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Sample records for overexpressing cell death

  1. RACK-1 overexpression protects against goniothalamin-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Inayat-Hussain, S.H.; Wong, L.T.; Chan, K.M.; Rajab, N.F.; Din, L.B.; Harun, R.; Kizilors, A.; Saxena, N.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, M.; Farzaneh, F.; Williams, G.T.

    2009-01-01

    Goniothalamin, a styryllactone, has been shown to induce cytotoxicity via apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. In this study, we have examined the potential role of several genes, which were stably transfected into T-cell lines and which regulate apoptosis in different ways, on goniothalamin-induced cell death. Overexpression of full-length receptor for activated protein C-kinase 1 (RACK-1) and pc3n3, which up-regulates endogenous RACK-1, in both Jurkat and W7.2 T cells resulted in inhibition of goniothalamin-induced cell death as assessed by MTT and clonogenic assays. However, overexpression of rFau (antisense sequence to Finkel–Biskis–Reilly murine sarcoma virus-associated ubiquitously expressed gene) in W7.2 cells did not confer resistance to goniothalamin-induced cell death. Etoposide, a clinically used cytotoxic agent, was equipotent in causing cytotoxicity in all the stable transfectants. Assessment of DNA damage by Comet assay revealed goniothalamin-induced DNA strand breaks as early as 1 h in vector control but this effect was inhibited in RACK-1 and pc3n3 stably transfected W7.2 cells. This data demonstrate that RACK-1 plays a crucial role in regulating cell death signalling pathways induced by goniothalamin. PMID:19698770

  2. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2009-12-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells.

  3. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong

    2009-01-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells. PMID:20054488

  4. Atg3 Overexpression Enhances Bortezomib-Induced Cell Death in SKM-1 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Chen; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with a high risk of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clonal evolutions are significantly associated with transformation to AML. According to a gene expression microarray, atg3 is downregulated in MDS patients progressing to leukemia, but less is known about the function of Atg3 in the survival and death of MSD/AML cells. Moreover, the role of autophagy as a result of bortezomib treatment is controversial. The current study was designed to investigate the function of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells and to study the effect of Atg3 on cell viability and cell death following bortezomib treatment. Methods Four leukemia cell lines (SKM-1, THP-1, NB4 and K562) and two healthy patients’ bone marrow cells were analyzed for Atg3 expression via qRT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. The role of Atg3 in SKM-1 cell survival and cell death was analyzed by CCK-8 assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, DAPI staining and Annexin V/PI dual staining with or without bortezomib treatment. Western blotting analysis was used to detect proteins in autophagic and caspase signaling pathways. Electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes after Atg3 overexpression. Results Downregulation of Atg3 expression was detected in four leukemia cell lines compared with healthy bone marrow cells. Atg3 mRNA was significantly decreased in MDS patients’ bone marrow cells. Overexpression of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells resulted in AKT-mTOR-dependent autophagy, a significant reduction in cell proliferation and increased cell death, which could be overcome by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. SKM-1 cells overexpressing Atg3 were hypersensitive to bortezomib treatment at different concentrations via autophagic cell death and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis in the SKM-1 cell line. Following treatment with 3-MA, the sensitivity of Atg3-overexpressing cells to bortezomib treatment was reduced

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Markham, Jonathan E; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2015-10-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  6. Cyclin B1 overexpression induces cell death independent of mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Joshua M; Kothari, Anisha; Chambers, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule inhibitors are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. These drugs characteristically induce mitotic arrest and cell death but the mechanisms linking the two are not firmly established. One of the problems is that cancer cells vary widely in their sensitivity to these agents, and thus comparison of data from different systems is difficult. To alleviate this problem we sought to molecularly induce mitotic death and study its mechanisms, by expressing non-degradable cyclin B (R42A) in HeLa cells. However, this approach failed to induce significant mitotic arrest, Cdk1 activation, or phosphorylation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, all characteristics of cells treated with microtubule inhibitors. Furthermore, cyclin B1-R42A induced rapid cell death, and when expressed in synchronized cells, cell death occurred in G1 phase. Decreasing the plasmid concentration reduced transfection efficiency but restored mitotic arrest and eliminated non-specific death. These results show that inappropriate overexpression of cyclin B1 causes non-specific cell death and suggest caution in its use for the study of mitotic events.

  7. Overexpression of Aldose Reductase Render Mouse Hepatocytes More Sensitive to Acetaminophen Induced Oxidative Stress and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Munzir M E; Al-Obosi, J A S; Osman, H M; Shayoub, M E

    2016-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) a commonly used drug for decrease the fever and pain but is capable to induced hepatotoxicity at over dose. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of APAP on the expression of anti-apoptotic and antioxidative defense genes, and whether aldose reductase over-expressing plasmid capable to protect against APAP-induced oxidative stress and cell death. APAP treatment induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and significantly increased aldose reductase mRNA and protein expression in mouse hepatocyte (AML-12). Unexpectedly, AML-12 cells over-expressing aldose reductase augmented APAP-induced reduction in cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion and glutathione S-transferase A2 expression. Moreover, over-expression of aldose reductase potentiated APAP induced reduction on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, B cell lymphoma-extra large (bcl-xL), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) and abolished APAP-induced B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2) inductions. Further, over-expression of aldose reductase significantly abolished AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in APAP-treated cells and induced p53 expression. This results demonstrate that APAP induced toxicity in AML-12, increased aldose reductase expression, and over-expression of aldose reductase render this cell more susceptible to APAP induced oxidative stress and cell death, this probably due to inhibition AMPK or bcl-2 activity, or may due to competition between aldose reductase and glutathione reductase for NADPH. PMID:27069324

  8. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Ceramide Synthases Differentially Affects Growth, Sphingolipid Metabolism, Programmed Cell Death, and Mycotoxin Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D.; Chen, Ming; Mehra, Amit; Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Markham, Jonathan E.; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide synthases catalyze an N-acyltransferase reaction using fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and long-chain base (LCB) substrates to form the sphingolipid ceramide backbone and are targets for inhibition by the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1). Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three genes encoding ceramide synthases with distinct substrate specificities: LONGEVITY ASSURANCE GENE ONE HOMOLOG1 (LOH1; At3g25540)- and LOH3 (At1g19260)-encoded ceramide synthases use very-long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and trihydroxy LCB substrates, and LOH2 (At3g19260)-encoded ceramide synthase uses palmitoyl-CoA and dihydroxy LCB substrates. In this study, complementary DNAs for each gene were overexpressed to determine the role of individual isoforms in physiology and sphingolipid metabolism. Differences were observed in growth resulting from LOH1 and LOH3 overexpression compared with LOH2 overexpression. LOH1- and LOH3-overexpressing plants had enhanced biomass relative to wild-type plants, due in part to increased cell division, suggesting that enhanced synthesis of very-long-chain fatty acid/trihydroxy LCB ceramides promotes cell division and growth. Conversely, LOH2 overexpression resulted in dwarfing. LOH2 overexpression also resulted in the accumulation of sphingolipids with C16 fatty acid/dihydroxy LCB ceramides, constitutive induction of programmed cell death, and accumulation of salicylic acid, closely mimicking phenotypes observed previously in LCB C-4 hydroxylase mutants defective in trihydroxy LCB synthesis. In addition, LOH2- and LOH3-overexpressing plants acquired increased resistance to FB1, whereas LOH1-overexpressing plants showed no increase in FB1 resistance, compared with wild-type plants, indicating that LOH1 ceramide synthase is most strongly inhibited by FB1. Overall, the findings described here demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis ceramide synthases results in strongly divergent physiological and metabolic phenotypes, some of which have significance

  9. Neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl-2 protooncogene in transgenic mice are protected from axotomy-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dauphin, M; Frankowski, H; Tsujimoto, Y; Huarte, J; Martinou, J C

    1994-01-01

    In vitro, the overexpression of the bcl-2 protooncogene in cultured neurons has been shown to prevent apoptosis induced by neurotrophic factor deprivation. We have generated transgenic mice overexpressing the Bcl-2 protein in neurons, including motoneurons of the facial nucleus. We have tested whether Bcl-2 could protect these motoneurons from experimentally induced cell death in new born mice. To address this question, we performed unilateral lesion of the facial nerve of wild-type and transgenic 2-day-old mice. In wild-type mice, the lesioned nerve and the corresponding motoneuron cell bodies in the facial nucleus underwent rapid degeneration. In contrast, in transgenic mice, facial motoneurons survived axotomy. Not only their cell bodies but also their axons were protected up to the lesion site. These results demonstrate that in vivo Bcl-2 protects neonatal motoneurons from degeneration after axonal injury. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which Bcl-2 prevents neuronal cell death in vivo could lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of motoneuron degenerative diseases. Images PMID:8159744

  10. GILZ overexpression attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated cell death via the activation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    André, Fanny; Corazao-Rozas, Paola; Idziorek, Thierry; Quesnel, Bruno; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2016-09-16

    The Glucocorticoïd-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) protein has profound anti-inflammatory activities in haematopoietic cells. GILZ regulates numerous signal transduction pathways involved in proliferation and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. Here, we have demonstrated the potential of GILZ in alleviating apoptosis induced by ER stress inducers. Whereas the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, protects from tunicamycin-induced cell death, silencing endogeneous GILZ in dexamethasone-treated cancer cells alter the capacity of glucocorticoids to protect from tunicamycin-mediated apoptosis. Under ER stress conditions, overexpression of GILZ significantly reduced activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by maintaining Bcl-xl level. GILZ protein affects the UPR signaling shifting the balance towards pro-survival signals as judged by down-regulation of CHOP, ATF4, XBP1s mRNA and increase in GRP78 protein level. Interestingly, GILZ sustains high mitochondrial OXPHOS during ER stress and cytoprotection mediated by GILZ is abolished in cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA, which are OXPHOS-deficient. These findings reveal a new role of GILZ, which acts as a cytoprotector against ER stress through a pathway involving mitochondrial OXPHOS. PMID:27416758

  11. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

  12. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M.; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M.; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of WT or A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells and yeast in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  13. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants.

    PubMed

    Maringer, Katherine; Saheb, Entsar; Bush, John

    2014-01-01

    Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA), and dominant negative (DN) forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell-cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses.

  14. c-CBL E3 Ubiquitin Ligase is Over-Expressed in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: Its Inhibition Promotes Activation Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianqiang; Salva, Katrin A.; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary syndrome (SS) are two major forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) characterized by resistance to apoptosis. A central pathway for T-cell apoptosis is activation-induced cell death (AICD) which is triggered through the T-cell receptor (TCR). This results in upregulation of FAS-ligand (FASL) and subsequent apoptosis through the FAS death receptor pathway. It has been known for more than a decade that TCR signaling is defective in CTCL; however, the underlying mechanism has not been apparent. In this report, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase, c-CBL, is over-expressed in CTCL and that its knockdown overcomes defective TCR signaling resulting in phosphorylation of PLCg1, calcium influx, ROS generation, up-regulation of FASL and extrinsic pathway apoptosis in CTCL cells expressing adequate FAS. In CTCL cells with suboptimal FAS expression, FAS can be upregulated epigenetically by derepression of the FAS promoter using methotrexate (MTX) which we showed previously has activity as a DNA methylation inhibitor. Using these combined strategies, FAS-low as well as FAS-high CTCL cells can be killed effectively. PMID:25140833

  15. Overexpression of hsp27 Rescued Neuronal Cell Death and Reduction in Life- and Health-Span in Drosophila melanogaster Against Prolonged Exposure to Dichlorvos.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Saini, Sanjay; Khatoon, Rehana; Sharma, Divya; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Kar Chowdhuri, Debapratim

    2016-07-01

    Long-term exposure to dichlorvos (O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide) is reported to exert neurotoxicity, i.e., generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative damage, and neuronal cell death along with life- and health-span reduction in nontarget organisms including humans. However, studies on genetic modulation towards neuroprotection against prolonged DDVP exposure are elusive. Hsp27 (a small heat shock protein) is involved in various cellular processes and thus has attained emphasis as a therapeutic target. We aimed to examine the protective effect of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure using an in vivo model Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were exposed to 15.0 ng/ml DDVP for a prolonged period to examine neuronal cell death, locomotor performance, and lifespan. After prolonged exposure, cell death, ROS level, glutathione depletion, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate level (NADPH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activities were examined in fly brain tissues at different days of age (days 10, 20, and 30). Flies with ubiquitous overexpression of hsp27 showed better resistance (improved lifespan and locomotor performance) in comparison to that targeted to motor neurons and nervous system. These flies also exhibited lesser intracellular ROS level and glutathione depletion by restoring G6PD activity, NADPH level, and TrxR activity in their brains thereby resisted neuronal cell death. Conversely, hsp27 knockdown flies exhibited reversal of the above endpoints. The study evidenced the neuroprotective efficacy of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure and favored Hsp27 as a therapeutic target towards achieving better organismal (including human) health against long-term chemical exposure.

  16. A novel antagonist to the inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) potentiates cell death in EGFR-overexpressing non-small-cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Lee, J-Y; Jung, C L; Bae, I H; Suh, K H; Ahn, Y G; Jin, D-H; Kim, T W; Suh, Y-A; Jang, S J

    2014-10-16

    In the effort to develop an efficient chemotherapy drug for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we analyzed the anti-tumorigenic effects of a novel small molecule targeting the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAPs), HM90822B, on NSCLC cells. HM90822B efficiently decreased IAP expression, especially that of XIAP and survivin, in several NSCLC cells. Interestingly, cells overexpressing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to the mutations were more sensitive to HM90822B, undergoing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis when treated. In xenograft experiments, inoculated EGFR-overexpressing NSCLC cells showed tumor regression when treated with the inhibitor, demonstrating the chemotherapeutic potential of this agent. Mechanistically, decreased levels of EGFR, Akt and phospho-MAPKs were observed in inhibitor-treated PC-9 cells on phosphorylation array and western blotting analysis, indicating that the reagent inhibited cell growth by preventing critical cell survival signaling pathways. In addition, gene-specific knockdown studies against XIAP and/or EGFR further uncovered the involvement of Akt and MAPK pathways in HM90822B-mediated downregulation of NSCLC cell growth. Together, these results support that HM90822B is a promising candidate to be developed as lung tumor chemotherapeutics by targeting oncogenic activities of IAP together with inhibiting cell survival signaling pathways.

  17. Vesicular Trafficking Defects, Developmental Abnormalities, and Alterations in the Cellular Death Process Occur in Cell Lines that Over-Express Dictyostelium GTPase, Rab2, and Rab2 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Maringer, Katherine; Saheb, Entsar; Bush, John

    2014-01-01

    Small molecular weight GTPase Rab2 has been shown to be a resident of pre-Golgi intermediates and required for protein transport from the ER to the Golgi complex, however, the function of Rab2 in Dictyostelium has yet to be fully characterized. Using cell lines that over-express DdRab2, as well as cell lines over-expressing constitutively active (CA), and dominant negative (DN) forms of the GTPase, we report a functional role in vesicular transport specifically phagocytosis, and endocytosis. Furthermore, Rab2 like other GTPases cycles between an active GTP-bound and an inactive GDP-bound state. We found that this GTP/GDP cycle for DdRab2 is crucial for normal Dictyostelium development and cell–cell adhesion. Similar to Rab5 and Rab7 in C. elegans, we found that DdRab2 plays a role in programmed cell death, possibly in the phagocytic removal of apoptotic corpses. PMID:25157910

  18. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment.

  19. Development of salinity tolerance in rice by constitutive-overexpression of genes involved in the regulation of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thi M. L.; Moghaddam, Lalehvash; Williams, Brett; Khanna, Harjeet; Dale, James; Mundree, Sagadevan G.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to over 70% of crop yield losses worldwide. Of these drought and salinity are the most significant causes of crop yield reduction. Rice is an important staple crop that feeds more than half of the world’s population. However among the agronomically important cereals rice is the most sensitive to salinity. In the present study we show that exogenous expression of anti-apoptotic genes from diverse origins, AtBAG4 (Arabidopsis), Hsp70 (Citrus tristeza virus) and p35 (Baculovirus), significantly improves salinity tolerance in rice at the whole plant level. Physiological, biochemical and agronomical analyses of transgenic rice expressing each of the anti-apoptotic genes subjected to salinity treatment demonstrated traits associated with tolerant varieties including, improved photosynthesis, membrane integrity, ion and ROS maintenance systems, growth rate, and yield components. Moreover, FTIR analysis showed that the chemical composition of salinity-treated transgenic plants is reminiscent of non-treated, unstressed controls. In contrast, wild type and vector control plants displayed hallmark features of stress, including pectin degradation upon subjection to salinity treatment. Interestingly, despite their diverse origins, transgenic plants expressing the anti-apoptotic genes assessed in this study displayed similar physiological and biochemical characteristics during salinity treatment thus providing further evidence that cell death pathways are conserved across broad evolutionary kingdoms. Our results reveal that anti-apoptotic genes facilitate maintenance of metabolic activity at the whole plant level to create favorable conditions for cellular survival. It is these conditions that are crucial and conducive to the plants ability to tolerate/adapt to extreme environments. PMID:25870602

  20. Calpastatin overexpression reduces oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial impairment and cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by decreasing calpain and calcineurin activation, induction of mitochondrial fission and destruction of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Tangmansakulchai, Kulvadee; Abubakar, Zuroida; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-09-01

    Calpain is an intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent protease, and the activation of calpain has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Calpain activity can be regulated by calpastatin, an endogenous specific calpain inhibitor. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated a potential role of calpastatin in preventing calpain-mediated pathogenesis. Additionally, several studies have revealed that calpain activation and mitochondrial damage are involved in the cell death process; however, recent evidence has not clearly indicated a neuroprotective mechanism of calpastatin against calpain-dependent mitochondrial impairment in the process of neuronal cell death. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential ability of calpastatin to inhibit calpain activation and mitochondrial impairment in oxidative stress-induced neuron degeneration. Calpastatin was stably overexpressed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In non-calpastatin overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly decreased cell viability, superoxide dismutase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP production and mitochondrial fusion protein (Opa1) levels in the mitochondrial fraction but increased reactive oxygen species formation, calpain and calcineurin activation, mitochondrial fission protein (Fis1 and Drp1) levels in the mitochondrial fraction and apoptotic cells. Nevertheless, these toxic effects were abolished in hydrogen peroxide-treated calpastatin-overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells. The results of the present study demonstrate the potential ability of calpastatin to diminish calpain and calcineurin activation and mitochondrial impairment in neurons that are affected by oxidative damage. PMID:27453331

  1. Overexpression of Ipe protein from the coliphage mEp021 induces pleiotropic effects involving haemolysis by HlyE-containing vesicles and cell death.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Ishida, Cecilia; Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Guarneros-Peña, Gabriel; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; Kameyama, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Lysogenic Escherichia coli K-12 harbouring the prophage mEp021 displays haemolytic activity. From a genomic library of mEp021, we identified an open reading frame (ORF 4) that was responsible for the haemolytic activity. However, the ORF 4 sequence contains four initiation codons in the same frame: ORF 4.1-ORF 4.4, coding for 83-a.a., 82-a.a., 77-a.a. and 72-a.a. products, respectively. The expression of the cloned ORF 4.3, or inducer of pleiotropic effects (ipe), reproduced the haemolytic phenotype in a native strain carrying the gene hlyE(+), but not in the mutant hlyE(-) strain. The overexpression of Ipe induced several pleiotropic effects, such as the inhibition of cell growth and the deregulation of cell division, which resulted in a mixture of normal and desiccated-like cells: normal-filamentous, desiccated-like-filamentous bacilli, minicells etc. Other effects included abnormalities of the cell membrane, the production of vesicles containing HlyE, and finally, cell death. These events were analysed at the molecular level by microarray assays. The global transcription profile of E. coli K-12 strain MC4100, which expressed Ipe after 4 h, revealed differential expression of various genes, most of which were related either to cell membrane and murein biosynthesis or to cell division. The up-regulation of some of these transcripts was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Additional research is needed to determine whether these effects are directly related to Ipe activity or are consequences of the cellular responses to putative structural damage induced by Ipe. PMID:22365985

  2. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  3. Transgenic over-expression of slit2 enhances disruption of blood-brain barrier and increases cell death after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Li, Hang; He, Xiao-Fei; Li, Ge; Zhang, Qun; Liang, Feng-Ying; Jia, Huan-Huan; Li, Jiang-Chao; Huang, Ren; Pei, Zhong; Wang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and disability among male adolescents and young adults; and mild traumatic brain injury is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain trauma. Previously, we have found that slit2, a member of slit protein family, increases permeability of BBB. In the present study, we examined the role of slit2 in the pathogenesis of mild TBI in a mouse model of micro TBI. Rhodamine BandPI (PropidiumIodide) staining were used to detect the permeability of BBB and cell death, respectively. The leakage of Rhodamine B and cell death were significantly increased in Slit2-Tg mice than in C57 control mice after micro TBI. The present results suggest that over expression of slit2 plays a detrimental role in the pathophysiology of mild TBI.

  4. Non-apoptotic programmed cell death with paraptotic-like features in bleomycin-treated plant cells is suppressed by inhibition of ATM/ATR pathways or NtE2F overexpression.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Ondřej; Široký, Jiří; Houlné, Guy; Opatrný, Zdeněk; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2012-04-01

    In plants, different forms of programmed cell death (PCD) have been identified, but they only partially correspond to those described for animals, which is most probably due to structural differences between animal and plant cells. Here, the results show that in tobacco BY-2 cells, bleomycin (BLM), an inducer of double-strand breaks (DSBs), triggers a novel type of non-apoptotic PCD with paraptotic-like features. Analysis of numerous PCD markers revealed an extensive vacuolization, vacuolar rupture, and chromatin condensation, but no apoptotic DNA fragmentation, fragmentation of the nuclei, or sensitivity to caspase inhibitors. BLM-induced PCD was cell cycle regulated, occurring predominantly upon G(2)/M cell cycle checkpoint activation. In addition, this paraptotic-like PCD was at least partially inhibited by caffeine, a known inhibitor of DNA damage sensor kinases ATM and ATR. Interestingly, overexpression of one NtE2F transcriptional factor, whose homologues play a dual role in animal apoptosis and DNA repair, reduced PCD induction and modulated G(2)/M checkpoint activation in BY-2 cells. These observations provide a solid ground for further investigations into the paraptotic-like PCD in plants, which might represent an ancestral non-apoptotic form of PCD conserved among animals, protists, and plants.

  5. The potential utility of acetyltanshinone IIA in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancer: Induction of cancer cell death by targeting apoptotic and metabolic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guerram, Mounia; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Yousef, Bashir Alsiddig; Hamdi, Aida Mejda; Hassan, Hozeifa Mohamed; Yuan, Zi-Qiao; Luo, Hou-Wei; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Increased lipogenesis and protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression and is under intense investigation as a potential antineoplastic target. Acetyltanshinone IIA (ATA) is a compound that was obtained from chemical modifications of tanshinone IIA (TIIA), a potent anticancer agent extracted from the dried roots of the Chinese herbal medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. A previous investigation indicated that ATA is more effective in inhibiting the growth of breast cancer especially cells with HER2 overexpression. However, the molecular mechanism(s) mediating this cytotoxic effect on HER2-positive breast cancer remained undefined. Studies described here report that ATA induced G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in the HER2-positive MDA-MB-453, SK-BR-3, and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the ATA-induced apoptosis effect is associated with remarkably down-regulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) EGFR/HER2 and inhibition of their downstream pro-survival signaling pathways. Interestingly, ATA was found to trigger oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses and to activate AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) leading to inactivation of key enzymes involved in lipid and protein biogenesis. Intraperitoneal administration of ATA significantly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-453 xenografts in athymic mice without causing weight loss and any other side effects. Additionally, transwell migration, invasion, and wound healing assays revealed that ATA could suppress tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that ATA may have broad utility in the treatment of HER2-overexpressed breast cancers. PMID:26068969

  6. Overexpression of KCNN3 results in sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Saagar; Mills, Robert W.; Tucker, Nathan R.; Simonson, Bridget; Macri, Vincenzo; Lemoine, Marc D.; Das, Saumya; Milan, David J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent genome-wide association study identified a susceptibility locus for atrial fibrillation at the KCNN3 gene. Since the KCNN3 gene encodes for a small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, we hypothesized that overexpression of the SK3 channel increases susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Methods and results We characterized the cardiac electrophysiological phenotype of a mouse line with overexpression of the SK3 channel. We generated homozygote (SK3T/T) and heterozygote (SK3+/T) mice with overexpression of the channel and compared them with wild-type (WT) controls. We observed a high incidence of sudden death among SK3T/T mice (7 of 19 SK3T/T mice). Ambulatory monitoring demonstrated that sudden death was due to heart block and bradyarrhythmias. SK3T/T mice displayed normal body weight, temperature, and cardiac function on echocardiography; however, histological analysis demonstrated that these mice have abnormal atrioventricular node morphology. Optical mapping demonstrated that SK3T/T mice have slower ventricular conduction compared with WT controls (SK3T/T vs. WT; 0.45 ± 0.04 vs. 0.60 ± 0.09 mm/ms, P = 0.001). Programmed stimulation in 1-month-old SK3T/T mice demonstrated inducible atrial arrhythmias (50% of SK3T/T vs. 0% of WT mice) and also a shorter atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 43 ± 6 vs. 52 ± 9 ms, P = 0.02). Three-month-old SK3T/T mice on the other hand displayed a trend towards a more prolonged atrioventricular nodal refractory period (SK3T/T vs. WT; 61 ± 1 vs. 52 ± 6 ms, P = 0.06). Conclusion Overexpression of the SK3 channel causes an increased risk of sudden death associated with bradyarrhythmias and heart block, possibly due to atrioventricular nodal dysfunction. PMID:24296650

  7. Chemotherapy Induces Programmed Cell Death-Ligand 1 Overexpression via the Nuclear Factor-κB to Foster an Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Hamanishi, Junzo; Matsumura, Noriomi; Abiko, Kaoru; Murat, Kumuruz; Baba, Tsukasa; Yamaguchi, Ken; Horikawa, Naoki; Hosoe, Yuko; Murphy, Susan K; Konishi, Ikuo; Mandai, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence has highlighted the host immune system in modulating the patient response to chemotherapy, but the mechanism of this modulation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in the tumor microenvironment of ovarian cancer. Treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with various chemotherapeutic agents resulted in upregulated expression of MHC class I and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) in a NF-κB-dependent manner and suppression of antigen-specific T-cell function in vitro. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, treatment with paclitaxel increased CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor site, upregulated PD-L1 expression, and activated NF-κB signaling. In particular, tumor-bearing mice treated with a combination of paclitaxel and a PD-L1/PD-1 signal blockade survived longer than mice treated with paclitaxel alone. In summary, we found that chemotherapy induces local immune suppression in ovarian cancer through NF-κB-mediated PD-L1 upregulation. Thus, a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy targeting the PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis may improve the antitumor response and offers a promising new treatment modality against ovarian cancer.

  8. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  9. Role of immunohistochemical overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-11 in the prognosis of death by ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Périgny, Martine; Bairati, Isabelle; Harvey, Isabelle; Beauchemin, Michel; Harel, François; Plante, Marie; Têtu, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes thought to be involved in tumor invasion. We hypothesized that MMP-2 and MMP-11 overexpression was associated with the aggressiveness of ovarian carcinoma. This study was performed on samples from 100 patients with stage III ovarian carcinomas treated surgically between 1990 and 2000. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on ovarian tumors and peritoneal implants using monoclonal antibodies. Overexpression was defined as more than 10% of cells expressing the marker. Multivariate analyses showed that only MMP-2 overexpression by cancer cells in peritoneal implants was associated with a significant risk of death by disease (hazard ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-4.97; P =.003). MMP-11 overexpression was not predictive of survival. These results suggest that MMP-2 overexpression by cancer cells in peritoneal implants and not in the primary ovarian cancer is predictive of ovarian cancer prognosis and more likely reflects the presence of particularly aggressive clones of cancer cells.

  10. Autophagic cell death exists

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Peter G.H.; Puyal, Julien

    2012-01-01

    The term autophagic cell death (ACD) initially referred to cell death with greatly enhanced autophagy, but is increasingly used to imply a death-mediating role of autophagy, as shown by a protective effect of autophagy inhibition. In addition, many authors require that autophagic cell death must not involve apoptosis or necrosis. Adopting these new and restrictive criteria, and emphasizing their own failure to protect human osteosarcoma cells by autophagy inhibition, the authors of a recent Editor’s Corner article in this journal argued for the extreme rarity or nonexistence of autophagic cell death. We here maintain that, even with the more stringent recent criteria, autophagic cell death exists in several situations, some of which were ignored by the Editor’s Corner authors. We reject their additional criterion that the autophagy in ACD must be the agent of ultimate cell dismantlement. And we argue that rapidly dividing mammalian cells such as cancer cells are not the most likely situation for finding pure ACD. PMID:22652592

  11. Classification of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107

  12. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  13. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  14. Programmed cell death in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miura, Masayuki

    2015-02-23

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an evolutionarily conserved contributor to nervous system development. In the vertebrate peripheral nervous system, PCD is the basis of the neurotrophic theory, whereby cell death results from a surplus of neurons relative to target and competition for neurotrophic factors. In addition to stochastic cell death, PCD can be intrinsically determined by cell lineage or position and timing in both invertebrate and vertebrate central nervous systems. The underlying PCD molecular mechanisms include intrinsic transcription factor cascades and regulators of competence/susceptibility to cell death. Here, we provide a framework for understanding neural PCD from its regulation to its functions.

  15. The Influenza Virus H5N1 Infection Can Induce ROS Production for Viral Replication and Host Cell Death in A549 Cells Modulated by Human Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xian; Wang, Ruifang; Zou, Wei; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhao, Lianzhong; Wang, Shengyu; Jin, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 infections are often accompanied by excessive pro-inflammatory response, high viral titer, and apoptosis; as such, the efficient control of these infections poses a great challenge. The pathogenesis of influenza virus infection is also related to oxidative stress. However, the role of endogenic genes with antioxidant effect in the control of influenza viruses, especially H5N1 viruses, should be further investigated. In this study, the H5N1 infection in lung epithelial cells decreased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) expression at mRNA and protein levels. Forced SOD1 expression significantly inhibited the H5N1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, decreased pro-inflammatory response, prevented p65 and p38 phosphorylation, and impeded viral ribonucleoprotein nuclear export and viral replication. The SOD1 overexpression also rescued H5N1-induced cellular apoptosis and alleviated H5N1-caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, this study described the role of SOD1 in the replication of H5N1 influenza virus and emphasized the relevance of this enzyme in the control of H5N1 replication in epithelial cells. Pharmacological modulation or targeting SOD1 may open a new way to fight H5N1 influenza virus. PMID:26761025

  16. The Influenza Virus H5N1 Infection Can Induce ROS Production for Viral Replication and Host Cell Death in A549 Cells Modulated by Human Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian; Wang, Ruifang; Zou, Wei; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaokun; Zhao, Lianzhong; Wang, Shengyu; Jin, Meilin

    2016-01-08

    Highly pathogenic H5N1 infections are often accompanied by excessive pro-inflammatory response, high viral titer, and apoptosis; as such, the efficient control of these infections poses a great challenge. The pathogenesis of influenza virus infection is also related to oxidative stress. However, the role of endogenic genes with antioxidant effect in the control of influenza viruses, especially H5N1 viruses, should be further investigated. In this study, the H5N1 infection in lung epithelial cells decreased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) expression at mRNA and protein levels. Forced SOD1 expression significantly inhibited the H5N1-induced increase in reactive oxygen species, decreased pro-inflammatory response, prevented p65 and p38 phosphorylation, and impeded viral ribonucleoprotein nuclear export and viral replication. The SOD1 overexpression also rescued H5N1-induced cellular apoptosis and alleviated H5N1-caused mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, this study described the role of SOD1 in the replication of H5N1 influenza virus and emphasized the relevance of this enzyme in the control of H5N1 replication in epithelial cells. Pharmacological modulation or targeting SOD1 may open a new way to fight H5N1 influenza virus.

  17. Flavone-resistant Leishmania donovani overexpresses LdMRP2 transporter in the parasite and activates host MRP2 on macrophages to circumvent the flavone-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sayan; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Saha, Sourav; Mishra, Amartya; Sengupta, Souvik; Roy, Syamal; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2014-06-01

    In parasites, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent an important family of proteins related to drug resistance and other biological activities. Resistance of leishmanial parasites to therapeutic drugs continues to escalate in developing countries, and in many instances, it is due to overexpressed ABC efflux pumps. Progressively adapted baicalein (BLN)-resistant parasites (pB(25)R) show overexpression of a novel ABC transporter, which was classified as ABCC2 or Leishmania donovani multidrug resistance protein 2 (LdMRP2). The protein is primarily localized in the flagellar pocket region and in internal vesicles. Overexpressed LdABCC2 confers substantial BLN resistance to the parasites by rapid drug efflux. The BLN-resistant promastigotes when transformed into amastigotes in macrophage cells cannot be cured by treatment of macrophages with BLN. Amastigote resistance is concomitant with the overexpression of macrophage MRP2 transporter. Reporter analysis and site-directed mutagenesis assays demonstrated that antioxidant response element 1 is activated upon infection. The expression of this phase II detoxifying gene is regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response element activation. In view of the fact that the signaling pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase controls microfilament rearrangement and translocation of actin-associated proteins, the current study correlates with the intricate pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase-mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which activates MRP2 expression in macrophages upon infection by the parasites. In contrast, phalloidin, an agent that prevents depolymerization of actin filaments, inhibits Nrf2 translocation and Mrp2 gene activation by pB(25)R infection. Taken together, these results provide insight into the mechanisms by which resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani induce intracellular events relevant to drug resistance.

  18. Flavone-resistant Leishmania donovani Overexpresses LdMRP2 Transporter in the Parasite and Activates Host MRP2 on Macrophages to Circumvent the Flavone-mediated Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan; Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Saha, Sourav; Mishra, Amartya; Sengupta, Souvik; Roy, Syamal; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2014-01-01

    In parasites, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent an important family of proteins related to drug resistance and other biological activities. Resistance of leishmanial parasites to therapeutic drugs continues to escalate in developing countries, and in many instances, it is due to overexpressed ABC efflux pumps. Progressively adapted baicalein (BLN)-resistant parasites (pB25R) show overexpression of a novel ABC transporter, which was classified as ABCC2 or Leishmania donovani multidrug resistance protein 2 (LdMRP2). The protein is primarily localized in the flagellar pocket region and in internal vesicles. Overexpressed LdABCC2 confers substantial BLN resistance to the parasites by rapid drug efflux. The BLN-resistant promastigotes when transformed into amastigotes in macrophage cells cannot be cured by treatment of macrophages with BLN. Amastigote resistance is concomitant with the overexpression of macrophage MRP2 transporter. Reporter analysis and site-directed mutagenesis assays demonstrated that antioxidant response element 1 is activated upon infection. The expression of this phase II detoxifying gene is regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response element activation. In view of the fact that the signaling pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase controls microfilament rearrangement and translocation of actin-associated proteins, the current study correlates with the intricate pathway of phosphoinositol 3-kinase-mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which activates MRP2 expression in macrophages upon infection by the parasites. In contrast, phalloidin, an agent that prevents depolymerization of actin filaments, inhibits Nrf2 translocation and Mrp2 gene activation by pB25R infection. Taken together, these results provide insight into the mechanisms by which resistant clinical isolates of L. donovani induce intracellular events relevant to drug resistance. PMID:24706751

  19. Programmed cell death in protists.

    PubMed

    Deponte, Marcel

    2008-07-01

    Programmed cell death in protists does not seem to make sense at first sight. However, apoptotic markers in unicellular organisms have been observed in all but one of the six/eight major groups of eukaryotes suggesting an ancient evolutionary origin of this regulated process. This review summarizes the available data on apoptotic markers in non-opisthokonts and elucidates potential functions and evolution of programmed cell death. A newly discovered family of caspase-like proteases, the metacaspases, is considered to exert the function of caspases in unicellular organisms. Important results on metacaspases, however, showed that they cannot be always correlated to the measured proteolytic activity during protist cell death. Thus, a major challenge for apoptosis research in a variety of protists remains the identification of the molecular cell death machinery.

  20. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Reductase 2, a Putative Oncogene Overexpressed in Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cell Death Involving xCT and CTH Gene Expressions through 15-Keto-PGE2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chen, Ing-Jung; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) is the enzyme that catalyzes 15-keto-PGE2, an endogenous PPARγ ligand, into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. Previously, we have reported a novel oncogenic role of PTGR2 in gastric cancer, where PTGR2 was discovered to modulate ROS-mediated cell death and tumor transformation. In the present study, we demonstrated the oncogenic potency of PTGR2 in pancreatic cancer. First, we observed that the majority of the human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues was stained positive for PTGR2 expression but not in the adjacent normal parts. In vitro analyses showed that silencing of PTGR2 expression enhanced ROS production, suppressed pancreatic cell proliferation, and promoted cell death through increasing 15-keto-PGE2. Mechanistically, silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 suppressed the expressions of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH), two important providers of intracellular cysteine for the generation of glutathione (GSH), which is widely accepted as the first-line antioxidative defense. The oxidative stress-mediated cell death after silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 was further abolished after restoring intracellular GSH concentrations and cysteine supply by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 2-Mercaptomethanol. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting PTGR2/15-keto-PGE2 for pancreatic cancer.

  1. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Reductase 2, a Putative Oncogene Overexpressed in Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Cell Death Involving xCT and CTH Gene Expressions through 15-Keto-PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chen, Ing-Jung; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin reductase 2 (PTGR2) is the enzyme that catalyzes 15-keto-PGE2, an endogenous PPARγ ligand, into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. Previously, we have reported a novel oncogenic role of PTGR2 in gastric cancer, where PTGR2 was discovered to modulate ROS-mediated cell death and tumor transformation. In the present study, we demonstrated the oncogenic potency of PTGR2 in pancreatic cancer. First, we observed that the majority of the human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues was stained positive for PTGR2 expression but not in the adjacent normal parts. In vitro analyses showed that silencing of PTGR2 expression enhanced ROS production, suppressed pancreatic cell proliferation, and promoted cell death through increasing 15-keto-PGE2. Mechanistically, silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 suppressed the expressions of solute carrier family 7 member 11 (xCT) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CTH), two important providers of intracellular cysteine for the generation of glutathione (GSH), which is widely accepted as the first-line antioxidative defense. The oxidative stress-mediated cell death after silencing of PTGR2 or addition of 15-keto-PGE2 was further abolished after restoring intracellular GSH concentrations and cysteine supply by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and 2-Mercaptomethanol. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting PTGR2/15-keto-PGE2 for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26820738

  2. Perinatal asphyxia leads to PARP-1 overactivity, p65 translocation, IL-1β and TNF-α overexpression, and apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonatal rats: prevention by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration.

    PubMed

    Neira-Peña, T; Rojas-Mancilla, E; Munoz-Vio, V; Perez, R; Gutierrez-Hernandez, M; Bustamante, D; Morales, P; Hermoso, M A; Gebicke-Haerter, P; Herrera-Marschitz, M

    2015-05-01

    Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a leading cause of neuronal damage in newborns, resulting in long-term neurological and cognitive deficits, in part due to impairment of mesostriatal and mesolimbic neurocircuitries. The insult can be as severe as to menace the integrity of the genome, triggering the overactivation of sentinel proteins, including poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 overactivation implies increased energy demands, worsening the metabolic failure and depleting further NAD(+) availability. Using a global PA rat model, we report here evidence that hypoxia increases PARP-1 activity, triggering a signalling cascade leading to nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65, modulating the expression of IL-1β and TNF-α, pro-inflammatory molecules, increasing apoptotic-like cell death in mesencephalon of neonate rats, monitored with Western blots, qPCR, TUNEL and ELISA. PARP-1 activity increased immediately after PA, reaching a maximum 1-8 h after the insult, while activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway was observed 8 h after the insult, with a >twofold increase of p65 nuclear translocation. IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA levels were increased 24 h after the insult, together with a >twofold increase in apoptotic-like cell death. A single dose of the PARP-1 inhibitor nicotinamide (0.8 mmol/kg, i.p.), 1 h post delivery, prevented the effect of PA on PARP-1 activity, p65 translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and apoptotic-like cell death. The present study demonstrates that PA leads to PARP-1 overactivation, increasing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death in mesencephalon, effects prevented by systemic neonatal nicotinamide administration, supporting the idea that PARP-1 inhibition represents a therapeutic target against the effects of PA.

  3. Caspase-independent cell deaths.

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2002-12-01

    A very common and the best understood of the mechanisms of physiological cell death is apoptosis, resulting from the activation, through either of two primary pathways, of site-specific proteases called caspases. There are, however, many other routes to cell death, prominently including autophagy and proteasomal degradation of critical constituents of cells. These routes are frequently seen in experimental situations in which initiator or effector caspases are inhibited or blocked through genetic means, but they are also encountered during normal physiological and pathological processes. Most frequently, autophagic or proteasomal degradation is used to eliminate massive cytoplasm of very large cells, especially post-mitotic cells, and these pathways are prominent even though caspase genes, messages, and pro-enzymes are found in the cells. These forms of cell death are fully physiological and not simply a default pathway for a defective cell; and they are distinct from necrosis. We do not yet understand the extent to which the pathways are linked, what mechanisms trigger the caspase-independent deaths, and how the choices are made.

  4. Regulated cell death in AKI.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Chen, Guochun; Dong, Guie; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan; Dong, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    AKI is pathologically characterized by sublethal and lethal damage of renal tubules. Under these conditions, renal tubular cell death may occur by regulated necrosis (RN) or apoptosis. In the last two decades, tubular apoptosis has been shown in preclinical models and some clinical samples from patients with AKI. Mechanistically, apoptotic cell death in AKI may result from well described extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as well as ER stress. Central converging nodes of these pathways are mitochondria, which become fragmented and sensitized to membrane permeabilization in response to cellular stress, resulting in the release of cell death-inducing factors. Whereas apoptosis is known to be regulated, tubular necrosis was thought to occur by accident until recent work unveiled several RN subroutines, most prominently receptor-interacting protein kinase-dependent necroptosis and RN induced by mitochondrial permeability transition. Additionally, other cell death pathways, like pyroptosis and ferroptosis, may also be of pathophysiologic relevance in AKI. Combination therapy targeting multiple cell-death pathways may, therefore, provide maximal therapeutic benefits. PMID:24925726

  5. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Angel L.; Mena, Salvador; Estrela, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy. PMID:24212662

  6. Cell Death in Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate survival of abnormal cells underlies tumorigenesis. Most discoveries about programmed cell death have come from studying model organisms. Revisiting the experimental contexts that inspired these discoveries helps explain confounding biases that inevitably accompany such discoveries. Amending early biases has added a newcomer to the collection of cell death models. Analysis of gene-dependent death in yeast revealed the surprising influence of single gene mutations on subsequent eukaryotic genome evolution. Similar events may influence the selection for mutations during early tumorigenesis. The possibility that an early random mutation might drive the selection for a cancer driver mutation is conceivable but difficult to demonstrate. This was tested in yeast, revealing that mutation of almost any gene appears to specify the selection for a new second mutation. Some human tumors contain pairs of mutant genes homologous to co-occurring mutant genes in yeast. Here we consider how yeast again provide novel insights into tumorigenesis. PMID:25725369

  7. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  8. Regulated Cell Death in AKI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guochun; Dong, Guie; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    AKI is pathologically characterized by sublethal and lethal damage of renal tubules. Under these conditions, renal tubular cell death may occur by regulated necrosis (RN) or apoptosis. In the last two decades, tubular apoptosis has been shown in preclinical models and some clinical samples from patients with AKI. Mechanistically, apoptotic cell death in AKI may result from well described extrinsic and intrinsic pathways as well as ER stress. Central converging nodes of these pathways are mitochondria, which become fragmented and sensitized to membrane permeabilization in response to cellular stress, resulting in the release of cell death–inducing factors. Whereas apoptosis is known to be regulated, tubular necrosis was thought to occur by accident until recent work unveiled several RN subroutines, most prominently receptor-interacting protein kinase–dependent necroptosis and RN induced by mitochondrial permeability transition. Additionally, other cell death pathways, like pyroptosis and ferroptosis, may also be of pathophysiologic relevance in AKI. Combination therapy targeting multiple cell-death pathways may, therefore, provide maximal therapeutic benefits. PMID:24925726

  9. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 modulates programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T

    2006-02-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae-induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events.

