established. A test of dilatancy of a brittle rock under triaxial compression is conducted; the comparison between experimental results and our theoretical results shows good consistency.

  4. ADOLESCENT ROMANCE AND DELINQUENCY: A FURTHER EXPLORATION OF HIRSCHI'S "COLD AND BRITTLE" RELATIONSHIPS HYPOTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Peggy C; Lonardo, Robert A; Manning, Wendy D; Longmore, Monica A

    2010-11-28

    Hirschi argued that delinquent youth tend to form relatively "cold and brittle" relationships with peers, depicting these youths as deficient in their attachments to others. The current analysis explores connections between delinquency and the character of adolescent romantic ties, drawing primarily on the first wave of the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study, and focusing on 957 teens with dating experience. We examine multiple relationship qualities/dynamics in order to explore both the "cold" and "brittle" dimensions of Hirschi's hypothesis. Regarding the "cold" assumption, results suggest that delinquency is not related to perceived importance of the romantic relationship, level of intimate self-disclosure or feelings of romantic love, and more delinquent youth actually report more frequent contact with their romantic partners. Analyses focused on two dimensions tapping the "brittle" description indicate that while durations of a focal relationship do not differ according to level of respondent delinquency, more delinquent youths report higher levels of verbal conflict.

  5. A theoretical derivation of the dilatancy equation for brittle rocks based on Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Huang, Houxu; Wang, Mingyang

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the micro-cracks in the brittle rocks are assumed to be penny shaped and evenly distributed; the damage and dilatancy of the brittle rocks is attributed to the growth and expansion of numerous micro-cracks under the local tensile stress. A single crack's behaviour under the local tensile stress is generalized to all cracks based on the distributed damage mechanics. The relationship between the local tensile stress and the external loading is derived based on the Maxwell model. The damage factor corresponding to the external loading is represented using the p-alpha ( p- α) model. A dilatancy equation that can build up a link between the external loading and the rock dilatancy is established. A test of dilatancy of a brittle rock under triaxial compression is conducted; the comparison between experimental results and our theoretical results shows good consistency.

  6. Variation of depth to the brittle-ductile transition due to cooling of a midcrustal intrusion.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The depth to the brittle-ductile transition in the crust is often defined by the intersection of a shear resistance relation in the brittle upper crust that increases linearly with depth and a power law relation for ductile flow in the lower crust that depends strongly on T. Transient variation of this depth caused by a magmatic intrusion at a depth near the regional transition can be modelled by a heat conduction model for a rectangular parallelepiped superimposed on a linear geothermal gradient. When parameters appropriate for the southeastern US are used, a moderate-sized intrusion is found to decrease the transition depth by as much as 7 km; significant variations last approx 10 m.y. Since the base of the seismogenic zone is identified with the brittle-ductile transition, these results imply that intrusions of late Tertiary age or younger could be important sources of clustered seismicity. -A.W.H.

  7. CARES/Life Software for Designing More Reliable Ceramic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Powers, Lynn M.; Baker, Eric H.

    1997-01-01

    Products made from advanced ceramics show great promise for revolutionizing aerospace and terrestrial propulsion, and power generation. However, ceramic components are difficult to design because brittle materials in general have widely varying strength values. The CAPES/Life software eases this task by providing a tool to optimize the design and manufacture of brittle material components using probabilistic reliability analysis techniques. Probabilistic component design involves predicting the probability of failure for a thermomechanically loaded component from specimen rupture data. Typically, these experiments are performed using many simple geometry flexural or tensile test specimens. A static, dynamic, or cyclic load is applied to each specimen until fracture. Statistical strength and SCG (fatigue) parameters are then determined from these data. Using these parameters and the results obtained from a finite element analysis, the time-dependent reliability for a complex component geometry and loading is then predicted. Appropriate design changes are made until an acceptable probability of failure has been reached.

  8. Prediction of Brittle Failure for TBM Tunnels in Anisotropic Rock: A Case Study from Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammyr, Øyvind

    2016-06-01

    Prediction of spalling and rock burst is especially important for hard rock TBM tunneling, because failure can have larger impact than in a drill and blast tunnel and ultimately threaten excavation feasibility. The majority of research on brittle failure has focused on rock types with isotropic behavior. This paper gives a review of existing theory and its application before a 3.5-m-diameter TBM tunnel in foliated granitic gneiss is used as a case to study brittle failure characteristics of anisotropic rock. Important aspects that should be considered in order to predict brittle failure in anisotropic rock are highlighted. Foliation is responsible for considerable strength anisotropy and is believed to influence the preferred side of v-shaped notch development in the investigated tunnel. Prediction methods such as the semi- empirical criterion, the Hoek- Brown brittle parameters, and the non-linear damage initiation and spalling limit method give reliable results; but only as long as the angle between compression axis and foliation in uniaxial compressive tests is relevant, dependent on the relation between tunnel trend/plunge, strike/dip of foliation, and tunnel boundary stresses. It is further demonstrated that local in situ stress variations, for example, due to the presence of discontinuities, can have profound impact on failure predictions. Other carefully documented case studies into the brittle failure nature of rock, in particular anisotropic rock, are encouraged in order to expand the existing and relatively small database. This will be valuable for future TBM planning and construction stages in highly stressed brittle anisotropic rock.

  9. The Potential of Brittle Star Extracted Polysaccharide in Promoting Apoptosis via Intrinsic Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer potential of marine natural products such as polysaccharides represented therapeutic potential in oncological researches. In this study, total polysaccharide from brittle star [Ophiocoma erinaceus (O. erinaceus)] was extracted and chemopreventive efficacy of Persian Gulf brittle star polysaccharide was investigated in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. To extract polysaccharide, dried brittle stars were ground and extracted mechanically. Then, detection of polysaccharide was performed by phenol sulfuric acid, Ultra Violet (UV)-sulfuric acid method and FTIR. The anti proliferative activity of isolated polysaccharide was examined by MTT assay and evaluation of cell death was done through morphological cell changes; Propodium Iodide staining, fluorescence microscopy and caspase-3, -9 enzymatic measurements. To assess its underlying mechanism, expression of Bax, Bcl-2 was evaluated. The polysaccharide detection methods demonstrated isolation of crude polysaccharide from Persian Gulf brittle star. The results revealed that O. erinaceus polysaccharide suppressed the proliferation of HeLa cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Morphological observation of DAPI and Acridine Orange/Propodium Iodide staining was documented by typical characteristics of apoptotic cell death. Flow cytometry analyses exhibited the accumulation of treated cells in sub-G1 region. Additionally, polysaccharide extracted induced intrinsic apoptosis via up-regulation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax along with down-regulation of Bcl-2 in HeLa cells. Taken together, the apoptosis inducing effect of brittle star polysaccharide via intrinsic pathway confirmed the anti tumor potential of marine polysaccharide. Therefore, these findings proposed new insight into anti cancer properties of brittle star polysaccharide as a promising agent in cervical cancer treatment.

  10. The Potential of Brittle Star Extracted Polysaccharide in Promoting Apoptosis via Intrinsic Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anti-cancer potential of marine natural products such as polysaccharides represented therapeutic potential in oncological researches. In this study, total polysaccharide from brittle star [Ophiocoma erinaceus (O. erinaceus)] was extracted and chemopreventive efficacy of Persian Gulf brittle star polysaccharide was investigated in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Methods: To extract polysaccharide, dried brittle stars were ground and extracted mechanically. Then, detection of polysaccharide was performed by phenol sulfuric acid, Ultra Violet (UV)-sulfuric acid method and FTIR. The anti proliferative activity of isolated polysaccharide was examined by MTT assay and evaluation of cell death was done through morphological cell changes; Propodium Iodide staining, fluorescence microscopy and caspase-3, -9 enzymatic measurements. To assess its underlying mechanism, expression of Bax, Bcl-2 was evaluated. Results: The polysaccharide detection methods demonstrated isolation of crude polysaccharide from Persian Gulf brittle star. The results revealed that O. erinaceus polysaccharide suppressed the proliferation of HeLa cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Morphological observation of DAPI and Acridine Orange/Propodium Iodide staining was documented by typical characteristics of apoptotic cell death. Flow cytometry analyses exhibited the accumulation of treated cells in sub-G1 region. Additionally, polysaccharide extracted induced intrinsic apoptosis via up-regulation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and Bax along with down-regulation of Bcl-2 in HeLa cells. Conclusion: Taken together, the apoptosis inducing effect of brittle star polysaccharide via intrinsic pathway confirmed the anti tumor potential of marine polysaccharide. Therefore, these findings proposed new insight into anti cancer properties of brittle star polysaccharide as a promising agent in cervical cancer treatment. PMID:26605009

  11. Influence of Composition and Deformation Conditions on the Strength and Brittleness of Shale Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Reinicke, A.; Meier, T.; Makasi, M.; Dresen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Stimulation of shale gas reservoirs by hydraulic fracturing operations aims to increase the production rate by increasing the rock surface connected to the borehole. Prospective shales are often believed to display high strength and brittleness to decrease the breakdown pressure required to (re-) initiate a fracture as well as slow healing of natural and hydraulically induced fractures to increase the lifetime of the fracture network. Laboratory deformation tests were performed on several, mainly European black shales with different mineralogical composition, porosity and maturity at ambient and elevated pressures and temperatures. Mechanical properties such as compressive strength and elastic moduli strongly depend on shale composition, porosity, water content, structural anisotropy, and on pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions, but less on strain rate. We observed a transition from brittle to semibrittle deformation at high P-T conditions, in particular for high porosity shales. At given P-T conditions, the variation of compressive strength and Young's modulus with composition can be roughly estimated from the volumetric proportion of all components including organic matter and pores. We determined also brittleness index values based on pre-failure deformation behavior, Young's modulus and bulk composition. At low P-T conditions, where samples showed pronounced post-failure weakening, brittleness may be empirically estimated from bulk composition or Young's modulus. Similar to strength, at given P-T conditions, brittleness depends on the fraction of all components and not the amount of a specific component, e.g. clays, alone. Beside strength and brittleness, knowledge of the long term creep properties of shales is required to estimate in-situ stress anisotropy and the healing of (propped) hydraulic fractures.

  12. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  13. Micromechanical constitutive model for low-temperature constant strain rate deformation of limestones in the brittle and semi-brittle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Deformation and failure of rocks are important for a better understanding of many crustal geological phenomena such as faulting and compaction. In carbonate rocks among others, low-temperature deformation can either occur with dilatancy or compaction, having implications for porosity changes, failure and petrophysical properties. Hence, a thorough understanding of all the micromechanisms responsible for deformation is of great interest. In this study, a constitutive model for the low-temperature deformation of low-porosity (<20 per cent) carbonate rocks is derived from the micromechanisms identified in previous studies. The micromechanical model is based on (1) brittle crack propagation, (2) a plasticity law (interpreted in terms of dislocation glide without possibility to climb) for porous media with hardening and (3) crack nucleation due to dislocation pile-ups. The model predicts stress-strain relations and the evolution of damage during deformation. The model adequately predicts brittle behaviour at low confining pressures, which switches to a semi-brittle behaviour characterized by inelastic compaction followed by dilatancy at higher confining pressures. Model predictions are compared to experimental results from previous studies and are found to be in close agreement with experimental results. This suggests that microphysical phenomena responsible for the deformation are sufficiently well captured by the model although twinning, recovery and cataclasis are not considered. The porosity range of applicability and limits of the model are discussed.

  14. Award-Winning CARES/Life Ceramics Durability Evaluation Software Is Making Advanced Technology Accessible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Products made from advanced ceramics show great promise for revolutionizing aerospace and terrestrial propulsion and power generation. However, ceramic components are difficult to design because brittle materials in general have widely varying strength values. The CARES/Life software developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center eases this by providing a tool that uses probabilistic reliability analysis techniques to optimize the design and manufacture of brittle material components. CARES/Life is an integrated package that predicts the probability of a monolithic ceramic component's failure as a function of its time in service. It couples commercial finite element programs--which resolve a component's temperature and stress distribution - with reliability evaluation and fracture mechanics routines for modeling strength - limiting defects. These routines are based on calculations of the probabilistic nature of the brittle material's strength.

  15. Mechanical behavior of limestone undergoing brittle-ductile transition: experiments and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Verberne, Berend; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Plümper, Oliver; Dimanov, Alexandre; Spiers, Christopher; Guéguen, Yves

    2017-04-01

    With increasing confining pressure, carbonate rocks can undergo the brittle-ductile transition at room temperature. In order to examine the brittle-ductile transition, we performed constant strain rate triaxial deformation and stress-stepping creep experiments on Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%) under various conditions. The evolution of elastic wave velocities were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. The constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for varying confining pressure from 5 to 90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. The latter is characterized by dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop at failure. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle with elastic compaction followed by inelastic compaction, then leading to dilatancy and eventual failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation motions and twinning) and micro-cracking. Constant strain rates experiments were modelled taking into account (1) crack propagation from pre-existing flaws, (2) plastic pore collapse and (3) crack nucleation from dislocation pile-ups. The obtained model predictions are in good agreement with our experimental data. Stress stepping (creep) experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition (from 20 to 85 MPa). In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack nucleation and/or propagation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant due to plastic pore collapse. All following stress steps are dilatant as a result of crack nucleation and/or propagation. In general, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last step, during which the axial strain

  16. Micromechanics-Based Permeability Evolution in Brittle Materials at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, Thibaut; Bhat, Harsha S.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a micromechanics-based permeability evolution model for brittle materials at high strain rates (≥ 100 s^{-1}). Extending for undrained deformation the mechanical constitutive description of brittle solids, whose constitutive response is governed by micro-cracks, we now relate the damage-induced strains to micro-crack aperture. We then use an existing permeability model to evaluate the permeability evolution. This model predicts both the percolative and connected regime of permeability evolution of Westerly Granite during triaxial loading at high strain rate. This model can simulate pore pressure history during earthquake coseismic dynamic ruptures under undrained conditions.

  17. The width of fault zones in a brittle-viscous lithosphere: Strike-slip faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, E. M.

    1991-01-01

    A fault zone in an ideal brittle material overlying a very weak substrate could, in principle, consist of a single slip surface. Real fault zones have a finite width consisting of a number of nearly parallel slip surfaces on which deformation is distributed. The hypothesis that the finite width of fault zones reflects stresses due to quasistatic flow in the ductile substrate of a brittle surface layer is explored. Because of the simplicity of theory and observations, strike-slip faults are examined first, but the analysis can be extended to normal and thrust faulting.

  18. Automated Glycemic Pattern Analysis: Overcoming Diabetes Clinical Inertia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Frank L.; Marling, Cynthia R.; Shubrook, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The OneTouch® Verio™ IQ Meter with PatternAlert™ Technology has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first self-glucose monitor that can automatically determine glycemic patterns [high and low pre-meal blood glucose (BG)] for health care providers (HCPs) and patients. In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Katz and coauthors demonstrate that this device was more accurate and quicker in detecting abnormal glucose patterns than the review by HCPs of 30-day handwritten BG logs and that its interpretations were positively accepted by the HCPs. Continued development of automated pattern analysis and decision-support software to overcome the “data-overload” associated with intensive glucose monitoring and diabetes management will reduce clinical inertia and could dramatically improve diabetes outcomes. PMID:23439174

  19. Sandia software guidelines: Software quality planning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies procedures to follow in producing a Software Quality Assurance Plan for an organization or a project, and provides an example project SQA plan. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Office Computer Software: A Comprehensive Review of Software Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secretary, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Describes types of software including system software, application software, spreadsheets, accounting software, graphics packages, desktop publishing software, database, desktop and personal information management software, project and records management software, groupware, and shareware. (JOW)

  1. Machine Condition Monitoring Software Agent Using JADE and Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, R.

    2015-03-01

    In recent days there is a huge demand to increase the production of any mechanical components without any disturbance or mechanical faults in the machine. Therefore, to increase the productivity, it is necessary to monitor the running machine at regular intervals. To overcome such difficulties, a new machine condition monitoring software is designed using the multi agent software. This software is designed using the JADE framework and the data are analyzed using free open source Weka explorer for statistical calculations.

