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Sample records for overhauser enhanced mri

  1. Whole-body kinetic image of a redox probe in mice using Overhauser-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Kosem, Nuttavut; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Phumala Morales, Noppawan; Yasukawa, Keiji; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Utsumi, Hideo

    2012-07-15

    Overhauser-enhanced MRI (OMRI) enables visualization of free radicals in animals based on dynamic nuclear polarization. Real-time data of tissue redox status gathered from kinetic images of redox-sensitive nitroxyl radical probes using OMRI provided both anatomic and physiological information. Phantom experiments demonstrated the linear correlation between the enhancement factor and the concentration of a membrane-impermeable probe, carboxy-PROXYL (3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl- pyrrolidine-1-oxyl). Whole-body OMRI images illustrated the in vivo kinetics of carboxy-PROXYL for 25 min. Initial distribution was observed in lung, heart, liver, and kidney, but not brain, corresponding to its minimal lipophilicity. Based on these images (pixel size, 1.33 × 1.33 mm; slice thickness, 50mm), a time-concentration curve with low coefficient of variance (<0.21) was created to assess pharmacokinetic behaviors. A biexponential curve showed a distribution phase from 1 to 10 min and an elimination phase from 15 to 25 min. The α rate constant was greater than the β rate constant in ROIs, confirming that its pharmacokinetics obeyed a two-compartment model. As a noninvasive technique, combining OMRI imaging with redox probes to monitor tissue redox status may be useful in acquiring valuable information regarding organ function for preclinical and clinical studies of oxidative diseases.

  2. Overhauser-Enhanced MRI of Elastase Activity from In Vitro Human Neutrophil Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Parzy, Elodie; Bouchaud, Véronique; Massot, Philippe; Voisin, Pierre; Koonjoo, Neha; Moncelet, Damien; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudière, Eric; Mellet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging can reveal exquisite anatomical details. However several diseases would benefit from an imaging technique able to specifically detect biochemical alterations. In this context protease activity imaging is one of the most promising areas of research. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an elastase substrate by grafting stable nitroxide free radicals on soluble elastin. This substrate generates a high Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) contrast upon digestion by the target proteases through the modulation of its rotational correlation time. The sensitivity is sufficient to generate contrasted images of the degranulation of neutrophils induced by a calcium ionophore from 2×104 cells per milliliter, well under the physiological neutrophils concentrations. Conclusions/Significance These ex-vivo experiments give evidence that OMRI is suitable for imaging elastase activity from neutrophil degranulation. Provided that a fast protease-substrate is used these results open the door to better diagnoses of a number of important pathologies (cystic fibrosis, inflammation, pancreatitis) by OMRI or Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging in vivo. It also provides a long-expected method to monitor anti-protease treatments efficiency and help pharmaceutical research. PMID:23469112

  3. Imaging human teeth by phosphorus magnetic resonance with nuclear Overhauser enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Brauckmann, Ole; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Kentgens, Arno; Garwood, Michael; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional phosphorus MR images (31P MRI) of teeth are obtained at a nominal resolution of 0.5 mm in less than 15 minutes using acquisition pulse sequences sensitive to ultra-short transversal relaxation times. The images directly reflect the spatially resolved phosphorus content of mineral tissue in dentin and enamel; they show a lack of signal from pulp tissue and reduced signal from de-mineralized carious lesions. We demonstrate for the first time that the signal in 31P MR images of mineralized tissue is enhanced by a 1H-31P nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). Using teeth as a model for imaging mineralized human tissue, graded differences in signal enhancement are observed that correlate well with known mineral content. From solid-state NMR experiments we conclude that the NOE is facilitated by spin diffusion and that the NOE difference can be assigned to a higher water content and a different micro-structure of dentin. Thus, a novel method for imaging mineral content without ionizing radiation is proposed. This method has potential use in the assessment of de-mineralization states in humans, such as caries of teeth and osteoporosis of bones. PMID:27498919

  4. Basic facts and perspectives of Overhauser DNP NMR.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    After the first surprisingly large (1)H DNP enhancements of the water signal in aqueous solutions of nitroxide radicals observed at high magnetic fields, Overhauser DNP is gaining increasing attention for a number of applications now flourishing, showing the potentialities of this mechanism in solution and solid state NMR as well as in MRI. Unexpected Overhauser DNP enhancements in insulating solids were recently measured at 100K, with a magnitude which increases with the applied magnetic field. We recapitulate here the theoretical premises of Overhauser DNP in solution and analyze the effects of the various parameters on the efficacy of the mechanism, underlining the link between the DNP enhancements and the field dependent relaxation properties. Promisingly, more effective DNP enhancements are expected by exploiting the potentialities offered by (13)C detection and the use of supercritical fluids.

  5. Electron spin resonance studies on deuterated nitroxyl spin probes used in Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    David Jebaraj, D; Utsumi, Hideo; Milton Franklin Benial, A

    2017-01-04

    The electron spin resonance studies were carried out for 2 mm concentration of (14) N-labeled and (15) N-labeled 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl, 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl, 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl and their deuterated nitroxyl radicals using X-band electron spin resonance spectrometer. The electron spin resonance line shape analysis was carried out. The electron spin resonance parameters such as linewidth, Lorentzian component, signal intensity ratio, rotational correlation time, hyperfine coupling constant and g-factor were estimated. The deuterated nitroxyl radicals have narrow linewidth and an increase in Lorentzian component, compared with undeuterated nitroxyl radicals. The dynamic nuclear polarization factor was observed for all nitroxyl radicals. Upon (2) H labeling, about 70% and 40% increase in dynamic nuclear polarization factor were observed for (14) N-labeled and (15) N-labeled nitroxyl radicals, respectively. The signal intensity ratio and g-value indicate the isotropic nature of the nitroxyl radicals in pure water. Therefore, the deuterated nitroxyl radicals are suitable spin probes for in vivo/in vitro electron spin resonance and Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging modalities. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Concentration dependence of nitroxyl spin probes in liposomal solution: electron spin resonance and overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance studies.

    PubMed

    Meenakumari, V; Utsumi, Hideo; Jawahar, A; Franklin Benial, A Milton

    2016-12-21

    In this work, the detailed studies of electron spin resonance (ESR) and overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) were carried out for permeable nitroxyl spin probe, MC-PROXYL as a function of agent concentration in liposomal solution. In order to compare the impermeable nature of nitroxyl radical, the study was also carried out only at 2 mM concentration of carboxy-PROXYL. The ESR parameters were estimated using L-band and 300 MHz ESR spectrometers. The line width broadening was measured as a function of agent concentration in liposomal solution. The estimated rotational correlation time is proportional to the agent concentration, which indicates that less mobile nature of nitroxyl spin probe in liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate that the diffusion of nitroxyl spin probe distribution into the lipid phase is maximum at 2 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL. The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) parameters such as DNP factor, longitudinal relaxivity, saturation parameter, leakage factor and coupling factor were estimated for 2 mM MC-PROXYL in 400 mM liposomal dispersion. The spin lattice relaxation time was shortened in liposomal solution, which leads to the high relaxivity. Reduction in coupling factor is due to less interaction between the electron and nuclear spins, which causes the reduction in enhancement. The leakage factor increases with increasing agent concentration. The increase in DNP enhancement was significant up to 2 mM in liposomal solution. These results paves the way for choosing optimum agent concentration and OMRI scan parameters used in intra and extra membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid permeable nitroxyl spin probes in OMRI experiments.

  7. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerten, S. G. J.; Tayler, M. C. D.; Kentgens, A. P. M.; van Bentum, P. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for 1H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in 1H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4 ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4 T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  8. Towards Overhauser DNP in supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    van Meerten, S G J; Tayler, M C D; Kentgens, A P M; van Bentum, P J M

    2016-06-01

    Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) is a well known technique to improve NMR sensitivity in the liquid state, where the large polarization of an electron spin is transferred to a nucleus of interest by cross-relaxation. The efficiency of the Overhauser mechanism for dipolar interactions depends critically on fast local translational dynamics at the timescale of the inverse electron Larmor frequency. The maximum polarization enhancement that can be achieved for (1)H at high magnetic fields benefits from a low viscosity solvent. In this paper we investigate the option to use supercritical CO2 as a solvent for Overhauser DNP. We have investigated the diffusion constants and longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates of toluene in high pressure CO2. The change in (1)H T1 by addition of TEMPO radical was analyzed to determine the Overhauser cross-relaxation in such a mixture, and is compared with calculations based on the Force Free Hard Sphere (FFHS) model. By analyzing the relaxation data within this model we find translational correlation times in the range of 2-4ps, depending on temperature, pressure and toluene concentration. Such short correlation times may be instrumental for future Overhauser DNP applications at high magnetic fields, as are commonly used in NMR. Preliminary DNP experiments have been performed at 3.4T on high pressure superheated water and model systems such as toluene in high pressure CO2.

  9. Overhauser effects in insulating solids

    SciTech Connect

    Can, T. V.; Corzilius, B.; Walish, J. J.; Griffin, R. G.; Caporini, M. A.; Rosay, M.; Maas, W. E.; Mentink-Vigier, F.; Vega, S.; Baldus, M.; Swager, T. M.

    2014-08-14

    We report magic angle spinning, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at magnetic fields of 9.4 T, 14.1 T, and 18.8 T using the narrow line polarizing agents 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) dispersed in polystyrene, and sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA) and trityl OX063 in glassy glycerol/water matrices. The {sup 1}H DNP enhancement field profiles of the BDPA radicals exhibit a significant DNP Overhauser effect (OE) as well as a solid effect (SE) despite the fact that these samples are insulating solids. In contrast, trityl exhibits only a SE enhancement. Data suggest that the appearance of the OE is due to rather strong electron-nuclear hyperfine couplings present in BDPA and SA-BDPA, which are absent in trityl and perdeuterated BDPA (d{sub 21}-BDPA). In addition, and in contrast to other DNP mechanisms such as the solid effect or cross effect, the experimental data suggest that the OE in non-conducting solids scales favorably with magnetic field, increasing in magnitude in going from 5 T, to 9.4 T, to 14.1 T, and to 18.8 T. Simulations using a model two spin system consisting of an electron hyperfine coupled to a {sup 1}H reproduce the essential features of the field profiles and indicate that the OE in these samples originates from the zero and double quantum cross relaxation induced by fluctuating hyperfine interactions between the intramolecular delocalized unpaired electrons and their neighboring nuclei, and that the size of these hyperfine couplings is crucial to the magnitude of the enhancements. Microwave power dependent studies show that the OE saturates at considerably lower power levels than the solid effect in the same samples. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of the Overhauser effect, and also provide a new approach to perform DNP experiments in chemical, biophysical, and physical systems at high magnetic fields.

  10. Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization amplification of NMR flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Lingwood, Mark D; Sederman, Andrew J; Mantle, Mick D; Gladden, Lynn F; Han, Songi

    2012-03-01

    We describe the first study comparing the ability of phase shift velocity imaging and Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced imaging to generate contrast for visualizing the flow of water. Prepolarization of water by the Overhauser DNP mechanism is performed in the 0.35T fringe field of an unshielded 2.0T non-clinical MRI magnet, followed by the rapid transfer of polarization-enhanced water to the 2.0T imaging location. This technique, previously named remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC), produces a continuous flow of hyperpolarized water and gives up to an -8.2-fold enhanced signal within the image with respect to thermally polarized signal at 2.0T. Using flow through a cylindrical expansion phantom as a model system, spin-echo intensity images with DNP are compared to 3D phase shift velocity images to illustrate the complementary information available from the two techniques. The spin-echo intensity images enhanced with DNP show that the levels of enhancement provide an estimate of the transient propagation of flow, while the phase shift velocity images quantitatively measure the velocity of each imaging voxel. Phase shift velocity images acquired with and without DNP show that DNP weights velocity values towards those of the inflowing (DNP-enhanced) water, while velocity images without DNP more accurately reflect the average steady-state velocity of each voxel. We conclude that imaging with DNP prepolarized water better captures the transient path of water shortly after injection, while phase shift velocity imaging is best for quantifying the steady-state flow of water throughout the entire phantom.

  11. Accuracy in the quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Feng; Li, Hua; Xu, Junzhong; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Zu, Zhongliang

    2017-03-08

    Accurate quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects, including dipole-dipole mediated relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer, is important for applications and studies of molecular concentration and transfer rate (and thereby pH or temperature). Although several quantification methods, such as Lorentzian difference (LD) analysis, multiple-pool Lorentzian fits, and the three-point method, have been extensively used in several preclinical and clinical applications, the accuracy of these methods has not been evaluated. Here we simulated multiple-pool Z spectra containing the pools that contribute to the main CEST and rNOE saturation transfer signals in the brain, numerically fit them using the different methods, and then compared their derived CEST metrics with the known solute concentrations and exchange rates. Our results show that the LD analysis overestimates contributions from amide proton transfer (APT) and intermediate exchanging amine protons; the three-point method significantly underestimates both APT and rNOE saturation transfer at -3.5 ppm (NOE(-3.5)). The multiple-pool Lorentzian fit is more accurate than the other two methods, but only at lower irradiation powers (≤1 μT at 9.4 T) within the range of our simulations. At higher irradiation powers, this method is also inaccurate because of the presence of a fast exchanging CEST signal that has a non-Lorentzian lineshape. Quantitative parameters derived from in vivo images of rodent brain tumor obtained using an irradiation power of 1 μT were also compared. Our results demonstrate that all three quantification methods show similar contrasts between tumor and contralateral normal tissue for both APT and the NOE(-3.5). However, the quantified values of the three methods are significantly different. Our work provides insight into the fitting accuracy obtainable in a complex tissue model and provides guidelines for evaluating other newly developed

  12. Continuous flow Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of water in the fringe field of a clinical magnetic resonance imaging system for authentic image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Mark D.; Siaw, Ting Ann; Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, Brian D.; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a system to generate hyperpolarized water in the 0.35 T fringe field of a clinical 1.5 T whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnet. Once generated, the hyperpolarized water is quickly and continuously transferred from the 0.35 T fringe to the 1.5 T center field of the same magnet for image acquisition using standard MRI equipment. The hyperpolarization is based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which effectively and quickly transfers the higher spin polarization of free radicals to nuclear spins at ambient temperatures. We visualize the dispersion of hyperpolarized water as it flows through water-saturated systems by utilizing an observed −15 fold DNP signal enhancement with respect to the unenhanced 1H MRI signal of water at 1.5 T. The experimental DNP apparatus presented here is readily portable and can be brought to and used with any conventional unshielded MRI system. A new method of immobilizing radicals to gel beads via polyelectrolyte linker arms is described, which led to superior flow Overhauser DNP performance compared to previously presented gels. We discuss the general applicability of Overhauser DNP hyperpolarization of water and aqueous solutions in the fringe field of commercially available magnets with central fields up to 4.7 Tesla. PMID:20541445

  13. Integrated speech enhancement for functional MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nishank; Milani, Ali A; Panahi, Issa; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated speech enhancement (SE) method for the noisy MRI environment. We show that the performance of SE system improves considerably when the speech signal dominated by MRI acoustic noise at very low SNR is enhanced in two successive stages using two-channel SE methods followed by a single-channel post processing SE algorithm. Actual MRI noisy speech data are used in our experiments showing the improved performance of the proposed SE method.

  14. Overhauser magnetometer sensor design for magnetic field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zan; Chen, Shudong; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Cao, Qiong

    2016-10-01

    The Overhauser magnetometer, with its unique set of advantages, such as low power consumption, high precision and fast recording ability has been widely used in geophysical mineral and oil exploration, archeology, environmental survey, ordnance and weapons detection (UXO) and other earth science applications. Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, which suffers from high power consumption and low precision, the Overhauser magnetometer excite the free radical solution in a cavity with RF signal to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Thus, RF resonator plays a crucial role in reducing power consumption and improving the accuracy of Overhauser magnetometer. There are a wide variety of resonators, but only two of them are chosen for Overhauser magnetometer: birdcage coil and coaxial resonator. In order to get the best RF cavity for Overhauser magnetometer sensor, both resonators are investigated here. Firstly, parameters of two RF resonators are calculated theoretically and simulated with Ansoft HFSS. The results indicate that birdcage coil is characterized by linear polarization while coaxial resonator is characterized by circular polarization. Besides, all RF fields are limited inside of the coaxial resonator while distributed both inside and outside of the birdcage coil. Then, the two resonators are practically manufactured based on the theoretical design. And the S-parameter and Smith chart of these resonators are measured with Agilent 8712ES RF network analyzer. The measured results indicate that the coaxial resonator has a much higher Q value(875) than the birdcage coil(70). All these results reveal a better performance for coaxial resonator. Finally, field experimental shows 0.074nT sensitivity for Overhauser magnetometer with coaxial resonator.

  15. Noise characteristics research of Overhauser magnetometer sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tala; Gu, Lingjia; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    Overhauser magnetometer, a kind of weak-magnetic measurement system based on the Overhauser effect, has been widely used in satellite magnetic survey, aeromagnetic survey and other engineering and environmental applications. Overhauser magnetometer plays an important role in the application of magnetic field measurement for its advantages of low power consumption and high accuracy. Weak field magnetic resonance is usually limited by the signal to noise ratio (SNR). In order to improve the SNR of Overhauser magnetometer, noise characteristics of Overhauser magnetometer sensor are investigated in this paper. A background noise model of Overhauser magnetometer sensor is presented. The calculated results indicate that the noise power spectral density shows a band-limited white noise characteristic. The maximum value of the noise power spectral density observed at the resonant frequency. The measured results coincide with the calculated results. The correlation between the SNR and the matched resistance is investigated by using the noise model. The calculated results demonstrate that large matched resistance is beneficial to improve the SNR of the sensor. When matched resistance is larger than 100kΩ, the SNR tends to be a constant. On the premise of stability, the sensor will achieve the optimal SNR when the matched resistance is around 100kΩ. This investigation is beneficial to improve noise performance of Overhauser magnetometer sensor.

  16. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  17. Manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI): neurophysiological applications

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Taeko; Majid, Tabassum; Pautler, Robia G.

    2012-01-01

    Manganese ion (Mn2+) is a calcium (Ca2+) analog that can enter neurons and other excitable cells through voltage gated Ca2+ channels. Mn2+ is also a paramagnetic that shortens the spin-lattice relaxation time constant (T1) of tissues where it has accumulated, resulting in positive contrast enhancement. Mn2+ was first investigated as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent approximately 20 years ago to assess the toxicity of the metal in rats. In the late 1990s, Alan Koretsky and colleagues pioneered the use of manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) towards studying brain activity, tract tracing and enhancing anatomical detail. This review will describe the methodologies and applications of MEMRI in the following areas: monitoring brain activity in animal models, in vivo neuronal tract tracing and using MEMRI to assess in vivo axonal transport rates. PMID:22098448

  18. Theodolite-borne vector Overhauser magnetometer: DIMOVER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunov, V.; Rasson, J.; Denisov, A.; Saveliev, D.; Kiselev, S.; Denisova, O.; Podmogov, Y.; Khomutov, S.

    2006-06-01

    This report covers results of the long-term research directed at developing an absolute vector proton magnetometer based on the switching of bias magnetic fields. The distinctive feature is the attempt of the installation of a miniature Overhauser sensor and optimized Garret solenoid directly on the telescope of the theodolite. Thus this design (Declination Inclination Modulus Overhauser magnetometer: DIMOVER) will complement the universally recognised DIflux absolute device by adding full vector measurement capability. Preliminary designs, which also can be interesting to the experts in vector proton magnetometers, are presented.

  19. Identification and assignment of base pairs in four helical segments of Bacillus megaterium ribosomal 5S RNA and its ribonuclease T1 cleavage fragments by means of 500-MHz proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.H.; Marshall, A.G. )

    1990-01-23

    Three different fragments of Bacillus megaterium ribosomal 5S RNA have been produced by enzymatic cleavage with ribonuclease T1. Fragment A consists of helices II and III, fragment B contains helix IV, and fragment C contains helix I of the universal 5S rRNA secondary structure. All (eight) imino proton resonances in the downfield region (9-15 ppm) of the 500-MHz proton FT NMR spectrum of fragment B have been identified and assigned as G{sub 80}{center dot}C{sub 92}{center dot}G{sub 81}{center dot}C{sub 91}-G{sub 82}{center dot}C{sub 90}-A{sub 83}{center dot}U{sub 89}-C{sub 84}{center dot}G{sub 88} and three unpaired U's in helix IV by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancement connectivities. The secondary structure in helix IV of the prokaryotic loop is completely demonstrated spectroscopically for the first time in any native or enzyme-cleaved 5S rRNA. In addition, G{sub 21}{center dot}C{sub 58}-A{sub 20}{center dot}U{sub 59}-G{sub 19}{center dot}C{sub 60}-A{sub 18}{center dot}U{sub 61} in helix II, U{sub 32}{center dot}A{sub 46}-G{sub 31}{center dot}C{sub 47}-C{sub 30}{center dot}G{sub 48}-C{sub 29}{center dot}G{sub 49} in helix III, and G{sub 4}{center dot}C{sub 112}-G{sub 5}{center dot}C{sub 111}-U{sub 6}{center dot}G{sub 110} in the terminal stem (helix I) have been assigned by means of NOE experiments on intact 5S rRNA and its fragments A and C. Base pairs in helices I-IV of the universal secondary structure of B. megaterium 5S RNA are described.

  20. Can Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DW-MRI) Evaluate Inflammation Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Zhang, Faming; Luan, Yun; Cao, Peng; Liu, Fei; He, Wenwen; Wang, Dehang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate diagnosis efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in Crohn's disease (CD). To find out the correlations between functional MRI parameters including Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with a serologic biomarker. The relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC were also studied. Thirty-two patients with CD (22 men, 10 women; mean age: 30.5 years) and 18 healthy volunteers without any inflammatory disease (10 men, 8 women; mean age, 34.11 years) were enrolled into this approved prospective study. Pearson analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and C-reactive protein (CRP), ADC, and CRP respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of the functional MRI parameters in terms of sensitivity and specificity were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Optimal cut-off values of each functional MRI parameters for differentiation of inflammatory from normal bowel were determined according to the Youden criterion. Mean value of Ktrans in the CD group was significantly higher than that of normal control group. Similar results were observed for Kep and Ve. On the contrary, the ADC value was lower in the CD group than that in the control group. Ktrans and Ve were shown to be correlated with CRP (r = 0.725, P < 0.001; r = 0.533, P = 0.002), meanwhile ADC showed negative correlation with CRP (r = −0.630, P < 0.001). There were negative correlations between the pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC, such as Ktrans to ADC (r = −0.856, P < 0.001), and Ve to ADC (r = −0.451, P = 0.01). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.994 for Ktrans (P < 0.001), 0.905 for ADC (P < 0.001), 0.806 for Ve (P < 0.001), and 0.764 for Kep (P = 0.002). The cut-off point of the Ktrans was found to be 0.931 min–1. This value provided the best trade-off between

  1. Fundamentals of tracer kinetics for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Koh, Tong San; Bisdas, Sotirios; Koh, Dow Mu; Thng, Choon Hua

    2011-12-01

    Tracer kinetic methods employed for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) share common roots with earlier tracer studies involving arterial-venous sampling and other dynamic imaging modalities. This article reviews the essential foundation concepts and principles in tracer kinetics that are relevant to DCE MRI, including the notions of impulse response and convolution, which are central to the analysis of DCE MRI data. We further examine the formulation and solutions of various compartmental models frequently used in the literature. Topics of recent interest in the processing of DCE MRI data, such as the account of water exchange and the use of reference tissue methods to obviate the measurement of an arterial input, are also discussed. Although the primary focus of this review is on the tracer models and methods for T(1) -weighted DCE MRI, some of these concepts and methods are also applicable for analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI data.

  2. [Study on cine view of relative enhancement ratio map in O2-enhanced MRI].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keita; Watanabe, Yasushi; Hanaoka, Shouhei; Motoyoshi, Kouichi; Goto, Masami; Amemiya, Shiori; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables the evaluation of organ structure and function. Oxygen-enhanced MRI (O2-enhanced MRI) is a method for evaluating the pulmonary ventilation function using oxygen as a contrast agent. We created the Cine View of Relative Enhancement Ratio Map (Cine RER map) in O2-enhanced MRI to easily observe the contrast effect for clinical use. Relative enhancement ratio (RER) was determined as the pixel values of the Cine RER map. Moreover, six healthy volunteers underwent O2-enhanced MRI to determine the appropriate scale width of the Cine RER map. We calculated each RER and set 0 to 1.27 as the scale width of the Cine RER map based on the results. The Cine RER map made it possible to observe the contrast effect over time and thus is a convenient tool for evaluating the pulmonary ventilation function in O2-enhanced MRI.

  3. Real time speech enhancement for the noisy MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Nishank; Panahi, Issa; Devineni, P; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Performance of two Adaptive (nLMS and Normalized Sign-error LMS) and a single channel (LogMMSE) speech enhancement algorithms are tested on a floating point DSP to reveal their effectiveness in enhancing speech corrupted in noisy MRI environment with very low SNR. The purpose of experiments is to reduce the fatigue of the listener by eliminating the strong MRI noise. The experiments use actual data set collected from a 3-Tesla MRI machine. Results of the experiments and performance of the speech enhancement system are presented in this paper. The speech enhancement system is automated. Our experiments reveal that after enhancement of the speech signal using Sign-Error LMS, the residual noise shows characteristics of white noise in contrast to the residual noise of the other algorithms which is more structured. It is also shown that the Sign-Error LMS offers fast convergence in comparison to the other two methods.

  4. Overhauser Geomagnetic Sensor Based on the Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Effect for Magnetic Prospecting

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jian; Dong, Haobin; Liu, Huan; Yuan, Zhiwen; Dong, He; Zhao, Zhizhuo; Liu, Yonghua; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect, an alternative design of an Overhauser geomagnetic sensor is presented that enhances the proton polarization and increases the amplitude of the free induction decay (FID) signal. The short-pulse method is adopted to rotate the enhanced proton magnetization into the plane of precession to create an FID signal. To reduce the negative effect of the powerful electromagnetic interference, the design of the anti-interference of the pick-up coil is studied. Furthermore, the radio frequency polarization method based on the capacitive-loaded coaxial cavity is proposed to improve the quality factor of the resonant circuit. In addition, a special test instrument is designed that enables the simultaneous testing of the classical proton precession and the Overhauser sensor. Overall, comparison experiments with and without the free radical of the Overhauser sensors show that the DNP effect does effectively improve the amplitude and quality of the FID signal, and the magnetic sensitivity, resolution and range reach to 10 pT/Hz1/2@1 Hz, 0.0023 nT and 20–100 μT, respectively. PMID:27258283

  5. Segmentation of knee MRI using structure enhanced local phase filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Mikhiel; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker

    2016-03-01

    The segmentation of bone surfaces from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has applications in the quanti- tative measurement of knee osteoarthritis, surgery planning for patient specific total knee arthroplasty and its subsequent fabrication of artificial implants. However, due to the problems associated with MRI imaging such as low contrast between bone and surrounding tissues, noise, bias fields, and the partial volume effect, segmentation of bone surfaces continues to be a challenging operation. In this paper, a new framework is presented for the enhancement of knee MRI scans prior to segmentation in order to obtain high contrast bone images. During the first stage, a new contrast enhanced relative total variation (RTV) regularization method is used in order to remove textural noise from the bone structures and surrounding soft tissue interface. This salient bone edge information is further enhanced using a sparse gradient counting method based on L0 gradient minimization, which globally controls how many non-zero gradients are resulted in order to approximate prominent bone structures in a structure-sparsity-management manner. The last stage of the framework involves incorporation of local phase bone boundary information in order to provide an intensity invariant enhancement of contrast between the bone and surrounding soft tissue. The enhanced images are segmented using a fast random walker algorithm. Validation against expert segmentation was performed on 10 clinical knee MRI images, and achieved a mean dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.975.