  10. Apoptosis of human tumor cells by chemotherapeutic anthracyclines is enhanced by Bax overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Yagi, T

    1999-09-01

    One of the major factors for efficacy of a chemotherapeutic drug is its activity to induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Doxorubicin and daunorubicin, radiomimetic anthracycline-group drugs, have been used for chemotherapy for about 30 years. Here we established the colorectal tumor and osteosarcoma cells in which Bax expression can be induced by the treatment of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside, and examined the effect of the Bax overexpression on the cell death caused by these drugs. While the Bax overexpression neither affected growth nor morphology of the undamaged cells, it enhanced the cell death caused by these drugs. Increase in cellular nucleus fragmentation and DNA ladder formation indicates that the Bax-enhanced cell death is due to enhanced apoptosis of the drug-treated cells. The enhanced cell death was not observed when the cells were irradiated with X-ray or treated with other chemotherapeutic agents we examined. These results indicate that Bax may have a specific role to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy with anthracycline-group agents.

  11. Programmed cell death in aging

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction. PMID:25862945

  12. Development of cytotoxicity-sensitive human cells using overexpression of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hidenori; Torimura, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Biosensors using live cells are analytical devices that have the advantage of being highly sensitive for their targets. Although attention has primarily focused on reporter gene assays using functional promoters, cell viability assays are still efficient. We focus on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are involved in the molecular mechanisms associated with responses to cellular stresses as a new biological material. Here we have developed human live cells transfected with lncRNAs that can be used as an intelligent sensor of cytotoxicity for a broad range of environmental stresses. We identified three lncRNAs (GAS5, IDI2-AS1, and SNHG15) that responded to cycloheximide in HEK293 cells. Overexpression of these lncRNAs sensitized human cells to cell death in response to various stresses (cycloheximide, ultraviolet irradiation, mercury II chloride, or hydrogen peroxide). In particular, dual lncRNA (GAS5 plus IDI2-AS1, or GAS5 plus SNHG15) overexpression sensitized cells to cell death by more cellular stresses. We propose a method for highly sensitive biosensors using overexpression of lncRNAs that can potentially measure the cytotoxicity signals of various environmental stresses.

  13. Cell death in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Rao, Rammohan V.; Mehlen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease trigger neuronal cell death through endogenous suicide pathways. Surprisingly, although the cell death itself may occur relatively late in the course of the degenerative process, the mediators of the underlying cell-death pathways have shown promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17051206

  14. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  16. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose; Leon, Francisco; Estevez, Francisco

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  17. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  18. Overexpressed TPX2 causes ectopic formation of microtubular arrays in the nuclei of acentrosomal plant cells.

    PubMed

    Petrovská, Beáta; Jerábková, Hana; Kohoutová, Lucie; Cenklová, Vera; Pochylová, Žaneta; Gelová, Zuzana; Kocárová, Gabriela; Váchová, Lenka; Kurejová, Michaela; Tomastíková, Eva; Binarová, Pavla

    2013-11-01

    TPX2 performs multiple roles in microtubule organization. Previously, it was shown that plant AtTPX2 binds AtAurora1 kinase and colocalizes with microtubules in a cell cycle-specific manner. To elucidate the function of TPX2 further, this work analysed Arabidopsis cells overexpressing AtTPX2-GFP. Distinct arrays of bundled microtubules, decorated with AtTPX2-GFP, were formed in the vicinity of the nuclear envelope and in the nuclei of overexpressing cells. The microtubular arrays showed reduced sensitivity to anti-microtubular drugs. TPX2-mediated formation of nuclear/perinuclear microtubular arrays was not specific for the transition to mitosis and occurred independently of Aurora kinase. The fibres were not observed in cells with detectable programmed cell death and, in this respect, they differed from TPX2-dependent microtubular assemblies functioning in mammalian apoptosis. Colocalization and co-purification data confirmed the interaction of importin with AtTPX2-GFP. In cells with nuclear foci of overexpressed AtTPX2-GFP, strong nuclear signals for Ran and importin diminished when microtubular arrays were assembled. This observation suggests that TPX2-mediated microtubule formation might be triggered by a Ran cycle. Collectively, the data suggest that in the acentrosomal plant cell, in conjunction with importin, overexpressed AtTPX2 reinforces microtubule formation in the vicinity of chromatin and the nuclear envelope.

  19. Pathogen Tactics to Manipulate Plant Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M Shahid; McCormack, Maggie E; Argueso, Cristiana T; Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M

    2016-07-11

    Cell death is a vital process for multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death (PCD) functions in a variety of processes including growth, development, and immune responses for homeostasis maintenance. In particular, plants and animals utilize PCD to control pathogen invasion and infected cell populations. Despite some similarity, there are a number of key differences between how these organisms initiate and regulate cell death. In contrast to animals, plants are sessile, lack a circulatory system, and have additional cellular structures, including cell walls and chloroplasts. Plant cells have the autonomous ability to induce localized cell death using conserved eukaryotic pathways as well as unique plant-specific pathways. Thus, in order to successfully infect host cells, pathogens must subvert immune responses and avoid detection to prevent PCD and allow infection. Here we discuss the roles of cell death in plant immune responses and the tactics pathogens utilize to avert cell death. PMID:27404256

  20. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  1. Cell death during crisis is mediated by mitotic telomere deprotection.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makoto T; Cesare, Anthony J; Rivera, Teresa; Karlseder, Jan

    2015-06-25

    Tumour formation is blocked by two barriers: replicative senescence and crisis. Senescence is triggered by short telomeres and is bypassed by disruption of tumour-suppressive pathways. After senescence bypass, cells undergo crisis, during which almost all of the cells in the population die. Cells that escape crisis harbour unstable genomes and other parameters of transformation. The mechanism of cell death during crisis remains unexplained. Here we show that human cells in crisis undergo spontaneous mitotic arrest, resulting in death during mitosis or in the following cell cycle. This phenotype is induced by loss of p53 function, and is suppressed by telomerase overexpression. Telomere fusions triggered mitotic arrest in p53-compromised non-crisis cells, indicating that such fusions are the underlying cause of cell death. Exacerbation of mitotic telomere deprotection by partial TRF2 (also known as TERF2) knockdown increased the ratio of cells that died during mitotic arrest and sensitized cancer cells to mitotic poisons. We propose a crisis pathway wherein chromosome fusions induce mitotic arrest, resulting in mitotic telomere deprotection and cell death, thereby eliminating precancerous cells from the population.

  2. Cell death: a dynamic response concept.

    PubMed

    Loos, Benjamin; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2009-07-01

    Autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis have previously been described as distinct static processes that induce and execute cell death. Due to an increased use of novel techniques in mapping cellular death-techniques which allow for reporting of real-time data-the existence of "grey zones" between cell death modes and the existence of the "point of no return" within these have been revealed. This revelation demands the integration of new concepts in describing the cellular death process. Furthermore, since the contribution of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is still poorly understood, it is important to accurately describe its function within the dynamic framework of cell death. In this review cell death is viewed as a dynamic and integrative cellular response to ensure the highest likelihood of self-preservation. Suggestions are offered for conceptualizing cell death modes and their morphological features, both individually and in relation to one another. It addresses the need for distinguishing between dying cells and dead cells so as to better locate and control the onset of cell death. Most importantly, the fundamental role of autophagy, autophagic flux, and the effects of the intracellular metabolic environment on the kinetics of the cell death modes are stressed. It also contextualizes the kinetic dimension of cell death as a process and aims to contribute towards a better understanding of autophagy as a key mechanism within this process. Understanding the dynamic nature of the cell death process and autophagy's central role can reveal new insight for therapeutic intervention in preventing cell death.

  3. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  4. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  5. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  6. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  7. Nerve Allografts Supplemented with Schwann Cells Overexpressing GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Katherine B.; Jesuraj, Nithya J.; Viader, Andreu; MacEwan, Matthew; Newton, Piyaraj; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We sought to determine if supplementation of acellular nerve allografts (ANAs) with Schwann Cells overexpressing GDNF (G-SCs) would enhance functional recovery following peripheral nerve injury. Methods SCs expanded in vitro were infected with a lentiviral vector to induce GDNF overexpression. Wild type-SCs (WT-SCs) and G-SCs were seeded into ANAs used to repair a 14mm nerve gap defect. Animals were harvested after 6 and 12 weeks for histomorphometric and muscle force analysis. Results At 6 weeks, histomorphometry revealed that ANAs supplemented with G-SCs promoted similar regeneration compared to the isograft at midgraft. However, G-SCs failed to promote regeneration into the distal stump. At 12 weeks, ANAs with G-SCs had lower maximum and specific force production compared to controls. Discussion The combined results suggest that consistent overexpression of GDNF by G-SCs trapped axons in the graft and prevented functional regeneration. PMID:23169341

  8. STIM1 overexpression promotes colorectal cancer progression, cell motility and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Sun, J; Huang, M-Y; Wang, Y-S; Hou, M-F; Sun, Y; He, H; Krishna, N; Chiu, S-J; Lin, S; Yang, S; Chang, W-C

    2015-08-13

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, with >90% of cancer-related death attributable to the spreading of metastatic cells to secondary organs. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the predominant Ca(2+) entry mechanism in most cancer cells, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor for store-operated channels. Here we reported that the STIM1 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STIM1 overexpression in CRC was significantly associated with tumor size, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis status and serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen. Furthermore, ectopic expression of STIM1 promoted CRC cell motility, while depletion of STIM1 with short hairpin RNA inhibited CRC cell migration. Our data further suggested that STIM1 promoted CRC cell migration through increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Importantly, ectopically expressed COX-2 or exogenous PGE2 were able to rescue migration defect in STIM1 knockdown CRC cells, and inhibition of COX-2 with ibuprofen and indomethacin abrogated STIM1-mediated CRC cell motility. In short, our data provided clinicopathological significance for STIM1 and SOCE in CRC progression, and implicated a role for COX-2 in STIM1-mediated CRC metastasis. Our studies also suggested a new approach to inhibit STIM1-mediated metastasis with COX-2 inhibitors.

  9. Chemotherapeutic Approaches for Targeting Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, M. Stacey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2011-01-01

    For several decades, apoptosis has taken center stage as the principal mechanism of programmed cell death in mammalian tissues. It also has been increasingly noted that conventional chemotherapeutic agents not only elicit apoptosis but other forms of nonapoptotic death such as necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. This review presents background on the signaling pathways involved in the different cell death outcomes. A re-examination of what we know about chemotherapy-induced death is vitally important in light of new understanding of nonapoptotic cell death signaling pathways. If we can precisely activate or inhibit molecules that mediate the diversity of cell death outcomes, perhaps we can succeed in more effective and less toxic chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:16614230

  10. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma.

  11. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma. PMID:24085287

  12. Overexpression of ankyrin1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; MacGregor, Anne; Hong, Seung-Mo; Ayars, Michael; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Borges, Michael; Kanda, Mitsuro; Li, Ang; Vincent, Audrey; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The methylation status of a promoter influences gene expression and aberrant methylation during tumor development has important functional consequences for pancreatic and other cancers. Using methylated CpG island amplification and promoter microarrays, we identified ANK1 as hypomethylated in pancreatic cancers. Expression analysis determined ANK1 as commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancers relative to normal pancreas. ANK1 was co-expressed with miR-486 in pancreatic cancer cells. Stable knockdown of ANK1 in the pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC1 led to changes in cell morphology, and decreases in colony formation. Stable knockdown of ANK1 also marked reduced the growth of tumors in athymic nude mice. Among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, those with pancreatic cancers expressing ANK1 had a poorer prognosis than those without ANK1 expression. These findings indicate a role for ANK1 overexpression in mediating pancreatic cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27144336

  13. Spontaneous cell death in the chorion laeve.

    PubMed

    Parmley, T H

    1990-06-01

    The granulosa cells of the dominant follicle grow, differentiate, and die in a roughly predictable amount of time. Because the simultaneous death of this population of cells results in menstruation, one may say that the life span of this population of cells "times" the menstrual cycle. Metamorphosis in amphibians and morphogenesis in several vertebrates are other examples of developmental milestones that are "timed" by the life span of specific cell populations. In all these examples, cell death is associated with a specific histology, apoptosis. Apoptosis characterizes the cell death that produces the progressive disappearance of the trophoblast in the chorion laeve as term is approached. Therefore, the histology of trophoblastic death in the near-term chorion laeve corresponds to that of populations of cells with life spans that "time" developmental events. The trophoblastic cell population of the chorion laeve is prematurely destroyed by infiltrating maternal leukocytes in cases of chorioamnionitis.

  14. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  15. The life and death of a B cell.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Thierry; Casamayor-Pallejà, Montserrat; Krammer, Peter H

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of apoptosis in the B cell lineage has implications for homeostasis, quality control of the antibody response, and tolerance. In this chapter we examine the different checkpoints that control life and death decisions of B cells during the antigen-independent and antigen-dependent phases of their development. We discuss the cell death mechanism involved in elimination of unwanted B cells at different stages of their development as well as the signals that trigger or repress the apoptotic process. At the steady state, before or after development of an immune response, B cell apoptosis ensures that the antigen receptor (BCR) on newly produced B cells is functional and does not recognize self-antigens with high avidity. It also ensures that the size of the peripheral B cell compartment remains constant in spite of the continuous input of B cells from the bone marrow. All these processes are controlled by the mitochondrial death pathway and are thus perturbed by overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the bcl-2 gene family. By contrast, the death receptor pathway plays a prominent role during the antigen-dependent phase of B cell development. Three sets of membrane molecules stand as crucial regulators of B cell survival. First, the BCR which plays a central but ambiguous role. On the one hand, it triggers death of B cells that recognize self-antigens or have been exposed to repeated antigenic stimulations. On the other hand, it promotes survival of the peripheral mature B cell pool and protects activated B cells from CD95-induced killing. Second, the death receptor Fas/CD95 which is instrumental in censoring B cells activated in a bystander fashion at the initiation of the response to T-dependent antigens. It also drives elimination of low-affinity and self-reactive B cell clones that arise through the process of somatic mutations during the germinal center reaction. As such, it contributes to the affinity maturation of the antibody response. Finally

  16. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  17. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  18. Overexpression of neurofilament H disrupts normal cell structure and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Smith, George M.; Li, Ping; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Studying exogenously expressed tagged proteins in live cells has become a standard technique for evaluating protein distribution and function. Typically, expression levels of experimentally introduced proteins are not regulated, and high levels are often preferred to facilitate detection. However, overexpression of many proteins leads to mislocalization and pathologies. Therefore, for normative studies, moderate levels of expression may be more suitable. To understand better the dynamics of intermediate filament formation, transport, and stability in a healthy, living cell, we inserted neurofilament heavy chain (NFH)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs in adenoviral vectors with tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoters. This system allows for turning on or off the synthesis of NFH-GFP at a selected time, for a defined period, in a dose-dependent manner. We used this inducible system for live cell imaging of changes in filament structure and cell shape, motility, and transport associated with increasing NFH-GFP expression. Cells with low to intermediate levels of NFH-GFP were structurally and functionally similar to neighboring, nonexpressing cells. In contrast, overexpression led to pathological alterations in both filament organization and cell function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Autophagy and cell death in model organisms.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, N; Tavernarakis, N

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy evolved in unicellular eukaryotes as a means for surviving nutrient stress. During the course of evolution, as multicellular organisms developed specialized cell types and complex intracellular signalling networks, autophagy has been summoned to serve additional cellular functions. Numerous recent studies indicate that apart from its pro-survival role under nutrient limitation, autophagy also participates in cell death. However, the precise role of this catabolic process in dying cells is not fully understood. Although in certain situations autophagy has a protective function, in other types of cell death it actually contributes to cellular destruction. Simple model organisms ranging from the unicellular Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and the metazoans Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster provide clearly defined cell death paradigms that can be used to dissect the involvement of autophagy in cell death, at the molecular level. In this review, we survey current research in simple organisms, linking autophagy to cell death and discuss the complex interplay between autophagy, cell survival and cell death. PMID:19079286

  20. Entosis and Related Forms of Cell Death within Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Wang, X-D

    2015-01-01

    By eliminating the unneeded or mutant cells, programmed cell death actively participates in a wide range of biological processes from embryonic development to homeostasis maintenance in adult. Continuing efforts have identified multiple cell death pathways, with apoptosis, necrosis and autophage the mostly studied. Recently a unique cell death pathway called "cell-in-cell death" has been defined. Unlike traditional cell death pathways, cell-in-cell death, characterized by cell death within another cell, is triggered by the invasion of one cell into its neighbor and executed by either lysosome-dependent degradation or caspase-dependent apoptosis. With remarkable progresses on cell-in-cell over past few years, multiple mechanisms, including entosis, cannibalism and emperitosis, are found to be responsible for cell-in-cell death. Some key questions, such as specific biochemical markers to distinguish precisely the properties of different cell-in-cell structures and the physiological and pathological relevance, remain to be addressed. In light of this situation and a surge of interests, leading scientists in this field intend to share with readers current research progresses on cell-in-cell structures from different model systems through this special edition on cell-in-cell. The mechanistic advances will be highlighted while the future researches be speculated. PMID:26511710

  1. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A.; Navarro-Villarán, E.; González, R.; Pereira, S.; Soriano-De Castro, L.B.; Sarrias-Giménez, A.; Barrera-Pulido, L.; Álamo-Martínez, J.M.; Serrablo-Requejo, A.; Blanco-Fernández, G.; Nogales-Muñoz, A.; Gila-Bohórquez, A.; Pacheco, D.; Torres-Nieto, M.A.; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J.; Suárez-Artacho, G.; Bernal-Bellido, C.; Marín-Gómez, L.M.; Barcena, J.A.; Gómez-Bravo, M.A.; Padilla, C.A.; Padillo, F.J.; Muntané, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10 nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. PMID:26233703

  2. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Danos, Arpad M.; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16ink4a cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16ink4a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway. PMID:23022476

  3. Over-expression of catalase in myeloid cells confers acute protection following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Brown, Milton E; Che, Pao Lin; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chiang, Bryce; Taylor, W Robert; Davis, Michael E

    2014-05-21

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  4. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  5. Over-expression of Trxo1 increases the viability of tobacco BY-2 cells under H2O2 treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Espín, Ana; Locato, Vittoria; Camejo, Daymi; Schiermeyer, Andreas; De Gara, Laura; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide, play a critical role in the regulation of plant development and in the induction of plant defence responses during stress adaptation, as well as in plant cell death. The antioxidant system is responsible for controlling ROS levels in these processes but redox homeostasis is also a key factor in plant cell metabolism under normal and stress situations. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous small proteins found in different cell compartments, including mitochondria and nuclei (Trxo1), and are involved in the regulation of target proteins through reduction of disulphide bonds, although their role under oxidative stress has been less well studied. This study describes over-expression of a Trxo1 for the first time, using a cell-culture model subjected to an oxidative treatment provoked by H2O2. Methods Control and over-expressing PsTrxo1 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells were treated with 35 mm H2O2 and the effects were analysed by studying the growth dynamics of the cultures together with oxidative stress parameters, as well as several components of the antioxidant systems involved in the metabolism of H2O2. Analysis of different hallmarks of programmed cell death was also carried out. Key Results Over-expression of PsTrxo1 caused significant differences in the response of TBY-2 cells to high concentrations of H2O2, namely higher and maintained viability in over-expressing cells, whilst the control line presented a severe decrease in viability and marked indications of oxidative stress, with generalized cell death after 3 d of treatment. In over-expressing cells, an increase in catalase activity, decreases in H2O2 and nitric oxide contents and maintenance of the glutathione redox state were observed. Conclusions A decreased content of endogenous H2O2 may be responsible in part for the delayed cell death found in over-expressing cells, in which changes in oxidative parameters and

  6. Activation of caspase-8 and Erk-1/2 in domes regulates cell death induced by confluence in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung-Heng; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Wang, Yang-Kao; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2007-04-01

    Under normal culture conditions, cells adhere to culture dish, spread out, proliferate, and finally cover all areas and reach confluence. During the confluent stage, cell proliferation ceases and differentiation is enhanced. Meanwhile, cell death also appears as the monolayer confluence proceeds. To delineate the mechanism of cell death induced by the confluent process, we employed Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. When approaching confluence, MDCK cells exhibited increase the levels of caspase-2 and enhanced the activity of caspase-8. Using various caspase inhibitors to block apoptosis, we found that only z-VAD-fmk and z-IETD-fmk can inhibit confluent cell death, indicating that confluent cell death is mediated by activation of caspase-8. Overexpression of Bcl-2 inhibited confluent cell death, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria-dependent pathway in confluent cell death. Interestingly, the activity of phospho-Erk (p-Erk) was initially decreased before confluence, but markedly increased after confluence. Immunofluorescence staining studies showed that p-Erk was expressed exclusively on dome-forming cells that underwent apoptosis. Treatment of confluent MDCK cells with PD98059 and UO126, the inhibitors of MEK, enhanced apoptosis as well as activity of caspase-8. These data indicate that elevation of p-Erk activity during confluence may serve to suppress confluent cell death. Taken together, activation of caspase-8 contributes to and results in confluent cell death, whereas elevated p-Erk activity serves to prevent confluent cell death by regulating activation of caspase-8.

  7. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, W G; Beers, E P; Dangl, J L; Franklin-Tong, V E; Gallois, P; Hara-Nishimura, I; Jones, A M; Kawai-Yamada, M; Lam, E; Mundy, J; Mur, L A J; Petersen, M; Smertenko, A; Taliansky, M; Van Breusegem, F; Wolpert, T; Woltering, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Bozhkov, P V

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term ‘apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined. PMID:21494263

  8. Loss of cyclophilin D reveals a critical role for mitochondrial permeability transition in cell death.

    PubMed

    Baines, Christopher P; Kaiser, Robert A; Purcell, Nicole H; Blair, N Scott; Osinska, Hanna; Hambleton, Michael A; Brunskill, Eric W; Sayen, M Richard; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Dorn, Gerald W; Robbins, Jeffrey; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2005-03-31

    Mitochondria play a critical role in mediating both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) leads to mitochondrial swelling, outer membrane rupture and the release of apoptotic mediators. The mPT pore is thought to consist of the adenine nucleotide translocator, a voltage-dependent anion channel, and cyclophilin D (the Ppif gene product), a prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix. Here we generated mice lacking Ppif and mice overexpressing cyclophilin D in the heart. Ppif null mice are protected from ischaemia/reperfusion-induced cell death in vivo, whereas cyclophilin D-overexpressing mice show mitochondrial swelling and spontaneous cell death. Mitochondria isolated from the livers, hearts and brains of Ppif null mice are resistant to mitochondrial swelling and permeability transition in vitro. Moreover, primary hepatocytes and fibroblasts isolated from Ppif null mice are largely protected from Ca2+-overload and oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, Bcl-2 family member-induced cell death does not depend on cyclophilin D, and Ppif null fibroblasts are not protected from staurosporine or tumour-necrosis factor-alpha-induced death. Thus, cyclophilin D and the mitochondrial permeability transition are required for mediating Ca2+- and oxidative damage-induced cell death, but not Bcl-2 family member-regulated death. PMID:15800627

  9. Regulated cell death and adaptive stress responses.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells react to potentially dangerous perturbations of the intracellular or extracellular microenvironment by activating rapid (transcription-independent) mechanisms that attempt to restore homeostasis. If such perturbations persist, cells may still try to cope with stress by activating delayed and robust (transcription-dependent) adaptive systems, or they may actively engage in cellular suicide. This regulated form of cell death can manifest with various morphological, biochemical and immunological correlates, and constitutes an ultimate attempt of stressed cells to maintain organismal homeostasis. Here, we dissect the general organization of adaptive cellular responses to stress, their intimate connection with regulated cell death, and how the latter operates for the preservation of organismal homeostasis.

  10. APP Overexpression Causes Aβ-Independent Neuronal Death through Intrinsic Apoptosis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ning; Jiao, Song; Gumaste, Ankita; Bai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a central hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is thought to be the cause of the observed neurodegeneration. Many animal models have been generated that overproduce Aβ yet do not exhibit clear neuronal loss, questioning this Aβ hypothesis. We previously developed an in vivo mouse model that expresses a humanized amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) showing robust apoptosis and olfactory dysfunction by 3 weeks of age, which is consistent with early OSN loss and smell deficits, as observed in AD patients. Here we show, by deleting the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in two distinct transgenic mouse models, that hAPP-induced apoptosis of OSNs is Aβ independent and remains cell autonomous. In addition, we reveal that the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is responsible for hAPP-induced OSN death, as marked by mitochondrial damage and caspase-9 activation. Given that hAPP expression causes OSN apoptosis despite the absence of BACE1, we propose that Aβ is not the sole cause of hAPP-induced neurodegeneration and that the early loss of olfactory function in AD may be based on a cell-autonomous mechanism, which could mark an early phase of AD, prior to Aβ accumulation. Thus, the olfactory system could serve as an important new platform to study the development of AD, providing unique insight for both early diagnosis and intervention. PMID:27517085

  11. APP Overexpression Causes Aβ-Independent Neuronal Death through Intrinsic Apoptosis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ning; Jiao, Song; Gumaste, Ankita; Bai, Li; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a central hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thought to be the cause of the observed neurodegeneration. Many animal models have been generated that overproduce Aβ yet do not exhibit clear neuronal loss, questioning this Aβ hypothesis. We previously developed an in vivo mouse model that expresses a humanized amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) showing robust apoptosis and olfactory dysfunction by 3 weeks of age, which is consistent with early OSN loss and smell deficits, as observed in AD patients. Here we show, by deleting the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in two distinct transgenic mouse models, that hAPP-induced apoptosis of OSNs is Aβ independent and remains cell autonomous. In addition, we reveal that the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is responsible for hAPP-induced OSN death, as marked by mitochondrial damage and caspase-9 activation. Given that hAPP expression causes OSN apoptosis despite the absence of BACE1, we propose that Aβ is not the sole cause of hAPP-induced neurodegeneration and that the early loss of olfactory function in AD may be based on a cell-autonomous mechanism, which could mark an early phase of AD, prior to Aβ accumulation. Thus, the olfactory system could serve as an important new platform to study the development of AD, providing unique insight for both early diagnosis and intervention. PMID:27517085

  12. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  13. Programmed cell death in cereal aleurone.

    PubMed

    Fath, A; Bethke, P; Lonsdale, J; Meza-Romero, R; Jones, R

    2000-10-01

    Progress in understanding programmed cell death (PCD) in the cereal aleurone is described. Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that function to synthesize and secrete hydrolytic enzymes that break down reserves in the starchy endosperm. Unlike the cells of the starchy endosperm, aleurone cells are viable in mature grain but undergo PCD when germination is triggered or when isolated aleurone layers or protoplasts are incubated in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) slows down the process of aleurone cell death and isolated aleurone protoplasts can be kept alive in media containing ABA for up to 6 months. Cell death in barley aleurone occurs only after cells become highly vacuolated and is manifested in an abrupt loss of plasma membrane integrity. Aleurone cell death does not follow the apoptotic pathway found in many animal cells. The hallmarks of apoptosis, including internucleosomal DNA cleavage, plasma membrane and nuclear blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, are not observed in dying aleurone cells. PCD in barley aleurone cells is accompanied by the accumulation of a spectrum of nuclease and protease activities and the loss of organelles as a result of cellular autolysis.

  14. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  15. Eiger-induced cell death relies on Rac1-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, W; Srinivasan, A; Lin, S; Kara, k-I; Barker, P A

    2016-01-01

    Signaling via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily members regulates cellular life and death decisions. A subset of mammalian TNFR proteins, most notably the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), induces cell death through a pathway that requires activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). However the receptor-proximal signaling events that mediate this remain unclear. Drosophila express a single tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand termed Eiger (Egr) that activates JNK-dependent cell death. We have exploited this model to identify phylogenetically conserved signaling events that allow Egr to induce JNK activation and cell death in vivo. Here we report that Rac1, a small GTPase, is specifically required in Egr-mediated cell death. rac1 loss of function blocks Egr-induced cell death, whereas Rac1 overexpression enhances Egr-induced killing. We identify Vav as a GEF for Rac1 in this pathway and demonstrate that dLRRK functions as a negative regulator of Rac1 that normally acts to constrain Egr-induced death. Thus dLRRK loss of function increases Egr-induced cell death in the fly. We further show that Rac1-dependent entry of Egr into early endosomes is a crucial prerequisite for JNK activation and for cell death and show that this entry requires the activity of Rab21 and Rab7. These findings reveal novel regulatory mechanisms that allow Rac1 to contribute to Egr-induced JNK activation and cell death. PMID:27054336

  16. Noggin 1 overexpression in retinal progenitors affects bipolar cell generation.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Bridi, Simone; Bozza, Angela; Bozzi, Yuri; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Casarosa, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Waves of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) and their antagonists are present during initial eye development, but their possible roles in retinogenesis are still unknown. We have recently shown that noggin 1, a BMP antagonist, renders pluripotent cells able to differentiate into retinal precursors, and might be involved in the maintenance of retinal structures in the adult vertebrate eye. Here, we report that noggin 1, differently from noggin 2 and noggin 4, is expressed during all phases of Xenopus laevis retinal development. Gain-of-function experiments by electroporation in the optic vesicle show that overexpression of noggin 1 significantly decreases the number of bipolar cells in the inner nuclear layer of the retina, without significantly affecting the generation of the other retinal cell types. Our data suggest that BMP signaling could be involved in the differentiation of retinal progenitors into specific retinal subtypes during late phases of vertebrate retinal development. PMID:27389985

  17. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  18. Nineteenth century research on cell death.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P G H; Clarke, S

    2012-10-01

    This paper reviews research on cell death in the 19th C. The first report of cell death was by Vogt in 1842, which was remarkably soon after the establishment of the cell theory by Schleiden and Schwann between 1838 and 1842. Initial studies on cell death, including that of Vogt, focused on its occurrence in metamorphosis (Vogt, 1842; Prévost and Lebert, 1844; Weismann, 1863-1866) or in blatant pathology (Virchow, 1858), but as histological techniques improved it was found to be involved in more subtle roles in numerous situations including endochondral ossification (Stieda, 1872), ovarian follicle atresia (Flemming, 1885), cell turnover (Nissen, 1886), the wholesale loss of a population of sensory neurons in fish (Beard, 1889), and the naturally occurring histogenetic death of myocytes (Felix, 1889) and neurons (Collin, 1906). The current categorization of cell death into about three main morphological types has 19th century roots in that apoptosis was well described by Flemming (1885), who called it chromatolysis, and various authors including Noetzel (1895) proposed a threefold classification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later". PMID:23069997

  19. Enhanced antioxidant and protective activities on retinal ganglion cells of carotenoids-overexpressing transgenic carrot.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kee Dong; Kang, Suk-Nam; Bae, Ji-Yeong; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Jang, Insurk; Kim, Il-Suk; Lee, Cheol Ho; Bae, Jung Myung; Lee, Shin Woo; Ahn, Mi-Jeong

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are considered to act as antioxidants and protect humans from serious disorders such as skin degeneration and ageing, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancer, and age-related diseases of the eye. In this study, these chemopreventive activities of a carotenoids-overexpressing transgenic carrot were evaluated. The results of DPPH, hydroxyl, and superoxide radical scavenging tests demonstrate that the acetone extract obtained from the taproots of the carrot plants exhibits significant antioxidant activity. A higher activity was detected in the transgenic carrot extract compared with the wild-type extract. A chemopreventive activity test for degenerative diseases of the eye revealed that pretreatment with the carrot extract reduced cell death in a retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5 cells exposed to 1-buthionine- (R,S)-sulfoximine and L-glutamic acid.

  20. Soluble extracellular Klotho decreases sensitivity to cigarette smoke induced cell death in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blake, David J; Reese, Caitlyn M; Garcia, Mario; Dahlmann, Elizabeth A; Dean, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the third leading cause of death in the US and is associated with an abnormal inflammatory response to cigarette smoke (CS). Exposure to CS induces oxidative stress and can result in cellular senescence in the lung. Cellular senescence can then lead to decreased proliferation of epithelial cells, the destruction of alveolar structure and pulmonary emphysema. The anti-aging gene, klotho, encodes a membrane bound protein that has been shown to be a key regulator of oxidative stress and cellular senescence. In this study the role of Klotho (KL) with regard to oxidative stress and cellular senescence was investigated in human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke. Individual clones that stably overexpress Klotho were generated through retroviral transfection and geneticin selection. Klotho overexpression was confirmed through RT-qPCR, Western blotting and ELISA. Compared to control cells, constitutive Klotho overexpression resulted in decreased sensitivity to cigarette smoke induced cell death in vitro via a reduction of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the expression of p21. Our results suggest that increasing Klotho level in pulmonary epithelial cells may be a promising strategy to reduce cellular senescence and mitigate the risk for the development of COPD.

  1. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  2. Resveratrol induces cell death and inhibits human herpesvirus 8 replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng-Yi; Chen, Chang-Yu; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Hong, Shin; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Wang, Lin-Yu; Wang, Yi-Fen

    2015-12-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been reported to inhibit proliferation of various cancer cells. However, the effects of resveratrol on the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) harboring primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells remains unclear. The anti-proliferation effects and possible mechanisms of resveratrol in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells were examined in this study. Results showed that resveratrol induced caspase-3 activation and the formation of acidic vacuoles in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells, indicating resveratrol treatment could cause apoptosis and autophagy in PEL cells. In addition, resveratrol treatment increased ROS generation but did not lead to HHV8 reactivation. ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) could attenuate both the resveratrol induced caspase-3 activity and the formation of acidic vacuoles, but failed to attenuate resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Caspase inhibitor, autophagy inhibitors and necroptosis inhibitor could not block resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Moreover, resveratrol disrupted HHV8 latent infection, inhibited HHV8 lytic gene expression and decreased virus progeny production. Overexpression of HHV8-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) could partially block resveratrol induced cell death in PEL cells. These data suggest that resveratrol-induced cell death in PEL cells may be mediated by disruption of HHV8 replication. Resveratrol may be a potential anti-HHV8 drug and an effective treatment for HHV8-related tumors.

  3. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  4. Insulin withdrawal-induced cell death in adult hippocampal neural stem cells as a model of autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kim, Seong Who; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2009-02-01

    The term "autophagic cell death" was coined to describe a form of cell death associated with the massive formation of autophagic vacuoles without signs of apoptosis. However, questions about the actual role of autophagy and its molecular basis in cell death remain to be elucidated. We recently reported that adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells undergo autophagic cell death following insulin withdrawal. Insulin-deprived HCN cells exhibit morphological and biochemical markers of autophagy, including accumulation of Beclin 1 and the type II form of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) without evidence of apoptosis. Suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 reduces cell death, whereas promotion of autophagy with rapamycin augments cell death in insulin-deficient HCN cells. These data reveal a causative role of autophagy in insulin withdrawal-induced HCN cell death. HCN cells have intact apoptotic capability despite the lack of apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. Our study demonstrates that autophagy is the default cell death mechanism in insulin-deficient HCN cells, and provides a genuine model of autophagic cell death in apoptosis-intact cells. Novel insight into molecular mechanisms of this underappreciated form of programmed cell death should facilitate the development of therapeutic methods to cope with human diseases caused by dysregulated cell death.

  5. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Curry, Merril C; Peters, Amelia A; Kenny, Paraic A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-05-10

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  6. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  7. Time-Lapse Imaging of Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    The best approach to distinguish between necrosis and apoptosis is time-lapse video microscopy. This technique enables a biological process to be photographed at regular intervals over a period, which may last from a few hours to several days, and can be applied to cells in culture or in vivo. We have established two time-lapse microscopy methods based on different ways of calculating cell death: semiautomated and automated. In the semiautomated approach, cell death can be visualized by staining with combinations of Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V and Sytox Green (SG), or Annexin V(FITC) and Propidium iodide (PI). The automated method is similar except that all cells are labeled with dyes. This allows faster quantification of data. To this end Cell Tracker Green is used to label all cells at time zero in combination with PI and Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated Annexin V. Necrotic cell death is accompanied by either simultaneous labeling with Annexin V and PI or SG (double-positive), or direct PI or SG staining. Additionally, necrotic cells display characteristic morphology, such as cytoplasmic swelling. In contrast to necrosis where membrane permeabilization is an early event, cells that die by apoptosis lose their membrane permeability relatively late. Therefore, the time between Annexin V staining and PI or SG uptake (double-positive) can be used to distinguish necrosis from apoptosis. This protocol describes the analysis of cell death by time-lapse imaging of HT1080 and L929 cells stained with these dyes, but it can be readily adapted to other cell types of interest. PMID:26933245

  8. The apoptosome: signalling platform of cell death.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Salvesen, Guy S

    2007-05-01

    Recent work on the initial switches that trigger cell death has revealed surprising inventions of nature that ensure the ordered suicide of a cell that has been selected for demise. Particularly intriguing is how a signal--the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria--is translated into the activation of the death cascade, which leads to a point of no return. Now there is new understanding of how this crucial process is delicately handled by a cytosolic signalling platform known as the apoptosome. The formation of the apoptosome and the activation of its effector, caspase-9, reveals a sophisticated mechanism that might be more common than was initially thought. PMID:17377525

  9. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    PubMed

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  10. Overexpression of the dependence receptor UNC5H4 inhibits cell migration and invasion, and triggers apoptosis in neuroblastoma cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Min; Li, Shuang; Chi, Zuofei; Hao, Liangchun

    2014-06-01

    UNC5H4 is a newly identified member of the UNC5H receptor family. Previously, we have demonstrated that UNC5H4 expression is significantly higher in favorable neuroblastomas than in unfavorable ones, and higher UNC5H4 level is correlated with longer survival time. However, the function of UNC5H4 in the tumorigenesis of neuroblastoma still remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of UNC5H4 overexpression on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. We showed that enforced expression of UNC5H4 receptor significantly inhibited anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth of SH-SY5Y cells. Cell migration and invasion of SH-SY5Y cells transfected with UNC5H4-expressing plasmid were obviously suppressed as compared to those transfected with emptor vector or non-transfected cells. Moreover, overexpression of UNC5H4 resulted in apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. The induction of apoptosis by UNC5H4 was completely abolished in the presence of its ligand, netrin-1. Finally, caspase cleavage and the presence of death domain were required for UNC5H4 to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. These data suggest that the dependence receptor UNC5H4 may act as a putative tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma.

  11. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms.

  12. Cell death pathways associated with PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy leads to both direct and indirect tumor cell death. The latter also involves the consequences of vascular shut-down and immunologic effects. While these factors are a major factor in tumor eradication, there is usually an element of direct cell killing that can reduce the cell population by as much as 2-3 logs. Necrosis was initially believed to represent the predominant PDT death mechanism. An apoptotic response to PDT was first reported by Oleinick in 1991, using a sensitizer that targets the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis leads to fragmentation of DNA and of cells into apoptotic bodies that are removed by phagocytosis. Inflammatory effects are minimized, and the auto- catalytic elements of the process can amplify the death signal. In this study, we examined consequences of Bcl-2 photodamage by a porphycene sensitizer that targets the ER and causes photodamage to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Death patterns after Bcl-2 inactivation by a small-molecular antagonist were also assessed. In addition to apoptosis, we also characterized a hitherto undescribed PDT effect, the initiation of autophagy. Autophagy was initially identified as a cell survival pathway, allowing the recycling of components as nutrients become scarce. We propose that autophagy can also represent both a potential survival pathway after PDT damage to cellular organelles, as well as a cell-death pathway. Recent literature reports indicate that autophagy, as well as apoptosis, can be evoked after down-regulation of Bcl-2, a result consistent with results reported here.

  13. High concentrations of glucose suppress etoposide-induced cell death of B-cell lymphoma through BCL-6.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yan; Ling, Chang Chun; Liu, Xu Qing

    2014-07-18

    Glucose is potentially a factor in the resistance to chemotherapy of B-cell lymphomas. In this study we investigated the expression of the glucose induced transcription factor Bcl-6 and the underlying mechanism by which it suppresses B-cell lymphoma cell death. Glucose was found to prevent etoposide-induced tumor cell death. BCL-6 expression was induced by glucose but down-regulated by etoposide. BCL-6 expression was regulated by the interaction of VDUP1 and p53. The molecular mechanism by which glucose prevented etoposide-induced tumor cell death was shown to involve the BCL-6 mediated caspase pathway. Our data suggest that glucose-induced BCL-6 overexpression could abrogate the etoposide chemotherapy effect on tumor cell death. PMID:24878528

  14. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date.

  15. Nanomaterials Toxicity and Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Daniela; Carnuccio, Rosa; Maiuri, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the nanotechnology advancement has developed a plethora of novel and intriguing nanomaterial application in many sectors, including research and medicine. However, many risks have been highlighted in their use, particularly related to their unexpected toxicity in vitro and in vivo experimental models. This paper proposes an overview concerning the cell death modalities induced by the major nanomaterials. PMID:23304518

  16. Lipids and cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding lipid-induced malfunction represents a major challenge of today's biomedical research. The connection of lipids to cellular and organ dysfunction, cell death, and disease (often referred to as lipotoxicity) is more complex than the sole lipotoxic effects of excess free fatty acids and requires genetically tractable model systems for mechanistic investigation. We herein summarize recent advances in the field of lipid-induced toxicity that employ the established model system for cell death and aging research of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies in yeast have shed light on various aspects of lipotoxicity, including free fatty acid toxicity, sphingolipid-modulated cell death as well as the involvement of cardiolipin and lipid peroxidation in the mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Regimens used range from exogenously applied lipids, genetic modulation of lipolysis and triacylglyceride synthesis, variations in sphingolipid/ceramide metabolism as well as changes in peroxisome function by either genetic or pharmacological means. In future, the yeast model of programmed cell death will further contribute to the clarification of crucial questions of lipid-associated malfunction. PMID:24119111

  17. Cholesteatoma Fibroblasts Promote Epithelial Cell Proliferation through Overexpression of Epiregulin

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Mamoru; Kojima, Hiromi; Yaguchi, Yuichiro; Okada, Naoko; Saito, Hirohisa; Moriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether keratinocytes proliferate in response to epiregulin produced by subepithelial fibroblasts derived from middle ear cholesteatoma. Tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing tympanoplasty. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were performed to examine epiregulin expression and localization in cholesteatoma tissues and retroauricular skin tissues. Fibroblasts were cultured from cholesteatoma tissues and from normal retroauricular skin. These fibroblasts were used as feeder cells for culture with a human keratinocyte cell line (PHK16-0b). To investigate the role of epiregulin in colony formation by PHK16-0b cells, epiregulin mRNA expression was knocked down in fibroblasts by using short interfering RNA and epiregulin protein was blocked with a neutralizing antibody. Epiregulin mRNA expression was significantly elevated in cholesteatoma tissues compared with that in normal retroauricular skin. Staining for epiregulin was more intense in the epithelial cells and subepithelial fibroblasts of cholesteatoma tissues than in retroauricular skin. When PHK16-0b cells were cultured with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, their colony-forming efficiency was 50% higher than when these cells were cultured with normal skin fibroblasts. Also, knockdown of epiregulin mRNA in cholesteatoma fibroblasts led to greater suppression of colony formation than knockdown in skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the colony-forming efficiency of PHK16-0b cells was significantly reduced after treatment with an epiregulin neutralizing antibody in co-culture with cholesteatoma fibroblasts, but not in co-culture with skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that keratinocyte hyperproliferation in cholesteatoma is promoted through overexpression of epiregulin by subepithelial fibroblasts via epithelial–mesenchymal interactions, which may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of middle ear cholesteatoma. PMID:23826119

  18. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  19. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  20. Overexpression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Andréll, Juni

    2013-01-01

    The number of structures of integral membrane proteins from higher eukaryotes is steadily increasing due to a number of innovative protein engineering and crystallization strategies devised over the last few years. However, it is sobering to reflect that these structures represent only a tiny proportion of the total number of membrane proteins encoded by a mammalian genome. In addition, the structures determined to date are of the most tractable membrane proteins, i.e., those that are expressed functionally and to high levels in yeast or in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. However, some membrane proteins that are expressed inefficiently in these systems can be produced at sufficiently high levels in mammalian cells to allow structure determination. Mammalian expression systems are an under-used resource in structural biology and represent an effective way to produce fully functional membrane proteins for structural studies. This review will discuss examples of vertebrate membrane protein overexpression in mammalian cells using a variety of viral, constitutive or inducible expression systems. PMID:22963530

  1. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes.

  2. Autophagic and apoptotic cell death in amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z-Y; Li, E-M; Lu, S-Q; Shen, J; Cai, Y-M; Wu, Y-E; Zheng, R-M; Tan, L-J; Xu, L-Y

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine if autophagic cell death is associated with apoptosis and whether it participates in the process of term amniotic rupture. Forty pieces of fresh term amnions, including twenty from a position near the margin of the placentas and twenty from the margin of the naturally ruptured part of the placentas in term gestation were collected, respectively. The amnions were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and amniotic epithelial (AE) cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Autophagic and apoptotic cell death (PCD) were assayed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) or flow cytometry using monodansylcadaverin (MDC) and propidium iodide (PI) stain. BCL(2) and BAX were examined by immunoblotting. Under SEM the amniotic epithelia appeared normal in the position near the placenta. They had an atrophied appearance in the margin of their natural broken parts. In the AE cells PCD was divided into three subtypes by TEM: autophagic cell death with positive stains of MDC and PI; apoptotic cell death; and the mixed type. Quantitative detection showed that there were more death cells, including autophagic and apoptotic, in the AE cells near the ruptured parts than near the placentas. An increased expression of BAX and a decreased expression of BCL(2) protein in the AE cells near the broken margin were observed. Apoptotic and autophagic cell death by the intrinsic pathway are the basic event in the AE cell and they are involved in the cause of membrane rupture of the human amnion in term gestation.