  2. Helping Developmental Students Overcome Communication Apprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.

    Since 20% of all college students experience communication apprehension (CA), the developmental student, distinguished by lower than average academic scores, may also experience this inhibiting fear of communication. Characteristics of the developmental communication apprehensive student indicate that a program for overcoming communication…

  3. Overcoming the Mechanism of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brian Marples PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: William Beaumont Hospital Inc...COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Overcoming the Mechanism of Radioresistance in Neuroblastoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...for highly aggressive advanced-stage neuroblastoma remains poor despite a multidisciplinary approach involving aggressive surgery, chemotherapy and

  4. First Davis Strait discovery overcomes offshore hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, R.G.

    1982-04-01

    In spite of icebergs umpredictable currents and brief drilling seasons, the first discovery well was completed recently in the Davis Strait. The success of this well, known as Hekja 0-71, has opened the waters off the northeastern coast of Canada to more exploration. A discussion is presented of how the well was drilled, the problems encountered and how they were overcome.

  5. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  6. Overcoming Xenophobia: Learning to Accept Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Judith A.

    1990-01-01

    Quality health education requires that health educators engage in the professional and personal development necessary to overcome xenophobia when working with special populations (obese, elderly, indigent, minorities, etc.). This article describes strategies employed in a university community health education class to help students overcome…

  7. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  8. Ideas for Creating and Overcoming Student Silences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Donald R.; Sheardown, Heather

    2009-01-01

    The key idea is that 50 minutes of teacher talk with passive student listening is relatively ineffective in developing student learning. Teachers can create silences for productive active student learning. Students can also change from passive listeners to active talker-discussers of their learning. Ideas are given about how to overcome silences…

  9. Overcoming Blocks and Barriers to Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudsepp, Eugene

    1982-01-01

    The most serious blocks to creative thinking are viewed as psychological in nature. These obstacles are the hardest to recognize and overcoming them requires changing basic personality traits that have been years in the making. Tips on how individuals can gather self-knowledge and express individuality and creativity are given. (MP)

  10. Successful Writing: Five Roadblocks to Overcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kathleen P.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides essential strategies to be more successful in one of the major roles in academia: writing. Most academics struggle with roadblocks in their writing process. We are forever battling to complete research articles, manuscripts, grant proposals or other documents. The strategies and perspective shared here help overcome several…

  11. Overcoming Barriers in the Media Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Clint

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 has revolutionized one's ability to teach students in new and exciting ways. Students with disabilities can now overcome many barriers that once kept them from being successful in the regular education classroom. Media specialists can effectively advocate for students with disabilities. School library media specialists have the ability to…

  12. In My View. Overcoming Math Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fotoples, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes math anxiety, explaining roadblocks to mathematics success; discussing strategies for overcoming anxiety (e.g., parent involvement, teacher sensitivity, and peer tutoring); and examining the influence of learning styles on mathematics achievement and attitudes. Mathematics teachers must identify students' problems in mathematics, work…

  13. Overcoming Barriers to Engaging in College Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Lauren; Shaulskiy, Stephanie; Zircher, Andrew; Sanders, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Underprepared college students face transition issues that prevent full academic engagement. The written responses of 176 students in a learning-strategies course were used to develop a grounded model of overcoming barriers to academic engagement. Findings revealed contexts in which academic engagement involved high costs (i.e., effort, trade-off,…

  14. Ideas for Creating and Overcoming Student Silences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Donald R.; Sheardown, Heather

    2009-01-01

    The key idea is that 50 minutes of teacher talk with passive student listening is relatively ineffective in developing student learning. Teachers can create silences for productive active student learning. Students can also change from passive listeners to active talker-discussers of their learning. Ideas are given about how to overcome silences…

  15. Overcoming Barriers to Engaging in College Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Lauren; Shaulskiy, Stephanie; Zircher, Andrew; Sanders, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Underprepared college students face transition issues that prevent full academic engagement. The written responses of 176 students in a learning-strategies course were used to develop a grounded model of overcoming barriers to academic engagement. Findings revealed contexts in which academic engagement involved high costs (i.e., effort, trade-off,…

  16. Complex brittle deformation pattern along the Southern Patagonian Andes (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberón, Vanesa; Sue, Christian; Ronda, Gonzalo; Ghiglione, Matías

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes is located in the southern extreme of the Pacific subduction zone, where the Antartic oceanic plate sinks underneath South America. The history of the area begins with compression during Paleozoic, Jurassic extension associated to the rift and opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, then a sag stage in the Lower Cretaceous followed by a foreland phase as a result of plate tectonics (Ghiglione et al., 2016). The kinematic study is concentrated in the Argentinean foothills, between 46°40' and 48° SL. We measured around 800 fault planes and their striaes with the sense of movement in order to characterize the stress field. The software used to make the stress inversion were Tensor (Delvaux, 2011) and Multiple Inverse Method MIM (Yamaji et al., 2011). The stress field map was built with the results of the MIM. We present new data from 48 sites located in the northern sector of the Southern Patagonian Andes. The measurements were made in several rocks from Paleozoic to Lower Cretaceous, even though most were taken in pyroclastic jurassic rocks from El Quemado Complex. Paleostress tensors obtained are mostly strike-slip, although a 25% is normal and there are a few compresional. The pattern of faults found is complex. In some sites the tensor can be locally linked to satellite images and observations from the field or be related to a major thrust front. There is no clear correlation between the age and/or lithology with the tensor since the youngest rocks measured are Lower Cretaceous. Probably there are several generations of family faults connected to different and recent tectonic phases then the paleostress tensors might correspond to the latest tectonic events.

  17. Post-yield Strength and Dilatancy Evolution Across the Brittle-Ductile Transition in Indiana Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, G.; Hedayat, A.; Kim, E.; Labrie, D.

    2017-07-01

    An extensive uniaxial and triaxial compression testing programme was performed on Indiana Limestone to assess its behaviour across the brittle-ductile transition. Particular attention has been paid to the post-yield evolution of strength and dilatancy. Specimens tested at σ 3 = 30 MPa displayed a fully ductile failure mechanism, whereas specimens tested at σ 3 = 15 MPa and σ 3 = 20 MPa displayed transitional mechanisms, which were neither fully brittle nor fully ductile. Based on an examination of failure localization and dilatancy characteristics, the stress at which crack volumetric strain begins to increase was found to be an indicator of individual specimen ductility. In contrast to less porous rocks, the reversal of total volumetric strain did not coincide with the onset of axial strain nonlinearity under unconfined conditions. With respect to post-yield strength, a major change in the rate of friction mobilization relative to plastic shear strain was observed across the brittle-ductile transition. The dilatancy of the specimens was also found to undergo a major change, with the plastic shear strains to mobilization of peak dilatancy in the ductile regime being approximately one order of magnitude higher than in the brittle regime.

  18. The effect of crack instability/stability on fracture toughness of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, F.I.

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes three recent experimental works coauthored by the present author regarding the effect of crack instability/stability on fracture toughness, and also includes the necessary formulae for predicting stability. Two recent works have shown that unstable crack extension resulted in apparent increases in fracture toughness compared to that determined during stable crack growth. In the first investigation a quasi-brittle polymer, polymethylmethacrylate, was examined. In the second, a more brittle metallic material, tungsten, was tested. In both cases the transition from unstable to stable behavior was predicted based on stability analyses. The third investigation was conducted on a truly brittle ceramic material, hot pressed silicon nitride. These three papers showed that fracture toughness test results conducted on brittle materials vary according to whether the material fractures in an unstable or stable manner. Suggestions for achieving this important yet difficult phenomenon of stable crack growth, which is necessary when determining the fracture toughness variation occurring during unstable/stable crack advance, are presented, as well as recommendations for further research.

  19. Brittle fracture phase-field modeling of a short-rod specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Ivana; Tupek, Michael R.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2015-09-01

    Predictive simulation capabilities for modeling fracture evolution provide further insight into quantities of interest in comparison to experimental testing. Based on the variational approach to fracture, the advent of phase-field modeling achieves the goal to robustly model fracture for brittle materials and captures complex crack topologies in three dimensions.

  20. Brittle Fracture of 2D MoSe2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingchao; Li, Xing; Wen, Minru; Hacopian, Emily; Chen, Weibing; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Jing; Li, Bo; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Chen, Qing; Zhu, Ting; Lou, Jun

    2016-11-03

    An in situ quantitative tensile testing platform is developed in this paper to enable the uniform in-plane loading of a freestanding membrane of 2D materials inside a scanning electron microscope. The in situ tensile testing reveals the brittle fracture of large-area MoSe2 crystals and measures their fracture strength for the first time.

  1. A statistical, micromechanical theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Sines, G.

    1978-01-01

    A general theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials is presented. This theory proposes that failure is brought about by structural weakening from accumulated crack damage which increases with the stress level. The statistics of the flaw distribution and the mechanism of crack initiation and extension are important. A sample calculation using the theory is given to demonstrate its application

  2. A study of mechanical processing damage in brittle materials. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.

    1994-11-01

    During the last year, the authors have continued work on the ultrasonic characterization of machining-induced cracks and residual stresses in brittle materials. Techniques for the analysis of cracks and surface residual stress are being developed simultaneously. Finally, an acoustic microscope is being developed for the study of porosity and velocity variations in green ceramics.

  3. Development of material model for assessment of brittle cracking behavior of plexiglas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. J.; Iqbal, N.; Saeed, H. A.; Tarar, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the brittle cracking behavior of Plexiglas material when subjected to indentation loading. Indentation tests were conducted on Modified Vickers testing machine to acquire the experimental data in the form of load-displacement curve. Several mechanical properties such as hardness, yielding stress and fracture toughness have been ascertained from the analysis of the experimental data. The experimental data then used to create a mathematical model of Plexiglas for its brittle cracking behavior with indentation loading. Furthermore, a numerical simulation based study was carried out to simulate the brittle cracking in Plexiglas plate when subjected to indentation loading. The simulations were performed in the FE solver Abaqus. The brittle cracking model in Abaqus/Explicit is used which determines the required force and displacement to produce crack in Plexiglas. Finally a comparison of simulation results was made to the experimental data to validate the FEA procedures and accuracy of predictions. The numerical predictions of load-displacement curve found remarkably consistent with experimental results.

  4. A statistical, micromechanical theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M.; Sines, G.

    1978-01-01

    A general theory of the compressive strength of brittle materials is presented. This theory proposes that failure is brought about by structural weakening from accumulated crack damage which increases with the stress level. The statistics of the flaw distribution and the mechanism of crack initiation and extension are important. A sample calculation using the theory is given to demonstrate its application

  5. Children with Brittle Bones: An Examination of Their Educational Needs and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1983-01-01

    A study of the educational achievements of 40 children (5-16 years old) with osteogenesis imperfecta, brittle bone disease, revealed no differences between Ss and control Ss without the condition in terms of nonverbal intelligence. Differences were found, however, in writing speed. Inteviews with children, teachers, and parents revealed…

  6. Posterior tunica vasculosa lentis and "brittle star" of persistent fetal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Marco; Shields, Carol L; Arepalli, Sruthi; Shields, Jerry A

    2014-11-19

    A 17-month-old girl referred for a suspected ciliary body medulloepithelioma was found to have persistent fetal vasculature. Fluorescein angiography showed perfused hyaloid artery posterior tunica vasculosa lentis with brittle star appearance and nonperfused anterior pupillary membrane. Ultrasound biomicroscopy confirmed absence of iris or ciliary body solid tumor.

  7. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was {minus}5{degree}F and, with the addition of a 30{degree}F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25{degree}F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50{degree}F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack.

  8. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was [minus]5[degree]F and, with the addition of a 30[degree]F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25[degree]F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50[degree]F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack.

  9. Children with Brittle Bones: An Examination of Their Educational Needs and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Jean

    1983-01-01

    A study of the educational achievements of 40 children (5-16 years old) with osteogenesis imperfecta, brittle bone disease, revealed no differences between Ss and control Ss without the condition in terms of nonverbal intelligence. Differences were found, however, in writing speed. Inteviews with children, teachers, and parents revealed…

  10. Software Model Of Software-Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chi Y.; Synott, Debra J.; Levary, Reuven R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of computer programs constitutes software tool for simulation of medium- to large-scale software-development projects. Necessary to include easily identifiable and more-readily quantifiable characteristics like costs, times, and numbers of errors. Mathematical model incorporating these and other factors of dynamics of software-development process implemented in the Software Life Cycle Simulator (SLICS) computer program. Simulates dynamics of software-development process. In combination with input and output expert software systems and knowledge-based management software system, develops information for use in managing large software-development project. Intended to aid managers in planning, managing, and controlling software-development processes by reducing uncertainties in budgets, required personnel, and schedules.

  11. Three-dimensional failure envelopes and the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SchöPfer, Martin P. J.; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom

    2013-04-01

    Rocks deformed at low confining pressure are brittle, meaning that after peak stress the strength decreases to a residual value determined by frictional sliding. The difference between the peak and residual value is the stress drop. At high confining pressure, however, no stress drop occurs. The transition pressure at which no loss in strength occurs is a possible definition of the brittle-ductile transition. Here, we show, using numerical rock deformation, how this type of brittle-ductile transition emerges from a simple model in which rock is idealized as an assemblage of cemented spherical unbreakable grains. Three-dimensional failure and residual strength envelopes determined for this model material illustrate that the brittle-ductile transition is a smoothly varying, mean stress-dependent function in principal stress space. Neither the Mohr-Coulomb nor the Drucker-Prager failure criterion, which are the most commonly used empirical laws in rock and soil mechanics, respectively, adequately describes the dependence of peak strength and the brittle-ductile transition on the intermediate stress (or Lode angle). A semi-quantitative comparison between the modeled peak strength envelope with a selection of existing polyaxial rock data shows that the emergent intermediate stress dependence of strength in bonded particle models is comparable to that observed in rock. Deformation of particle models in which bond shear failure is inhibited illustrates that the non-linear pressure dependence of strength (concave failure envelopes) is, at high mean stress, the result of microscopic shear failure, a result consistent with earlier two-dimensional numerical multiple-crack simulations.

  12. How does tooth cusp radius of curvature affect brittle food item processing?

    PubMed Central

    Berthaume, Michael A.; Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Grosse, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth cusp sharpness, measured by radius of curvature (RoC), has been predicted to play a significant role in brittle/hard food item fracture. Here, we set out to test three existing hypotheses about this relationship: namely, the Blunt and Strong Cusp hypotheses, which predict that dull cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture, and the Pointed Cusp hypothesis, which predicts that sharp cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture using a four cusp bunodont molar. We also put forth and test the newly constructed Complex Cusp hypothesis, which predicts that a mixture of dull and sharp cusps will be most efficient at brittle food item fracture. We tested the four hypotheses using finite-element models of four cusped, bunodont molars. When testing the three existing hypotheses, we assumed all cusps had the same level of sharpness (RoC), and gained partial support for the Blunt Cusp hypotheses. We found no support for the Pointed Cusp or Strong Cusp hypotheses. We used the Taguchi sampling method to test the Complex Cusps hypothesis with a morphospace created by independently varying the radii of curvature of the four cusps in the buccolingual and mesiodistal directions. The optimal occlusal morphology for fracturing brittle food items consists of a combination of sharp and dull cusps, which creates high stress concentrations in the food item while stabilizing the food item and keeping the stress concentrations in the enamel low. This model performed better than the Blunt Cusp hypothesis, suggesting a role for optimality in the evolution of cusp form. PMID:23635495

  13. Role of fluid overpressures in crustal strength and the form of the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth model of Brace and Kolhstedt (1980) (see figure) based on experimental rock mechanics depends in the brittle regime on the critical assumption of linearly increasing hydrostatic pore-fluid pressures. This leads to a predicted linearly increasing brittle strength that is well established based on deep borehole stress measurements in crystalline crust. In contrast, fluid overpressures are widely documented in orogenic belts based on borehole data, seismic velocity analysis and analysis of veins, in some cases showing complex fault-valve pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic. Typical observed overpressure-depth relationships predict a brittle crustal strength that is approximately constant with depth in contrast with the classic model. This constant-strength behavior below the fluid-retention depth (ZFRD in figure) has been confirmed using deep borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements (Suppe, 2014). Recent ductile-plastic modeling of disequilibrium compaction suggests that pressure solution promotes further increases in overpressure and weakening, promoting a very prolonged low-strength brittle-ductile transition. Overpressured conditions can be inferred to exist over a substantial fraction of crustal thickness, spanning the brittle-ductile transition, in several tectonic environments, most straightforwardly in shale-rich clastic sedimentary basins built to sea level on oceanic or highly thinned continental crust such as the US Gulf Coast and Niger Delta. These thick accumulations commonly deform into shale-rich plate boundary mountain belts (e.g. Bangladesh/Miyanmar, Makran, Trinidad/Barbados, Gulf of Alaska, southern Taiwan and New Zealand). There is deep geophysical evidence for near lithostatic pore-fluid pressures existing to depths of 20-30km based on Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Q observations. We present active examples from Taiwan and New Zealand, combining borehole data and seismic tomography.