  6. Manganese-Enhanced MRI: Biological Applications in Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Paiva, Fernando Fernandes; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Hamani, Clement; Covolan, Luciene

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool to investigate biological systems. The administration of the paramagnetic divalent ion manganese (Mn(2+)) enhances MRI contrast in vivo. Due to similarities between Mn(2+) and calcium (Ca(2+)), the premise of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is that the former may enter neurons and other excitable cells through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. As such, MEMRI has been used to trace neuronal pathways, define morphological boundaries, and study connectivity in morphological and functional imaging studies. In this article, we provide a brief overview of MEMRI and discuss recently published data to illustrate the usefulness of this method, particularly in animal models.

  7. Manganese-Enhanced MRI: Biological Applications in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Paiva, Fernando Fernandes; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Hamani, Clement; Covolan, Luciene

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool to investigate biological systems. The administration of the paramagnetic divalent ion manganese (Mn2+) enhances MRI contrast in vivo. Due to similarities between Mn2+ and calcium (Ca2+), the premise of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is that the former may enter neurons and other excitable cells through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. As such, MEMRI has been used to trace neuronal pathways, define morphological boundaries, and study connectivity in morphological and functional imaging studies. In this article, we provide a brief overview of MEMRI and discuss recently published data to illustrate the usefulness of this method, particularly in animal models. PMID:26217304

  8. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  9. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases.

  10. Microtesla MRI with dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Owens, Tuba; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Savukov, Igor M.; Gomez, John J.; Espy, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at microtesla fields is a promising imaging method that combines the pre-polarization technique and broadband signal reception by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors to enable in vivo MRI at microtesla-range magnetic fields similar in strength to the Earth magnetic field. Despite significant advances in recent years, the potential of microtesla MRI for biomedical imaging is limited by its insufficient signal-to-noise ratio due to a relatively low sample polarization. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used approach that allows polarization enhancement by two-four orders of magnitude without an increase in the polarizing field strength. In this work, the first implementation of microtesla MRI with Overhauser DNP and SQUID signal detection is described. The first measurements of carbon-13 NMR spectra at microtesla fields are also reported. The experiments were performed at the measurement field of 96 microtesla, corresponding to Larmor frequency of 4 kHz for protons and 1 kHz for carbon-13. The Overhauser DNP was carried out at 3.5 –5.7 mT field using rf irradiation at 120 MHz. Objects for imaging included water phantoms and a cactus plant. Aqueous solutions of metabolically relevant sodium bicarbonate, pyruvate, alanine, and lactate, labeled with carbon-13, were used for NMR studies. All the samples were doped with TEMPO free radicals. The Overhauser DNP enabled nuclear polarization enhancement by factor as high as −95 for protons and as high as −200 for carbon-13, corresponding to thermal polarizations at 0.33 T and 1.1 T fields, respectively. These results demonstrate that SQUID-based microtesla MRI can be naturally combined with Overhauser DNP in one system, and that its signal-to-noise performance is greatly improved in this case. They also suggest that microtesla MRI can become an efficient tool for in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized carbon-13, produced by the low-temperature dissolution DNP

  11. An improved Overhauser magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shifang; Chen, Shudong; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Cao, Qiong

    2016-09-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a kind of high-precision devices for magnetostatic field measurement. It is widely used in geological survey, earth field variations, UXO detection etc. However, the original Overhauser magnetometer JOM-2 shows great shortcomings of low signal to noise ratio (SNR) and high power consumption, which directly affect the performance of the device. In order to increase the sensitivity and reduce power consumption, we present an improved Overhauser magnetometer. Firstly, compared with the original power board which suffers from heavy noise for improper EMC design, an improved power broad with 20mV peak to peak noise is presented in this paper. Then, the junction field effect transistor (JFET) is used as pre-amplifier in our new design, to overcome the higher current noise produced by the original instrumentation amplifier. By adjusting the parameters carefully low noise factor down to 0.5 dB can be obtained. Finally, the new architecture of ARM + CPLD is adopted to replace the original one with DSP+CPLD. So lower power consumption and greater flash memory can be realized. With these measures, an improved Overhauser magnetometer with higher sensitivity and lower power consumption is design here. The experimental results indicate that the sensitivity of the improved Overhauser magnetometer is 0.071nT, which confirms that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  12. Detection of suspicious lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI data.

    PubMed

    Twellmann, T; Saalbach, A; Müller, C; Nattkemper, T W; Wismüller, A

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnet resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important source of information to aid breast cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, next to the temporal sequence of 3D volume data from the DCE-MRI technique, the radiologist commonly adducts information from other modalities for his final diagnosis. Thus, the diagnosis process is time consuming and tools are required to support the human expert. We investigate an automatic approach that detects the location and delineates the extent of suspicious masses in multi-temporal DCE-MRI data sets. It applies the state-of-the-art support vector machine algorithm to the classification of the short-time series associated with each voxel. The ROC analysis shows an increased specificity in contrast to standard evaluations techniques.

  13. Simultaneous segmentation and registration of contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Xiaohua, Chen; Brady, Michael; Lo, Jonathan Lok-Chuen; Moore, Niall

    2005-01-01

    Breast Contrast-Enhanced MRI (ce-MRI) requires a series of images to be acquired before, and repeatedly after, intravenous injection of a contrast agent. Breast MRI segmentation based on the differential enhancement of image intensities can assist the clinician detect suspicious regions. Image registration between the temporal data sets is necessary to compensate for patient motion, which is quite often substantial. Although segmentation and registration are usually treated as separate problems in medical image analysis, they can naturally benefit a great deal from each other. In this paper, we propose a scheme for simultaneous segmentation and registration of breast ce-MRI. It is developed within a Bayesian framework, based on a maximum a posteriori estimation method. A pharmacokinetic model and Markov Random Field model have been incorporated into the framework in order to improve the performance of our algorithm. Our method has been applied to the segmentation and registration of clinical ce-MR images. The results show the potential of our methodology to extract useful information for breast cancer detection.

  14. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  15. Manganese-Enhanced MRI: An Exceptional Tool in Translational Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Afonso C.; Bock, Nicholas A.

    2008-01-01

    The metal manganese is a potent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that is essential in cell biology. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is providing unique information in an ever-growing number of applications aimed at understanding the anatomy, the integration, and the function of neural circuits both in normal brain physiology as well as in translational models of brain disease. A major drawback to the use of manganese as a contrast agent, however, is its cellular toxicity. Therefore, paramount to the successful application of MEMRI is the ability to deliver Mn2+ to the site of interest using as low a dose as possible while preserving detectability by MRI. In the present work, the different approaches to MEMRI in translational neuroimaging are reviewed and challenges for future identified from a practical standpoint. PMID:18550591

  16. Enhancement of virchow-robin spaces. An MRI evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Papaioannou, S; Arvaniti, M; Tsitouridis, K; Rodokalakis, G; Papastergiou, C

    2009-01-20

    Virchow-Robin spaces are enclosed spaces filled with interstitial fluid and covered with pia that accompany arteries, arterioles, veins and venules as they perforate the brain. They are round, linear or punctuate areas depending on the image that parallel cerebrospinal fluid attenuation or signal intensity. They are classically described as isointense to cerebrospinal fluid on images obtained with all pulse sequences. They appear hypointense relative to brain on T1-weighted MR scans and present a high signal intensity on T2-weighted MR scans. They also show complete signal suppression on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) scans and no enhancement after intravenous contrast administration. However, many pathologic states result in abnormal dilation with an increased number of Virchow-Robin spaces visible on MRI imaging and many pathological conditions cause the spaces to enhance. The purpose of this study is to present the major causes of Virchow-Robin enhancement.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  18. Comparison of the Specificity of MREIT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Method; EIS, Electrical Impedance Scanning; OPAMP, Operational Amplifier; SVD, Singular Value Decomposition; NEX, Number of Excitations ; CE- MRI ... simulate a low conductivity region (Fig. 1). The plane of the disk was placed perpendicular to the main static MRI field. Four copper electrodes each...and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ozlem Birgul, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  19. MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement Is Not Associated with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Dietzel, Matthias; Baltzer, Pascal Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, a strong positive association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and breast cancer was reported in high-risk populations. We sought to determine, whether this was also true for non-high-risk patients. Methods 540 consecutive patients underwent breast MRI for assessment of breast findings (BI-RADS 0–5, non-high-risk screening (no familial history of breast cancer, no known genetic mutation, no prior chest irradiation, or previous breast cancer diagnosis)) and subsequent histological work-up. For this IRB-approved study, BPE and fibroglandular tissue FGT were retrospectively assessed by two experienced radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between BPE, FGT, age and final diagnosis of breast cancer. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression analysis, considering covariate colinearities, was performed, using final diagnosis as the target variable and BPE, FGT and age as covariates. Results Age showed a moderate negative correlation with FGT (r = -0.43, p<0.001) and a weak negative correlation with BPE (r = -0.28, p<0.001). FGT and BPE correlated moderately (r = 0.35, p<0.001). Final diagnosis of breast cancer displayed very weak negative correlations with FGT (r = -0.09, p = 0.046) and BPE (r = -0.156, p<0.001) and weak positive correlation with age (r = 0.353, p<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only independent covariate for prediction of breast cancer was age (OR 1.032, p<0.001). Conclusions Based on our data, neither BPE nor FGT independently correlate with breast cancer risk in non-high-risk patients at MRI. Our model retained only age as an independent risk factor for breast cancer in this setting. PMID:27379395

  20. In Vivo Evaluation of the Visual Pathway in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes by Diffusion Tensor MRI and Contrast Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kancherla, Swarupa; Kohler, William J.; van der Merwe, Yolandi

    2016-01-01

    Visual function has been shown to deteriorate prior to the onset of retinopathy in some diabetic patients and experimental animal models. This suggests the involvement of the brain's visual system in the early stages of diabetes. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the integrity of the visual pathway in a diabetic rat model using in vivo multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into an experimental diabetic group by intraperitoneal injection of 65 mg/kg streptozotocin in 0.01 M citric acid, and a sham control group by intraperitoneal injection of citric acid only. One month later, diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) was performed to examine the white matter integrity in the brain, followed by chromium-enhanced MRI of retinal integrity and manganese-enhanced MRI of anterograde manganese transport along the visual pathway. Prior to MRI experiments, the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats showed significantly smaller weight gain and higher blood glucose level than the control rats. DTI revealed significantly lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in the prechiasmatic optic nerve of the diabetic rats compared to the control rats. No apparent difference was observed in the axial diffusivity of the optic nerve, the chromium enhancement in the retina, or the manganese enhancement in the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus between groups. Our results suggest that streptozotocin-induced diabetes leads to early injury in the optic nerve when no substantial change in retinal integrity or anterograde transport along the visual pathways was observed in MRI using contrast agent enhancement. DTI may be a useful tool for detecting and monitoring early pathophysiological changes in the visual system of experimental diabetes non-invasively. PMID:27768755

  1. Ex vivo assessment of polyol coated-iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI diagnosis applications: toxicological and MRI contrast enhancement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomati-Miguel, Oscar; Miguel-Sancho, Nuria; Abasolo, Ibane; Candiota, Ana Paula; Roca, Alejandro G.; Acosta, Milena; Schwartz, Simó; Arus, Carles; Marquina, Clara; Martinez, Gema; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Polyol synthesis is a promising method to obtain directly pharmaceutical grade colloidal dispersion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Here, we study the biocompatibility and performance as T2-MRI contrast agents (CAs) of high quality magnetic colloidal dispersions (average hydrodynamic aggregate diameter of 16-27 nm) consisting of polyol-synthesized SPIONs (5 nm in mean particle size) coated with triethylene glycol (TEG) chains (TEG-SPIONs), which were subsequently functionalized to carboxyl-terminated meso-2-3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated-iron oxide nanoparticles (DMSA-SPIONs). Standard MTT assays on HeLa, U87MG, and HepG2 cells revealed that colloidal dispersions of TEG-coated iron oxide nanoparticles did not induce any loss of cell viability after 3 days incubation with dose concentrations below 50 μg Fe/ml. However, after these nanoparticles were functionalized with DMSA molecules, an increase on their cytotoxicity was observed, so that particles bearing free terminal carboxyl groups on their surface were not cytotoxic only at low concentrations (<10 μg Fe/ml). Moreover, cell uptake assays on HeLa and U87MG and hemolysis tests have demonstrated that TEG-SPIONs and DMSA-SPIONs were well internalized by the cells and did not induce any adverse effect on the red blood cells at the tested concentrations. Finally, in vitro relaxivity measurements and post mortem MRI studies in mice indicated that both types of coated-iron oxide nanoparticles produced higher negative T2-MRI contrast enhancement than that measured for a similar commercial T2-MRI CAs consisting in dextran-coated ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Ferumoxtran-10). In conclusion, the above attributes make both types of as synthesized coated-iron oxide nanoparticles, but especially DMSA-SPIONs, promising candidates as T2-MRI CAs for nanoparticle-enhanced MRI diagnosis applications.

  2. Emerging role of contrast-enhanced MRI in diagnosing vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Turley, Ryan S; Lidsky, Michael E; Markovic, Jovan N; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Vascular malformations comprise a diverse and rare group of lesions which generally pose a formidable treatment challenge. Requisite for optimal surgical planning are imaging modalities capable of delineating involved anatomy and malformation flow characteristics. In this regard, we and others have purported the advantages of contrast-enhanced MRI. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding the emerging of role of contrast enhanced MRI for the management of vascular malformations.

  3. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) quantified from breast DCE-MRI and breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shandong; Kurland, Brenda F.; Berg, Wendie A.; Zuley, Margarita L.; Jankowitz, Rachel C.; Sumkin, Jules; Gur, David

    2015-03-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended as an adjunct to mammography for women who are considered at elevated risk of developing breast cancer. As a key component of breast MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) uses a contrast agent to provide high intensity contrast between breast tissues, making it sensitive to tissue composition and vascularity. Breast DCE-MRI characterizes certain physiologic properties of breast tissue that are potentially related to breast cancer risk. Studies have shown that increased background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), which is the contrast enhancement occurring in normal cancer-unaffected breast tissues in post-contrast sequences, predicts increased breast cancer risk. Signal enhancement ratio (SER) computed from pre-contrast and post-contrast sequences in DCE-MRI measures change in signal intensity due to contrast uptake over time and is a measure of contrast enhancement kinetics. SER quantified in breast tumor has been shown potential as a biomarker for characterizing tumor response to treatments. In this work we investigated the relationship between quantitative measures of SER and breast cancer risk. A pilot retrospective case-control study was performed using a cohort of 102 women, consisting of 51 women who had diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer and 51 matched controls (by age and MRI date) with a unilateral biopsy-proven benign lesion. SER was quantified using fully-automated computerized algorithms and three SER-derived quantitative volume measures were compared between the cancer cases and controls using logistic regression analysis. Our preliminary results showed that SER is associated with breast cancer risk, after adjustment for the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS)-based mammographic breast density measures. This pilot study indicated that SER has potential for use as a risk factor for breast cancer risk assessment in women at elevated risk of developing breast cancer.

  4. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with…

  5. Solution conformation of peptides by the intramolecular nuclear Overhauser effect experiment. Study of valinomycin-K+.

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, N R; Agresti, D G; Glickson, J D; Walter, R

    1978-01-01

    This study demonstrates how the intramolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) experiment can be employed quantitatively to select from a set of possible conformations for a peptide or a protein the particular conformation (or a group of conformations) most consistent with the data. This procedure is demonstrated on a model depsipeptide system--valinomycin K+ in CDCl3--for which the solution conformation has been inferred by other methods. The NOE enhancements are very sensitive to the conformations assumed by this antibiotic. It is shown that the set of conformations, collectively labeled as A2 (including the X-ray crystallographic structure) gives a very good description of the NOE enhancements. The structure proposed by Bystrov et al. (1977. Eur. J. Biochem. 78:63) for the uncomplexed valinomycin in nonpolar solvents is also consistent with the experimental data on the potassium complex. Using statistical hypothesis testing involving the Hamilton R-factor ratio criterion, all the other models have been rejected as inconsistent with the experimental data. A general formalism is presented for describing the NOE effects in isotropically reorienting molecules. The formalism is not restricted to the extreme narrowing limit of the rotational correlation times and hence applies to both small and large molecules. Some of the factors that can influence the NOE measurements, viz. anisotropic rotational diffusion, conformational averaging, and nuclear spin diffusion, have been considered in this study. PMID:737287

  6. Coregistration of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy for characterizing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, David; Shah, Natasha; Yu, Hon; Su, Min-Ying; Cerussi, Albert; Butler, John; Baick, Choong; Mehta, Rita; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Tromberg, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    A hand-held scanning probe based on broadband Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (DOS) was used in combination with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to quantitatively characterize locally-advanced breast cancers in six patients. Measurements were performed sequentially using external fiducial markers for co-registration. Tumor patterns were categorized according to MRI morphological data, and 3D DCE-MRI slices were converted into a volumetric matrix with isotropic voxels to generate views that coincided with the DOS scanning plane. Tumor volume and depth at each DOS measurement site were determined, and a tissue optical index (TOI) that reflects both angiogenic and stromal characteristics was derived from broadband DOS data. In all six cases, optical scans showed significant TOI contrast corresponding to MRI morphological information. Sharp TOI peaks were recovered for well-circumscribed masses. A reduction in TOI was found inside a tumor with a necrotic center. A broadened peak was observed for a diffuse tumor pattern, and an inflammatory septal case provided two TOI peaks that correlated qualitatively with MRI enhancement. These results provide qualitative confirmation of the common signal origin and complementary information content that can be achieved by combining optical and MR imaging for breast cancer detection and clinical management.

  7. pH-sensitive MRI demarcates graded tissue acidification during acute stroke - pH specificity enhancement with magnetization transfer and relaxation-normalized amide proton transfer (APT) MRI.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingkun; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Chan, Suk-Tak; Wang, Yu; Mandeville, Emiri T; Igarashi, Takahiro; Lo, Eng H; Ji, Xunming; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2016-11-01

    pH-sensitive amide proton transfer (APT) MRI provides a surrogate metabolic biomarker that complements the widely-used perfusion and diffusion imaging. However, the endogenous APT MRI is often calculated using the asymmetry analysis (MTRasym), which is susceptible to an inhomogeneous shift due to concomitant semisolid magnetization transfer (MT) and nuclear overhauser (NOE) effects. Although the intact brain tissue has little pH variation, white and gray matter appears distinct in the MTRasym image. Herein we showed that the heterogeneous MTRasym shift not related to pH highly correlates with MT ratio (MTR) and longitudinal relaxation rate (R1w), which can be reasonably corrected using the multiple regression analysis. Because there are relatively small MT and R1w changes during acute stroke, we postulate that magnetization transfer and relaxation-normalized APT (MRAPT) analysis increases MRI specificity to acidosis over the routine MTRasym image, hence facilitates ischemic lesion segmentation. We found significant differences in perfusion, pH and diffusion lesion volumes (P<0.001, ANOVA). Furthermore, MRAPT MRI depicted graded ischemic acidosis, with the most severe acidosis in the diffusion lesion (-1.05±0.29%/s), moderate acidification within the pH/diffusion mismatch (i.e., metabolic penumbra, -0.67±0.27%/s) and little pH change in the perfusion/pH mismatch (i.e., benign oligemia, -0.04±0.14%/s), providing refined stratification of ischemic tissue injury.

  8. Characterization of tumor angiogenesis in rat brain using iron-based vessel size index MRI in combination with gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Marine; Lemasson, Benjamin; Farion, Régine; Segebarth, Christoph; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed at combining an iron-based, steady-state, vessel size index magnetic resonance imaging (VSI MRI) approach, and a gadolinium (Gd)-based, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI approach (DCE MRI) to characterize tumoral microvasculature. Rats bearing an orthotopic glioma (C6, n=14 and RG2, n=6) underwent DCE MRI and combined VSI and DCE MRI 4 h later, at 2.35 T. Gd-DOTA (200 mumol of Gd per kg) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) (200 micromol of iron per kg) were used for DCE and VSI MRI, respectively. C6 and RG2 gliomas were equally permeable to Gd-DOTA but presented different blood volume fractions and VSI, in good agreement with histologic data. The presence of USPIO yielded reduced K(trans) values. The K(trans) values obtained with Gd-DOTA in the absence and in the presence of USPIO were well correlated for the C6 glioma but not for the RG2 glioma. It was also observed that, within the time frame of DCE MRI, USPIO remained intravascular in the C6 glioma whereas it extravasated in the RG2 glioma. In conclusion, VSI and DCE MRI can be combined provided that USPIO does not extravasate with the time frame of the DCE MRI experiment. The mechanisms at the origin of USPIO extravasation remain to be elucidated.

  9. Proton–proton Overhauser NMR spectroscopy with polypeptide chains in large structures

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Reto; Wider, Gerhard; Fiaux, Jocelyne; Bertelsen, Eric B.; Horwich, Arthur L.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The use of 1H–1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE) for structural studies of uniformly deuterated polypeptide chains in large structures is investigated by model calculations and NMR experiments. Detailed analysis of the evolution of the magnetization during 1H–1H NOE experiments under slow-motion conditions shows that the maximal 1H–1H NOE transfer is independent of the overall rotational correlation time, even in the presence of chemical exchange with the bulk water, provided that the mixing time is adjusted for the size of the structure studied. 1H–1H NOE buildup measurements were performed for the 472-kDa complex of the 72-kDa cochaperonin GroES with a 400-kDa single-ring variant of the chaperonin GroEL (SR1). These experiments demonstrate that multidimensional NOESY experiments with cross-correlated relaxation-enhanced polarization transfer and transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy elements can be applied to structures of molecular masses up to several hundred kilodaltabs, which opens new possibilities for studying functional interactions in large maromolecular assemblies in solution. PMID:17032756

  10. Fast and Quantitative T1ρ-weighted Dynamic Glucose Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schuenke, Patrick; Paech, Daniel; Koehler, Christina; Windschuh, Johannes; Bachert, Peter; Ladd, Mark E.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Radbruch, Alexander; Zaiss, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Common medical imaging techniques usually employ contrast agents that are chemically labeled, e.g. with radioisotopes in the case of PET, iodine in the case of CT or paramagnetic metals in the case of MRI to visualize the heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment. Recently, it was shown that natural unlabeled D-glucose can be used as a nontoxic biodegradable contrast agent in Chemical Exchange sensitive Spin-Lock (CESL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect the glucose uptake and potentially the metabolism of tumors. As an important step to fulfill the clinical needs for practicability, reproducibility and imaging speed we present here a robust and quantitative T1ρ-weighted technique for dynamic glucose enhanced MRI (DGE-MRI) with a temporal resolution of less than 7 seconds. Applied to a brain tumor patient, the new technique provided a distinct DGE contrast between tumor and healthy brain tissue and showed the detailed dynamics of the glucose enhancement after intravenous injection. Development of this fast and quantitative DGE-MRI technique allows for a more detailed analysis of DGE correlations in the future and potentially enables non-invasive diagnosis, staging and monitoring of tumor response to therapy. PMID:28169369

  11. The Potential for an Enhanced Role for MRI in Radiation-therapy Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, P.; Liney, G. P.; Holloway, L.; Walker, A.; Barton, M.; Delaney, G. P.; Vinod, S.; Tomé, W.

    2013-01-01

    The exquisite soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has meant that the technique is having an increasing role in contouring the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OAR) in radiation therapy treatment planning systems (TPS). MRI-planning scans from diagnostic MRI scanners are currently incorporated into the planning process by being registered to CT data. The soft-tissue data from the MRI provides target outline guidance and the CT provides a solid geometric and electron density map for accurate dose calculation on the TPS computer. There is increasing interest in MRI machine placement in radiotherapy clinics as an adjunct to CT simulators. Most vendors now offer 70 cm bores with flat couch inserts and specialised RF coil designs. We would refer to these devices as MR-simulators. There is also research into the future application of MR-simulators independent of CT and as in-room image-guidance devices. It is within the background of this increased interest in the utility of MRI in radiotherapy treatment planning that this paper is couched. The paper outlines publications that deal with standard MRI sequences used in current clinical practice. It then discusses the potential for using processed functional diffusion maps (fDM) derived from diffusion weighted image sequences in tracking tumor activity and tumor recurrence. Next, this paper reviews publications that describe the use of MRI in patient-management applications that may, in turn, be relevant to radiotherapy treatment planning. The review briefly discusses the concepts behind functional techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE), diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Significant applications of MR are discussed in terms of the following treatment sites: brain, head and neck, breast, lung, prostate and cervix. While not yet routine, the use of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map analysis indicates an exciting future

  12. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  13. A multichannel speech enhancement method for functional MRI systems using a distributed microphone array.

    PubMed

    Milani, Ali A; Kannan, Govind; Panahi, Issa M S; Briggs, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Multichannel speech enhancement has been shown to be an effective method to decrease speech distortion introduced during speech enhancement, especially in environments like MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) which have a distributed noise source. However, these methods suffer from high computational complexity which makes them almost impractical. The use of subband filtering has been suggested to reduce this complexity but the performance of the existing subband methods deteriorate as the number of subbands increases. In this paper we introduce a new multichannel speech enhancement algorithm based on subband adaptive filtering that works for higher number of subbands at a lower complexity. The real-world experiments demonstrate the performance of the new scheme in an MRI room.

  14. Kinetics of the in vivo31P 1H nuclear overhauser effect of the human-calf-muscle phosphocreatine resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachert, Peter; Bellemann, Matthias E.

    In 31P 1H double-resonance experiments in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, we observed in vivo the truncated driven, transient, and steady-state 31P- 1H nuclear Overhauser effect of the phosphocreatine resonance in 31P MR spectra of human gastrocnemius muscle. Maximum signal enhancements of 0.52 ± 0.01, 0.20 ± 0.01, and 0.79 ± 0.02 were measured, respectively. Fitting the data with theoretical functions which solve the multispin Solomon equations for N protons (S spins) dipolar coupled to a 31P nucleus (I spin) yields cross-relaxation times {2}/{[Σ i=1-N σIS(i) ] } in the order of 20 s. In vivo experiments are feasible for studying relaxation mechanisms in coupled 31P 1H spin systems in intact tissue.