  3. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Goto, Renata N; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

  4. HAMLET triggers apoptosis but tumor cell death is independent of caspases, Bcl-2 and p53.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, O; Gustafsson, L; Irjala, H; Selivanova, G; Orrenius, S; Svanborg, C

    2006-02-01

    HAMLET (Human alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumor cells) triggers selective tumor cell death in vitro and limits tumor progression in vivo. Dying cells show features of apoptosis but it is not clear if the apoptotic response explains tumor cell death. This study examined the contribution of apoptosis to cell death in response to HAMLET. Apoptotic changes like caspase activation, phosphatidyl serine externalization, chromatin condensation were detected in HAMLET-treated tumor cells, but caspase inhibition or Bcl-2 over-expression did not prolong cell survival and the caspase response was Bcl-2 independent. HAMLET translocates to the nuclei and binds directly to chromatin, but the death response was unrelated to the p53 status of the tumor cells. p53 deletions or gain of function mutations did not influence the HAMLET sensitivity of tumor cells. Chromatin condensation was partly caspase dependent, but apoptosis-like marginalization of chromatin was also observed. The results show that tumor cell death in response to HAMLET is independent of caspases, p53 and Bcl-2 even though HAMLET activates an apoptotic response. The use of other cell death pathways allows HAMLET to successfully circumvent fundamental anti-apoptotic strategies that are present in many tumor cells.

  5. Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Sickle Cell Trait Not Linked to Early Death in Study However, black soldiers with the gene ... cell gene variant, are at risk of premature death. People with the sickle cell gene variant do ...

  6. Blocking CD147 induces cell death in cancer cells through impairment of glycolytic energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Miyako Inoue, Masahiro; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Nishizawa, Yasuko

    2008-09-12

    CD147 is a multifunctional transmembrane protein and promotes cancer progression. We found that the anti-human CD147 mouse monoclonal antibody MEM-M6/1 strongly induces necrosis-like cell death in LoVo, HT-29, WiDr, and SW620 colon cancer cells and A2058 melanoma cells, but not in WI-38 and TIG-113 normal fibroblasts. Silencing or overexpression of CD147 in LoVo cells enhanced or decreased the MEM-M6/1 induced cell death, respectively. CD147 is known to form complex with proton-linked monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), which is critical for lactate transport and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. In LoVo cells, CD147 and MCT-1 co-localized on the cell surface, and MEM-M6/1 inhibited the association of these molecules. MEM-M6/1 inhibited lactate uptake, lactate release, and reduced pHi. Further, the induction of acidification was parallel to the decrease of the glycolytic flux and intracellular ATP levels. These effects were not found in the normal fibroblasts. As cancer cells depend on glycolysis for their energy production, CD147 inhibition might induce cell death specific to cancer cells.

  7. Cell Death and Autophagy in TB

    PubMed Central

    Moraco, Andrew H.; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has succeeded in infecting one third of the human race though inhibition or evasion of innate and adaptive immunity. The pathogen is a facultative intracellular parasite that uses the niche provided by mononuclear phagocytes for its advantage. Complex interactions determine whether the bacillus will or will not be delivered to acidified lysosomes, whether the host phagocyte will survive infection or die, and whether the timing and mode of cell death works to the advantage of the host or the pathogen. Here we discuss cell death and autophagy in TB. These fundamental processes of cell biology feature in all aspects of TB pathogenesis and may be exploited to the treatment or prevention of TB disease. PMID:25453227

  8. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system

    PubMed Central

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-01-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms. PMID:21475301

  9. DAPIT Over-Expression Modulates Glucose Metabolism and Cell Behaviour in HEK293T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kontro, Heidi; Cannino, Giuseppe; Rustin, Pierre; Dufour, Eric; Kainulainen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Associated Protein in Insulin-sensitive Tissues (DAPIT) is a subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase and has also been found to associate with the vacuolar H+-ATPase. Its expression is particularly high in cells with elevated aerobic metabolism and in epithelial cells that actively transport nutrients and ions. Deletion of DAPIT is known to induce loss of mitochondrial ATP synthase but the effects of its over-expression are obscure. Results In order to study the consequences of high expression of DAPIT, we constructed a transgenic cell line that constitutively expressed DAPIT in human embryonal kidney cells, HEK293T. Enhanced DAPIT expression decreased mtDNA content and mitochondrial mass, and saturated respiratory chain by decreasing H+-ATP synthase activity. DAPIT over-expression also increased mitochondrial membrane potential and superoxide level, and translocated the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) and β-catenin to the nucleus. Accordingly, cells over-expressing DAPIT used more glucose and generated a larger amount of lactate compared to control cells. Interestingly, these changes were associated with an epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT)-like transition by changing E-cadherin to N-cadherin and up-regulating several key junction/adhesion proteins. At physiological level, DAPIT over-expression slowed down cell growth by G1 arrest and migration, and enhanced cell detachment. Several cancers also showed an increase in genomic copy number of Usmg5 (gene encoding DAPIT), thereby providing strong correlative evidence for DAPIT possibly having oncogenic function in cancers. Conclusions DAPIT over-expression thus appears to modulate mitochondrial functions and alter cellular regulations, promote anaerobic metabolism and induce EMT-like transition. We propose that DAPIT over-expression couples the changes in mitochondrial metabolism to physiological and pathophysiological regulations, and suggest it could play a critical

  10. Direct induction of autophagy by Atg1 inhibits cell growth and induces apoptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ryan C.; Juhász, Gábor; Neufeld, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    Background To survive starvation and other forms of stress, eukaryotic cells undergo a lysosomal process of cytoplasmic degradation known as autophagy. Autophagy has been implicated in a number of cellular and developmental processes, including cell growth control and programmed cell death. However, direct evidence of a causal role for autophagy in these processes is lacking, due in part to the pleiotropic effects of signaling molecules such as TOR that regulate autophagy. Here, we circumvent this difficulty by directly manipulating autophagy rates in Drosophila through the autophagy-specific protein kinase Atg1. Results We find that overexpression of Atg1 is sufficient to induce high levels of autophagy, the first such demonstration among wild type Atg proteins. In contrast to findings in yeast, induction of autophagy by Atg1 is dependent on its kinase activity. We find that cells with high levels of Atg1-induced autophagy are rapidly eliminated, demonstrating that autophagy is capable of inducing cell death. However, this cell death is caspase dependent and displays DNA fragmentation, suggesting that autophagy represents an alternative induction of apoptosis, rather than a distinct form of cell death. In addition, we demonstrate that Atg1-induced autophagy strongly inhibits cell growth, and that Atg1 mutant cells have a relative growth advantage under conditions of reduced TOR signaling. Finally, we show that Atg1 expression results in negative feedback on the activity of TOR itself. Conclusions Our results reveal a central role for Atg1 in mounting a coordinated autophagic response, and demonstrate that autophagy has the capacity to induce cell death. Furthermore, this work identifies autophagy as a critical mechanism by which inhibition of TOR signaling leads to reduced cell growth. PMID:17208179

  11. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  12. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  13. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  14. Ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Monian, Prashant; Pan, Qiuhui; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jenny; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of regulated necrosis. It is implicated in various human diseases, including ischemic organ damage and cancer. Here, we report the crucial role of autophagy, particularly autophagic degradation of cellular iron storage proteins (a process known as ferritinophagy), in ferroptosis. Using RNAi screening coupled with subsequent genetic analysis, we identified multiple autophagy-related genes as positive regulators of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis induction led to autophagy activation and consequent degradation of ferritin and ferritinophagy cargo receptor NCOA4. Consistently, inhibition of ferritinophagy by blockage of autophagy or knockdown of NCOA4 abrogated the accumulation of ferroptosis-associated cellular labile iron and reactive oxygen species, as well as eventual ferroptotic cell death. Therefore, ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process, and NCOA4-mediated ferritinophagy supports ferroptosis by controlling cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:27514700

  15. Cell Death and Deubiquitinases: Perspectives in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Seemana

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  16. Overexpression of LMO4 induces mammary hyperplasia, promotes cell invasion, and is a predictor of poor outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sum, Eleanor Y M; Segara, Davendra; Duscio, Belinda; Bath, Mary L; Field, Andrew S; Sutherland, Robert L; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Visvader, Jane E

    2005-05-24

    The zinc finger protein LMO4 is overexpressed in a high proportion of breast carcinomas. Here, we report that overexpression of a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Lmo4 transgene in the mouse mammary gland elicits hyperplasia and mammary intraepithelial neoplasia or adenosquamous carcinoma in two transgenic strains with a tumor latency of 13-18 months. To investigate cellular processes controlled by LMO4 and those that may be deregulated during oncogenesis, we used RNA interference. Down-regulation of LMO4 expression reduced proliferation of human breast cancer cells and increased differentiation of mouse mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, small-interfering-RNA-transfected breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) had a reduced capacity to migrate and invade an extracellular matrix. Conversely, overexpression of LMO4 in noninvasive, immortalized human MCF10A cells promoted cell motility and invasion. Significantly, in a cohort of 159 primary breast cancers, high nuclear levels of LMO4 were an independent predictor of death from breast cancer. Together, these findings suggest that deregulation of LMO4 in breast epithelium contributes directly to breast neoplasia by altering the rate of cellular proliferation and promoting cell invasion.

  17. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  18. Decoding cell death signals in liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Catherine; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Inflammation can be either beneficial or detrimental to the liver, depending on multiple factors. Mild (i.e., limited in intensity and destined to resolve) inflammatory responses have indeed been shown to exert consistent hepatoprotective effects, contributing to tissue repair and promoting the re-establishment of homeostasis. Conversely, excessive (i.e., disproportionate in intensity and permanent) inflammation may induce a massive loss of hepatocytes and hence exacerbate the severity of various hepatic conditions, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, systemic metabolic alterations (e.g., obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disorders), alcoholic hepatitis, intoxication by xenobiotics and infection, de facto being associated with irreversible liver damage, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Both liver-resident cells (e.g., Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells) and cells that are recruited in response to injury (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells) emit pro-inflammatory signals including - but not limited to - cytokines, chemokines, lipid messengers, and reactive oxygen species that contribute to the apoptotic or necrotic demise of hepatocytes. In turn, dying hepatocytes release damage-associated molecular patterns that-upon binding to evolutionary conserved pattern recognition receptors-activate cells of the innate immune system to further stimulate inflammatory responses, hence establishing a highly hepatotoxic feedforward cycle of inflammation and cell death. In this review, we discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that account for the most deleterious effect of hepatic inflammation at the cellular level, that is, the initiation of a massive cell death response among hepatocytes. PMID:23567086

  19. 1-Methylnicotinamide ameliorates lipotoxicity-induced oxidative stress and cell death in kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Kume, Shinji; Araki, Hisazumi; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Free fatty acid-bound albumin (FFA-albumin)-related oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of proximal tubular cell (PTC) damage and subsequent renal dysfunction in patients with refractory proteinuria. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has recently been focused on as a novel therapeutic target for several modern diseases, including diabetes. This study was designed to identify a novel molecule in NAD metabolism to protect PTCs from lipotoxicity-related oxidative stress. Among 19 candidate enzymes involved in mammalian NAD metabolism, the mRNA expression level of nicotinamide n-methyltransferase (NNMT) was significantly increased in both the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice and cultured PTCs stimulated with palmitate-albumin. Knockdown of NNMT exacerbated palmitate-albumin-induced cell death in cultured PTCs, whereas overexpression of NNMT inhibited it. Intracellular concentration of 1-Methylnicotinamide (1-MNA), a metabolite of NNMT, increased and decreased in cultured NNMT-overexpressing and -knockdown PTCs, respectively. Treatment with 1-MNA inhibited palmitate-albumin-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and cell death in cultured PTCs. Furthermore, oral administration of 1-MNA ameliorated oxidative stress, apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice. In conclusion, NNMT-derived 1-MNA can reduce lipotoxicity-mediated oxidative stress and cell damage in PTCs. Supplementation of 1-MNA may have potential as a new therapy in patients with refractory proteinuria.

  20. Current and Emerging Biomarkers of Cell Death in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kongning; Wu, Deng; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Lu; Yi, Ying; Miao, Zhengqiang; Jin, Nana; Bi, Xiaoman; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a critical biological process, serving many important functions within multicellular organisms. Aberrations in cell death can contribute to the pathology of human diseases. Significant progress made in the research area enormously speeds up our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of cell death. According to the distinct morphological and biochemical characteristics, cell death can be triggered by extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death, and mitotic catastrophe. Nevertheless, the realization that all of these efforts seek to pursue an effective treatment and cure for the disease has spurred a significant interest in the development of promising biomarkers of cell death to early diagnose disease and accurately predict disease progression and outcome. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about cell death, survey current and emerging biomarkers of cell death, and discuss the relationship with human diseases. PMID:24949464

  1. Adenovirus-Mediated Over-Expression of Nrf2 Within Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) Protected Rats Against Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh-Vardin, Mohammad; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recent developments in the field of cell therapy have led to a renewed interest in treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the early death of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in stressful microenvironment of a recipient tissue is a major problem with this kind of treatment. The objective of this study was to determine whether overexpression of a cytoprotective factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), in MSCs could protect rats against AKI. Methods: The Nrf2 was overexpressed in MSCs by recombinant adenoviruses, and the MSCs were implanted to rats suffering from cisplatin-induced AKI. Results: The obtained results showed that transplantation with the engineered MSCs ameliorates cisplatin-induced AKI. Morphologic features of the investigated kidneys showed that transplantation with the MSCs in which Nrf2 had been overexpressed significantly improved the complications of AKI. Conclusion: These findings suggested that the engineered MSCs might be a good candidate to be further evaluated in clinical trials. However, detailed studies must be performed to investigate the possible carcinogenic effect of Nrf2 overexpression. PMID:26236658

  2. Cell Death Control by Matrix Metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dirk; Gomez-Barrera, Juan A; Pasule, Christian; Brack-Frick, Ursula B; Sieferer, Elke; Nicholson, Tim M; Pfannstiel, Jens; Stintzi, Annick; Schaller, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that play important roles in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in animals, the proteases responsible for dynamic modifications of the plant cell wall are largely unknown. A possible involvement of MMPs was addressed by cloning and functional characterization of Sl2-MMP and Sl3-MMP from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The two tomato MMPs were found to resemble mammalian homologs with respect to gelatinolytic activity, substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the scissile bond, and catalytic properties. In transgenic tomato seedlings silenced for Sl2/3-MMP expression, necrotic lesions were observed at the base of the hypocotyl. Cell death initiated in the epidermis and proceeded to include outer cortical cell layers. In later developmental stages, necrosis spread, covering the entire stem and extending into the leaves of MMP-silenced plants. The subtilisin-like protease P69B was identified as a substrate of Sl2- and Sl3-MMP. P69B was shown to colocalize with Sl-MMPs in the apoplast of the tomato hypocotyl, it exhibited increased stability in transgenic plants silenced for Sl-MMP activity, and it was cleaved and inactivated by Sl-MMPs in vitro. The induction of cell death in Sl2/3-MMP-silenced plants depended on P69B, indicating that Sl2- and Sl3-MMP act upstream of P69B in an extracellular proteolytic cascade that contributes to the regulation of cell death in tomato. PMID:27208293

  3. Macrophage-Mediated Trogocytosis Leads to Death of Antibody-Opsonized Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Challa, Dilip K; Ram, Sripad; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the complex behavior of effector cells such as monocytes or macrophages in regulating cancerous growth is of central importance for cancer immunotherapy. Earlier studies using CD20-specific antibodies have demonstrated that the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated transfer of the targeted receptors from tumor cells to these effector cells through trogocytosis can enable escape from antibody therapy, leading to the viewpoint that this process is protumorigenic. In the current study, we demonstrate that persistent trogocytic attack results in the killing of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Further, antibody engineering to increase FcγR interactions enhances this tumoricidal activity. These studies extend the complex repertoire of activities of macrophages to trogocytic-mediated cell death of HER2-overexpressing target cells and have implications for the development of effective antibody-based therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1879-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27226489

  4. The Mitochondrial Fission Regulator DRP3B Does Not Regulate Cell Death in Plants

    PubMed Central

    YOSHINAGA, KEIKO; FUJIMOTO, MASARU; ARIMURA, SHIN-ICHI; TSUTSUMI, NOBUHIRO; UCHIMIYA, HIROFUMI; KAWAI-YAMADA, MAKI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Recent reports have described dramatic alterations in mitochondrial morphology during metazoan apoptosis. A dynamin-related protein (DRP) associated with mitochondrial outer membrane fission is known to be involved in the regulation of apoptosis. This study analysed the relationship between mitochondrial fission and regulation of plant cell death. • Methods Transgenic plants were generated possessing Arabidopsis DRP3B (K56A), the dominant-negative form of Arabidopsis DRP, mitochondrial-targeted green fluorescent protein and mouse Bax. • Key Results Arabidopsis plants over-expressing DRP3B (K56A) exhibited long tubular mitochondria. In these plants, mitochondria appeared as a string-of-beads during cell death. This indicates that DRP3B (K56A) prevented mitochondrial fission during plant cell death. However, in contrast to results for mammalian cells and yeast, Bax-induced cell death was not inhibited in DRP3B (K56A)-expressing plant cells. Similarly, hydrogen peroxide-, menadione-, darkness- and salicylic acid-induced cell death was not inhibited by DRP3B (K56A) expression. • Conclusions These results indicate that the systems controlling cell death in animals and plants are not common in terms of mitochondrial fission. PMID:16533833

  5. Mitochondrial fusion is regulated by Reaper to modulate Drosophila programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Thomenius, M; Freel, C D; Horn, S; Krieser, R; Abdelwahid, E; Cannon, R; Balasundaram, S; White, K; Kornbluth, S

    2011-01-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the decision to undergo programmed cell death in response to cellular damage or developmental cues is typically transmitted through mitochondria. It has been suggested that an exception is the apoptotic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the role of mitochondria remains unclear. Although IAP antagonists in Drosophila such as Reaper, Hid and Grim may induce cell death without mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, it is surprising that all three localize to mitochondria. Moreover, induction of Reaper and Hid appears to result in mitochondrial fragmentation during Drosophila cell death. Most importantly, disruption of mitochondrial fission can inhibit Reaper and Hid-induced cell death, suggesting that alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can modulate cell death in fly cells. We report here that Drosophila Reaper can induce mitochondrial fragmentation by binding to and inhibiting the pro-fusion protein MFN2 and its Drosophila counterpart dMFN/Marf. Our in vitro and in vivo analyses reveal that dMFN overexpression can inhibit cell death induced by Reaper or γ-irradiation. In addition, knockdown of dMFN causes a striking loss of adult wing tissue and significant apoptosis in the developing wing discs. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work describing a role for mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery in the decision of cells to die. PMID:21475305

  6. The endoplasmic reticulum binding protein BiP displays dual function in modulating cell death events.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Humberto H; Silva, Priscila A; Mendes, Giselle C; Brustolini, Otávio J B; Pimenta, Maiana R; Gouveia, Bianca C; Valente, Maria Anete S; Ramos, Humberto J O; Soares-Ramos, Juliana R L; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2014-02-01

    The binding protein (BiP) has been demonstrated to participate in innate immunity and attenuate endoplasmic reticulum- and osmotic stress-induced cell death. Here, we employed transgenic plants with manipulated levels of BiP to assess whether BiP also controlled developmental and hypersensitive programmed cell death (PCD). Under normal conditions, the BiP-induced transcriptome revealed a robust down-regulation of developmental PCD genes and an up-regulation of the genes involved in hypersensitive PCD triggered by nonhost-pathogen interactions. Accordingly, the BiP-overexpressing line displayed delayed leaf senescence under normal conditions and accelerated hypersensitive response triggered by Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato in soybean (Glycine max) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), as monitored by measuring hallmarks of PCD in plants. The BiP-mediated delay of leaf senescence correlated with the attenuation of N-rich protein (NRP)-mediated cell death signaling and the inhibition of the senescence-associated activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). By contrast, under biological activation of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and hypersensitive PCD, BiP overexpression further induced NRP-mediated cell death signaling and antagonistically inhibited the UPR. Thus, the SA-mediated induction of NRP cell death signaling occurs via a pathway distinct from UPR. Our data indicate that during the hypersensitive PCD, BiP positively regulates the NRP cell death signaling through a yet undefined mechanism that is activated by SA signaling and related to ER functioning. By contrast, BiP's negative regulation of leaf senescence may be linked to its capacity to attenuate the UPR activation and NRP cell death signaling. Therefore, BiP can function either as a negative or positive modulator of PCD events. PMID:24319082

  7. Autophagic cell death: Loch Ness monster or endangered species?

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Ming; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The concept of autophagic cell death was first established based on observations of increased autophagic markers in dying cells. The major limitation of such a morphology-based definition of autophagic cell death is that it fails to establish the functional role of autophagy in the cell death process, and thus contributes to the confusion in the literature regarding the role of autophagy in cell death and cell survival. Here we propose to define autophagic cell death as a modality of non-apoptotic or necrotic programmed cell death in which autophagy serves as a cell death mechanism, upon meeting the following set of criteria: (i) cell death occurs without the involvement of apoptosis; (ii) there is an increase of autophagic flux, and not just an increase of the autophagic markers, in the dying cells; and (iii) suppression of autophagy via both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic approaches is able to rescue or prevent cell death. In light of this new definition, we will discuss some of the common problems and difficulties in the study of autophagic cell death and also revisit some well-reported cases of autophagic cell death, aiming to achieve a better understanding of whether autophagy is a real killer, an accomplice or just an innocent bystander in the course of cell death. At present, the physiological relevance of autophagic cell death is mainly observed in lower eukaryotes and invertebrates such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Drosophila melanogaster. We believe that such a clear definition of autophagic cell death will help us study and understand the physiological or pathological relevance of autophagic cell death in mammals.

  8. Cell death goes LIVE: technological advances in real-time tracking of cell death.

    PubMed

    Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-06-15

    Cell population can be viewed as a quantum system, which like Schrödinger's cat exists as a combination of survival- and death-allowing states. Tracking and understanding cell-to-cell variability in processes of high spatio-temporal complexity such as cell death is at the core of current systems biology approaches. As probabilistic modeling tools attempt to impute information inaccessible by current experimental approaches, advances in technologies for single-cell imaging and omics (proteomics, genomics, metabolomics) should go hand in hand with the computational efforts. Over the last few years we have made exciting technological advances that allow studies of cell death dynamically in real-time and with the unprecedented accuracy. These approaches are based on innovative fluorescent assays and recombinant proteins, bioelectrical properties of cells, and more recently also on state-of-the-art optical spectroscopy. Here, we review current status of the most innovative analytical technologies for dynamic tracking of cell death, and address the interdisciplinary promises and future challenges of these methods.

  9. ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G.; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunctions. In plants with acd2 and ACD2+ sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as cell non-autonomous in promoting spreading PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active; the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria. PMID:21988537

  10. Accelerated cell death 2 suppresses mitochondrial oxidative bursts and modulates cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Venkataramani, Sujatha; Hortensteiner, Stefan; Kunz, Lukas; Christ, Bastien; Moulin, Michael; Smith, Alison G; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Greenberg, Jean T

    2012-02-01

    The Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 2 (ACD2) protein protects cells from programmed cell death (PCD) caused by endogenous porphyrin-related molecules like red chlorophyll catabolite or exogenous protoporphyrin IX. We previously found that during bacterial infection, ACD2, a chlorophyll breakdown enzyme, localizes to both chloroplasts and mitochondria in leaves. Additionally, acd2 cells show mitochondrial dysfunction. In plants with acd2 and ACD2 (+) sectors, ACD2 functions cell autonomously, implicating a pro-death ACD2 substrate as being cell non-autonomous in promoting the spread of PCD. ACD2 targeted solely to mitochondria can reduce the accumulation of an ACD2 substrate that originates in chloroplasts, indicating that ACD2 substrate molecules are likely to be mobile within cells. Two different light-dependent reactive oxygen bursts in mitochondria play prominent and causal roles in the acd2 PCD phenotype. Finally, ACD2 can complement acd2 when targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively, as long as it is catalytically active: the ability to bind substrate is not sufficient for ACD2 to function in vitro or in vivo. Together, the data suggest that ACD2 localizes dynamically during infection to protect cells from pro-death mobile substrate molecules, some of which may originate in chloroplasts, but have major effects on mitochondria.

  11. Baicalein induces programmed cell death in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bao-Di; Cao, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shan; Xu, Yong-Gang; Gao, Ping-Hui; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of an apoptotic phenotype in Candida albicans that is inducible with environmental stresses such as acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and amphotericin B. In the present study, we found that the Chinese herbal medicine Baicalein (BE), which was one of the skullcapflavones, can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. The apoptotic effects of BE were detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and DAPI, and it was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. After exposure to 4 microg/ml BE for 12 h, about 10% of C. albicans cells were apoptotic. Both the increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of some redox-related genes (CAP1, SOD2, TRR1) were observed. Furthermore, we compared the survivals of CAP1 deleted, wild-type, and overexpressed strains and found that Cap1p attenuated BE-initiated cell death, which was coherent with a higher mRNA level of the CAP1 gene. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential of C. albicans cells changed significantly ( p<0.001) upon BE treatment compared with control. Taken together, our results indicate that BE treatment induces apoptosis in C.albicans cells, and the apoptosis was associated with the breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:19734718

  12. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  13. C/EBP-β Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Triggered Cell Death in Mouse and Human Models

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Ofir; Dvash, Efrat; Werman, Ariel; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress elicits the unfolded protein response (UPR), initially aimed at coping with the stress, but triggering cell death upon further stress. ER stress induces the C/EBP-® variant Liver-enriched Activating Protein (LAP), followed by the dominant-negative variant, Liver Inhibitory Protein (LIP). However, the distinct role of LAP and LIP in ER stress is unknown. We found that the kinetics of the ER stress-induced expression of LIP overlapped with that of the cell death in mouse B16 melanoma cells. Furthermore, inducible over-expression of LIP augmented ER stress-triggered cell death whereas over-expression of LAP attenuated cell death. Similar results were obtained in human 293T cells. Limited vasculature in tumors triggers hypoxia, nutrient shortage and accumulation of toxic metabolites, all of which eliciting continuous ER stress. We found that LAP promoted and LIP inhibited B16 melanoma tumor progression without affecting angiogenesis or accelerating the cell cycle. Rather, LAP attenuated, whereas LIP augmented tumor ER stress. We therefore suggest that C/EBP-® regulates the transition from the protective to the death–promoting phase of the UPR. We further suggest that the over-expression of LAP observed in many solid tumors promotes tumor progression by attenuating ER stress–triggered tumor cell death. PMID:20209087

  14. Cellular Stress Responses: Cell Survival and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone; Gorman, Adrienne M.; Hori, Osamu; Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    Cells can respond to stress in various ways ranging from the activation of survival pathways to the initiation of cell death that eventually eliminates damaged cells. Whether cells mount a protective or destructive stress response depends to a large extent on the nature and duration of the stress as well as the cell type. Also, there is often the interplay between these responses that ultimately determines the fate of the stressed cell. The mechanism by which a cell dies (i.e., apoptosis, necrosis, pyroptosis, or autophagic cell death) depends on various exogenous factors as well as the cell's ability to handle the stress to which it is exposed. The implications of cellular stress responses to human physiology and diseases are manifold and will be discussed in this review in the context of some major world health issues such as diabetes, Parkinson's disease, myocardial infarction, and cancer. PMID:20182529

  15. Inhibition of caspases prevents ototoxic and ongoing hair cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Jonathan I.; Ogilvie, Judith M.; Warchol, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory hair cells die after acoustic trauma or ototoxic insults, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate hair cell death are not known. Here we identify several important signaling events that regulate the death of vestibular hair cells. Chick utricles were cultured in media supplemented with the ototoxic antibiotic neomycin and selected pharmacological agents that influence signaling molecules in cell death pathways. Hair cells that were treated with neomycin exhibited classically defined apoptotic morphologies such as condensed nuclei and fragmented DNA. Inhibition of protein synthesis (via treatment with cycloheximide) increased hair cell survival after treatment with neomycin, suggesting that hair cell death requires de novo protein synthesis. Finally, the inhibition of caspases promoted hair cell survival after neomycin treatment. Sensory hair cells in avian vestibular organs also undergo continual cell death and replacement throughout mature life. It is unclear whether the loss of hair cells stimulates the proliferation of supporting cells or whether the production of new cells triggers the death of hair cells. We examined the effects of caspase inhibition on spontaneous hair cell death in the chick utricle. Caspase inhibitors reduced the amount of ongoing hair cell death and ongoing supporting cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In isolated sensory epithelia, however, caspase inhibitors did not affect supporting cell proliferation directly. Our data indicate that ongoing hair cell death stimulates supporting cell proliferation in the mature utricle.

  16. Taip2 is a novel cell death-related gene expressed in the brain during development

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Kazumi; Akiyama, Nobutake; Yamada, Shuichi; Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Saito, Saburo; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2008-05-02

    TAIP2 was isolated as one of the homologous genes of TAIP3 (TGF-{beta}-up-regulated apoptosis-inducing-protein chromosome 3). The transcript of the mouse counterpart of TAIP2, designated mTaip2, was detected in several tissue specimens from embryos to adults, while mTaip2 was dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain. The overexpression of the full-length mTaip2 induced cell death in various cell lines. An analysis of mTaip2 deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal half of mTaip2, but not the C-terminal half, had nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activities. The results indicate that mTaip2 is a novel cell death-related gene dominantly expressed in the embryonic brain, thus suggesting that mTaip2 may play a role in development of the brain.

  17. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a vast family of enzymes involved in chromatin remodeling and have crucial roles in numerous biological processes, largely through their repressive influence on transcription. In addition to modifying histones, HDACs also target many other non-histone protein substrates to regulate gene expression. Recently, HDACs have gained growing attention as HDAC-inhibiting compounds are being developed as promising cancer therapeutics. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to induce differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis in a variety of transformed cell lines. In this review, we mainly discuss how HDACi may elicit a therapeutic response to human cancers through different cell death pathways, in particular, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24898083

  19. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27404255

  20. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Macrophage cell death upon intracellular bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Xu, Yunsheng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage-pathogen interaction is a complex process and the outcome of this tag-of-war for both sides is to live or die. Without attempting to be comprehensive, this review will discuss the complexity and significance of the interaction outcomes between macrophages and some facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens as exemplified by Francisella, Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia. Upon bacterial infection, macrophages can die by a variety of ways, such as apoptosis, autophagic cell death, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, pyronecrosis, pyroptosis etc, which is the focus of this review. PMID:26690967

  2. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  3. Pepper mitochondrial FORMATE DEHYDROGENASE1 regulates cell death and defense responses against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Du Seok; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-11-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH; EC 1.2.1.2) is an NAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide. Here, we report the identification and characterization of pepper (Capsicum annuum) mitochondrial FDH1 as a positive regulator of cell death and defense responses. Transient expression of FDH1 caused hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The D-isomer -: specific 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase signatures of FDH1 were required for the induction of HR-like cell death and FDH activity. FDH1 contained a mitochondrial targeting sequence at the N-terminal region; however, mitochondrial localization of FDH1 was not essential for the induction of HR-like cell death and FDH activity. FDH1 silencing in pepper significantly attenuated the cell death response and salicylic acid levels but stimulated growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria. By contrast, transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) overexpressing FDH1 exhibited greater resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato in a salicylic acid-dependent manner. Arabidopsis transfer DNA insertion mutant analysis indicated that AtFDH1 expression is required for basal defense and resistance gene-mediated resistance to P. syringae pv tomato infection. Taken together, these data suggest that FDH1 has an important role in HR-like cell death and defense responses to bacterial pathogens.

  4. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Alice D; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:27315169

  5. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Baudot, Alice D; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M

    2016-09-01

    p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy.

  6. p53 directly regulates the glycosidase FUCA1 to promote chemotherapy-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Baudot, Alice D.; Crighton, Diane; O'Prey, Jim; Somers, Joanna; Sierra Gonzalez, Pablo; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT p53 is a central factor in tumor suppression as exemplified by its frequent loss in human cancer. p53 exerts its tumor suppressive effects in multiple ways, but the ability to invoke the eradication of damaged cells by programmed cell death is considered a key factor. The ways in which p53 promotes cell death can involve direct activation or engagement of the cell death machinery, or can be via indirect mechanisms, for example though regulation of ER stress and autophagy. We present here another level of control in p53-mediated tumor suppression by showing that p53 activates the glycosidase, FUCA1, a modulator of N-linked glycosylation. We show that p53 transcriptionally activates FUCA1 and that p53 modulates fucosidase activity via FUCA1 up-regulation. Importantly, we also report that chemotherapeutic drugs induce FUCA1 and fucosidase activity in a p53-dependent manner. In this context, while we found that over-expression of FUCA1 does not induce cell death, RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous FUCA1 significantly attenuates p53-dependent, chemotherapy-induced apoptotic death. In summary, these findings add an additional component to p53s tumor suppressive response and highlight another mechanism by which the tumor suppressor controls programmed cell death that could potentially be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:27315169

  7. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  8. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  9. Inhibition of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells by overexpression of p300.

    PubMed

    Miller, K A; Chung, J; Lo, D; Jones, J C; Thimmapaya, B; Weitzman, S A

    2000-03-17

    The transcriptional coactivator p300 is essential for normal embryonic development and cellular differentiation. We have been studying the role of p300 in the transcription of a variety of genes, and we became interested in the role of this coactivator in the transcription of genes important in breast epithelial cell biology. From MCF-10A cells (spontaneously immortalized, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells), we developed cell lines that stably overexpress p300. These p300-overexpressing cells displayed reduced adhesion to culture dishes and were found to secrete an extracellular matrix deficient in laminin-5. Laminin-5 is the major extracellular matrix component produced by breast epithelium. Immunofluorescence studies, as well as experiments using normal matrix, confirmed that the decreased adhesion of p300-overexpressing cells is due to laminin-5-deficient extracellular matrix and not due to loss of laminin-5 receptors. Northern blots revealed markedly decreased levels of expression of two of the genes (designated LAMA3 and LAMC2) encoding the alpha3 and gamma2 chains of the laminin-5 heterotrimer in the cells that overexpress p300, whereas LAMB3 mRNA, encoding the third or beta3 chain of laminin-5, was not markedly reduced. Transient transfection experiments with a vector containing a murine LAMA3 promoter demonstrate that overexpressing p300 down-regulates the LAMA3 promoter. In summary, overexpression of p300 leads to down-regulation of laminin-5 production in breast epithelial cells, resulting in decreased adhesion. PMID:10713141

  10. Hypermutator Salmonella Heidelberg induces an early cell death in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Zenbaa, Neila; Bouchard, Damien; Lavault, Marie-Thérèse; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bousarghin, Latifa

    2015-10-22

    We have previously described that a strain of Salmonella Heidelberg with a hypermutator phenotype, B182, adhered strongly to HeLa cells. In this work, we showed that this hypermutator Salmonella strain invaded HeLa epithelial cells and induced cytoskeleton alteration. Those changes lead to HeLa cell death which was characteristic of apoptosis. For the first time, we showed that this hypermutator strain induced apoptosis associated with the activation of caspases 2, 9 and 3. Complementation of B182 strain showed a decrease in cells death induction. In the presence of other Salmonella Heidelberg with a normomutator phenotype, such as WT and SL486, cell death and caspase 3 were undetectable. These results suggested that early apoptosis and caspase 3 activation were specific to B182. Besides, B182 induced LDH release and caspase 3 activation in CaCo-2 and HCT116 cells. Heat-treated B182 and diffusible products failed to induce this phenotype. Epithelial cells treatment with cytochalasin D caused the inhibition of B182 internalisation and caspase 3 activation. These results showed that this cell death required active S. Heidelberg B182 protein synthesis and bacterial internalisation. However sipB and sopB, usually involved in apoptosis induced by Salmonella were not overexpressed in B182, contrary to fimA and fliC. Comparative genome analysis showed numerous mutations as in rpoS which would be more investigated. The role of the hypermutator phenotype might be suspected to be implicated in these specific features. This result expands our knowledge about strong mutators frequently found in bacterial organisms isolated from clinical specimens.

  11. Cell Death and DAMPs in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Billiar, Timothy R; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    Cell death and inflammation are key pathologic responses of acute pancreatitis (AP), the leading cause of hospital admissions for gastrointestinal disorders. It is becoming increasingly clear that damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of AP by linking local tissue damage to systemic inflammation syndrome. Endogenous DAMPs released from dead, dying or injured cells initiate and extend sterile inflammation via specific pattern recognition receptors. Inhibition of the release and activity of DAMPs (for example, high mobility group box 1, DNA, histones and adenosine triphosphate) provides significant protection against experimental AP. Moreover, increased serum levels of DAMPs in patients with AP correlate with disease severity. These findings provide novel insight into the mechanism, diagnosis and management of AP. DAMPs might be an attractive therapeutic target in AP. PMID:25105302

  12. Bcl-xL overexpression attenuates glutathione depletion in FL5.12 cells following interleukin-3 withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Bojes, H K; Datta, K; Xu, J; Chin, A; Simonian, P; Nuñez, G; Kehrer, J P

    1997-01-01

    Bcl-xL and bax are bcl-2-related genes whose protein products either inhibit or promote apoptosis. Oxidative damage, including the loss of glutathione, has been implicated in the induction of apoptosis. The ability of the Bcl proteins to affect GSH was assessed in control, bax- and bcl-xL-transfected FL5.12 cells [an interleukin (IL)-3-dependent murine prolymphocytic cell line]. Overall levels of GSH were approximately the same in control and bcl-xL transfectants during the 6 h incubation period, although levels increased in bcl-xL transfectants 24 h after replating. GSH in cells overexpressing bax was reduced by approximately 36%. There were no consistent differences between these cell lines in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase or glutathione reductase. Following IL-3 withdrawal, a condition known to cause apoptosis in these cells, a rapid loss of intracellular GSH occurred in control and bax transfectants, which preceded the onset of apoptosis. GSH depletion could not be attributed to intracellular oxidation but rather seemed to occur due to a translocation out of the cell. Cells overexpressing bcl-xL did not lose significant amounts of GSH upon withdrawal of IL-3, and no apoptosis was evident. These results suggest a possible role for GSH in the mechanism by which bcl-xL prevents cell death. PMID:9230108

  13. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N.; Neto, Marinaldo P.C.; Sousa, Lucas O.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  14. SrrAB Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Cell Death through Regulation of cidABC Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Windham, Ian H.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Thomas, Vinai C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The death and lysis of a subpopulation in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm cells are thought to benefit the surviving population by releasing extracellular DNA, a critical component of the biofilm extracellular matrix. Although the means by which S. aureus controls cell death and lysis is not understood, studies implicate the role of the cidABC and lrgAB operons in this process. Recently, disruption of the srrAB regulatory locus was found to cause increased cell death during biofilm development, likely as a result of the sensitivity of this mutant to hypoxic growth. In the current study, we extended these findings by demonstrating that cell death in the ΔsrrAB mutant is dependent on expression of the cidABC operon. The effect of cidABC expression resulted in the generation of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and was independent of acetate production. Interestingly, consistently with previous studies, cidC-encoded pyruvate oxidase was found to be important for the generation of acetic acid, which initiates the cell death process. However, these studies also revealed for the first time an important role of the cidB gene in cell death, as disruption of cidB in the ΔsrrAB mutant background decreased ROS generation and cell death in a cidC-independent manner. The cidB mutation also caused decreased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, which suggests a complex role for this system in ROS metabolism. Overall, the results of this study provide further insight into the function of the cidABC operon in cell death and reveal its contribution to the oxidative stress response. IMPORTANCE The manuscript focuses on cell death mechanisms in Staphylococcus aureus and provides important new insights into the genes involved in this ill-defined process. By exploring the cause of increased stationary-phase death in an S. aureus ΔsrrAB regulatory mutant, we found that the decreased viability of this mutant was a consequence of the overexpression of the cid

  15. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  16. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  17. Protection of islet cells from inflammatory cell death in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, V; Kolb, H

    1993-01-01

    Islet cells cocultured with activated macrophages are lysed within 15 h in vitro. We showed previously that nitric oxide generated by macrophages is a major mediator of islet cell death. We have now probed several pathways to interfere with the chain of events leading to islet cell death. Scavenging of extracellular oxygen radicals by superoxide dismutase and catalase did not improve islet cell survival. Scavenging of extra- and intracellular oxygen radicals by two potent substances, citiolone and dimethyl-thiourea, also did not reduce islet cell lysis, while a lipid-soluble scavenger, probucol, provided partial protection. These findings argue against a synergistic action of nitric oxide and oxygen radicals in islet cell toxicity. The inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase by 3-aminobenzamide significantly improved islet cell survival. Selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, such as indomethacin or acetylsalicylic acid, did not improve islet cell survival. Full protection was seen in the presence of NDGA, an inhibitor of lipoxygenase, and partial suppression was caused by BW755c, an inhibitor of both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase. We conclude that inflammatory islet cell death caused by activated macrophages involves the activation of arachidonic acid metabolism and of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, but that scavenging of oxygen free radicals provides little protection from lysis. PMID:8348756

  18. Implication of different domains of the Leishmania major metacaspase in cell death and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, M; Gonzalez, I J; Sprissler, C; Zalila, H; Dacher, M; Basmaciyan, L; Späth, G F; Azas, N; Fasel, N

    2015-01-01

    Metacaspases (MCAs) are cysteine peptidases expressed in plants, fungi and protozoa, with a caspase-like histidine–cysteine catalytic dyad, but differing from caspases, for example, in their substrate specificity. The role of MCAs is subject to debate: roles in cell cycle control, in cell death or even in cell survival have been suggested. In this study, using a Leishmania major MCA-deficient strain, we showed that L. major MCA (LmjMCA) not only had a role similar to caspases in cell death but also in autophagy and this through different domains. Upon cell death induction by miltefosine or H2O2, LmjMCA is processed, releasing the catalytic domain, which activated substrates via its catalytic dyad His/Cys and a proline-rich C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain interacted with proteins, notably proteins involved in stress regulation, such as the MAP kinase LmaMPK7 or programmed cell death like the calpain-like cysteine peptidase. We also showed a new role of LmjMCA in autophagy, acting on or upstream of ATG8, involving Lmjmca gene overexpression and interaction of the C-terminal domain of LmjMCA with itself and other proteins. These results allowed us to propose two models, showing the role of LmjMCA in the cell death and also in the autophagy pathway, implicating different protein domains. PMID:26492367

  19. Engineered hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing controlled-release insulin reverse hyperglycemia in mice with type L diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunling; Liu, Feilin; Li, Pengdong; Zhao, Guifang; Lan, Shaowei; Jiang, Wenyue; Meng, Xiangwei; Tian, Lixing; Li, Gang; Li, Yulin; Liu, Jin Yu

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered stem cells that overexpress genes encoding therapeutic products can be exploited to correct metabolic disorders by repairing and regenerating diseased organs or restoring their function. Hair follicles are readily accessible and serve as a rich source of autologous stem cells for cell-based gene therapy. Here we isolated mesenchymal stem cells from human hair follicles (HF-MSCs) and engineered them to overexpress the human insulin gene and release human insulin in a time- and dose-dependent manner in response to rapamycin. The engineered HF-MSCs retained their characteristic cell surface markers and retained their potential to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. When mice with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes were engrafted with these engineered HF-MSCs, these cells expressed and released a dose of human insulin, dramatically reversed hyperglycemia, and significantly reduced death rate. Moreover, the engineered HF-MSCs did not form detectable tumors throughout the 120-day animal tests in our experiment. Our results show that HF-MSCs can be used to safely and efficiently express therapeutic transgenes and therefore show promise for cell-based gene therapy of human disease.

  20. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  1. Sulfur dioxide induced programmed cell death in Vicia guard cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Huilan; Yin, Jingjing; Liu, Xin; Jing, Xiuqing; Fan, Sanhong; Zhang, Hufang

    2012-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) induced nuclear condensation and nuclear fragmentation and rapid loss of guard cell viability in detached epidermis of Vicia leaves at concentrations of 1 mM and higher (3 h exposure). Caspase inhibitors Z-Asp-CH(2)-DCB (0.1 mM) and TLCK (0.1 mM) markedly suppressed SO(2)-induced cell death. The typical nuclear morphological changes and the inhibition effects of caspase inhibitors suggest the activation of a programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. SO(2)-induced cell death can be blocked by either antioxidants (0.1 mM AsA or 200 U/mL CAT) or Ca(2+) antagonists (0.1mM EGTA or LaCl(3)). AsA and CAT also blocked SO(2)-induced ROS production and [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase. However, EGTA and LaCl(3) can inhibit SO(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase, but cannot suppress SO(2)-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that high concentrations of SO(2) induce guard cell death via a PCD pathway through ROS mediating [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation, which causes harmful effects to plants.