  14. Book and Software Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissick, Cheryl

    2000-01-01

    This introductory column on books and software concerned with special education technology presents an article by JuHye Yook on the software design process. It discusses the rationale for developing new software for students with reading disabilities, the design and development process, and analysis of the software design. Software use by two…

  15. Other People's Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, E.; Murray, S. S.

    Why do we continually re-invent the astronomical software wheel? Why is it so difficult to use ``other people's software''? Leaving aside issues such as money, power, and control, we need to investigate practically how we can remove barriers to software sharing. This paper will offer a starting point for software cooperation, centered on the concept of ``minimal software buy-in''.

  16. [Overcoming mandatory vaccination policy: first steps].

    PubMed

    Ferro, A; Cinquetti, S; Menegon, T; Napoletano, G; Bertoncello, L; Valsecchi, M

    2008-01-01

    Steps toward overcoming mandatory vaccination policy follow two main tracks: scientific and administrative. Scientific course checks starting conditions of the project in Veneto Region and monitors the effects of policy. Thanks to sensibilization regional programs and partecipation to national campaigns of vaccination, Veneto Region has achieved high coverage for all actively promoted vaccinations. Specific projects has been implemented in order to improve vaccination system quality, particularly with regard to infectious diseases and vaccine adverse events surveillance, training workers and informatization. On 23rd March 2007 Veneto Region passed the regional law number 7 called "Sospensione dell'obbligo vaccinale per l'età evolutiva" becoming in force for children born since January 1st 2008. The law provides for the institution of a scientific committee having the task of monitoring both vaccination coverage and preventable infectious diseases incidence after overcoming mandatory vaccination policy.

  17. Overcoming cellular barriers for RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Steven F

    2017-03-01

    RNA-based therapeutics, such as small-interfering (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), aptamers, synthetic mRNAs and CRISPR-Cas9, have great potential to target a large part of the currently undruggable genes and gene products and to generate entirely new therapeutic paradigms in disease, ranging from cancer to pandemic influenza to Alzheimer's disease. However, for these RNA modalities to reach their full potential, they first need to overcome a billion years of evolutionary defenses that have kept RNAs on the outside of cells from invading the inside of cells. Overcoming the lipid bilayer to deliver RNA into cells has remained the major problem to solve for widespread development of RNA therapeutics, but recent chemistry advances have begun to penetrate this evolutionary armor.

  18. Overcoming drug resistance through in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Trosset, Jean-Yves

    2014-03-01

    Prediction tools are commonly used in pre-clinical research to assist target selection, to optimize drug potency or to predict the pharmacological profile of drug candidates. In silico prediction and overcoming drug resistance is a new opportunity that creates a high interest in pharmaceutical research. This review presents two main in silico strategies to meet this challenge: a structure-based approach to study the influence of mutations on the drug-target interaction and a system-biology approach to identify resistance pathways for a given drug. In silico screening of synergies between therapeutic and resistant pathways through biological network analysis is an example of technique to escape drug resistance. Structure-based drug design and in silico system biology are complementary approaches to reach few objectives at once: increase efficiency, reduce toxicity and overcoming drug resistance.

  19. Enhanced CARES Software Enables Improved Ceramic Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed award-winning software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of brittle material (e.g., ceramic, intermetallic, graphite) structures in a wide variety of 21st century applications. The CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) series of software is successfully used by numerous engineers in industrial, academic, and government organizations as an essential element of the structural design and material selection processes. The latest version of this software, CARES/Life, provides a general- purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. CARES/Life was recently enhanced by adding new modules designed to improve functionality and user-friendliness. In addition, a beta version of the newly-developed CARES/Creep program (for determining the creep life of monolithic ceramic components) has just been released to selected organizations.

  20. Enhanced CARES Software Enables Improved Ceramic Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janosik, Lesley A.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed award-winning software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of brittle material (e.g., ceramic, intermetallic, graphite) structures in a wide variety of 21st century applications. The CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) series of software is successfully used by numerous engineers in industrial, academic, and government organizations as an essential element of the structural design and material selection processes. The latest version of this software, CARES/Life, provides a general- purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. CARES/Life was recently enhanced by adding new modules designed to improve functionality and user-friendliness. In addition, a beta version of the newly-developed CARES/Creep program (for determining the creep life of monolithic ceramic components) has just been released to selected organizations.

  1. Software attribute visualization for high integrity software

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, G.M.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents a prototype tool developed to investigate the use of visualization and virtual reality technologies for improving software surety confidence. The tool is utilized within the execution phase of the software life cycle. It provides a capability to monitor an executing program against prespecified requirements constraints provided in a program written in the requirements specification language SAGE. The resulting Software Attribute Visual Analysis Tool (SAVAnT) also provides a technique to assess the completeness of a software specification.

  2. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors.

  3. Report: Scientific Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of scientific software, including evaluation and selection of commercial software products; program exchanges, catalogs, and other information sources; major data analysis packages; statistics and chemometrics software; and artificial intelligence. (JN)

  4. Controlling Software Piracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Albert S.

    1992-01-01

    Explains what software manufacturers are doing to combat software piracy, recommends how managers should deal with this problem, and provides a role-playing exercise to help students understand the issues in software piracy. (SR)

  5. Report: Scientific Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of scientific software, including evaluation and selection of commercial software products; program exchanges, catalogs, and other information sources; major data analysis packages; statistics and chemometrics software; and artificial intelligence. (JN)

  6. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  7. Predicting brittle zones in the Bakken Formation using well logs and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecher, Michael E.

    The oil-in-place estimate for the Bakken Formation has varied from 10 billion barrels in 1974 to 503 billion barrels in 1999. However, only a small fraction of this estimate is recoverable due to the formation having very low porosity and permeability. Implementation of hydraulic fracture stages along horizontal wells in the Bakken has been productive. Recently, identification of zones where the formation is brittle has been used to improve hydraulic fracture stimulation efficiency in an effort to improve production. The first goal for this thesis is to identify a correlation between brittleness and production data by using elastic moduli and normalized production values. The hypothesis for this study is that rock with a low Poisson's ratio and high Young's modulus will be more brittle and will ultimately produce a higher amount of oil than more ductile rock. The next goal was to create and test a method to identify brittle zones with high normalized production in a 3D seismic data set without well control using producing wells from outside the survey with dipole sonic logs from the Bakken Formation. Correlations between normalized production values and elastic moduli were subsequently identified. Cumulative first-four-months' production was found to have the best correlation to the elastic moduli. Correlations of normalized production values and Poisson's ratio showed that sections of the middle Bakken with low Poisson's ratio yield higher normalized production values. Correlations of Young's modulus and normalized production showed that middle Bakken zones with low Young's modulus have higher normalized production values. However, when using additional wells that were not used for well-to-3D seismic correlations, the correlation shows that higher Young's modulus yield higher normalized production. The correlation with additional wells best represented the data and agrees with the initial hypothesis. Brittle zones were mapped in a 3D seismic data set by

  8. Brittle to semibrittle transition in quartz sandstone: Energetics and crack interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2016-12-01

    Using quantitative microscopy, we estimated the energy partitioning of different deformation mechanisms in the brittle faulting and semibrittle faulting regimes in quartz sandstone deformed at Pe to 175 MPa and T to 900°C. (1) Our results show that the energy input is fully accounted by a sum of fracture surface energy (US) and frictional energy along shear bands at all PT tested. This indicates that, for both regimes, the deformation away from the macroscopic fault is accommodated primarily by grain-scale brittle mechanisms with little contribution from dislocation mechanisms, supporting the findings from previous studies. (2) Our analysis shows that US is much greater in the semibrittle regime than estimated in the brittle regime; however, the relative importance of different mechanisms (intragranular tensile fracture, intergranular shear band, and grain crushing) remains similar between the two regimes. This relationship, together with the temperature dependence of yield strength observed, indicates that the increase in US with increasing PT results from the operation of subcritical microcracking over a longer experiment time (strain) in these mechanisms. These results suggest that the growth of brittle damage (Us) is influenced by the timescale over which thermally-activated cataclastic mechanisms occur. (3) Our results suggest that shear band is the primary process governing the shape of stress-strain curves through frictionally dissipating 95% of plastic energy. Our findings illuminate an important role of shear bands on the constitutive behavior of granular rocks, in addition to influencing fluid transport properties. On the basis of mapping microfractures over a range of length scales and comparing with models of crack interaction, we determined a critical geometry (the ratio of fracture spacing to length) for crack interaction leading to shear localization. Our results suggest that the interaction of mm-scale shear fractures is responsible for the

  9. Role of Brittle Behaviour of Soft Calcarenites Under Low Confinement: Laboratory Observations and Numerical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco

    2017-07-01

    The strength decay that occurs in the post-peak stage, under low confinement stress, represents a key factor of the stress-strain behaviour of rocks. However, for soft rocks this issue is generally underestimated or even neglected in the solution of boundary value problems, as for example those concerning the stability of underground cavities or rocky cliffs. In these cases, the constitutive models frequently used in limit equilibrium analyses or more sophisticated numerical calculations are, respectively, rigid-plastic or elastic-perfectly plastic. In particular, most of commercial continuum-based numerical codes propose a variety of constitutive models, including elasticity, elasto-plasticity, strain-softening and elasto-viscoplasticity, which are not exhaustive in simulating the progressive failure mechanisms affecting brittle rock materials, these being characterized by material detachment and crack opening and propagation. As a consequence, a numerical coupling with mechanical joint propagation is needed to cope with fracture mechanics. Therefore, continuum-based applications that treat the simulation of the failure processes of intact rock masses at low stress levels may need the adoption of numerical techniques capable of implementing fracture mechanics and rock brittleness concepts, as it is shown in this paper. This work is aimed at highlighting, for some applications of rock mechanics, the essential role of post-peak brittleness of soft rocks by means of the application of a hybrid finite-discrete element method. This method allows for a proper simulation of the brittle rock behaviour and the related mechanism of fracture propagation. In particular, the paper presents two ideal problems, represented by a shallow underground cave and a vertical cliff, for which the evolution of the stability conditions is investigated by comparing the solutions obtained implementing different brittle material responses with those resulting from the assumption of perfectly

  10. A unified phase-field theory for the mechanics of damage and quasi-brittle failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Ying

    2017-06-01

    Being one of the most promising candidates for the modeling of localized failure in solids, so far the phase-field method has been applied only to brittle fracture with very few exceptions. In this work, a unified phase-field theory for the mechanics of damage and quasi-brittle failure is proposed within the framework of thermodynamics. Specifically, the crack phase-field and its gradient are introduced to regularize the sharp crack topology in a purely geometric context. The energy dissipation functional due to crack evolution and the stored energy functional of the bulk are characterized by a crack geometric function of polynomial type and an energetic degradation function of rational type, respectively. Standard arguments of thermodynamics then yield the macroscopic balance equation coupled with an extra evolution law of gradient type for the crack phase-field, governed by the aforesaid constitutive functions. The classical phase-field models for brittle fracture are recovered as particular examples. More importantly, the constitutive functions optimal for quasi-brittle failure are determined such that the proposed phase-field theory converges to a cohesive zone model for a vanishing length scale. Those general softening laws frequently adopted for quasi-brittle failure, e.g., linear, exponential, hyperbolic and Cornelissen et al. (1986) ones, etc., can be reproduced or fit with high precision. Except for the internal length scale, all the other model parameters can be determined from standard material properties (i.e., Young's modulus, failure strength, fracture energy and the target softening law). Some representative numerical examples are presented for the validation. It is found that both the internal length scale and the mesh size have little influences on the overall global responses, so long as the former can be well resolved by sufficiently fine mesh. In particular, for the benchmark tests of concrete the numerical results of load versus displacement

  11. Discrete element modeling on the crack evolution behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yan-Hua; Ranjith, P. G.; Jiao, Yu-Yong; Ji, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Based on experimental results of brittle, intact sandstone under uniaxial compression, the micro-parameters were firstly confirmed by adopting particle flow code (PFC^{2D}). Then, the validation of the simulated models were cross checked with the experimental results of brittle sandstone containing three parallel fissures under uniaxial compression. The simulated results agreed very well with the experimental results, including the peak strength, peak axial strain, and ultimate failure mode. Using the same micro-parameters, the numerical models containing a new geometry of three fissures are constructed to investigate the fissure angle on the fracture mechanical behavior of brittle sandstone under uniaxial compression. The strength and deformation parameters of brittle sandstone containing new three fissures are dependent to the fissure angle. With the increase of the fissure angle, the elastic modulus, the crack damage threshold, and the peak strength of brittle sandstone containing three fissures firstly increase and secondly decrease. But the peak axial strain is nonlinearly related to the fissure angle. In the entire process of deformation, the crack initiation and propagation behavior of brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression are investigated with respect to the fissure angle. Six different crack coalescence modes are identified for brittle sandstone containing three fissures under uniaxial compression. The influence of the fissure angle on the length of crack propagation and crack coalescence stress is evaluated. These investigated conclusions are very important for ensuring the stability and safety of rock engineering with intermittent structures.

  12. Software Engineering Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John; Wenneson, Greg

    1993-01-01

    The Software Engineering Guidebook describes SEPG (Software Engineering Process Group) supported processes and techniques for engineering quality software in NASA environments. Three process models are supported: structured, object-oriented, and evolutionary rapid-prototyping. The guidebook covers software life-cycles, engineering, assurance, and configuration management. The guidebook is written for managers and engineers who manage, develop, enhance, and/or maintain software under the Computer Software Services Contract.

  13. A natural example of fluid-mediated brittle-ductile cyclicity in quartz veins from Olkiluoto Island, SW Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, Barbara; Garofalo, Paolo S.; Viola, Giulio; Mattila, Jussi; Menegon, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Brittle faults are well known as preferential conduits for localised fluid flow in crystalline rocks. Their study can thus reveal fundamental details of the physical-chemical properties of the flowing fluid phase and of the mutual feedbacks between mechanical properties of faults and fluids. Crustal deformation at the brittle-ductile transition may occur by a combination of competing brittle fracturing and viscous flow processes, with short-lived variations in fluid pressure as a viable mechanism to produce this cyclicity switch. Therefore, a detailed study of the fluid phases potentially present in faults can help to better constrain the dynamic evolution of crustal strength within the seismogenic zone, as a function of varying fluid phase characteristics. With the aim to 1) better understand the complexity of brittle-ductile cyclicity under upper to mid-crustal conditions and 2) define the physical and chemical features of the involved fluid phase, we present the preliminary results of a recently launched (micro)structural and geochemical project. We study deformed quartz veins associated with brittle-ductile deformation zones on Olkiluoto Island, chosen as the site for the Finnish deep repository for spent nuclear fuel excavated in the Paleoproterozoic crust of southwestern Finland. The presented results stem from the study of brittle fault zone BFZ300, which is a mixed brittle and ductile deformation zone characterized by complex kinematics and associated with multiple generations of quartz veins, and which serves as a pertinent example of the mechanisms of fluid flow-deformation feedbacks during brittle-ductile cyclicity in nature. A kinematic and dynamic mesostructural study is being integrated with the detailed analysis of petrographic thin sections from the fault core and its immediate surroundings with the aim to reconstruct the mechanical deformation history along the entire deformation zone. Based on the observed microstructures, it was possible to

  14. Overcoming Obstacles to Machine-Supported Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Arthur J.

    1991-01-01

    Defines collaborating systems, i.e., hardware, software, communications, and people working together; examines the need for machine-supported collaboration; and addresses the major obstacles impeding the progress of collaboration, including economic, political, human, and technical factors. A framework for the implementation of machine-supported…

  15. Integrated software packages in the physical laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, J.; Barvík, I.; Praus, P.; Heřman, P.; Čermáková, D.

    1990-11-01

    The automation of a UV-VIS spectrometer and a single-photon counting apparatus by an IBM-AT is described. Software needed for the computer control, data acquisition and processing was developed in the ASYST environment. This enabled us to use its very good graphics, its support of I/O cards, and its other excellent properties. Also we show ways to overcome some minor shortcomings using the multilanguage programming.

  16. Material brittle fracture owing to thermoelastic effect of high energy nuclear particle

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichenko, A.I.

    1996-12-31

    Rapid arising of the overheated domain near very heavy ion path (near fast neutron collision point) in solid results in generation of cylinder (spherical) thermoelastic stress wave. The latter can exceed the material strength and cause brittle fracture at going out on the free body interface. Size and shape of an erosion zone as well as erosion rate for both sorts of primary nuclear particles are found. The role of wave attenuation is discussed. The products of erosion are of macroscopic scaly particles having the typical thickness (1 {divided_by} 5) {center_dot} 10{sup -7} cm and mass 10{sup -18} {divided_by} 10{sup -17} g. Such ion (neutron)-stimulated thermoacoustic grinding can take place in radioactive materials with fissionable addenda. The consideration of the brittle destruction under cosmic ray bombardment may be essential for equipment of deep space missions.