  15. Oxygen-enhanced MRI accurately identifies, quantifies, and maps tumor hypoxia in preclinical cancer models

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James PB; Boult, Jessica KR; Jamin, Yann; Babur, Muhammad; Finegan, Katherine G; Williams, Kaye J; Little, Ross A; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff JM; Reynolds, Andrew R; Waterton, John C; Robinson, Simon P

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for non-invasive biomarkers of tumor hypoxia for prognostic and predictive studies, radiotherapy planning and therapy monitoring. Oxygen enhanced MRI (OE-MRI) is an emerging imaging technique for quantifying the spatial distribution and extent of tumor oxygen delivery in vivo. In OE-MRI, the longitudinal relaxation rate of protons (ΔR1) changes in proportion to the concentration of molecular oxygen dissolved in plasma or interstitial tissue fluid. Therefore, well-oxygenated tissues show positive ΔR1. We hypothesized that the fraction of tumor tissue refractory to oxygen challenge (lack of positive ΔR1, termed “Oxy-R fraction”) would be a robust biomarker of hypoxia in models with varying vascular and hypoxic features. Here we demonstrate that OE-MRI signals are accurate, precise and sensitive to changes in tumor pO2 in highly vascular 786-0 renal cancer xenografts. Furthermore, we show that Oxy-R fraction can quantify the hypoxic fraction in multiple models with differing hypoxic and vascular phenotypes, when used in combination with measurements of tumor perfusion. Finally, Oxy-R fraction can detect dynamic changes in hypoxia induced by the vasomodulator agent hydralazine. In contrast, more conventional biomarkers of hypoxia (derived from blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) did not relate to tumor hypoxia consistently. Our results show that the Oxy-R fraction accurately quantifies tumor hypoxia non-invasively and is immediately translatable to the clinic. PMID:26659574

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in clinical trials of antivascular therapies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Roberts, Caleb; Jayson, Gordon C

    2012-02-14

    About 100 early-phase clinical trials and investigator-led studies of targeted antivascular therapies--both anti-angiogenic and vascular-targeting agents--have reported data derived from T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. However, the role of DCE-MRI for decision making during the drug-development process remains controversial. Despite well-documented guidelines on image acquisition and analysis, several key questions concerning the role of this technique in early-phase trial design remain unanswered. This Review describes studies of single-agent antivascular therapies, in which DCE-MRI parameters are incorporated as pharmacodynamic biomarkers. We discuss whether these parameters, such as volume transfer constant (K(trans)), are reproducible and reliable biomarkers of both drug efficacy and proof of concept, and whether they assist in dose selection and drug scheduling for subsequent phase II trials. Emerging evidence indicates that multiparametric analysis of DCE-MRI data offers greater insight into the mechanism of drug action than studies measuring a single parameter, such as K(trans). We also provide an overview of current data and appraise the future directions of this technique in oncology trials. Finally, major hurdles in imaging biomarker development, validation and qualification that hinder a wide application of DCE-MRI techniques in clinical trials are addressed.

  17. Efficient compressed sensing SENSE parallel MRI reconstruction with joint sparsity promotion and mutual incoherence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Il Yong Chun; Adcock, Ben; Talavage, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered a key modality for the future as it offers several advantages, including the use of non-ionizing radiation and having no known side effects on the human body, and has recently begun to serve as a key component of multi-modal neuroimaging. However, two major intrinsic problems exist: slow acquisition and intrusive acoustic noise. Parallel MRI (pMRI) techniques accelerate acquisition by reducing the duration and coverage of conventional gradient encoding. The under-sampled k-space data is detected with several receiver coils surrounding the object, using distinct spatial encoding information for each coil element to reconstruct the image. However, this scanning remains slow compared to typical clinical imaging (e.g. X-ray CT). Compressed Sensing (CS), a sampling theory based on random sub-sampling, has potential to further reduce the sampling used in pMRI, accelerating acquisition further. In this work, we propose a new CS SENSE pMRI reconstruction model promoting joint sparsity across channels and enhancing mutual incoherence to improve reconstruction accuracy from limited k-space data. For fast image reconstruction and fair comparisons, all reconstructions are computed with split-Bregman and variable splitting techniques. Numerical results show that, with the introduced methods, reconstruction performance can be crucially improved with limited amount of k-space data.

  18. [Non-masslike enhancement on breast MRI: interpretation pearls].

    PubMed

    Thomassin-Naggara, I; Salem, C; Darai, E; Bazot, M; Uzan, S; Marsault, C; Chopier, J

    2009-03-01

    The MR Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon of the American College of Radiology (ACR) includes a new lesion category defined as non-masslike enhancement. The purpose of this paper is to review the definition of this new entity, illustrate the main imaging features described in the BI-RADS lexicon and to propose a diagnostic approach based on data from the literature in order to achieve diagnosis and optimal patient management.

  19. Improvements in Diagnostic Accuracy with Quantitative Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    order to eliminate variations in parenchymal enhancement during the menstrual cycle , for pre-menopausal patients [5]. When it has not been possible...to scan them within a few days, their second scan was planned for a time when they were in the same phase of the menstrual cycle as in the first scan...allowed us to eliminate voxels which, due to noise or perhaps varying stages of the cardiac cycle when the image was acquired, led to concentration curves

  20. Perceptual enhancement of arteriovenous malformation in MRI angiography displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhari, Kamyar; Baxter, John S. H.; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2012-02-01

    The importance of presenting medical images in an intuitive and usable manner during a procedure is essential. However, most medical visualization interfaces, particularly those designed for minimally-invasive surgery, suffer from a number of issues as a consequence of disregarding the human perceptual, cognitive, and motor system's limitations. This matter is even more prominent when human visual system is overlooked during the design cycle. One example is the visualization of the neuro-vascular structures in MR angiography (MRA) images. This study investigates perceptual performance in the usability of a display to visualize blood vessels in MRA volumes using a contour enhancement technique. Our results show that when contours are enhanced, our participants, in general, can perform faster with higher level of accuracy when judging the connectivity of different vessels. One clinical outcome of such perceptual enhancement is improvement of spatial reasoning needed for planning complex neuro-vascular operations such as treating Arteriovenous Malformations (AVMs). The success of an AVM intervention greatly depends on fully understanding the anatomy of vascular structures. However, poor visualization of pre-operative MRA images makes the planning of such a treatment quite challenging.

  1. Early Inflammatory Response following Traumatic Brain Injury in Rabbits Using USPIO- and Gd-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To monitor the inflammatory response (IR) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) before and after the rehabilitation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in rabbits using USPIO- and Gd-enhanced MRI. Materials and Methods. Twenty white big-eared rabbits with mild TBI (mTBI) were randomly and equally divided into four groups. Rabbits were sacrificed for the brain specimens immediately after the last MRI-monitoring. Sequences were tse-T1WI, tse-T2WI, Gd-T1WI, and USPIO-T1WI. Dynamical MRI presentations were evaluated and compared with pathological findings for each group. Results. Twenty-four hours after injury, all rabbits displayed high signal foci on T2WI, while only 55% lesions could be found on Gd-T1WI and none on USPIO-T1WI. The lesions were enhanced on Gd-T1WI in 100% subjects after 48 h and the enhancement sizes augmented to the largest after 72 h. At the time point of 72 h after TBI, 90% lesions were enhanced by USPIO. Five days after injury, 19 lesions showed decreased Gd-enhancement and one disappeared; however, USPIO-enhancement became larger than before. Pathological findings showed microglias slightly appeared in dense leukocytes at 48 h, but became the dominant inflammatory cells after five days. Conclusions. Dynamic IR following injury could be monitored by combination of Gd- and USPIO-MRI in mTBI rabbits. PMID:27868069

  2. One-pot facile synthesis of PEGylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lingling; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Zhongqiu; Guo, Fangfang; Shi, Donglu; Zhang, Bingbo

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEG·SPIONs) were prepared by a facile one-pot approach. The synthesized PEG·SPIONs were found to be uniform in size with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 11.7 nm. PEG·SPIONs exhibited excellent dispersibility in water, colloidal stability, and biocompatibility. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) properties of PEG·SPIONs were characterized both in vitro and in vivo. The dual contrast both in T1 and T2-weighted imaging was well enhanced with longitudinal and transverse relaxivity (r1, r2) of 35.92 s(-1) per mM of Fe(3+) and 206.91 s(-1) per mM of Fe(3+) respectively. In vivo T2-weighted MRI shows pronounced enhancement in the liver and spleen but not in T1-weighted MRI. Accumulations of nanoparticles were found primarily in the liver, spleen, and intestine, while much lower uptake in the kidney, heart, and lungs. A gradual excretion of PEG·SPIONs was observed via hepatobiliary (HB) processing over a period of 14 days. The toxicity of PEG·SPIONs was also evaluated in vitro and in vivo. PEG·SPIONs were found to be biocompatible by investigating organ tissues after hematoxylin-eosin staining. The conclusion of the study indicates a high potential of PEG·SPIONs in medical MRI.

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  4. Manganese-Enhanced MRI for Preclinical Evaluation of Retinal Degeneration Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Schur, Rebecca M.; Sheng, Li; Sahu, Bhubanananda; Yu, Guanping; Gao, Songqi; Yu, Xin; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Apply manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) to assess ion channel activity and structure of retinas from mice subject to light-induced retinal degeneration treated with prophylactic agents. Methods Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− double knockout mice with and without prophylactic retinylamine (Ret-NH2) treatment were illuminated with strong light. Manganese-enhanced MRI was used to image the retina 2 hours after intravitreous injection of MnCl2 into one eye. Contrast-enhanced MRIs of the retina and vitreous humor in each experimental group were assessed and correlated with the treatment. Findings were compared with standard structural and functional assessments of the retina by optical coherence tomography (OCT), histology, and electroretinography (ERG). Results Manganese-enhanced MRI contrast in the retina was high in nonilluminated and illuminated Ret-NH2–treated mice, whereas no enhancement was evident in the retina of the light-illuminated mice without Ret-NH2 treatment (P < 0.0005). A relatively high signal enhancement was also observed in the vitreous humor of mice treated with Ret-NH2. Strong MEMRI signal enhancement in the retinas of mice treated with retinylamine was correlated with their structural integrity and function evidenced by OCT, histology, and a strong ERG light response. Conclusions Manganese-enhanced MRI has the potential to assess the response of the retina to prophylactic treatment based on the measurement of ion channel activity. This approach could be used as a complementary tool in preclinical development of new prophylactic therapies for retinopathies. PMID:26225634

  5. Immobilized contrast-enhanced MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR contrast enhancement of the vein graft vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T; Campagna, Christina M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Mulkern, Robert V; Ozaki, C Keith; Rybicki, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance postsurgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small-vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent "labeling" of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium(3+) dihydrogen complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3 T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period.

  6. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  7. Multifunctional nanoparticle platforms for in vivo MRI enhancement and photodynamic therapy of a rat brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul; Lee Koo, Yong-Eun; Philbert, Martin; Moffat, Bradford A.; Ramachandra Reddy, G.; McConville, Patrick; Hall, Daniel E.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Bhojani, Mahaveer Swaroop; Buck, Sarah M.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2005-05-01

    A paradigm for brain cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring is established. Multifunctional biomedical nanoparticles (30-60 nm) containing photosensitizer externally deliver reactive oxygen species (ROS) to cancer cells while simultaneously enhancing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast providing real-time tumor kill measurement. Plasma residence time control and specific cell targeting are achieved. A 5 min treatment in rats halted and even reversed in vivo tumor growth after 3-4 days post-treatment.

  8. Late enhancement: a new feature in MRI of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Wieneke, Heinrich; Bruder, Oliver; Krueger, Ulrich; Schlosser, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate whether late enhancement (LE) in contrast-enhanced MRI can be used to characterize fibrofatty myocardial replacement in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC). Fifteen patients with suspected ARVC underwent CE-MRI using a 1.5 T scanner. Long and short axis SSFP cine images and T1-weighted fast spin echo images were collected in all patients. After injection of 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Schering, Berlin, Germany), inversion recovery gradient echo images were acquired in long and contiguous short axes to detect myocardial LE indicating areas of fibrous tissue within the myocardium. For definition of ARVC, the ESC Task force criteria were used. In 7 (47%) of 15 patients, ARVC was diagnosed based on the ESC criteria. In all of these 7 patients, MRI showed morphologic or functional criteria of ARVC according to the ESC. LE of the right ventricular myocardium was detected in 5 (71%) of the 7 ARVC patients, additional LE of the left ventricular myocardium in 2 of these patients. None of the 7 patients meeting the ARVC diagnostic criteria had fatty RV infiltration demonstrable by conventional T1-weighted imaging. Eight patients neither showed morphologic criteria of ARVC nor LE. In conclusion, late enhancement can be detected in the right and left ventricular myocardium in some ARVC patients. LE might represent intramyocardial areas of fibrous tissue.

  9. Automatic detection of regional heart rejection in USPIO-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Moura, José M F; Wu, Yijen L; Ho, Chien

    2008-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to study the infiltration of cells in vivo. This research adopts ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles as contrast agents. USPIO particles administered intravenously can be endocytosed by circulating immune cells, in particular, macrophages. Hence, macrophages are labeled with USPIO particles. When a transplanted heart undergoes rejection, immune cells will infiltrate the allograft. Imaged by T(2)(*)-weighted MRI, USPIO-labeled macrophages display dark pixel intensities. Detecting these labeled cells in the image facilitates the identification of acute heart rejection. This paper develops a classifier to detect the presence of USPIO-labeled macrophages in the myocardium in the framework of spectral graph theory. First, we describe a USPIO-enhanced heart image with a graph. Classification becomes equivalent to partitioning the graph into two disjoint subgraphs. We use the Cheeger constant of the graph as an objective functional to derive the classifier. We represent the classifier as a linear combination of basis functions given from the spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian. Minimization of the Cheeger constant based functional leads to the optimal classifier. Experimental results and comparisons with other methods suggest the feasibility of our approach to study the rejection of hearts imaged by USPIO-enhanced MRI.

  10. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is the leading factor in angiogenesis. Angiogenesis can be identified by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI (DCE MRI). Here we investigate the relationship between perfusion parameters on DCE MRI and angiogenic and prognostic factors in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, kep and ve) of 81 IDC were obtained using histogram analysis. Twenty-fifth, 50th and 75th percentile values were calculated and were analyzed for association with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and conventional prognostic factors. Correlation between MVD and ve50 was positive (r = 0.33). Ktrans50 was higher in tumors larger than 2 cm than in tumors smaller than 2 cm. In multivariate analysis, Ktrans50 was affected by tumor size and MVD with 12.8% explanation. There was significant association between Ktrans50 and tumor size and MVD. Therefore we conclude that DCE MRI perfusion parameters are potential imaging biomarkers for prediction of tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. PMID:28036342

  11. Comparison of the Specificity of MR-EIT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    used in classification. Current conductivity imaging techniques can only provide low-resolution images and fail in extreme cases. Magnetic resonance ...procedures for dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) that will be used in the comparative studies in the last year of the...tomography (EIT), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), breast cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  12. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods.

  13. Molecular dynamics-based selectivity for Fast-Field-Cycling relaxometry by Overhauser and solid effect dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Neudert, Oliver; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade nuclear spin hyperpolarization methods, especially Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP), have provided unprecedented possibilities for various NMR techniques by increasing the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. Recently, in-situ DNP-enhanced Fast Field Cycling (FFC) relaxometry was shown to provide appreciable NMR signal enhancements in liquids and viscous systems. In this work, a measurement protocol for DNP-enhanced NMR studies is introduced which enables the selective detection of nuclear spin hyperpolarized by either Overhauser effect or solid effect DNP. Based on field-cycled DNP and relaxation studies it is shown that these methods allow for the independent measurement of polymer and solvent nuclear spins in a concentrated solution of high molecular weight polybutadiene in benzene doped with α,γ-bisdiphenylene-β-phenylallyl radical. Appreciable NMR signal enhancements of about 10-fold were obtained for both constituents. Moreover, qualitative information about the dynamics of the radical and solvent was obtained. Selective DNP-enhanced FFC relaxometry is applied for the measurement of the (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion of both constituents with improved precision. The introduced method is expected to greatly facilitate NMR studies of complex systems with multiple overlapping signal contributions that cannot be distinguished by standard methods.

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion for differentiating between melanoma and lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hatzoglou, Vaios; Tisnado, Jamie; Mehta, Alpesh; Peck, Kyung K; Daras, Mariza; Omuro, Antonio M; Beal, Kathryn; Holodny, Andrei I

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases originating from different primary sites overlap in appearance and are difficult to differentiate with conventional MRI. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI can assess tumor microvasculature and has demonstrated utility in characterizing primary brain tumors. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of plasma volume (Vp) and volume transfer coefficient (K(trans) ) derived from DCE-MRI in distinguishing between melanoma and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Forty-seven NSCLC and 23 melanoma brain metastases were retrospectively assessed with DCE-MRI. Regions of interest were manually drawn around the metastases to calculate Vpmean and Kmeantrans. The Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) were performed to compare perfusion parameters between the two groups. The Vpmean of melanoma brain metastases (4.35, standard deviation [SD] = 1.31) was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than Vpmean of NSCLC brain metastases (2.27, SD = 0.96). The Kmeantrans values were higher in melanoma brain metastases, but the difference between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.12). Based on ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 3.02 for Vpmean (area under curve = 0.659 with SD = 0.074) distinguished between melanoma brain metastases and NSCLC brain metastases (P < 0.01) with 72% specificity. Our data show the DCE-MRI parameter Vpmean can differentiate between melanoma and NSCLC brain metastases. The ability to noninvasively predict tumor histology of brain metastases in patients with multiple malignancies can have important clinical implications.

  15. A corrole nanobiologic elicits tissue-activated MRI contrast enhancement and tumor-targeted toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jessica D; Hwang, Jae Youn; Wagner, Shawn; Alonso-Valenteen, Felix; Hanson, Chris; Taguiam, Jan Michael; Polo, Richard; Harutyunyan, Ira; Karapetyan, Gevorg; Sorasaenee, Karn; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Marban, Eduardo; Moats, Rex; Gray, Harry B; Gross, Zeev; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K

    2015-11-10

    Water-soluble corroles with inherent fluorescence can form stable self-assemblies with tumor-targeted cell penetration proteins, and have been explored as agents for optical imaging and photosensitization of tumors in pre-clinical studies. However, the limited tissue-depth of excitation wavelengths limits their clinical applicability. To examine their utility in more clinically-relevant imaging and therapeutic modalities, here we have explored the use of corroles as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and evaluated their potential for tumor-selective delivery when encapsulated by a tumor-targeted polypeptide. We have found that a manganese-metallated corrole exhibits significant T1 relaxation shortening and MRI contrast enhancement that is blocked by particle formation in solution but yields considerable MRI contrast after tissue uptake. Cell entry but not low pH enables this. Additionally, the corrole elicited tumor-toxicity through the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytoskeletal breakdown when delivered by the targeted polypeptide. The protein-corrole particle (which we call HerMn) exhibited improved therapeutic efficacy compared to current targeted therapies used in the clinic. Taken together with its tumor-preferential biodistribution, our findings indicate that HerMn can facilitate tumor-targeted toxicity after systemic delivery and tumor-selective MR imaging activatable by internalization.

  16. Improved Visualization of Neuronal Injury Following Glial Activation by Manganese Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Aditya N.; Zhou, Biyun; Epstein, Adrian A.; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Luo, Jiangtao; Gendelman, Howard E.; Boska, Michael D.; Liu, Yutong

    2013-01-01

    Research directed at anatomical, integrative and functional activities of the central nervous system (CNS) can be realized through bioimaging. A wealth of data now demonstrates the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) towards unraveling complex neural connectivity operative in health and disease. A means to improve MRI sensitivity is through contrast agents and notably manganese (Mn2+). The Mn2+ ions enter neurons through voltage-gated calcium channels and unlike other contrast agents such as gadolinium, iron oxide, iron platinum and imaging proteins, provide unique insights into brain physiology. Nonetheless, a critical question that remains is the brain target cells serving as sources for the signal of Mn2+ enhanced MRI (MEMRI). To this end, we investigated MEMRI’s abilities to detect glial (astrocyte and microglia) and neuronal activation signals following treatment with known inflammatory inducing agents. The idea is to distinguish between gliosis (glial activation) and neuronal injury for the MEMRI signal and as such use the agent as a marker for neural activity in inflammatory and degenerative disease. We now demonstrate that glial inflammation facilitates Mn2+ neuronal ion uptake. Glial Mn2+ content was not linked to its activation. MEMRI performed on mice injected intracranially with lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased neuronal activity. These results support the notion that MEMRI reflects neuronal excitotoxicity and impairment that can occur through a range of insults including neuroinflammation. We conclude that the MEMRI signal enhancement is induced by inflammation stimulating neuronal Mn2+ uptake. PMID:23729245

  17. Convection-enhanced delivery improves MRI visualization of basal ganglia for stereotactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bond, Aaron E; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Lopes, M Beatriz; Elias, W Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Stereotactic deep brain stimulation surgery is most commonly performed while patients are awake. This allows for intraoperative clinical assessment and electrophysiological target verification, thereby promoting favorable outcomes with few side effects. Intraoperative CT and MRI have challenged this concept of clinical treatment validation. Image-guided surgery is capable of delivering electrodes precisely to a planned, stereotactic target; however, these methods can be limited by low anatomical resolution even with sophisticated MRI modalities. The authors are developing a novel method using convection-enhanced delivery to safely manipulate the extracellular space surrounding common anatomical targets for surgery. By altering the extracellular content of deep subcortical structures and their associated white matter tracts, the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia can be improved to better define the anatomy. This technique could greatly improve the accuracy and success of stereotactic surgery, potentially eliminating the reliance on awake surgery. METHODS Observations were made in the clinical setting where vasogenic and cytotoxic edema improved the MRI visualization of the basal ganglia. These findings were replicated in the experimental setting using an FDA-approved intracerebral catheter that was stereotactically inserted into the thalamus or basal ganglia of 7 swine. Five swine were infused with normal saline, and 2 were infused with autologous CSF. Flow rates varied between 1 μl/min to 6 μl/min to achieve convective distributions. Concurrent MRI was performed at 15-minute intervals to monitor the volume of infusion and observe the imaging changes of the deep subcortical structures. The animals were then clinically observed, and necropsy was performed within 48 hours, 1 week, or 1 month for histological analysis. RESULTS In all animals, the white matter tracts became hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging as compared with basal ganglia nuclei

  18. T₁ and T₂ dual-mode MRI contrast agent for enhancing accuracy by engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Shin, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Jin-sil; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Youngmee; Park, Kook In; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2014-04-22

    One of the holy grails in biomedical imaging technology is to achieve accurate imaging of biological targets. The development of sophisticated instrumentation and the use of contrast agents have improved the accuracy of biomedical imaging. However, the issue of false imaging remains a problem. Here, we developed a dual-mode artifact filtering nanoparticle imaging agent (AFIA) that comprises a combination of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic nanomaterials. This AFIA has the ability to perform "AND logic gate" algorithm to eliminate false errors (artifacts) from the raw images to enhance accuracy of the MRI. We confirm the artifact filtering capability of AFIA in MRI phantoms and further demonstrate that artifact-free imaging of stem cell migration is possible in vivo.

  19. Engineering Gd-loaded nanoparticles to enhance MRI sensitivity via T1 shortening

    PubMed Central

    Bruckman, Michael A.; Yu, Xin; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of obtaining high-resolution anatomical images of the body. Major drawbacks of MRI are the low contrast agent sensitivity and inability to distinguish healthy tissue from diseased tissue, making early detection challenging. To address this technological hurdle, paramagnetic contrast agents have been developed to increase the longitudinal relaxivity (R1), leading to an increased signal-to-noise ratio. This review focuses on methods and principles that enabled the design and engineering of nanoparticles to deliver contrast agents with enhanced ionic relaxivities. Different engineering strategies and nanoparticle platforms will be compared in terms of their manufacturability, biocompatibility properties, and their overall potential to make an impact in clinical MR imaging. PMID:24158750

  20. Uncertainty in the analysis of tracer kinetics using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Buckley, David L

    2002-03-01

    In recent years a number of physiological models have gained prominence in the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI data. However, there remains little evidence to support their use in estimating the absolute values of tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and blood volume. In an attempt to address this issue, data were simulated using a distributed pathway model of tracer kinetics, and three published models were fitted to the resultant concentration-time curves. Parameter estimates obtained from these fits were compared with the parameters used for the simulations. The results indicate that the use of commonly accepted models leads to systematic overestimation of the transfer constant, Ktrans, and potentially large underestimates of the blood plasma volume fraction, Vp. In summary, proposals for a practical approach to physiological modeling using MRI data are outlined.

  1. The Added Diagnostic Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI at 3.0 T in Nonpalpable Breast Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Merckel, Laura G.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Peters, Nicky H. G. M.; Mann, Ritse M.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; Storm, Remmert K.; Weits, Teun; Duvivier, Katya M.; van Dalen, Thijs; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the added diagnostic value of 3.0 Tesla breast MRI over conventional breast imaging in the diagnosis of in situ and invasive breast cancer and to explore the role of routine versus expert reading. Materials and Methods We evaluated MRI scans of patients with nonpalpable BI-RADS 3–5 lesions who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced 3.0 Tesla breast MRI. Initially, MRI scans were read by radiologists in a routine clinical setting. All histologically confirmed index lesions were re-evaluated by two dedicated breast radiologists. Sensitivity and specificity for the three MRI readings were determined, and the diagnostic value of breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging was assessed. Interobserver reliability between the three readings was evaluated. Results MRI examinations of 207 patients were analyzed. Seventy-eight of 207 (37.7%) patients had a malignant lesion, of which 33 (42.3%) patients had pure DCIS and 45 (57.7%) invasive breast cancer. Sensitivity of breast MRI was 66.7% during routine, and 89.3% and 94.7% during expert reading. Specificity was 77.5% in the routine setting, and 61.0% and 33.3% during expert reading. In the routine setting, MRI provided additional diagnostic information over clinical information and conventional imaging, as the Area Under the ROC Curve increased from 0.76 to 0.81. Expert MRI reading was associated with a stronger improvement of the AUC to 0.87. Interobserver reliability between the three MRI readings was fair and moderate. Conclusions 3.0 T breast MRI of nonpalpable breast lesions is of added diagnostic value for the diagnosis of in situ and invasive breast cancer. PMID:24713637

  2. A fully automated system for quantification of background parenchymal enhancement in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ufuk Dalmiş, Mehmet; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Borelli, Cristina; Vreemann, Suzan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) observed in breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been identified as an important biomarker associated with risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we present a fully automated framework for quantification of BPE. We initially segmented fibroglandular tissue (FGT) of the breasts using an improved version of an existing method. Subsequently, we computed BPEabs (volume of the enhancing tissue), BPErf (BPEabs divided by FGT volume) and BPErb (BPEabs divided by breast volume), using different relative enhancement threshold values between 1% and 100%. To evaluate and compare the previous and improved FGT segmentation methods, we used 20 breast DCE-MRI scans and we computed Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values with respect to manual segmentations. For evaluation of the BPE quantification, we used a dataset of 95 breast DCE-MRI scans. Two radiologists, in individual reading sessions, visually analyzed the dataset and categorized each breast into minimal, mild, moderate and marked BPE. To measure the correlation between automated BPE values to the radiologists' assessments, we converted these values into ordinal categories and we used Spearman's rho as a measure of correlation. According to our results, the new segmentation method obtained an average DSC of 0.81 0.09, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to the previous method (0.76 0.10). The highest correlation values between automated BPE categories and radiologists' assessments were obtained with the BPErf measurement (r=0.55, r=0.49, p<0.001 for both), while the correlation between the scores given by the two radiologists was 0.82 (p<0.001). The presented framework can be used to systematically investigate the correlation between BPE and risk in large screening cohorts.

  3. P4 radiology of hepatobiliary diseases with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Qayyum, Aliya; Bastati, Nina; Fakhrai, Negar; Herold, Christian J; Caseiro Alves, Filipe

    2014-02-01

    A recent paradigm shift in radiology has focused on the globalization of so-called P4 radiology. P4 radiology represents delivery of imaging results that are predictive, personalized, pre-emptive and participatory. The combination of the P4 approach and biomarkers is particularly pertinent to MRI, especially with technological advances such as diffusion-weighted imaging. The development of new liver-specific MRI contrast media, particularly gadoxetic acid, demonstrate specific pharmacokinetic properties, which provide combined morphologic and functional information in the same setting. The evaluation of hepatobiliary pathology beyond morphology gives rise to the possibilty of using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI as an imaging biomarker of hepatobiliary diseases. The integration of functional imaging with an understanding of complex disease mechanisms forms the basis for P4 radiology, which may ultimately lead to individualized, cost-effective, targeted therapy for patients. This will enable radiologists to determine the prognosis of the disease and estimate early response to treatment, with the participation of all the required medical disciplines.