  2. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E; El-Sayed, Mesbah A; Shoaib, Mahmoud B; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  3. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M.; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H.; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E.; El-Sayed, Mesbah A.; Shoaib, Mahmoud B.; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  4. Xylem cell death: emerging understanding of regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Bollhöner, Benjamin; Prestele, Jakob; Tuominen, Hannele

    2012-02-01

    Evolutionary, as well as genetic, evidence suggests that vascular development evolved originally as a cell death programme that allowed enhanced movement of water in the extinct protracheophytes, and that secondary wall formation in the water-conducting cells evolved afterwards, providing mechanical support for effective long-distance transport of water. The extant vascular plants possess a common regulatory network to coordinate the different phases of xylem maturation, including secondary wall formation, cell death, and finally autolysis of the cell contents, by the action of recently identified NAC domain transcription factors. Consequently, xylem cell death is an inseparable part of the xylem maturation programme, making it difficult to uncouple cell death mechanistically from secondary wall formation, and thus identify the key factors specifically involved in regulation of cell death. Current knowledge suggests that the necessary components for xylem cell death are produced early during xylem differentiation, and cell death is prevented through the action of inhibitors and storage of hydrolytic enzymes in inactive forms in compartments such as the vacuole. Bursting of the central vacuole triggers autolytic hydrolysis of the cell contents, which ultimately leads to cell death. This cascade of events varies between the different xylem cell types. The water-transporting tracheary elements rely on a rapid cell death programme, with hydrolysis of cell contents taking place for the most part, if not entirely, after vacuolar bursting, while the xylem fibres disintegrate cellular contents at a slower pace, well before cell death. This review includes a detailed description of cell morphology, function of plant growth regulators, such as ethylene and thermospermine, and the action of hydrolytic nucleases and proteases during cell death of the different xylem cell types.

  5. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  6. Translational and posttranslational regulation of XIAP by eIF2α and ATF4 promotes ER stress–induced cell death during the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Messah, Carissa; Han, Jaeseok; LaVail, Matthew M.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lin, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein misfolding activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to help cells cope with ER stress. If ER homeostasis is not restored, UPR promotes cell death. The mechanisms of UPR-mediated cell death are poorly understood. The PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR is implicated in ER stress–induced cell death, in part through up-regulation of proapoptotic CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Chop−/− cells are partially resistant to ER stress–induced cell death, and CHOP overexpression alone does not induce cell death. These findings suggest that additional mechanisms regulate cell death downstream of PERK. Here we find dramatic suppression of antiapoptosis XIAP proteins in response to chronic ER stress. We find that PERK down-regulates XIAP synthesis through eIF2α and promotes XIAP degradation through ATF4. Of interest, PERK's down-regulation of XIAP occurs independently of CHOP activity. Loss of XIAP leads to increased cell death, whereas XIAP overexpression significantly enhances resistance to ER stress–induced cell death, even in the absence of CHOP. Our findings define a novel signaling circuit between PERK and XIAP that operates in parallel with PERK to CHOP induction to influence cell survival during ER stress. We propose a “two-hit” model of ER stress–induced cell death involving concomitant CHOP up-regulation and XIAP down-regulation both induced by PERK. PMID:24623724

  7. Translational and posttranslational regulation of XIAP by eIF2α and ATF4 promotes ER stress-induced cell death during the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Messah, Carissa; Han, Jaeseok; LaVail, Matthew M; Kaufman, Randal J; Lin, Jonathan H

    2014-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein misfolding activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to help cells cope with ER stress. If ER homeostasis is not restored, UPR promotes cell death. The mechanisms of UPR-mediated cell death are poorly understood. The PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) arm of the UPR is implicated in ER stress-induced cell death, in part through up-regulation of proapoptotic CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Chop((-)/(-)) cells are partially resistant to ER stress-induced cell death, and CHOP overexpression alone does not induce cell death. These findings suggest that additional mechanisms regulate cell death downstream of PERK. Here we find dramatic suppression of antiapoptosis XIAP proteins in response to chronic ER stress. We find that PERK down-regulates XIAP synthesis through eIF2α and promotes XIAP degradation through ATF4. Of interest, PERK's down-regulation of XIAP occurs independently of CHOP activity. Loss of XIAP leads to increased cell death, whereas XIAP overexpression significantly enhances resistance to ER stress-induced cell death, even in the absence of CHOP. Our findings define a novel signaling circuit between PERK and XIAP that operates in parallel with PERK to CHOP induction to influence cell survival during ER stress. We propose a "two-hit" model of ER stress-induced cell death involving concomitant CHOP up-regulation and XIAP down-regulation both induced by PERK.

  8. Profilin potentiates chemotherapeutic agents mediated cell death via suppression of NF-κB and upregulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Raviprakash, Nune; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Gupta, Pankaj; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism by which Profilin acts as a tumor suppressor is still unclear. Several chemotherapeutic agents, used till date either have unfavorable side effects or acquired resistance in tumor cells. Our findings show that Profilin enhances cell death mediated by several chemotherapeutic-agents. The activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes, mediated by paclitaxel and vinblastine, was completely inhibited in Profilin overexpressing cells. This inhibition was due to the Profilin mediated attenuation of IκBα degradation, thereby preventing p65 nuclear translocation and low NF-κB DNA binding activity.Moreover, Profilin increases level of p53 in the presence of known inducers, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and benzofuran. This increased p53 level leads to enhanced cell death as indicated by activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, which results in cleavage of PARP.Furthermore, knocking down of p53 in Profilin overexpressing cells leads to decreased cell death. Ectopic expression of Profilin in HCT116 p53 knock out cells showed lesser cell death as compared to the HCT116 p53 wild type cells. For the first time, we provide evidences, which suggest that Profilin synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs to induce tumor cell death by regulating NF-κB and p53. Thus, modulation of Profilin may be a useful strategy for effective combination therapy. PMID:26842845

  9. Pyroptotic cell death defends against intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Ine; Miao, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inflammatory caspases play a central role in innate immunity by responding to cytosolic signals and initiating a twofold response. First, caspase-1 induces the activation and secretion of the two prominent pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Second, either caspase-1 or caspase-11 can trigger a form of lytic, programmed cell death called pyroptosis. Pyroptosis operates to remove the replication niche of intracellular pathogens, making them susceptible to phagocytosis and killing by a secondary phagocyte. However, aberrant, systemic activation of pyroptosis in vivo may contribute to sepsis. Emphasizing the efficiency of inflammasome detection of microbial infections, many pathogens have evolved to avoid or subvert pyroptosis. This review focuses on molecular and morphological characteristics of pyroptosis and the individual inflammasomes and their contribution to defense against infection in mice and humans. PMID:25879289

  10. Caspases Connect Cell-Death Signaling to Organismal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; López-Soto, Alejandro; Kumar, Sharad; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-02-16

    Some forms of regulated cell death, such as apoptosis, are precipitated by the activation of cysteine proteases of the caspase family, including caspase 8, 9, and 3. Other caspases, such as caspase 1 and 4, are well known for their pro-inflammatory functions but regulate cell death in a limited number of pathophysiological settings. Accumulating evidence suggests that the most conserved function of mammalian caspases is not to control cell death sensu stricto, but to regulate inflammatory and immune reactions to dying cells and infectious challenges. Here, we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms though which mammalian caspases connect cell-death signaling to the maintenance of organismal homeostasis.

  11. Cell death by autophagy: facts and apparent artefacts

    PubMed Central

    Denton, D; Nicolson, S; Kumar, S

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy (the process of self-digestion by a cell through the action of enzymes originating within the lysosome of the same cell) is a catabolic process that is generally used by the cell as a mechanism for quality control and survival under nutrient stress conditions. As autophagy is often induced under conditions of stress that could also lead to cell death, there has been a propagation of the idea that autophagy can act as a cell death mechanism. Although there is growing evidence of cell death by autophagy, this type of cell death, often called autophagic cell death, remains poorly defined and somewhat controversial. Merely the presence of autophagic markers in a cell undergoing death does not necessarily equate to autophagic cell death. Nevertheless, studies involving genetic manipulation of autophagy in physiological settings provide evidence for a direct role of autophagy in specific scenarios. This article endeavours to summarise these physiological studies where autophagy has a clear role in mediating the death process and discusses the potential significance of cell death by autophagy. PMID:22052193

  12. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates a HER2-Associated Lipogenic Phenotype, Induces Apoptosis, and Increases Trastuzumab Action in HER2-Overexpressing Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ravacci, Graziela Rosa; Brentani, Maria Mitzi; Tortelli, Tharcisio Citrângulo; Torrinhas, Raquel Suzana M. M.; Santos, Jéssica Reis; Logullo, Angela Flávia; Waitzberg, Dan Linetzky

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, lipid metabolic alterations have been recognized as potential oncogenic stimuli that may promote malignancy. To investigate whether the oncogenic nature of lipogenesis closely depends on the overexpression of HER2 protooncogene, the normal breast cell line, HB4a, was transfected with HER2 cDNA to obtain HER2-overexpressing HB4aC5.2 cells. Both cell lines were treated with trastuzumab and docosahexaenoic acid. HER2 overexpression was accompanied by an increase in the expression of lipogenic genes involved in uptake (CD36), transport (FABP4), and storage (DGAT) of exogenous fatty acids (FA), as well as increased activation of “de novo” FA synthesis (FASN). We further investigate whether this lipogenesis reprogramming might be regulated by mTOR/PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway markers, p70S6 K1, SREBP1, and LIPIN1, as well as an increase in DEPTOR expression (the main inhibitor of the mTOR) was detected in HB4aC5.2. Based on these results, a PPARγ selective antagonist, GW9662, was used to treat both cells lines, and the lipogenic genes remained overexpressed in the HB4aC5.2 but not HB4a cells. DHA treatment inhibited all lipogenic genes (except for FABP4) in both cell lines yet only induced death in the HB4aC5.2 cells, mainly when associated with trastuzumab. Neither trastuzumab nor GW9662 alone was able to induce cell death. In conclusion, oncogenic transformation of breast cells by HER2 overexpression may require a reprogramming of lipogenic genetic that is independent of mTORC1 pathway and PPARγ activity. This reprogramming was inhibited by DHA. PMID:26640797

  13. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Stroke and cardiac cell death: Two peas in a pod.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-03-01

    A close pathological link between stroke brain and heart failure may exist. Here, we discuss relevant laboratory and clinical reports demonstrating neural and cardiac myocyte cell death following ischemic stroke. Although various overlapping risk factors exist between cerebrovascular incidents and cardiac incidents, stroke therapy has largely neglected the cardiac pathological consequences. Recent preclinical stroke studies have implicated an indirect cell death pathway, involving toxic molecules, that originates from the stroke brain and produces cardiac cell death. In concert, previous laboratory reports have revealed a reverse cell death cascade, in that cardiac arrest leads to ischemic cell death in the brain. A deeper understanding of the crosstalk of cell death pathways between stroke and cardiac failure will facilitate the development of novel treatments designed to arrest the global pathology of both diseases thereby improving the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with stroke and heart failure.

  15. RB mutation and RAS overexpression induce resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier; Golán-Cancela, Irene; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Costoya, Jose A; de la Cruz, Verónica Pérez; Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Several theories aim to explain the malignant transformation of cells, including the mutation of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Deletion of Rb (a tumor suppressor), overexpression of mutated Ras (a proto-oncogene), or both, are sufficient for in vitro gliomagenesis, and these genetic traits are associated with their proliferative capacity. An emerging hallmark of cancer is the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system. Whether specific mutations are related with this, remains to be analyzed. To address this issue, three transformed glioma cell lines were obtained (Rb(-/-), Ras(V12), and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12)) by in vitro retroviral transformation of astrocytes, as previously reported. In addition, Ras(V12) and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12) transformed cells were injected into SCID mice and after tumor growth two stable glioma cell lines were derived. All these cells were characterized in terms of Rb and Ras gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity, expression of MHC I, Rae1δ, and Rae1αβγδε, mult1, H60a, H60b, H60c, as ligands for NK cell receptors, and their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results show that transformation of astrocytes (Rb loss, Ras overexpression, or both) induced phenotypical and functional changes associated with resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, the transfer of cell lines of transformed astrocytes into SCID mice increased resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, thus suggesting that specific changes in a tumor suppressor (Rb) and a proto-oncogene (Ras) are enough to confer resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells and therefore provide some insight into the ability of tumor cells to evade immune responses.

  16. Her-2 overexpression increases the metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Herring, Jeanne M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Weil, Robert J; Stark, Andreas M; Kurek, Raffael; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Halverson, Douglas; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Steinberg, Seth M; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2007-05-01

    Retrospective studies of breast cancer patients suggest that primary tumor Her-2 overexpression or trastuzumab therapy is associated with a devastating complication: the development of central nervous system (brain) metastases. Herein, we present Her-2 expression trends from resected human brain metastases and data from an experimental brain metastasis assay, both indicative of a functional contribution of Her-2 to brain metastatic colonization. Of 124 archival resected brain metastases from breast cancer patients, 36.2% overexpressed Her-2, indicating an enrichment in the frequency of tumor Her-2 overexpression at this metastatic site. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser capture microdissected epithelial cells, Her-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in a cohort of 12 frozen brain metastases were increased up to 5- and 9-fold, respectively, over those of Her-2-amplified primary tumors. Co-overexpression of Her-2 and EGFR was also observed in a subset of brain metastases. We then tested the hypothesis that overexpression of Her-2 increases the colonization of breast cancer cells in the brain in vivo. A subclone of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells that selectively metastasizes to brain (231-BR) overexpressed EGFR; 231-BR cells were transfected with low (4- to 8-fold) or high (22- to 28-fold) levels of Her-2. In vivo, in a model of brain metastasis, low or high Her-2-overexpressing 231-BR clones produced comparable numbers of micrometastases in the brain as control transfectants; however, the Her-2 transfectants yielded 3-fold greater large metastases (>50 microm(2); P < 0.001). Our data indicate that Her-2 overexpression increases the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in the brain in this model system. PMID:17483330

  17. Overexpression of c-myc induces epithelial mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung Bin; Cho, Min Kyong; Lee, Won Young; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-07-28

    The c-myc gene is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer and its target genes are involved in tumorigenesis. Epithelial mesenchymal transitions (EMT), where cells undergo a developmental switch from a polarized epithelial phenotype to a highly motile mesenchymal phenotype, are associated with invasion and motility of cancer cells. Basal E-cadherin expression was down-regulated in c-myc overexpressing MCF10A (c-myc-MCF10A) cells compared to GFP-overexpressing MCF10A (GFP-MCF10A) cells, while N-cadherin was distinctly increased in c-myc-MCF10A cells. Given that glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and the snail axis have key roles in E-cadherin deregulation during EMT, we investigated the role of GSK-3beta/snail signaling pathways in the induction of EMT by c-myc overexpression. In contrast to GFP-MCF10A cells, both the transcriptional activity and the ubiquitination-dependent protein stability of snail were enhanced in c-myc-MCF10A cells, and this was reversed by GSK-3beta overexpression. We also found that c-myc overexpression inhibits GSK-3beta activity through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of ERK by dominant negative mutant transfection or chemical inhibitor significantly suppressed snail gene transcription. These results suggest that c-myc overexpression during transformation of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) is involved in EMTs via ERK-dependent GSK-3beta inactivation and subsequent snail activation.

  18. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. NAC1, a POZ/BTB protein present in the adult mammalian brain, triggers apoptosis after adenovirus-mediated overexpression in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Korutla, Laxminarayana; Neustadter, Jason H; Fournier, Keith M; Mackler, Scott A

    2003-05-01

    POZ/BTB proteins influence cellular development and in some examples act as oncoproteins. However, several POZ/BTB transcription factors have been found in terminally differentiated neurons, where their functions remain unknown. One example is NAC1, a constitutively-expressed protein that can regulate behaviors associated with cocaine use. The present study represents an initial attempt to understand the actions of NAC1 within neurons by using adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell survival in PC-12 cells overexpressing NAC1 was greatly reduced compared with cells infected by a control Ad-GFP. The morphological appearance of the dying cells was consistent with programmed cell death. Fragmentation of genomic DNA occurred in PC-12 cells infected with adenoviruses encoding NAC1 but not control viruses. NAC1 over expression was followed by the down regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-2-xl. Concurrently, levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 increased following NAC1 overexpression. These observations suggest that NAC1expression in PC-12 cells induces apoptosis by altering the expression of these upstream mediators of the execution phase of programmed cell death. These findings raise the possibility that aberrantly regulated NAC1 expression in the mammalian brain may contribute to programmed cell death.

  20. The copper chelator ATN-224 induces peroxynitrite-dependent cell death in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kristy; Briehl, Margaret M; Mazar, Andrew P; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Reboucas, Julio S; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty; Rimsza, Lisa M; Tome, Margaret E

    2013-07-01

    Chemoresistance due to oxidative stress resistance or upregulation of Bcl-2 contributes to poor outcome in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In this study, we utilize the copper-chelator drug ATN-224 (choline tetrathiomolybdate) to induce cell death in oxidative stress-resistant cells and cells overexpressing Bcl-2 by modulating the cellular redox environment and causing mitochondrial dysfunction. ATN-224 treatment decreases superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) activity, increases intracellular oxidants, and induces peroxynitrite-dependent cell death. ATN-224 also targets the mitochondria, decreasing both cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. The concentration of ATN-224 required to induce cell death is proportional to SOD1 levels, but independent of Bcl-2 status. In combination with doxorubicin, ATN-224 enhances cell death. In primary B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient samples, ATN-224 decreases the viable cell number. Our findings suggest that ATN-224's dual targeting of SOD1 and CcOX is a promising approach for treatment of hematological malignancies either as an adjuvant or as a single agent.

  1. Singlet Oxygen-Induced Membrane Disruption and Serpin-Protease Balance in Vacuolar-Driven Cell Death1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carmieli, Raanan; Mor, Avishai; Fluhr, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Singlet oxygen plays a role in cellular stress either by providing direct toxicity or through signaling to initiate death programs. It was therefore of interest to examine cell death, as occurs in Arabidopsis, due to differentially localized singlet oxygen photosensitizers. The photosensitizers rose bengal (RB) and acridine orange (AO) were localized to the plasmalemma and vacuole, respectively. Their photoactivation led to cell death as measured by ion leakage. Cell death could be inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine in treatments with AO but not with RB. In the case of AO treatment, the vacuolar membrane was observed to disintegrate. Concomitantly, a complex was formed between a vacuolar cell-death protease, RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION-21 and its cognate cytoplasmic protease inhibitor ATSERPIN1. In the case of RB treatment, the tonoplast remained intact and no complex was formed. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 repressed cell death, only under AO photodynamic treatment. Interestingly, acute water stress showed accumulation of singlet oxygen as determined by fluorescence of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green, by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the induction of singlet oxygen marker genes. Cell death by acute water stress was inhibited by the singlet oxygen scavenger histidine and was accompanied by vacuolar collapse and the appearance of serpin-protease complex. Over-expression of AtSerpin1 also attenuated cell death under this mode of cell stress. Thus, acute water stress damage shows parallels to vacuole-mediated cell death where the generation of singlet oxygen may play a role. PMID:26884487

  2. Neurodegeneration in Lurcher mice occurs via multiple cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Doughty, M L; De Jager, P L; Korsmeyer, S J; Heintz, N

    2000-05-15

    Lurcher (Lc) is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor (GRID2) that results in the cell-autonomous death of cerebellar Purkinje cells in heterozygous lurcher (+/Lc) mice. This in turn triggers the massive loss of afferent granule cells during the first few postnatal weeks. Evidence suggests that the death of Purkinje cells as a direct consequence of GRID2(Lc) activation and the secondary death of granule cells because of target deprivation occur by apoptosis. We have used mice carrying null mutations of both the Bax and p53 genes to examine the roles of these genes in cell loss in lurcher animals. The absence of Bax delayed Purkinje cell death in response to the GRID2(Lc) mutation and permanently rescued the secondary death of granule cells. In contrast, the p53 deletion had no effect on either cell death pathway. Our results demonstrate that target deprivation induces a Bax-dependent, p53-independent cell death response in cerebellar granule cells in vivo. In contrast, Bax plays a minor role in GRID2(Lc)-mediated Purkinje cell death.

  3. Light regulation of cadmium-induced cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J; Wang, Yun; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant with deleterious effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the effects of cadmium toxicity are concentration dependent; lower doses destabilize many physiological processes and inhibit cell growth and multiplication, while higher doses evoke a more severe response that triggers activation of cell death. We recently investigated the effects of light on cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis using a cell suspension culture system. Although not affecting the inhibitory effects on cell multiplication, we found that light is a powerful regulator of Cd-induced cell death. A very specific proteomic response, which was clearly controlled by light, preceded cell death. Here we discuss the implications of these findings and highlight similarities between the regulation of cell death triggered by Cd and fumonisin B1. We consider how both compounds could be useful tools in dissecting plant cell death signaling. PMID:24398567

  4. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  5. Decisive role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/Ref-1 in initiation of cell death.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung Joo; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2010-11-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor-1 (APE/Ref-1) is involved in the base excision repair of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites induced by oxidative DNA damage. APE/Ref-1 was decreased by kainic acid (KA) injury in a time-dependent manner at the level of proteins, not transcripts. We investigated whether alteration of APE/Ref-1 amounts would influence hippocampal cell fate, survival or death, after KA injury. Overexpression of APE/Ref-1 using adenovirus and restoration of APE small peptides significantly reduced KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Both silencing of APE/Ref-1 by siRNA and inhibition of endonuclease by an antibody significantly increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic cell death triggered from the early time after exposure to KA. These findings suggest that cell death is initiated by reducing APE/Ref-1 protein and inhibiting its repair function in spite of enough protein amounts. In conclusion, APE/Ref-1 may be a regulator of cell death initiation, and APE small peptides could provide molecular mechanism-based therapies for neuroprotection in progressive excitotoxic neuronal damage.

  6. Arabidopsis ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 Modulates Programmed Cell DeathW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nan; Greenberg, Jean T.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast protein ACCELERATED CELL DEATH2 (ACD2) modulates the amount of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by Pseudomonas syringae and protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) treatment. In vitro, ACD2 can reduce red chlorophyll catabolite, a chlorophyll derivative. We find that ACD2 shields root protoplasts that lack chlorophyll from light- and PPIX-induced PCD. Thus, chlorophyll catabolism is not obligatory for ACD2 anti-PCD function. Upon P. syringae infection, ACD2 levels and localization change in cells undergoing PCD and in their close neighbors. Thus, ACD2 shifts from being largely in chloroplasts to partitioning to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and, to a small extent, cytosol. ACD2 protects cells from PCD that requires the early mitochondrial oxidative burst. Later, the chloroplasts of dying cells generate NO, which only slightly affects cell viability. Finally, the mitochondria in dying cells have dramatically altered movements and cellular distribution. Overproduction of both ACD2 (localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts) and ascorbate peroxidase (localized to chloroplasts) greatly reduces P. syringae–induced PCD, suggesting a pro-PCD role for mitochondrial and chloroplast events. During infection, ACD2 may bind to and/or reduce PCD-inducing porphyrin-related molecules in mitochondria and possibly chloroplasts that generate reactive oxygen species, cause altered organelle behavior, and activate a cascade of PCD-inducing events. PMID:16387834

  7. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Sohei; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Taisei

    1995-12-31

    Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes {open_quote}programmed cell death{close_quote} or {open_quote}apoptosis{close_quote} - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage microarray analysis of H2O2-induced cell death have begun to unravel the complexity of the H2O2 network. This review also describes a novel link between H2O2 and sphingolipids, two signals that can interplay and regulate plant cell death. PMID:15631987

  9. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    PubMed Central

    OGURA, TAKEHARU; TANAKA, YOSHIYUKI; TAMAKI, HIROKI; HARADA, MAMORU

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemo-resistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  10. Death of mitochondria during programmed cell death of leaf mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Selga, Tūrs; Selga, Maija; Pāvila, Vineta

    2005-12-01

    The role of plant mitochondria in the programmed cell death (PCD) is widely discussed. However, spectrum and sequence of mitochondrial structural changes during different types of PCD in leaves are poorly described. Pea, cucumber and rye plants were grown under controlled growing conditions. A part of them were sprinkled with ethylene releaser to accelerate cell death. During yellowing the palisade parenchyma mitochondria were attracted to nuclear envelope. Mitochondrial matrix became electron translucent. Mitochondria entered vacuole by invagination of tonoplast and formed multivesicular bodies. Ethephon treatment increased the frequency of sticking of mitochondria to the nuclear envelope or chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Mitochondria divided by different mechanisms and became enclosed in Golgi and ER derived authopagic vacuoles or in the central vacuole. Several fold increase of the diameter of cristae became typical. In all cases mitochondria were attached to nuclear envelope. It can be considered as structural mechanism of promoting of PCD.

  11. α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a small protein that has special relevance for understanding Parkinson disease and related disorders. Not only is α-synuclein found in Lewy bodies characteristic of Parkinson disease, but also mutations in the gene for α-synuclein can cause an inherited form of Parkinson disease and expression of normal α-synuclein can increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease in sporadic, or non-familial, cases. Both sporadic and familial Parkinson disease are characterized by substantial loss of several groups of neurons, including the dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra that are the target of most current symptomatic therapies. Therefore, it is predicted that α-synuclein, especially in its mutant forms or under conditions where its expression levels are increased, is a toxic protein in the sense that it is associated with an increased rate of neuronal cell death. This review will discuss the experimental contexts in which α-synuclein has been demonstrated to be toxic. I will also outline what is known about the mechanisms by which α-synuclein triggers neuronal damage, and identify some of the current gaps in our knowledge about this subject. Finally, the therapeutic implications of toxicity of α-synuclein will be discussed. PMID:19193223

  12. [Overexpression of KIAA1456 inhibits the proliferation of HO8910PM cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaimei; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Yingfeng; Gao, Yanhong

    2016-09-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of over-expressed KIAA1456 on the proliferation and cell cycle of HO8910PM cells. Methods KIAA1456 was amplified by PCR and inserted into lentiviral expression vector Ubi-MCS-EGFP-IRES-puromycin to construct Ubi-KIAA1456-EGFP-puromycin (LV-KIAA1456) vector. Thereafter, the lentiviral particles were packaged and used to infect HO8910PM cells. The green fluorescence protein (GFP) expression was observed at 72 hours. The expression of KIAA1456 was examined by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. Cell growth was detected with CCK-8 assay and cell cycles were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting showed that HO8910PM cells infected with LV-KIAA1456 vector over-expressed KIAA1456 mRNA and protein. Cell proliferation was inhibited and G1 phase cells significantly increased in HO8910PM cells overexpressing KIAA1456. Conclusion Over-expression of KIAA1456 inhibits the proliferation of HO8910PM ovarian cancer cells and arrests the cell cycle in G1 phase. PMID:27609572

  13. Effects of resistin-like molecule β over-expression on gastric cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li-Duan; Yang, Chun-Lei; Qi, Teng; Qi, Meng; Tong, Ling; Tong, Qiang-Song

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) over-expression on the invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells. METHODS: Human RELMβ encoding expression vector was constructed and transfected into the RELMβ lowly-expressed gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45. Gene expression was measured by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR. Cell proliferation was measured by 2-(4,5-dimethyltriazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide colorimetry, colony formation and 5-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine incorporation assays. The in vitro migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells were measured by cell adhesion assay, scratch assay and matrigel invasion assay. The angiogenic capabilities of cancer cells were measured by tube formation of endothelial cells. RESULTS: Transfection of RELMβ vector into SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells resulted in over-expression of RELMβ, which did not influence the cellular proliferation. However, over-expression of RELMβ suppressed the in vitro adhesion, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, accompanied by decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Moreover, transfection of RELMβ attenuated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and in vitro angiogenic capabilities of cancer cells. CONCLUSION: Over-expression of RELMβ abolishes the invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells in vitro, suggesting its potentials as a novel therapeutic target for gastric cancer. PMID:22371635

  14. Geminin overexpression prevents the completion of topoisomerase IIα chromosome decatenation, leading to aneuploidy in human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The nuclear enzyme topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα) is able to cleave DNA in a reversible manner, making it a valuable target for agents such as etoposide that trap the enzyme in a covalent bond with the 5′ DNA end to which it cleaves. This prevents DNA religation and triggers cell death in cancer cells. However, development of resistance to these agents limits their therapeutic use. In this study, we examined the therapeutic targeting of geminin for improving the therapeutic potential of TopoIIα agents. Methods Human mammary epithelial (HME) cells and several breast cancer cell lines were used in this study. Geminin, TopoIIα and cell division cycle 7 (Cdc7) silencing were done using specific small interfering RNA. Transit or stable inducible overexpression of these proteins and casein kinase Iε (CKIε) were also used, as well as several pharmacological inhibitors that target TopoIIα, Cdc7 or CKIε. We manipulated HME cells that expressed H2B-GFP, or did not, to detect chromosome bridges. Immunoprecipitation and direct Western blot analysis were used to detect interactions between these proteins and their total expression, respectively, whereas interactions on chromosomal arms were detected using a trapped in agarose DNA immunostaining assay. TopoIIα phosphorylation by Cdc7 or CKIε was done using an in vitro kinase assay. The TopoGen decatenation kit was used to measure TopoIIα decatenation activity. Finally, a comet assay and metaphase chromosome spread were used to detect chromosome breakage and changes in chromosome condensation or numbers, respectively. Results We found that geminin and TopoIIα interact primarily in G2/M/early G1 cells on chromosomes, that geminin recruits TopoIIα to chromosomal decatenation sites or vice versa and that geminin silencing in HME cells triggers the formation of chromosome bridges by suppressing TopoIIα access to chromosomal arms. CKIε kinase phosphorylates and positively regulates TopoIIα chromosome

  15. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  16. Overexpression of Pax6 results in microphthalmia, retinal dysplasia and defective retinal ganglion cell axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Martine; Pratt, Thomas; Liu, Min; Jeffery, Glen; Price, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Pax6 is expressed by many cell types in the developing eye. Eyes do not form in homozygous loss-of-function mouse mutants (Pax6Sey/Sey) and are abnormally small in Pax6Sey/+ mutants. Eyes are also abnormally small in PAX77 mice expressing multiple copies of human PAX6 in addition to endogenous Pax6; protein sequences are identical in the two species. The developmental events that lead to microphthalmia in PAX77 mice are not well-characterised, so it is not clear whether over- and under-expression of Pax6/PAX6 cause microphthalmia through similar mechanisms. Here, we examined the consequences of over-expression for the eye and its axonal connections. Results Eyes form in PAX77+/+ embryos but subsequently degenerate. At E12.5, we found no abnormalities in ocular morphology, retinal cell cycle parameters and the incidence of retinal cell death. From E14.5 on, we observed malformations of the optic disc. From E16.5 into postnatal life there is progressively more severe retinal dysplasia and microphthalmia. Analyses of patterns of gene expression indicated that PAX77+/+ retinae produce a normal range of cell types, including retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). At E14.5 and E16.5, quantitative RT-PCR with probes for a range of molecules associated with retinal development showed only one significant change: a slight reduction in levels of mRNA encoding the secreted morphogen Shh at E16.5. At E16.5, tract-tracing with carbocyanine dyes in PAX77+/+ embryos revealed errors in intraretinal navigation by RGC axons, a decrease in the number of RGC axons reaching the thalamus and an increase in the proportion of ipsilateral projections among those RGC axons that do reach the thalamus. A survey of embryos with different Pax6/PAX6 gene dosage (Pax6Sey/+, Pax6+/+, PAX77+ and PAX77+/+) showed that (1) the total number of RGC axons projected by the retina and (2) the proportions that are sorted into the ipsilateral and contralateral optic tracts at the

  17. Modulation of programmed cell death by medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Thatte, U; Bagadey, S; Dahanukar, S

    2000-02-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis), a form of cell death, described by Kerr and Wyllie some 20 years ago, has generated considerable interest in recent years. The mechanisms by which this mode of cell death (seen both in animal and plant cells), takes place have been examined in detail. Extracellular signals and intracellular events have been elaborated. Of interest to the clinician, is the concentrated effort to study pharmacological modulation of programmed cell death. The attempt to influence the natural phenomenon of programmed cell death stems from the fact that it is reduced (like in cancer) or increased (like in neurodegenerative diseases) in several clinical situations. Thus, chemicals that can modify programmed cell death are likely to be potentially useful drugs. From foxglove, which gave digitalis to the Pacific Yew from which came taxol, plants have been a source of research material for useful drugs. Recently, a variety of plant extracts have been investigated for their ability to influence the apoptotic process. This article discusses some of the interesting data. The ability of plants to influence programmed cell death in cancerous cells in an attempt to arrest their proliferation has been the topic of much research. Various cell-lines like HL60, human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (KIM-1), a cholangiocarcinoma cell-line (KMC-1), B-cell hybridomas, U937 a monocytic cell-line, HeLa cells, human lymphoid leukemia (MOLT-4B) cells and K562 cells have been studied. The agents found to induce programmed cell death (measured either morphologically or flow cytometrically) included extracts of plants like mistletoe and Semicarpus anacardium. Isolated compounds like bryonolic acid (from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. Japonica, crocin (from saffron) and allicin (from Allium sativum) have also been found to induce programmed cell death and therefore arrest proliferation. Even Chinese herbal medicine "Sho-saiko-to" induces programmed cell death in selected

  18. Bacterial programmed cell death of cerebral endothelial cells involves dual death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bermpohl, Daniela; Halle, Annett; Freyer, Dorette; Dagand, Emilie; Braun, Johann S.; Bechmann, Ingo; Schröder, Nicolas W.J.; Weber, Joerg R.

    2005-01-01

    Major barriers separating the blood from tissue compartments in the body are composed of endothelial cells. Interaction of bacteria with such barriers defines the course of invasive infections, and meningitis has served as a model system to study endothelial cell injury. Here we report the impressive ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae, clinically one of the most important pathogens, to induce 2 morphologically distinct forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in brain-derived endothelial cells. Pneumococci and the major cytotoxins H202 and pneumolysin induce apoptosis-like PCD independent of TLR2 and TLR4. On the other hand, pneumococcal cell wall, a major proinflammatory component, causes caspase-driven classical apoptosis that is mediated through TLR2. These findings broaden the scope of bacterial-induced PCD, link these effects to innate immune TLRs, and provide insight into the acute and persistent phases of damage during meningitis. PMID:15902310

  19. Cell death programs in Yersinia immunity and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Naomi H.; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell death plays a central role in host-pathogen interactions, as it can eliminate the pathogen's replicative niche and provide pro-inflammatory signals necessary for an effective immune response; conversely, cell death can allow pathogens to eliminate immune cells and evade anti-microbial effector mechanisms. In response to developmental signals or cell-intrinsic stresses, the executioner caspases-3 and -7 mediate apoptotic cell death, which is generally viewed as immunologically silent or immunosuppressive. A proinflammatory form of cell death that requires caspase-1, termed pyroptosis, is activated in response to microbial products within the host cytosol or disruption of cellular membranes by microbial pathogens. Infection by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia has features of both apoptosis and pyroptosis. Cell death and caspase-1 processing in Yersinia-infected cells occur in response to inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling by the Yersinia virulence factor YopJ. However, the molecular basis of YopJ-induced cell death, and the role of different death pathways in anti-Yersinia immune responses remain enigmatic. Here, we discuss the role that cell death may play in inducing specific pro-inflammatory signals that shape innate and adaptive immune responses against Yersinia infection. PMID:23226685

  20. SOK1 translocates from the Golgi to the nucleus upon chemical anoxia and induces apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Emilio; Fidalgo, Miguel; Molnar, Arpad; Kyriakis, John; Force, Thomas; Zalvide, Juan; Pombo, Celia M

    2008-06-01

    SOK1 is a Ste20 protein kinase of the germinal center kinase (GCK) family that has been shown to be activated by oxidant stress and chemical anoxia, a cell culture model of ischemia. More recently, it has been shown to be localized to the Golgi apparatus, where it functions in a signaling pathway required for cell migration and polarization. Herein, we demonstrate that SOK1 regulates cell death after chemical anoxia, as its down-regulation by RNA interference enhances cell survival. Furthermore, expression of SOK1 elicits apoptotic cell death by activating the intrinsic pathway. We also find that a cleaved form of SOK1 translocates from the Golgi to the nucleus after chemical anoxia and that this translocation is dependent on both caspase activity and on amino acids 275-292, located immediately C-terminal to the SOK1 kinase domain. Furthermore, SOK1 entry into the nucleus is important for the cell death response since SOK1 mutants unable to enter the nucleus do not induce cell death. In summary, SOK1 is necessary to induce cell death and can induce death when overexpressed. Furthermore, SOK1 appears to play distinctly different roles in stressed versus non-stressed cells, regulating cell death in the former.

  1. Amplification and overexpression of aurora kinase A (AURKA) in immortalized human ovarian epithelial (HOSE) cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, C M; Man, C; Jin, Y; Jin, C; Guan, X Y; Wang, Q; Wan, T S K; Cheung, A L M; Tsao, S W

    2005-07-01

    Immortalization is an early and essential step of human carcinogenesis. Amplification of chromosome 20q has been shown to be a common event in immortalized cells and cancers. We have previously reported that gain and amplification of chromosome 20q is a non-random and common event in immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells. The chromosome 20q harbors genes including TGIF2 (20q11.2-q12), AIB1 (20q12), PTPN1 (20q13.1), ZNF217 (20q13.2), and AURKA (20q13.2-q13.3), which were previously reported to be amplified and overexpressed in ovarian cancers. Some of these genes may be involved in immortalization of HOSE cells and represent crucial premalignant changes in ovarian surface epithelium. Investigation of the involvement of these genes was examined in four pairs of pre-crisis (preimmortalized) and post-crisis (immortalized) HOSE cells. Overexpression of AURKA (Aurora kinase A), also known as BTAK and STK15, by both real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) and Western blotting was detected in all the four immortalized HOSE cells examined while overexpression of AIB1 and ZNF217 was observed in two of four immortalized HOSE cells examined. Overexpression of TGIF2 and PTPN1 was not significant in our immortalized HOSE cell systems. The degree of overexpression of AURKA was shown to be closely associated with the amplification of chromosome 20q in immortalized HOSE cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with labeled P1 artificial clone (PAC) confirmed the amplification of the chromosomal region (20q13.2-13.3) where AURKA resides. DNA amplification of AURKA was also confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. Our study showed that amplification and overexpression of AURKA is a common and significant event during immortalization of HOSE cells and may represent an important premalignant change in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  2. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  3. iTRAQ analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines suggests Drebrin (DBN1) is overexpressed during liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qifeng; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Khoo, Avery; Lim, Kiat Hon; Chung, Maxey C M

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third in cancer incidence worldwide and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. Mortality in colorectal cancer is often ascribed to liver metastasis. In an effort to elucidate the proteins involved in colorectal cancer liver metastasis, we compared the proteome profiles of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 with its metastatic derivative E1, using the iTRAQ labelling technology, coupled to 2D-LC and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. A total of 547 proteins were identified, of which 31 of them were differentially expressed in the E1 cell line. Among these proteins, the differential expressions of translationally controlled tumour protein 1, A-kinase anchor protein 12 and Drebrin (DBN1) were validated using Western blot. In particular, DBN1, a protein not previously known to be involved in colorectal cancer metastasis, was found to be overexpressed in E1 as compared to HCT-116 cells. The overexpression of DBN1 was further validated using immunohistochemistry on colorectal cancer tissue sections with matched lymph node and liver metastasis tissues. DBN1 is currently believed to be involved in actin cytoskeleton reorganisation and suppresses actin filament cross-linking and bundling. Since actin reorganisation is an important process for tumour cell migration and invasion, DBN1 may have an important role during colorectal cancer metastasis.

  4. Cetuximab enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent in ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Yifan; Huang, Lihua; Liu, Tao; Huang, Yue; Zhao, Jianming; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Ma, Shaolin; Huang, Liyan; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Gu, Yong; Fu, Liwu

    2015-12-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is closely associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer, which represents a formidable obstacle to the successful cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated that cetuximab, an EGFR monoclonal antibody, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Our results showed that cetuximab significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate agent in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cells but had no effect in their parental drug sensitive cells and ABCC1, ABCG2 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, cetuximab markedly increased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Cetuximab stimulated the ATPase activity but did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 or block phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Interestingly, cetuximab decreased the cell membrane fluidity which was known to decrease the function of ABCB1. Our findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of cetuximab and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer patients.

  5. Cetuximab enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent in ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Yue; Zhao, Jianming; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Ma, Shaolin; Huang, Liyan; Wah To, Kenneth Kin; Gu, Yong; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is closely associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer, which represents a formidable obstacle to the successful cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated that cetuximab, an EGFR monoclonal antibody, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Our results showed that cetuximab significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate agent in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cells but had no effect in their parental drug sensitive cells and ABCC1, ABCG2 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, cetuximab markedly increased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Cetuximab stimulated the ATPase activity but did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 or block phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Interestingly, cetuximab decreased the cell membrane fluidity which was known to decrease the function of ABCB1. Our findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of cetuximab and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer patients. PMID:26506420

  6. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma protect human mammary epithelial cells from Tam-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Girard, Brian J; Regan Anderson, Tarah M; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L; Ostrander, Julie H

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness.

  7. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma Protect Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Tam-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Brian J.; Regan Anderson, Tarah M.; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Ostrander, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  8. Overexpression of pairedless Pax6 in the retina disrupts corneal development and affects lens cell survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiha; Lauderdale, James D

    2008-01-01

    The Pax6 transcription factor is required for multiple aspects of vertebrate eye development. The Pax6 gene encodes isoforms that either contain (Pax6+PD) or lack (Pax6DeltaPD) the N-terminal paired-box DNA-binding domain, in addition to the homeodomain. Alternative promoters control the expression of Pax6+PD and Pax6DeltaPD in the eye. Using a modified bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgene that specifically expresses Pax6DeltaPD, but not paired-containing Pax6, in the normal endogenous pattern, we show that overexpression of Pax6DeltaPD causes a severe microphthalmic phenotype in both wild-type and Pax6-deficient (Sey(/+)) mice in a dosage-dependent manner. The microphthalmic phenotype is due to lens degeneration during embryonic development. Lens development initiates correctly, but cells in the lens undergo apoptotic cell death between E12 and E13. Concomitantly, in these mice, changes in Bmp4, Msx1, and Wnt2b expression were observed in the mesenchymal cells of the developing cornea. To visualize Pax6DeltaPD expression, we developed a dual-reporter Pax6 BAC transgene in which EGFP and DsRed demonstrate paired-containing and pairedless transcripts, respectively. In BAC transgenic mice, DsRed is predominantly expressed in the peripheral neural retina during early eye development, but not in the developing lens or cornea. Later DsRed is strongly expressed in the developing ciliary body, but not in the iris. We suggest that the ratio of Pax6+PD and Pax6DeltaPD isoforms in the distal retina is important for both cornea and lens development, either directly by controlling transcription of necessary growth factors or indirectly by controlling development of the distal neural retina.

  9. Cell death by necrosis, a regulated way to go.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Mauricio; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andrés; Quest, Andrew F G

    2008-05-01

    Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death with well-defined morphological traits that are often associated with activation of caspases. More recently evidence has become available demonstrating that upon caspase inhibition alternative programs of cell death are executed, including ones with features characteristic of necrosis. These findings have changed our view of necrosis as a passive and essentially accidental form of cell death to that of an active, regulated and controllable process. Also necrosis has now been observed in parallel with, rather than as an alternative pathway to, apoptosis. Thus, cell death responses are extremely flexible despite being programmed. In this review, some of the hallmarks of different programmed cell death modes have been highlighted before focusing the discussion on necrosis. Obligatory events associated with this form of cell death include uncompensated cell swelling and related changes at the plasma membrane. In this context, representatives of the transient receptor channel family and their regulation are discussed. Also mechanisms that lead to execution of the necrotic cell death program are highlighted. Emphasis is laid on summarizing our understanding of events that permit switching between cell death modes and how they connect to necrosis. Finally, potential implications for the treatment of some disease states are mentioned. PMID:18473819

  10. Actin as Deathly Switch? How Auxin Can Suppress Cell-Death Related Defence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers – a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death. PMID:25933033

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Chunyang; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Wuhua; Zhang, Wu; Ding, Songming; Wei, Bajin; Yu, Xiaobo; Su, Rong; Zheng, Shusen

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 is commonly overexpressed in HCC and is associated with poor clinical outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 could stimulate the proliferation of HCC cells by promoting G1/S transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 could inhibit the expression of p21 in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 has no effect on apoptosis and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, and BIRC5 was located at the center of the co-expression network. -- Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the protein phosphatases family and has a dual function in cell cycling. The function of this gene has been studied in several kinds of cancers, but its role in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that CDKN3 was frequently overexpressed in both HCC cell lines and clinical samples, and this overexpression was correlated with poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stage. Functional studies showed that overexpression of CDKN3 could promote cell proliferation by stimulating G1-S transition but has no impact on cell apoptosis and invasion. Microarray-based co-expression analysis identified a total of 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, with most of them involved in cell proliferation, and BIRC5 was located at the center of CDKN3 co-expression network. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene in human hepatocellular carcinoma and antagonism of CDKN3 may be of interest for the treatment of HCC.