  17. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li{sub x}Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li{sub x}Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  18. Brittleness estimation from seismic measurements in unconventional reservoirs: Application to the Barnett shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Altimar, Roderick

    Brittleness is a key characteristic for effective reservoir stimulation and is mainly controlled by mineralogy in unconventional reservoirs. Unfortunately, there is no universally accepted means of predicting brittleness from measures made in wells or from surface seismic data. Brittleness indices (BI) are based on mineralogy, while brittleness average estimations are based on Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. I evaluate two of the more popular brittleness estimation techniques and apply them to a Barnett Shale seismic survey in order to estimate its geomechanical properties. Using specialized logging tools such as elemental capture tool, density, and P- and S wave sonic logs calibrated to previous core descriptions and laboratory measurements, I create a survey-specific BI template in Young's modulus versus Poisson's ratio or alternatively lambdarho versus murho space. I use this template to predict BI from elastic parameters computed from surface seismic data, providing a continuous estimate of BI estimate in the Barnett Shale survey. Extracting lambdarho-murho values from microseismic event locations, I compute brittleness index from the template and find that most microsemic events occur in the more brittle part of the reservoir. My template is validated through a suite of microseismic experiments that shows most events occurring in brittle zones, fewer events in the ductile shale, and fewer events still in the limestone fracture barriers. Estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) is an estimate of the expected total production of oil and/or gas for the economic life of a well and is widely used in the evaluation of resource play reserves. In the literature it is possible to find several approaches for forecasting purposes and economic analyses. However, the extension to newer infill wells is somewhat challenging because production forecasts in unconventional reservoirs are a function of both completion effectiveness and reservoir quality. For shale gas reservoirs

  19. Forming of Brittle Materials—A New and Valuable Application of Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Bammer, F.; Schumi, T.; Holzinger, B.

    2010-10-01

    Laser assisted bending is a new and versatile method to allow simple bending of brittle materials. Laser technology is used to illuminate and heat the forming zone. Only a laser allows directing the power on a narrow area. Further there is no unnecessary heating of other parts of the bending equipment, no wear of the tool and, if properly done, no damage of the surface of the metal. We describe now the integration of 200 W-diode-laser-bars on micro-channel coolers that where installed into the lower tool of the bending press. The solution allows any required bending length by a combination of several bending tools with integrated lasers. The optical power of 16 kW per meter bending length allows achieving the temperature necessary to bend brittle sheet metals within seconds.

  20. Micromechanics based permeability evolution in brittle materials at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, T.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    We develop a micro-mechanics based permeability evolution model for brittle materials that are strain rate sensitive. Extending the mechanical constitutive description of brittle solids, whose constitutive response is governed by micro-cracks, developed by Bhat et al. (2012) we now relate the damage related strains (plastic strains) to calculate the evolution of micro-crack aperture. We then use the permeability model developed by Gueguen and Dienes (1989) and Simpson et al. (2001) to evaluate the permeability evolution. Permeability evolution computed using this model is shown to be in very good agreement with experimental results. Pore pressure evolution in a damaged medium, due to waste water injection for example, is then computed and we show that spatially variable permeability plays a major role in determining the pore pressure excess in the surrounding medium.

  1. Hypervelocity impact on brittle materials of semi-infinite thickness: fracture morphology related to projectile diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Emma A.; Kay, Laurie; Shrine, Nick R. G.

    Hypervelocity impact on brittle materials produces features not observed on ductile targets. Low fracture toughness and high yield strength produce a range of fracture morphologies including cracking, spallation and shatter. For sub-mm diameter projectiles, impact features are characterised by petaloid spallation separated by radial cracks. The conchoidal or spallation diameter is a parameter in current cratering equations. An alternative method for interpreting hypervelocity impacts on glass targets of semi-infinite thickness is tested against impact data produced using the Light Gas Gun (LGG) facility at the University of Kent at Canterbury (UKC), U.K. Spherical projectiles of glass and other materials with diameters 30-300 μm were fired at ~5 km s^-1 at a glass target of semi-infinite thickness. The data is used to test a power law relationship between projectile diameter and crack length. The results of this work are compared with published cratering/spallation equations for brittle materials.

  2. Crack Arrest in Brittle Ceramics Subjected to Thermal Shock and Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Wei; Yu, He-Long; Tang, Hong-Xiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-09-01

    Ceramics are suitable for high temperature applications, especially for aerospace materials. When serving in high temperature environments, ceramics usually have to deal with the challenge of both thermal shock and ablation. We report the crack arrest in brittle ceramics during thermal shock and ablation. In our experiment, the specimens of Al2O3 are subjected to oxygen-propane flame heating until the temperature arises up to 1046°C and then are cooled down in air. The crack occurs, however, it does not propagate when arrested by the microstructures (e.g., micro-bridges) of the crack tip. Such micro-bridge enhances the toughness of the brittle ceramics and prevents the crack propagation, which provides a hint for design of materials against the thermal shock.

  3. Linking Nanoscales and Dislocation Shielding to the Ductile-Brittle Transition of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsala, Eric; Teresi, Claire; Gerberich, William W.

    2016-12-01

    The ductile-brittle transition of nano/microscale silicon is explored at low-temperature, high stress conditions. A pathway to eventual mechanism maps describing this ductile-brittle transition behavior using sample size, strain rate, and temperature is outlined. First, a discussion of variables controlling the BDT in silicon is given and discussed in the context of development of eventual modeling that could simultaneously incorporate all their effects. For description of energy dissipation by dislocation nucleation from a crack tip, three critical input parameters are identified: the effective stress, activation volume, and activation energy for dislocation motion. These are discussed individually relating to the controlling variables for the BDT. Lastly, possibilities for measuring these parameters experimentally are also described.

  4. Brittle and semibrittle creep of Tavel limestone deformed at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Regnet, J. B.; Verberne, B. A.; Plümper, O.; Dimanov, A.; Spiers, C. J.; Guéguen, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Deformation and failure mode of carbonate rocks depend on the confining pressure. In this study, the mechanical behavior of a limestone with an initial porosity of 14.7% is investigated at constant stress. At confining pressures below 55 MPa, dilatancy associated with microfracturing occurs during constant stress steps, ultimately leading to failure, similar to creep in other brittle media. At confining pressures higher than 55 MPa, depending on applied differential stress, inelastic compaction occurs, accommodated by crystal plasticity and characterized by constant ultrasonic wave velocities, or dilatancy resulting from nucleation and propagation of cracks due to local stress concentrations associated with dislocation pileups, ultimately causing failure. Strain rates during secondary creep preceding dilative brittle failure are sensitive to stress, while rates during compactive creep exhibit an insensitivity to stress indicative of the operation of crystal plasticity, in agreement with elastic wave velocity evolution and microstructural observations.

  5. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  6. Prediction of material strength and fracture of brittle materials using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwwerf, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of many devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in windshields; and rock and concrete that are used in oil wells. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, they did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  7. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  8. Size-Dependent Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Silica Glass Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhang; Wang, Jiangwei; Bitzek, Erik; Huang, Jian Yu; Zheng, He; Tong, Limin; Yang, Qing; Li, Ju; Mao, Scott X

    2016-01-13

    Silica (SiO2) glass, an essential material in human civilization, possesses excellent formability near its glass-transition temperature (Tg > 1100 °C). However, bulk SiO2 glass is very brittle at room temperature. Here we show a surprising brittle-to-ductile transition of SiO2 glass nanofibers at room temperature as its diameter reduces below 18 nm, accompanied by ultrahigh fracture strength. Large tensile plastic elongation up to 18% can be achieved at low strain rate. The unexpected ductility is due to a free surface affected zone in the nanofibers, with enhanced ionic mobility compared to the bulk that improves ductility by producing more bond-switching events per irreversible bond loss under tensile stress. Our discovery is fundamentally important for understanding the damage tolerance of small-scale amorphous structures.

  9. Micromechanics of brittle faulting and cataclastic flow in Alban Hills tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Baud, Patrick; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2011-06-01

    An understanding of how tuff deforms and fails is of importance in the mechanics of volcanic eruption as well as geotechnical and seismic applications related to the integrity of tuff structures and repositories. Previous rock mechanics studies have focused on the brittle strength. We conducted mechanical tests on nominally dry and water-saturated tuff samples retrieved from the Colli Albani drilling project, in conjunction with systematic microstructural observations on the deformed samples so as to elucidate the micromechanics of brittle failure and inelastic compaction. The phenomenological behavior was observed to be qualitatively similar to that in a porous sedimentary rock. Synthesizing published data, we observe a systematic trend for both uniaxial compressive strength and pore collapse pressure of nonwelded tuff to decrease with increasing porosity. To interpret the compaction behavior in tuff, we extended the cataclastic pore collapse model originally formulated for a porous carbonate rock to a dual porosity medium made up of macropores and micropores or microcracks.

  10. Micromechanics of brittle faulting and cataclastic flow in Alban Hills tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, P.; Zhu, W.; Vinciguerra, S.; Wong, T.

    2010-12-01

    An understanding of how tuff deforms and fails is of importance in the mechanics of volcanic eruption, as well as geotechnical and seismic applications related to the integrity of tuff structures and repositories. Previous rock mechanics studies have focused on the brittle strength. We conducted mechanical tests on nominally dry and water-saturated tuff samples retrieved from the Colli Albani drilling project, in conjunction with systematic microstructural observations on the deformed samples so as to elucidate the micromechanics of brittle failure and inelastic compaction. The phenomenological behavior was observed to be qualitatively similar to that in a porous sedimentary rock. Synthesizing published data, we observe a systematic trend for both uniaxial compressive strength and pore collapse pressure of nonwelded tuff to decrease with increasing porosity. To interpret the compaction behavior in tuff, we extended the cataclastic pore collapse model originally formulated for a porous carbonate rock to a dual porosity medium made up of macropores and micropores or microcracks.

  11. Semi-brittle rheology and ice dynamics in DynEarthSol3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Liz C.; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo; Tan, Eh; Catania, Ginny A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a semi-brittle rheology and explore its potential for simulating glacier and ice sheet deformation using a numerical model, DynEarthSol3D (DES), in simple, idealized experiments. DES is a finite-element solver for the dynamic and quasi-static simulation of continuous media. The experiments within demonstrate the potential for DES to simulate ice failure and deformation in dynamic regions of glaciers, especially at quickly changing boundaries like glacier termini in contact with the ocean. We explore the effect that different rheological assumptions have on the pattern of flow and failure. We find that the use of a semi-brittle constitutive law is a sufficient material condition to form the characteristic pattern of basal crevasse-aided pinch-and-swell geometry, which is observed globally in floating portions of ice and can often aid in eroding the ice sheet margins in direct contact with oceans.

  12. On the brittle-ductile behavior of iron meteorites - New experimental constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, T.; Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    Impact trials were performed at the NASA vertical gun range to study low-temperature brittle-ductile transitions in meteoritic, steel and iron targets. The trials were performed to enhance the data base underlying the concept of formation of planetesimals in collisional coagulation. Impact velocities of 1.6-5.5 km/sec were used, as were temperatures from 100-300 K. Spallation was observed in the tests with meteorite samples, even at room temperature, and brittleness was enhanced at temperature below 200 C. Net mass losses were induced at the higher impact velocities. It is suggested that iron meteorite agglomerations could form in the inner solar region during nebular condensation, but would not form in farther-out regions such as the asteroid belt. The protoplanets could have an iron core, with metallicity decreasing with radius from the core, which may have happened with the earth.

  13. Brittle-fault deformation history in the NW Himalaya (Himachal Pradesh, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintersberger, E.; Decker, K.; Thiede, R.; Strecker, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Himalayan mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau are the manifestations of intense crustal shortening and uplift along the southern margin of Eurasia associated with the India-Eurasia collision. While crustal shortening has been focused at lower elevations until the present day along the southern boundary of the Lesser Himalaya and the Siwalik ranges, several generations of both, orogen-parallel and orogen-perpendicular extensional structures have developed. These structures characterize the higher-elevation regions within the Higher and Tethyan Himalaya, suggesting syntectonic extension. In the NW Himalaya (India), extending from the deeply cut gorges of the Sutlej and Spiti rivers to the Garhwal Himalaya, closely spaced young normal faults, focal mechanisms of earthquakes with magnitudes between 5.2 and 6.8, and regional GPS measurements reveal ongoing E-W extension. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other extensional features observed in the Himalaya, this direction is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the NE-SW regional shortening direction. Here, we present new data obtained from structural geological mapping, fault kinematic analysis of hundreds of brittle faults, and remote sensing spanning the area between the Tso Morari Lake in the Tibetan Himalaya in the north and the mountain front in the Garhwal Himalaya in the south (30°-33°N/77°-79°E). In addition, we integrated published data on extensional phenomena in this region of the Himalaya. In the Garhwal Himalaya and the Sutlej-Spiti region, we collected and analyzed outcrop-scale brittle fault-planes with displacements of up to several cm. To analyze fault kinematic data (strike and dip of the fault, slip direction and sense of slip) for these micro-faults, we calculated strain axes for approx. 100 outcrop locations using the TectonicsFP program. This data set, as well as field observations on crosscutting relationships, mineralization of fault planes, and correlations with deformation structures

  14. Superior room-temperature ductility of typically brittle quasicrystals at small sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Kuczera, Pawel; Sologubenko, Alla; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Steurer, Walter; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals three decades ago unveiled a class of matter that exhibits long-range order but lacks translational periodicity. Owing to their unique structures, quasicrystals possess many unusual properties. However, a well-known bottleneck that impedes their widespread application is their intrinsic brittleness: plastic deformation has been found to only be possible at high temperatures or under hydrostatic pressures, and their deformation mechanism at low temperatures is still unclear. Here, we report that typically brittle quasicrystals can exhibit remarkable ductility of over 50% strains and high strengths of ~4.5 GPa at room temperature and sub-micrometer scales. In contrast to the generally accepted dominant deformation mechanism in quasicrystals--dislocation climb, our observation suggests that dislocation glide may govern plasticity under high-stress and low-temperature conditions. The ability to plastically deform quasicrystals at room temperature should lead to an improved understanding of their deformation mechanism and application in small-scale devices.

  15. Software Configuration Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The growth in cost and importance of software to NASA has caused NASA to address the improvement of software development across the agency. One of the products of this program is a series of guidebooks that define a NASA concept of the assurance processes which are used in software development. The Software Assurance Guidebook, SMAP-GB-A201, issued in September, 1989, provides an overall picture of the concepts and practices of NASA in software assurance. Lower level guidebooks focus on specific activities that fall within the software assurance discipline, and provide more detailed information for the manager and/or practitioner. This is the Software Configuration Management Guidebook which describes software configuration management in a way that is compatible with practices in industry and at NASA Centers. Software configuration management is a key software development process, and is essential for doing software assurance.

  16. Fortification: overcoming technical and practical barriers.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Richard F

    2002-04-01

    The main barriers to successful iron fortification are the following: 1) finding an iron compound that is adequately absorbed but causes no sensory changes to the food vehicle; and 2) overcoming the inhibitory effect on iron absorption of dietary components such as phytic acid, phenolic compounds and calcium. These barriers have been successfully overcome with some food vehicles but not with others. Iron-fortified fish sauce, soy sauce, curry powder, sugar, dried milk, infant formula and cereal based complementary foods have been demonstrated to improve iron status in targeted populations. The reasons for this success include the use of soluble iron such as ferrous sulfate, the addition of ascorbic acid as an absorption enhancer or the use of NaFeEDTA to overcome the negative effect of phytic acid. In contrast, at the present time, it is not possible to guarantee a similar successful fortification of cereal flours or salt. There is considerable doubt that the elemental iron powders currently used to fortify cereal flours are adequately absorbed, and there is an urgent need to investigate their potential for improving iron status. Better absorbed alternative compounds for cereal fortification include encapsulated ferrous sulfate and NaFeEDTA, which, unlike ferrous sulfate, do not provoke fat oxidation of cereals during storage. Encapsulated compounds also offer a possibility to fortify low grade salt without causing off-colors or iodine loss. Finally, a new and useful additional approach to ensuring adequate iron absorption from cereal based complementary foods is the complete degradation of phytic acid with added phytases or by activating native cereal phytases.