  4. Semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion in children using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Thong, William E.; Ou, Phalla

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the study of semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion acquired from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a study population mainly composed of children with pulmonary malformations. The automatic analysis approach proposed is based on the indicator-dilution theory introduced in 1954. First, a robust method is developed to segment the pulmonary artery and the lungs from anatomical MRI data, exploiting 2D and 3D mathematical morphology operators. Second, the time-dependent contrast signal of the lung regions is deconvolved by the arterial input function for the assessment of the local hemodynamic system parameters, ie. mean transit time, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary blood flow. The discrete deconvolution method implements here a truncated singular value decomposition (tSVD) method. Parametric images for the entire lungs are generated as additional elements for diagnosis and quantitative follow-up. The preliminary results attest the feasibility of perfusion quantification in pulmonary DCE-MRI and open an interesting alternative to scintigraphy for this type of evaluation, to be considered at least as a preliminary decision in the diagnostic due to the large availability of the technique and to the non-invasive aspects.

  5. DCE@urLAB: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic analysis tool for preclinical data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DCE@urLAB is a software application for analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data (DCE-MRI). The tool incorporates a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to interactively select and analyze a region of interest (ROI) within the image set, taking into account the tissue concentration of the contrast agent (CA) and its effect on pixel intensity. Results Pixel-wise model-based quantitative parameters are estimated by fitting DCE-MRI data to several pharmacokinetic models using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA). DCE@urLAB also includes the semi-quantitative parametric and heuristic analysis approaches commonly used in practice. This software application has been programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) and tested both with publicly available simulated data and preclinical studies from tumor-bearing mouse brains. Conclusions A user-friendly solution for applying pharmacokinetic and non-quantitative analysis DCE-MRI in preclinical studies has been implemented and tested. The proposed tool has been specially designed for easy selection of multi-pixel ROIs. A public release of DCE@urLAB, together with the open source code and sample datasets, is available at http://www.die.upm.es/im/archives/DCEurLAB/. PMID:24180558

  6. Using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI to Quantitatively Characterize Maternal Vascular Organization in the Primate Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Frias, A.E.; Schabel, M.C.; Roberts, V.H.J.; Tudorica, A.; Grigsby, P.L.; Oh, K.Y.; Kroenke, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The maternal microvasculature of the primate placenta is organized into 10-20 perfusion domains that are functionally optimized to facilitate nutrient exchange to support fetal growth. This study describes a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) method for identifying vascular domains, and quantifying maternal blood flow in them. Methods A rhesus macaque on the 133rd day of pregnancy (G133, term=165 days) underwent Doppler ultrasound (US) procedures, DCE-MRI, and Cesarean-section delivery. Serial T1-weighted images acquired throughout intravenous injection of a contrast reagent (CR) bolus were analyzed to obtain CR arrival time maps of the placenta. Results Watershed segmentation of the arrival time map identified 16 perfusion domains. The number and location of these domains corresponded to anatomical cotyledonary units observed following delivery. Analysis of the CR wave front through each perfusion domain enabled determination of volumetric flow, which ranged from 9.03 to 44.9 mL/sec (25.2 ± 10.3 mL/sec). These estimates are supported by Doppler US results. Conclusions The DCE-MRI analysis described here provides quantitative estimates of the number of maternal perfusion domains in a primate placenta, and estimates flow within each domain. Anticipated extensions of this technique are to the study placental function in nonhuman primate models of obstetric complications. PMID:24753177

  7. Simultaneous tDCS-fMRI Identifies Resting State Networks Correlated with Visual Search Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Callan, Daniel E.; Falcone, Brian; Wada, Atsushi; Parasuraman, Raja

    2016-01-01

    This study uses simultaneous transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate tDCS modulation of resting state activity and connectivity that underlies enhancement in behavioral performance. The experiment consisted of three sessions within the fMRI scanner in which participants conducted a visual search task: Session 1: Pre-training (no performance feedback), Session 2: Training (performance feedback given), Session 3: Post-training (no performance feedback). Resting state activity was recorded during the last 5 min of each session. During the 2nd session one group of participants underwent 1 mA tDCS stimulation and another underwent sham stimulation over the right posterior parietal cortex. Resting state spontaneous activity, as measured by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF), for session 2 showed significant differences between the tDCS stim and sham groups in the precuneus. Resting state functional connectivity from the precuneus to the substantia nigra, a subcortical dopaminergic region, was found to correlate with future improvement in visual search task performance for the stim over the sham group during active stimulation in session 2. The after-effect of stimulation on resting state functional connectivity was measured following a post-training experimental session (session 3). The left cerebellum Lobule VIIa Crus I showed performance related enhancement in resting state functional connectivity for the tDCS stim over the sham group. The ability to determine the relationship that the relative strength of resting state functional connectivity for an individual undergoing tDCS has on future enhancement in behavioral performance has wide ranging implications for neuroergonomic as well as therapeutic, and rehabilitative applications. PMID:27014014

  8. Pulmonary fibrosis: tissue characterization using late-enhanced MRI compared with unenhanced anatomic high-resolution CT

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Lisa P.; Brady, Darragh; McEvoy, Sinead; Murphy, David; Gibney, Brian; Gallagher, Annika; Butler, Marcus; Shortt, Fionnula; McMullen, Marie; Fabre, Aurelie; Lynch, David A.; Keane, Michael P.; Dodd, Jonathan D.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to prospectively evaluate anatomic chest computed tomography (CT) with tissue characterization late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). METHODS Twenty patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and twelve control patients underwent late-enhanced MRI and high-resolution CT. Tissue characterization of PF was depicted using a segmented inversion-recovery turbo low-angle shot MRI sequence. Pulmonary arterial blood pool nulling was achieved by nulling main pulmonary artery signal. Images were read in random order by a blinded reader for presence and extent of overall PF (reticulation and honeycombing) at five anatomic levels. Overall extent of IPF was estimated to the nearest 5% as well as an evaluation of the ratios of IPF made up of reticulation and honeycombing. Overall grade of severity was dependent on the extent of reticulation and honeycombing. RESULTS No control patient exhibited contrast enhancement on lung late-enhanced MRI. All IPF patients were identified with late-enhanced MRI. Mean signal intensity of the late-enhanced fibrotic lung was 31.8±10.6 vs. 10.5±1.6 for normal lung regions, P < 0.001, resulting in a percent elevation in signal intensity from PF of 204.8%±90.6 compared with the signal intensity of normal lung. The mean contrast-to-noise ratio was 22.8±10.7. Late-enhanced MRI correlated significantly with chest CT for the extent of PF (R=0.78, P = 0.001) but not for reticulation, honeycombing, or coarseness of reticulation or honeycombing. CONCLUSION Tissue characterization of IPF is possible using inversion recovery sequence thoracic MRI. PMID:28067202

  9. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahaliou, A.; Vassiou, K.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Kanavou, T.; Yiakoumelos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.960±0.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  10. MRI Edge Enhancement as a Diffusive Discord of Spin Phase Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Duh, Andrej; Mohorič, Aleš; Serša, Igor

    1999-03-01

    The enhancement of magnetic resonance image intensity near impermeable boundaries can be nicely described by a new approach where the diffusional spin echo attenuation is linked to the correlation function of molecular motion. In this method the spin phase structure created by the applied gradient is considered to be a composition of plane waves with the wave vectors representing feasible momentum states of a particle in confinement. The enhancement of edges on the magnetic resonance images (MRI) comes out as a discord of plane waves due to particle motion. It results from the average of the wave phase by using the cumulant expansion in the Gaussian approximation. The acquired analytical expression describes the MRI signal space distribution where the enhancement of edges depends on the intensity and the duration of gradient sequence as well as on the length of the mean squared particle displacement in restricted geometry. This new method works well with gradients of general waveform and is, therefore, suitable for imaging sequences where finite or even modulated gradients are usually used.

  11. Combined Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Liver MRI and MRA Using Interleaved Variable Density Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mahdi Salmani; Korosec, Frank R.; Wang, Kang; Holmes, James H.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Bannas, Peter; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a method for volumetric contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the liver, with high spatial and temporal resolutions, for combined dynamic imaging and MR angiography using a single injection of contrast. Methods An interleaved variable density (IVD) undersampling pattern was implemented in combination with a real-time-triggered, time-resolved, dual-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence. Parallel imaging autocalibration lines were acquired only once during the first time-frame. Imaging was performed in ten subjects with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and compared with their clinical MRI. The angiographic phase of the proposed method was compared to a dedicated MR angiogram acquired during a second injection of contrast. Results A total of 21 FNH, 3 cavernous hemangiomas, and 109 arterial segments were visualized in 10 subjects. The temporally-resolved images depicted the characteristic arterial enhancement pattern of the lesions with a 4 s update rate. Images were graded as having significantly higher quality compared to the clinical MRI. Angiograms produced from the IVD method provided non-inferior diagnostic assessment compared to the dedicated MRA. Conclusion Using an undersampled IVD imaging method, we have demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging and simultaneous MRA of the liver. PMID:24639130

  12. Enhancement of NMR and MRI in the presence of hyperpolarized noble gases

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Budinger, Thomas; Navon, Gil; Song, Yi-Qiao; Appelt, Stephan; Bifone, Angelo; Taylor, Rebecca; Goodson, Boyd; Seydoux, Roberto; Room, Toomas; Pietrass, Tanja

    2004-11-16

    The present invention relates generally to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for both spectroscopy and imaging. More particularly, the present invention relates to methods in which hyperpolarized noble gases (e.g., Xe and He) are used to enhance and improve NMR and MRI. Additionally, the hyperpolarized gas solutions of the invention are useful both in vitro and in vivo to study the dynamics or structure of a system. When used with biological systems, either in vivo or in vitro, it is within the scope of the invention to target the hyperpolarized gas and deliver it to specific regions within the system.

  13. Dynamic fractal signature dissimilarity analysis for therapeutic response assessment using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunhao; Subashi, Ergys; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic fractal signature dissimilarity (FSD) method as a novel image texture analysis technique for the quantification of tumor heterogeneity information for better therapeutic response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Methods: A small animal antiangiogenesis drug treatment experiment was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Sixteen LS-174T implanted mice were randomly assigned into treatment and control groups (n = 8/group). All mice received bevacizumab (treatment) or saline (control) three times in two weeks, and one pretreatment and two post-treatment DCE-MRI scans were performed. In the proposed dynamic FSD method, a dynamic FSD curve was generated to characterize the heterogeneity evolution during the contrast agent uptake, and the area under FSD curve (AUCFSD) and the maximum enhancement (MEFSD) were selected as representative parameters. As for comparison, the pharmacokinetic parameter Ktrans map and area under MR intensity enhancement curve AUCMR map were calculated. Besides the tumor’s mean value and coefficient of variation, the kurtosis, skewness, and classic Rényi dimensions d1 and d2 of Ktrans and AUCMR maps were evaluated for heterogeneity assessment for comparison. For post-treatment scans, the Mann–Whitney U-test was used to assess the differences of the investigated parameters between treatment/control groups. The support vector machine (SVM) was applied to classify treatment/control groups using the investigated parameters at each post-treatment scan day. Results: The tumor mean Ktrans and its heterogeneity measurements d1 and d2 values showed significant differences between treatment/control groups in the second post-treatment scan. In contrast, the relative values (in reference to the pretreatment value) of AUCFSD and MEFSD in both post-treatment scans showed significant differences between treatment/control groups. When using AUCFSD and MEFSD as SVM input for treatment/control classification

  14. Improved visualization of neuronal injury following glial activation by manganese enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Bade, Aditya N; Zhou, Biyun; Epstein, Adrian A; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Luo, Jiangtao; Gendelman, Howard E; Boska, Michael D; Liu, Yutong

    2013-09-01

    Research directed at anatomical, integrative and functional activities of the central nervous system (CNS) can be realized through bioimaging. A wealth of data now demonstrates the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) towards unraveling complex neural connectivity operative in health and disease. A means to improve MRI sensitivity is through contrast agents and notably manganese (Mn²⁺). The Mn²⁺ ions enter neurons through voltage-gated calcium channels and unlike other contrast agents such as gadolinium, iron oxide, iron platinum and imaging proteins, provide unique insights into brain physiology. Nonetheless, a critical question that remains is the brain target cells serving as sources for the signal of Mn²⁺ enhanced MRI (MEMRI). To this end, we investigated MEMRI's abilities to detect glial (astrocyte and microglia) and neuronal activation signals following treatment with known inflammatory inducing agents. The idea is to distinguish between gliosis (glial activation) and neuronal injury for the MEMRI signal and as such use the agent as a marker for neural activity in inflammatory and degenerative disease. We now demonstrate that glial inflammation facilitates Mn²⁺ neuronal ion uptake. Glial Mn²⁺ content was not linked to its activation. MEMRI performed on mice injected intracranially with lipopolysaccharide was associated with increased neuronal activity. These results support the notion that MEMRI reflects neuronal excitotoxicity and impairment that can occur through a range of insults including neuroinflammation. We conclude that the MEMRI signal enhancement is induced by inflammation stimulating neuronal Mn²⁺ uptake.

  15. Relationship between diffusion parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion MRI and perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Simona; Stefanetti, Linda; Sperati, Francesca; Anelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the link between diffusion parameters measured by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the perfusion metrics obtained with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in soft tissue tumors (STTs). Twenty-eight patients affected by histopathologically confirmed STT were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent both DCE MRI and IVIM DWI. The perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D and perfusion-related diffusion coefficient D* were estimated using a bi-exponential function to fit the DWI data. DCE MRI was acquired with a temporal resolution of 3-5 s. Maps of the initial area under the gadolinium concentration curve (IAUGC), time to peak (TTP) and maximum slope of increase (MSI) were derived using commercial software. The relationships between the DCE MRI and IVIM DWI measurements were assessed by Spearman's test. To exclude false positive results under multiple testing, the false discovery rate (FDR) procedure was applied. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the differences between all variables in patients with non-myxoid and myxoid STT. No significant relationship was found between IVIM parameters and any DCE MRI parameters. Higher f and D*f values were found in non-myxoid tumors compared with myxoid tumors (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). MSI was significantly higher in non-myxoid tumors than in myxoid tumors (p = 0.029). From the visual assessments of single clinical cases, both f and D*f maps were in satisfactory agreement with DCE maps in the extreme cases of an avascular mass and a highly vascularized mass, whereas, for tumors with slight vascularity or with a highly heterogeneous perfusion pattern, this association was not straightforward. Although IVIM DWI was demonstrated to be feasible in STT, our data did not support evident relationships between perfusion-related IVIM parameters and perfusion measured by DCE MRI.

  16. Mn enhancement and respiratory gating for in utero MRI of the embryonic mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Deans, Abby E; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Berrios-Otero, César A; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-06-01

    The mouse is the preferred model organism for genetic studies of mammalian brain development. MRI has potential for in utero studies of mouse brain development, but has been limited previously by challenges of maximizing image resolution and contrast while minimizing artifacts due to physiological motion. Manganese (Mn)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) studies have demonstrated central nervous system (CNS) contrast enhancement in mice from the earliest postnatal stages. The purpose of this study was to expand MEMRI to in utero studies of the embryonic CNS in combination with respiratory gating to decrease motion artifacts. We investigated MEMRI-facilitated CNS segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) analysis in wild-type mouse embryos from midgestation, and explored effects of Mn on embryonic survival and image contrast. Motivated by observations that MEMRI provided an effective method for visualization and volumetric analysis of embryonic CNS structures, especially in ventral regions, we used MEMRI to examine Nkx2.1 mutant mice that were previously reported to have ventral forebrain defects. Quantitative MEMRI analysis of Nkx2.1 knockout mice demonstrated volumetric changes in septum (SE) and basal ganglia (BG), as well as alterations in hypothalamic structures. This method may provide an effective means for in utero analysis of CNS phenotypes in a variety of mouse mutants.

  17. The MRI contrast agent gadoteridol enhances distribution of rAAV1 in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hullinger, R; Ugalde, J; Purón-Sierra, L; Osting, S; Burger, C

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are commonly used in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor the distribution of molecules in the brain. Recent experiments conducted in our laboratory have shown that co-infusion of recombinant Adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (rAAV5) and the MRI contrast agent gadoteridol (Gd) enhances vector transduction in the rat striatum. The goal of this study was to determine whether gadoteridol may also be used as a tool to enhance transduction efficiency of rAAV1 and rAAV5 within the rat hippocampus. We show that Gd/rAAV1-GFP but not Gd/rAAV5-GFP co-infusion results in significantly higher distribution of the transgene both in the injected hemisphere as well as in the contralateral side and adjacent areas of cortex along the injection track. We also show that Gd/rAAV1-GFP co-infusion has no deleterious effect on hippocampal function as assessed by two tests of spatial memory formation. This work indicates that Gd can be exploited as a method to increase transduction efficiency of AAV1 in the hippocampus for animal studies.

  18. Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles cure and image Brain Tumors: Selective MRI Contrast Enhancement and Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelman, Raoul

    2008-03-01

    Aimed at targeted therapy and imaging of brain tumors, our approach uses targeted, multi-functional nano-particles (NP). A typical nano-particle contains a biologically inert, non-toxic matrix, biodegradable and bio-eliminable over a long time period. It also contains active components, such as fluorescent chemical indicators, photo-sensitizers, MRI contrast enhancement agents and optical imaging dyes. In addition, its surface contains molecular targeting units, e.g. peptides or antibodies, as well as a cloaking agent, to prevent uptake by the immune system, i.e. enabling control of the plasma residence time. These dynamic nano-platforms (DNP) contain contrast enhancement agents for the imaging (MRI, optical, photo-acoustic) of targeted locations, i.e. tumors. Added to this are targeted therapy agents, such as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). A simple protocol, for rats implanted with human brain cancer, consists of tail injection with DNPs, followed by 5 min red light illumination of the tumor region. It resulted in excellent cure statistics for 9L glioblastoma.

  19. Comparison of contrast‐enhanced ultrasonograpy with Gd‐EOB‐DTPA‐enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Kazue; Ikehara, Takashi; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Kogame, Michio; Kikuchi, Yoshinori; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Kaneko, Hironori; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To compare contrast‐enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) using Sonazoid with Gd‐EOB‐DTPA‐enhanced MRI (EOB‐MRI) in the diagnosis of liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods A total of 69 patients diagnosed with or suspected of having liver metastasis were enrolled. These hepatic lesions were diagnosed by histopathological examination after surgical resection or based on follow‐up using various imaging modalities. The diagnostic accuracies of CEUS and EOB‐MRI were compared. Results One hundred thirty‐three lesions were detected. Of these lesions, 109 were diagnosed as liver metastases. Of the 133 lesions, 90.2% were detected on CEUS, and 98.5% on EOB‐MRI. One hundred nine lesions were diagnosed as liver metastasis. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for diagnosis were 0.906 and 0.851 on CEUS and EOB‐MRI, respectively (p = 0.41). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value, and overall accuracy were 90.8%, 84.5%, 97.1%, 67.1%, and 90.2%, respectively, for CEUS, and 95.4%, 70.8%, 93.7%, 77.3%, and 91%, respectively, for EOB‐MRI. Conclusions CEUS has a higher specificity and PPV for the diagnosis of liver metastasis than EOB‐MRI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:138–144, 2017 PMID:27861987

  20. Comparison of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and Doppler ultrasound in the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Naik, K S; Ward, J; Irving, H C; Robinson, P J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCEMR) with Doppler ultrasound (US) in the assessment of portal venous anatomy and to analyse the causes of discrepancy. Over a 1 year period, 97 patients undergoing assessment prior to hepatic surgery underwent imaging of the liver and portal venous system using US with colour and spectral Doppler and MRI with axial T2 weighted spin echo (SE) and coronal oblique T1 weighted rapid gradient echo (GRE) imaging before and immediately after bolus injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol kg-1). When the US and MRI findings were discrepant, the images were reviewed by two observers and compared with surgical findings. US and DCEMR were concordant in 90 patients (portal vein patent in 80, occluded in 10). In three patients with cirrhosis and gross ascites the portal vein was reported as occluded on US and patent on MRI; surgery confirmed the MRI findings. In one patient the portal vein was patient on US but not on MRI, but there was a 3 week interval between the examinations. In three patients the portal vein was patent on US, but MRI detected occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches in two, and encasement of an intrahepatic branch in the third case. Spontaneous splenorenal shunts were seen in 15 patients only on MRI; varices were seen in 39 patients on MRI and in 22 patients on US. Both US and DCEMR contribute to the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system. MRI provides additional information over US in assessing intrahepatic portal branches and detecting varices and splenorenal shunts, and is recommended for all surgical candidates and in patients with abnormal portal venous anatomy and equivocal US findings.

  1. Calculation of intravascular signal in dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI using adaptive complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Chopra, Rajiv; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    Assessing tumor response to therapy is a crucial step in personalized treatments. Pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling provides quantitative information about tumor perfusion and vascular permeability that are associated with prognostic factors. A fundamental step in most PK analyses is calculating the signal that is generated in the tumor vasculature. This signal is usually inseparable from the extravascular extracellular signal. It was shown previously using in vivo and phantom experiments that independent component analysis (ICA) is capable of calculating the intravascular time-intensity curve in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A novel adaptive complex independent component analysis (AC-ICA) technique is developed in this study to calculate the intravascular time-intensity curve and separate this signal from the DCE-MR images of tumors. The use of the complex-valued DCE-MRI images rather than the commonly used magnitude images satisfied the fundamental assumption of ICA, i.e., linear mixing of the sources. Using an adaptive cost function in ICA through estimating the probability distribution of the tumor vasculature at each iteration resulted in a more robust and accurate separation algorithm. The AC-ICA algorithm provided a better estimate for the intravascular time-intensity curve than the previous ICA-based method. A simulation study was also developed in this study to realistically simulate DCE-MRI data of a leaky tissue mimicking phantom. The passage of the MR contrast agent through the leaky phantom was modeled with finite element analysis using a diffusion model. Once the distribution of the contrast agent in the imaging field of view was calculated, DCE-MRI data was generated by solving the Bloch equation for each voxel at each time point. The intravascular time-intensity curve calculation results were compared to the previously proposed ICA-based intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method that applied ICA to the magnitude of the DCE-MRI data

  2. Gadolinium Enhanced MRI Assessment of Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Graft Harvest on Patellar Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kristofer J.; Lazaro, Lionel E.; Taylor, Samuel; Pardee, Nadine C.; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Warren, Russell F.; Lorich, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft remains a favored graft source for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction despite problems related to donor-site morbidity. Patellar devascularization has been proposed as a source of anterior knee pain following vascular disruption from traumatic injury (fracture) or surgical procedures involving the patella (total knee arthroplasty); however, no study has investigated the effect of BPTB harvest on patellar vascularity. Recent anatomic studies have suggested that the dominant arterial supply enters the patella through the inferior pole. We hypothesized that BPTB harvest can significantly diminish patellar vascularity following graft harvest. Methods: Nine matched pair cadaveric knee specimens (mean age 47.4 years) were dissected and cannulated at the superficial femoral, anterior tibialis, and posterior tibialis arteries. A single knee was randomly selected to undergo bone graft harvest. The contralateral knee was left intact to serve as a control. Gadolinium (Gd-DPTA) was injected into each knee and MRI signal enhancement was quantified to determine differences in osseous uptake between the two knees. Following MRI assessment, each matched pair was injected with a urethane polymer compound and dissected to correlate vessel disruption with MRI findings. Results: Graft harvest resulted in a mean 31% (range, 7.1-69.5%) decrease in signal enhancement when compared to the matched control. MRI assessment revealed two predominant patterns of vessel entry for the dominant inferior arterial supply. In one pattern, the vessel entered the inferomedial aspect (∼7 o’clock) of the distal patellar pole and was disrupted by bone graft harvest in two matched pairs (2/9, 22%). In the second pattern, the predominant vessel entered further medial (∼8 o’clock) and was not disrupted in 7 matched pairs. The mean decrease in gadolinium uptake following disruption of the predominant vessel measured 56% (range, 42

  3. Imaging Modalities for Assessment of Treatment Response to Nonsurgical Hepatocellular Carcinoma Therapy: Contrast-Enhanced US, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Minami, Yasunori; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-03-01

    Tumor response and time to progression have been considered pivotal for surrogate assessment of treatment efficacy for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent advancements in imaging modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are playing an important role in assessing the therapeutic effects of HCC treatments. According to some HCC clinical guidelines, post-therapeutic evaluation of HCC patients is based exclusively on contrast-enhanced dynamic imaging criteria. The recommended techniques are contrast-enhanced CT or contrast-enhanced MRI. Contrast-enhanced US is employed more in the positive diagnosis of HCC than in post-therapeutic monitoring. Although contrast enhancement is an important finding on imaging, enhancement does not necessarily depict the same phenomenon across modalities. We need to become well acquainted with the characteristics of each modality, including not only contrast-enhanced CT and MRI but also contrast-enhanced US. Many nonsurgical treatment options are now available for unresectable HCC, and accurate assessment of tumor response is essential to achieve favorable outcomes. For the assessment of successful radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the achievement of a sufficient ablation margin as well the absence of tumor vascular enhancement is essential. To evaluate the response to transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), enhanced tumor shrinkage is relied on as a measure of antitumor activity. Here, we give an overview of the current status of imaging assessment of HCC response to nonsurgical treatments including RFA and TACE.

  4. Enhancement and suppression in a lexical interference fMRI-paradigm.

    PubMed

    Abel, Stefanie; Dressel, Katharina; Weiller, Cornelius; Huber, Walter

    2012-03-01

    Previous picture-word interference (PWI) fMRI-paradigms revealed ambiguous mechanisms underlying facilitation and inhibition in healthy subjects. Lexical distractors revealed increased (enhancement) or decreased (suppression) activation in language and monitoring/control areas. Performing a secondary examination and data analysis, we aimed to illuminate the relation between behavioral and neural interference effects comparing target-related distractors (REL) with unrelated distractors (UNREL). We hypothesized that interference involves both (A) suppression due to priming and (B) enhancement due to simultaneous distractor and target processing. Comparisons to UNREL should remain distractor unspecific even at a low threshold. (C) Distractor types with common characteristics should reveal overlapping brain areas. In a 3T MRI scanner, participants were asked to name pictures while auditory words were presented (stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] = -200 msec). Associatively and phonologically related distractors speeded responses (facilitation), while categorically related distractors slowed them down (inhibition) compared to UNREL. As a result, (A) reduced brain activations indeed resembled previously reported patterns of neural priming. Each target-related distractor yielded suppressions at least in areas associated with vision and conflict/competition monitoring (anterior cingulate cortex [ACC]), revealing least priming for inhibitors. (B) Enhancements concerned language-related but distractor-unspecific regions. (C) Some wider brain regions were commonly suppressed for combinations of distractor types. Overlapping areas associated with conceptual priming were found for facilitatory distractors (inferior frontal gyri), and areas related to phonetic/articulatory processing (precentral gyri and left parietal operculum/insula) for distractors sharing feature overlap. Each distractor with semantic relatedness revealed nonoverlapping suppressions in lexical

  5. [An evaluation of ischemic stroke using dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Igarashi, H; Katayama, Y; Terashi, A

    1998-04-01

    Thrombolytic therapy during the hyperacute stage is important for salvaging dying cerebral tissue. To date, however, accurate non-invasive assessment of an ischemic lesion during the hyperacute stage has not been possible. Perfusion MRI may be the key to the quick diagnosis of ischemic lesions. To assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI, echo planar imaging was performed in 10 patients with ischemic stroke. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (MTT), and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) were measured based on moment analysis and the gamma variate method. These measurements, however, are not suitable for the detection of cerebral ischemia during the hyperacute stage. Therefore, we additionally studied the changes in a concentration curve (time-delta R* curve) of Gd-DTPA, injected into the median vein of the forearm. From the curve the SUM (delta R*) time to peak and the delta R* peak, which may be calculated quickly, were determined and were compared to rCBV, MTT, and rCBF, respectively. The rCBV and the rCBF in the ischemic regions were less than those in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), and the MTT in the ischemic regions was longer than that in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05). Additionally, SUM (delta R*) and the delta R* peak in the ischemic regions were less, and the time to peak in the ischemic regions was longer than the value in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), correlating well to the rCBV, rCBF, and MTT measurements. Also, images of these parameters, depicting the ischemic lesion earlier than conventional T2 weighted images, can be easily made by using an MRI console. These results suggest that the SUM (delta R*), time to peak and the delta R* peak images calculated with dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI may be one of the best techniques for the detection of cerebral ischemic lesions during the hyperacute stage.