  12. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  13. Beclin1 overexpression inhibitis proliferation, invasion and migration of CaSki cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Jia-hua; Sui, Yu-xia; Jin, Long; Yang, Yin; Lin, Sai-mei; Shi, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the autophagy-related gene Beclin1 on proliferation, invasion and metastasis of the cervical cancer CaSki cells and its possible mechanism in vitro were here targeted. After the overexpression vector pcDNA3.1-Beclin1 and RNA interference vector pSUPER-Beclin1 were transfected into CaSki cells in vitro, stable expression cell lines demonstration Beclin1 expression was upregulated, and VEGF and MMP-9 expression were decreased, leading to cell arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. MTT assays further revealed proliferation of cells was significantly inhibited in Beclin1-overexpressing transfectant cells, with invasion and metastasis also being inhibited in Transwell chamber assays. The present results suggest that Beclin1 inhibits invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer CaSki cells in vitro. Mechanisms probably involve Beclin1 inhibition of cell proliferation, and decreased expression of VEGF and MMP-9 proteins.

  14. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  15. Downregulation of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 by overexpressed microRNA 34a enhanced titanium dioxide nanoparticle-induced autophagy in BEAS-2B cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Sun, Pengling; Gao, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (TNPs) are manufactured worldwide for a wide range of applications and the toxic effect of TNPs on biological systems is gaining attention. Autophagy is recognized as an emerging toxicity mechanism triggered by nanomaterials. MicroRNA 34a (miR34a) acts as a tumor suppressor gene by targeting many oncogenes, but how it affects autophagy induced by TNPs is not completely understood. Here, we observed the activation of TNP-induced autophagy through monodansylcadaverine staining and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion. Meanwhile, the transmission electron microscope ultrastructural analysis showed typical morphological characteristics in autophagy process. We detected the expression of miR34a and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2). In addition, the underlying mechanism of TNP-induced autophagy was performed using overexpression of miR34a by lentivirus vector transfection. Results showed that TNPs induced autophagy generation evidently. Typical morphological changes in the process of autophagy were observed by the transmission electron microscope ultrastructural analysis and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion increased significantly in TNP-treated cells. Meanwhile, TNPs induced the downregulation of miR34a and increased the expression of Bcl-2. Furthermore, overexpressed miR34a decreased the expression of Bcl-2 both in messenger RNA and protein level, following which the level of autophagy and cell death rate increased after the transfected cells were incubated with TNPs for 24 hours. These findings provide the first evidence that overexpressed miR34a enhanced TNP-induced autophagy and cell death through targeted downregulation of Bcl-2 in BEAS-2B cells. PMID:27226226

  16. Pro-migratory actions of the prostacyclin receptor in human breast cancer cells that over-express cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Allison, Sarah E; Petrovic, Nenad; Mackenzie, Peter I; Murray, Michael

    2015-08-15

    Metastasis is the major cause of death in cancer patients. Elevated expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is observed in many human cancers and over-production of downstream prostaglandins (PGs) has been shown to stimulate metastasis. A role for increased PGE2 production has been proposed, but whether other PGs contribute is currently unclear. In this study the pro-migratory actions of individual PGs were evaluated in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells that stably over-expressed COX-2 (MDA-COX-2 cells); cell migration was quantified using 3D-matrigel droplet assays. Inhibition of the prostacyclin and PGE synthases, but not alternate prostanoid synthases, prevented the increase in MDA-COX-2 cell migration produced by arachidonic acid (AA); direct treatment of cells with the stable prostacyclin analogue cicaprost also promoted migration. Pharmacological antagonism and knockdown of the IP receptor decreased cell migration, while antagonists of the alternate DP, EP2, FP, and TP prostanoid receptors were inactive. In support of these findings, activation of the IP receptor also enhanced migration in the MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231 and A549 cell lines, and IP receptor knock-down in MDA-COX-2 cells decreased the expression of a number of pro-migratory genes. In further studies, the prostacyclin/IP receptor and PGE2/EP4 receptor pathways were found to be functionally independent and the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) selectively impaired the IP-receptor-dependent migration in MDA-COX-2 cells. Taken together, the prostacyclin/IP/PI3K-p38 MAPK axis has emerged as a novel pro-migratory pathway in breast cancer cells that over-express COX-2. This information could be utilized in novel treatment strategies to minimize tumor metastasis.

  17. A mouse embryonic stem cell bank for inducible overexpression of human chromosome 21 genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dosage imbalance is responsible for several genetic diseases, among which Down syndrome is caused by the trisomy of human chromosome 21. Results To elucidate the extent to which the dosage imbalance of specific human chromosome 21 genes perturb distinct molecular pathways, we developed the first mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell bank of human chromosome 21 genes. The human chromosome 21-mouse ES cell bank includes, in triplicate clones, 32 human chromosome 21 genes, which can be overexpressed in an inducible manner. Each clone was transcriptionally profiled in inducing versus non-inducing conditions. Analysis of the transcriptional response yielded results that were consistent with the perturbed gene's known function. Comparison between mouse ES cells containing the whole human chromosome 21 (trisomic mouse ES cells) and mouse ES cells overexpressing single human chromosome 21 genes allowed us to evaluate the contribution of single genes to the trisomic mouse ES cell transcriptome. In addition, for the clones overexpressing the Runx1 gene, we compared the transcriptome changes with the corresponding protein changes by mass spectroscopy analysis. Conclusions We determined that only a subset of genes produces a strong transcriptional response when overexpressed in mouse ES cells and that this effect can be predicted taking into account the basal gene expression level and the protein secondary structure. We showed that the human chromosome 21-mouse ES cell bank is an important resource, which may be instrumental towards a better understanding of Down syndrome and other human aneuploidy disorders. PMID:20569505

  18. IL-35 over-expression increases apoptosis sensitivity and suppresses cell growth in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Jun; Zhang, Xulong; Wen, Mingjie; Kong, Qingli; Lv, Zhe; An, Yunqing; Wei, Xiao-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-35 is a novel heterodimeric cytokine in the IL-12 family and is composed of two subunits: Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and IL-12p35. IL-35 is expressed in T regulatory (Treg) cells and contributes to the immune suppression function of these cells. In contrast, we found that both IL-35 subunits were expressed concurrently in most human cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines. In addition, we found that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulation led to increased IL-35 expression in human cancer cells. Furthermore, over-expression of IL-35 in human cancer cells suppressed cell growth in vitro, induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and mediated robust apoptosis induced by serum starvation, TNF-α, and IFN-γ stimulation through the up-regulation of Fas and concurrent down-regulation of cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-2 expression. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel functional role for IL-35 in suppressing cancer activity, inhibiting cancer cell growth, and increasing the apoptosis sensitivity of human cancer cells through the regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis. Thus, this research provides new insights into IL-35 function and presents a possible target for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  19. Triggering Death of Adherent Cells with Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a convenient stimulus for triggering cell death that is available in most laboratories. We use a Stratalinker UV cross-linker because it is a safe, cheap, reliable, consistent, and easily controlled source of UV irradiation. This protocol describes using a Stratalinker to trigger UV-induced death of HeLa cells. PMID:27371593

  20. Increased Mitochondrial Activity in Anthrax-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenesis of anthrax lethal toxin (LT) is attributed to its ability to cause death of infected cells. New work has demonstrated that increase of mitochondrial F1F0 ATPase activity and subsequent depletion of cellular ATP level are critical early events during LT-induced cell death. PMID:26124679

  1. Increased oxidative stress and toxicity in ADH and CYP2E1 overexpressing human hepatoma VL-17A cells exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Karthikeyan; Swaminathan, Kavitha; Kumar, S Mathan; Clemens, Dahn L; Dey, Aparajita

    2012-05-01

    High glucose mediated oxidative stress and cell death is a well documented phenomenon. Using VL-17A cells which are HepG2 cells over-expressing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) and control HepG2 cells, the association of ADH and CYP2E1 with high glucose mediated oxidative stress and toxicity in liver cells was investigated. Cell viability was measured and apoptosis or necrosis was determined through caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-propidium iodide staining and detecting decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential. Reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and the formation of advanced glycated-end products were assessed. The levels of several antioxidants which included glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase were altered in high glucose treated VL-17A cells. Greater toxicity was observed in VL-17A cells exposed to high glucose when compared to HepG2 cells. Oxidative stress parameters were greatly increased in high glucose exposed VL-17A cells and apoptotic cell death was observed. Inhibition of CYP2E1 or caspase 3 or addition of the antioxidant trolox led to significant decreases in high glucose mediated oxidative stress and toxicity. Thus, the over-expression of ADH and CYP2E1 in liver cells is associated with increased high glucose mediated oxidative stress and toxicity.

  2. Proteomic characterization of Her2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hexin; Pimienta, Genaro; Gu, Yiben; Sun, Xu; Hu, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is an oncogene amplified in invasive breast cancer and its overexpression in mammary epithelial cell lines is a strong determinant of a tumorigenic phenotype. Accordingly, HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors are commonly indicative of a poor prognosis in patients. Several quantitative proteomic studies have employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides only limited information about the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2/neu signaling. In the present study, we used a SILAC-based approach to compare the proteomic profile of normal breast epithelial cells with that of Her2/neu-overexpressing mammary epithelial cells, isolated from primary mammary tumors arising in MMTV-Her2/neu transgenic mice. We identified 23 proteins with relevant annotated functions in breast cancer, showing a substantial differential expression. This included overexpression of creatine kinase, retinol-binding protein 1, thymosin beta 4 and tumor protein D52, which correlated with the tumorigenic phenotype of Her2-overexpressing cells. The differential expression pattern of two genes, gelsolin and retinol binding protein 1, was further validated in normal and tumor tissues. Finally, an in silico analysis of published cancer microarray datasets revealed a 23-gene signature which can be used to predict the probability of metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. PMID:20960451

  3. Proteomic characterization of Her2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hexin; Pimienta, Genaro; Gu, Yiben; Sun, Xu; Hu, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2010-11-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is an oncogene amplified in invasive breast cancer and its overexpression in mammary epithelial cell lines is a strong determinant of a tumorigenic phenotype. Accordingly, HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors are commonly indicative of a poor prognosis in patients. Several quantitative proteomic studies have employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with MS/MS, which provides only limited information about the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2/neu signaling. In the present study, we used a SILAC-based approach to compare the proteomic profile of normal breast epithelial cells with that of Her2/neu-overexpressing mammary epithelial cells, isolated from primary mammary tumors arising in mouse mammary tumor virus-Her2/neu transgenic mice. We identified 23 proteins with relevant annotated functions in breast cancer, showing a substantial differential expression. This included overexpression of creatine kinase, retinol-binding protein 1, thymosin 4 and tumor protein D52, which correlated with the tumorigenic phenotype of Her2-overexpressing cells. The differential expression pattern of two genes, gelsolin and retinol binding protein 1, was further validated in normal and tumor tissues. Finally, an in silico analysis of published cancer microarray data sets revealed a 23-gene signature, which can be used to predict the probability of metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients.

  4. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  5. Novel 5-fluorouracil-resistant human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Shinya; Nakai, Yukie; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Kobunai, Takashi; Takechi, Teiji; Amanuma, Yusuke; Yoshioka, Masahiro; Ida, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Okuno, Yasushi; Miyamoto, Shin’ichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Chiba, Tsutomu; Muto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a key drug for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC); however, resistance to it remains a critical limitation to its clinical use. To clarify the mechanisms of 5-FU resistance of ESCC, we originally established 5-FU-resistant ESCC cells, TE-5R, by step-wise treatment with continuously increasing concentrations of 5-FU. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of 5-FU showed that TE-5R cells were 15.6-fold more resistant to 5-FU in comparison with parental TE-5 cells. TE-5R cells showed regional copy number amplification of chromosome 1p including the DPYD gene, as well as high mRNA and protein expressions of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), an enzyme involved in 5-FU degradation. 5-FU treatment resulted in a significant decrease of the intracellular 5-FU concentration and increase of the concentration of α-fluoro-ureidopropionic acid (FUPA), a metabolite of 5-FU, in TE-5R compared with TE-5 cells in vitro. Conversely, gimeracil, a DPD inhibitor, markedly increased the intracellular 5-FU concentration, decreased the intracellular FUPA concentration, and attenuated 5-FU resistance of TE-5R cells. These results indicate that 5-FU resistance of TE-5R cells is due to the rapid degradation of 5-FU by DPD overexpression. The investigation of 5-FU-resistant ESCC with DPYD gene copy number amplification and consequent DPD overexpression may generate novel biological evidence to explore strategies against ESCC with 5-FU resistance. PMID:26396918

  6. Silencing overexpression of FXYD3 protein in breast cancer cells amplifies effects of doxorubicin and γ-radiation on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Teh, Rachel; Mozar, Christine A; Baxter, Robert C; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2016-01-01

    FXYD3, also known as mammary tumor protein 8, is overexpressed in several common cancers, including in many breast cancers. We examined if such overexpression might protect Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and cancer cells against the high levels of oxidative stress characteristic of many tumors and often induced by cancer treatments. We measured FXYD3 expression, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and glutathionylation of the β1 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, a reversible oxidative modification that inhibits the ATPase, in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Expression of FXYD3 was suppressed by transfection with FXYD3 siRNA. A colorimetric end-point assay was used to estimate cell viability. Apoptosis was estimated by caspase 3/7 (DEVDase) activation using a Caspase fluorogenic substrate kit. Expression of FXYD3 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells was ~eightfold and ~twofold higher than in non-cancer MCF-10A cells and MDA-MB-468 cancer cells, respectively. A ~50 % reduction in FXYD3 expression increased glutathionylation of the β1 Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase subunit and reduced Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity by ~50 %, consistent with the role of FXYD3 to facilitate reversal of glutathionylation of the β1 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and glutathionylation-induced inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Treatment of MCF-7 and MDA-MB- 468 cells with doxorubicin or γ-radiation decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. The treatments upregulated FXYD3 expression in MCF-7 but not in MDA-MB-468 cells and suppression of FXYD3 in MCF-7 but not in MDA-MB-468 cells amplified effects of treatments on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and treatment-induced cell death and apoptosis. Overexpression of FXYD3 may be a marker of resistance to cancer treatments and a potentially important therapeutic target.

  7. TRAIL restores DCA/metformin-mediated cell death in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Song, Jie-Young; Lee, Jin Kyung; Hong, Jungil; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Woo Chul; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, In-Chul

    2016-09-23

    Previous studies have shown that hypoxia can reverse DCA/metformin-induced cell death in breast cancer cells. Therefore, targeting hypoxia is necessary for therapies targeting cancer metabolism. In the present study, we found that TRAIL can overcome the effect of hypoxia on the cell death induced by treatment of DCA and metformin in breast cancer cells. Unexpectedly, DR5 is upregulated in the cells treated with DCA/metformin, and sustained under hypoxia. Blocking DR5 by siRNA inhibited DCA/metformin/TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that DR5 upregulation plays an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that activation of JNK and c-Jun is responsible for upregulation of DR5 induced by DCA/metformin. These findings support the potential application of combining TRAIL and metabolism-targeting drugs in the treatment of cancers under hypoxia. PMID:27569287

  8. The convergence of radiation and immunogenic cell death signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Encouse B.; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Demaria, Sandra; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) triggers programmed cell death in tumor cells through a variety of highly regulated processes. Radiation-induced tumor cell death has been studied extensively in vitro and is widely attributed to multiple distinct mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe (MC), autophagy, and senescence, which may occur concurrently. When considering tumor cell death in the context of an organism, an emerging body of evidence suggests there is a reciprocal relationship in which radiation stimulates the immune system, which in turn contributes to tumor cell kill. As a result, traditional measurements of radiation-induced tumor cell death, in vitro, fail to represent the extent of clinically observed responses, including reductions in loco-regional failure rates and improvements in metastases free and overall survival. Hence, understanding the immunological responses to the type of radiation-induced cell death is critical. In this review, the mechanisms of radiation-induced tumor cell death are described, with particular focus on immunogenic cell death (ICD). Strategies combining radiotherapy with specific chemotherapies or immunotherapies capable of inducing a repertoire of cancer specific immunogens might potentiate tumor control not only by enhancing cell kill but also through the induction of a successful anti-tumor vaccination that improves patient survival. PMID:22891162

  9. Programmed death-ligand 1 overexpression is a prognostic marker for aggressive papillary thyroid cancer and its variants.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subrata; Veyhl, Joe; Jessa, Fatima; Polyakova, Olena; Alenzi, Ahmed; MacMillan, Christina; Ralhan, Ranju; Walfish, Paul G

    2016-05-31

    Programmed death-ligand 1(PD-L1) expression on tumor cells is emerging as a potential predictive biomarker in anti-PD-L1 directed cancer immunotherapy. We analyzed PD-L1 expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and its variants and determined its prognostic potential to predict clinical outcome in these patients. This study was conducted at an academic oncology hospital which is a prime referral centre for thyroid diseases. Immunohistochemical subcellular localization (IHC) analyses of PD-L1 protein was retrospectively performed on 251 archived formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) surgical tissues (66 benign thyroid nodules and 185 PTCs) using a rabbit monoclonal anti-PD-L1 antibody (E1L3N, Cell Signaling Technology) and detected using VECTASTAIN rapid protocol with diaminobenzidine (DAB) as the chromogen. The clinical-pathological factors and disease outcome over 190 months were assessed; immunohistochemical subcellular localization of PD-L1 was correlated with disease free survival (DFS) using Kaplan Meier survival and Cox multivariate regression analysis. Increased PD-L1 immunostaining was predominantly localized in cytoplasm and occasionally in plasma membrane of tumor cells. Among all combined stages of PTC, patients with increased PD-L1 membrane or cytoplasmic positivity had significantly shorter median DFS (36 months and 49 months respectively) as compared to those with PD-L1 negative tumors (DFS, both 186 months with p < 0.001 and p < 0.01 respectively). Comparison of PD-L1+ and PD-L1- patients with matched staging showed increased cytoplasmic positivity in all four stages of PTC that correlated with a greater risk of recurrence and a poor prognosis, but increased membrane positivity significantly correlated with a greater risk of metastasis or death only in Stage IV patients. In conclusion, PD-L1 positive expression in PTC correlates with a greater risk of recurrence and shortened disease free survival supporting its potential application as

  10. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  11. [Programmed cell death: history and future of a concept].

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Cell death was observed and understood since the 19th century, but there was no experimental examination until the mid-20th century. Beginning in the 1960's, several laboratories demonstrated that cell death was biologically controlled (programmed) and that the morphology was common and not readily explained (apoptosis). By 1990 the genetic basis of programmed cell death had been established and the first components of the cell death machinery (caspase 3, bcl-2 and Fas) had been identified, sequenced, and recognized as highly conserved in evolution. The rapid development of the field has given us substantial understanding of how cell death is achieved. However, capitalizing on our knowledge for therapeutic purposes requires us to learn much more about how a cell commits to death, as well as recognizing that apoptosis may be the most common and efficient means of death, but that there are alternative pathways that can result in cell death even when the conventional pathway is blocked. Interestingly enough, many of the arguments and missteps in the history of the field were anticipated by Claude Bernard, and his warnings and recommendations remain valid today.

  12. Nitric oxide and cell death in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Muntané, Jordi; De la Rosa, Angel J; Marín, Luís M; Padillo, Francisco J

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a lipophillic, highly diffusible, and short-lived physiological messenger which regulates a variety of physiopathological responses. NO may exert its cellular action through cGMP-dependent and cGMP-independent pathways which includes different postranslational modifications. The effect of NO in cancer depends on the activity and localization of NOS isoforms, concentration and duration of NO exposure, cellular sensitivity, and hypoxia/re-oxygenation process. NO regulates critical factors such as the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and p53 generally leading to growth arrest, apoptosis or adaptation. NO sensitizes hepatoma cells to chemotherapeutic compounds probably through increased p53 and cell death receptor expressions.

  13. Over-expression of CKS1B activates both MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways and promotes myeloma cell drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Maurizio; Xu, Hongwei; Cao, Thai M.; Xu, Chunjiao; Wu, Yong; Xiao, Fang; Liu, Yinghong; Yang, Ye; Salama, Mohamed; Li, Guiyuan; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2010-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the crucial role of CKS1B in multiple myeloma (MM) progression and define CKS1B-mediated SKP2/p27Kip1-independent down-stream signaling pathways. Forced-expression of CKS1B in MM cells increased cell multidrug-resistance. CKS1B activates STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. In contrast, SKP2 knockdown or p27Kip1 over-expression resulted in activation of the STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. Further investigations showed that BCL2 is a downstream target of MEK/ERK signaling. Stimulation of STAT3 and MEK/ERK signaling pathways partially abrogated CKS1B knockdown induced MM cell death and growth inhibition. Targeting STAT3 and MEK/ ERK signaling pathways by specific inhibitors induced significant MM cell death and growth inhibition in CKS1B-overexpressing MM cells and their combinations resulted in synergy. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for targeting STAT3 and MEK/ERK/ BCL2 signaling in aggressive CKS1B-overexpressing MM. PMID:20930946

  14. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M; Reichel, Christoph A; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R; Green, Douglas R; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-11-25

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy. PMID:25385600

  15. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M.; Reichel, Christoph A.; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R.; Green, Douglas R.; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy. PMID:25385600

  16. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  18. Cotreatment with Smac mimetics and demethylating agents induces both apoptotic and necroptotic cell death pathways in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Steve; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-05-28

    Treatment resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is often caused by defects in programmed cell death, e.g. by overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Here, we report that small-molecule Smac mimetics (i.e. BV6, LCL161, birinapant) that neutralize x-linked IAP (XIAP), cellular IAP (cIAP)1 and cIAP2 cooperate with demethylating agents (i.e. 5-azacytidine (5AC) or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC)) to induce cell death in ALL cells. Molecular studies reveal that induction of cell death is preceded by BV6-mediated depletion of cIAP1 protein and involves tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α autocrine/paracrine signaling, since the TNFα-blocking antibody Enbrel significantly reduces BV6/5AC-induced cell death. While BV6/5AC cotreatment induces caspase-3 activation, the broad-range caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) only partly rescues ALL cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death. This indicates that BV6/5AC cotreatment engages non-apoptotic cell death upon caspase inhibition. Indeed, genetic silencing of key components of necroptosis such as Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP)3 or mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) in parallel with administration of zVAD.fmk provides a significantly better protection against BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. Similarly, concomitant administration of pharmacological inhibitors of necroptosis (i.e. necrostatin-1s, GSK'872, dabrafenib, NSA) together with zVAD.fmk is superior in rescuing cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. These findings demonstrate that in ALL cells BV6/5AC-induced cell death is mediated via both apoptotic and necroptotic pathways. Importantly, BV6/5AC cotreatment triggers necroptosis in ALL cells that are resistant to apoptosis due to caspase inhibition. This opens new perspectives to overcome apoptosis resistance with important implications for the development of new treatment strategies

  19. Diversin Is Overexpressed in Breast Cancer and Accelerates Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinmiao; Wang, Minghao; Dong, Qianze; Jin, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Diversin was recently reported to play roles in Wnt and JNK pathways. However, the expression pattern and biological roles of diversin in human breast cancer have not been reported. In the present study, we found that diversin was overexpressed in breast cancer specimens by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Significant association was observed between diversin overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0036), nodal metastasis (p = 0.0033), negative estrogen receptor expression (p = 0.0012) and triple-negative status (p = 0.0017). Furthermore, colony formation assay and matrigel invasion assay showed that knockdown of diversin expression in MDA-MB-231 cell line with high endogenous expression decreased cell proliferation and cell invasion. Transfection of diversin plasmid in MCF-7 cell line increased cell proliferation and invasion. Further analysis showed that diversin depletion downregulated JNK phosphorylation while its overexpression upregulated JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that diversin was overexpressed in human breast cancers. Diversin could contribute to breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. PMID:24858714

  20. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities. PMID:27404254

  1. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-11-10

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5-/- cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  2. Sorafenib-induced defective autophagy promotes cell death by necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Pedram; Chioureas, Dimitris; Baltatzis, George; Fonseca, Pedro; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Lennartsson, Lena; Björklund, Ann-Charlotte; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Grandér, Dan; Egevad, Lars; Nilsson, Sten; Panaretakis, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the main cytoprotective mechanisms that cancer cells deploy to withstand the cytotoxic stress and survive the lethal damage induced by anti-cancer drugs. However, under specific conditions, autophagy may, directly or indirectly, induce cell death. In our study, treatment of the Atg5-deficient DU145 prostate cancer cells, with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, induces mitochondrial damage, autophagy and cell death. Molecular inhibition of autophagy by silencing ULK1 and Beclin1 rescues DU145 cells from cell death indicating that, in this setting, autophagy promotes cell death. Re-expression of Atg5 restores the lipidation of LC3 and rescues DU145 and MEF atg5−/− cells from sorafenib-induced cell death. Despite the lack of Atg5 expression and LC3 lipidation, DU145 cells form autophagosomes as demonstrated by transmission and immuno-electron microscopy, and the formation of LC3 positive foci. However, the lack of cellular content in the autophagosomes, the accumulation of long-lived proteins, the presence of GFP-RFP-LC3 positive foci and the accumulated p62 protein levels indicate that these autophagosomes may not be fully functional. DU145 cells treated with sorafenib undergo a caspase-independent cell death that is inhibited by the RIPK1 inhibitor, necrostatin-1. Furthermore, treatment with sorafenib induces the interaction of RIPK1 with p62, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and a proximity ligation assay. Silencing of p62 decreases the RIPK1 protein levels and renders necrostatin-1 ineffective in blocking sorafenib-induced cell death. In summary, the formation of Atg5-deficient autophagosomes in response to sorafenib promotes the interaction of p62 with RIPK leading to cell death by necroptosis. PMID:26416459

  3. Overexpression of VMAT-2 and DT-diaphorase protects substantia nigra-derived cells against aminochrome neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Patricia; Paris, Irmgard; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that both VMAT-2 and DT-diaphorase are an important cellular defense against aminochrome-dependent neurotoxicity during dopamine oxidation. A cell line with VMAT-2 and DT-diaphorase over-expressed was created. The transfection of RCSN-3 cells with a bicistronic plasmid coding for VMAT-2 fused with GFP-IRES-DT-diaphorase cDNA induced a significant increase in protein expression of VMAT-2 (7-fold; P<0.001) and DT-diaphorase (9-fold; P<0.001), accompanied by a 4- and 5.5-fold significant increase in transport and enzyme activity, respectively. Studies with synaptic vesicles from rat substantia nigra revealed that VMAT-2 uptake of 3H-aminochrome 6.3 ± 0.4nmol/min/mg was similar to dopamine uptake 6.2 ± 0.3 nmol/min/mg that which were dependent on ATP. Interestingly, aminochrome uptake was inhibited by 2 μM lobeline but not reserpine (1 and 10 μM). Incubation of cells overexpressing VMAT-2 and DT-diaphorase with 20 μM aminochrome resulted in (i) a significant decrease in cell death (6-fold, P<0.001); (ii) normal ultra structure determined by transmission electron microscopy contrasting with a significant increase of autophagosome and a dramatic remodeling of the mitochondrial inner membrane in wild type cells; (iii) normal level of ATP (256 ± 11 μM) contrasting with a significant decrease in wild type cells (121 ± 11 μM, P<0.001); and (iv) a significant decrease in DNA laddering (21 ± 8 pixels, P<0.001) cells in comparison with wild type cells treated with 20 μM aminochrome (269 ± 9). These results support our hypothesis that VMAT-2 and DT-diaphorase are an important defense system against aminochrome formed during dopamine oxidation. PMID:22483869

  4. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  5. Sclerostin is overexpressed by plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Giacomina; Oranger, Angela; Mori, Giorgio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rinaldi, Erminia; Curci, Paola; Zallone, Alberta; Rizzi, Rita; Grano, Maria; Colucci, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    Sclerostin, an osteocyte-expressed negative regulator of bone formation, is one of the inhibitors of Wnt signaling that is a critical pathway in the correct process of osteoblast differentiation. It has been demonstrated that Wnt signaling through the secretion of Wnt inhibitors, such as DKK1, sFRP-2, and sFRP-3, plays a key role in the decreased osteoblast activity associated with multiple myeloma (MM) bone disease. We provide evidence that sclerostin is expressed by myeloma cells that are human myeloma cell lines and plasma cells (CD138(+) cells) obtained from the bone marrow (BM) of a large number of MM patients with bone disease. Moreover, we show that there are no differences in sclerostin serum levels between MM patients and controls. Thus, our data indicate that MM cells, as a sclerostin source in the BM, could create a microenvironment with high sclerostin concentration that could contribute toward inhibiting osteoblast differentiation.

  6. Antitumor efficacy of piperine in the treatment of human HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jae Ho; Khanal, Tilak; Park, Bong Hwan; Tran, Thu Phuong; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-12-01

    Piperine is a bioactive component of black pepper, Piper nigrum Linn, commonly used for daily consumption and in traditional medicine. Here, the molecular mechanisms by which piperine exerts antitumor effects in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells was investigated. The results showed that piperine strongly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Furthermore, piperine inhibited HER2 gene expression at the transcriptional level. Blockade of ERK1/2 signaling by piperine significantly reduced SREBP-1 and FAS expression. Piperine strongly suppressed EGF-induced MMP-9 expression through inhibition of AP-1 and NF-κB activation by interfering with ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and Akt signaling pathways resulting in a reduction in migration. Finally, piperine pretreatment enhanced sensitization to paclitaxel killing in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Our findings suggest that piperine may be a potential agent for the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer with HER2 overexpression.

  7. Human lactoferrin triggers a mitochondrial- and caspase-dependent regulated cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Zaldívar, M; Andrés, M T; Rego, A; Pereira, C S; Fierro, J F; Côrte-Real, M

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown that the antifungal activity of human lactoferrin (hLf) against Candida albicans relies on its ability to induce cell death associated with apoptotic markers. To gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying hLf-induced apoptosis, we characterized this cell death process in the well-established Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. Our results indicate that hLf induces cell death in S. cerevisiae in a manner that requires energy and de novo protein synthesis. Cell death is associated with nuclear chromatin condensation, preservation of plasma membrane integrity, and is Yca1p metacaspase-dependent. Lactoferrin also caused mitochondrial dysfunction associated with ROS accumulation and release of cytochrome c. Pre-incubation with oligomycin, an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, increased resistance to hLf and, accordingly, mutants deficient in the F1F0-ATP synthase complex were more resistant to death induced by hLf. This indicates that mitochondrial energetic metabolism plays a key role in the killing effect of hLf, though a direct role of F1F0-ATP synthase cannot be precluded. Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL or pre-incubation with N-acetyl cysteine reduced the intracellular level of ROS and increased resistance to hLf, confirming a ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death process. Mitochondrial involvement was further reinforced by the higher resistance of cells lacking mitochondrial DNA, or other known yeast mitochondrial apoptosis regulators, such as, Aif1p, Cyc3p and Aac1/2/3p. This study provides new insights into a detailed understanding at the molecular level of hLf-induced apoptosis, which may allow the design of new strategies to overcome the emergence of resistance of clinically relevant fungi to conventional antifungals.

  8. Noncanonical cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kinet, Maxime J.; Shaham, Shai

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis. elegans has served as a fruitful setting for cell death research for over three decades. A conserved pathway of four genes, egl-1/BH3-only, ced-9/Bcl-2, ced-4/Apaf-1, and ced-3/caspase, coordinates most developmental cell deaths in C. elegans. However, other cell death forms, programmed and pathological, have also been described in this animal. Some of these share morphological and/or molecular similarities with the canonical apoptotic pathway, while others do not. Indeed, recent studies suggest the existence of an entirely novel mode of programmed developmental cell destruction that may also be conserved beyond nematodes. Here we review evidence for these noncanonical pathways. We propose that different cell death modalities can function as backup mechanisms for apoptosis, or as tailor-made programs that allow specific dying cells to be efficiently cleared from the animal. PMID:25065890

  9. NDRG1 overexpression promotes the progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through modulating Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Runna; Sun, Yulin; Guo, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Lanping; Liu, Fang; Hendricks, Denver T.; Xu, Yang; Zhao, Xiaohang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT N-myc down-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) has been shown to regulate tumor growth and metastasis in various malignant tumors and also to be dysregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here, we show that NDRG1 overexpression (91.9%, 79/86) in ESCC tumor tissues is associated with poor overall survival of esophageal cancer patients. When placed in stable transfectants of the KYSE 30 ESCC cell line generated by lentiviral transduction with the ectopic overexpression of NDRG1, the expression of transducin-like enhancer of Split 2 (TLE2) was decreased sharply, however β−catenin was increased. Mechanistically, NDRG1 physically associates with TLE2 and β−catenin to affect the Wnt pathway. RNA interference and TLE2 overexpression studies demonstrate that NDRG1 fails to active Wnt pathway compared with isogenic wild-type controls. Strikingly, NDRG1 overexpression induces the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) through activating the Wnt signaling pathway in ESCC cells, decreased the expression of E-cadherin and enhanced the expression of Snail. Our study elucidates a mechanism of NDRG1-regulated Wnt pathway activation and EMT via affecting TLE2 and  β-catenin expression in esophageal cancer cells. This indicates a pro-oncogenic role for NDRG1 in esophageal cancer cells whereby it modulates tumor progression. PMID:27414086

  10. Aire-Overexpressing Dendritic Cells Induce Peripheral CD4⁺ T Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongbei; Li, Haijun; Fu, Haiying; Niu, Kunwei; Guo, Yantong; Guo, Chuan; Sun, Jitong; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire) can promote the ectopic expression of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (mTECs), which leads to the deletion of autoreactive T cells and consequently prevents autoimmune diseases. However, the functions of Aire in the periphery, such as in dendritic cells (DCs), remain unclear. This study's aim was to investigate the effect of Aire-overexpressing DCs (Aire cells) on the functions of CD4⁺ T cells and the treatment of type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that Aire cells upregulated the mRNA levels of the tolerance-related molecules CD73, Lag3, and FR4 and the apoptosis of CD4⁺ T cells in STZ-T1D mouse-derived splenocytes. Furthermore, following insulin stimulation, Aire cells decreased the number of CD4⁺ IFN-γ⁺ T cells in both STZ-T1D and WT mouse-derived splenocytes and reduced the expression levels of TCR signaling molecules (Ca(2+) and p-ERK) in CD4⁺ T cells. We observed that Aire cells-induced CD4⁺ T cells could delay the development of T1D. In summary, Aire-expressing DCs inhibited TCR signaling pathways and decreased the quantity of CD4⁺IFN-γ⁺ autoreactive T cells. These data suggest a mechanism for Aire in the maintenance of peripheral immune tolerance and provide a potential method to control autoimmunity by targeting Aire.

  11. Hexamethylene bisacetamide induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) and down-regulates BCL-2 expression in human myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D S; Zhang, X; Feinman, R; Teitz, T; Zelenetz, A; Richon, V M; Rifkind, R A; Marks, P A; Michaeli, J

    1998-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell malignancy characterized by the expansion of monoclonal Ig-secreting plasma cells with low proliferative activity. It is postulated that inhibition of physiologic cell death is an underlying factor in the pathophysiology of MM. The development of chemoresistance is a common feature in patients with MM. In the present studies, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), a hybrid polar compound that is a potent inducer of terminal differentiation of various transformed cells, is shown to inhibit the growth of several human myeloma cell lines (ARP-1, U266, and RPMI 8226), including doxorubicin-resistant RPMI 8226 variants that overexpress the multidrug-resistance gene, MDR-1, and its product, p-glycoprotein. In addition to growth arrest and suppression of clonogenicity, HMBA induces apoptosis both in freshly isolated human myeloma cells and in cell lines, as determined by morphologic alterations, cell cycle distribution and endonucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Further, HMBA decreases BCL-2 protein expression in myeloma cells within 12-48 hr. Overexpression of BCL-2 protein in ARP-1 cells confers resistance to HMBA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that HMBA is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human myeloma cells, which may act through suppressing the anti-apoptotic function of the bcl-2 gene. HMBA, and related hybrid polar compounds, may prove useful in the management of this presently incurable disease.

  12. Low-Dose Bafilomycin Attenuates Neuronal Cell Death Associated with Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pivtoraiko, Violetta N.; Harrington, Adam J.; Mader, Burton J.; Luker, Austin M.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Roth, Kevin A.; Shacka, John J.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown previously that the plecomacrolide antibiotics bafilomycin A1 and B1 significantly attenuate cerebellar granule neuron death resulting from agents that disrupt lysosome function. To further characterize bafilomycin-mediated cytoprotection, we examined its ability to attenuate the death of naïve and differentiated neuronal SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells from agents that induce lysosome dysfunction in vitro, and from in vivo dopaminergic neuron death in C. elegans. Low-dose bafilomycin significantly attenuated SH-SY5Y cell death resulting from treatment with chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine amodiaquine and staurosporine. Bafilomycin also attenuated the chloroquine-induced reduction in processing of cathepsin D, the principal lysosomal aspartic acid protease, to its mature “active” form. Chloroquine induced autophagic vacuole accumulation and inhibited autophagic flux, effects that were attenuated upon treatment with bafilomycin and were associated with a significant decrease in chloroquine-induced accumulation of detergent-insoluble α-synuclein oligomers. In addition, bafilomycin significantly and dose-dependently attenuated dopaminergic neuron death in C. elegans resulting from in vivo over-expression of human wild-type α-synuclein. Together, our findings suggest that low-dose bafilomycin is cytoprotective in part through its maintenance of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, and underscores its therapeutic potential for treating Parkinson Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases that exhibit disruption of protein degradation pathways and accumulation of toxic protein species. PMID:20534000

  13. A necrotic cell death model in a protist.

    PubMed

    Laporte, C; Kosta, A; Klein, G; Aubry, L; Lam, D; Tresse, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    2007-02-01

    While necrotic cell death is attracting considerable interest, its molecular bases are still poorly understood. Investigations in simple biological models, taken for instance outside the animal kingdom, may benefit from less interference from other cell death mechanisms and from better experimental accessibility, while providing phylogenetic information. Can necrotic cell death occur outside the animal kingdom? In the protist Dictyostelium, developmental stimuli induced in an autophagy mutant a stereotyped sequence of events characteristic of necrotic cell death. This sequence included swift mitochondrial uncoupling with mitochondrial 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence, ATP depletion and increased oxygen consumption. This was followed by perinuclear clustering of dilated mitochondria. Rapid plasma membrane rupture then occurred, which was evidenced by time-lapse videos and quantified by FACS. Of additional interest, developmental stimuli and classical mitochondrial uncouplers triggered a similar sequence of events, and exogenous glucose delayed plasma membrane rupture in a nonglycolytic manner. The occurrence of necrotic cell death in the protist Dictyostelium (1) provides a very favorable model for further study of this type of cell death, and (2) strongly suggests that the mechanism underlying necrotic cell death was present in an ancestor common to the Amoebozoa protists and to animals and has been conserved in evolution.

  14. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer.

  15. Prolonged survival in hepatocarcinoma patients with increased regucalcin gene expression: HepG2 cell proliferation is suppressed by overexpression of regucalcin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Osuka, Satoru; Weitzmann, M Neale; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Shoji, Mamoru; Murata, Tomiyasu

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant cancers worldwide and ranks third in overall global cancer-related mortality rates. Importantly, in this study gene expression data demonstrate that prolonged survival in HCC patients is associated with increased regucalcin gene expression. Regucalcin has been shown to play a pivotal role as a transcription repressor and diminished expression or activity of regucalcin may play a key role in the development of human carcinogenesis. Indeed, overexpression of regucalcin suppressed the proliferation, cell death, and migration of human HCC HepG2 cells in vitro. Mechanistically, regucalcin induced G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest of HepG2 cells through suppression of multiple signaling pathways including Ras, Akt, MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK and by increasing the tumor suppressors p53 and Rb. Furthermore, the oncogenes c-fos and c-myc were suppressed by overexpression of regucalcin, and overexpression of regucalcin caused an increase in p21 and a decrease in NF-κB p65 and β-catenin. These findings suggest that regucalcin may play a potential role as a suppressor of human HCC, and that diminished expression of regucalcin may predispose patients to development of HCC. Overexpression of regucalcin may constitute a novel therapeutic approach to treating HCC. PMID:27633001

  16. [Death].

    PubMed

    Ribas, Jordi Domingo

    2003-12-01

    Intercultural factors are essential for reflection. In this article, the authors deals with a more direct vision on the special edition about Grief and Mourning, about the topic which lies in the depths of all of our consciences: death and the question what lies beyond death? The author provides us elements to reflect about concepts, some accepted in various cases, rejected in others, but always polemical, which help us to penetrate farther into the real mystery of life: death and what follows death.

  17. Neuronal cell death in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Northington, Frances J; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Martin, Lee J

    2011-05-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and young children. Therapeutic opportunities are very limited for neonatal and pediatric HIE. Specific neural systems and populations of cells are selectively vulnerable in HIE; however, the mechanisms of degeneration are unresolved. These mechanisms involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and the activation of several different cell death pathways. Decades ago the structural and mechanistic basis of the cellular degeneration in HIE was thought to be necrosis. Subsequently, largely due to advances in cell biology and to experimental animal studies, emphasis has been switched to apoptosis or autophagy mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms as important forms of degeneration in HIE. We have conceptualized based on morphological and biochemical data that this degeneration is better classified according to an apoptosis-necrosis cell death continuum and that programmed cell necrosis has prominent contribution in the neurodegeneration of HIE in animal models. It is likely that neonatal HIE evolves through many cell death chreodes influenced by the dynamic injury landscape. The relevant injury mechanisms remain to be determined in human neonatal HIE, though preliminary work suggests a complexity in the cell death mechanisms greater than that anticipated from experimental animal models. The accurate identification of the various cell death chreodes and their mechanisms unfolding within the immature brain matrix could provide fresh insight for developing meaningful therapies for neonatal and pediatric HIE. PMID:21520238

  18. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes.

  19. Neuronal Cell Death in Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Northington, Frances J.; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Martin, Lee J.

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in infants and young children. Therapeutic opportunities are very limited for neonatal and pediatric HIE. Specific neural systems and populations of cells are selectively vulnerable in HIE; however, the mechanisms of degeneration are unresolved. These mechanisms involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and the activation of several different cell death pathways. Decades ago the structural and mechanistic basis of the cellular degeneration in HIE was thought to be necrosis. Subsequently, largely due to advances in cell biology and to experimental animal studies, emphasis has been switched to apoptosis or autophagy mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms as important forms of degeneration in HIE. We have conceptualized based on morphological and biochemical data that this degeneration is better classified according to an apoptosis-necrosis cell death continuum and that programmed cell necrosis has prominent contribution in the neurodegeneration of HIE in animal models. It is likely that neonatal HIE evolves through many cell death chreodes influenced by the dynamic injury landscape. The relevant injury mechanisms remain to be determined in human neonatal HIE, though preliminary work suggests a complexity in the cell death mechanisms greater than that anticipated from experimental animal models. The accurate identification of the various cell death chreodes and their mechanisms unfolding within the immature brain matrix could provide fresh insight for developing meaningful therapies for neonatal and pediatric HIE. PMID:21520238

  20. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes. PMID:25962350

  1. Sickle cell trait and sudden death--bringing it home.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle cell trait continues to be the leading cause of sudden death for young African Americans in military basic training and civilian organized sports. The syndrome may have caused the death of up to 10 college football players since 1974 and, as recently as 2000, was suspected as the cause of death of three U.S. Army recruits. The penal military-style boot camps in the United States and the recent death of two teenagers with sickle cell trait merits renewed vigor in the education of athletic instructors, the military and the public about conditions associated with sudden death in individuals with sickle cell trait. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:17393956

  2. Autophagy-related cell death by pan-histone deacetylase inhibition in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Waldegger, Petra; Jabari, Samir; Lingelbach, Susanne; Montalbano, Roberta; Ocker, Matthias; Slater, Emily P.; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Illig, Romana; Neureiter, Daniel; Wissniowski, Thaddeus T.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic, catabolic degradation process and cell fate essential regulatory mechanism. Protracted autophagy triggers cell death; its aberrant function is responsible for several malignancies. Panobinostat, a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor, causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of autophagy in deacetylase inhibitor-triggered liver cancer cell death. HepG2 (p53wt) and Hep3B (p53 null) liver cancer cell lines were exposed to panobinostat. RT-qPCR and western blot confirmed autophagic factor modulation. Immuno-fluorescence, -precipitation and -histochemistry as well as transmission electron microscopy verified autophagosome formation. The cytotoxicity of panobinostat and autophagy modulators was detected using a real time cell viability assay. Panobinostat induced autophagy-related factor expression and aggregation. Map1LC3B and Beclin1 were significantly over-expressed in HepG2 xenografts in nude mice treated with panobinostat for 4 weeks. Subcellular distribution of Beclin1 increased with the appearance of autophagosomes-like aggregates. Cytosolic loss of p53, in HepG2, and p73, in Hep3B cells, and a corresponding gain of their nuclear level, together with modulation of DRAM1, were observed. Autophagosome aggregation was visible after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of cells stably expressing GFP-RFPtag Map1LC3B resulted in aggregation and a fluorescence switch, thus confirming autophagosome formation and maturation. Tamoxifen, an inducer of autophagy, caused only a block in cell proliferation; but in combination with panobinostat it resulted in cell death. Autophagy triggers cell demise in liver cancer. Its modulation by the combination of tamoxifen and panobinostat could be a new option for palliative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27058414

  3. Radiation-induced Cochlea hair cell death: mechanisms and protection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pei-Xin; Du, Sha-Sha; Ren, Chen; Yao, Qi-Wei; Yuan, Ya-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Cochlea hair cell death is regarded to be responsible for the radiation-induced sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), which is one of the principal complications of radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancers. In this mini- review, we focus on the current progresses trying to unravel mechanisms of radiation-induced hair cell death and find out possible protection. P53, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways have been proposed as pivotal in the processes leading to radiation hair cell death. Potential protectants, such as amifostine, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and epicatechin (EC) , are claimed to be effective at reducing radiation- inducedhair cell death. The RT dosage, selection and application of concurrent chemotherapy should be pre- examined in order to minimize the damage to cochlea hair cells.