  17. Determination of the Ductile to Brittle Transition Temperature of Platinum-Aluminide Gas Turbine Blade Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of five basic platinum- aluminide gas turbine blade coatings on a nickel-base superalloy (IN738). The results...gas turbine blade coatings on a nickel-base superalloy (IN738). The results of these tests were compared to similarly formed nickel- aluminide coatings ... aluminide coating became more widely used, it -°j.established itself as an excellent life extender for most superalloy blade materials. However, as

  18. Permeability and mechanical behavior of carbonates during semi-brittle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slim, Mirna; Evans, Brian

    2010-05-01

    Permeability and mechanical behavior of carbonates during semi-brittle flow Mirna Slim and Brian Evans, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Mass. Inst. Tech., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA In both natural and engineering conditions, carbonate rocks exhibit deformation modes ranging from localized brittle fracture to non-localized plastic flow, depending on overburden pressure, deviatoric stress, temperature, strain-rate, pore geometry, and the pressure and chemistry of the pore-fluid. At relatively low temperatures and confinement, the strength of low porosity carbonates is relatively rate-insensitive, even the deformation mechanism include a mixture of twinning, slip, and local cataclasis, and brittle fracture is generally accompanied by dilatancy and permeability enhancement. But, in rocks with even modest porosity, non-localized flow can induce transitions from brittle fracture to compactive flow, and thus, permeability may either decrease with further straining. As temperature is elevated, variations in temperature, strain rate, and pore fluid chemistry also affect the yield stress, the strain to failure, and the ultimate failure strength. For example in Solnhofen limestone, the stress required for the inception of dilatancy and localization decreases considerably when samples are saturated with water. Even when temperature, pressure and strain rate are such that deformation is accommodated by an increasingly large proportion of crystal plastic processes, carbonates with small amounts of porosity still exhibit a double-surface yield cap. When subjected to triaxial deformation at elevated temperatures, calcite-quartz aggregates with porosity of 20% or less exhibit shear-enhanced compaction. Interestingly and somewhat counter to intuition, the permeability of these rocks deforming under triaxial loads was not as sensitive to porosity changes as that for the same material during isostatic compaction. In addition, the percolation threshold for the

  19. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: STM, TEM and electron channeling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1997-01-01

    The original thrust of this grant was to apply newly developed techniques in scanning tunneling and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of brittle fracture. This grant spun-off several new directions in that some of the findings on bulk structural materials could be utilized on thin films or intermetallic single crystals. Modeling and material evaluation efforts in this grant are represented in a figure. Out of this grant evolved the field the author has designated as Contact Fracture Mechanics. By appropriate modeling of stress and strain distribution fields around normal indentations or scratch tracks, various measures of thin film fracture or decohesion and brittle fracture of low ductility intermetallics is possible. These measures of fracture resistance in small volumes are still evolving and as such no standard technique or analysis has been uniformly accepted. For brittle ceramics and ceramic films, there are a number of acceptable analyses such as those published by Lawn, Evans and Hutchinson. For more dissipative systems involving metallic or polymeric films and/or substrates, there is still much to be accomplished as can be surmised from some of the findings in the present grant. In Section 2 the author reviews the funding history and accomplishments associated mostly with bulk brittle fracture. This is followed by Section 3 which covers more recent work on using novel techniques to evaluate fracture in low ductility single crystals or thin films using micromechanical probes. Basically Section 3 outlines how the recent work fits in with the goals of defining contact fracture mechanics and gives an overview of how the several examples in Section 4 (the Appendices) fit into this framework.

  20. Controlling factors for the brittle-to-ductile transition in tungsten single crystals

    PubMed

    Gumbsch; Riedle; Hartmaier; Fischmeister

    1998-11-13

    Materials performance in structural applications is often restricted by a transition from ductile response to brittle fracture with decreasing temperature. This transition is currently viewed as being controlled either by dislocation mobility or by the nucleation of dislocations. Fracture experiments on tungsten single crystals reported here provide evidence for the importance of dislocation nucleation for the fracture toughness in the semibrittle regime. However, it is shown that the transition itself, in general, is controlled by dislocation mobility rather than by nucleation.

  1. Contact mechanics at nanometric scale using nanoindentation technique for brittle and ductile materials.

    PubMed

    Roa, J J; Rayon, E; Morales, M; Segarra, M

    2012-06-01

    In the last years, Nanoindentation or Instrumented Indentation Technique has become a powerful tool to study the mechanical properties at micro/nanometric scale (commonly known as hardness, elastic modulus and the stress-strain curve). In this review, the different contact mechanisms (elastic and elasto-plastic) are discussed, the recent patents for each mechanism (elastic and elasto-plastic) are summarized in detail, and the basic equations employed to know the mechanical behaviour for brittle and ductile materials are described.

  2. From boron carbide to glass: Absorption of an elongated high-speed projectile in brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, B. V.

    2016-09-01

    Penetration into boron carbide of an elongated high-speed projectile in the form of a copper jet produced by an explosion of a cumulative charge is studied. The efficiency of absorption of a copper jet in different brittle materials for evaluating their protective ability is compared. Conditions for the absence of the influence of the lateral unloading wave on the penetration zone, which provide the minimum penetration depth, are determined.

  3. Overcoming Scalability Challenges for Tool Daemon Launching

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, D H; Arnold, D C; de Supinski, B R; Lee, G L; Miller, B P; Schulz, M

    2008-02-15

    Many tools that target parallel and distributed environments must co-locate a set of daemons with the distributed processes of the target application. However, efficient and portable deployment of these daemons on large scale systems is an unsolved problem. We overcome this gap with LaunchMON, a scalable, robust, portable, secure, and general purpose infrastructure for launching tool daemons. Its API allows tool builders to identify all processes of a target job, launch daemons on the relevant nodes and control daemon interaction. Our results show that Launch-MON scales to very large daemon counts and substantially enhances performance over existing ad hoc mechanisms.

  4. Overcoming Challenges in Engineering the Genetic Code.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, M J; Söll, D; Church, G M

    2016-02-27

    Withstanding 3.5 billion years of genetic drift, the canonical genetic code remains such a fundamental foundation for the complexity of life that it is highly conserved across all three phylogenetic domains. Genome engineering technologies are now making it possible to rationally change the genetic code, offering resistance to viruses, genetic isolation from horizontal gene transfer, and prevention of environmental escape by genetically modified organisms. We discuss the biochemical, genetic, and technological challenges that must be overcome in order to engineer the genetic code. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Strategies to Overcome Heparins’ Low Oral Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Ana Rita; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena

    2016-01-01

    Even after a century, heparin is still the most effective anticoagulant available with few side effects. The poor oral absorption of heparins triggered the search for strategies to achieve oral bioavailability since this route has evident advantages over parenteral administration. Several approaches emerged, such as conjugation of heparins with bile acids and lipids, formulation with penetration enhancers, and encapsulation of heparins in micro and nanoparticles. Some of these strategies appear to have potential as good delivery systems to overcome heparin’s low oral bioavailability. Nevertheless, none have reached the market yet. Overall, this review aims to provide insights regarding the oral bioavailability of heparin. PMID:27367704

  6. Overcoming Barriers to Palliative Care Consultation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Kathleen Ouimet; Kazanowski, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Palliative care consultations for patients with life-threatening illnesses provide benefits for the patients and their families as well as for the health care team. Patients have better quality of life and live longer but cost the health care system less. Still, many patients are not offered the opportunity to receive a palliative care consultation. Barriers to palliative care consultation for patients in critical care units include misunderstandings about palliative care and not having agreed upon criteria for referral. Critical care nurses can assist in overcoming these barriers.

  7. Overcoming semantic heterogeneity in spatial data infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M.; Sprado, J.; Klien, E.; Schubert, C.; Christ, I.

    2009-04-01

    In current spatial data infrastructures (SDIs), it is still often difficult to effectively exchange or re-use geographic data sets. A main reason for this is semantic heterogeneity, which occurs at different levels: at the metadata, the schema and the data content level. It is the goal of the work presented in this paper to overcome the problems caused by semantic heterogeneity on all three levels. We present a method based on ontologies and logical reasoning, which enhances the discovery, retrieval, interpretation and integration of geographic data in SDIs. Its benefits and practical use are illustrated with examples from the domains of geology and hydrology.

  8. The conserved genetic background for pluteus arm development in brittle stars and sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Morino, Yoshiaki; Koga, Hiroyuki; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Echinoderm pluteus larvae are considered a classical example of convergent evolution that occurred in sea urchins and brittle stars. Several genes are known to be involved in the development of pluteus arms in sea urchins, including fgfA, pax2/5/8, pea3, otp, wnt5, and tet. To determine whether the convergent evolution of larval arms also involves these genes in brittle stars, their expression patterns were determined in brittle star. We found that all genes showed similar expression in the arms of ophiopluteus to that seen in echinopluteus, suggesting that convergent evolution of pluteus arms occurred by recruitment of a similar set of genes. This may be explained by our observation that some of these genes are also expressed in the spine rudiment of direct-type development sea urchins. We propose an evolutionary scenario wherein the pluteus arms of both echinopluteus and ophiopluteus were acquired by independent co-options of the genetic module responsible for the projection of the adult skeleton. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Atomistic simulations on ductile-brittle transition in ⟨111⟩ BCC Fe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, G.; Choudhary, B. K.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to understand the influence of temperature on the tensile deformation and fracture behavior of ⟨111⟩ BCC Fe nanowires. The simulations have been carried out at different temperatures in the range 10-1000 K employing a constant strain rate of 1 × 108 s-1. The results indicate that at low temperatures (10-375 K), the nanowires yield through the nucleation of a sharp crack and fails in brittle manner. On the other hand, nucleation of multiple 1/2⟨111⟩ dislocations at yielding followed by significant plastic deformation leading to ductile failure has been observed at high temperatures in the range 450-1000 K. At 400 K, the nanowire yields through nucleation of crack associated with many mobile 1/2⟨111⟩ and immobile ⟨100⟩ dislocations at the crack tip and fails in ductile manner. The ductile-brittle transition observed in ⟨111⟩ BCC Fe nanowires is appropriately reflected in the stress-strain behavior and plastic strain at failure. The ductile-brittle transition increases with increasing nanowire size. The change in fracture behavior has been discussed in terms of the relative variations in yield and fracture stresses and change in slip behavior with respect to temperature. Further, the dislocation multiplication mechanism assisted by the kink nucleation from the nanowire surface observed at high temperatures has been presented.

  10. Cyclic flattened Brazilian disc tests for measuring the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nuwen; Zhao, Tao

    2017-08-01

    We propose a cyclic flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) testing method to measure the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks. Our method has obvious merits in its specimen preparation and experimental operation. Two parallel flattens are introduced in the disc specimen, which facilitate easily and uniformly loading the specimen without special loading devices required. Moreover, the contact regions between two flattens and loading planes barely change during the entire loading and unloading process, ensuring a consistent contact condition. With certain appropriate loading angles, this method guarantees that the very first breakage of the specimen occurs at the center of the disc, which is the prerequisite of the Brazilian-type indirect tensile tests. To demonstrate our new method, nine cyclic FBD tensile tests are conducted. The fatigue load-deformation characteristics of FBD specimens are revealed. The tensile fatigue lives of tested specimens are observed to increase with the increase in cyclic loading frequency. Our proposed method provides a convenient and reliable approach to indirectly measure the fatigue tensile properties of brittle rocks and other brittle solids subjected to cyclic tensile loadings.

  11. Development of branching brittle and ductile shear zones: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sven Erik; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Passchier, Cees

    2017-06-01

    Continental collision zones are usually associated with large-scale strike-slip shear zones. In most cases, these shear zones are complex and consist of multiple strands, varying in width, length, and total displacement. Here we present 2-D numerical models to simulate the formation of such shear zones at different depth levels within the crust, under either brittle (frictional/plastic) or ductile conditions. Localization of shear zones is initiated by a material contrast (heterogeneity) of the material parameters. We systematically test the rate of strain weakening in brittle and in ductile regimes to understand its influence on the development of shear zone networks. Our simulations suggest that the development of antithetic faults in a brittle shear zone system is closely linked to a decrease in the angle of friction during deformation. In general, variation of the strain weakening also has a significant influence on ductile shear zones. Numerical results show that the geometry and thickness of the localized high strain zone are especially affected by weakening mechanisms during deformation. Furthermore, the interconnection and interaction of the shear strands lead to a more complex kinematic pattern, which lead to a local change in the maximum principal stress axis. These interaction of shear strands may explain the occurrence of shear-related structures (e.g., folds) or differing characteristics of shear zones, such as the thickness of shear zones or the orientation of the faults to the stress field, which are consistent with field observations.

  12. Growth and production of the brittle stars Ophiura sarsii and Ophiocten sericeum (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, Alexandra M.; Konar, Brenda; Bluhm, Bodil; Iken, Katrin

    2017-05-01

    Dense brittle star assemblages dominate vast areas of the Arctic marine shelves, making them key components of Arctic ecosystem. This study is the first to determine the population dynamics of the dominant shelf brittle star species, Ophiura sarsii and Ophiocten sericeum, through age determination, individual production and total turnover rate (P:B). In the summer of 2013, O. sarsii were collected in the northeastern Chukchi Sea (depth 35-65 m), while O. sericeum were collected in the central Beaufort Sea (depth 37-200 m). Maximum age was higher for O. sarsii than for O. sericeum (27 and 20 years, respectively); however, both species live longer than temperate region congeners. Growth curves for both species had similar initial fast growth, with an inflection period followed by a second phase of fast growth. Predation avoidance in addition to changes in the allocation of energy may be the mechanisms responsible for the observed age dependent growth rates. Individual production was higher for O. sarsii than for O. sericeum by nearly an order of magnitude throughout the size spectra. The distinct distribution pattern of the two species in the Alaskan Arctic may be determined by environmental characteristics such as system productivity. Both species had equally low turnover rates (0.2 and 0.1, respectively), similar to Antarctic species, but lower than temperate species. Such characteristics suggest that the dense brittle star assemblages that characterize the Arctic shelf system could have a recovery time from disturbance on the order of decades.

  13. Fracture-mode map of brittle coatings: Theoretical development and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chong; Xie, Zhaoqian; Guo, Zhenbin; Yao, Haimin

    2015-10-01

    Brittle coatings, upon sufficiently high indentation load, tend to fracture through either ring cracking or radial cracking. In this paper, we systematically study the factors determining the fracture modes of bilayer material under indentation. By analyzing the stress field developed in a coating/substrate bilayer under indentation in combination with the application of the maximum-tensile-stress fracture criterion, we show that the fracture mode of brittle coatings due to indentation is determined synergistically by two dimensionless parameters being functions of the mechanical properties of coating and substrate, coating thickness and indenter tip radius. Such dependence can be graphically depicted by a diagram called 'fracture-mode map', whereby the fracture modes can be directly predicated based on these two dimensionless parameters. Experimental verification of the fracture-mode map is carried out by examining the fracture modes of fused quartz/cement bilayer materials under indentation. The experimental observation exhibits good agreement with the prediction by the fracture-mode map. Our finding in this paper may not only shed light on the mechanics accounting for the fracture modes of brittle coatings in bilayer structures but also pave a new avenue to combating catastrophic damage through fracture mode control.

  14. [Psychosocial predictors of metabolic instability in brittle diabetes--a multivariate time series analysis].

    PubMed

    Brosig, B; Leweke, F; Milch, W; Eckhard, M; Reimer, C

    2001-06-01

    The term "brittle diabetes" denotes the unstable course of an insulin-dependent diabetes characterised by frequent hypo- or hyperglycaemic crises. The aim of this study is to demonstrate empirically how psychosocial parameters interact with metabolic instability in a paradigmatic case of juvenile brittle diabetes. By means of a structured diary study, blood sugar values, moods (SAM), body symptoms (GBB), the daily hustle and hassle, helping therapeutic alliance (HAQ) and the aspects of setting were registered. Resulting time series (112 days each) were ARIMA-analysed by a multivariate approach. It could be shown that the mean variance of daily blood sugar values as an indicator of brittleness was predicted by moods, body complaints and by a family session as setting factor (p < 0.05, for corresponding predictors). Feelings of dominance preceded an increase of blood sugar variance, whereas depressive moods, anger and body symptoms were associated with metabolic instability. A family therapy session also resulted in an increase of the mean blood sugar variance. The model accounted for almost 30% of the total variance of the dependent variable (R-square-adjusted, p < 0.0001). The potential of multivariate time-series as a means to demonstrate psychosomatic interrelations is discussed. We believe that the results may also contribute to an empirically rooted understanding of psychodynamic processes in psychosomatoses.