  6. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  7. Ferumoxytol enhanced resting state fMRI and relative cerebral blood volume mapping in normal human brain.

    PubMed

    D'Arceuil, Helen; Coimbra, Alexandre; Triano, Pamela; Dougherty, Margaret; Mello, Julie; Moseley, Michael; Glover, Gary; Lansberg, Maarten; Blankenberg, Francis

    2013-12-01

    The brain demonstrates spontaneous low-frequency (<0.1 Hz) cerebral blood flow (CBF) fluctuations, measurable by resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). Ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles have been shown to enhance task-based fMRI signals (cerebral blood volume fMRI or CBV-fMRI), compared to the BOLD effect, by a factor of ≈2.5 at 3 T in primates and humans. We evaluated the use of ferumoxytol for steady state, resting state FMRI (CBV-rs-fMRI) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) mapping, at 3T, in healthy volunteers. All standard resting state networks (RSNs) were identified in all subjects. On average the RSN Z statistics (MELODIC independent components) and volumes of the visual and default mode (DMN) networks were comparable. rCBV values were averaged for the visual (Vis) and DMN networks and correlated with the corresponding DMN and visual network Z statistics. There was a negative correlation between the rCBV and the Z statistics for the DMN, for both BOLD and CBV-rs-fMRI contrast (R2=0.63, 0.76). A similar correlation was not found for the visual network. Short repetition time rs-fMRI data were Fourier transformed to evaluate the effect of ferumoxytol on cardiac and respiratory fluctuations in the brain rs-BOLD, CBV signals. Cardiac and respiratory fluctuations decreased to baseline within large vessels post ferumoxytol. Robust rs-fMRI and CBV mapping is possible in normal human brain.

  8. SWIFT MRI Enhances Detection of Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Weber, Joseph; Garwood, Michael; Sachdev, Deepali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the capability of longitudinal MR scans using sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) to detect breast cancer metastasis to the lung in mice. Methods Mice with breast cancer metastatic to the lung were generated by tail vein injection of MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells. Thereafter, MR imaging was performed every week using three different pulse sequences: SWIFT (TE~3 μs), concurrent dephasing and excitation (CODE; TE~300 μs), and 3D gradient echo (GRE; TE=2.2 ms). Motion during the long SWIFT MR scans was compensated for by rigid-body motion correction. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were generated to visualize changes in lung vascular structures during the development and growth of metastases. Results SWIFT MRI was more sensitive to signals from the lung parenchyma than CODE or 3D GRE MRI. Metastatic tumor growth in the lungs induced a progressive increase in intensity of parenchymal signals in SWIFT images. MIP images from SWIFT clearly visualized lung vascular structures and their disruption due to progression of breast cancer metastases in the lung. Conclusion SWIFT MRI’s sensitivity to fast-decaying signals and tolerance of magnetic susceptibility enhances its effectiveness at detecting structural changes in lung parenchyma and vasculature due to breast cancer metastases in the lung. PMID:24919566

  9. Serial MRI study of the enhanced therapeutic effects of liposome-encapsulated citicoline in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Agulla, Jesús; Argibay, Bárbara; Pérez-Mato, María; Castillo, José

    2011-02-28

    Liposome encapsulation of active principles enhances their bioavailability to the brain. We investigated whether encapsulation of citicoline in liposomes increases its therapeutic effects in ischemia, performing a longitudinal MRI study of lesion volumes and edema in an animal model of stroke. Nineteen rats were submitted to permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and treated with: (1) saline, (2) intraperitoneal citicoline (500mg/kg), (3) intravenous citicoline (48mg/kg), and (4) intravenous liposome-encapsulated citicoline (48mg/kg). Lesion volumes were measured by MRI at days 0, 1, 3 and 7 following surgery. Encapsulation in liposomes increased the therapeutic effects of citicoline, as reflected by a 32% reduction of the infarct sizes at day 7, in contrast with controls where infarct sizes at day 7 increased by 39%, respect to values at day 0. Intravenously injected citicoline reduced infarct sizes by 9% while intraperitoneal citicoline resulted in an increase of infarct sizes by 10%. A slight (not significant) reduction of edema formation was observed for animals treated with citicoline, in all of its delivery forms. Liposome-encapsulated citicoline causes a noticeable reduction in lesion volumes as compared to free citicoline (either i.p. or i.v.) at days 1, 3 and 7 following permanent stroke.

  10. Quantitation of a spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) between a hyperpolarized (13) C-labeled cell metabolite and water protons.

    PubMed

    Marco-Rius, Irene; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Kettunen, Mikko I; Larkin, Timothy J; Basharat, Meer; Seeley, Colm; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effect (SPINOE) describes the enhancement of spin polarization of solvent nuclei by the hyperpolarized spins of a solute. In this communication we demonstrate that SPINOEs can be observed between [1,4-(13) C2 ]fumarate, hyperpolarized using the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization technique, and solvent water protons. We derive a theoretical expression for the expected enhancement and demonstrate that this fits well with experimental measurements. Although the magnitude of the effect is relatively small (around 2% measured here), the SPINOE increases at lower field strengths, so that at clinically relevant magnetic fields (1.5-3 T) it may be possible to track the passage through the circulation of a bolus containing a hyperpolarized (13) C-labeled substrate through the increase in solvent water (1) H signal.

  11. Water accessibility in a membrane-inserting peptide comparing Overhauser DNP and pulse EPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Takuya F.; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Garbuio, Luca; Doll, Andrin; Polyhach, Yevhen O.; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-05-01

    Water accessibility is a key parameter for the understanding of the structure of biomolecules, especially membrane proteins. Several experimental techniques based on the combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling are currently available. Among those, we compare relaxation time measurements and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments using pulse EPR with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at X-band frequency and a magnetic field of 0.33 T. Overhauser DNP transfers the electron spin polarization to nuclear spins via cross-relaxation. The change in the intensity of the 1H NMR spectrum of H2O at a Larmor frequency of 14 MHz under a continuous-wave microwave irradiation of the nitroxide spin label contains information on the water accessibility of the labeled site. As a model system for a membrane protein, we use the hydrophobic α-helical peptide WALP23 in unilamellar liposomes of DOPC. Water accessibility measurements with all techniques are conducted for eight peptides with different spin label positions and low radical concentrations (10-20 μM). Consistently in all experiments, the water accessibility appears to be very low, even for labels positioned near the end of the helix. The best profile is obtained by Overhauser DNP, which is the only technique that succeeds in discriminating neighboring positions in WALP23. Since the concentration of the spin-labeled peptides varied, we normalized the DNP parameter ɛ, being the relative change of the NMR intensity, by the electron spin concentration, which was determined from a continuous-wave EPR spectrum.

  12. Diffuse Infantile Hepatic Hemangioendothelioma With Early Central Enhancement in an Adult: A Case Report of CT and MRI Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Dong, Hui; Zuo, Changjing; He, Tianlin

    2015-12-01

    Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma (IHH) is the most common vascular tumor of the liver in infancy. Adult with IHH is extremely rare. We presented a diffuse IHH in an adult patient with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings.A 39-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a 2-year history of abnormal liver function tests and a 7-day history of jaundice. Physical examination revealed enlarged liver. Unenhanced abdominal CT showed enlargement of the liver with diffuse hypodensity. Enhanced CT on the arterial phase revealed multiple centrally enhanced lesions diffusely involved the enlarged liver. The enhanced areas of the lesions became larger on the portal phase and all the lesions became homogeneous enhanced on the delayed phase. These lesions showed heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image, hypointense on T1-weighted image, and early centrally enhanced on dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI, with complete tumor enhancement after 180 s. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. IHH type 2 was confirmed by pathology. The patient died of tumor recurrence in the liver 4 months after transplantation.Unlike the previously described imaging appearances of IHH, this case showed diffuse nodules with early central enhancement on CT and MRI. Considering the importance of the ability to differentiate IHH from other hepatic tumors, radiologists should be aware of these imaging appearances to establish knowledge of the entire spectrum of IHH.

  13. Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Lagarde, Alejandra; Armony, Jorge L.; del Río-Portilla, Yolanda; Trejo-Martínez, David; Conde, Ruben; Corsi-Cabrera, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness. PMID:22719723

  14. Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Lagarde, Alejandra; Armony, Jorge L; Del Río-Portilla, Yolanda; Trejo-Martínez, David; Conde, Ruben; Corsi-Cabrera, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

  15. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints.

    PubMed

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El-Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A; Gamal, Rania M; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as association with disease characteristics and laboratory findings. Twenty-seven male patients with established chronic gout agreed to participate, mean age 47.6 years, and mean disease duration in months 43.2 (±31.8). For all patients, detailed demographic, disease characteristics, and laboratory findings were obtained and correlated with MRI findings. In 27 patients with established gout, a total of 50 MRI studies were performed of the following joints: feet joints (n = 23), ankles (n = 18), knees (n = 5), and hand and wrist joints (n = 4). MRI revealed capsular thickening in 19 patients, bone marrow edema (BME) in 15, soft tissue edema (STE) in 20, joint effusion in 21, bone erosions in 17, cartilaginous erosions in 4, and tenosynovitis in 9 cases. In 17 cases, tophaceous lesions were found. Post contrast MRI showed synovial thickening in seven cases. Positive correlations were observed between serum uric acid levels and the following MRI findings: capsular thickening (r = 0.552, p = 0.003), BME (r = 0.668, p ≤ 0.0001), STE (r = 0.559, p = 0.002), and tenosynovitis (r = 0.513, p = 0.006). Using MRI in chronic gout, important features can be detected like BME, minute cartilaginous erosions, and hypertrophic synovial inflammation in post contrast MR images. Serum uric acid (SUA) was positively correlated with capsular thickening, BME, STE, and tenosynovitis.

  16. Nanoparticle-Enhanced MRI to Evaluate Radiation Delivery to the Regional Lymphatics for Patients With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.; Katkar, Amol; Napolitano, Brian; Wolfgang, John; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: At present, radiation (RT) fields are based largely, and often solely, on bony anatomy. Recent efforts have been taken to better define lymphatic regions for RT planning. Lymphotrophic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI (LN-MRI) allows for accurate identification of malignant and benign lymph nodes. We sought to evaluate RT delivery to lymphatics for breast cancer using LN-MRI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients with breast cancer underwent LN-MRI. MRIs were anatomically registered to a reference CT; benign and malignant lymph nodes were contoured. Standard RT fields were planned and dose calculated to prescribe 45-50 Gy. Lymphatic regions were contoured on CT. Coverage of LN-MRI lymph nodes by RT fields and contoured lymphatics were assessed. Results: Eighty-one percent of all lymph nodes defined by LN-MRI were covered by the 45-Gy isodose line; 82% of malignant and 79% of benign. The 50-Gy isodose line only encompassed 60% of LN-MRI defined lymph nodes-64% of malignant and 59% of benign. For nodal volumes contoured in the absence of a margin, 86% of actual lymph nodes were within contoured volumes. When a 5-mm expansion was added, 99% were included. Conclusions: LN-MRI is a useful tool to delineate the location of breast regional lymphatics. These results suggest less than desired coverage of lymph nodes using standard RT fields and that a margin may be advisable when defining nodal volumes by CT. The use of IMRT and RT in lieu of surgery makes accurate definition of the location of breast regional lymphatics of paramount importance.

  17. Infarction of Uterine Fibroids After Embolization: Relationship Between Postprocedural Enhanced MRI Findings and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumori, Tetsuya Kasahara, Toshiyuki; Kin, Yoko; Nozaki, Taiki

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the relationship between the degree of infarction of uterine fibroids on enhanced MRI after embolization and long-term clinical outcomes. Methods. During 92 months, 290 consecutive patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated with embolization; 221 who underwent enhanced MRI before embolization and 1 week after embolization were included in this study. The infarction rates of all fibroid tissue were assessed using enhanced MRI after embolization. Patients were divided into three groups according to the infarction rates: group A (100% infarction, n 142), group B (90-99% infarction, n = 74), group C (<90% infarction, n = 5). The cumulative rates of clinical outcomes were compared among groups using the Kaplan-Meier limited method. Results. Group A had a significantly higher rate of symptom control than groups B and C. The cumulative rates of symptom control at 5 years were 93%, 71%, and 60% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Group A had a significantly lower rate of gynecologic intervention after embolization than groups B and C. The cumulative rates of additional gynecologic intervention at 5 years were 3%, 15%, and 20% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Conclusions. The degree of infarction of uterine fibroids after embolization on enhanced MRI was related to long-term clinical outcomes. Complete infarction of all fibroid tissue can induce a higher rate of symptom control, with a lower rate of additional gynecologic intervention in the long term compared with incomplete infarction of fibroid tissue.

  18. Differentiation of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing among different solid pancreatic tumor types, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) is important, as the treatment options are vastly different. This study compared characteristics of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty patients underwent MR imaging of pancreatic masses with a histopathology that was later confirmed as an adenocarcinoma (n = 27), a NET (n = 16), and a SPT (n = 7). For qualitative analysis, two reviewers evaluated the morphologic features of the tumors: locations, margins, shapes, contained products, pancreatic ductal dilatation, and grade of signal intensity (SI). For the quantitative analysis, all phases of the MR images were co-registered using proprietary image registration software; thus, a region of interest (ROI) defined on one phase could be re-applied in other phases. The following four ratios were considered: tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas SI ratio, percent SI change, tumor-touninvolved pancreas enhancement index, and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed for the four ratios. Adenocarcinomas had ill-defined margins, irregular shapes, and ductal dilatation compared with NETs and SPTs (P < 0.001). The tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas ratio on all dynamic phases was significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). Percentage SI changes of pancreatic tumors on the pancreatic and the portal venous phases were significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). A significant difference between NETs and adenocarcinomas was also found with respect to the tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas enhancement index and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The percentage SI changes in the pancreatic phase and the arterial-to-delayed washout rate best distinguished between adenocarcinomas and

  19. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  20. Manganese-enhanced MRI Offers Correlation with Severity of Spinal Cord Injury in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Turner, Gregory H.; Kaufman, Jason; Patel, Arpan A.; Belykh, Evgenii; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Theodore, Nicholas; Preul, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord injuries (SCI) are clinically challenging, because neural regeneration after cord damage is unknown. In SCI animal models, regeneration is evaluated histologically, requiring animal sacrifice. Noninvasive techniques are needed to detect longitudinal SCI changes. Objective: To compare manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI [MEMRI]) in hemisection and transection of SCI rat models with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and histology. Methods: Rats underwent T9 spinal cord transection (n=6), hemisection (n=6), or laminectomy without SCI (controls, n=6). One-half of each group received lateral ventricle MnCl2 injections 24 hours later. Conventional DTI or T1-weighted MRI was performed 84 hours post-surgery. MEMRI signal intensity ratio above and below the SCI level was calculated. Fractional anisotropy (FA) measurements were taken 1 cm rostral to the SCI. The percentage of FA change was calculated 10 mm rostral to the SCI epicenter, between FA at the dorsal column lesion normalized to a lateral area without FA change. Myelin load (percentage difference) among groups was analyzed by histology. Results: In transection and hemisection groups, mean MEMRI ratios were 0.62 and 0.87, respectively, versus 0.99 in controls (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively); mean FA decreases were 67.5% and 40.1%, respectively, compared with a 6.1% increase in controls (P=0.002 and P=0.019, respectively). Mean myelin load decreased by 38.8% (transection) and 51.8% (hemisection) compared to controls (99.1%) (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). Pearson’s correlation coefficients were -0.94 for MEMRI ratio and FA changes and 0.87 for MEMRI and myelin load. Conclusion: MEMERI results correlated to SCI severity measured by FA and myelin load. MEMRI is a useful noninvasive tool to assess neuronal damage after SCI. PMID:28144384

  1. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27523813

  2. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  3. Corticospinal Tract Tracing in the Marmoset with a Clinical Whole-Body 3T Scanner Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Plas, Benjamin; Bolan, Faye; Boulanouar, Kader; Renaud, Luc; Darmana, Robert; Vaysse, Laurence; Vieu, Christophe; Loubinoux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been described as a powerful tool to depict the architecture of neuronal circuits. In this study we investigated the potential use of in vivo MRI detection of manganese for tracing neuronal projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) in healthy marmosets (Callithrix Jacchus). We determined the optimal dose of manganese chloride (MnCl2) among 800, 400, 40 and 8nmol that led to manganese-induced hyperintensity furthest from the injection site, as specific to the corticospinal tract as possible, and that would not induce motor deficit. A commonly available 3T human clinical MRI scanner and human knee coil were used to follow hyperintensity in the corticospinal tract 24h after injection. A statistical parametric map of seven marmosets injected with the chosen dose, 8 nmol, showed the corticospinal tract and M1 connectivity with the basal ganglia, substantia nigra and thalamus. Safety was determined for the lowest dose that did not induce dexterity and grip strength deficit, and no behavioral effects could be seen in marmosets who received multiple injections of manganese one month apart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time in marmosets, a reliable and reproducible way to perform longitudinal ME-MRI experiments to observe the integrity of the marmoset corticospinal tract on a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:26398500

  4. Characterizing Prostiva RF treatments of the prostate for BPH with gadolinium-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Huidobro, Christian; Larson, Benjamin; Mynderse, Samuel; Myers, James J; Busel, David; Acevedo, Cristian; Larson, Thayne R; Mynderse, Lance A

    2009-01-18

    Transurethral needle ablation (TUNA) is an accepted and effective therapy for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Prostiva (Medtronic, Shoreview, MN) is the newest-generation device, which includes a new needle design and radio frequency (RF) generator. This device creates temperatures of 120 degrees C and necrotic lesions in less than 2.5 min. Using previously described techniques, we analyzed dynamic, gadolinium-enhanced MRIs to characterize the ablative properties of the new Prostiva RF device. Ten men with LUTS due to BPH were treated with the standard Prostiva manufacturer-recommended protocol. The bladder neck and lateral lobes received treatment based on prostate volume and prostatic urethral length. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI sequences were obtained prior to and 1 week post-treatment. Analyze software (Mayo Clinic Biomedical Imaging Resource, Rochester, MN) was used to evaluate MRIs. New gadolinium defects were seen in all patients following Prostiva treatments. All lesions coalesced within the prostate. No defects were seen beyond the prostate, and the urethra was spared in all patients. The mean volume of necrosis was 7.56 cc, representing a mean of 11.28% of total prostate volume. Dynamic, gadolinium-enhanced MRIs demonstrate new vascular defects representing necrosis caused by Prostiva RF therapy of the prostate. The standard Prostiva RF protocol produces lesions that coalesce to create larger lesions in the bladder neck and lateral lobes. Compared to the TUNA Precision Plus device, the ablative lesions appear comparable while produced with a shorter burn time.

  5. Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI before coronary artery bypass surgery: impact of myocardial scar extent on bypass flow.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Massoudy, Parwis; Boehm, Claudia; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai; Knipp, Stephan; Eggebrecht, Holger; Thielmann, Matthias; Erbel, Raimund; Jakob, Heinz; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to relate the extent of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiac MRI to intraoperative graft flow in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Thirty-three CAD patients underwent LGE MRI before surgery using an inversion-recovery GRE sequence (turboFLASH). Intraoperative graft flow in Doppler ultrasonography was compared with the scar extent in each coronary vessel territory. One hundred and fourteen grafts were established supplying 86 of the 99 vessel territories. A significant negative correlation was found between scar extent and graft flow (r = -0.4, p < 0.0001). Flow in grafts to territories with no or small subendocardial scar was significantly higher than in grafts to territories with broad nontransmural or transmural scar (75 +/- 39 vs. 38 +/- 26 cc min(-1); p < 0.0001). In summary, the extent of myocardial scar as defined by contrast-enhanced MRI predicts coronary bypass graft flow. Beyond the probability of functional recovery, preoperative MRI might add value to surgery planning by predicting midterm bypass graft patency.

  6. Predictive values of serum VEGF and CRP levels combined with contrast enhanced MRI in hepatocellular carcinoma patients after TACE

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Xue, Tong-Qing; Chen, Xiao-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the predictive value of serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels combined with enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). One hundred and seventeen patients who received TACE from June 2010 to December 2012 in our hospital were included in this study. Serum VEGF and CRP levels before and after TACE were determined by ELISA and single immunodiffusion method for analyzing the association of serum levels with pathological features. Enhanced MRI was utilized before and after TACE to measure tumor size and ADC value in enhanced region and non-enhanced region. MRI data were combined with serum VEGF and CRP levels to analyze the predictive value in efficacy and prognosis for HCC patients after TACE. The serum VEGF and CRP levels after TACE were increased, but can return to normal levels in a certain time. VEGF and CRP levels were not statistically associated with tumor location, tumor staining or presence of membrane (all P > 0.05), but closely correlated with combined portal vein tumor thrombus, combined arteriovenous fistula and distant metastasis (all P < 0.05). Low levels of serum VEGF and CRP, small tumor size and low ADC value before treatment indicated a better prognosis. The sensitivity and specificity of serum VEGF and CRP levels, tumor size and ADC value were respectively 92.31% and 88.46%, 93.85% and 90.38%, 81.54% and 78.85% as well as 47.69% and 84.62%. Serum VEGF and CRP levels, tumor size and ADC value could predict the efficacy of TACE for HCC patients. Serum VEGF and CRP levels combined with enhanced MRI may serve as markers for efficacy and prognosis evaluation in HCC patients after TACE. PMID:27822426

  7. Three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the accurate, extensive quantification of microvascular permeability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Lobatto, Mark E; Dyvorne, Hadrien; Robson, Philip M; Millon, Antoine; Senders, Max L; Lairez, Olivier; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Coolen, Bram F; Black, Alexandra; Mulder, Willem J M; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques that cause stroke and myocardial infarction are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has been proposed as a method to quantify vessel wall microvascular permeability in vivo. Until now, most DCE-MRI studies of atherosclerosis have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) multi-slice imaging. Although providing the high spatial resolution required to image the arterial vessel wall, these approaches do not allow the quantification of plaque permeability with extensive anatomical coverage, an essential feature when imaging heterogeneous diseases, such as atherosclerosis. To our knowledge, we present the first systematic evaluation of three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, DCE-MRI for the extensive quantification of plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed, with validation in atherosclerotic rabbits. We compare two acquisitions: 3D turbo field echo (TFE) with motion-sensitized-driven equilibrium (MSDE) preparation and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE). We find 3D TFE DCE-MRI to be superior to 3D TSE DCE-MRI in terms of temporal stability metrics. Both sequences show good intra- and inter-observer reliability, and significant correlation with ex vivo permeability measurements by Evans Blue near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, we explore the feasibility of using compressed sensing to accelerate 3D DCE-MRI of atherosclerosis, to improve its temporal resolution and therefore the accuracy of permeability quantification. Using retrospective under-sampling and reconstructions, we show that compressed sensing alone may allow the acceleration of 3D DCE-MRI by up to four-fold. We anticipate that the development of high-spatial-resolution 3D DCE-MRI with prospective compressed sensing acceleration may allow for the more accurate and extensive quantification of atherosclerotic plaque permeability along an entire vascular bed. We foresee that this approach may allow for

  8. Chemosensory anxiety cues enhance the perception of fearful faces - An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Wudarczyk, Olga A; Kohn, Nils; Bergs, Rene; Goerlich, Katharina S; Gur, Raquel E; Turetsky, Bruce; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that humans can communicate emotion via chemosensory signals. Olfactory cues signaling anxiety can bias the perception of ambiguous stimuli, but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of this effect are currently unknown. Here, we investigated the brain responses to subtle changes in facial expressions in response to anxiety chemosensory cues. Ten healthy individuals donated their sweat in two situations: while anticipating an important oral examination (anxiety condition) and during physical exercise (control condition). Subsequently, 24 participants completed a parametrically morphed (neutral to fearful) emotion recognition task under exposure to the olfactory cues of anxiety and sports, in the fMRI scanner. Behaviorally, the participants rated more discernible fearful faces as more fearful and neutral faces as more neutral under exposure to the anxiety cues. For brain response, under exposure to the anxiety cues, increased fearfulness of the face corresponded to increased activity in the left insula and the left middle occipital gyrus extending into fusiform gyrus. Moreover, with higher subjective ratings of facial fearfulness, participants additionally showed increased activity in the left hippocampus. These results suggest that chemosensory anxiety cues facilitate processing of socially relevant fearful stimuli and boost memory retrieval due to enhanced emotional context.

  9. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Welch, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10–20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N1.9), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise. PMID:25922795

  10. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Li, Ruijiang; Cui, Yi; Tha, Khin Khin; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying “triple-negative" breast cancers. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) using cross-validation. Results Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01). Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement. Conclusions Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly

  11. Bioactive conformation of stromelysin inhibitors determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnella, N C; Bohacek, R; Zhang, X; Kolossváry, I; Paris, C G; Melton, R; Winter, C; Hu, S I; Ganu, V

    1995-01-01

    The transferred nuclear Overhauser effect has been used to determine the biologically active conformations of two stromelysin inhibitors. Both inhibitors used in this study were hydroxamic acids generated via chemical synthesis. These structures, representing the conformation of each inhibitor bound to stromelysin, superimposed with excellent agreement. The study also provided information on the shape and orientation of the S2' and S1' pockets of the enzyme relative to thermolysin. Comparisons were made between stromelysin and thermolysin inhibitors to critically examine thermolysin as a template for stromelysin-inhibitor design. The enzyme-bound conformations of these stromelysin inhibitors were determined for use as a template in conformationally restricted drug design. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7831311

  12. Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases: a prospective validation of diagnostic yield.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Inbar, Or; Xu, Zhiyuan; Dodson, Blair; Rizvi, Tanvir; Durst, Christopher R; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Sheehan, Jason P

    2016-12-01

    The radiological detection of brain metastases (BMs) is essential for optimizing a patient's treatment. This statement is even more valid when stereotactic radiosurgery, a noninvasive image guided treatment that can target BM as small as 1-2 mm, is delivered as part of that care. The timing of image acquisition after contrast administration can influence the diagnostic sensitivity of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for BM. Investigate the effect of time delayed acquisition after administration of intravenous Gadavist® (Gadobutrol 1 mmol/ml) on the detection of BM. This is a prospective IRB approved study of 50 patients with BM who underwent post-contrast MRI sequences after injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadavist® as part of clinical care (time-t0), followed by axial T1 sequences after a 10 min (time-t1) and 20 min delay (time-t2). MRI studies were blindly compared by three neuroradiologists. Single measure intraclass correlation coefficients were very high (0.914, 0.904 and 0.905 for time-t0, time-t1 and time-t2 respectively), corresponding to a reliable inter-observer correlation. The delayed MRI at time-t2 delayed sequences showed a significant and consistently higher diagnostic sensitivity for BM by every participating neuroradiologist and for the entire cohort (p = 0.016, 0.035 and 0.034 respectively). A disproportionately high representation of BM detected on the delayed studies was located within posterior circulation territories (compared to predictions based on tissue volume and blood-flow volumes). Considering the safe and potentially high yield nature of delayed MRI sequences, it should supplement the standard MRI sequences in all patients in need of precise delineation of their intracranial disease.