  4. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Michelle Barbi; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Van Houten, Bennett; Goetzman, Eric S

    2014-01-01

    SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose) all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  5. PsANT, the adenine nucleotide translocase of Puccinia striiformis, promotes cell death and fungal growth

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wei, Jinping; Han, Qingmei; Liu, Rui; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Fu, Yanping; Huang, Xueling; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is a constitutive mitochondrial component that is involved in ADP/ATP exchange and mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis in yeast and mammals. However, little is known about the function of ANT in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we identified an ANT gene of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), designated PsANT. The PsANT protein contains three typical conserved mitochondrion-carrier-protein (mito-carr) domains and shares more than 70% identity with its orthologs from other fungi, suggesting that ANT is conserved in fungi. Immuno-cytochemical localization confirmed the mitochondrial localization of PsANT in normal Pst hyphal cells or collapsed cells. Over-expression of PsANT indicated that PsANT promotes cell death in tobacco, wheat and fission yeast cells. Further study showed that the three mito-carr domains are all needed to induce cell death. qRT-PCR analyses revealed an in-planta induced expression of PsANT during infection. Knockdown of PsANT using a host-induced gene silencing system (HIGS) attenuated the growth and development of virulent Pst at the early infection stage but not enough to alter its pathogenicity. These results provide new insight into the function of PsANT in fungal cell death and growth and might be useful in the search for and design of novel disease control strategies. PMID:26058921

  6. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Binding Protein BiP Displays Dual Function in Modulating Cell Death Events1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto H.; Silva, Priscila A.; Mendes, Giselle C.; Brustolini, Otávio J.B.; Pimenta, Maiana R.; Gouveia, Bianca C.; Valente, Maria Anete S.; Ramos, Humberto J.O.; Soares-Ramos, Juliana R.L.; Fontes, Elizabeth P.B.

    2014-01-01

    The binding protein (BiP) has been demonstrated to participate in innate immunity and attenuate endoplasmic reticulum- and osmotic stress-induced cell death. Here, we employed transgenic plants with manipulated levels of BiP to assess whether BiP also controlled developmental and hypersensitive programmed cell death (PCD). Under normal conditions, the BiP-induced transcriptome revealed a robust down-regulation of developmental PCD genes and an up-regulation of the genes involved in hypersensitive PCD triggered by nonhost-pathogen interactions. Accordingly, the BiP-overexpressing line displayed delayed leaf senescence under normal conditions and accelerated hypersensitive response triggered by Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato in soybean (Glycine max) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), as monitored by measuring hallmarks of PCD in plants. The BiP-mediated delay of leaf senescence correlated with the attenuation of N-rich protein (NRP)-mediated cell death signaling and the inhibition of the senescence-associated activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). By contrast, under biological activation of salicylic acid (SA) signaling and hypersensitive PCD, BiP overexpression further induced NRP-mediated cell death signaling and antagonistically inhibited the UPR. Thus, the SA-mediated induction of NRP cell death signaling occurs via a pathway distinct from UPR. Our data indicate that during the hypersensitive PCD, BiP positively regulates the NRP cell death signaling through a yet undefined mechanism that is activated by SA signaling and related to ER functioning. By contrast, BiP’s negative regulation of leaf senescence may be linked to its capacity to attenuate the UPR activation and NRP cell death signaling. Therefore, BiP can function either as a negative or positive modulator of PCD events. PMID:24319082

  7. Overexpression of IGF-I receptor in HeLa cells enhances in vivo radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Haruna; Yu, Dong; Miura, Masahiko

    2007-11-30

    Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase whose activation strongly promotes cell growth and survival. We previously reported that IGF-IR activity confers intrinsic radioresistance in mouse embryo fibroblasts in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether tumor cells overexpressing IGF-IR exhibit radioresistance in vivo. For this purpose, we established HeLa cells that overexpress IGF-IR (HeLa-R), subcutaneously transplanted these cells into nude mice, and examined radioresponse in the resulting solid tumors. HeLa-R cells exhibited typical in vitro phenotypes generally observed in IGF-IR-overexpressing cells, as well as significant intrinsic radioresistance in vitro compared with parent cells. As expected, the transplanted HeLa-R tumors grew at a remarkably higher rate than parent tumors. Histological analysis revealed that HeLa-R tumors expressed more VEGF and had a higher density of tumor vessels. Unexpectedly, a marked growth delay was observed in HeLa-R tumors following 10 Gy of X-irradiation. Immunostaining of HeLa-R tumors for the hypoxia marker pimonidazole revealed a significantly lower level of hypoxic cells. Moreover, clamp hypoxia significantly increased radioresistance in HeLa-R tumors. Tumor microenvironments in vivo generated by the IGF-IR expression thus could be a major factor in determining the tumor radioresponse in vivo.

  8. Overexpression of AQP3 Modifies the Cell Cycle and the Proliferation Rate of Mammalian Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Serna, Ana; Echevarría, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal AQP3 overexpression in tumor cells of different origins has been reported and a role for this enhanced AQP3 expression in cell proliferation and tumor processess has been indicated. To further understand the role AQP3 plays in cell proliferation we explore the effect that stable over expression of AQP3 produces over the proliferation rate and cell cycle of mammalian cells. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) and the cell proliferation rate measured through cell counting and BrdU staining. Cells with overexpression of AQP3 (AQP3-o) showed higher proliferation rate and larger percentage of cells in phases S and G2/M, than wild type cells (wt). Evaluation of the cell response against arresting the cell cycle with Nocodazole showed that AQP3-o exhibited a less modified cell cycle pattern and lower Annexin V specific staining than wt, consistently with a higher resistance to apoptosis of AQP3-overexpressing cells. The cell volume and complexity were also larger in AQP3-o compared to wt cells. After transcriptomic analysis, RT-qPCR was performed to highlight key molecules implicated in cell proliferation which expression may be altered by overexpression of AQP3 and the comparative analysis between both type of cells showed significant changes in the expression of Zeb2, Jun, JunB, NF-kβ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, TNF, and TNF receptors. We conclude that the role of AQP3 in cell proliferation seems to be connected to increments in the cell cycle turnover and changes in the expression levels of relevant genes for this process. Larger expression of AQP3 may confer to the cell a more tumor like phenotype and contributes to explain the presence of this protein in many different tumors.

  9. Overexpression of AQP3 Modifies the Cell Cycle and the Proliferation Rate of Mammalian Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Serna, Ana; Echevarría, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal AQP3 overexpression in tumor cells of different origins has been reported and a role for this enhanced AQP3 expression in cell proliferation and tumor processess has been indicated. To further understand the role AQP3 plays in cell proliferation we explore the effect that stable over expression of AQP3 produces over the proliferation rate and cell cycle of mammalian cells. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) and the cell proliferation rate measured through cell counting and BrdU staining. Cells with overexpression of AQP3 (AQP3-o) showed higher proliferation rate and larger percentage of cells in phases S and G2/M, than wild type cells (wt). Evaluation of the cell response against arresting the cell cycle with Nocodazole showed that AQP3-o exhibited a less modified cell cycle pattern and lower Annexin V specific staining than wt, consistently with a higher resistance to apoptosis of AQP3-overexpressing cells. The cell volume and complexity were also larger in AQP3-o compared to wt cells. After transcriptomic analysis, RT-qPCR was performed to highlight key molecules implicated in cell proliferation which expression may be altered by overexpression of AQP3 and the comparative analysis between both type of cells showed significant changes in the expression of Zeb2, Jun, JunB, NF-kβ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, TNF, and TNF receptors. We conclude that the role of AQP3 in cell proliferation seems to be connected to increments in the cell cycle turnover and changes in the expression levels of relevant genes for this process. Larger expression of AQP3 may confer to the cell a more tumor like phenotype and contributes to explain the presence of this protein in many different tumors. PMID:26367709

  10. SIRT1 Overexpression Maintains Cell Phenotype and Function of Endothelial Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Jen, Michele; Perrin, Louisiane; Wertheim, Jason A; Ameer, Guillermo A

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that are differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be used in establishing disease models for personalized drug discovery or developing patient-specific vascularized tissues or organoids. However, a number of technical challenges are often associated with iPSC-ECs in culture, including instability of the endothelial phenotype and limited cell proliferative capacity over time. Early senescence is believed to be the primary mechanism underlying these limitations. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase involved in the regulation of cell senescence, redox state, and inflammatory status. We hypothesize that overexpression of the SIRT1 gene in iPSC-ECs will maintain EC phenotype, function, and proliferative capacity by overcoming early cell senescence. SIRT1 gene was packaged into a lentiviral vector (LV-SIRT1) and transduced into iPSC-ECs at passage 4. Beginning with passage 5, iPSC-ECs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology, whereas iPSC-ECs overexpressing SIRT1 maintained EC cobblestone morphology. SIRT1 overexpressing iPSC-ECs also exhibited a higher percentage of canonical markers of endothelia (LV-SIRT1 61.8% CD31(+) vs. LV-empty 31.7% CD31(+), P < 0.001; LV-SIRT1 46.3% CD144(+) vs. LV-empty 20.5% CD144(+), P < 0.02), with a higher nitric oxide synthesis, lower β-galactosidase production indicating decreased senescence (3.4% for LV-SIRT1 vs. 38.6% for LV-empty, P < 0.001), enhanced angiogenesis, increased deacetylation activity, and higher proliferation rate. SIRT1 overexpressing iPSC-ECs continued to proliferate through passage 9 with high purity of EC-like characteristics, while iPSC-ECs without SIRT1 overexpression became senescent after passage 5. Taken together, SIRT1 overexpression in iPSC-ECs maintains EC phenotype, improves EC function, and extends cell lifespan, overcoming critical hurdles associated with the use of iPSC-ECs in translational research.

  11. Intracellular cleavage of osteopontin by caspase-8 modulates hypoxia/reoxygenation cell death through p53.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Ho-June; Jun, Joon-Il; Oh, Yumin; Choi, Seon-Guk; Kim, Hyunjoo; Chung, Chul-Woong; Kim, In-Ki; Park, Il-Sun; Chae, Han-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2009-09-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is highly expressed in cancer patients and plays important roles in many stages of tumor progression, such as anti-apoptosis, proliferation, and metastasis. From functional screening of human cDNA library, we isolated OPN as a caspase-8 substrate that regulates cell death during hypoxia/reoxygenation (Hyp/RO). In vitro cleavage assays demonstrate that OPN is cleaved at Asp-135 and Asp-157 by caspase-8. Cellular cleavage of OPN is observed in apoptotic cells exposed to Hyp/RO among various apoptotic stimuli and its cleavage is blocked by zVAD or IETD caspase inhibitor. Further, over-expression of OPN, the form with secretion signal, inhibits Hyp/RO-induced cell death. Caspase cleavage-defective OPN mutant (OPN D135A/D157A) is more efficient to suppress Hyp/RO-induced cell death than wild-type OPN. OPN D135A/D157A sustains AKT activity to increase cell viability through inhibition of caspase-9 during Hyp/RO. In addition, OPN is highly induced in some tumor cells during Hyp/RO, such as HeLa and Huh-7 cells, which is associated with their resistance to Hyp/RO by sustaining AKT activity. Notably, OPN C-terminal cleavage fragment produced by caspase-8 is detected in the nucleus. Plasmid-encoded expression of OPN C-terminal cleavage fragment increases p53 protein level and induces apoptosis of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, but not p53(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These observations suggest that the protective function of OPN during Hyp/RO is inactivated via the proteolytic cleavage by caspase-8 and its cleavage product subsequently induces cell death via p53, postulating caspase-8 as a negative regulator of tumorigenic activity of OPN.

  12. Chemical Reactivity Window Determines Prodrug Efficiency toward Glutathione Transferase Overexpressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    van Gisbergen, Marike W; Cebula, Marcus; Zhang, Jie; Ottosson-Wadlund, Astrid; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Haenen, Guido R M M; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Saneyoshi, Hisao; Araki, Mika; Shishido, Yuko; Ito, Yoshihiro; Arnér, Elias S J; Abe, Hiroshi; Morgenstern, Ralf; Johansson, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are often overexpressed in tumors and frequently correlated to bad prognosis and resistance against a number of different anticancer drugs. To selectively target these cells and to overcome this resistance we previously have developed prodrugs that are derivatives of existing anticancer drugs (e.g., doxorubicin) incorporating a sulfonamide moiety. When cleaved by GSTs, the prodrug releases the cytostatic moiety predominantly in GST overexpressing cells, thus sparing normal cells with moderate enzyme levels. By modifying the sulfonamide it is possible to control the rate of drug release and specifically target different GSTs. Here we show that the newly synthesized compounds, 4-acetyl-2-nitro-benzenesulfonyl etoposide (ANS-etoposide) and 4-acetyl-2-nitro-benzenesulfonyl doxorubicin (ANS-DOX), function as prodrugs for GSTA1 and MGST1 overexpressing cell lines. ANS-DOX, in particular, showed a desirable cytotoxic profile by inducing toxicity and DNA damage in a GST-dependent manner compared to control cells. Its moderate conversion of 500 nmol/min/mg, as catalyzed by GSTA1, seems hereby essential since the more reactive 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl doxorubicin (DNS-DOX) (14000 nmol/min/mg) did not display a preference for GSTA1 overexpressing cells. DNS-DOX, however, effectively killed GSTP1 (20 nmol/min/mg) and MGST1 (450 nmol/min/mg) overexpressing cells as did the less reactive 4-mononitrobenzenesulfonyl doxorubicin (MNS-DOX) in a MGST1-dependent manner (1.5 nmol/min/mg) as shown previously. Furthermore, we show that the mechanism of these prodrugs involves a reduction in GSH levels as well as inhibition of the redox regulatory enzyme thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) by virtue of their electrophilic sulfonamide moiety. TrxR1 is upregulated in many tumors and associated with resistance to chemotherapy and poor patient prognosis. Additionally, the prodrugs potentially acted as a general shuttle system for DOX, by overcoming resistance

  13. Bnip3 mediates mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death through Bax and Bak

    PubMed Central

    Kubli, Dieter A.; Ycaza, John E.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2007-01-01

    Bnip3 is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that is down-regulated in pancreatic cancers, which correlates with resistance to chemotherapy and a worsened prognosis. In contrast, Bnip3 is up-regulated in heart failure and contributes to loss of myocardial cells during I/R (ischaemia/reperfusion). Bnip3 exerts its action at the mitochondria, but the mechanism by which Bnip3 mediates mitochondrial dysfunction is not clear. In the present study, we have identified Bax and Bak as downstream effectors of Bnip3-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Bnip3 plays a role in hypoxia-mediated cell death, but MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) derived from mice deficient in Bax and Bak were completely resistant to hypoxia even with substantial up-regulation of Bnip3. These cells were also resistant to Bnip3 overexpression, but re-expression of Bax or Bak restored susceptibility to Bnip3, suggesting that Bnip3 can act via either Bax or Bak. In contrast, Bnip3 overexpression in wild-type MEFs induced mitochondrial dysfunction with loss of membrane potential and release of cytochrome c. Cell death by Bnip3 was reduced in the presence of mPTP (mitochondrial permeability transition pore) inhibitors, but did not prevent Bnip3-mediated activation of Bax or Bak. Moreover, overexpression of Bnip3ΔTM, a dominant-negative form of Bnip3, reduced translocation of GFP (green fluorescent protein)–Bax to mitochondria during sI/R (simulated I/R) in HL-1 myocytes. Similarly, down-regulation of Bnip3 using RNA interference decreased activation of Bax in response to sI/R in HL-1 myocytes. These results suggest that Bnip3 mediates mitochondrial dysfunction through activation of Bax or Bak which is independent of mPTP opening. PMID:17447897

  14. Octylphenol induces vitellogenin production and cell death in fish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, B.H.; Monteverdi, G.H.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of octylphenol (OP) on vitellogenin production and cell death in hepatocytes from brown bullhead catfish (Americurus nebulosus) were studied. Production of vitellogenin was induced in hepatocytes exposed to 10 to 50 {micro}M OP, whereas a higher concentration of OP (100 {micro}M) induced apoptotic cell death. By 3 h after the addition of 100 {micro}M OP, dying cells showed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation as determined by fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Later stages of cell death (nuclear membrane breakdown and cell fragmentation into apoptotic bodies) were identified in cells exposed to OP for at least 6 h. Hepatocytes exposed to 100 {micro}M OP also produced less vitellogenin than cells exposed to 50 {micro}M OP. An estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, greatly decreased vitellogenin production in OP-exposed hepatocytes from male fish but did not decrease cell death in these cells. Thus, although the ability of OP to induce vitellogenin production is likely mediated through interactions with the estrogen receptor, the induction of apoptotic cell death by OP does not appear to be dependent on its estrogenic activity but may be a more general toxic effect.

  15. Cell biology: Death drags down the neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Claudia G.; Martin, Adam C.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of dying cells reveals that they play an active part in modifying tissue shape by pulling on neighbouring cells. This induces neighbouring cells to contract at their apices, which results in tissue folding. See Letter p.245

  16. The Impact of Autophagy on Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy represents a homeostatic cellular mechanism for the turnover of organelles and proteins, through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy facilitates cell survival through the recycling of metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can modulate other vital processes such as programmed cell death (e.g., apoptosis), inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms and thereby influence disease pathogenesis. Selective pathways can target distinct cargoes (e.g., mitochondria and proteins) for autophagic degradation. At present, the causal relationship between autophagy and various forms of regulated or nonregulated cell death remains unclear. Autophagy can occur in association with necrosis-like cell death triggered by caspase inhibition. Autophagy and apoptosis have been shown to be coincident or antagonistic, depending on experimental context, and share cross-talk between signal transduction elements. Autophagy may modulate the outcome of other regulated forms of cell death such as necroptosis. Recent advances suggest that autophagy can dampen inflammatory responses, including inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activation and maturation of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy may also act as regulator of caspase-1 dependent cell death (pyroptosis). Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases in which apoptosis or other forms of regulated cell death may play a cardinal role. PMID:24639873

  17. The Rab GTPase RabG3b positively regulates autophagy and immunity-associated hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Il; Cho, Hong Joo; Kim, Sung Ryul; Park, Ohkmae K

    2013-04-01

    A central component of the plant defense response to pathogens is the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death (PCD). Rapid and localized induction of HR PCD ensures that pathogen invasion is prevented. Autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of HR cell death, but the functional relationship between autophagy and HR PCD and the regulation of these processes during the plant immune response remain controversial. Here, we show that a small GTP-binding protein, RabG3b, plays a positive role in autophagy and promotes HR cell death in response to avirulent bacterial pathogens in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Transgenic plants overexpressing a constitutively active RabG3b (RabG3bCA) displayed accelerated, unrestricted HR PCD within 1 d of infection, in contrast to the autophagy-defective atg5-1 mutant, which gradually developed chlorotic cell death through uninfected sites over several days. Microscopic analyses showed the accumulation of autophagic structures during HR cell death in RabG3bCA cells. Our results suggest that RabG3b contributes to HR cell death via the activation of autophagy, which plays a positive role in plant immunity-triggered HR PCD.

  18. Overexpression of Serpinb1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells increases recombinant IgG productivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan; Brooks, Jeanne; Sealover, Natalie; George, Henry J; Kayser, Kevin J

    2015-01-10

    We report the discovery and validation of a novel CHO cell engineering target for improving IgG expression, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade B, member 1 (Serpinb1). Transcriptomic studies using microarrays revealed that Serpinb1 was up-regulated in cultures with IgG heavy and light chain transcription transiently repressed compared with cultures treated with non-targeting siRNA. As proof of concept, a lentiviral vector was employed to overexpress the Chinese Hamster Serpinb1 in a CHOZN(®) Glutamine Synthetase (-/-) recombinant IgG producing CHO line. The lentiviral stable pool demonstrated 4.2-fold SERPINB1 overexpression compared with the non-transduced control. The peak viable cell density (VCD) and peak IgG volumetric productivity of the lentiviral stable pool increased 1.3 and 2.0 fold, respectively, compared with the non-transduced control. For host cell engineering, a plasmid encoding SERPINB1 was transfected into the CHOZN(®) GS (-/-) host cell line to create several stable pools. Single-cell clones isolated from the pools were characterized for their SERPINB1 expression levels and growth. The clone (SERPINB1_OE_27) with the highest SERPINB1 expression had decreased peak viable cell density and exponential phase growth rate. Selected SERPINB1 OE clones were subsequently evaluated for their IgG expression capabilities using GS selection. Clone SERPINB1_OE_42 with moderate SERPINB1 overexpression demonstrated increased IgG productivity in "bulk" selection. We conclude that manipulating Serpinb1 expression can lead to increased recombinant IgG productivity, but the effect in host cell lines may vary by clone and by overexpression level. This work represents the ongoing effort in applying "-omics" findings to novel CHO host cell line engineering.

  19. Bcl-2 inhibitors potentiate the cytotoxic effects of radiation in Bcl-2 overexpressing radioresistant tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Takamitsu; Omura-Minamisawa, Motoko . E-mail: momuram@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp; Chao Cheng; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Ito, Megumi; Inoue, Tomio

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: Bcl-2, an inhibitor of apoptosis frequently shows elevated expression in human tumors, thus resulting in resistance to radiation therapy. Therefore, inhibiting Bcl-2 function may enhance the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Tetrocarcin A (TC-A) and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides exhibit antitumor activity by inhibiting Bcl-2 function and transcription, respectively. We investigated whether these antitumor agents would enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation in tumor cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Methods and materials: We used HeLa/bcl-2 cells, a stable Bcl-2-expressing cell line derived from wild-type HeLa (HeLa/wt) cells. Cells were incubated with TC-A and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides for 24 h after irradiation, and cell viability was then determined. Apoptotic cells were quantified by flow cytometric assay. Results: The HeLa/bcl-2 cells were more resistant to radiation than HeLa/wt cells. At concentrations that are not inherently cytotoxic, both TC-A and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides increased the cytotoxic effects of radiation in HeLa/bcl-2 cells, but not in HeLa/wt cells. However, in HeLa/bcl-2 cells, additional treatment with TC-A in combination with radiation did not significantly increase apoptosis. Conclusions: The present results suggest that TC-A and bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotides reduce radioresistance of tumor cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Therefore, a combination of radiotherapy and Bcl-2 inhibitors may prove to be a useful therapeutic approach for treating tumors that overexpress Bcl-2.

  20. Inhibition of regulated cell death by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Stefan; Dewitz, Christin; Fändrich, Fred; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Development of the means to efficiently and continuously renew missing and non-functional proteins in diseased cells remains a major goal in modern molecular medicine. While gene therapy has the potential to achieve this, substantial obstacles must be overcome before clinical application can be considered. A promising alternative approach is the direct delivery of non-permeant active biomolecules, such as oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins, to the affected cells with the purpose of ameliorating an advanced disease process. In addition to receptor-mediated endocytosis, cell-penetrating peptides are widely used as vectors for rapid translocation of conjugated molecules across cell membranes into intracellular compartments and the delivery of these therapeutic molecules is generally referred to as novel prospective protein therapy. As a broad coverage of the enormous amount of published data in this field is unrewarding, this review will provide a brief, focused overview of the technology and a summary of recent studies of the most commonly used protein transduction domains and their potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cellular damage and the prevention of regulated cell death. PMID:27048815

  1. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  2. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  3. Acute overexpression of lactate dehydrogenase-A perturbs beta-cell mitochondrial metabolism and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, E K; Zhao, C; Rutter, G A

    2000-07-01

    Islet beta-cells express low levels of lactate dehydrogenase and have high glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity. To determine whether this configuration favors oxidative glucose metabolism via mitochondria in the beta-cell and is important for beta-cell metabolic signal transduction, we have determined the effects on glucose metabolism and insulin secretion of acute overexpression of the skeletal muscle isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A. Monitored in single MIN6 beta-cells, LDH hyperexpression (achieved by intranuclear cDNA microinjection or adenoviral infection) diminished the response to glucose of both phases of increases in mitochondrial NAD(P)H, as well as increases in mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic free ATP, and cystolic free Ca2+. These effects were observed at all glucose concentrations, but were most pronounced at submaximal glucose levels. Correspondingly, adenoviral vector-mediated LDH-A overexpression reduced insulin secretion stimulated by 11 mmol/l glucose and the subsequent response to stimulation with 30 mmol/l glucose, but it was without significant effect when the concentration of glucose was raised acutely from 3 to 30 mmol/l. Thus, overexpression of LDH activity interferes with normal glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in the islet beta-cell type, and it may therefore be directly responsible for insulin secretory defects in some forms of type 2 diabetes. The results also reinforce the view that glucose-derived pyruvate metabolism in the mitochondrion is critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the beta-cell.

  4. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  5. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4.

  6. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  7. Homozygous mdm2 SNP309 cancer cells with compromised transcriptional elongation at p53 target genes are sensitive to induction of p53-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Melissa; Polotskaia, Alla; Bargonetti, Jill

    2015-10-27

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (T to G) in the mdm2 P2 promoter, mdm2 SNP309, leads to MDM2 overexpression promoting chemotherapy resistant cancers. Two mdm2 G/G SNP309 cancer cell lines, MANCA and A875, have compromised wild-type p53 that co-localizes with MDM2 on chromatin. We hypothesized that MDM2 in these cells inhibited transcription initiation at the p53 target genes p21 and puma. Surprisingly, following etoposide treatment transcription initiation occurred at the compromised target genes in MANCA and A875 cells similar to the T/T ML-1 cell line. In all cell lines tested there was equally robust recruitment of total and initiated RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We found that knockdown of MDM2 in G/G cells moderately increased expression of subsets of p53 target genes without increasing p53 stability. Importantly, etoposide and actinomycin D treatments increased histone H3K36 trimethylation in T/T, but not G/G cells, suggesting a G/G correlated inhibition of transcription elongation. We therefore tested a chemotherapeutic agent (8-amino-adenosine) that induces p53-independent cell death for higher clinically relevant cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that T/T and G/G mdm2 SNP309 cells were equally sensitive to 8-amino-adenosine induced cell death. In conclusion for cancer cells overexpressing MDM2, targeting MDM2 may be less effective than inducing p53-independent cell death.

  8. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:27460563

  9. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections.

  10. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  11. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:23915134

  12. DJ-1 protects against cell death following acute cardiac ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Dongworth, R K; Mukherjee, U A; Hall, A R; Astin, R; Ong, S-B; Yao, Z; Dyson, A; Szabadkai, G; Davidson, S M; Yellon, D M; Hausenloy, D J

    2014-01-01

    Novel therapeutic targets are required to protect the heart against cell death from acute ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI). Mutations in the DJ-1 (PARK7) gene in dopaminergic neurons induce mitochondrial dysfunction and a genetic form of Parkinson's disease. Genetic ablation of DJ-1 renders the brain more susceptible to cell death following ischemia–reperfusion in a model of stroke. Although DJ-1 is present in the heart, its role there is currently unclear. We sought to investigate whether mitochondrial DJ-1 may protect the heart against cell death from acute IRI by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of DJ-1 in HL-1 cardiac cells conferred the following beneficial effects: reduced cell death following simulated IRI (30.4±4.7% with DJ-1 versus 52.9±4.7% in control; n=5, P<0.05); delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening (a critical mediator of cell death) (260±33 s with DJ-1 versus 121±12 s in control; n=6, P<0.05); and induction of mitochondrial elongation (81.3±2.5% with DJ-1 versus 62.0±2.8% in control; n=6 cells, P<0.05). These beneficial effects of DJ-1 were absent in cells expressing the non-functional DJ-1L166P and DJ-1Cys106A mutants. Adult mice devoid of DJ-1 (KO) were found to be more susceptible to cell death from in vivo IRI with larger myocardial infarct sizes (50.9±3.5% DJ-1 KO versus 41.1±2.5% in DJ-1 WT; n≥7, P<0.05) and resistant to cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning. DJ-1 KO hearts showed increased mitochondrial fragmentation on electron microscopy, although there were no differences in calcium-induced MPTP opening, mitochondrial respiratory function or myocardial ATP levels. We demonstrate that loss of DJ-1 protects the heart from acute IRI cell death by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. We propose that DJ-1 may represent a novel therapeutic target for cardioprotection. PMID:24577080

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma overexpression suppresses proliferation of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the correlation between PPAR{gamma} expression and cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} overexpression reduces cell viability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show the synergistic effect of cell growth inhibition by a PPAR{gamma} agonist. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) plays an important role in the differentiation of intestinal cells and tissues. Our previous reports indicate that PPAR{gamma} is expressed at considerable levels in human colon cancer cells. This suggests that PPAR{gamma} expression may be an important factor for cell growth regulation in colon cancer. In this study, we investigated PPAR{gamma} expression in 4 human colon cancer cell lines, HT-29, LOVO, DLD-1, and Caco-2. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis revealed that the relative levels of PPAR{gamma} mRNA and protein in these cells were in the order HT-29 > LOVO > Caco-2 > DLD-1. We also found that PPAR{gamma} overexpression promoted cell growth inhibition in PPAR{gamma} lower-expressing cell lines (Caco-2 and DLD-1), but not in higher-expressing cells (HT-29 and LOVO). We observed a correlation between the level of PPAR{gamma} expression and the cells' sensitivity for proliferation.

  14. Nitric oxide released from JS-K induces cell death by mitotic catastrophe as part of necrosis in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Günzle, Jessica; Osterberg, Nadja; Saavedra, Joseph E; Weyerbrock, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) donor JS-K is specifically activated by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in GST-overexpressing cells. We have shown the induction of cell death in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells at high JS-K doses but the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NO-induced cell death is triggered by induction of apoptotic or necrotic pathways. For the first time, we demonstrate that NO induces cell death via mitotic catastrophe (MC) with non-apoptotic mechanisms in GBM cells. Moreover, the level of morphological changes indicating MC correlates with increased necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that MC is the main mechanism by which GBM cells undergo cell death after treatment with JS-K associated with necrosis rather than apoptosis. In addition, we show that PARP1 is not an exclusive marker for late apoptosis but is also involved in MC. Activating an alternative way of cell death can be useful for the multimodal cancer therapy of GBM known for its strong anti-apoptotic mechanisms and drug resistance. PMID:27584787

  15. High Cell Surface Death Receptor Expression Determines Type I Versus Type II Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Peterson, Kevin L.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula; Lee, Sun-Hee; Zhang, Jin-San; Koenig, Alexander; Bronk, Steve; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Gores, Gregory J.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there are two signaling pathways leading from ligation of the Fas receptor to induction of apoptosis. Type I signaling involves Fas ligand-induced recruitment of large amounts of FADD (FAS-associated death domain protein) and procaspase 8, leading to direct activation of caspase 3, whereas type II signaling involves Bid-mediated mitochondrial perturbation to amplify a more modest death receptor-initiated signal. The biochemical basis for this dichotomy has previously been unclear. Here we show that type I cells have a longer half-life for Fas message and express higher amounts of cell surface Fas, explaining the increased recruitment of FADD and subsequent signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that cells with type II Fas signaling (Jurkat or HCT-15) can signal through a type I pathway upon forced receptor overexpression and that shRNA-mediated Fas down-regulation converts cells with type I signaling (A498) to type II signaling. Importantly, the same cells can exhibit type I signaling for Fas and type II signaling for TRAIL (TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), indicating that the choice of signaling pathway is related to the specific receptor, not some other cellular feature. Additional experiments revealed that up-regulation of cell surface death receptor 5 levels by treatment with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin converted TRAIL signaling in HCT116 cells from type II to type I. Collectively, these results suggest that the type I/type II dichotomy reflects differences in cell surface death receptor expression. PMID:21865165

  16. Glycomic and sialoproteomic data of gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing ST3GAL4

    PubMed Central

    Mereiter, Stefan; Magalhães, Ana; Adamczyk, Barbara; Jin, Chunsheng; Almeida, Andreia; Drici, Lylia; Ibáñez-Vea, Maria; Larsen, Martin R.; Kolarich, Daniel; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Reis, Celso A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma MKN45 cells stably transfected with the full-length ST3GAL4 gene were characterised by glycomic and sialoproteomic analysis. Complementary strategies were applied to assess the glycomic alterations induced by ST3GAL4 overexpression. The N- and O-glycome data were generated in two parallel structural analyzes, based on PGC-ESI-MS/MS. Data on glycan structure identification and relative abundance in ST3GAL4 overexpressing cells and respective mock control are presented. The sialoproteomic analysis based on titanium-dioxide enrichment of sialopeptides with subsequent LC-MS/MS identification was performed. This analysis identified 47 proteins with significantly increased sialylation. The data in this article is associated with the research article published in Biochim Biophys Acta “Glycomic analysis of gastric carcinoma cells discloses glycans as modulators of RON receptor tyrosine kinase activation in cancer” [1]. PMID:27077082

  17. Glycomic and sialoproteomic data of gastric carcinoma cells overexpressing ST3GAL4.

    PubMed

    Mereiter, Stefan; Magalhães, Ana; Adamczyk, Barbara; Jin, Chunsheng; Almeida, Andreia; Drici, Lylia; Ibáñez-Vea, Maria; Larsen, Martin R; Kolarich, Daniel; Karlsson, Niclas G; Reis, Celso A

    2016-06-01

    Gastric carcinoma MKN45 cells stably transfected with the full-length ST3GAL4 gene were characterised by glycomic and sialoproteomic analysis. Complementary strategies were applied to assess the glycomic alterations induced by ST3GAL4 overexpression. The N- and O-glycome data were generated in two parallel structural analyzes, based on PGC-ESI-MS/MS. Data on glycan structure identification and relative abundance in ST3GAL4 overexpressing cells and respective mock control are presented. The sialoproteomic analysis based on titanium-dioxide enrichment of sialopeptides with subsequent LC-MS/MS identification was performed. This analysis identified 47 proteins with significantly increased sialylation. The data in this article is associated with the research article published in Biochim Biophys Acta "Glycomic analysis of gastric carcinoma cells discloses glycans as modulators of RON receptor tyrosine kinase activation in cancer" [1].

  18. Nucleolin overexpression in breast cancer cell sub-populations with different stem-like phenotype enables targeted intracellular delivery of synergistic drug combination.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Nuno A; Rodrigues, Ana S; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Alves, Vera; Gregório, Ana C; Valério-Fernandes, Ângela; Gomes-da-Silva, Lígia C; Rosa, Manuel Santos; Moura, Vera; Ramalho-Santos, João; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (CSC) are thought responsible for tumor growth and relapse, metastization and active evasion to standard chemotherapy. The recognition that CSC may originate from non-stem cancer cells (non-SCC) through plastic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition turned these into relevant cell targets. Of crucial importance for successful therapeutic intervention is the identification of surface receptors overexpressed in both CSC and non-SCC. Cell surface nucleolin has been described as overexpressed in cancer cells as well as a tumor angiogenic marker. Herein we have addressed the questions on whether nucleolin was a common receptor among breast CSC and non-SCC and whether it could be exploited for targeting purposes. Liposomes functionalized with the nucleolin-binding F3 peptide, targeted simultaneously, nucleolin-overexpressing putative breast CSC and non-SCC, which was paralleled by OCT4 and NANOG mRNA levels in cells from triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) origin. In murine embryonic stem cells, both nucleolin mRNA levels and F3 peptide-targeted liposomes cellular association were dependent on the stemness status. An in vivo tumorigenic assay suggested that surface nucleolin overexpression per se, could be associated with the identification of highly tumorigenic TNBC cells. This proposed link between nucleolin expression and the stem-like phenotype in TNBC, enabled 100% cell death mediated by F3 peptide-targeted synergistic drug combination, suggesting the potential to abrogate the plasticity and adaptability associated with CSC and non-SCC. Ultimately, nucleolin-specific therapeutic tools capable of simultaneous debulk multiple cellular compartments of the tumor microenvironment may pave the way towards a specific treatment for TNBC patient care.

  19. Understanding Cone Photoreceptor Cell Death in Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Livia S; Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2016-01-01

    Colour vision is only achieved in the presence of healthy and functional cone photoreceptors found in the retina. It is an essential component of human vision and usually the first complaint patients undergoing vision degeneration have is the loss of daylight colour vision. Therefore, an understanding of the biology and basic mechanisms behind cone death under the degenerative state of retinal dystrophies and how the activation of the apoptotic pathway is triggered will provide valuable knowledge. It will also have broader applications for a spectrum of visual disorders and will be critical for future advances in translational research. PMID:26427416

  20. Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression in human erythroleukemia cells but only cyclopamine has a pro-apoptotic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezali, Lamia; Leger, David Yannick; Limami, Youness; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Beneytout, Jean-Louis; Liagre, Bertrand

    2013-04-15

    Erythroleukemia is generally associated with a very poor response and survival to current available therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been described to play a crucial role in the proliferation and differentiation of leukemia cells, this enzyme seems to play an important role in chemoresistance in different cancer types. Previously, we demonstrated that diosgenin, a plant steroid, induced apoptosis in HEL cells with concomitant COX-2 overexpression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of cyclopamine and jervine, two steroidal alkaloids with similar structures, on HEL and TF1a human erythroleukemia cell lines and, for the first time, their effect on COX-2 expression. Cyclopamine, but not jervine, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in these cells. Both compounds induced COX-2 overexpression which was responsible for apoptosis resistance. In jervine-treated cells, COX-2 overexpression was NF-κB dependent. Inhibition of NF-κB reduced COX-2 overexpression and induced apoptosis. In addition, cyclopamine induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression via PKC activation. Inhibition of the PKC pathway reduced both apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression in both cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the p38/COX-2 pathway was involved in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis since p38 inhibition reduced COX-2 overexpression and increased apoptosis in both cell lines. - Highlights: ► Cyclopamine alone but not jervine induces apoptosis in human erythroleukemia cells. ► Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression. ► COX-2 overexpression is implicated in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis. ► Apoptotic potential of jervine is restrained by NF-κB pathway activation. ► PKC is involved in cyclopamine-induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression.

  1. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  2. Overexpression of NTRK1 Promotes Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells into Cholinergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; He, Feng; Zhong, Zhuoyuan; Lv, Ruiyan; Xiao, Songhua; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase type 1 (NTRK1) plays critical roles in proliferation, differentiation, and survival of cholinergic neurons; however, it remains unknown whether enhanced expression of NTRK1 in neural stem cells (NSCs) can promote their differentiation into mature neurons. In this study, a plasmid encoding the rat NTRK1 gene was constructed and transfected into C17.2 mouse neural stem cells (NSCs). NTRK1 overexpression in C17.2 cells was confirmed by western blot. The NSCs overexpressing NTRK1 and the C17.2 NSCs transfected by an empty plasmid vector were treated with or without 100 ng/mL nerve growth factor (NGF) for 7 days. Expression of the cholinergic cell marker, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), was detected by florescent immunocytochemistry (ICC). In the presence of NGF induction, the NSCs overexpressing NTRK1 differentiated into ChAT-immunopositive cells at 3-fold higher than the NSCs transfected by the plasmid vector (26% versus 9%, P < 0.05). The data suggest that elevated NTRK1 expression increases differentiation of NSCs into cholinergic neurons under stimulation of NGF. The approach also represents an efficient strategy for generation of cholinergic neurons. PMID:26509167

  3. Measuring Cell Death by Propidium Iodide Uptake and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Scott, Adrian P; Marfell, Brooke J; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) is a small fluorescent molecule that binds to DNA but cannot passively traverse into cells that possess an intact plasma membrane. PI uptake versus exclusion can be used to discriminate dead cells, in which plasma membranes become permeable regardless of the mechanism of death, from live cells with intact membranes. PI is excited by wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm and emits light between 600 and 700 nm, and is therefore compatible with lasers and photodetectors commonly available in flow cytometers. This protocol for PI staining can be used to quantitate cell death in most modern research facilities and universities. PMID:27371595

  4. Morphological and cytochemical determination of cell death by apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Burton E.; Budd, Ralph C.

    2007-01-01

    Several modes of cell death are now recognized, including necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. Oftentimes the distinctions between these various modes may not be apparent, although the precise mode may be physiologically important. Accordingly, it is often desirable to be able to classify the mode of cell death. Apoptosis was originally defined by structural alterations in cells observable by transmitted light and electron microscopy. Today, a wide variety of imaging and cytochemical techniques are available for the investigation of apoptosis. This review will highlight many of these methods, and provide a critique on the advantages and disadvantages associated with them for the specific identification of apoptotic cells in culture and tissues. PMID:18000678

  5. Transcriptomics and functional genomics of ROS-induced cell death regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1.

    PubMed

    Brosché, Mikael; Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-02-01

    Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR. PMID:24550736

  6. Transcriptomics and Functional Genomics of ROS-Induced Cell Death Regulation by RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1

    PubMed Central

    Salojärvi, Jarkko; Cui, Fuqiang; Sipari, Nina; Leppälä, Johanna; Lamminmäki, Airi; Tomai, Gloria; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Reddy, Ramesha A.; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to changes in environmental conditions are mediated by a network of signaling events leading to downstream responses, including changes in gene expression and activation of cell death programs. Arabidopsis thaliana RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) has been proposed to regulate plant stress responses by protein-protein interactions with transcription factors. Furthermore, the rcd1 mutant has defective control of cell death in response to apoplastic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Combining transcriptomic and functional genomics approaches we first used microarray analysis in a time series to study changes in gene expression after apoplastic ROS treatment in rcd1. To identify a core set of cell death regulated genes, RCD1-regulated genes were clustered together with other array experiments from plants undergoing cell death or treated with various pathogens, plant hormones or other chemicals. Subsequently, selected rcd1 double mutants were constructed to further define the genetic requirements for the execution of apoplastic ROS induced cell death. Through the genetic analysis we identified WRKY70 and SGT1b as cell death regulators functioning downstream of RCD1 and show that quantitative rather than qualitative differences in gene expression related to cell death appeared to better explain the outcome. Allocation of plant energy to defenses diverts resources from growth. Recently, a plant response termed stress-induced morphogenic response (SIMR) was proposed to regulate the balance between defense and growth. Using a rcd1 double mutant collection we show that SIMR is mostly independent of the classical plant defense signaling pathways and that the redox balance is involved in development of SIMR. PMID:24550736

  7. NF-κB p65 repression by the sesquiterpene lactone, Helenalin, contributes to the induction of autophagy cell death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Interestingly, several anticancer agents were found to exert their anticancer effects by triggering autophagy. Emerging data suggest that autophagy represents a novel mechanism that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Pharmacologically active natural compounds such as those from marine, terrestrial plants and animals represent a promising resource for novel anticancer drugs. There are several prominent examples from the past proving the success of natural products and derivatives exhibiting anticancer activity. Helenalin, a sesquiterpene lactone has been demonstrated to have potent anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. Albeit previous studies demonstrating helenalin’s multi modal action on cellular proliferative and apoptosis, the mechanisms underlying its action are largely unexplained. Methods To deduce the mechanistic action of helenalin, cancer cells were treated with the drug at various concentrations and time intervals. Using western blot, FACS analysis, overexpression and knockdown studies, cellular signaling pathways were interrogated focusing on apoptosis and autophagy markers. Results We show here that helenalin induces sub-G1 arrest, apoptosis, caspase cleavage and increases the levels of the autophagic markers. Suppression of caspase cleavage by the pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk, suppressed induction of LC3-B and Atg12 and reduced autophagic cell death, indicating caspase activity was essential for autophagic cell death induced by helenalin. Additionally, helenalin suppressed NF-κB p65 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. Exogenous overexpression of p65 was accompanied by reduced levels of cell death whereas siRNA mediated suppression led to augmented levels of caspase cleavage, autophagic cell death markers and increased cell death. Conclusions Taken together, these results show that helenalin mediated

  8. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells.