  15. The diagenetic role of brittle deformation in compaction and pressure solution, Etjo Sanstone, Namibia

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, W.W.; Milliken, K.L.

    1995-05-01

    Scanned-cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of the quartz-rich, porous Etjo Sandstone from northern Namibia shows that brittle deformation has played a major role in developing arcuate and interpenetrated grain contacts. Such contacts, previously interpreted to result from pressure solution, are seen in scanned-CL images to arise primarily from rearrangement of fragments formed by brittle deformation. Brittle deformation dominates compaction and produces extensive microfractures that heal with authigenic quartz cement. The volume of intragranular authigenic cement is significant and represents a previously unrecognized sink for silica in sandstones. True pressure solution is minor in the Etjo and is generally limited to contacts between brecciated fragments and unfractured, detrital grains. In addition to this pressure solution, silica may also be mobilized from the dissolution of comminuted fragments near grain contacts. However, the amount of silica imported into grains is substantially larger than that which appears to come from dissolution sites. Grain overlap can no longer be considered to arise from simple pressure solution, and the volume of authigenic quartz measured in sandstones must include intragranular fracture-filling cement as well as overgrowths and pore-filling cement. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  16. 3D modelling of salt tectonics with a brittle overburden in an extensional regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichheimer, Philipp; Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Most previous numerical models of salt tectonics only considered 2D cases or did not taken a brittle sedimentary overburden into account, both of which are likely to be important in nature. To get insights into the dynamics of diapiric rise of salt we here present time-dependent high resolution 3D models of salt tectonics in the presence of a brittle overburden and sedimentation. We focus on the internal deformation of an embedded anhydrite layer within a nonlinear viscous salt layer. As salt in nature tends to rise upwards to the surface along fault zones, the salt layer is overlain by a brittle overburden to simulate faulting. The resulting complex folding of the anhydrite layer obtained in our models is consistent with natural observations, e.g. Gorleben [1]. Regarding field examples we vary the shape of the anhydrite layer to understand different modes of deformation [2]. We test the effect of overburden rheology, extension and sedimentation rates on the 3D salt dome patterns and on its internal deformation. [1] O. Bornemann. Zur Geologie des Salzstocks Gorleben nach den Bohrergebnissen. Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz (1991). [2] Z. Chemia, H. Koyi, and H. Schmeling. Numerical modelling of rise and fall of a dense layer in salt diapirs. Geophysical Journal International 172.2 (2008): 798-816.

  17. A study of fracture in brittle laminar composites that contain weak interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Colin Stuart

    Ceramics have material properties that make them useful for many industrial applications. They are strong, hard, and chemically inert. Their refractoriness gives them an advantage over metals and polymers for use at high temperature. Unfortunately, the inherent brittleness of ceramics limits their use in structural applications. One way to improve the toughness of ceramics is to combine them with other materials to make composites. The correct combination of materials can lead to synergism, and a significant improvement in properties. In this work, brittle laminates that contain weak interlayers are considered. The weak interlayers lead to crack deflection, and can result in non-catastrophic failure of the material. The requirements for consistent crack deflection and non-catastrophic failure are not fully understood. This work is an attempt to explain the observed fracture behaviour in brittle laminar composites that contain weak interlayers. A combination of experimental work, fracture mechanics modeling and finite element modeling has been used to predict the requirements necessary for non-catastrophic failure. The work shows the size of flaws in the surface of the composite, in the weak interlayer, and in subsequent strong layers in the material, all play an important role in the fracture behaviour. Control and understanding of the effect of the various flaw sizes can be used to achieve non-catastrophic failure and increased work of fracture in these composites.

  18. Brittleness index calculation and evaluation for CBM reservoirs based on AVO simultaneous inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Dong, Shouhua; Huang, Yaping; Wang, Haolong; Chen, Guiwu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed for coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir brittleness index (BI) calculations. The BI, as a guide for fracture area selection, is calculated by dynamic elastic parameters (dynamic Young's modulus Ed and dynamic Poisson's ratio υd) obtained from an amplitude versus offset (AVO) simultaneous inversion. Among the three different classes of CBM reservoirs distinguished on the basis of brittleness in the theoretical part of this study, class I reservoirs with high BI values are identified as preferential target areas for fracturing. Therefore, we derive the AVO approximation equation expressed by Ed and υd first. This allows the direct inversion of the dynamic elastic parameters through the pre-stack AVO simultaneous inversion, which is based on Bayes' theorem. Thereafter, a test model with Gaussian white noise and a through-well seismic profile inversion is used to demonstrate the high reliability of the inversion parameters. Accordingly, the BI of a CBM reservoir section from the Qinshui Basin is calculated using the proposed method and a class I reservoir section detected through brittleness evaluation. From the outcome of this study, we believe the adoption of this new approach could act as a guide and reference for BI calculations and evaluations of CBM reservoirs.

  19. Brittle-to-quasibrittle transition in bundles of nonlinear elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Chandreyee; Manna, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    Properties of the fiber bundle model have been studied using equal load-sharing dynamics where each fiber obeys a nonlinear stress (s )-strain (x ) characteristic function s =G (x ) till its breaking threshold. In particular, four different functional forms have been studied: G (x ) =eα x , 1 +xα , xα, and x eα x where α is a continuously tunable parameter of the model in all cases. Analytical studies, supported by extensive numerical calculations of this model, exhibit a brittle to quasibrittle phase transition at a critical value of αc only in the first two cases. This transition is characterized by the weak power law modulated logarithmic (brittle) and logarithmic (quasibrittle) dependence of the relaxation time on the two sides of the critical point. Moreover, the critical load σc(α ) for the global failure of the bundle depends explicitly on α in all cases. In addition, four more cases have also been studied, where either the nonlinear functional form or the probability distribution of breaking thresholds has been suitably modified. In all these cases similar brittle to quasibrittle transitions have been observed.

  20. Rock Drilling Performance Evaluation by an Energy Dissipation Based Rock Brittleness Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    To reliably estimate drilling performance both tool-rock interaction laws along with a proper rock brittleness index are required to be implemented. In this study, the performance of a single polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutter cutting and different drilling methods including PDC rotary drilling, roller-cone rotary drilling and percussive drilling were investigated. To investigate drilling performance by rock strength properties, laboratory PDC cutting tests were performed on different rocks to obtain cutting parameters. In addition, results of laboratory and field drilling on different rocks found elsewhere in literature were used. Laboratory and field cutting and drilling test results were coupled with values of a new rock brittleness index proposed herein and developed based on energy dissipation withdrawn from the complete stress-strain curve in uniaxial compression. To quantify cutting and drilling performance, the intrinsic specific energy in rotary-cutting action, i.e. the energy consumed in pure cutting action, and drilling penetration rate values in percussive action were used. The results show that the new energy-based brittleness index successfully describes the performance of different cutting and drilling methods and therefore is relevant to assess drilling performance for engineering applications.

  1. Reliable Support Design for Excavations in Brittle Rock Using a Global Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, J. Connor; Diederichs, Mark S.

    2015-03-01

    Spalling damage can pose significant risks during the construction of underground excavations in brittle rock. While deterministic analyses have traditionally been used in the design of these structures, reliability-based design (RBD) methods provide a more rational approach to quantify spalling risk by directly incorporating input uncertainty into the design process and quantifying variable ground response. This paper presents a new RBD approach to evaluate the excavation response and support performance for a tunnel in brittle ground. Guidance for the selection of appropriate parameters for variable brittle materials is provided using a combination of the damage initiation and spalling limit method and theories of microcrack initiation. System performance is then evaluated using a proposed global response surface method (GRSM) coupled with the first-order reliability method, random sampling and finite element analysis. The proposed GRSM provides a computationally efficient way to evaluate the probability of failure for various limit states, allowing for the selection of appropriate design parameters such as minimum bolt length and required bolt capacity during early stages of design. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, a preliminary design option for a proposed deep geologic repository located in Canada was assessed. Numerical analyses were completed using finite element modeling to determine the depth of spalling around the excavation and support loads over the range of possible rock mass and in situ stress conditions. The results of these analyses were then used to assess support performance and make support recommendations.

  2. Cyclic flattened Brazilian disc tests for measuring the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nuwen; Zhao, Tao

    2017-08-01

    We propose a cyclic flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) testing method to measure the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks. Our method has obvious merits in its specimen preparation and experimental operation. Two parallel flattens are introduced in the disc specimen, which facilitate easily and uniformly loading the specimen without special loading devices required. Moreover, the contact regions between two flattens and loading planes barely change during the entire loading and unloading process, ensuring a consistent contact condition. With certain appropriate loading angles, this method guarantees that the very first breakage of the specimen occurs at the center of the disc, which is the prerequisite of the Brazilian-type indirect tensile tests. To demonstrate our new method, nine cyclic FBD tensile tests are conducted. The fatigue load-deformation characteristics of FBD specimens are revealed. The tensile fatigue lives of tested specimens are observed to increase with the increase in cyclic loading frequency. Our proposed method provides a convenient and reliable approach to indirectly measure the fatigue tensile properties of brittle rocks and other brittle solids subjected to cyclic tensile loadings.

  3. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  4. A multi-step transmission electron microscopy sample preparation technique for cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials.

    PubMed

    Weiss Brennan, Claire V; Walck, Scott D; Swab, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    A new technique for the preparation of heavily cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials for examination in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described in detail. In this study, cross-sectional TEM samples were prepared from indented silicon carbide (SiC) bulk ceramics, although this technique could also be applied to other brittle and/or multiphase materials. During TEM sample preparation, milling-induced damage must be minimized, since in studying deformation mechanisms, it would be difficult to distinguish deformation-induced cracking from cracking occurring due to the sample preparation. The samples were prepared using a site-specific, two-step ion milling sequence accompanied by epoxy vacuum infiltration into the cracks. This technique allows the heavily cracked, brittle ceramic material to stay intact during sample preparation and also helps preserve the true microstructure of the cracked area underneath the indent. Some preliminary TEM results are given and discussed in regards to deformation studies in ceramic materials. This sample preparation technique could be applied to other cracked and/or heavily damaged materials, including geological materials, archaeological materials, fatigued materials, and corrosion samples.

  5. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  6. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  7. Complexity, Systems, and Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-14

    2014 Carnegie Mellon University Complexity, Systems, and Software Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 8...for the operation of the Software Engineering Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the United States

  8. Software distribution using xnetlib

    SciTech Connect

    Dongarra, J.J. |; Rowan, T.H.; Wade, R.C.

    1993-06-01

    Xnetlib is a new tool for software distribution. Whereas its predecessor netlib uses e-mail as the user interface to its large collection of public-domain mathematical software, xnetlib uses an X Window interface and socket-based communication. Xnetlib makes it easy to search through a large distributed collection of software and to retrieve requested software in seconds.

  9. Statistical Software Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-13

    multiversion software subject to coincident errors. IEEE Trans. Software Eng. SE-11:1511-1517. Eckhardt, D.E., A.K Caglayan, J.C. Knight, L.D. Lee, D.F...J.C. and N.G. Leveson. 1986. Experimental evaluation of the assumption of independence in multiversion software. IEEE Trans. Software

  10. Decentralized Software Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Institute for Software Research University of California, Irvine www.isr.uci.edu/tech-reports.html Peyman Oreizy University of California, Irvine... Peyman Oreizy and Richard N. Taylor Institute for Software Research University of California, Irvine Irvine, CA 92697-3425 USA {peymano, taylor...mechanisms that enforce cooperation among Decentralized Software Evolution Peyman Oreizy and Richard N. Taylor Institute for Software Research

  11. Finding Helpful Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Ted, Comp.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a list of evaluation services currently producing critical reviews of educational software. Includes information about The Apple K-12 Curriculum Software Reference, The Educational Software Preview, The Educational Software Selector, MicroSIFT, and Only The Best: The Discriminating Guide for Preschool-Grade 12. (TW)

  12. Image Processing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosio, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT: A brief description of astronomical image software is presented. This software was developed in a Digital Micro Vax II Computer System. : St presenta una somera descripci6n del software para procesamiento de imagenes. Este software fue desarrollado en un equipo Digital Micro Vax II. : DATA ANALYSIS - IMAGE PROCESSING

  13. Software productivity improvement through software engineering technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been estimated that NASA expends anywhere from 6 to 10 percent of its annual budget on the acquisition, implementation and maintenance of computer software. Although researchers have produced numerous software engineering approaches over the past 5-10 years; each claiming to be more effective than the other, there is very limited quantitative information verifying the measurable impact htat any of these technologies may have in a production environment. At NASA/GSFC, an extended research effort aimed at identifying and measuring software techniques that favorably impact productivity of software development, has been active over the past 8 years. Specific, measurable, software development technologies have been applied and measured in a production environment. Resulting software development approaches have been shown to be effective in both improving quality as well as productivity in this one environment.

  14. Overcoming pain as a barrier to work.

    PubMed

    Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Main, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    To consider whether pain is a barrier to work and if so how this can be overcome. Recent findings demonstrate that in addition to absence, pain can lead to a significant loss of productivity. The reasons why employees take absence or attend work while ill are complex and include personal, social and moral pressures around absence, and personally and institutionally mediated presenteeism. Interventions have moved on from a purely biomedical or psychosocial focus towards integrated programmes supporting individuals in managing their pain in the workplace. Pain is one of the leading causes of absenteeism and presenteeism with related costs for both employees and employers. Ongoing pain presents a number of physical, psychological and social obstacles to work, which may or may not be modifiable. A range of interventions has been tested in randomized trials with a recent move towards identifying and tackling musculoskeletal pain in the wider context as conceptualized by the flags framework. However, in order for any intervention to be successful in ensuring employees overcome pain as a barrier to work, there needs to be widespread change in behaviour with regard to occupational health in general and effective interventions need to be implemented in both workplace and healthcare settings.

  15. Software Formal Inspections Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Software Formal Inspections Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) is applicable to NASA software. This Standard defines the requirements that shall be fulfilled by the software formal inspections process whenever this process is specified for NASA software. The objective of this Standard is to define the requirements for a process that inspects software products to detect and eliminate defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. The process also provides for the collection and analysis of inspection data to improve the inspection process as well as the quality of the software.

  16. Microstructures relevant to brittle fracture initiation at the heat-affected zone of weldment of a low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, K.; Kim, J.; Yokoyama, K.; Nagumo, M.

    1996-09-01

    Charpy toughness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of weldment of a low carbon steel has been investigated by means of an instrumented Charpy test and fractographic analysis. Microstructures were varied with thermal cycles simulating double-pass welding. The ductile-brittle transition temperature is the most deteriorated at an intermediate second-cycle heating temperature. The origin of the difference in the transition temperatures has been analyzed to exist in the brittle fracture initiation stage. Fractographic examination correlating with microstructural features has revealed that the brittle fracture initiation site is associated with the intersection of bainitic ferrite areas with different orientations rather than the martensite-austenite constituents. The role of the constraint of plastic deformation on the brittle fracture initiation is discussed.