  13. Prostate cancer transrectal HIFU ablation: detection of local recurrences using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Girouin, Nicolas; Glas, Ludivine; Ben Cheikh, Alexandre; Gelet, Albert; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Rabilloud, Muriel; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in detecting local cancer recurrences after prostate high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Fifty-nine patients with biochemical recurrence after prostate HIFU ablation underwent T2-weighted and DCE MRI before transrectal biopsy. For each patient, biopsies were performed by two operators: operator 1 (blinded to MR results) performed random and colour Doppler-guided biopsies ("routine biopsies"); operator 2 obtained up to three cores per suspicious lesion on MRI ("targeted biopsies"). Seventy-seven suspicious lesions were detected on DCE images (n = 52), T2w images (n = 2) or both (n = 23). Forty patients and 41 MR lesions were positive at biopsy. Of the 36 remaining MR lesions, 20 contained viable benign glands. Targeted biopsy detected more cancers than routine biopsy (36 versus 27 patients, p = 0.0523). The mean percentages of positive cores per patient and of tumour invasion of the cores were significantly higher for targeted biopsies (p < 0.0001). The odds ratios of the probability of finding viable cancer and viable prostate tissue (benign or malignant) at targeted versus routine biopsy were respectively 3.35 (95% CI 3.05-3.64) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.13-1.63). MRI combining T2-weighted and DCE images is a promising method for guiding post-HIFU biopsy towards areas containing recurrent cancer and viable prostate tissue.

  14. The Incremental Value of Contrast-Enhanced MRI in the Detection of Biopsy-Proven Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radical Prostatectomy: Effect of Reader Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wassberg, Cecilia; Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to retrospectively assess the incremental value of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI in the detection of postsurgical local recurrence of prostate cancer by readers of different experience levels, using biopsy as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-two men with biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy underwent 1.5-T endorectal MRI with multiphase contrast-enhanced imaging and had biopsy within 3 months of MRI. Two radiologists (reader 1 had 1 year and reader 2 had 6 years of experience) independently reviewed each MRI study and classified the likelihood of recurrent cancer on a 5-point scale. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (Az) were calculated to assess readers’ diagnostic performance with T2-weighted MRI alone and combined with CE-MRI. Interobserver agreement was assessed using Cohen kappa statistics. RESULTS Thirty-three patients (63%) had biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer. With the addition of CE-MRI to T2-weighted imaging, the Az for cancer detection increased significantly for reader 1 (0.77 vs 0.85; p = 0.0435) but not for reader 2 (0.86 vs 0.88; p = 0.7294). The use of CE-MRI improved interobserver agreement from fair (κ = 0.39) to moderate (κ = 0.58). CONCLUSION CE-MRI increased interobserver agreement and offered incremental value to T2-weighted MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer for the relatively inexperienced reader. PMID:22826397

  15. An improved coverage and spatial resolution--using dual injection dynamic contrast-enhanced (ICE-DICE) MRI: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced technique for cerebral tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ka-Loh; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni; Thompson, Gerard; Cain, John R; Watkins, Amy; Russell, David; Qureshi, Salman; Evans, D Gareth; Lloyd, Simon K; Zhu, Xiaoping; Jackson, Alan

    2012-08-01

    A new dual temporal resolution-based, high spatial resolution, pharmacokinetic parametric mapping method is described--improved coverage and spatial resolution using dual injection dynamic contrast-enhanced (ICE-DICE) MRI. In a dual-bolus dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI acquisition protocol, a high temporal resolution prebolus is followed by a high spatial resolution main bolus to allow high spatial resolution parametric mapping for cerebral tumors. The measured plasma concentration curves from the dual-bolus data were used to reconstruct a high temporal resolution arterial input function. The new method reduces errors resulting from uncertainty in the temporal alignment of the arterial input function, tissue response function, and sampling grid. The technique provides high spatial resolution 3D pharmacokinetic maps (voxel size 1.0 × 1.0 × 2.0 mm(3)) with whole brain coverage and greater parameter accuracy than that was possible with the conventional single temporal resolution methods. High spatial resolution imaging of brain lesions is highly desirable for small lesions and to support investigation of heterogeneity within pathological tissue and peripheral invasion at the interface between diseased and normal brain. The new method has the potential to be used to improve dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI techniques in general.

  16. Detection of renal ischemic lesions using Gd-DTPA enhanced turbo FLASH MRI: Experimental and clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Vosshenrich, R.; Fischer, U.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to investigate the role of Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic MRI in the evaluation of renal ischemic lesions. With a turbo FLASH sequence before and after injection of Gd-DTPA, nine foxhound dogs after 60-120 min of renal ischemia underwent MR examination. In addition, five patients with a tumor in a solitary kidney were examined before and after nephron-sparing renal surgery to evaluate renal perfusion and function. The experimental and clinical findings were correlated with conventional measurements of kidney function and with histological findings. Complete renal ischemia leads to a poor corticomedullary differentiation in Gd-DTPA-enhanced turbo FLASH MRI. The signal-intensity-versus-time plots of kidneys with significant postischemic changes show a less steep increase of signal intensity in the cortex and a steeper increase of signal intensity in the medulla than those of normal kidneys. Dynamic MRI demonstrate renal morphology and reflect the functional status of the renal vasculature. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: Gd-enhanced image features on MRI and arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Matsuki, Kei; Hoshi, Hiroko; Saito, Masahiko; Ikegawa, Naoshi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint is a relatively rare benign condition with around 200 reported cases. We have recently encountered two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint which preoperative MRI had assessed as highly suspect and which arthroscopic resection and subsequent histological examinations confirmed as synovial hemangiomas. Published studies have identified the following as characteristic MRI features of synovial haemangioma: homogenous low intensity to iso-intensity on T1 sequence; and heterogeneous high intensity with low-intensity septa or spots within the lesion on T2 sequence. However, several other intra-knee disorders mimic these characteristics. In our two cases, we found that gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced images, which have been relatively rarely discussed in the literature, were useful for making the diagnosis and for determining the extent of this condition. These images also were very helpful during arthroscopic excision of the lesion. Nonetheless, even after Gd enhancement, differentiating between malignant conditions such as synovial sarcoma and haemangioma solely from MRI findings is still difficult.

  18. Enhancing fraction measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI predicts disease-free survival in patients with carcinoma of the cervix

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, S B; Buckley, D L; O'Connor, J P; Davidson, S E; Carrington, B M; Jones, A P; West, C M L

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is a need for simple imaging parameters capable of predicting therapeutic outcome. Methods: This retrospective study analysed 50 patients with locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI before receiving potentially curative radiotherapy. The proportion of enhancing pixels (EF) in the whole-tumour volume post-contrast agent injection was calculated and assessed in relation to disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Tumours with high EF had a significantly poorer probability of DFS than those with low EF (P=0.011). Interpretation: EF is a simple imaging biomarker that should be studied further in a multi-centre setting. PMID:19920831

  19. Model selection in measures of vascular parameters using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: experimental and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ewing, James R; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan

    2013-08-01

    A review of the selection of models in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is conducted, with emphasis on the balance between the bias and variance required to produce stable and accurate estimates of vascular parameters. The vascular parameters considered as a first-order model are the forward volume transfer constant K(trans) , the plasma volume fraction vp and the interstitial volume fraction ve . To illustrate the critical issues in model selection, a data-driven selection of models in an animal model of cerebral glioma is followed. Systematic errors and extended models are considered. Studies with nested and non-nested pharmacokinetic models are reviewed; models considering water exchange are considered.

  20. Predicting response before initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer using new methods for the analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE MRI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrandchamp, Joseph B.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Abramson, V. G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI have shown promise as biomarkers for tumor response to therapy. However, standard methods of analyzing DCE MRI data (Tofts model) require high temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the Arterial Input Function (AIF). Such models produce reliable biomarkers of response only when a therapy has a large effect on the parameters. We recently reported a method that solves the limitations, the Linear Reference Region Model (LRRM). Similar to other reference region models, the LRRM needs no AIF. Additionally, the LRRM is more accurate and precise than standard methods at low SNR and slow temporal resolution, suggesting LRRM-derived biomarkers could be better predictors. Here, the LRRM, Non-linear Reference Region Model (NRRM), Linear Tofts model (LTM), and Non-linear Tofts Model (NLTM) were used to estimate the RKtrans between muscle and tumor (or the Ktrans for Tofts) and the tumor kep,TOI for 39 breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). These parameters and the receptor statuses of each patient were used to construct cross-validated predictive models to classify patients as complete pathological responders (pCR) or non-complete pathological responders (non-pCR) to NAC. Model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC). The AUC for receptor status alone was 0.62, while the best performance using predictors from the LRRM, NRRM, LTM, and NLTM were AUCs of 0.79, 0.55, 0.60, and 0.59 respectively. This suggests that the LRRM can be used to predict response to NAC in breast cancer.

  1. fMRI neurofeedback of amygdala response to aversive stimuli enhances prefrontal-limbic brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Ruf, Matthias; Gerchen, Martin Fungisai; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Demirakca, Traute; Jungkunz, Martin; Bertsch, Katja; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2016-01-15

    Down-regulation of the amygdala with real-time fMRI neurofeedback (rtfMRI NF) potentially allows targeting brain circuits of emotion processing and may involve prefrontal-limbic networks underlying effective emotion regulation. Little research has been dedicated to the effect of rtfMRI NF on the functional connectivity of the amygdala and connectivity patterns in amygdala down-regulation with neurofeedback have not been addressed yet. Using psychophysiological interaction analysis of fMRI data, we present evidence that voluntary amygdala down-regulation by rtfMRI NF while viewing aversive pictures was associated with increased connectivity of the right amygdala with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in healthy subjects (N=16). In contrast, a control group (N=16) receiving sham feedback did not alter amygdala connectivity (Group×Condition t-contrast: p<.05 at cluster-level). Task-dependent increases in amygdala-vmPFC connectivity were predicted by picture arousal (β=.59, p<.05). A dynamic causal modeling analysis with Bayesian model selection aimed at further characterizing the underlying causal structure and favored a bottom-up model assuming predominant information flow from the amygdala to the vmPFC (xp=.90). The results were complemented by the observation of task-dependent alterations in functional connectivity of the vmPFC with the visual cortex and the ventrolateral PFC in the experimental group (Condition t-contrast: p<.05 at cluster-level). Taken together, the results underscore the potential of amygdala fMRI neurofeedback to influence functional connectivity in key networks of emotion processing and regulation. This may be beneficial for patients suffering from severe emotion dysregulation by improving neural self-regulation.

  2. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  3. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameters and tumor cellularity in a rat model of cerebral glioma at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Madhava Prasad

    This dissertation mainly focuses on establishing and evaluating a stable and reproducible procedure for assessing tumor microvasculature by measuring the tissue parameters: plasma volume (vp), forward transfer constant (Ktrans), interstitial volume (ve) and distribution volume (VD), utilizing T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and examining their relationship with a histo measure, cell counting. In the first part of the work, two T1-weighted DCE-MRI studies at 24 hrs time interval, using a dual-echo gradient-echo pulse sequence, were performed in 18 athymic rats implanted with U251 cerebral glioma. Using the "standard," or "consensus" model, and a separate Logan graphical analysis, T1-weighted images before, during and after the injection of a gadolinium contrast agent were used to estimate the tissue parameters mentioned above. After MRI study rats were sacrificed, and sectioned brain tissues were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin for cell counting. Measurements in a region where a model selection process demonstrates that it can be reliably shown that contrast agent leaks from the capillary into the interstitial space quickly enough, and a concentration sufficient to measure its back flux to the vasculature, especially for Ktrans and ve, showed a remarkable stability. The combined mean parameter values in this region were: vp = (0.79+/-0.36)%, Ktrans = (2.23+/-0.71) x10-2 min -1, ve = (6.99+/-2.14)%, and VD = (7.57+/-2.32)%. In the second part of this work, the Logan graphical approach, after establishing its stability in an untreated control group, was applied to investigate a cohort of animals in which a therapeutic dose of 20 Gy radiation had been administered. In this cohort, tissue normalization appeared to be the most effective at 8 h after irradiation; this implies that the 8 hrs post-treatment time might be an ideal combination time for optimized therapeutic outcome in combined modalities. The relationship between non-invasive DCE-MRI

  4. Retrieval of Brain Tumors with Region-Specific Bag-of-Visual-Words Representations in Contrast-Enhanced MRI Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system is proposed for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors. In this CBIR system, spatial information in the bag-of-visual-words model and domain knowledge on the brain tumor images are considered for the representation of brain tumor images. A similarity metric is learned through a distance metric learning algorithm to reduce the gap between the visual features and the semantic concepts in an image. The learned similarity metric is then used to measure the similarity between two images and then retrieve the most similar images in the dataset when a query image is submitted to the CBIR system. The retrieval performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain CE-MRI dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). The experimental results demonstrate that the mean average precision values of the proposed method range from 90.4% to 91.5% for different views (transverse, coronal, and sagittal) with an average value of 91.0%. PMID:23243462

  5. Evaluation of T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in localizing prostate cancer before repeat biopsy.

    PubMed

    Cheikh, Alexandre Ben; Girouin, Nicolas; Colombel, Marc; Maréchal, Jean-Marie; Gelet, Albert; Bissery, Alvine; Rabilloud, Muriel; Lyonnet, Denis; Rouvière, Olivier

    2009-03-01

    We assessed the accuracy of T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in localizing prostate cancer before transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat biopsy. Ninety-three patients with abnormal PSA level and negative prostate biopsy underwent T2w and DCE prostate MRI using pelvic coil before repeat biopsy. T2w and DCE images were interpreted using visual criteria only. MR results were correlated with repeat biopsy findings in ten prostate sectors. Repeat biopsy found prostate cancer in 23 patients (24.7%) and 44 sectors (6.6%). At per patient analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 47.8%, 44.3%, 20.4% and 79.5% for T2w imaging and 82.6%, 20%, 24.4% and 93.3% for DCE imaging. When all suspicious areas (on T2w or DCE imaging) were taken into account, a sensitivity of 82.6% and a negative predictive value of 100% could be achieved. At per sector analysis, DCE imaging was significantly less specific (83.5% vs. 89.7%, p < 0.002) than T2w imaging; it was more sensitive (52.4% vs. 32.1%), but the difference was hardly significant (p = 0.09). T2w and DCE MRI using pelvic coil and visual diagnostic criteria can guide prostate repeat biopsy, with a good sensitivity and NPV.

  6. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  7. Preliminary Study of Oxygen-Enhanced Longitudinal Relaxation in MRI: A Potential Novel Biomarker of Oxygenation Changes in Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, James P.B.; Naish, Josephine H.; Parker, Geoff J.M.; Waterton, John C.; Watson, Yvonne; Jayson, Gordon C.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Cheung, Sue; Buckley, David L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; West, Catharine M.L.; Davidson, Susan E.; Roberts, Caleb; Mills, Samantha J.; Mitchell, Claire L.; Hope, Lynn; Ton, N. Chan; Jackson, Alan

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing non-invasive methods of mapping tumor hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygen concentration produce proportional changes in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal relaxation rate (R{sub 1}). This technique has been used previously to evaluate oxygen delivery to healthy tissues and is distinct from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Here we report application of this method to detect alteration in tumor oxygenation status. Methods and materials: Ten patients with advanced cancer of the abdomen and pelvis underwent serial measurement of tumor R{sub 1} while breathing medical air (21% oxygen) followed by 100% oxygen (oxygen-enhanced MRI). Gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was then performed to compare the spatial distribution of perfusion with that of oxygen-induced DELTAR{sub 1}. Results: DELTAR{sub 1} showed significant increases of 0.021 to 0.058 s{sup -1} in eight patients with either locally recurrent tumor from cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas or metastases from ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. In general, there was congruency between perfusion and oxygen concentration. However, regional mismatch was observed in some tumor cores. Here, moderate gadolinium uptake (consistent with moderate perfusion) was associated with low area under the DELTAR{sub 1} curve (consistent with minimal increase in oxygen concentration). Conclusions: These results provide evidence that oxygen-enhanced longitudinal relaxation can monitor changes in tumor oxygen concentration. The technique shows promise in identifying hypoxic regions within tumors and may enable spatial mapping of change in tumor oxygen concentration.

  8. Preparation and initial characterization of biodegradable particles containing gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent for enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Amber L; Chu, Kevin; Ali, Adeel; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-11-11

    Accurate imaging of atherosclerosis is a growing necessity for timely treatment of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for plaque imaging. The goal of this study was to create polymeric particles of a small size with high loading of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) and demonstrate their usefulness for MRI. A water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used to encapsulate the MRI agent in a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) particle for the purpose of concentrating the agent at an imaging site. PLGA particles with two separate average sizes of 1.83 microm and 920 nm, and PLA-PEG particles with a mean diameter of 952 nm were created. Loading of up to 30 wt % Gd-DTPA was achieved, and in vitro release occurred over 5 h. PLGA particles had highly negative zeta potentials, whereas the particles incorporating PEG had zeta potentials closer to neutral. Cytotoxicity of the particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was shown to be minimal. The ability of the polymeric contrast agent formulation to create contrast was similar to that of Gd-DTPA alone. These results demonstrate the possible utility of the contrast agent-loaded polymeric particles for plaque detection with MRI.

  9. Enhanced control of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurophysiology with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training and working memory practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew S; Kane, Jessica H; Weisend, Michael P; Parker, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback can be used to train localized, conscious regulation of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. As a therapeutic technique, rt-fMRI neurofeedback reduces the symptoms of a variety of neurologic disorders. To date, few studies have investigated the use of self-regulation training using rt-fMRI neurofeedback to enhance cognitive performance. This work investigates the utility of rt-fMRI neurofeedback as a tool to enhance human cognition by training healthy individuals to consciously control activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A cohort of 18 healthy participants in the experimental group underwent rt-fMRI neurofeedback from the left DLPFC in five training sessions across two weeks while 7 participants in the control group underwent similar training outside the MRI and without rt-fMRI neurofeedback. Working memory (WM) performance was evaluated on two testing days separated by the five rt-fMRI neurofeedback sessions using two computerized tests. We investigated the ability to control the BOLD signal across training sessions and WM performance across the two testing days. The group with rt-fMRI neurofeedback demonstrated a significant increase in the ability to self-regulate the BOLD signal in the left DLPFC across sessions. WM performance showed differential improvement between testing days one and two across the groups with the highest increases observed in the rt-fMRI neurofeedback group. These results provide evidence that individuals can quickly gain the ability to consciously control the left DLPFC, and this training results in improvements of WM performance beyond that of training alone.

  10. An aqueous method for the controlled manganese (Mn(2+)) substitution in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI.

    PubMed

    Ereath Beeran, Ansar; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Fernandez, Francis Boniface; Muvvala, Krishna Surendra; Wunderlich, Wilfried; Anil, Sukumaran; Vellappally, Sajith; Ramachandra Rao, M S; John, Annie; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Varma, P R Harikrishna

    2015-02-14

    Despite the success in the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) for various scientific applications, its potential in biomedical fields has not been exploited to its full potential. In this context, an in situ substitution of Mn(2+) was performed in SPION and a series of ferrite particles, MnxFe1-xFe2O4 with a varying molar ratio of Mn(2+) : Fe(2+) where 'x' varies from 0-0.75. The ferrite particles obtained were further studied in MRI contrast applications and showed appreciable enhancement in their MRI contrast properties. Manganese substituted ferrite nanocrystals (MnIOs) were synthesized using a novel, one-step aqueous co-precipitation method based on the use of a combination of sodium hydroxide and trisodium citrate (TSC). This approach yielded the formation of highly crystalline, superparamagnetic MnIOs with good control over their size and bivalent Mn ion crystal substitution. The presence of a TSC hydrophilic layer on the surface facilitated easy dispersion of the materials in an aqueous media. Primary characterizations such as structural, chemical and magnetic properties demonstrated the successful formation of manganese substituted ferrite. More significantly, the MRI relaxivity of the MnIOs improved fourfold when compared to SPION crystals imparting high potential for use as an MRI contrast agent. Further, the cytocompatibility and blood compatibility evaluations demonstrated excellent cell morphological integrity even at high concentrations of nanoparticles supporting the non-toxic nature of nanoparticles. These results open new horizons for the design of biocompatible water dispersible ferrite nanoparticles with good relaxivity properties via a versatile and easily scalable co-precipitation route.

  11. Influence of Temporal Regularization and Radial Undersampling Factor on Compressed Sensing Reconstruction in Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungheon G.; Feng, Li; Grimm, Robert; Freed, Melanie; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Moy, Linda; Otazo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of temporal sparsity regularization and radial undersampling on compressed sensing reconstruction of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, using the iterative Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel (iGRASP) MRI technique in the setting of breast cancer evaluation. Method DCE-MRI examinations of the breast (n=7) were conducted using iGRASP at 3T. Images were reconstructed with five different radial undersampling schemes corresponding to temporal resolutions between 2 and 13.4 s/frame and with four different weights for temporal sparsity regularization (λ=0.1, 0.5, 2, and 6 times of noise level). Image similarity to time-averaged reference images was assessed by two breast radiologists and using quantitative metrics. Temporal similarity was measured in terms of wash-in slope and contrast kinetic model parameters. Results iGRASP images reconstructed with λ=2 and 5.1s/frame had significantly (p<0.05) higher similarity to time-averaged reference images than the images with other reconstruction parameters (mutual information (MI) >5%), in agreement with the assessment of two breast radiologists. Higher undersampling (temporal resolution < 5.1 s/frame) required stronger temporal sparsity regularization (λ≥2) to remove streaking aliasing artifacts (MI>23% between λ=2 and 0.5). The difference between the kinetic-model transfer rates of benign and malignant groups decreased as temporal resolution decreased (82% between 2 and 13.4s/frame). Conclusion This study demonstrates objective spatial and temporal similarity measures can be used to assess the influence of sparsity constraint and undersampling in compressed sensing DCE-MRI and also shows that the iGRASP method provides the flexibility of optimizing these reconstruction parameters in the post-processing stage using the same acquired data. PMID:26032976

  12. pH-Responsive Theranostic Polymer-Caged Nanobins (PCNs): Enhanced Cytotoxicity and T1 MRI Contrast by Her2-Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bong Jin; Swindell, Elden P.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Hankins, Patrick L.; Chipre, Anthony J.; Mastarone, Daniel J.; Ahn, Richard W.; Meade, Thomas J.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-01-01

    A PCN theranostic platform comprises a doxorubicin (DXR)-loaded liposomal core and an acid-sensitive polymer shell that is functionalized with Herceptin and GdIII-based MRI contrast agents. In vitro testing reveals a 14-fold increase in DXR-based cytotoxicity versus a non-targeted analogue and an 120-fold improvement in cellular GdIII–uptake in comparison with clinically approved DOTA-GdIII, leading to significant T1 MRI contrast enhancement. PMID:24516291

  13. Rationally Separating the Corona and Membrane Functions of Polymer Vesicles for Enhanced T₂ MRI and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jingya; Liu, Qiuming; Zhang, Junxue; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Yao; Du, Jianzhong

    2015-07-01

    It is an important challenge to in situ grow ultrafine super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in drug carriers such as polymer vesicles (also called polymersomes) while keeping their biodegradability for enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery. Herein, we present a new strategy by rationally separating the corona and membrane functions of polymer vesicles to solve the above problem. We designed a poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO43-b-PCL98-b-PAA25) triblock copolymer and self-assembled it into polymer vesicle. The PAA chains in the vesicle coronas are responsible for the in situ nanoprecipitation of ultrafine SPIONs, while the vesicle membrane composed of PCL is biodegradable. The SPIONs-decorated vesicle is water-dispersible, biocompatible, and slightly cytotoxic to normal human cells. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, energy disperse spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer revealed the formation of ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (1.9 ± 0.3 nm) in the coronas of polymer vesicles. Furthermore, the CCK-8 assay revealed low cytotoxicity of vesicles against normal L02 liver cells without and with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The in vitro and in vivo MRI experiments confirmed the enhanced T2-weighted MRI sensitivity and excellent metastasis in mice. The loading and release experiments of an anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), indicated that the Fe3O4-decorated magnetic vesicles have potential applications as a nanocarrier for anticancer drug delivery. Moreover, the polymer vesicle is degradable in the presence of enzyme such as Pseudomonas lipases, and the ultrafine Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the vesicle coronas are confirmed to be degradable under weakly acidic conditions. Overall, this decoration-in-vesicle-coronas strategy provides us with a new insight for preparing water-dispersible ultrafine super-paramagnetic Fe3O

  14. Low incidence of left atrial delayed enhancement with MRI in patients with AF: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bois, John P; Glockner, James; Young, Phillip M; Foley, Thomas A; Sheldon, Seth; Newman, Darrell B; Lin, Grace; Packer, Douglas L; Brady, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained atrial arrhythmia. One potential target for ablation is left atrial (LA) scar (LAS) regions that may be the substrate for re-entry within the atria, thereby sustaining AF. Identification of LAS through LA delayed gadolinium enhancement (LADE) with MRI has been proposed. Objectives We sought to evaluate LADE in patients referred for catheter ablation of AF. Methods Prospective analysis was conducted of consecutive patients who underwent pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) ablation for AF at a single institution. Patients underwent LADE with MRI to determine LAS regions before ablation. MRI data were analysed independently in accordance with prespecified institutional protocol by two staff cardiac radiologists to whom patient outcomes were masked, and reports of LADE were documented. Where no initial consensus occurred regarding delayed enhancement (DE), a third staff cardiac radiologist independently reviewed the case and had the deciding vote. Results Of the 149 consecutive patients (mean (SD) age, 59 (9) years), AF was persistent in 64 (43%) and paroxysmal in 85 (57%); 45 (30%) had prior ablation. Only five patients (3%) had identifiable DE in LA walls (persistent AF, n=1; paroxysmal AF, n=4). LADE was present in two (4%) of the 45 patients with previous left PVAI. The presence of LADE was not associated with a higher recurrence rate of AF. Conclusions In contrast to previous studies, the finding of DE within LA walls was uncommon and, when present, did not correlate with AF type or risk of AF recurrence. It therefore is of unclear clinical significance. PMID:28123766

  15. Enhanced MRI relaxivity of aquated Gd3+ ions by carboxyphenylated water-dispersed graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Gizzatov, Ayrat; Keshishian, Vazrik; Guven, Adem; Dimiev, Ayrat M; Qu, Feifei; Muthupillai, Raja; Decuzzi, Paolo; Bryant, Robert G; Tour, James M; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-03-21

    The present study demonstrates that highly water-dispersed graphene nanoribbons dispersed by carboxyphenylated substituents and conjugated to aquated Gd(3+) ions can serve as a high-performance contrast agent (CA) for applications in T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with relaxivity (r1,2) values outperforming currently-available clinical CAs by up to 16 times for r1 and 21 times for r2.