  9. WISP-1 overexpression upregulates cell proliferation in human salivary gland carcinomas via regulating MMP-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fu-Jun; Wang, Xin-Juan; Zhou, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Background WISP-1 is a member of the CCN family of growth factors and has been reported to play an important role in tumorigenesis by triggering downstream events via integrin signaling. However, little is known about the role of WISP-1 in proliferation of salivary gland carcinoma (SGC) cells. Methods In this study, we investigated the WISP-1 expression in SGC tissues via immunohistochemical staining, Western blotting assay, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method, and then evaluated the regulatory role of WISP-1 in the growth of SGC A-253 cells. In addition, the role of MMP-2 in the WISP-1-mediated growth regulation was also investigated. Results It was demonstrated that the WISP-1 expression was upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in 15 of 21 SGC tumor tissues, compared to the non-tumor tissues (five of 21), associated with the lymph node dissection and bone invasion. The in vitro CCK-8 assay and colony-forming assay demonstrated that the exogenous WISP-1 treatment or the WISP-1 overexpression promoted the growth of A-253 cells. In addition, we confirmed that the WISP-1 overexpression upregulated the MMP-2 expression in A-253 cells with the gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies, and that the MMP-2 knockdown attenuated the WISP-1-mediated growth promotion of A-253 cells. Conclusion We found that WISP-1 was overexpressed in the human SGCs, and the WISP-1 overexpression promoted the salivary gland cell proliferation via upregulating MMP-2 expression. Our study recognized the oncogenic role of WISP-1 in human SGCs, which could serve as a potential target for anticancer therapy. PMID:27799801

  10. A matter of life and cell death.

    PubMed

    Evan, G; Littlewood, T

    1998-08-28

    In multicellular organisms, mutations in somatic cells affecting critical genes that regulate cell proliferation and survival cause fatal cancers. Repair of the damage is one obvious option, although the relative inconsequence of individual cells in metazoans means that it is often a "safer" strategy to ablate the offending cell. Not surprisingly, corruption of the machinery that senses or implements DNA damage greatly predisposes to cancer. Nonetheless, even when oncogenic mutations do occur, there exist potent mechanisms that limit the expansion of affected cells by suppressing their proliferation or triggering their suicide. Growing understanding of these innate mechanisms is suggesting novel therapeutic strategies for cancer.

  11. Cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in experimental colon carcinogenesis: intervening with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2015-01-01

    Relative imbalance in the pathways regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, or cell death marks a prerequisite for neoplasm. C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis and a selective COX-2 inhibitor along with piroxicam, a traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug was used to investigate the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proinflammatory transcription factor NFκB in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Cell cycle regulators [cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), CDK4, and p53], NFκB (p65) pathway, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated by gene and protein expression, whereas apoptosis was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and apoptotic bleb assay. Molecular docking of ligand protein interaction was done to validate the in vivo results. Cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4 were overexpressed in DMH, whereas piroxicam and c-phycocyanin promoted the cell cycle arrest by downregulating them. Both drugs mediated apoptosis through p53 activation. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin also stimulated antiproliferation by restraining PCNA expression and reduced cell survival via inhibiting NFκB (p65) pathway. Molecular docking revealed that phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of c-phycocyanin) interact with DNA binding site of NFκB. Inhibition of cyclin/CDK complex by piroxicam and c-phycocyanin affects the expression of p53 in colon cancer followed by downregulation of NFκB and PCNA levels, thus substantiating the antineoplastic role of these agents. PMID:25825916

  12. Melatonin enhances hyperthermia-induced apoptotic cell death in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Carlos; Cabrera, Javier; Perdomo, Juan; Estévez, Francisco; Loro, Juan F; Reiter, Russel J; Quintana, José

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine with a wide range of biological functions. In addition to modulating circadian rhythms, it plays important roles in the health as an antioxidant. Melatonin has also the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and to enhance the antitumoral activity of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the effect of melatonin on hyperthermia-induced apoptosis was explored using human leukemia cells. The results demonstrate that melatonin greatly improved the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia in U937 cells. The potentiation of cell death was achieved with 1 mmol/L concentrations of the indoleamine but not with concentrations close to physiological levels in blood (1 nmol/L). This effect was associated to an enhancement of the apoptotic response, revealed by an increase in cells with hypodiploid DNA content and activation of multiple caspases (caspase-2, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9). Melatonin also increased hyperthermia-induced Bid activation as well as translocation of Bax from the cytosol to mitochondria and cytochrome c release. Hyperthermia-provoked apoptosis and potentiation by melatonin were abrogated by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) as well as by specific inhibitors against caspase-8 or caspase-3. In contrast, blocking of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis either with a caspase-9 inhibitor or overexpressing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 (U937/Bcl-2) reduced the number of apoptotic cells in response to hyperthermia but it was unable to suppress melatonin enhancement. Melatonin appears to modulate the apoptotic response triggered by hyperthermia in a cell type-specific manner as similar results were observed in HL-60 but not in K562 or MOLT-3 cells.

  13. Melatonin enhances hyperthermia-induced apoptotic cell death in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Carlos; Cabrera, Javier; Perdomo, Juan; Estévez, Francisco; Loro, Juan F; Reiter, Russel J; Quintana, José

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine with a wide range of biological functions. In addition to modulating circadian rhythms, it plays important roles in the health as an antioxidant. Melatonin has also the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and to enhance the antitumoral activity of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the effect of melatonin on hyperthermia-induced apoptosis was explored using human leukemia cells. The results demonstrate that melatonin greatly improved the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia in U937 cells. The potentiation of cell death was achieved with 1 mmol/L concentrations of the indoleamine but not with concentrations close to physiological levels in blood (1 nmol/L). This effect was associated to an enhancement of the apoptotic response, revealed by an increase in cells with hypodiploid DNA content and activation of multiple caspases (caspase-2, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9). Melatonin also increased hyperthermia-induced Bid activation as well as translocation of Bax from the cytosol to mitochondria and cytochrome c release. Hyperthermia-provoked apoptosis and potentiation by melatonin were abrogated by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) as well as by specific inhibitors against caspase-8 or caspase-3. In contrast, blocking of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis either with a caspase-9 inhibitor or overexpressing the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 (U937/Bcl-2) reduced the number of apoptotic cells in response to hyperthermia but it was unable to suppress melatonin enhancement. Melatonin appears to modulate the apoptotic response triggered by hyperthermia in a cell type-specific manner as similar results were observed in HL-60 but not in K562 or MOLT-3 cells. PMID:27465521

  14. External and internal triggers of cell death in yeast.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, yeast was confirmed as a useful eukaryotic model system to decipher the complex mechanisms and networks occurring in higher eukaryotes, particularly in mammalian cells, in physiological as well in pathological conditions. This article focuses attention on the contribution of yeast in the study of a very complex scenario, because of the number and interconnection of pathways, represented by cell death. Yeast, although it is a unicellular organism, possesses the basal machinery of different kinds of cell death occurring in higher eukaryotes, i.e., apoptosis, regulated necrosis and autophagy. Here we report the current knowledge concerning the yeast orthologs of main mammalian cell death regulators and executors, the role of organelles and compartments, and the cellular phenotypes observed in the different forms of cell death in response to external and internal triggers. Thanks to the ease of genetic manipulation of this microorganism, yeast strains expressing human genes that promote or counteract cell death, onset of tumors and neurodegenerative diseases have been constructed. The effects on yeast cells of some of these genes are also presented.

  15. Alpha-tubulin enhanced renal tubular cell proliferation and tissue repair but reduced cell death and cell-crystal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Manissorn, Juthatip; Khamchun, Supaporn; Vinaiphat, Arada; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals on renal tubular epithelial cells is a critical event for kidney stone disease that triggers many cascades of cellular response. Our previous expression proteomics study identified several altered proteins in MDCK renal tubular cells induced by CaOx crystals. However, functional significance of those changes had not been investigated. The present study thus aimed to define functional roles of such proteome data. Global protein network analysis using STRING software revealed α-tubulin, which was decreased, as one of central nodes of protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of α-tubulin (pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A) was then performed and its efficacy was confirmed. pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A could maintain levels of α-tubulin and its direct interacting partner, vimentin, after crystal exposure. Also, pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A successfully reduced cell death to almost the basal level and increased cell proliferation after crystal exposure. Additionally, tissue repair capacity was improved in pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A cells. Moreover, cell-crystal adhesion was reduced by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. Finally, levels of potential crystal receptors (HSP90, HSP70, and α-enolase) on apical membrane were dramatically reduced to basal levels by pcDNA6.2-TUBA1A. These findings implicate that α-tubulin has protective roles in kidney stone disease by preventing cell death and cell-crystal adhesion, but on the other hand, enhancing cell proliferation and tissue repair function. PMID:27363348

  16. Inhibition of B-cell death does not restore T-cell-dependent immune responses in CD40-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Jesús; Díez, Miguel A; Muñiz, María; Buelta, Luis; Núñez, Gabriel; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Merino, Ramón

    2003-01-01

    Signalling through CD40 is essential for the development of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses, germinal centres and B-cell memory against T-dependent antigens. In addition, engagement of CD40 in B cells promotes cell survival by inducing the expression of anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family of cell-death regulators. In the present study we analysed whether T-dependent immune responses can be developed in mice deficient in CD40 if the anti-apoptotic activity mediated by the engagement of CD40 in B cells is compensated by the constitutive over-expression of anti-apoptotic genes of the bcl-2 family. We showed that the over-expression of either hbcl-2 or hbcl-xL transgenes in B cells is not sufficient to restore IgG antibody responses and germinal centre formation in CD40-deficient mice. These results indicate that CD40 functions, other than those mediated through survival, are required for the establishment of T-dependent B-cell responses. PMID:12871216

  17. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  18. Therapeutic approaches to preventing cell death in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Anna; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect the lives of millions of patients and their families. Due to the complexity of these diseases and our limited understanding of their pathogenesis, the design of therapeutic agents that can effectively treat these diseases has been challenging. Huntington disease (HD) is one of several neurological disorders with few therapeutic options. HD, like numerous other neurodegenerative diseases, involves extensive neuronal cell loss. One potential strategy to combat HD and other neurodegenerative disorders is to intervene in the execution of neuronal cell death. Inhibiting neuronal cell death pathways may slow the development of neurodegeneration. However, discovering small molecule inhibitors of neuronal cell death remains a significant challenge. Here, we review candidate therapeutic targets controlling cell death mechanisms that have been the focus of research in HD, as well as an emerging strategy that has been applied to developing small molecule inhibitors—fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). FBDD has been successfully used in both industry and academia to identify selective and potent small molecule inhibitors, with a focus on challenging proteins that are not amenable to traditional high-throughput screening approaches. FBDD has been used to generate potent leads, pre-clinical candidates, and has led to the development of an FDA approved drug. This approach can be valuable for identifying modulators of cell-death-regulating proteins; such compounds may prove to be the key to halting the progression of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22967354

  19. Therapeutic approaches to preventing cell death in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Anna; Stockwell, Brent R

    2012-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect the lives of millions of patients and their families. Due to the complexity of these diseases and our limited understanding of their pathogenesis, the design of therapeutic agents that can effectively treat these diseases has been challenging. Huntington disease (HD) is one of several neurological disorders with few therapeutic options. HD, like numerous other neurodegenerative diseases, involves extensive neuronal cell loss. One potential strategy to combat HD and other neurodegenerative disorders is to intervene in the execution of neuronal cell death. Inhibiting neuronal cell death pathways may slow the development of neurodegeneration. However, discovering small molecule inhibitors of neuronal cell death remains a significant challenge. Here, we review candidate therapeutic targets controlling cell death mechanisms that have been the focus of research in HD, as well as an emerging strategy that has been applied to developing small molecule inhibitors-fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD). FBDD has been successfully used in both industry and academia to identify selective and potent small molecule inhibitors, with a focus on challenging proteins that are not amenable to traditional high-throughput screening approaches. FBDD has been used to generate potent leads, pre-clinical candidates, and has led to the development of an FDA approved drug. This approach can be valuable for identifying modulators of cell-death-regulating proteins; such compounds may prove to be the key to halting the progression of HD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22967354

  20. Solamargine triggers hepatoma cell death through apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    XIE, XIAODONG; ZHU, HAITAO; YANG, HUIJIAN; HUANG, WENSI; WU, YINGYING; WANG, YING; LUO, YANLING; WANG, DONGQING; SHAO, GENBAO

    2015-01-01

    Solamargine (SM), a steroidal alkaloid glycoside extracted from the traditional Chinese herb Solanum incanum, has been evidenced to inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis in a number of human cancer cell lines. In the present study, the anticancer effect of SM and underlying molecular mechanism of SM-induced apoptosis were investigated on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC7721 and HepG2. The proliferation effects of SM on the SMMC7721 and HepG2 cell lines were evaluated using MTT and colony formation assays. In addition, the percentage of apoptosis was measured using an Annexin V/propidium iodide staining method and the cell cycle distribution mediated by SM was analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, caspase-9, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna) and Ki67 proteins were examined to further demonstrate the proliferate and apoptosis effects of SM on the hepatoma cells. The results indicated that SM effectively inhibited hepatoma cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. SM resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in the two cell lines. In addition, SM downregulated the levels of proliferation-associated (Ki67 and pcna) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) proteins, and promoted the activity of apoptosis-associated proteins (Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9). Therefore, the activation of the Bcl-2/Bax and caspase signaling pathways may be involved in the SM-induced apoptosis of hepatoma cells. PMID:26170994

  1. Microenvironmental Effects of Cell Death in Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Christopher D; Ford, Catriona A; Voss, Jorine J L P

    2016-01-01

    Although apoptosis is well recognized as a cell death program with clear anticancer roles, accumulating evidence linking apoptosis with tissue repair and regeneration indicates that its relationship with malignant disease is more complex than previously thought. Here we review how the responses of neighboring cells in the microenvironment of apoptotic tumor cells may contribute to the cell birth/cell death disequilibrium that provides the basis for cancerous tissue emergence and growth. We describe the bioactive properties of apoptotic cells and consider, in particular, how apoptosis of tumor cells can engender a range of responses including pro-oncogenic signals having proliferative, angiogenic, reparatory, and immunosuppressive features. Drawing on the parallels between wound healing, tissue regeneration and cancer, we propose the concept of the "onco-regenerative niche," a cell death-driven generic network of tissue repair and regenerative mechanisms that are hijacked in cancer. Finally, we consider how the responses to cell death in tumors can be targeted to provide more effective and long-lasting therapies. PMID:27558817

  2. Lung epithelial cell death induced by oil-dispersant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Shi, Yongli; Major, Danielle; Yang, Zhanjun

    2012-08-01

    The dispersants used in oil spill disasters are claimed to be safe, but increased solubility of high-molecular-weight components in crude oil is of public health concern. The water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of crude oil mixed with dispersants may become airborne and cause lung epithelial damage when inhaled. This study was designed to examine the cell death and related death pathways of lung epithelial cells in response to WAF. Cultured A549 cells were treated for 2 or 24h with different concentrations of WAF. The WAF was prepared by mixing each of the dispersants (Corexit EC9527A, Corexit EC9500A and Corexit EC9580A) with crude oil for extraction with PBS. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT assay, lactate dehydrogenase assay, morphology and cleaved caspase 9 protein, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 were all used to measure cell viability, necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy quantitation, respectively. Results showed that the WAF of oil-dispersant mixtures caused cell death in the lung epithelial cells, in a dose-dependent manner, with the major cellular pathways of necrosis and apoptosis involved. Autophagy also occurred in cells exposed to WAF mixtures at lower concentrations before any detectable cell death, indicating greater sensitivity to WAF exposure. The three types of cell behavior, namely necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy, may play different roles in oil spill-related respiratory disorders. PMID:22504303

  3. Overexpression of SOCS3 inhibits astrogliogenesis and promotes maintenance of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang; Hata, Ryuji; Zhu, Pengxiang; Ma, Yong-Jie; Tanaka, Junya; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Hashimoto, Koji; Niinobe, Michio; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Sakanaka, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the effects of suppressors of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) on neural stem cell fate, stem cells were infected with an adenoviral vector expressing SOCS3. Three days later, western blot analysis and immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the protein level of MAP2 and the number of MAP2-positive cells were significantly increased in SOCS3-transfected cells, whereas the protein level of GFAP and the number of GFAP-positive cells were significantly decreased. Furthermore, promoter assay revealed a significant reduction in the transcriptional level of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in the transfected cells. In addition, the mRNA levels of Notch family member (notch1) and inhibitory basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors (hes5 and id3) were significantly up-regulated 1 day after overexpression of SOCS3. Three days after transfection, the mRNA level of hes5 was significantly decreased, whereas that of notch1 was still up-regulated. Moreover, all of SOCS3-positive cells expressed Nestin protein but did not express MAP2 or GFAP proteins. These data indicate that overexpression of SOCS3 induced neurogenesis and inhibited astrogliogenesis in neural stem cells. Our data also show that SOCS3 promoted maintenance of neural stem cells.

  4. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  5. Cdk5r1 Overexpression Induces Primary β-Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Draney, Carrie; Hobson, Amanda E.; Grover, Samuel G.; Jack, Benjamin O.; Tessem, Jeffery S.

    2016-01-01

    Decreased β-cell mass is a hallmark of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Islet transplantation as a method of diabetes therapy is hampered by the paucity of transplant ready islets. Understanding the pathways controlling islet proliferation may be used to increase functional β-cell mass through transplantation or by enhanced growth of endogenous β-cells. We have shown that the transcription factor Nkx6.1 induces β-cell proliferation by upregulating the orphan nuclear hormone receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Using expression analysis to define Nkx6.1-independent mechanisms by which Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 induce β-cell proliferation, we demonstrated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit 1 (Cdk5r1) is upregulated by Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 but not by Nkx6.1. Overexpression of Cdk5r1 is sufficient to induce primary rat β-cell proliferation while maintaining glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Overexpression of Cdk5r1 in β-cells confers protection against apoptosis induced by etoposide and thapsigargin, but not camptothecin. The Cdk5 kinase complex inhibitor roscovitine blocks islet proliferation, suggesting that Cdk5r1 mediated β-cell proliferation is a kinase dependent event. Overexpression of Cdk5r1 results in pRb phosphorylation, which is inhibited by roscovitine treatment. These data demonstrate that activation of the Cdk5 kinase complex is sufficient to induce β-cell proliferation while maintaining glucose stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:26788519

  6. Cdk5r1 Overexpression Induces Primary β-Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Draney, Carrie; Hobson, Amanda E; Grover, Samuel G; Jack, Benjamin O; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-01-01

    Decreased β-cell mass is a hallmark of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Islet transplantation as a method of diabetes therapy is hampered by the paucity of transplant ready islets. Understanding the pathways controlling islet proliferation may be used to increase functional β-cell mass through transplantation or by enhanced growth of endogenous β-cells. We have shown that the transcription factor Nkx6.1 induces β-cell proliferation by upregulating the orphan nuclear hormone receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Using expression analysis to define Nkx6.1-independent mechanisms by which Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 induce β-cell proliferation, we demonstrated that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit 1 (Cdk5r1) is upregulated by Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 but not by Nkx6.1. Overexpression of Cdk5r1 is sufficient to induce primary rat β-cell proliferation while maintaining glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Overexpression of Cdk5r1 in β-cells confers protection against apoptosis induced by etoposide and thapsigargin, but not camptothecin. The Cdk5 kinase complex inhibitor roscovitine blocks islet proliferation, suggesting that Cdk5r1 mediated β-cell proliferation is a kinase dependent event. Overexpression of Cdk5r1 results in pRb phosphorylation, which is inhibited by roscovitine treatment. These data demonstrate that activation of the Cdk5 kinase complex is sufficient to induce β-cell proliferation while maintaining glucose stimulated insulin secretion.

  7. Role of Aif1 in regulation of cell death under environmental stress in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ma, Feiyang; Zhang, Yueqi; Wang, Yuzhou; Wan, Yajuan; Miao, Yunheng; Ma, Tianyu; Yu, Qilin; Li, Mingchun

    2016-09-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a conserved flavoprotein localized in the mitochondria, inducing apoptosis after translocation into the nucleus. However, its role in the important fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, remains to be investigated. In this study, we find that the C. albicans AIF protein Aif1, similar to its homologues in other organisms, is localized at the mitochondria and translocated into the nucleus under apoptosis-inducing conditions. Moreover, deletion of AIF1 causes attenuated apoptosis in this pathogen under apoptosis-inducing conditions, such as the treatment of 2 mm H2 O2 , 10 mm acetic acid or 0.08 mg/l caspofungin, and its overexpression enhances this process. Interestingly, treatment with high levels of these agents leads to reversed sensitivity of aif1Δ/Δ and the overexpression strain AIF1ov. In addition, the virulence of C. albicans is not affected by deletion or overexpression of AIF1. Hence, C. albicans Aif1, as a mitochondria-localized protein, plays a dual role in the regulation of cell death under different concentrations of the stress-caused agents. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27121326

  8. A role for c-myc in chemically induced renal-cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Cleveland, J L; Stevens, J L

    1997-01-01

    A variety of genes, including c-myc, are activated by chemical toxicants in vivo and in vitro. Although enforced c-myc expression induces apoptosis after withdrawing survival factors, it is not clear if activation of the endogenous c-myc gene is an apoptotic signal after toxicant exposure. The renal tubular epithelium is a target for many toxicants. c-myc expression is activated by tubular damage. In quiescent LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells, c-myc but not max or mad mRNA is induced by the nephrotoxicant S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC). The kinetics of DCVC-induced c-myc expression and apoptosis suggested an association between cell death and prolonged activation of c-myc expression after toxicant exposure. Accordingly, prolonged activation of an estrogen receptor-Myc fusion construct, but not a construct in which a c-Myc transactivation domain had been deleted, was sufficient to induce apoptosis in LLC-PK1 cells. Moreover, under conditions in which necrosis was the predominant cell death pathway caused by DCVC in parental cells, overexpressing c-myc biased the cell death pathway toward apoptosis. DCVC also induced ornithine decarboxylase (odc) mRNA and activated the odc promoter. Activation of the odc promoter by DCVC required consensus c-Myc-Max binding sites in odc intron 1. Inhibiting ODC activity with alpha-difluoromethylornithine delayed DCVC-induced cell death. Therefore, odc is a target gene in the DCVC apoptotic pathway involving c-myc activation and contributes to apoptosis. Finally, a structurally related cytotoxic but nongenotoxic analog of DCVC did not induce c-myc and did not activate the odc promoter or induce apoptosis. The data support the hypothesis that activation of apoptotic cell death in quiescent renal epithelial cells involves induction of c-myc. This is the first study to demonstrate that c-myc induction by a specific nephrotoxicant leads to gene activation and cell death. PMID:9343440

  9. Aptamers against Cells Overexpressing Glypican 3 from Expanded Genetic Systems Combined with Cell Engineering and Laboratory Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqin; Yang, Zunyi; Le Trinh, Thu; Teng, I-Ting; Wang, Sai; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Wu, Qunfeng; Cansiz, Sena; Rowold, Diane J; McLendon, Christopher; Kim, Myong-Sang; Wu, Yuan; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Stewart, Kimberly; Wan, Shuo; Liu, Chen; Benner, Steven A; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-26

    Laboratory in vitro evolution (LIVE) might deliver DNA aptamers that bind proteins expressed on the surface of cells. In this work, we used cell engineering to place glypican 3 (GPC3), a possible marker for liver cancer theranostics, on the surface of a liver cell line. Libraries were then built from a six-letter genetic alphabet containing the standard nucleobases and two added nucleobases (2-amino-8H-imidazo[1,2-a][1,3,5]triazin-4-one and 6-amino-5-nitropyridin-2-one), Watson-Crick complements from an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS). With counterselection against non-engineered cells, eight AEGIS-containing aptamers were recovered. Five bound selectively to GPC3-overexpressing cells. This selection-counterselection scheme had acceptable statistics, notwithstanding the possibility that cells engineered to overexpress GPC3 might also express different off-target proteins. This is the first example of such a combination. PMID:27601357

  10. Aptamers against Cells Overexpressing Glypican 3 from Expanded Genetic Systems Combined with Cell Engineering and Laboratory Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqin; Yang, Zunyi; Le Trinh, Thu; Teng, I-Ting; Wang, Sai; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Wu, Qunfeng; Cansiz, Sena; Rowold, Diane J; McLendon, Christopher; Kim, Myong-Sang; Wu, Yuan; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Stewart, Kimberly; Wan, Shuo; Liu, Chen; Benner, Steven A; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-26

    Laboratory in vitro evolution (LIVE) might deliver DNA aptamers that bind proteins expressed on the surface of cells. In this work, we used cell engineering to place glypican 3 (GPC3), a possible marker for liver cancer theranostics, on the surface of a liver cell line. Libraries were then built from a six-letter genetic alphabet containing the standard nucleobases and two added nucleobases (2-amino-8H-imidazo[1,2-a][1,3,5]triazin-4-one and 6-amino-5-nitropyridin-2-one), Watson-Crick complements from an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS). With counterselection against non-engineered cells, eight AEGIS-containing aptamers were recovered. Five bound selectively to GPC3-overexpressing cells. This selection-counterselection scheme had acceptable statistics, notwithstanding the possibility that cells engineered to overexpress GPC3 might also express different off-target proteins. This is the first example of such a combination.

  11. Detection of Apoptotic Versus Autophagic Cell Death by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Maiuri, M Chiara; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of regulated cell death (RCD) can be initiated by distinct molecular machineries and their morphological manifestations can be difficult to discriminate. Moreover, cells responding to stress often activate an adaptive response centered around autophagy, and whether such a response is cytoprotective or cytotoxic cannot be predicted based on morphological parameters only. Molecular definitions are therefore important to understand various RCD subroutines from a mechanistic perspective. In vitro, various forms of RCD including apoptosis and autophagic cell death can be easily discriminated from each other with assays that involve chemical or pharmacological interventions targeting key components of either pathway. Here, we detail a straightforward method to discriminate apoptosis from autophagic cell death by flow cytometry, based on the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the genetic inhibition of ATG5.

  12. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  13. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  14. Technological advances in real-time tracking of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Cell population can be viewed as a quantum system, which like Schrödinger’s cat exists as a combination of survival- and death-allowing states. Tracking and understanding cell-to-cell variability in processes of high spatio-temporal complexity such as cell death is at the core of current systems biology approaches. As probabilistic modeling tools attempt to impute information inaccessible by current experimental approaches, advances in technologies for single-cell imaging and omics (proteomics, genomics, metabolomics) should go hand in hand with the computational efforts. Over the last few years we have made exciting technological advances that allow studies of cell death dynamically in real-time and with the unprecedented accuracy. These approaches are based on innovative fluorescent assays and recombinant proteins, bioelectrical properties of cells, and more recently also on state-of-the-art optical spectroscopy. Here, we review current status of the most innovative analytical technologies for dynamic tracking of cell death, and address the interdisciplinary promises and future challenges of these methods. PMID:20519963

  15. Effect of ATP Sulfurylase Overexpression in Bright Yellow 2 Tobacco Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Hatzfeld, Yves; Cathala, Nicole; Grignon, Claude; Davidian, Jean-Claude

    1998-01-01

    To determine if the ATP sulfurylase reaction is a regulatory step for the SO42−-assimilation pathway in plants, an Arabidopsis thaliana ATP sulfurylase cDNA, APS2, was fused to the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus and introduced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation into isolated Bright Yellow 2 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells. The ATP sulfurylase activity in transgenic cells was 8-fold that in control cells, and was correlated with the expression of a specific polypeptide revealed by western analysis using an anti-ATP sulfurylase antibody. The molecular mass of this polypeptide agreed with that for the overexpressed mature protein. ATP sulfurylase overexpression had no effect on [35S]SO42− influx or ATP sulfurylase activity regulation by S availability, except that ATP sulfurylase activity variations in response to S starvation in transgenic cells were 8 times higher than in the wild type. There were also no differences in cell growth or sensitivity to SeO42− (a toxic SO42− analog) between transgenic and wild-type cells. We propose that in Bright Yellow 2 tobacco cells, the ATP sulfurylase derepression by S deficiency may involve a posttranscriptional mechanism, and that the ATP sulfurylase abundance is not limiting for cell metabolism. PMID:9536047

  16. Overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase promotes the survival of prostate cancer cells exposed to hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Sujatha; Wagner, Brett A; Jiang, Xiaohong; Wang, Hong P; Schafer, Freya Q; Ritchie, Justine M; Patrick, Burns C; Oberley, Larry W; Buettner, Garry R

    2004-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that exposure of cells to hyperthermia results in an increased flux of reactive oxygen species (ROS), primarily superoxide anion radicals, and that increasing antioxidant enzyme levels will result in protection of cells from the toxicity of these ROS. In this study, the prostate cancer cell line, PC-3, and its manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)-overexpressing clones were subjected to hyperthermia (43 degrees C, 1 h). Increased expression of MnSOD increased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Hyperthermic exposure of PC-3 cells resulted in increased ROS production, as determined by aconitase inactivation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 formation with a reduction in cell survival. In contrast, PC-3 cells overexpressing MnSOD had less ROS production, less lipid peroxidation, and greater cell survival compared to PC-3 Wt cells. Since MnSOD removes superoxide, these results suggest that superoxide free radical or its reaction products are responsible for part of the cytotoxicity associated with hyperthermia and that MnSOD can reduce cellular injury and thereby enhance heat tolerance. PMID:15512801

  17. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  18. Overexpression of Specific CD44 Isoforms Is Associated with Aggressive Cell Features in Acquired Endocrine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bellerby, Rebecca; Smith, Chris; Kyme, Sue; Gee, Julia; Günthert, Ursula; Green, Andy; Rakha, Emad; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Hiscox, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While endocrine therapy is the mainstay of ER+ breast cancer, the clinical effectiveness of these agents is limited by the phenomenon of acquired resistance that is associated with disease relapse and poor prognosis. Our previous studies revealed that acquired resistance is accompanied by a gain in cellular invasion and migration and also that CD44 family proteins are overexpressed in the resistant phenotype. Given the association of CD44 with tumor progression, we hypothesized that its overexpression may act to promote the aggressive behavior of endocrine-resistant breast cancers. Here, we have investigated further the role of two specific CD44 isoforms, CD44v3 and CD44v6, in the endocrine-resistant phenotype. Our data revealed that overexpression of CD44v6, but not CD44v3, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 cells resulted in a gain in EGFR signaling, enhanced their endogenous invasive capacity, and attenuated their response to endocrine treatment. Suppression of CD44v6 in endocrine-resistant cell models was associated with a reduction in their invasive capacity. Our data suggest that upregulation of CD44v6 in acquired resistant breast cancer may contribute to a gain in the aggressive phenotype of these cells and loss of endocrine response through transactivation of the EGFR pathway. Future therapeutic targeting of CD44v6 may prove to be an effective strategy alongside EGFR-targeted agents in delaying/preventing acquired resistance in breast cancer. PMID:27379207

  19. Ceramide path in human lung cell death.

    PubMed

    Chan, C; Goldkorn, T

    2000-04-01

    Lung epithelium plays a significant role in modulating the inflammatory response to lung injury. Airway epithelial cells are targeted by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and oxygen radicals, which are agents commonly produced during inflammatory processes. The mechanisms and molecular sites affected by H(2)O(2) are largely unknown but may involve the induction of sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis to generate ceramide, which serves as a second messenger in initiating an apoptotic response. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial (HAE) cells to 50 to 100 microM H(2)O(2) induces within 5 to 10 min a greater than 2-fold activation of neutral sphingomyelinase activity with concomitant SM hydrolysis, ceramide generation, and apoptosis. On the other hand, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate inhibits both H(2)O(2)-induced ceramide production and apoptosis. The apoptotic response could be restored by the addition of 25 microM cell-permeant C6-ceramide. These findings indicate that ceramide, the product of SM hydrolysis, plays an important role in H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in HAE cells, and that PKC counteracts ceramide-mediated apoptosis in these cells. We suggest that the mediation of epithelial cell apoptosis by ceramide and its inhibition by PKC constitute a central mechanism by which inflammatory processes are modulated in the epithelium of the lung.

  20. Identification of the death zone: a spatially restricted region for programmed cell death that sculpts the fly eye.

    PubMed

    Monserrate, J P; Brachmann, C Baker

    2007-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) sculpts many developing tissues. The final patterning step of the Drosophila retina is the elimination, through PCD, of a subset of interommatidial lattice cells during pupation. It is not understood how this process is spatially regulated to ensure that cells die in the proper positions. To address this, we observed PCD of lattice cells in the pupal retina in real time. This live-visualization method demonstrates that lattice cell apoptosis is a highly specific process. In all, 85% of lattice cells die in exclusive 'death zone' positions between adjacent ommatidia. In contrast, cells that make specific contacts with primary pigment cells are protected from death. Two signaling pathways, Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (dEgfr) and Notch, that are thought to be central to the regulation of lattice cell survival and death, are not sufficient to establish the death zone. Thus, application of live visualization to the fly eye gives new insight into a dynamic developmental process.

  1. Alpha-toxin induces programmed cell death of human T cells, B cells, and monocytes during USA300 infection.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Tyler K; Pallister, Kyler B; DuMont, Ashley L; DeWald, Mark; Watkins, Robert L; Pallister, Erik Q; Malone, Cheryl; Griffith, Shannon; Horswill, Alexander R; Torres, Victor J; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examines the influence of alpha-toxin (Hla) during USA300 infection of human leukocytes. Survival of an USA300 isogenic deletion mutant of hla (USA300Δhla) in human blood was comparable to the parental wild-type strain and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plasma membrane permeability caused by USA300 did not require Hla. Flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following infection by USA300, USA300Δhla, and USA300Δhla transformed with a plasmid over-expressing Hla (USA300Δhla Comp) demonstrated this toxin plays a significant role inducing plasma membrane permeability of CD14(+), CD3(+), and CD19(+) PBMCs. Rapid plasma membrane permeability independent of Hla was observed for PMNs, CD14(+) and CD19(+) PBMCs following intoxication with USA300 supernatant while the majority of CD3(+) PBMC plasma membrane permeability induced by USA300 required Hla. Addition of recombinant Hla to USA300Δhla supernatant rescued CD3(+) and CD19(+) PBMC plasma membrane permeability generated by USA300 supernatant. An observed delay in plasma membrane permeability caused by Hla in conjunction with Annexin V binding and ApoBrdU Tunel assays examining PBMCs intoxicated with recombinant Hla or infected with USA300, USA300Δhla, USA300Δhla Comp, and USA300ΔsaeR/S suggest Hla induces programmed cell death of monocytes, B cells, and T cells that results in plasma membrane permeability. Together these findings underscore the importance of Hla during S. aureus infection of human tissue and specifically demonstrate Hla activity during USA300 infection triggers programmed cell death of human monocytes, T cells and B cells that leads to plasma membrane permeability.

  2. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, Elena T; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl(3)-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 microM AlCl(3) showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation. Cell death was effectively inhibited by protease and human caspase inhibitors indicating a cell death execution mechanism with similarities to animal apoptosis. Cell death was suppressed by application of antoxidants and by inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), phospholipase D (PLD) and ethylene signalling pathways. The results suggest that low concentrations of heavy metal ions stimulate both PLC and PLD signalling pathways leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death executed by caspase-like proteases.

  3. Dual induction of apoptotic and autophagic cell death by targeting survivin in head neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Zhang, W; Wang, Y-F; Liu, B; Zhang, W-F; Zhao, Y-F; Kulkarni, A B; Sun, Z-J

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is ubiquitously expressed in patients with head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and is associated with poor survival and chemotherapy resistance. Sepantronium bromide (YM155) is a selective survivin suppressant that exhibits potent antitumor activities by inducing apoptosis and autophagy in various types of cancer. However, the curative effects and underlying mechanisms of YM155 in HNSCC remain unclear. This study showed that survivin overexpression positively correlated with p-S6, p-Rb and LAMP2 but negatively correlated with the autophagic marker LC3 in human HNSCC tissues. In vitro studies revealed that YM155 triggered apoptosis of HNSCC cells in mitochondria and death receptor-dependent manner. The treatment also significantly enhanced autophagy by upregulating Beclin1, which led to cell death. YM155 not only downregulated the expression of survivin but also remarkably suppressed the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. YM155 displayed potent antitumor activities in both CAL27 xenograft and transgenic HNSCC mice models by delaying tumor onset and suppressing tumor growth. Furthermore, YM155 combined with docetaxel promoted tumor regression better than either treatment alone without causing considerable body weight loss in the HNSCC xenograft models. Overall, targeting survivin by YM155 can benefit HNSCC therapy by increasing apoptotic and autophagic cell death, and suppressing prosurvival pathways. PMID:26018732

  4. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  5. Transplantation of CXCR4 Overexpressed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Regeneration in Degenerated Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji-Nan; Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao; Liu, Lei; Hong, Xin; Tang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals play important roles in regulating the stem cell-based tissue regeneration. The aim of this research is to evaluate whether high expression of CXCR4 enhances the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and increases the efficiency of intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. MSCs overexpressing CXCR (CXCR4-MSC) were created by lentiviral-CXCR4-vect transfection, labeled with SPIO, and transplanted into rabbit degenerative IVD induced by annulus puncture. X-ray and T2-weighted MR images of the spine were obtained at 0, 8, and 16 weeks post-transplantation. The transplanted stem cells were traced by both MR imaging and Prussian blue staining. The stem cell-based IVD degeneration was evaluated by quantifying the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen. The in vitro chemotaxis test was performed to study the migration of CXCR4-MSCs to the supplement of SDF-1. The CXCR4-overexpressing MSCs stably elevated the expression of CXCR4 and increased the migration to SDF-1. The SPIO-labeled CXCR4-MSC could be detected within the IVD by MRI till 16 weeks post-transplantation. Prussian blue staining evidenced more SPIO-positive cells within the IVD transplanted with CXCR4-MSCs. Compared to the control group, loss of disc height was slowed while the mRNA expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was increased by MSC transplantation, especially in the IVD supplemented with CXCR4-MSCs. CXCR4 overexpression promoted MSC retention within the IVD and enhanced the stem cell-based IVD regeneration. The SDF-1/CXCR4 chemotaxis signals might help provide a new perspective to understand stem cell migration and infiltration within the degenerated IVD. PMID:26788981

  6. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    PubMed

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  7. Overexpression of CDX2 in gastric cancer cells promotes the development of multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin-Hai; Wei, Wei-Yuan; Cao, Wen-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Shi; Xie, Yu-Bo; Xiao, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Modulator of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene is a direct transcriptional target of CDX2. However, we still speculate whether CDX2 affects MDR through other ways. In this study, a cisplatin-resistant (SGC7901/DDP) and a 5-fluoro-2, 4(1h,3h)pyrimidinedione-resistant (BGC823/5-FU) gastric cancer cell line with stable overexpression of CDX2 were established. The influence of overexpression of CDX2 on MDR was assessed by measuring IC50 of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil, rate of doxorubicin efflux, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression detected by flow cytometry. In addition, we determined the in vivo effects of CDX2-overexpression lentiviral vector (LV-CDX2-GFP) on tumor size, and apoptotic cells in tumor tissues were detected by deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results showed that LV-CDX2-GFP led to up-regulation of CDX2 mRNA and protein expression. It significantly inhibited the sensitivity of SGC7901/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil. Flow cytometry confirmed that the percentage of apoptotic cells decreased after CDX2 up-regulation. This notion was further supported by the observation that up-regulation of CDX2 blocked entry into the M-phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, up-regulation of CDX2 significantly decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. In molecular studies, quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that CDX2 up-regulation could suppress expression of Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PTEN, and increased the expression of MDR1, MRP, mTOR, HIF-1α. PMID:25628941

  8. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice. PMID:26771609

  9. Overexpression of PRL7D1 in Leydig Cells Causes Male Reproductive Dysfunction in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Su, Xingyu; Hao, Jie; Chen, Maoxin; Liu, Weijia; Liao, Xiaogang; Li, Gang

    2016-01-13

    Prolactin family 7, subfamily d, member 1 (PRL7D1) is found in mouse placenta. Our recent work showed that PRL7D1 is also present in mouse testis Leydig cells, and the expression of PRL7D1 in the testis exhibits an age-related increase. In the present study, we generated transgenic mice with Leydig cell-specific PRL7D1 overexpression to explore its function during male reproduction. Prl7d1 male mice exhibited subfertility as reflected by reduced sperm counts and litter sizes. The testes from Prl7d1 transgenic mice appeared histologically normal, but the frequency of apoptotic germ cells was increased. Prl7d1 transgenic mice also had lower testosterone concentrations than wild-type mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Prl7d1 transgenic mice have defects in the testicular expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) and hydroxy-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase, 3 beta- and steroid delta-isomerase cluster (HSD3B). Further studies revealed that PRL7D1 overexpression affected the expression of transferrin (TF) in Sertoli cells. These results suggest that PRL7D1 overexpression could lead to increased germ cell apoptosis and exert an inhibitory effect on testosterone production in Leydig cells by reducing the expression of certain steroidogenic-related genes. In addition, PRL7D1 appears to have important roles in the function of Sertoli cells, which, in turn, affects male fertility. We conclude that the expression level of PRL7D1 is associated with the reproductive function of male mice.