  17. Deciphering the brittle evolution of SW Norway through a combined structural, mineralogical and geochronological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, Thomas; Viola, Giulio; Fredin, Ola; Zwingmann, Horst; Wilkinson, Camilla Maya; Ganerød, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    SW Norway has experienced a complex brittle history after cessation of the Caledonian orogeny, and the recent discoveries of major hydrocarbon reserves in heavily fractured and weathered basement offshore SW Norway has triggered a renewed interest in understanding this complex tectonic evolution. In this contribution we present results from a multidisciplinary study combining lineament analysis, field work, paleo-stress inversion, mineralogical characterization and radiometric dating in the Bømlo area of SW Norway in order to develop a tectonic model for the brittle evolution of this important region. The study area mainly consists of the Rolvsnes granodiorite (U-Pb zircon age of ca. 466 Ma), which is devoid of penetrative ductile deformation features. The first identified brittle faults are muscovite-bearing top-to-the-NNW thrusts and E-W striking dextral strike-slip faults decorated with stretched biotite. These are mechanically compatible and are assigned to the same NNW-SSE transpressional regime. Ar-Ar muscovite and biotite dates of ca. 450 Ma (Late Ordovician) indicate fault activity in the course of a Taconian-equivalent orogenic event. During the subsequent Silurian Laurentia-Baltica collision variably oriented, lower-grade chlorite and epidote-coated faults formed in response to a ENE-WSW compressional stress regime. A large number of mainly N-S striking normal faults consist of variably thick fault gouge cores with illite, quartz, kaolinite, calcite and epidote mineralizations, accommodating mainly E-W extension. K-Ar dating of illites separated from representative fault gouges and zones of altered granodiorite constrain deformation ranging from the Permian to the Late Jurassic, indicating a long history of crustal extension where faults were repeatedly activated. In addition, a set of ca. SW-NE striking faults associated with alteration zones give Cretaceous dates, either representing a young phase of NW-SE extension or reactivation of previously formed

  18. Micromechanics of brittle creep and implications for the strength of the upper crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2012-04-01

    In the upper crust, the chemical influence of pore water or other aqueous solutions promotes time dependent brittle deformation through sub-critical crack growth. Sub-critical crack growth allows rocks to deform and fail at stresses far below their short-term failure strength, and even at constant applied stress ("brittle creep"). Here we present a new micromechanical model describing time dependent brittle creep of water-saturated rocks under triaxial stress conditions. Macroscopic brittle creep is modelled on the basis of microcrack extension under compressive stresses due to sub-critical crack growth. The incremental strains due to the growth of cracks in compression are derived from the sliding wing crack model of Ashby and Sammis (1990). Crack length evolution is computed from Charles' power law description of stress corrosion crack growth. The macroscopic strains and strain rates computed from the model are non-linear and compare well with experimental results obtained on granite, low porosity sandstone and basalt samples. Primary creep (decelerating strain rate) corresponds to decelerating crack growth, due to an initial decrease in stress intensity factor with increasing crack length in compression. Tertiary creep (accelerating strain rate as failure is approached) corresponds to an increase in crack growth rate due to crack interactions. Secondary creep, with apparently constant strain rate, arises as merely an inflexion between these two end-member phases. The strain rate at the inflexion point can be estimated analytically as a function of model parameters, effective confining pressure and temperature conditions, which provides an approximate creep law for the process. The creep law is used to infer the long term differential stress as a function of depth in the upper crust for tectonic loading rates: sub-critical cracking induces an offset of the rock strength, which is equivalent to a decrease in cohesion. For porous rocks, the competition between sub

  19. Rheology of Pure Glasses and Crystal Bearing Melts: from the Newtonian Field to the Brittle Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordonnier, B.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J. M.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition remains a central question of modern geology. If rocks can be perceived as a granular flow on geological time-scale, their behavior is brittle in dynamic areas. Understanding rock failure conditions is the main parameter in mitigating geological risks, more specifically the eruptive style transitions from effusive to explosive. If numerical simulations are the only way to fully understanding the physical processes involved, we are in a strong need of an experimental validation of the proposed models. here we present results obtained under torsion and uni-axial compression on both pure glasses and crystal bearing melts. We characterized the brittle onset of two phases magmas from 0 to 65% crystals. The strain-rates span a 5 orders magnitude range, from the Newtonian flow to the Brittle field (10-5 - 100 s-1). We particularly emphasize the time dependency of the measured rheology. The materials tested are a borosilicate glass from the National Bureau of Standards, a natural sample from Mt Unzen volcano and a synthetic sample. The lattest is an HPG8 melt with 7% sodium mole excess. The particles are quasi-isometric corundum crystalschosen for their shape and integrity under the stress range investigated. The crystal fraction ranges from 0 to 0.65. Concerning pure magmas, we recently demonstrated that the material passes from a Newtonian to a non-Nemtonian behavior with increasing strain-rate. This onset can mostly be explained by viscous-heating effects. However, for even greater strain-rates, the material cracks and finally fail. The brittle onset is here explained with the visco-elastic theory and corresponds to a Deborah number greater than 10-2. Concerning crystal bearing melts the departure from the Newtonian state is characterized by two effects: a shear-thinning and a time weakening effect. The first one is instantaneous and loading-unloading cyclic tests suggest an elastic contribution of the crystal network. The second one

  20. SG2PS (structural geology to postscript converter) - A graphical solution for brittle structural data evaluation and paleostress calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasvári, Ágoston; Baharev, Ali

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to create an open source cross platform application to process brittle structural geological data with seven paleostress inversion algorithms published by different authors and formerly not available within a single desktop application. The tool facilitates separate processing and plotting of different localities, data types and user made groups, using the same single input file. Simplified data input is supported, requiring as small amount of data as possible. Data rotation to correct for bedding tilting, rotation with paleomagnetic declination and k-means clustering are available. RUP and ANG stress estimators calculation and visualization, resolved shear direction display and Mohr circle stress visualization are available. RGB-colored vector graphical outputs are automatically generated in Encapsulated PostScript and Portable Document Format. Stereographical displays on great circle or pole point plot, equal area or equal angle net and upper or lower hemisphere projections are implemented. Rose plots displaying dip direction or strike, with dip angle distribution of the input data set are available. This tool is ideal for preliminary data interpretation on the field (quick processing and visualization in seconds); the implemented methods can be regularly used in the daily academic and industrial work as well. The authors' goal was to create an open source and self-contained desktop application that does not require any additional third party framework (such as .NET) or the Java Virtual Machine. The software has a clear and highly modular structure enabling good code portability, easy maintainability, reusability and extensibility. A Windows installer is publicly available and the program is also fully functional on Linux. The Mac OS X port should be feasible with minimal effort. The install file with test and demo data sets, detailed manual, and links to the GitHub repositories are available on the regularly updated website www.sg2ps.eu.

  1. Software Partitioning Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-29

    1 Software Partitioning Technologies Tim Skutt Smiths Aerospace 3290 Patterson Ave. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512-1991 (616) 241-8645 skutt_timothy...Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 12 2 Agenda n Software Partitioning Overview n Smiths Software Partitioning Technology n Software Partitioning...Partition Level OS Core Module Level OS Timers MMU I/O API Layer Partitioning Services 6 Smiths Software Partitioning Technology n Smiths has developed

  2. Responsbility for unreliable software

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, N.J.

    1994-12-31

    Unreliable software exposes software developers and distributors to legal risks. Under certain circumstances, the developer and distributor of unreliable software can be sued. To avoid lawsuits, software developers should do the following: determine what the risks am, understand the extent of the risks, and identify ways of avoiding the risks and lessening the consequences of the risks. Liability issues associated with unreliable software are explored in this article.

  3. Software component quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.

  4. Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Development Report Microstructural Features Controlling Ductile-to- Brittle Transition Behavior in High-Strength, Martensitic Steel Weld Metals C 0by...Martensitic Steel Weld Metals PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) .J. DeLoach, Jr. .TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 1S PAGE COUNT I...if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP High strength steel , Ductile-brittle transition Martensitic Mechanical proper ties

  5. Description of new dry granular materials of variable cohesion and friction coefficient: Implications for laboratory modeling of the brittle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M. M.; Bulois, C.; Mourgues, R.; Galland, O.; Legland, J.-B.; Gruber, C.

    2016-08-01

    Cohesion and friction coefficient are fundamental parameters for scaling brittle deformation in laboratory models of geological processes. However, they are commonly not experimental variable, whereas (1) rocks range from cohesion-less to strongly cohesive and from low friction to high friction and (2) strata exhibit substantial cohesion and friction contrasts. This brittle paradox implies that the effects of brittle properties on processes involving brittle deformation cannot be tested in laboratory models. Solving this paradox requires the use of dry granular materials of tunable and controllable brittle properties. In this paper, we describe dry mixtures of fine-grained cohesive, high friction silica powder (SP) and low-cohesion, low friction glass microspheres (GM) that fulfill this requirement. We systematically estimated the cohesions and friction coefficients of mixtures of variable proportions using two independent methods: (1) a classic Hubbert-type shear box to determine the extrapolated cohesion (C) and friction coefficient (μ), and (2) direct measurements of the tensile strength (T0) and the height (H) of open fractures to calculate the true cohesion (C0). The measured values of cohesion increase from 100 Pa for pure GM to 600 Pa for pure SP, with a sub-linear trend of the cohesion with the mixture GM content. The two independent cohesion measurement methods, from shear tests and tension/extensional tests, yield very similar results of extrapolated cohesion (C) and show that both are robust and can be used independently. The measured values of friction coefficients increase from 0.5 for pure GM to 1.05 for pure SP. The use of these granular material mixtures now allows testing (1) the effects of cohesion and friction coefficient in homogeneous laboratory models and (2) testing the effect of brittle layering on brittle deformation, as demonstrated by preliminary experiments. Therefore, the brittle properties become, at last, experimental variables.

  6. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  7. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  8. Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-15

    Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support) Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1...Meteorology Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1 & 2, 2010 Hosted by University

  9. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed. PMID:26649310

  10. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  11. Innovative Strategies to Overcome Biofilm Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taraszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Fila, Grzegorz; Grinholc, Mariusz; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    We review the recent literature concerning the efficiency of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation toward various microbial species in planktonic and biofilm cultures. The review is mainly focused on biofilm-growing microrganisms because this form of growth poses a threat to chronically infected or immunocompromised patients and is difficult to eradicate from medical devices. We discuss the biofilm formation process and mechanisms of its increased resistance to various antimicrobials. We present, based on data in the literature, strategies for overcoming the problem of biofilm resistance. Factors that have potential for use in increasing the efficiency of the killing of biofilm-forming bacteria include plant extracts, enzymes that disturb the biofilm structure, and other nonenzymatic molecules. We propose combining antimicrobial photodynamic therapy with various antimicrobial and antibiofilm approaches to obtain a synergistic effect to permit efficient microbial growth control at low photosensitizer doses. PMID:23509680

  12. Library outreach: overcoming health literacy challenges*

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Ruth; Kreps, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the powerful influences of consumer health literacy on access to and use of relevant health information. Method: The paper describes how widespread problems with health literacy significantly limit effective dissemination of relevant health information in society, especially to many vulnerable populations where health literacy challenges are especially pervasive. Results: The paper examines strengths and weaknesses of different programs for addressing health literacy problems, including educational programs, message design programs, and strategic communication training and intervention programs. Implications: The paper evaluates strategies that can be implemented throughout the modern health care system to address problems of health literacy by improving health information access, processing, and understanding. It concludes by examining several strategies that libraries can adopt to overcome many health literacy challenges. PMID:16239962

  13. Overcoming the effects of intentional forgetting.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Melissa; Malmberg, Kenneth J

    2011-02-01

    The long-term effects of the compartmentalization of task-irrelevant memories were investigated using a directed forgetting procedure. Many models tacitly assume the persistence of the costs and benefits of directed forgetting or otherwise fail to predict what factors might reduce or eliminate them. In contrast, a retrieving effectively from memory model (REM; Lehman & Malmberg, 2009) predicts that intentional forgetting should only be observed for free recall when temporal context is used to probe memory. By manipulating whether study lists were constructed from category exemplars or from a random set of words, and by either providing temporal or category cues at test, we tested the prediction. The effects of directed forgetting were eliminated when categorized lists were studied and category cues were provided. When categorized lists were used but category cues were not provided, the usual costs and benefits of directed forgetting were observed. These results specify the conditions under which the consequences of intentional forgetting can be overcome.

  14. Overcoming catastrophic forgetting in neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, James; Pascanu, Razvan; Rabinowitz, Neil; Veness, Joel; Desjardins, Guillaume; Rusu, Andrei A.; Milan, Kieran; Quan, John; Ramalho, Tiago; Grabska-Barwinska, Agnieszka; Hassabis, Demis; Clopath, Claudia; Kumaran, Dharshan; Hadsell, Raia

    2017-01-01

    The ability to learn tasks in a sequential fashion is crucial to the development of artificial intelligence. Until now neural networks have not been capable of this and it has been widely thought that catastrophic forgetting is an inevitable feature of connectionist models. We show that it is possible to overcome this limitation and train networks that can maintain expertise on tasks that they have not experienced for a long time. Our approach remembers old tasks by selectively slowing down learning on the weights important for those tasks. We demonstrate our approach is scalable and effective by solving a set of classification tasks based on a hand-written digit dataset and by learning several Atari 2600 games sequentially. PMID:28292907

  15. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multi-core, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to .50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  16. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multicore, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to approx.50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  17. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  18. Software Engineering Program: Software Process Improvement Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide experience-based guidance in implementing a software process improvement program in any NASA software development or maintenance community. This guidebook details how to define, operate, and implement a working software process improvement program. It describes the concept of the software process improvement program and its basic organizational components. It then describes the structure, organization, and operation of the software process improvement program, illustrating all these concepts with specific NASA examples. The information presented in the document is derived from the experiences of several NASA software organizations, including the SEL, the SEAL, and the SORCE. Their experiences reflect many of the elements of software process improvement within NASA. This guidebook presents lessons learned in a form usable by anyone considering establishing a software process improvement program within his or her own environment. This guidebook attempts to balance general and detailed information. It provides material general enough to be usable by NASA organizations whose characteristics do not directly match those of the sources of the information and models presented herein. It also keeps the ideas sufficiently close to the sources of the practical experiences that have generated the models and information.

  19. Space Station Software Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Four panels of invited experts and NASA representatives focused on the following topics: software management, software development environment, languages, and software standards. Each panel deliberated in private, held two open sessions with audience participation, and developed recommendations for the NASA Space Station Program. The major thrusts of the recommendations were as follows: (1) The software management plan should establish policies, responsibilities, and decision points for software acquisition; (2) NASA should furnish a uniform modular software support environment and require its use for all space station software acquired (or developed); (3) The language Ada should be selected for space station software, and NASA should begin to address issues related to the effective use of Ada; and (4) The space station software standards should be selected (based upon existing standards where possible), and an organization should be identified to promulgate and enforce them. These and related recommendations are described in detail in the conference proceedings.

  20. Brittle deformation and exhumation mechanisms in the core of the Eastern Alps, The Tauern Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Audrey; Garcia, Sebastian; Rosenberg, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Tauern Window (TW) is a Tertiary structural and thermal dome located in the core of the Eastern Alpine orogen and in front of the Dolomite indenter. The Penninic basement and cover units within the TW attained their thermal peak about 30 Myr ago (e.g., Selverstone et al., 1992) followed by cooling and exhumation from Early Oligocene to late Miocene time (e.g., Grundmann and Morteani, 1985). Most exhumation was partly accommodated by two normal faults at the western and eastern ends of the TW (Brenner and Katschberg faults, respectively). Although these normal faults are well described in the literature, their roles in the exhumation of the TW are still under debate: Exhumation accommodated primarily by folding and erosion (e.g., Rosenberg et al., 2004) versus exhumation mainly accommodated by Brenner and Katschberg normal faulting (e.g., Selverstone, 1988; Ratschbacher et al., 1989). New fault-slip data from the TW allow us to reconstruct paleostress axes by inversion and to constrain the relative roles of the folding and orogen-parallel extension during the late deformation history of the TW, in the brittle-field. Our results show little evidence of compression and a clear zoning of the paleostress field in the TW. In the central part of the TW, the σ1 direction is sub-horizontal N-S to NE-SW (strike-slip), whereas it is steep in the footwall of the Brenner and the Katschberg normal faults. Local variability of the σ3 direction are observed; indeed, the σ3 direction varies from E-W to WNW-ESE along the Brenner fault, to NW-SE along the Jaufen fault, the inferred southern continuation of the Brenner fault (Schneider et al., this session). Along the Katschberg fault, the σ3 direction is mainly NNW-SSE oriented, which is consistent with extension in front of a triangular dead zone shape induced by the WSW-striking Dolomites indenter. Nearly no evidence of a stress field compatible with upright folding (D2 phase of deformation) was found in the brittle domain

  1. Facilitating Controlled Tests of Website Design Changes Using Aspect-Oriented Software Development and Software Product Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, Javier; Kobsa, Alfred

    Controlled online experiments in which envisaged changes to a website are first tested live with a small subset of site visitors have proven to predict the effects of these changes quite accurately. However, these experiments often require expensive infrastructure and are costly in terms of development effort. This paper advocates a systematic approach to the design and implementation of such experiments in order to overcome the aforementioned drawbacks by making use of Aspect-Oriented Software Development and Software Product Lines.