  16. The Use of MRI Modeling to Enhance Osteochondral Transfer in Segmental Kienböck's Disease.

    PubMed

    Barber, Lauren; Koff, Matthew F; Virtue, Patrick; Lipman, Joseph P; Hotchkiss, Robert J; Potter, Hollis G

    2012-04-01

    Kienböck's disease, defined as avascular necrosis of the lunate, is a relatively rare condition with a poorly understood etiology. Conservative and invasive treatments for Kienböck's disease exist, including wrist immobilization, surgical joint-leveling procedures, vascularized bone grafting, proximal row carpectomy, and total wrist arthrodesis. Staging Kienböck's disease using radiography assumes near complete avascularity of the lunate. The staging distinguishes only the "state of collapse" in an ordinal classification scheme and does not allow localization or indicate partial involvement of the lunate, which the image contrast from MRI may provide. In this short communication, we report the treatment of a patient's Kienböck's disease by combining MRI with mathematical modeling to optimize the congruency between the curvature of donor and recipient sites of an autologous osteoarticular plug transfer. Follow-up MRI and radiographs at 1 year postoperatively demonstrated gradual graft incorporation and bone healing. The purpose of this study was to describe the feasibility of a novel surgical technique. The results indicate that donor site selection for autologous osteoarticular transfer using a quantitative evaluation of articular surface curvature may be beneficial for optimizing the likelihood for restoring the radius of curvature and thus joint articulation following cartilage repair.

  17. Sol and Gel States in Peptide Hydrogels Visualized by Gd(III)-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Weerasekare, Mahika; Taraban, Marc B.; Shi, Xianfeng; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Trewhella, Jill; Yu, Yihua Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogels assembled from a pair of self-repulsive but mutually-attractive decapeptides are visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. It is found that in the absence of Gd(III)-chelate, gelation has little effect on MRI signal intensity. In the presence of Gd(III)-chelate, gelation leads to significant changes in water relaxation and MR signal intensity. The sol to gel transition is best visualized by T2-weighted imaging using large echo time with the sol producing a bright spot and the gel producing a dark spot. MRI studies indicate high local Gd(III)-chelate concentration. Small-angle X-ray scattering study indicates that this local enrichment of Gd(III)-chelate has two contributing processes: first, the aggregation of peptides into fibers; second, within peptide fibers, Gd(III)-chelate further aggregate into clusters. This work demonstrates that the status of peptide-based hydrogels can be visualized by MRI with the aid of covalently linked Gd(III)-chelates. This result has implications for monitoring peptide scaffolds in vivo. PMID:22252424

  18. Correlation of histological findings with gadolinium enhanced MRI scans during healing of a PHEMA orbital implant in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, C.; Morris, I.; Vijayasekaran, S.; Fallon, M.; McAllister, J.; Clayton, A.; Chirila, T.; Crawford, G.; Constable, I.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—To investigate a poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) orbital implant with a spongy anterior hemisphere and a smooth gel posterior hemisphere, by histology correlated with magnetic resonance images.
METHODS—Following enucleation, eight rabbits received PHEMA implants to which the muscles were directly sutured, and underwent gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from 3 to 52 weeks. After the rabbits were killed, the implants were removed, cut in a plane corresponding to the scan, and processed for light and electron microscopy.
RESULTS—All eight rabbits retained their implant to the end of the study period without complications. The scans demonstrated muscle attachment to the anterior half of the implant, and enhancement was seen on injection of gadolinium chelate. Histology confirmed muscle attachment, and cellular and vascular ingrowth. Over time, a transformation from reactive inflammatory to relatively non-vascular scar tissue was seen within the implant. Calcium deposits in one implant were detected by imaging and histology.
CONCLUSION—The implants are readily visualised on MRI. Muscle attachment and fibrovascular ingrowth into the anterior hemisphere are seen, while encapsulation of the posterior hemisphere is minimal. Histological findings confirm the progress of the healing response, with initial inflammation and marked vascularisation, developing later into quiescent scar tissue predominantly of fibroblasts.

 PMID:10216066

  19. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  20. Optimal gadolinium dose level for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of U87-derived tumors in athymic nude rats for the assessment of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Nathan; Varghai, Davood; Flask, Chris A.; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of varying gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dose on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) tracking of brain tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells (derived from human malignant glioma) into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 9, 12, and 13 days DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 9.4 T micro-MRI scanner before and after administration of 100, 150, or 200 μL of Gd-DTPA. Results: Tumor region normalized DCE-MRI scan enhancement at peak was: 1.217 over baseline (0.018 Standard Error [SE]) at the 100 μL dose, 1.339 (0.013 SE) at the 150 μL dose, and 1.287 (0.014 SE) at the 200 μL dose. DCE-MRI peak tumor enhancement at the 150 μL dose was significantly greater than both the 100 μL dose (p < 3.323E-08) and 200 μL dose (p < 0.0007396). Discussion: In this preliminary study, the 150 μL Gd-DTPA dose provided the greatest T1 weighted contrast enhancement, while minimizing negative T2* effects, in DCE-MRI scans of U87-derived tumors. Maximizing Gd-DTPA enhancement in DCE-MRI scans may assist development of a clinically robust (i.e., unambiguous) technique for PDT outcome assessment.

  1. Intraoperative detection of glioma invasion beyond MRI enhancement with Raman spectroscopy in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Cancer tissue is frequently impossible to distinguish from normal brain during surgery. Gliomas are a class of brain cancer which invade into the normal brain. If left unresected, these invasive cancer cells are the source of glioma recurrence. Moreover, these invasion areas do not show up on standard-of-care pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This inability to fully visualize invasive brain cancers results in subtotal surgical resections, negatively impacting patient survival. To address this issue, we have demonstrated the efficacy of single-point in vivo Raman spectroscopy using a contact hand-held fiber optic probe for rapid detection of cancer invasion in 8 patients with low and high grade gliomas. Using a supervised machine learning algorithm to analyze the Raman spectra obtained in vivo, we were able to distinguish normal brain from the presence of cancer cells with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Moreover, by correlating these results with pre-operative MRI we demonstrate the ability to detect low density cancer invasion up to 1.5cm beyond the cancer extent visible using MRI. This represents the potential for significant improvements in progression-free and overall patient survival, by identifying previously undetectable residual cancer cell populations and preventing the resection of normal brain tissue. While the importance of maximizing the volume of tumor resection is important for all grades of gliomas, the impact for low grade gliomas can be dramatic because surgery can even be curative. This convenient technology can rapidly classify cancer invasion in real-time, making it ideal for intraoperative use in brain tumor resection.

  2. A pilot study using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI as a response biomarker of the radioprotective effect of memantine in patients receiving whole brain radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Philip; Leppert, Ilana R.; Roberge, David; Boudam, Karim; Brown, Paul D.; Muanza, Thierry; Pike, G. Bruce; Chankowsky, Jeffrey; Mihalcioiu, Catalin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This pilot prospective study sought to determine whether dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) could be used as a clinical imaging biomarker of tissue toxicity from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Method 14 patients who received WBRT were imaged using dynamic contrast enhanced DCE-MRI prior to and at 8-weeks, 16-weeks and 24-weeks after the initiation of WBRT. Twelve of the patients were also enrolled in the RTOG 0614 trial, which randomized patients to the use of placebo or memantine. After the unblinding of the treatments received by RTOG 0614 patients, DCE-MRI measures of tumor tissue and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) vascular permeability (Initial Area Under the Curve (AUC) Blood Adjusted) was analyzed. Cognitive, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment and blood samples were collected according to the patient's ability to tolerate the exams. Circulating endothelial cells (CEC) were measured using flow cytometry. Results Following WBRT, there was an increasing trend in the vascular permeability of tumors (p=0.09) and NAWM (p=0.06) with time. Memantine significantly (p=0.01) reduced NAWM AUC changes following radiotherapy. Patients on memantine retained (COWA p= 0.03) better cognitive functions than those on placebo. No association was observed between the level of CEC and DCE-MRI changes, time from radiotherapy or memantine use. Conclusions DCE-MRI can detect vascular damage secondary to WBRT. Our data suggests that memantine reduces WBRT-induced brain vasculature damages. PMID:27248467

  3. The use of error-category mapping in pharmacokinetic model analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data.

    PubMed

    Gill, Andrew B; Anandappa, Gayathri; Patterson, Andrew J; Priest, Andrew N; Graves, Martin J; Janowitz, Tobias; Jodrell, Duncan I; Eisen, Tim; Lomas, David J

    2015-02-01

    This study introduces the use of 'error-category mapping' in the interpretation of pharmacokinetic (PK) model parameter results derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI data. Eleven patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were enrolled in a multiparametric study of the treatment effects of bevacizumab. For the purposes of the present analysis, DCE-MRI data from two identical pre-treatment examinations were analysed by application of the extended Tofts model (eTM), using in turn a model arterial input function (AIF), an individually-measured AIF and a sample-average AIF. PK model parameter maps were calculated. Errors in the signal-to-gadolinium concentration ([Gd]) conversion process and the model-fitting process itself were assigned to category codes on a voxel-by-voxel basis, thereby forming a colour-coded 'error-category map' for each imaged slice. These maps were found to be repeatable between patient visits and showed that the eTM converged adequately in the majority of voxels in all the tumours studied. However, the maps also clearly indicated sub-regions of low Gd uptake and of non-convergence of the model in nearly all tumours. The non-physical condition ve ≥ 1 was the most frequently indicated error category and appeared sensitive to the form of AIF used. This simple method for visualisation of errors in DCE-MRI could be used as a routine quality-control technique and also has the potential to reveal otherwise hidden patterns of failure in PK model applications.

  4. In-Vivo Imaging of Cell Migration Using Contrast Enhanced MRI and SVM Based Post-Processing.

    PubMed

    Weis, Christian; Hess, Andreas; Budinsky, Lubos; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a living organism can be observed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with iron oxide nanoparticles as an intracellular contrast agent. This method, however, suffers from low sensitivity and specificty. Here, we developed a quantitative non-invasive in-vivo cell localization method using contrast enhanced multiparametric MRI and support vector machines (SVM) based post-processing. Imaging phantoms consisting of agarose with compartments containing different concentrations of cancer cells labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles were used to train and evaluate the SVM for cell localization. From the magnitude and phase data acquired with a series of T2*-weighted gradient-echo scans at different echo-times, we extracted features that are characteristic for the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, in particular hyper- and hypointensities, relaxation rates, short-range phase perturbations, and perturbation dynamics. High detection quality was achieved by SVM analysis of the multiparametric feature-space. The in-vivo applicability was validated in animal studies. The SVM detected the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging phantoms with high specificity and sensitivity with a detection limit of 30 labeled cells per mm3, corresponding to 19 μM of iron oxide. As proof-of-concept, we applied the method to follow the migration of labeled cancer cells injected in rats. The combination of iron oxide labeled cells, multiparametric MRI and a SVM based post processing provides high spatial resolution, specificity, and sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for non-invasive in-vivo cell detection and cell migration studies over prolonged time periods.

  5. A Microfluidic Platform to design crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles (cHANPs) for enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Maria; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Torino, Enza

    2016-11-01

    Recent advancements in imaging diagnostics have focused on the use of nanostructures that entrap Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agents (CAs), without the need to chemically modify the clinically approved compounds. Nevertheless, the exploitation of microfluidic platforms for their controlled and continuous production is still missing. Here, a microfluidic platform is used to synthesize crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid NanoParticles (cHANPs) in which a clinically relevant MRI-CAs, gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA), is entrapped. This microfluidic process facilitates a high degree of control over particle synthesis, enabling the production of monodisperse particles as small as 35 nm. Furthermore, the interference of Gd-DTPA during polymer precipitation is overcome by finely tuning process parameters and leveraging the use of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) of surfactants and pH conditions. For both production strategies proposed to design Gd-loaded cHANPs, a boosting of the relaxation rate T1 is observed since a T1 of 1562 is achieved with a 10 μM of Gd-loaded cHANPs while a similar value is reached with 100 μM of the relevant clinical Gd-DTPA in solution. The advanced microfluidic platform to synthesize intravascularly-injectable and completely biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles entrapping clinically approved CAs enables the implementation of straightforward and scalable strategies in diagnostics and therapy applications.

  6. Metal-substituted protein MRI contrast agents engineered for enhanced relaxivity and ligand sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lelyveld, Victor S; Brustad, Eric; Arnold, Frances H; Jasanoff, Alan

    2011-02-02

    Engineered metalloproteins constitute a flexible new class of analyte-sensitive molecular imaging agents detectable by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but their contrast effects are generally weaker than synthetic agents. To augment the proton relaxivity of agents derived from the heme domain of cytochrome P450 BM3 (BM3h), we formed manganese(III)-containing proteins that have higher electron spin than their native ferric iron counterparts. Metal substitution was achieved by coexpressing BM3h variants with the bacterial heme transporter ChuA in Escherichia coli and supplementing the growth medium with Mn3+-protoporphyrin IX. Manganic BM3h variants exhibited up to 2.6-fold higher T1 relaxivities relative to native BM3h at 4.7 T. Application of ChuA-mediated porphyrin substitution to a collection of thermostable chimeric P450 domains resulted in a stable, high-relaxivity BM3h derivative displaying a 63% relaxivity change upon binding of arachidonic acid, a natural ligand for the P450 enzyme and an important component of biological signaling pathways. This work demonstrates that protein-based MRI sensors with robust ligand sensitivity may be created with ease by including metal substitution among the toolkit of methods available to the protein engineer.

  7. A Microfluidic Platform to design crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles (cHANPs) for enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Maria; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Torino, Enza

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in imaging diagnostics have focused on the use of nanostructures that entrap Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agents (CAs), without the need to chemically modify the clinically approved compounds. Nevertheless, the exploitation of microfluidic platforms for their controlled and continuous production is still missing. Here, a microfluidic platform is used to synthesize crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid NanoParticles (cHANPs) in which a clinically relevant MRI-CAs, gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA), is entrapped. This microfluidic process facilitates a high degree of control over particle synthesis, enabling the production of monodisperse particles as small as 35 nm. Furthermore, the interference of Gd-DTPA during polymer precipitation is overcome by finely tuning process parameters and leveraging the use of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) of surfactants and pH conditions. For both production strategies proposed to design Gd-loaded cHANPs, a boosting of the relaxation rate T1 is observed since a T1 of 1562 is achieved with a 10 μM of Gd-loaded cHANPs while a similar value is reached with 100 μM of the relevant clinical Gd-DTPA in solution. The advanced microfluidic platform to synthesize intravascularly-injectable and completely biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles entrapping clinically approved CAs enables the implementation of straightforward and scalable strategies in diagnostics and therapy applications. PMID:27901092

  8. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  9. Layer-Specific Manganese-Enhanced MRI of the Diabetic Rat Retina in Light and Dark Adaptation at 11.7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Eric R.; Chandra, Saurav B.; De La Garza, Bryan H.; Velagapudi, Chakradhar; Abboud, Hanna E.; Duong, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To employ high-resolution manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) to study abnormal calcium activity in different cell layers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retinas, and to determine whether MEMRI detects changes at earlier time points than previously reported. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied 14 days (n = 8) and 30 days (n = 5) after streptozotocin (STZ) or vehicle (n = 7) injection. Manganese-enhanced MRI at 20 × 20 × 700 μm, in which contrast is based on manganese as a calcium analogue and an MRI contrast agent, was obtained in light and dark adaptation of the retina in the same animals in which one eye was covered and the fellow eye was not. The MEMRI activity encoding of the light and dark adaptation was achieved in awake conditions and imaged under anesthesia. Results. Manganese-enhanced MRI showed three layers, corresponding to the inner retina, outer retina, and the choroid. In normal animals, the outer retina showed higher MEMRI activity in dark compared to light; the inner retina displayed lower activity in dark compared to light; and the choroid showed no difference in activity. Manganese-enhanced MRI activity changed as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia and decreased with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina in dark relative to light adaptation. The choroid also had altered MEMRI activity at 14 days, which returned to normal by 30 days. No differences in MEMRI activity were detected in the inner retina. Conclusions. Manganese-enhanced MRI detects progressive reduction in calcium activity with duration of hyperglycemia in the outer retina as early as 14 days after hyperglycemia, earlier than any other time point reported in the literature. PMID:26098468

  10. Semi-parametric analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using Bayesian P-splines.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Volker J; Whitcher, Brandon; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Current approaches to quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI with non-linear models involve the convolution of an arterial input function (AIF) with the contrast agent concentration at a voxel or regional level. Full quantification provides meaningful biological parameters but is complicated by the issues related to convergence, (de-)convolution of the AIF, and goodness of fit. To overcome these problems, this paper presents a penalized spline smoothing approach to model the data in a semi-parametric way. With this method, the AIF is convolved with a set of B-splines to produce the design matrix, and modeling of the resulting deconvolved biological parameters is obtained in a way that is similar to the parametric models. Further kinetic parameters are obtained by fitting a non-linear model to the estimated response function and detailed validation of the method, both with simulated and in vivo data is

  11. Improved fuzzy clustering algorithms in segmentation of DC-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Kannan, S R; Ramathilagam, S; Devi, Pandiyarajan; Sathya, A

    2012-02-01

    Segmentation of medical images is a difficult and challenging problem due to poor image contrast and artifacts that result in missing or diffuse organ/tissue boundaries. Many researchers have applied various techniques however fuzzy c-means (FCM) based algorithms is more effective compared to other methods. The objective of this work is to develop some robust fuzzy clustering segmentation systems for effective segmentation of DCE - breast MRI. This paper obtains the robust fuzzy clustering algorithms by incorporating kernel methods, penalty terms, tolerance of the neighborhood attraction, additional entropy term and fuzzy parameters. The initial centers are obtained using initialization algorithm to reduce the computation complexity and running time of proposed algorithms. Experimental works on breast images show that the proposed algorithms are effective to improve the similarity measurement, to handle large amount of noise, to have better results in dealing the data corrupted by noise, and other artifacts. The clustering results of proposed methods are validated using Silhouette Method.

  12. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    PubMed Central

    Mera Iglesias, Moisés; Aramburu Núñez, David; del Olmo Claudio, José Luis; Salvador Gómez, Francisco; Driscoll, Brandon; Coolens, Catherine; Alba Castro, José L.; Muñoz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets. PMID:25788972

  13. Raloxifene treatment enhances brain activation during recognition of familiar items: a pharmacological fMRI study in healthy elderly males.

    PubMed

    Goekoop, Rutger; Barkhof, Frederik; Duschek, Erik J J; Netelenbos, Coen; Knol, Dirk L; Scheltens, Philip; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2006-07-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that may delay the onset of mild cognitive impairment in elderly women. Effects of raloxifene treatment on mental performance in males remain to be investigated. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we showed that raloxifene treatment enhanced brain activation in elderly males during encoding of new information (faces) into memory. The current study used fMRI in the same group of subjects to screen for effects of raloxifene treatment on brain function during face recognition. Healthy elderly males (n=28; mean age 63.6 years, SD 2.4) were scanned at baseline and after 3 months of treatment with either raloxifene 120 mg (n=14) or placebo (n=14) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. Functional data were analyzed in an event-related fashion with respect to correct hits and correct rejections using FSL software. Performance data were analyzed with respect to recognition accuracy, latency, and response bias. Functional effects of treatment were found on brain activation related to correct hits only. When compared to placebo treatment, raloxifene treatment enhanced brain activation in the left posterior parahippocampal area (Z=3.9) and right inferior prefrontal cortex (Z=3.5). Recognition accuracy scores remained stable in the raloxifene group, whereas the placebo group showed a small but significant decrease in accuracy scores (p=0.02). No significant effects were found on response bias or latency. In conclusion, raloxifene treatment affects brain function during memory performance in a way that may reflect increased arousal during initial encoding, with downstream effects on brain function during retrieval of information. Behaviorally, such neurofunctional effects may actively block decreased memory performance as a result of context-dependency. The validity of these predictions can be tested in large-scale clinical trials.

  14. Enhancing the quantification of tissue sodium content by MRI: time-efficient sodium B1 mapping at clinical field strengths.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Jonathan; Konstandin, Simon; Krämer, Philipp; Schad, Lothar R

    2016-02-01

    Tissue sodium content (TSC) is a sensitive measure of pathological changes and can be detected non-invasively by MRI. For the absolute quantification of TSC, B1 inhomogeneities must be corrected, which is not well established beyond research applications. An in-depth analysis of B1 mapping methods which are suitable for application in TSC quantification is presented. On the basis of these results, a method for simultaneous B1 mapping and imaging is proposed in order to enhance accuracy and to reduce measurement time at clinical field strengths. The B1 mapping techniques used were phase-sensitive (PS), Bloch-Siegert shift (BSS), double-angle (DAM) and actual flip-angle imaging (AFI) methods. Experimental and theoretical comparisons demonstrated that the PS technique yields the most accurate field profiles and exhibits the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simultaneous B1 mapping and imaging was performed for the PS method, employing both degrees of freedom of the MR signal: the B1 field is encoded into signal phase and the amplitude provides the concentration information. In comparison with the more established DAM, a 13% higher SNR was obtained and field effects could be corrected more accurately without the need for additional measurement time. The protocol developed was applied to measure TSC in the healthy human head at an isotropic resolution of 4 mm. TSC was determined to be 35 ± 1 mM in white matter and 134 ± 3 mM in vitreous humor. By employing the proposed simultaneous characterization of the B1 field and acquisition of the spin density-weighted sodium signal, the accuracy of the non-invasive measurement of TSC is enhanced and the measurement time is reduced. This should allow (23)Na MRI to be better incorporated into clinical studies and routine.

  15. Dual Manganese-Enhanced and Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI Detects Myocardial Border Zone Injury in a Pig Ischemia-Reperfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Rajesh; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Hahn-Windgassen, Annett; Matsuura, Yuka; Bennett, Mihoko V.; Lyons, Jennifer K.; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Robbins, Robert C.; McConnell, Michael V.; Yeung, Alan C.; Brinton, Todd J.; Harnish, Phillip P.; Yang, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Delayed gadolinium (Gd) enhancement MRI (DEMRI) identifies non-viable myocardium, but is non-specific and may overestimate nonviable territory. Manganese (Mn2+)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) denotes specific Mn2+ uptake into viable cardiomyocytes. We performed a dual-contrast myocardial assessment in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion (IR) model to test the hypothesis that combined DEMRI and MEMRI will identify viable infarct border zone (BZ) myocardium in vivo. Methods and Results Sixty-minute LAD ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) was induced in 13 adult swine. Twenty-one days post-IR, 3T cardiac MRI was performed. MEMRI was obtained after injection (0.7 cc/kg) of Mn2+ contrast agent (EVP1001-1, Eagle Vision Pharmaceutical Corp.). DEMRI was then acquired after 0.2mmol/kg Gd injection. Left ventricular (LV) mass, infarct, and function were analyzed. Subtraction of MEMRI defect from DEMRI signal identified injured border zone myocardium. Explanted hearts were analyzed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) stain and tissue electron microscopy (TEM) to compare infarct, BZ, and remote myocardium. Average LV ejection fraction was reduced (30±7%). MEMRI and DEMRI infarct volumes correlated with TTC (MEMRI: r=0.78; DEMRI: r=0.75; p<0.004). MEMRI infarct volume percentage was significantly lower than DEMRI (14±4%* vs. 23±4%; *p<0.05). BZ MEMRI SNR was intermediate to remote and core infarct SNR (7.5±2.8* vs. 13.2±3.4 and 2.9±1.6; *p<0.0001), and DEMRI BZ SNR tended to be intermediate to remote and core infarct (8.4±5.4 vs. 3.3±0.6 and 14.3±6.6; p>0.05). TEM analysis exhibited preserved cell structure in BZ cardiomyocytes despite transmural DEMRI enhancement. Conclusions Dual-contrast MEMRI-DEMRI detects BZ viability within DEMRI infarct zones. This approach may identify injured, at-risk myocardium in ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21719779

  16. A review of technical aspects of T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, M; Bonzano, L; Levrero, F; Mancardi, G L; Roccatagliata, L

    2014-09-01

    In the last few years, several imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, have been used to investigate the degree of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in patients with neurological diseases including multiple sclerosis, ischemic stroke, and brain tumors. One promising MRI method for assessing the BBB permeability of patients with neurological diseases in vivo is T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Here we review the technical issues involved in DCE-MRI in the study of human brain tumors. In the first part of this paper, theoretical models for the DCE-MRI analysis will be described, including the Toft-Kety models, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model and the two-compartment exchange model. These models can be used to estimate important kinetic parameters related to BBB permeability. In the second part of this paper, details of the data acquisition, issues related to the arterial input function, and procedures for DCE-MRI image analysis are illustrated.

  17. Monitoring Pc 4-mediated photodynamic therapy of U87 tumors with dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the athymic nude rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghai, Davood; Covey, Kelly; Sharma, Rahul; Cross, Nathan; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Flask, Chris A.; Dean, David

    2008-02-01

    Post-operative verification of the specificity and sensitivity of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is most pressing for deeply placed lesions such as brain tumors. We wish to determine whether Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) can provide a non-invasive and unambiguous quantitative measure of the specificity and sensitivity of brain tumor PDT. Methods: 2.5 x 10 5 U87 cells were injected into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 5-6 days, the animals received 0.5 mg/kg b.w. of the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 via tail-vein injection. On day 7 peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7T microMRI scanner before and after tail-vein administration of 100 μL gadolinium and 400 μL saline. After this scan the animals received a 30 J/cm2 dose of 672-nm light from a diode laser (i.e., PDT). The DCE-MRI scan protocol was repeated on day 13. Next, the animals were euthanized and their brains were explanted for Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) histology. Results: No tumor was found in one animal. The DCE-MRI images of the other five animals demonstrated significant tumor enhancement increase (p < 0.053 two-sided t-test and p < 0.026 one-sided t-test) following PDT. H&E histology presented moderate to severe tumor necrosis. Discussion: The change in signal detected by DCE-MRI appears to be due to PDT-induced tumor necrosis. This DCE-MRI signal appears to provide a quantitative, non-invasive measure of the outcome of PDT in this animal model and may be useful for determining the safety and effectiveness of PDT in deeply placed tumors (e.g., glioma).