  10. Murine matrix metalloproteinase-20 overexpression stimulates cell invasion into the enamel layer via enhanced Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masashi; Suzuki, Maiko; Guan, Xiaomu; Smith, Charles E.; Bartlett, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) is expressed by ameloblasts in developing teeth and MMP20 mutations cause enamel malformation. We established a stably transfected Tet-Off Mmp20-inducible ameloblast-lineage cell line and found that MMP20 expression promoted cell invasion. Previously, we engineered transgenic mice (Tg) that drive Mmp20 expression and showed that Mmp20+/+Tg mice had soft enamel. Here we asked if Mmp20 overexpression disrupts ameloblast function. Incisors from Mmp20+/+ mice expressing the Mmp20 Tg had a striking cell infiltrate which nearly replaced the entire enamel layer. A thin layer of enamel-like material remained over the dentin and at the outer tooth surface, but between these regions were invading fibroblasts and epithelial cells that surrounded ectopic bone-like calcifications. Mmp20+/+Tg mice had decreased enamel organ cadherin levels compared to the Mmp20 ablated and WT mice and, instead of predominantly locating adjacent to the ameloblast cell membrane, β-catenin was predominantly present within the nuclei of invading cells. Our data suggest that increased cadherin cleavage by transgenic MMP20 in the WT background releases excess β-catenin, which translocates to ameloblast nuclei to promote cell migration/invasion. Therefore, we conclude that MMP20 plays a role in normal ameloblast migration through tightly controlled Wnt signaling and that MMP20 overexpression disrupts this process. PMID:27403713

  11. Overexpression of YY1 increases the protein production in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tastanova, Aizhan; Schulz, Alexandra; Folcher, Marc; Tolstrup, Anne; Puklowski, Anja; Kaufmann, Hitto; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-10

    The production of therapeutic antibodies using mammalian cells remains a high-priority in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Bioengineers have targeted different cellular processes, including transcription, translation, secretion and post-translational modifications, to overcome the metabolic bottlenecks limiting production capacity and create high-producing mammalian cell lines. The polycomb group (PcG) proteins belong to a family of chromatin regulators with important roles in multicellular development. By overexpressing and screening genes from the PcG family, we have identified an epigenetic key player for biopharmaceutical manufacturing enhancement: the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). The overexpression of YY1 led to an increase in the production of several product genes (SEAP, VEGF165, IgG including Rituximab), provided that human YY1 (hYY1) was expressed in human cells (HeLa, HT-1080, HEK-293T, FreeStyle™ 293-F) and Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived YY1 (cYY1) was expressed in CHO cells (CHO-K1, CHO-easyC, FreeStyle™ CHO-S, CHO-B13-24, CHO-IgG1). Ectopic expression of cYY1 in the stable CHO-derived IgG producer cell lines CHO-B13-24 and CHO-IgG1 increased the antibody titer up to 6-fold, suggesting that epigenetic engineering of mammalian production cell lines could become a new strategy to improve the manufacturing of complex protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:26686315

  12. Cell death and autophagy: cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors.

    PubMed

    Bursch, Wilfried; Karwan, Anneliese; Mayer, Miriam; Dornetshuber, Julia; Fröhwein, Ulrike; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Fazi, Barbara; Di Sano, Federica; Piredda, Lucia; Piacentini, Mauro; Petrovski, Goran; Fésüs, László; Gerner, Christopher

    2008-12-30

    Cells may use multiple pathways to commit suicide. In certain contexts, dying cells generate large amounts of autophagic vacuoles and clear large proportions of their cytoplasm, before they finally die, as exemplified by the treatment of human mammary carcinoma cells with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM, < or = 1 microM). Protein analysis during autophagic cell death revealed distinct proteins of the nuclear fraction including GST-pi and some proteasomal subunit constituents to be affected during autophagic cell death. Depending on the functional status of caspase-3, MCF-7 cells may switch between autophagic and apoptotic features of cell death [Fazi, B., Bursch, W., Fimia, G.M., Nardacci R., Piacentini, M., Di Sano, F., Piredda, L., 2008. Fenretinide induces autophagic cell death in caspase-defective breast cancer cells. Autophagy 4(4), 435-441]. Furthermore, the self-destruction of MCF-7 cells was found to be completed by phagocytosis of cell residues [Petrovski, G., Zahuczky, G., Katona, K., Vereb, G., Martinet, W., Nemes, Z., Bursch, W., Fésüs, L., 2007. Clearance of dying autophagic cells of different origin by professional and non-professional phagocytes. Cell Death Diff. 14 (6), 1117-1128]. Autophagy also constitutes a cell's strategy of defense upon cell damage by eliminating damaged bulk proteins/organelles. This biological condition may be exemplified by the treatment of MCF-7 cells with a necrogenic TAM-dose (10 microM), resulting in the lysis of almost all cells within 24h. However, a transient (1h) challenge of MCF-7 cells with the same dose allowed the recovery of cells involving autophagy. Enrichment of chaperones in the insoluble cytoplasmic protein fraction indicated the formation of aggresomes, a potential trigger for autophagy. In a further experimental model HL60 cells were treated with TAM, causing dose-dependent distinct responses: 1-5 microM TAM, autophagy predominant; 7-9 microM, apoptosis predominant; 15 microM, necrosis. These phenomena

  13. Glycobiology of cell death: when glycans and lectins govern cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, R G; Rabinovich, G A

    2013-01-01

    Although one typically thinks of carbohydrates as associated with cell growth and viability, glycosylation also has an integral role in many processes leading to cell death. Glycans, either alone or complexed with glycan-binding proteins, can deliver intracellular signals or control extracellular processes that promote initiation, execution and resolution of cell death programs. Herein, we review the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins as essential components of the cell death machinery during physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:23703323

  14. Apoptotic photoreceptor cell death in mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Portera-Cailliau, C; Sung, C H; Nathans, J; Adler, R

    1994-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited human diseases in which photoreceptor degeneration leads to visual loss and eventually to blindness. Although mutations in the rhodopsin, peripherin, and cGMP phosphodiesterase genes have been identified in some forms of RP, it remains to be determined whether these mutations lead to photoreceptor cell death through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that photoreceptor cell death occurs by an apoptotic mechanism in three mouse models of RP: retinal degeneration slow (rds) caused by a peripherin mutation, retinal degeneration (rd) caused by a defect in cGMP phosphodiesterase, and transgenic mice carrying a rhodopsin Q344ter mutation responsible for autosomal dominant RP. Two complementary techniques were used to detect apoptosis-specific internucleosomal DNA fragmentation: agarose gel electrophoresis and in situ labeling of apoptotic cells by terminal dUTP nick end labeling. Both methods showed extensive apoptosis of photoreceptors in all three mouse models of retinal degeneration. We also show that apoptotic death occurs in the retina during normal development, suggesting that different mechanisms can cause photoreceptor death by activating an intrinsic death program in these cells. These findings raise the possibility that retinal degenerations may be slowed by interfering with the apoptotic mechanism itself. Images PMID:8302876

  15. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  16. Programmed Cell Death During Female Gametophyte Development

    SciTech Connect

    Drews, Gary, N.

    2004-09-15

    Endosperm is a storage tissue in the angiosperm seed that is important both biologically and agriculturally. Endosperm is biologically important because it provides nutrients to the embryo during seed development and agriculturally important because it is a significant source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. Approximately two-thirds of human calories are derived from endosperm, either directly or indirectly through animal feed. Furthermore, endosperm is used as a raw material for numerous industrial products including ethanol. A major event in endosperm development is the transition between the syncytial phase, during which the endosperm nuclei undergo many rounds of mitosis without cytokinesis, and the cellularized phase, during which cell walls form around the endosperm nuclei. Understanding how the syncytial-cellular transition is regulated is agriculturally important because it influences seed size, seed sink strength, and grain weight. However, the molecular processes controlling this transition are not understood. This project led to the identification of the AGL62 gene that regulates the syncytial-cellular transition during endosperm development. AGL62 is expressed during the syncytial phase and suppresses endosperm cellularization during this period. AGL62 most likely does so by suppressing the expression of genes required for cellularization. At the end of the syncytial phase, the FIS PcG complex suppresses AGL62 expression, which allows expression of the cellularization genes and triggers the initiation of the cellularized phase. Endosperm arises following fertilization of the central cell within the female gametophyte. This project also led to the identification of the AGL80 gene that is required for development of the central cell into the endosperm. Within the ovule and seed, AGL80 is expressed exclusively in the central cell and uncellularized endosperm. AGL80 is required for expression of several central cell-expressed genes, including

  17. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    PubMed

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment.

  18. The antitumor natural compound falcarindiol promotes cancer cell death by inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H R; Zhao, J; Zhang, Z; Liao, Y; Wang, C-Z; Huang, W-H; Li, S-P; He, T-C; Yuan, C-S; Du, W

    2012-01-01

    Falcarindiol (FAD) is a natural polyyne with various beneficial biological activities. We show here that FAD preferentially kills colon cancer cells but not normal colon epithelial cells. Furthermore, FAD inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model and exhibits strong synergistic killing of cancer cells with 5-fluorouracil, an approved cancer chemotherapeutic drug. We demonstrate that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Decreasing the level of ER stress, either by overexpressing the ER chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) or by knockout of components of the UPR pathway, reduces FAD-induced apoptosis. In contrast, increasing the level of ER stress by knocking down GRP78 potentiates FAD-induced apoptosis. Finally, FAD-induced ER stress and apoptosis is correlated with the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that FAD functions at least in part by interfering with proteasome function, leading to the accumulation of unfolded protein and induction of ER stress. Consistent with this, inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide significantly decreases the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and blocks FAD-induced ER stress and cell death. Taken together, our study shows that FAD is a potential new anticancer agent that exerts its activity through inducing ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:22914324

  19. Danger signalling during cancer cell death: origins, plasticity and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garg, A D; Martin, S; Golab, J; Agostinis, P

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that following anti-cancer treatments, cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic or tolerogenic by the immune system. The former is made possible due to the ability of certain anti-cancer modalities to induce immunogenic cell death (ICD) that is associated with the emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which assist in unlocking a sequence of events leading to the development of anti-tumour immunity. In response to ICD inducers, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been identified to be indispensable to confer the immunogenic character of cancer cell death, due to its ability to coordinate the danger signalling pathways responsible for the trafficking of vital DAMPs and subsequent anti-cancer immune responses. However, in recent times, certain processes apart from ER stress have emerged (e.g., autophagy and possibly viral response-like signature), which have the ability to influence danger signalling. In this review, we discuss the molecular nature, emerging plasticity in the danger signalling mechanisms and immunological impact of known DAMPs in the context of immunogenic cancer cell death. We also discuss key effector mechanisms modulating the interface between dying cancer cells and the immune cells, which we believe are crucial for the therapeutic relevance of ICD in the context of human cancers, and also discuss the influence of experimental conditions and animal models on these. PMID:23686135

  20. Cell death in protists without mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chose, Olivier; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Noël, Christophe; Gerbod, Delphine; Jimenez, Juan-Carlos; Brenner, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric; Roseto, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    Some protozoans, such as Trichomonad species, do not possess mitochondria. Most of the time, they harbor another type of membrane-bounded organelle, called hydrogenosome from its capacity to produce H(2). This is the case for the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Some other parasites, such as the protist Giardia lamblia, do not harbor any of these organelles. From this observation arises naturally a naive question: How do cells die when the mitochondrion, the cornerstone of apoptotic process, is absent? Data strongly suggest that the mitochondrion and the hydrogenosome arose from a common ancestral endosymbiont. But hydrogenosomes do not appear to directly substitute for mitochondria in apoptotic functions. Thus, it appears judicious to examine more closely the genome of unicellular cells, which do not harbor mitochondria, and search for new molecules that could participate in the apoptotic process in these microorganisms. PMID:15033707

  1. Cell death in protists without mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chose, Olivier; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Noël, Christophe; Gerbod, Delphine; Jimenez, Juan-Carlos; Brenner, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric; Roseto, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    Some protozoans, such as Trichomonad species, do not possess mitochondria. Most of the time, they harbor another type of membrane-bounded organelle, called hydrogenosome from its capacity to produce H(2). This is the case for the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Some other parasites, such as the protist Giardia lamblia, do not harbor any of these organelles. From this observation arises naturally a naive question: How do cells die when the mitochondrion, the cornerstone of apoptotic process, is absent? Data strongly suggest that the mitochondrion and the hydrogenosome arose from a common ancestral endosymbiont. But hydrogenosomes do not appear to directly substitute for mitochondria in apoptotic functions. Thus, it appears judicious to examine more closely the genome of unicellular cells, which do not harbor mitochondria, and search for new molecules that could participate in the apoptotic process in these microorganisms.

  2. FGF-2 is overexpressed in myoepithelial cells of carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma in situ structures.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elizabeth F; Demasi, Ana P D; Miguita, Lucyene; Altemani, Albina; Araújo, Ney S; Araújo, Vera C

    2010-07-01

    Increasing emphasis has been placed on the role of myoepithelial cells, the contractile components of secretory glands, in the in situ to invasive carcinoma transition. These cells are placed at the interface between luminal epithelial cells and the stromal compartment, which favors their cross-talk with all other cell types comprising the tumor micro-environment. To obtain some clues about this cross-talk and also to better understand our previous immunoprofile study of myoepithelial cells in salivary gland carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA), we investigated FGF-2 expression in CXPA in situ structures as well as in cells cultured under conditions attempting to simulate the cellular interactions of this tumor stage. We have observed by immunohistochemistry that myoepithelial cells of CXPA in situ structures overexpress FGF-2. In addition, our results supported by qPCR and Western blotting, demonstrated that the expression of FGF-2 in the benign myoepithelial cells was in fact increased by stimulation with the conditioned medium from malignant cells. Low molecular weight FGF-2, known to be primarily released from the cells to exert its biological activity through receptors, was the predominant FGF-2 form detected in the benign myoepithelial cells. Specific FGF-2 receptors were found in the malignant epithelial but not in the benign myo-epithelial cells of CXPA, indicating a paracrine role for benign myoepithelial cell-derived FGF-2. Abnormal paracrine myo-epithelial/epithelial cell interactions and also myoepithelial/ stromal cell interactions could favor tumor growth, invasion and metastasis.

  3. Overexpression of SAMD9 suppresses tumorigenesis and progression during non small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qing; Yu, Tao; Ren, Yao-Yao; Gong, Ting; Zhong, Dian-Sheng

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • SAMD9 is down-regulated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • Knockdown of SAMD9 expression is increased the invasion, migration and proliferation in H1299 cells in vitro. • Overexpression of SAMD9 suppressed proliferation and invasion in A549 cells in vitro. • Depletion of SAMD9 increases tumor formation in vivo. - Abstract: The Sterile Alpha Motif Domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) gene has been recently emphasized during the discovery that it is expressed at a lower level in aggressive fibromatosis and some cases of breast and colon cancer, however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we found that SAMD9 is down-regulated in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, knockdown of SAMD9 expression is increased the invasion, migration and proliferation in H1299 cells in vitro and overexpression of SAMD9 suppressed proliferation and invasion in A549 cells. Finally, depletion of SAMD9 increases tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking NSCLC tumorigenesis and progression.

  4. VCC-1 over-expression inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhitao; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Mu, Xia; Qu, Rongmei; Li, Ming

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levels of VCC-1 are increased significantly in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 could promotes cellular proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 inhibit the cisplatin-provoked apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 plays an important role in control the tumor growth and apoptosis. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor-correlated chemokine 1 (VCC-1), a recently described chemokine, is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which aberrant VCC-1 expression determines poor outcomes of cancers are unknown. In this study, we found that VCC-1 was highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue. It was also associated with proliferation of HepG2 cells, and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conversely, down-regulation of VCC-1 in HepG2 cells increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In summary, these results suggest that VCC-1 is involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells, and also provides some evidence for VCC-1 as a potential cellular target for chemotherapy.

  5. Trastuzumab-targeted gene delivery to Her2-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K; Kullberg, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel gene delivery system that specifically targets human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells. The targeting complexes consist of a PEGylated polylysine core that is bound to DNA molecules coding for either green fluorescent protein or shrimp luciferase. The complex is disulfide linked to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and to a pore-forming protein, Listeriolysin O (LLO). Trastuzumab is responsible for specific targeting of Her2 receptors and uptake of the gene delivery complex into endosomes of recipient cells, whereas LLO ensures that the DNA molecules are capable of transit from the endosomes into the cytoplasm. Omission of either trastuzumab or LLO from the nanocomplexes results in minimal gene product in targeted cells. Treatment of isogeneic MCF7 and MCF7/Her18 cell lines, differing only in number of Her2 receptors, with the complete gene delivery system results in a 30-fold greater expression of luciferase activity in the Her2-overexpressing MCF7/Her18 cells. Our nanocomplexes are small (150–250 nm), stable to storage, nontoxic and generic in make-up such that any plasmid DNA or antibody specific for cell-surface receptors can be coupled to the PEGylated polylysine core. PMID:27199219

  6. DAMPs from Cell Death to New Life

    PubMed Central

    Vénéreau, Emilie; Ceriotti, Chiara; Bianchi, Marco Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Our body handles tissue damage by activating the immune system in response to intracellular molecules released by injured tissues [damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)], in a similar way as it detects molecular motifs conserved in pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns). DAMPs are molecules that have a physiological role inside the cell, but acquire additional functions when they are exposed to the extracellular environment: they alert the body about danger, stimulate an inflammatory response, and finally promote the regeneration process. Beside their passive release by dead cells, some DAMPs can be secreted or exposed by living cells undergoing a life-threatening stress. DAMPs have been linked to inflammation and related disorders: hence, inhibition of DAMP-mediated inflammatory responses is a promising strategy to improve the clinical management of infection- and injury-elicited inflammatory diseases. However, it is important to consider that DAMPs are not only danger signals but also central players in tissue repair. Indeed, some DAMPs have been studied for their role in tissue healing after sterile or infection-associated inflammation. This review is focused on two exemplary DAMPs, HMGB1 and adenosine triphosphate, and their contribution to both inflammation and tissue repair. PMID:26347745

  7. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  8. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel; El-Hafidi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection. PMID:27642497

  9. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection. PMID:27642497

  10. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ramírez, Angélica; López-Acosta, Ocarol; Barrios-Maya, Miguel Angel; El-Hafidi, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs), specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria interplay mediates apoptotic cell death: relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela Moniz; Esteves, A Raquel; Cardoso, Sandra M; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2009-09-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Many cellular mechanisms are thought to be involved in the death of these specific neurons in PD, including oxidative stress, changes of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Since recent studies have revealed that also endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in conjunction with abnormal protein degradation can contribute to the PD pathophysiology, we investigated here the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between ER and mitochondria and its relevance in the control of neuronal cell death in PD. We observed that MPP+ induced changes in the mitochondrial function, affecting mitochondrial membrane potential and electron transport chain function. Likewise, it was also evident the unfolded protein response activation by an overexpression of GRP78 protein. Moreover, stress stimuli caused the release of Ca2+ from the ER that consistently induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, with a rise of mitochondrial matrix free Ca2+. Besides, Ca2+ release inhibition prevented MPP+ mediated mitochondria-dependent caspases activation. Our findings show that ER and mitochondria are in a close communication, establishing a dynamic ER-Ca2+-mitochondria interconnection that can play a prominent role in the neuronal cell death induction under particular stressful circumstances of PD pathology.

  12. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Jerry D; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980's, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies.

  13. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Jerry D.; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies. PMID:25954154

  14. O-GlcNAcase overexpression reverses coronary endothelial cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Ayako; Dai, Anzhi; Han, Ying; Youssef, Katia D; Wang, Weihua; Donthamsetty, Reshma; Scott, Brian T; Wang, Hong; Dillmann, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes, and endothelial dysfunction is commonly seen in these patients. Increased O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) protein modification is one of the central pathogenic features of diabetes. Modification of proteins by O-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) is regulated by two key enzymes: β-N-acetylglucosaminidase [O-GlcNAcase (OGA)], which catalyzes the reduction of protein O-GlcNAcylation, and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which induces O-GlcNAcylation. However, it is not known whether reducing O-GlcNAcylation can improve endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. To examine the effect of endothelium-specific OGA overexpression on protein O-GlcNAcylation and coronary endothelial function in diabetic mice, we generated tetracycline-inducible, endothelium-specific OGA transgenic mice, and induced OGA by doxycycline administration in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. OGA protein expression was significantly decreased in mouse coronary endothelial cells (MCECs) isolated from diabetic mice compared with control MCECs, whereas OGT protein level was markedly increased. The level of protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in diabetic compared with control mice, and OGA overexpression significantly decreased the level of protein O-GlcNAcylation in MCECs from diabetic mice. Capillary density in the left ventricle and endothelium-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries were significantly decreased in diabetes, while OGA overexpression increased capillary density to the control level and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation without changing endothelium-independent relaxation. We found that connexin 40 could be the potential target of O-GlcNAcylation that regulates the endothelial functions in diabetes. These data suggest that OGA overexpression in endothelial cells improves endothelial function and may have a beneficial effect on coronary vascular complications in diabetes.

  15. Anosmin-1 over-expression regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, migration and myelin sheath thickness.

    PubMed

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Martínez-Hernández, José; Gruart, Agnès; Luján, Rafael; Delgado-García, José María; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    During development of the central nervous system, anosmin-1 (A1) works as a chemotropic cue contributing to axonal outgrowth and collateralization, as well as modulating the migration of different cell types, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) being the main receptor involved in all these events. To further understand the role of A1 during development, we have analysed the over-expression of human A1 in a transgenic mouse line. Compared with control mice during development and in early adulthood, A1 over-expressing transgenic mice showed an enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and a higher number of OPCs in the subventricular zone and in the corpus callosum (CC). The migratory capacity of OPCs from the transgenic mice is increased in vitro due to a higher basal activation of ERK1/2 mediated through FGFR1 and they also produced more myelin basic protein (MBP). In vivo, the over-expression of A1 resulted in an elevated number of mature oligodendrocytes with higher levels of MBP mRNA and protein, as well as increased levels of activation of the ERK1/2 proteins, while electron microscopy revealed thicker myelin sheaths around the axons of the CC in adulthood. Also in the mature CC, the nodes of Ranvier were significantly longer and the conduction velocity of the nerve impulse in vivo was significantly increased in the CC of A1 over-expressing transgenic mice. Altogether, these data confirmed the involvement of A1 in oligodendrogliogenesis and its relevance for myelination.

  16. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  17. Mechanisms of Cell Death in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bantel, Heike; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can be the consequence of various etiologies, that might vary between different geographic regions. Most frequent are intoxications with acetaminophen, viral hepatitis, or liver damage of unknown origin. ALF occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death exceeds the regenerative capacity of the liver. The mode of liver cell death that is predominantly induced in ALF, i.e., apoptosis or necrosis, is still controversial and presumably determined by the etiology, duration, and magnitude of liver injury. Severe liver damage involves oxidative stress and depletion of ATP resulting in necrosis. In contrast, maintenance of ATP stores is required for the execution of apoptosis. Recent data suggest that necrosis resulting from severe liver damage is associated with poor outcome of ALF patients. Discrimination between apoptosis and necrosis might be therefore useful for the identification of ALF patients requiring liver transplantation. Identification of the molecular cell death mechanisms remains an important issue not only for early prediction of ALF outcome, but also for therapeutic interventions. In view of the pleiotropic functions of critical mediators of cell death and tissue regeneration, a particular challenge will be to reduce hepatocellular death without inhibiting the regenerative capacity of the liver. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte injury and the pathways leading to apoptosis and necrosis, which might represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in ALF. PMID:22485095

  18. Sam68 is Overexpressed in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lijuan; Che, Hailuo; Li, Mingmei; Li, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest gynecological malignancy, and evidence is accumulating on how molecular markers may be associated with the origin and process of EOC. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis, of 68 kD), is a K homology domain RNA-binding protein that has been investigated as a risk factor in multiple types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the Sam68 gene in the pathogenesis of EOC. MATERIAL AND METHODS Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR methods were performed to examine Sam68 expression in EOC tissue specimens. The association of Sam68 expression with clinic-pathologic variables of EOC was evaluated. Then gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies were adopted to examine the regulation of Sam68 on the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells using CCK-8 and colony forming assays. RESULTS Sam68 was overexpressed in both mRNA and protein levels in EOC tumor tissue (n=152) in an association with malignant factors of EOC such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumor size (cm), histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In vitro results demonstrated that Sam68 overexpression was upregulated while Sam68 knockdown downregulated the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells via regulation of cell growth and colony formation. CONCLUSIONS Sam68 was overexpressed in EOC tissue in association with such cancer malignant factors of FIGO stage, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis, and also positively regulated the proliferation of EOC cells. Our research suggests that Sam68 might accelerate cell cycle progression, and present as a prognostic marker for EOC. PMID:27623016

  19. Sam68 is Overexpressed in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Promotes Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijuan; Che, Hailuo; Li, Mingmei; Li, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest gynecological malignancy, and evidence is accumulating on how molecular markers may be associated with the origin and process of EOC. Sam68 (Src-associated in mitosis, of 68 kD), is a K homology domain RNA-binding protein that has been investigated as a risk factor in multiple types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the Sam68 gene in the pathogenesis of EOC. Material/Methods Western blot assay and real-time quantitative PCR methods were performed to examine Sam68 expression in EOC tissue specimens. The association of Sam68 expression with clinic-pathologic variables of EOC was evaluated. Then gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies were adopted to examine the regulation of Sam68 on the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells using CCK-8 and colony forming assays. Results Sam68 was overexpressed in both mRNA and protein levels in EOC tumor tissue (n=152) in an association with malignant factors of EOC such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumor size (cm), histological grade, and lymph node metastasis. In vitro results demonstrated that Sam68 overexpression was upregulated while Sam68 knockdown downregulated the proliferation of EOC OVCAR-3 cells via regulation of cell growth and colony formation. Conclusions Sam68 was overexpressed in EOC tissue in association with such cancer malignant factors of FIGO stage, histological grade, and lymph node metastasis, and also positively regulated the proliferation of EOC cells. Our research suggests that Sam68 might accelerate cell cycle progression, and present as a prognostic marker for EOC. PMID:27623016

  20. Functions of the lethal leaf-spot 1 gene in wheat cell death and disease tolerance to Puccinia striiformis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Wang, Xiaojie; Duan, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Xiaodong; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    Pheophorbide a oxygenase (PaO) is a key enzyme in chlorophyll catabolism that is known to suppress cell death in maize and Arabidopsis. The catalytic activity of PaO in chlorophyll degradation has been clearly demonstrated, but the function of PaO in the regulation of cell death and plant–microbe interactions is largely unknown. In this study, we characterized a PaO homologue in wheat of the lethal leaf-spot 1 gene, TaLls1, that was induced in leaves infected by Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst) and wounding treatment. The TaLls1 protein contains a conserved Rieske [2Fe-2S] motif and a mononuclear iron-binding site typical of PaOs. Silencing of TaLls1 by virus-induced gene silencing in wheat led to leaf cell death without pathogen attacks, possibly due to the accumulation of pheophorbide a (upstream substrate of PaO), indicating a suppressor role of TaLls1, while overexpression of TaLls1 also triggered cell death in both tobacco and wheat leaves, probably owing to the accumulation of the red chlorophyll catabolite (downstream product of PaO). Further deletion mutant analysis showed that the conserved Rieske domain, but not the iron-binding site, was essential for cell death induction. These results thus suggest a threshold for TaLls1 in maintaining cell homeostasis to adapt in various stresses, and shed new light on the role of TaLls1 in cell death regulation. Furthermore, silencing of TaLls1 in wheat did not change the disease symptoms but enhanced tolerance to Pst via an significant increase in H2O2 generation, elevated cell death occurrence, and upregulation of pathogenesis-related genes. PMID:23811695

  1. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  2. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  4. MiR-129-5p is required for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brest, Patrick; Lassalle, Sandra; Hofman, Veronique; Bordone, Olivier; Gavric Tanga, Virginie; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Moreilhon, Chimene; Rios, Geraldine; Santini, José; Barbry, Pascal; Svanborg, Catharina; Mograbi, Baharia; Mari, Bernard; Hofman, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for the antitumor activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) remains elusive. As HDACi have been described to alter miRNA expression, the aim of this study was to characterize HDACi-induced miRNAs and to determine their functional importance in the induction of cell death alone or in combination with other cancer drugs. Two HDACi, trichostatin A and vorinostat, induced miR-129-5p overexpression, histone acetylation and cell death in BCPAP, TPC-1, 8505C, and CAL62 cell lines and in primary cultures of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. In addition, miR-129-5p alone was sufficient to induce cell death and knockdown experiments showed that expression of this miRNA was required for HDACi-induced cell death. Moreover, miR-129-5p accentuated the anti-proliferative effects of other cancer drugs such as etoposide or human α-lactalbumin made lethal for tumor cells (HAMLET). Taken together, our data show that miR-129-5p is involved in the antitumor activity of HDACi and highlight a miRNA-driven cell death mechanism.

  5. Adenoviral infection or deferoxamine? Two approaches to overexpress VEGF in beta-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Allan; Bietiger, William; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Maillard, Elisa; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence; Sigrist, Severine

    2009-07-01

    Rapid and adequate revascularization of transplanted islets is important for their survival and function during transplantation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a critical role with respect to islet revascularization. The aim of this study was to compare two strategies that are used to overexpress VEGF in beta-cells: (1) gene therapy through adenoviral infection and (2) a pharmacological approach using deferoxamine (DFO). beta-Cell lines from rat insulinoma (RINm5F) were either infected using an adenovirus encoding the gene of human VEGF 165 or incubated with DFO. One day after treatment, the viability of RINm5F cells was preserved with 10 micromol/L of DFO (103.95 +/- 5.66% toward control; n = 4). In addition, adenoviral infection maintained the viability of cells for all the concentrations used. In both treatments, overexpression of VEGF was in a comparable level. Finally, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 indicated that the apoptosis increased in infected beta-cells whereas treatment with DFO seems to be antiapoptotic. Our results suggest that the use of DFO could be a realistic approach to improve the vascularization of islets during transplantation. PMID:19527112

  6. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  7. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A6 overexpression in breast cancer cells resistant to methotrexate.

    PubMed

    de Almagro, M Cristina; Selga, Elisabet; Thibaut, Rémi; Porte, Cinta; Noé, Véronique; Ciudad, Carlos J

    2011-01-01

    Methotrexate is a chemotherapeutic agent used in breast cancer treatment, but the occurrence of resistance limits its therapeutic use. A microarrays analysis between sensitive and methotrexate resistant MCF7 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells pointed out the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) family as a common deregulated node in both cell lines. This family of genes is involved in Phase II metabolism. UGT1A6 was the main isoform responsible for UGT1A family overexpression in these cells. Its overexpression was not due to gene amplification. Transfection of a vector encoding for UGT1A6 in sensitive cells counteracted the cytotoxicity caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate increased the transcriptional activity from a luciferase reporter driven by the UGT1A6 promoter and induced UGT1A6 mRNA and enzymatic activity. Promoter analysis suggested that UGT1A6 induction by methotrexate could be driven by the transcription factors ARNT (HIF-1) and AhR/ARNT. Cells incubated with anticancer drugs susceptible to glucuronidation, such as tamoxifen or irinotecan, together with methotrexate, showed a lesser degree of cytotoxicity, due to UGT1A6 induction. The pharmacological effect of this induction should be taken into account when combining methotrexate with other drugs that are glucuronidated.

  8. Overexpression of transcriptional coactivator AIB1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression by enhancing cell proliferation and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Chen, Q; Li, W; Su, X; Chen, T; Liu, Y; Zhao, Y; Yu, C

    2010-06-10

    Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. AIB1 has an important role in malignancy of several cancers such as breast and prostate cancers. However, its involvement in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression remains unclear. Here, we found that AIB1 protein was overexpressed in 23 of 34 human HCC specimens (68%). Down-regulation of AIB1 reduced HCC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation ability and tumorigenic potential in nude mice. These phenotypic changes caused by AIB1 knockdown correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1/Waf1) and decreased Akt activation and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and matrix metallopeptidase MMP-9. In agreement with these findings, clinical AIB1-positive HCC expressed higher levels of PCNA than AIB1-negative HCC. A positive correlation was established between the levels of AIB1 protein and PCNA protein in HCC, suggesting that AIB1 may contribute to HCC cell proliferation. In addition, MMP-9 expression in AIB1-postive HCC was significantly higher than that in AIB1-negative HCC, suggesting that AIB1-postive HCC may be more invasive. Collectively, our results show that overexpression of AIB1 promotes human HCC progression by enhancing cell proliferation and invasiveness. Therefore, AIB1 is a master regulator of human HCC growth and might be a useful molecular target for HCC prognosis and treatment.

  9. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  10. The metabolism beyond programmed cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Julia; Sommer, Cornelia; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Eisenberg, Tobias; Madeo, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A cell's reaction to any change in the endogenous or exogenous conditions often involves a complex response that eventually either leads to cell adaptation and survival or to the initiation and execution of (programmed) cell death. The molecular decision whether to live or die, while depending on a cell's genome, is fundamentally influenced by its actual metabolic status. Thus, the collection of all metabolites present in a biological system at a certain time point (the so-called metabolome) defines its physiological, developmental and pathological state and determines its fate during changing and stressful conditions. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a unicellular organism that allows to easily modify and monitor conditions affecting the cell's metabolome, for instance through a simple change of the nutrition source. Such changes can be used to mimic and study (patho)physiological scenarios, including caloric restriction and longevity, the Warburg effect in cancer cells or changes in mitochondrial mass affecting cell death. In addition, disruption of single genes or generation of respiratory deficiency (via abrogation of mitochondrial DNA) assists in revealing connections between metabolism and apoptosis. In this minireview, we discuss recent studies using the potential of the yeast model to provide new insights into the processes of stress defense, cell death and longevity. PMID:22480867

  11. Thymic abnormalities and enhanced apoptosis of thymocytes and bone marrow cells in transgenic mice overexpressing Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase: implications for Down syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Peled-Kamar, M; Lotem, J; Okon, E; Sachs, L; Groner, Y

    1995-01-01

    The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) gene resides on chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in Down syndrome (DS) patients. Transgenic CuZnSOD mice with elevated levels of CuZnSOD were used to determine whether, as in DS, overexpression of CuZnSOD was also associated with thymus and bone marrow abnormalities. Three independently derived transgenic CuZnSOD strains had abnormal thymi showing diminution of the cortex and loss of corticomedullary demarcation, resembling thymic defects in children with DS. Transgenic CuZnSOD mice were also more sensitive than control mice to in vivo injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), reflected by an earlier onset and enhanced apoptotic cell death in the thymus. This higher susceptibility to LPS-induced apoptosis was associated with an increased production of hydrogen peroxide and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. When cultured under suboptimal concentrations of interleukin 3 or in the presence of tumour necrosis factor, bone marrow cells from transgenic CuZnSOD mice produced 2- to 3-fold less granulocyte and macrophage colonies than control. The results indicate that transgenic CuZnSOD mice have certain thymus and bone marrow abnormalities which are similar to those found in DS patients, and that the defects are presumably due to an increased oxidative damage resulting in enhanced cell death by apoptosis. Images PMID:7588627

  12. Ghrelin Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Attenuating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin in spinal cord injury-induced apoptotic cell death of oligodendrocytes. However, how ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocytes apoptosis, is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether ghrelin inhibits microglia activation and thereby inhibits oligodendrocyte apoptosis. Methods Using total cell extracts prepared from BV-2 cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without ghrelin, the levels of p-p38 phosphor-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38MAPK), phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), p-c-Jun, and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) were examined by Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated by using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. To examine the effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocyte cell death, oligodendrocytes were cocultured in transwell chambers of 24-well plates with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. After 48 hours incubation, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine, 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling staining were assessed. Results Ghrelin treatment significantly decreased levels of p-p38MAPK, p-JNK, p-c-Jun, and proNGF in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. ROS production increased in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin treatment. In addition, ghrelin significantly inhibited oligodendrocyte cell death when cocultured with LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Conclusion Ghrelin inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by decreasing proNGF and ROS production as well as p38MAPK and JNK activation in activated microglia as an anti-inflammatory hormone. PMID:25309797

  13. Measuring Cell Death by Trypan Blue Uptake and Light Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Trypan blue is a colorimetric dye that stains dead cells with a blue color easily observed using light microscopy at low resolution. The staining procedure is rapid and cells can be analyzed within minutes. The number of live (unstained) and dead (blue) cells can be counted using a hemocytometer on a basic upright microscope. Trypan blue staining is therefore a convenient assay for rapidly determining the overall viability of cells in a culture before commencing scientific experimentation, or for quantitating cell death following treatment with any cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:27371594

  14. MRP1 gene expression level regulates the death and differentiation response of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Peaston, A E; Gardaneh, M; Franco, A V; Hocker, J E; Murphy, K M; Farnsworth, M L; Catchpoole, D R; Haber, M; Norris, M D; Lock, R B; Marshall, G M

    2001-01-01

    We have previously reported a strong correlation between poor prognosis in childhood neuroblastoma (NB) patients and high-level expression of the transmembrane efflux pump, Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein (MRP1), in NB tumour tissue. In this study, we inhibited the endogenous expression of MRP1 in 2 different NB tumour cell lines by stably transfecting an MRP1 antisense expression vector (MRP-AS). Compared with control cells, MRP-AS transfectant cells demonstrated a higher proportion of dead and morphologically apoptotic cells, spontaneous neuritogenesis, and, increased synaptophysin and neurofilament expression. Bcl-2 protein expression was markedly reduced in MRP-AS cells compared to controls. Conversely, we found that the same NB tumour cell line overexpressing the full-length MRP1 cDNA in sense orientation (MRP-S) demonstrated resistance to the neuritogenic effect of the differentiating agent, all-trans-retinoic acid. Taken together, the results suggest that the level of MRP1 expression in NB tumour cells may influence the capacity of NB cells for spontaneous regression in vivo through cell differentiation and death. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720446

  15. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W.; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress. PMID:25620910

  16. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress.

  17. Suppression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, but not NF-kappa B sensitizes melanoma specific cell death.

    PubMed

    Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Sahoo, Binay K; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-08-01

    Mutation in B-Raf leads to gain of function in melanoma and causes aggressive behavior for proliferation. Most of the therapeutics are ineffective in this scenario. However, regulation of this aggressive behavior by targeting the key molecules would be viable strategy to develop novel and effective therapeutics. In this report we provide evidences that the resveratrol is potent to regulate melanoma cell growth than other inducers of apoptosis. Resveratrol inhibits pronounced cell proliferation in melanoma than other tumor cell types. Cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry shows that the treatment with resveratrol results in S phase arrest. Resveratrol inhibits microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its dependent genes without interfering the MITF DNA binding in vitro. Resveratrol-mediated cell death is protected in MITF overexpressed cells and it is aggravated in MITF knocked down cells. These suggest the resveratrol-mediated decrease in MITF is the possible cause of melanoma cell death. Though resveratrol-mediated downregulation of NF-κB is responsible for cell apoptosis, but the downregulation of MITF is the main reason for melanoma-specific cell death. Thus, resveratrol can be effective chemotherapeutic agent against rapid proliferative melanoma cells. PMID:27325430

  18. Induced overexpression of OCT4A in human embryonic stem cells increases cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Steven C; Chang, David F; Hong, Chang-Mu; Xia, Ping; Senadheera, Dinithi; Trump, Lisa; Mishra, Suparna; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2014-06-15

    Our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying human embryonic stem cell (hESC) self-renewal and differentiation is incomplete. The level of octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4), a critical regulator of pluripotency, is precisely controlled in mouse embryonic stem cells. However, studies of human OCT4 are often confounded by the presence of three isoforms and six expressed pseudogenes, which has complicated the interpretation of results. Using an inducible lentiviral overexpression and knockdown system to manipulate OCT4A above or below physiological levels, we specifically examine the functional role of the OCT4A isoform in hESC. (We also designed and generated a comparable series of vectors, which were not functional, for the overexpression and knockdown of OCT4B.) We show that specific knockdown of OCT4A results in hESC differentiation, as indicated by morphology changes, cell surface antigen expression, and upregulation of ectodermal genes. In contrast, inducible overexpression of OCT4A in hESC leads to a transient instability of the hESC phenotype, as indicated by changes in morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and transcriptional profile, that returns to baseline within 5 days. Interestingly, sustained expression of OCT4A past 5 days enhances hESC cloning efficiency, suggesting that higher levels of OCT4A can support self-renewal. Overall, our results indicate that high levels of OCT4A increase hESC cloning efficiency and do not induce differentiation (whereas OCT4B expression cannot be induced in hESC), highlighting the importance of isoform-specific studies in a stable and inducible expression system for human OCT4. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of an efficient method for conditional gene expression in hESC.

  19. Overexpressed human heme Oxygenase-1 decreases adipogenesis in pigs and porcine adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-11-27

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) are multipotent, which means they are able to differentiate into several lineages in vivo and in vitro under proper conditions. This indicates it is possible to determine the direction of differentiation of ADSC by controlling the microenvironment. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a type of antioxidant enzyme, attenuates adipogenicity and obesity. We produced transgenic pigs overexpressing human HO-1 (hHO-1-Tg), and found that these animals have little fatty tissue when autopsied. To determine whether overexpressed human HO-1 suppresses adipogenesis in pigs, we analyzed body weight increases of hHO-1-Tg pigs and wild type (WT) pigs of the same strain, and induced adipogenic differentiation of ADSC derived from WT and hHO-1-Tg pigs. The hHO-1-Tg pigs had lower body weights than WT pigs from 16 weeks of age until they died. In addition, hHO-1-Tg ADSC showed reduced adipogenic differentiation and expression of adipogenic molecular markers such as PPARγ and C/EBPα compared to WT ADSC. These results suggest that HO-1 overexpression reduces adipogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, which could support identification of therapeutic targets of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  20. Curcumin Attenuates Staurosporine-Mediated Death of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burugula, Balabharathi; Ganesh, Bhagyalaxmi S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Staurosporine (SS) causes retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. Since previous studies on RGC-5 cells indicated that SS induces cell death by elevating proteases, this study was undertaken to investigate whether SS induces RGC loss by elevating proteases in the retina, and curcumin prevents SS-mediated death of RGCs. Methods. Transformed mouse retinal ganglion-like cells (RGC-5) were treated with 2.0 μM SS and various doses of curcumin. Two optimal doses of SS (12.5 and 100 nM) and curcumin (2.5 and 10 μM) were injected into the vitreous of C57BL/6 mice. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) activities were assessed by zymography assays. Viability of RGC-5 cells was assessed by MTT assays. RGC and amacrine cell loss in vivo was assessed by immunostaining with Brn3a and ChAT antibodies, respectively. Frozen retinal cross sections were immunostained for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Results. Staurosporine induced uPA and tPA levels in RGC-5 cells, and MMP-9, uPA, and tPA levels in the retinas and promoted the death of RGC-5 cells in vitro and RGCs and amacrine cells in vivo. In contrast, curcumin attenuated RGC and amacrine cell loss, despite elevated levels of proteases. An NF-κB inhibitory peptide reversed curcumin-mediated protective effect on RGC-5 cells, but did not inhibit protease levels. Curcumin did not inhibit protease levels in vivo, but attenuated RGC and amacrine cell loss by restoring NF-κB expression. Conclusions. The results show that curcumin attenuates RGC and amacrine cell death despite elevated levels of proteases and raises the possibility that it may be used as a plausible adjuvant therapeutic agent to prevent the loss of these cells in retinal degenerative conditions. PMID:21498608

  1. Cell death monitoring using quantitative optical coherence tomography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2011-03-01

    Cell death is characterized by a series of predictable morphological changes, which modify the light scattering properties of cells. We present a multi-parametric approach to detecting changes in subcellular morphology related to cell death using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells undergoing apoptosis over a period of 48 hours. Integrated backscatter (IB) and spectral slope (SS) were computed from OCT backscatter spectra and statistical parameters were extracted from a generalized gamma (GG) distribution fit to OCT signal intensity histograms. The IB increased by 2-fold over 48 hours with significant increases observed as early as 4 hours. The SS increased in steepness by 2.5-fold with significant changes at 12 hours, while the GG parameters were sensitive to apoptotic changes at 24 to 48 hours. Histology slides indicated nuclear condensation and fragmentation at 24 hours, suggesting the late scattering changes could be related to nuclear structure. A second series of measurements from AML cells treated with cisplatin, colchicine or ionizing radiation suggested that the GG parameters could potentially differentiate between modes of cell death. Distinct cellular morphology was observed in histology slides obtained from cells treated under each condition.

  2. Evidence of apoptotic cell death in HIV encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Petito, C. K.; Roberts, B.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of cell death in the brains of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome was examined in 15 cases, 8 of whom had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis, and in 8 control cases. Postmortem formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were prepared for routine histology and immunohistochemistry to detect cell-specific antigens. Apoptosis was detected by its morphology and by in situ end labeling of its characteristic oligonucleosomal fragments. Combined in situ end labeling and immunohistochemistry identified specific cell types. Six acquired immune deficiency syndrome brains, 5 of which had HIV encephalitis, contained positive nuclei by in situ end labeling. Co-labeling studies identified the cells as neurons, reactive astrocytes, and, rarely, the multinucleated giant cells of HIV encephalitis. The only control with nuclei positive by in situ end labeling had hepatic encephalopathy and Alzheimer type II astrocytes; the location and absence of cell-specific markers suggested a glial origin for the labeled cells. These results demonstrate that at least some neuronal and astrocytic death in HIV infection occurs by apoptosis. Its stimuli are unknown, but likely candidates include tumor necrosis factor or HIV viral products. Additionally, we hypothesize that apoptotic death of reactive astrocytes may be a normal mechanism whereby the brain removes an excess number of astrocytes that have proliferated after certain types of brain injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 PMID:7747806

  3. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging.

    PubMed

    Smaili, Soraya; Hirata, Hanako; Ureshino, Rodrigo; Monteforte, Priscila T; Morales, Ana P; Muler, Mari L; Terashima, Juliana; Oseki, Karen; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Lopes, Guiomar S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2009-09-01

    Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+) and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+) are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes may lead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.

  4. Light uncages a copper complex to induce nonapoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Anupa A; Franks, Andrew T; Butcher, Raymond J; Franz, Katherine J

    2013-03-25

    Cu3G is a Cu(II) complex of a photoactive tetradentate ligand that is cleaved upon UV irradiation to release Cu. Here we show that the cytotoxicity of Cu3G increases in response to brief UV stimulation to result in extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is indicative of nonapoptotic cell death. PMID:23417227

  5. Hox proteins: sculpting body parts by activating localized cell death.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Claudio R

    2002-11-19

    Hox proteins shape animal structures by eliciting different developmental programs along the anteroposterior body axis. A recent study reveals that the Drosophila Hox protein Deformed directly activates the cell-death-promoting gene reaper to maintain the boundaries between distinct head segments.

  6. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo; Foglieni, Chiara; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ferrarini, Marina; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  7. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lee J.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy. PMID:21258649

  8. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos.

    Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  9. Hepatic Overexpression of Hemopexin Inhibits Inflammation and Vascular Stasis in Murine Models of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vercellotti, Gregory M; Zhang, Ping; Nguyen, Julia; Abdulla, Fuad; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Phong; Nowotny, Carlos; Steer, Clifford J; Smith, Ann; Belcher, John D

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have low serum hemopexin (Hpx) levels due to chronic hemolysis. We hypothesized that in SCD mice, hepatic overexpression of hemopexin would scavenge the proximal mediator of vascular activation, heme, and inhibit inflammation and microvascular stasis. To examine the protective role of Hpx in SCD, we transplanted bone marrow from NY1DD SCD mice into Hpx-/- or Hpx+/+ C57BL/6 mice. Dorsal skin fold chambers were implanted 13 wks post-transplant, and microvascular stasis (% nonflowing venules) was evaluated in response to heme infusion. Hpx-/- sickle mice had significantly greater microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion than Hpx+/+ sickle mice (p < 0.05), demonstrating the protective effect