  2. New perspectives on the transition between discrete fracture, fragmentation, and pulverization during brittle failure of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H.; Barber, T. J.; Borjas, C.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of Earth's tectonic plates are typically measured in millimeters to tens of centimeters per year, seemingly confirming the generally-held view that tectonic processes are slow, and have been throughout Earth's history. In line with this perspective, the vast majority of laboratory rock mechanics research focused on failure in the brittle regime has been limited to experiments utilizing slow loading rates. On the other hand, many natural processes that pose significant risk for humans (e.g., earthquakes and extraterrestrial impacts), as well as risks associated with human activities (blow-outs, explosions, mining and mine failures, projectile penetration), occur at rates that are hundreds to thousands of times faster than those typically simulated in the laboratory. Little experimental data exists to confirm or calibrate theoretical models explaining the connection between these dramatic events and the pulverized rocks found in fault zones, impacts, or explosions; however the experimental data that does exist is thought-provoking: At the earth's surface, the process of brittle fracture passes through a critical transition in rocks at high strain rates (101-103s-1) between regimes of discrete fracture and distributed fragmentation, accompanied by a dramatic increase in strength. Previous experimental works on this topic have focused on key thresholds (e.g., peak stress, peak strain, average strain rate) that define this transition, but more recent work suggests that this transition is more fundamentally dependent on characteristics (e.g., shape) of the loading pulse and related microcrack dynamics, perhaps explaining why for different lithologies different thresholds more effectively define the pulverization transition. In this presentation we summarize some of our work focused on this transition, including the evolution of individual defects at the microscopic, microsecond scale and the energy budget associated with the brittle fragmentation process as a

  3. Evolution of permeability across the transition from brittle failure to cataclastic flow in porous siltstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Kitajima, Hiroko; Carpenter, Brett M.; Saffer, Demian M.; Marone, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Porous sedimentary rocks fail in a variety of modes ranging from localized, brittle deformation to pervasive, cataclastic flow. To improve our understanding of this transition and its affect on fluid flow and permeability, we investigated the mechanical behavior of a siltstone unit within the Marcellus Formation, PA USA, characterized by an initial porosity ranging from 41 to 45%. We explored both hydrostatic loading paths (σ1 = σ2 = σ3) and triaxial loading paths (σ1 > σ2 = σ3) while maintaining constant effective pressure (Pe = Pc - Pp). Samples were deformed with an axial displacement rate of 0.1 μm/s (strain rate of 2 × 10-6 s-1). Changes in pore water volume were monitored (drained conditions) to measure the evolution of porosity. Permeability was measured at several stages of each experiment. Under hydrostatic loading, we find the onset of macroscropic grain crushing (P*) at 39 MPa. Triaxial loading experiments show a transition from brittle behavior with shear localization and compaction to cataclastic-flow as confining pressure increases. When samples fail by shear localization, permeability decreases abruptly without significant changes in porosity. Conversely, for cataclastic deformation, permeability reduction is associated with significant porosity reduction. Postexperiment observation of brittle samples show localized shear zones characterized by grain comminution. Our data show how zones of shear localization can act as barriers to fluid flow and thus modify the hydrological and mechanical properties of the surrounding rocks. Our results have important implications for deformation behavior and permeability evolution in sedimentary systems, and in particular where the stress field is influenced by injection or pumping.

  4. An elasto-plastic solution for channel cracking of brittle coating on polymer substrate

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Fangliang; Gray, Matthew H.; ...

    2017-04-25

    In this study, an elasto-plastic channel-cracking model is presented to study the open-mode fracture of a thin layer brittle coating grown on a polymer substrate. A linear elastic shear interlayer is introduced to describe the stress transfer from the elasto-plastic substrate to the brittle coating, on basis of the shear-lag principle. The channel cracking behavior involves three stages: elastic, elasto-plastic and plastic stages, which are solved in a continuous manner based on the deformation status of the substrate. Explicit solutions are derived for the mutli-stage cracking process. Corresponding experimental tests for a titanium oxide (TiO2) coating on a poly (ethylenemore » terephthalate) substrate are conducted. The fracture toughness of the coating layer is estimated based on the crack spacing versus layer thickness relationship at certain strain levels. This method is found to be more reliable than the traditional methods using crack onset strain. Parametric studies of the fracture energy release rate for the coating and interfacial compliance of the thin film system are conducted, through which the effect of plastic deformation on the channel cracking behavior is studied extensively. The results indicate that the tangent modulus of the substrate controls the evolution curvature of crack spacing where a smaller tangent modulus corresponds to a slower saturation of crack spacing. The energy release rate also varies significantly with the properties of the interlayer. The study highlights the necessity of an elasto-plastic model for the thin film systems of brittle coating on a plastic substrate.« less

  5. Numerical simulation of the fracture process in cutting heterogeneous brittle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Y.; Kou, S. Q.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    2002-11-01

    The process of cutting homogeneous soft material has been investigated extensively. However, there are not so many studies on cutting heterogeneous brittle material. In this paper, R-T2D (Rock and Tool interaction), based on the rock failure process analysis model, is developed to simulate the fracture process in cutting heterogeneous brittle material. The simulated results reproduce the process involved in the fragmentation of rock or rock-like material under mechanical tools: the build-up of the stress field, the formation of the crushed zone, surface chipping, and the formation of the crater and subsurface cracks. Due to the inclusion of heterogeneity in the model, some new features in cutting brittle material are revealed. Firstly, macroscopic cracks sprout at the two edges of the cutter in a tensile mode. Then with the tensile cracks releasing the confining pressure, the rock in the initially high confining pressure zone is compressed into failure and the crushed zone gradually comes into being. The cracked zone near the crushed zone is always available, which makes the boundary of the crushed zone vague. Some cracks propagate to form chipping cracks and some dip into the rock to form subsurface cracks. The chipping cracks are mainly driven to propagate in a tensile mode or a mixed tensile and shear mode, following curvilinear paths, and finally intersect with the free surface to form chips. According to the simulated results, some qualitative and quantitative analyses are performed. It is found that the back rake angle of the cutter has an important effect on the cutting efficiency. Although the quantitative analysis needs more research work, it is not difficult to see the promise that the numerical method holds. It can be utilized to improve our understanding of tool-rock interaction and rock failure mechanisms under the action of mechanical tools, which, in turn, will be useful in assisting the design of fragmentation equipment and fragmentation operations.

  6. Deformation of brittle-ductile thrust wedges in experiments and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, J. H. W.; Brun, J. P.; Sokoutis, D.

    2003-10-01

    Even though the rheology of thrust wedges is mostly frictional, a basal ductile decollement is often involved. By comparison with purely frictional wedges, such brittle-ductile wedges generally display anomalous structures such as backward vergence, widely spaced thrust units, and nonfrontward sequences of thrust development. Laboratory experiments are used here to study the deformation of brittle-ductile thrust wedges. Results are compared with natural systems in the Jura Mountains and the northern Pakistan Salt Range and Potwar Plateau. Two series of three models are used to illustrate the effects of varying the basal wedge angle (β) and shortening rate (V). These two parameters directly control variations in relative strength between brittle and ductile layers (BD coupling). Wedges with strong BD coupling (low β and high V) give almost regular frontward sequences with closely spaced thrust units and, as such, are not significantly different from purely frictional wedges. Weak BD coupling (high β and low V) gives dominantly backward thrusting sequences. Intermediate BD coupling produces frontward-backward oscillating sequences. The spacing of thrust units increases as coupling decreases. Back thrusts develop in parts of a wedge where BD coupling is weak, regardless of the thrust sequence. Wedges with weak BD coupling need large amounts of bulk shortening (more than 30%) to attain a state of equilibrium, at which stable sliding along the base occurs. On this basis, we argue that a state of equilibrium has not yet been attained in at least some parts of the Jura Mountains and eastern Salt Range and Potwar Plateau thrust systems.

  7. The climatology of the Alaska Beaufort Sea shelf told by brittle star population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo, A.; Konar, B.; Bluhm, B.; Iken, K.

    2016-02-01

    Brittle stars are a key component of Arctic benthic shelf systems due to their high standing stock, dominance in abundance over all other epibenthic organisms, and as prey for higher trophic organisms. On the Alaskan Arctic shelves, the circumboreal species Ophiura sarsii and Ophiocten sericeum are the dominant brittle stars with densities of up to 260 ind. m-2 and 20 ind. m-2, respectively. Although present across all Alaska Arctic shelves these specie have a segregated distribution; O. sarsii dominates the more productive Chukchi and western Beaufort Sea shelves and O. sericeum dominates the more river influenced Beaufort Sea shelf east of 150°W. Despite the pervasiveness of these species, little is known of their population parameters, the stability of their respective distribution patterns over time, or the factors that contribute to their geographic distribution. The objective of this study was to analyze the population size structure, growth, productivity, and distribution of the two species. Our results indicate that O. sarsii grows faster and lives longer than O. sericeum, and at equal body size, O. sarsii has significantly higher organic mass compared to O. sericeum. Compared to early records, we observed a shift in the distribution of the two species on the Alaska Beaufort Sea shelf over the past 40 years. Changes in intensity and frequency of easterly wind events over the western Beaufort Sea may be a key factor driving the distribution expansion of O. sericeum and the retreat of O. sarsii towards the west in this region. Considering the significant difference in these species' growth rate and organic mass content, the consequences of this distribution shift for brittle star predators and benthic community remineralization may be substantial.

  8. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  9. Brittle seismic damage before and after eruptions, worldwide statistical analyses: implications for prediction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Agathe; Grasso, Jean-Robert

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies suggested that the seismic events prior and after an eruption follow an Omori's law similar to the one observed for earthquakes with possible different exponent values (e.g., Lemarchand and Grasso, 2007). Given these similarities, we are interested in going further into the analogy between damage triggered by earthquake failure and eruption onset, by studying the damage of the upper crust contemporary to eruptions. First, using worldwide earthquakes and eruptions databases, we quantified the spatial scale involved in crust damage around eruptions, as a function of the size of volcanic events, i.e. as measured by VEI. Using the distribution of seismic events around the time of eruption onsets, we found that larger volumes are involved in the brittle crust damage for the largest eruption sizes. Second, we analyzed the analogy between eruptions and earthquakes regarding crust loading and discharge, thanks to patterns of seismicity around event times. For eruptions on a given volcano, evidences for crust loading have been highlighted thanks to seismicity up to ten days prior eruption time (e.g.,Voight, 1988; Kilburn, 2003; Chastin and Main, 2003; Collombet and Grasso, 2003). For worldwide eruptions, average seismicity around eruption time, shows direct and inverse Omori's law, the same way earthquakes do but with different values of exponents (Lemarchand and Grasso, 2007). Contrarily to earthquakes Omori's law, our preliminary analysis suggests the values of these exponents to possibly vary with the eruption sizes. Given that eruption processes generally show longer failure times than earthquake rupture propagation, we are interested in the mechanical responses of the brittle crust damages as a function of the forcing rate. It possibly argues for the eruption process to impact the brittle crust the same way than a slow earthquake, with a larger number of foreshocks than the regular earthquake. Implications for prediction of eruptions, regarding the size

  10. Software Engineering Improvement Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In performance of this task order, bd Systems personnel provided support to the Flight Software Branch and the Software Working Group through multiple tasks related to software engineering improvement and to activities of the independent Technical Authority (iTA) Discipline Technical Warrant Holder (DTWH) for software engineering. To ensure that the products, comments, and recommendations complied with customer requirements and the statement of work, bd Systems personnel maintained close coordination with the customer. These personnel performed work in areas such as update of agency requirements and directives database, software effort estimation, software problem reports, a web-based process asset library, miscellaneous documentation review, software system requirements, issue tracking software survey, systems engineering NPR, and project-related reviews. This report contains a summary of the work performed and the accomplishments in each of these areas.

  11. Design software for reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracz, Will

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the designing of software for reuse. Topics include terminology, software reuse maxims, the science of programming, an interface design example, a modularization example, and reuse and implementation guidelines.

  12. Software assurance standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This standard specifies the software assurance program for the provider of software. It also delineates the assurance activities for the provider and the assurance data that are to be furnished by the provider to the acquirer. In any software development effort, the provider is the entity or individual that actually designs, develops, and implements the software product, while the acquirer is the entity or individual who specifies the requirements and accepts the resulting products. This standard specifies at a high level an overall software assurance program for software developed for and by NASA. Assurance includes the disciplines of quality assurance, quality engineering, verification and validation, nonconformance reporting and corrective action, safety assurance, and security assurance. The application of these disciplines during a software development life cycle is called software assurance. Subsequent lower-level standards will specify the specific processes within these disciplines.

  13. Guidelines for software inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Quality control inspections are software problem finding procedures which provide defect removal as well as improvements in software functionality, maintenance, quality, and development and testing methodology is discussed. The many side benefits include education, documentation, training, and scheduling.

  14. Foreign Source Software: Systems and Software Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-23

    Foreign Sour S t & S ft Tys ems o ware e April Presen J ifenn e ce Software h l C fc no ogy on erence 2009 ted by: G ildr u 1 Rea • Almost all... software , open source, has som involvement • Foreign influences in negatively effects the lity proprietary as well as e form of foreign modern... software DoD’s security 2 Information Tech • In the past, proprieta typically developed u resources • Now, most companie their development off • Systems

  15. Deformation and Fracture of Porous Brittle Materials Under Different Loading Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, N. L.; Sablina, T. Yu.; Sevostyanova, I. N.; Buyakova, S. P.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of alumina and zirconia compression- and shear-test specimens with porosity ranging from 10 to 70% is investigated. Analysis of the stress-strain curves for the materials under study has revealed a transition from a characteristically brittle fracture of fairly dense Al2O3 and ZrO2 specimens to pseudo-plastic fracture for a high porosity level. The ultimate compression strength, effective elastic and shear moduli, and Poisson's ratio are found to decrease with increase in the pore space volume of the ceramic specimens, which is shown to correlate with development of strain-induced multiple cracking of the materials.

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  17. A reliable approach to prepare brittle semiconducting materials for cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dycus, J H; Lebeau, J M

    2017-07-07

    Here, we present a sample preparation approach that simplifies the thinning of very brittle wide bandgap semiconducting materials in cross-section geometry for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy. Using AlN thin films grown on sapphire and AlN substrates as case studies, we demonstrate that high-quality samples can be routinely prepared while greatly reducing the preparation time and consumables cost. The approach removes the sample preparation barrier to studying a wide variety of materials by electron microscopy. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Static stress drop associated with brittle slip events on exhumed faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; di Toro, G.; Pennacchioni, G.; Pollard, D. D.; Nielsen, S.

    2009-02-01

    We estimate the static stress drop on small exhumed strike-slip faults in the Lake Edison granodiorite of the central Sierra Nevada (California). The subvertical strike-slip faults were exhumed from 4 to 15 km depth and were chosen because they are exposed in outcrop along their entire tip-to-tip lengths of 8-12 m. Slip nucleated on joints and accumulated by crystal-plastic shearing (forming quartz mylonites from early quartz vein filling in joints) and successive brittle faulting (forming epidote-bearing cataclasites). The occurrence of thin, ≤300 μm wide, pseudotachylytes along some small faults throughout the study area suggests that some, if not all, of the brittle slip on the study area faults may have been seismic. We suggest that the contribution of brittle, cataclastic slip to the total slip along the studied cataclasite-bearing small faults may be estimated by the length of epidote-filled, rhombohedral dilatational jogs (rhombochasms) distributed quasi-periodically along the length of the faults. The interpretation that slip recorded by rhombochasms occurred in single events is based on evidence that (1) epidote crystals are randomly oriented and undeformed within the rhombochasm; (2) cataclasite in principal slip zones does not include clasts of previous cataclasite, and (3) rhombochasm lengths vary systematically along the length of the faults with slip maximum occurring near the fault center, tapering to the fault tips. We thereby constrain both the rupture length and slip. On the basis of these measurements, we calculate stress drops ranging over 90-250 MPa, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude larger than typical seismological estimates for earthquakes, but similar in magnitude to seismological estimates of small (brittle faults

  19. Self-organized criticality in a block lattice model of the brittle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunsheng; Takayasu, Hideki; Tretyakov, Alex Yu; Takayasu, Misako; Yumoto, Shinji

    1998-06-01

    An earthquake model is introduced, in which the brittle crust is treated as a two-dimensional system of many blocks divided by faults, and the mechanical behavior of the faults is described by the Burridge-Knopoff stick-slip model. The coherent system naturally evolves into a self-organized critical state. Some universal scaling laws of seismicity, such as the Gutenberg-Richter law with the b value in agreement with the observational result and the fractal feature of fault patterns, are reproduced. Some ambiguity in simple cellular automata models is also solved.

  20. Semiempirical formulae for elastic moduli and brittleness of diamondlike and zinc-blende covalent crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamran, Sami; Chen, Liang; Chen, Kuiying

    2008-03-01

    In the present work, semiempirical formulae for both bulk B and shear G moduli of diamondlike and zinc-blende covalent crystals are elaborated in terms of bond length and ionicity fraction of the bonding. The resulting expressions can be applied to a broad selection of covalent materials and their modulus predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data and those from ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the correlation between the ratio G/B and the aforementioned bonding parameters was investigated. The analysis of this relationship demonstrates that compared to the ionicity fraction, the bond length is the predominant parameter responsible for the brittle features of covalent materials.