  18. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p < 0.05). The enhancement was evaluated based on a consensus of four observers. The enhancement pattern and the morphological features during the arterial and the delayed phases were correlated between the Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim

  19. Improvements in Diagnostic Accuracy with Quantitative Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Cancer   0.59   DCIS   0.47   Invasive  Ductal  Carcinoma  (IDC)   0.45   Benign  enhancing  focus   0.41   Fibroadenoma ...0.39   Atypical  Ductal  Hyperplasia  (ADH)   biopsy  site  enhancement   0.32   Fibroadenoma   0.30

  20. Quantification of fibrosis in infarcted swine hearts by ex vivo late gadolinium-enhancement and diffusion-weighted MRI methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Mihaela; Ghugre, Nilesh R.; Ramanan, Venkat; Morikawa, Lily; Stanisz, Greg; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-08-01

    Many have speculated that MRI signal characteristics can be used to identify regions of heterogeneous infarct associated with an arrhythmogenic substrate; however, direct evidence of this relationship is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the remodelling characteristics of fibrosis by means of histology and high-resolution MR imaging. For this purpose, we performed whole-mount histology in heart samples (n = 9) collected from five swine at six weeks post-infarction and compared the extent of fibrosis in the infarcted areas delineated in these histological images with that obtained ex vivo by MRI using late gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) methods. All MR images were obtained at a submillimetre resolution (i.e., voxel size of 0.6×0.6×1.2 mm3). Specifically, in the histology images, we differentiated moderate fibrosis (consisting of a mixture of viable and non-viable myocytes, known as border zone, BZ) from severe fibrosis (i.e., the dense scar). Correspondingly, tissue heterogeneities in the MR images were categorized by a Gaussian mixture model into healthy, BZ and scar. Our results showed that (a) both MRI methods were capable of qualitatively distinguishing sharp edges between dense scar and healthy tissue from regions of heterogeneous BZ; (b) the BZ and dense scar areas had intermediate-to-high increased values of signal intensity in the LGE images and of apparent diffusion coefficient in the DWI, respectively. In addition, as demonstrated by the Picrosirius Red and immunohistochemistry stains, the viable bundles in the BZ were clearly separated by thin collagen strands and had reduced expression of Cx43, whereas the core scar was composed of dense fibrosis. A quantitative analysis demonstrated that the comparison between BZ/scar extent in LGE and DWI to the corresponding areas identified in histology yielded very good correlations (i.e., for the scar identified by LGE, R2 was 0.96 compared to R2 = 0.93 for the

  1. SU-D-303-03: Impact of Uncertainty in T1 Measurements On Quantification of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Aryal, M; Cao, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI requires native longitudinal relaxation time (T1) measurement. This study aimed to assess uncertainty in T1 measurements using two different methods. Methods and Materials: Brain MRI scans were performed on a 3T scanner in 9 patients who had low grade/benign tumors and partial brain radiotherapy without chemotherapy at pre-RT, week-3 during RT (wk-3), end-RT, and 1, 6 and 18 months after RT. T1-weighted images were acquired using gradient echo sequences with 1) 2 different flip angles (50 and 150), and 2) 5 variable TRs (100–2000ms). After creating quantitative T1 maps, average T1 was calculated in regions of interest (ROI), which were distant from tumors and received a total of accumulated radiation doses < 5 Gy at wk-3. ROIs included left and right normal Putamen and Thalamus (gray matter: GM), and frontal and parietal white matter (WM). Since there were no significant or even a trend of T1 changes from pre-RT to wk-3 in these ROIs, a relative repeatability coefficient (RC) of T1 as a measure of uncertainty was estimated in each ROI using the data pre-RT and at wk-3. The individual T1 changes at later time points were evaluated compared to the estimated RCs. Results: The 2-flip angle method produced small RCs in GM (9.7–11.7%) but large RCs in WM (12.2–13.6%) compared to the saturation-recovery (SR) method (11.0–17.7% for GM and 7.5–11.2% for WM). More than 81% of individual T1 changes were within T1 uncertainty ranges defined by RCs. Conclusion: Our study suggests that the impact of T1 uncertainty on physiological parameters derived from DCE MRI is not negligible. A short scan with 2 flip angles is able to achieve repeatability of T1 estimates similar to a long scan with 5 different TRs, and is desirable to be integrated in the DCE protocol. Present study was supported by National Institute of Health (NIH) under grant numbers; UO1 CA183848 and RO1 NS064973.

  2. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  3. Value of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI to Detect Local Tumor Recurrence in Primary Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sung, Yu Sub; Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Park, Ji Eun; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Treatment failures in head and neck cancer patients are mainly related to locoregional tumor recurrence. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of model-free dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to detect local recurrence during the surveillance of head and neck cancer patients.Our retrospective study enrolled 24 patients with primary head and neck cancer who had undergone definitive treatment. Patients were grouped into local recurrence (n = 12) or posttreatment change (n = 12) groups according to the results of biopsy or clinicoradiologic follow-up. The types of time-signal intensity (TSI) curves were classified as follows: "progressive increment" as type I, "plateau" as type II, and "washout" as type III. TSI curve types and their parameters (i.e., wash-in, Emax, Tmax, area under the curve [AUC]60, AUC90, and AUC120) were compared between the 2 study groups.The distributions of TSI curve types for local recurrence versus posttreatment change were statistically significant (P < 0.001) (i.e., 0% vs 83.3% for type I, 58.3% vs 16.7% for type II, and 41.7% vs 0% for type III). There were statistically significant differences in Emax, Tmax, and all of the AUC parameters between 2 groups (P < 0.0083 [0.05/6]). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses indicated that the TSI curve type was the best predictor of local recurrence with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 73.5-100.0) and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI, 51.6-97.9) (cutoff with type II).Model-free DCE-MRI using TSI curves and TSI curve-derived parameters detects local recurrence in head and neck cancer patients with a high diagnostic accuracy.

  4. Non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation assessment of the human lung by means of fourier decomposition in proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Puderbach, Michael; Deimling, Michael; Jellus, Vladimir; Chefd'hotel, Christophe; Dinkel, Julien; Hintze, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schad, Lothar R

    2009-09-01

    Assessment of regional lung perfusion and ventilation has significant clinical value for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In this work a new method of non-contrast-enhanced functional lung MRI (not dependent on intravenous or inhalative contrast agents) is proposed. A two-dimensional (2D) true fast imaging with steady precession (TrueFISP) pulse sequence (TR/TE = 1.9 ms/0.8 ms, acquisition time [TA] = 112 ms/image) was implemented on a 1.5T whole-body MR scanner. The imaging protocol comprised sets of 198 lung images acquired with an imaging rate of 3.33 images/s in coronal and sagittal view. No electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory triggering was used. A nonrigid image registration algorithm was applied to compensate for respiratory motion. Rapid data acquisition allowed observing intensity changes in corresponding lung areas with respect to the cardiac and respiratory frequencies. After a Fourier analysis along the time domain, two spectral lines corresponding to both frequencies were used to calculate the perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images. The described method was applied in preliminary studies on volunteers and patients showing clinical relevance to obtain non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation data.

  5. Quantifying Intracranial Plaque Permeability with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, P.; Elmokadem, A.H.; Syed, F.H.; Cantrell, C.G.; Dehkordi, F.H.; Carroll, T.J.; Ansari, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaque hyperintensity and/or gadolinium contrast enhancement have been studied as imaging biomarkers of acutely symptomatic ischemic presentations using single static MR imaging measurements. However, the value in modeling the dynamics of intracranial plaque permeability has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to use dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to quantify the contrast permeability of intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques in symptomatic patients and to compare these parameters against existing markers of plaque volatility using black-blood MR imaging pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a prospective study of contrast uptake dynamics in the major intracranial vessels proximal and immediately distal to the circle of Willis using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, specifically in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Using the Modified Tofts model, we extracted the volume transfer constant (Ktrans) and fractional plasma volume (Vp) parameters from plaque-enhancement curves. Using regression analyses, we compared these parameters against time from symptom onset as well as intraplaque hyperintensity and postcontrast enhancement derived from T1 SPACE, a black-blood MR vessel wall imaging sequence. RESULTS We completed analysis in 10 patients presenting with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Ktrans and Vp measurements were higher in plaques versus healthy white matter and similar or less than values in the choroid plexus. Only Ktrans correlated significantly with time from symptom onset (P = .02). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging parameters were not found to correlate significantly with intraplaque enhancement or intraplaque hyperintensity (P = .4 and P = .17, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Elevated Ktrans and Vp values found in intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques versus healthy white matter suggest that dynamic

  6. A novel method for viability assessment by cinematographic and late contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gang; Cockshott, Paul W.; Martin, Thomas N.; Foster, John E.; Elliott, Alex; Dargie, Henry; Groenning, Bjoern A.

    2004-04-01

    Using cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a combination of late contrast enhanced MR (ceMR) and cinematographic (CINE) images, a myocardial viability score can be derived. At present this score is produced by visual evaluation of wall motion abnormalities in combination with presence or absence of late hyper enhancement (LE) on ceMR. We set out to develop and validate image processing techniques derived from stereo vision capable of reducing the observer dependence and improving accuracy in the diagnosis of viable myocardium.

  7. Enhanced disease characterization through multi network functional normalization in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Mustafa S.; Khullar, Siddharth; Damaraju, Eswar; Michael, Andrew M.; Baum, Stefi A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, structural topology is used for spatial normalization during the pre-processing of fMRI. The co-existence of multiple intrinsic networks which can be detected in the resting brain are well-studied. Also, these networks exhibit temporal and spatial modulation during cognitive task vs. rest which shows the existence of common spatial excitation patterns between these identified networks. Previous work (Khullar et al., 2011) has shown that structural and functional data may not have direct one-to-one correspondence and functional activation patterns in a well-defined structural region can vary across subjects even for a well-defined functional task. The results of this study and the existence of the neural activity patterns in multiple networks motivates us to investigate multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization for multi groups of subjects. We extend the previous approach (Khullar et al., 2011) by co-registering multi group of subjects (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and by utilizing multiple resting-state networks (instead of just one) as a single fusion template for functional normalization. In this paper we describe the initial steps toward using multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization. A simple wavelet-based image fusion approach is presented in order to evaluate the feasibility of combining multiple functional networks. Our results showed improvements in both the significance of group statistics (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and the spatial extent of activation when a multiple resting-state network applied as a single fusion template for functional normalization after the conventional structural normalization. Also, our results provided evidence that the improvement in significance of group statistics lead to better accuracy results for classification of healthy controls and schizophrenia patients. PMID:25873853

  8. Enhanced Thalamic Functional Connectivity with No fMRI Responses to Affected Forelimb Stimulation in Stroke-Recovered Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Woo H.; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jeong K.; Jeong, Jaeseung; Kim, Young R.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological recovery after stroke has been extensively investigated to provide better understanding of neurobiological mechanism, therapy, and patient management. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, particularly functional MRI (fMRI), have widely contributed to unravel the relationship between the altered neural function and stroke-affected brain areas. As results of previous investigations, the plastic reorganization and/or gradual restoration of the hemodynamic fMRI responses to neural stimuli have been suggested as relevant mechanisms underlying the stroke recovery process. However, divergent study results and modality-dependent outcomes have clouded the proper interpretation of variable fMRI signals. Here, we performed both evoked and resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) to clarify the link between the fMRI phenotypes and post-stroke functional recovery. The experiments were designed to examine the altered neural activity within the contra-lesional hemisphere and other undamaged brain regions using rat models with large unilateral stroke, which despite the severe injury, exhibited nearly full recovery at ∼6 months after stroke. Surprisingly, both blood oxygenation level-dependent and blood volume-weighted (CBVw) fMRI activities elicited by electrical stimulation of the stroke-affected forelimb were completely absent, failing to reveal the neural origin of the behavioral recovery. In contrast, the functional connectivity maps showed highly robust rs-fMRI activity concentrated in the contra-lesional ventromedial nucleus of thalamus (VM). The negative finding in the stimuli-induced fMRI study using the popular rat middle cerebral artery model denotes weak association between the fMRI hemodynamic responses and neurological improvement. The results strongly caution the indiscreet interpretation of stroke-affected fMRI signals and demonstrate rs-fMRI as a complementary tool for efficiently characterizing stroke recovery. PMID:28119575

  9. Improvements in Diagnostic Accuracy with Quantitative Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 15 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code )   Table of Contents...Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as an imaging biomarker. J. Clin. Oncol. 2006;24: 3293 –8. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2006.06.8080. 15

  10. Focal lesions in the cirrhotic liver: their pivotal role in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and recognition by the Western guidelines.

    PubMed

    Golfieri, Rita; Garzillo, Giorgio; Ascanio, Salvatore; Renzulli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health concern, and early HCC diagnosis is a primary radiological concern. The goal of imaging liver cirrhosis is the early identification of high-grade dysplastic nodules/early HCC since their treatment is associated with a higher chance of radical cure and lower recurrence rates. The newly introduced MRI contrast agent gadoxetic acid (gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, Gd-EOB-DTPA) has enabled the concurrent assessment of tumor vascularity and hepatocyte-specific contrast enhancement during the hepatobiliary phase (HBP), which can help to detect and characterize smaller HCCs and their precursors. HBP-EOB-MRI identifies hypovascular HCC nodules that are difficult to detect using ultrasonography or computed tomography, which do not show the diagnostic HCC hallmarks of arterial washin and portal/delayed washout. During the HBP, typical HCC and early HCC appear hypointense on EOB-MRI, whereas low-grade dysplastic or regenerative nodules appear as iso- or hyperintense lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of EOB-MRI for the diagnosis of early HCC is approximately 95-100%. One third of hypovascular hypointense nodules in HBP become hypervascular 'progressed' HCC, with a 1- and 3-year cumulative incidence of 25 and 41%, respectively. Therefore, these hypovascular nodules should be strictly followed up or definitely treated as typical HCC. Due to this capability of identifying the precursors and biological behavior of HCC, EOB-MRI has rapidly become a key imaging tool for the diagnosis of HCC and its precursors, despite the scarce MRI availability throughout Europe. With increasing experience, EOB-MRI may eventually be established as the diagnostic imaging modality of choice in this setting. Full recognition by the Western EASL-AASLD guidelines is expected.

  11. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans .

  12. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-31

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3-14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion.

  13. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3–14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion. PMID:28139701

  14. On the Dark Rim Artifact in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Myocardial Perfusion Studies

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, E.V.R.; Parker, D.L.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    A dark band or rim along parts of the subendocardial border of the left ventricle (LV) and the myocardium has been noticed in some dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion studies. The artifact is thought to be due to susceptibility effects from the gadolinium bolus, motion, or resolution, or a combination of these. Here motionless ex vivo hearts in which the cavity was filled with gadolinium are used to show that dark rim artifacts can be consistent with resolution effects alone. PMID:16200553

  15. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Evaluation of Textural Feature Extraction for Radiotherapy Response Assessment of Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Using Diffusion Weighted MRI and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y; Wang, C; Horton, J; Chang, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using classic textural feature extraction in radiotherapy response assessment, we studied a unique cohort of early stage breast cancer patients with paired pre - and post-radiation Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: 15 female patients from our prospective phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Each patient received a single-fraction radiation treatment, and DWI and DCE scans were conducted before and after the radiotherapy. DWI scans were acquired using a spin-echo EPI sequence with diffusion weighting factors of b = 0 and b = 500 mm{sup 2} /s, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. DCE-MRI scans were acquired using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3D SPGR sequence with a temporal resolution of about 1 minute. The contrast agent (CA) was intravenously injected with a 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight dose at 2 ml/s. Two parameters, volume transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and k{sub ep} were analyzed using the two-compartment Tofts kinetic model. For DCE parametric maps and ADC maps, 33 textural features were generated from the clinical target volume (CTV) in a 3D fashion using the classic gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) and gray level run length matrix (GLRLM). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the significance of each texture feature’s change after the radiotherapy. The significance was set to 0.05 with Bonferroni correction. Results: For ADC maps calculated from DWI-MRI, 24 out of 33 CTV features changed significantly after the radiotherapy. For DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, all 33 CTV features of K{sup trans} and 33 features of k{sub ep} changed significantly. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that those significantly changed classic texture features are sensitive to radiation-induced changes and can be used for assessment of radiotherapy response in breast cancer.

  16. Differentiation between multiple liver hemangiomas and liver metastases of gastrinomas: Value of enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.F.; Laissy, J.P.; Limot, O.; Cadiot, G.

    1996-05-01

    Hepatic metastases of neuroendocrine tumors are known to mimic hemangiomas on nonenhanced SE MR sequences. The usefulness of MR examination with gadolinium injection to identify lesions was prospectively evaluated. Nine patients with multiple liver metastases of gastrinomas were compared with six patients showing multiple liver hemangiomas. Patients underwent unenhanced T2-weighted SE, T1-weighted SE, and FLASH sequences, followed by enhanced sequential FLASH sequences and a 5 min delayed T1-weighted SE sequence. On T2-weighted SE sequence, all hemangiomas displayed the same typical morphology as a sharply defined, homogeneous, high signal intensity lesion, but this pattern was also observed for some or all of the lesions in seven of nine patients with gastrinoma metastases. Dynamic FLASH sequences were accurate for lesions larger than 2 cm, hemangiomas displaying a nodular peripheral enhancement with centripetal filling in, and metastases displaying either an initial homogeneous or a regular peripheral enhancement. Precise assessment of lesions smaller than 2 cm remained equivocal. Delayed T1-weighted SE sequence (performed at least 5 min after Gd-chelate injection) was the most accurate technique to identify metastases by showing hypo-or isointensity signal, whereas all hemangiomas were hyperintense. Postcontrast delayed T1-weighted sequence is the primary technique to differentiate equivocal cases of hemangiomas from metastases of gastrinoma. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. An evaluation of the contributions of diffusion and exchange in relaxation enhancement by MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Yves; Roch, Alain; Muller, Robert N.; Gillis, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Magnetic compounds are known to enhance water proton relaxation, either by diffusion or by proton exchange. An experimental procedure to distinguish both mechanisms is proposed and validated by relaxation measurements made in water-methanol solutions of Dy 3+, Ni 2+, Gd 3+, Tempo, and AMI-25. The test discriminates according to the character of the transverse relaxation in water-methanol solutions: a mono-exponential decay corresponds to diffusion, while a bi-exponential decay indicates the contribution of a proton exchange. The study of ferritin and akaganeite particle solutions confirms the occurrence of a proton exchange between protons belonging to hydroxyl groups of the particle surface and free water protons.

  18. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Parameters as Biomarkers in Assessing Head and Neck Lesions After Chemoradiotherapy Using a Wide-Bore 3 Tesla Scanner.

    PubMed

    Lerant, Gergely; Sarkozy, Peter; Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polony, Gabor; Tamas, Laszlo; Toth, Erika; Boer, Andras; Javor, Laszlo; Godeny, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Pilot studies have shown promising results in characterizing head and neck tumors (HNT) using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), differentiating between malignant and benign lesions and evaluating changes in response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Our aim was to find DCE-MRI parameters, biomarkers in evaluating the post-CRT status. Two hundred and five patients with head and neck lesions were examined with DCE-MRI sequences. The time intensity curves (TIC) were extracted and processed to acquire time-to-peak (TTP), relative maximum enhancement (RME), relative wash-out (RWO), and two new parameters attack and decay. These parameters were analyzed using univariate tests in SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17, SPSS Inc. Chicago, USA) to identify parameters that could be used to infer tumor malignancy and post-CRT changes. Multiple parameters of curve characteristics were significantly different between malignant tumors after CRT (MACRT) and changes caused by CRT. The best-performing biomarkers were the attack and the decay. We also found multiple significant (p < 0.05) parameters for both the benign and malignant status as well as pre- and post-CRT status. Our large cohort of data supports the increasing role of DCE-MRI in HNT differentiation, particularly for the assessment of post-CRT status along with accurate morphological imaging.

  19. The quantitation of nuclear Overhauser effect methods for total conformational analysis of peptides in solution. Application to gramicidin S.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C R; Sikakana, C T; Hehir, S; Kuo, M C; Gibbons, W A

    1978-01-01

    The [1H:1H] nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE's) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) are reported for the backbone protons of the decapeptide gramicidin S. Several methods for calculating interproton distances from these measurements are presented. Ratios of interproton distances were obtained from [1H:1H] NOE's and from the combination of [1H:1H]NOE'S and T1 values. Actual proton-proton distances were calculated from these ratios either by using the known distance between two geminal protons or distances derived from scalar coupling constants. The interproton distances calculated for gramicidin S are consistent with a II' beta-turn/antiparallel beta-sheet conformation. PMID:83886

  20. Reduced hippocampal manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) signal during pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus: edema or apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Jackeline Moraes; Persike, Daniele Suzete; Castro, Leticia Urbano Cardoso de; Sanches, Talita Rojas Cunha; Andrade, Lúcia da Conceição; Tannús, Alberto; Covolan, Luciene

    2014-05-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been considered a surrogate marker of Ca(+2) influx into activated cells and tracer of neuronal active circuits. However, the induction of status epilepticus (SE) by kainic acid does not result in hippocampal MEMRI hypersignal, in spite of its high cell activity. Similarly, short durations of status (5 or 15min) induced by pilocarpine did not alter the hippocampal MEMRI, while 30 min of SE even reduced MEMRI signal Thus, this study was designed to investigate possible explanations for the absence or decrease of MEMRI signal after short periods of SE. We analyzed hippocampal caspase-3 activation (to evaluate apoptosis), T2 relaxometry (tissue water content) and aquaporin 4 expression (water-channel protein) of rats subjected to short periods of pilocarpine-induced SE. For the time periods studied here, apoptotic cell death did not contribute to the decrease of the hippocampal MEMRI signal. However, T2 relaxation was higher in the group of animals subjected to 30min of SE than in the other SE or control groups. This result is consistent with higher AQP-4 expression during the same time period. Based on apoptosis and tissue water content analysis, the low hippocampal MEMRI signal 30min after SE can potentially be attributed to local edema rather than to cell death.

  1. Neural Basis of Working Memory Enhancement after Acute Aerobic Exercise: fMRI Study of Preadolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ai-Guo; Zhu, Li-Na; Yan, Jun; Yin, Heng-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Working memory lies at the core of cognitive function and plays a crucial role in children’s learning, reasoning, problem solving, and intellectual activity. Behavioral findings have suggested that acute aerobic exercise improves children’s working memory; however, there is still very little knowledge about whether a single session of aerobic exercise can alter working memory’s brain activation patterns, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Therefore, we investigated the effect of acute moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on working memory and its brain activation patterns in preadolescent children, and further explored the neural basis of acute aerobic exercise on working memory in these children. We used a within-subjects design with a counterbalanced order. Nine healthy, right-handed children were scanned with a Siemens MAGNETOM Trio 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner while they performed a working memory task (N-back task), following a baseline session and a 30-min, moderate-intensity exercise session. Compared with the baseline session, acute moderate-intensity aerobic exercise benefitted performance in the N-back task, increasing brain activities of bilateral parietal cortices, left hippocampus, and the bilateral cerebellum. These data extend the current knowledge by indicating that acute aerobic exercise enhances children’s working memory, and the neural basis may be related to changes in the working memory’s brain activation patterns elicited by acute aerobic exercise. PMID:27917141

  2. Neural Basis of Working Memory Enhancement after Acute Aerobic Exercise: fMRI Study of Preadolescent Children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ai-Guo; Zhu, Li-Na; Yan, Jun; Yin, Heng-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Working memory lies at the core of cognitive function and plays a crucial role in children's learning, reasoning, problem solving, and intellectual activity. Behavioral findings have suggested that acute aerobic exercise improves children's working memory; however, there is still very little knowledge about whether a single session of aerobic exercise can alter working memory's brain activation patterns, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Therefore, we investigated the effect of acute moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on working memory and its brain activation patterns in preadolescent children, and further explored the neural basis of acute aerobic exercise on working memory in these children. We used a within-subjects design with a counterbalanced order. Nine healthy, right-handed children were scanned with a Siemens MAGNETOM Trio 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner while they performed a working memory task (N-back task), following a baseline session and a 30-min, moderate-intensity exercise session. Compared with the baseline session, acute moderate-intensity aerobic exercise benefitted performance in the N-back task, increasing brain activities of bilateral parietal cortices, left hippocampus, and the bilateral cerebellum. These data extend the current knowledge by indicating that acute aerobic exercise enhances children's working memory, and the neural basis may be related to changes in the working memory's brain activation patterns elicited by acute aerobic exercise.

  3. [Amyloid beta-related angiitis: brain lesions showing leptomeningeal gadolinium enhancement on MRI and characteristic surgical pathologic features].

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuka; Ouchi, Haruka; Sato, Tomoe; Shimbo, Junsuke; Sato, Aki; Sasaki, Osamu; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Igarashi, Shuichi

    2013-06-01

    Amyloid-β-related angiitis (ABRA) of the CNS occurs in association with vasculitis of small-and medium-sized leptomeningeal arteries. Here, we describe the clinicopathological features of a 76-year-old man with ABRA. The patient suffered progressive truncal oscillation, aphasia, and recent memory disturbance with a subacute disease onset. His cerebrospinal fluid showed a mild increase in protein levels (101 mg/dL) and pleocytosis (8/mm(3)). High-intensity brain lesion were detected on T(2)-weighted and FLAIR MRI scans, and prominent spread of gadolinium enhancement spreading was observed through the sulci of the left occipital and temporal lobes and left cerebellar hemisphere. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed a granulomatous and angiodestructive inflammation with infiltration of many CD4(+) T-lymphocytes and multinucleated giant cells and with fibrinoid necrosis of the arterial walls in the subarachnoid space. Immunolabeling for Aβ(1-40) revealed the abundant deposition of this protein in the affected arteries. On the basic of the diagnosis of ABRA, immunosuppressive therapy was conducted, and it ameliorated the clinical course.

  4. Towards magnetic-enhanced cellular uptake, MRI and chemotherapeutics delivery by magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-10-01

    A type of nanoparticle with three functional modalities was prepared with the aim of providing a multifunctional drug delivery system. The nanoparticle was 50 nm in size, with 2.7 nm mesopores and a magnetic nanocrystal core, which was further doped with FITC to enable the tracking of cellular uptake. We demonstrated that the internalization of the nanoparticles in tumor cells could be enhanced by applying an external magnetic field and furthermore, this kind of nanoparticle could be used in magnetic targeted drug delivery. With high transverse relaxivity, the magnetic nanoparticles shortened proton relaxation time and induced high magnetic resonance imaging contrast in tumor cells. Studies on anticancer drug loading and delivery capacity of anticancer drugs also showed that this type of nanoparticles could load water-soluble doxorubicin, and produce a prominent inhibitive effect against tumor cells. Taken together, the presented nanoparticles could become a promising agent in cancer theranostics.

  5. In vivo Imaging of Optic Nerve Fiber Integrity by Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Witte, Otto W.; Weih, Falk; Kretz, Alexandra; Haenold, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    The rodent visual system encompasses retinal ganglion cells and their axons that form the optic nerve to enter thalamic and midbrain centers, and postsynaptic projections to the visual cortex. Based on its distinct anatomical structure and convenient accessibility, it has become the favored structure for studies on neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. Recent advancements in MR imaging have enabled the in vivo visualization of the retino-tectal part of this projection using manganese mediated contrast enhancement (MEMRI). Here, we present a MEMRI protocol for illustration of the visual projection in mice, by which resolutions of (200 µm)3 can be achieved using common 3 Tesla scanners. We demonstrate how intravitreal injection of a single dosage of 15 nmol MnCl2 leads to a saturated enhancement of the intact projection within 24 hr. With exception of the retina, changes in signal intensity are independent of coincided visual stimulation or physiological aging. We further apply this technique to longitudinally monitor axonal degeneration in response to acute optic nerve injury, a paradigm by which Mn2+ transport completely arrests at the lesion site. Conversely, active Mn2+ transport is quantitatively proportionate to the viability, number, and electrical activity of axon fibers. For such an analysis, we exemplify Mn2+ transport kinetics along the visual path in a transgenic mouse model (NF-κB p50KO) displaying spontaneous atrophy of sensory, including visual, projections. In these mice, MEMRI indicates reduced but not delayed Mn2+ transport as compared to wild type mice, thus revealing signs of structural and/or functional impairments by NF-κB mutations. In summary, MEMRI conveniently bridges in vivo assays and post mortem histology for the characterization of nerve fiber integrity and activity. It is highly useful for longitudinal studies on axonal degeneration and regeneration, and investigations of mutant mice for genuine or

  6. Differentiation of pancreatic carcinoma and mass-forming focal pancreatitis: qualitative and quantitative assessment by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI combined with diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Li; Liu, Huan-huan; Zhang, Cai-yuan; Li, Xiao-ming; Lu, Jian-ping; Wang, Deng-bin

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between pancreatic carcinoma (PC) and mass-forming focal pancreatitis (FP) is invariably difficult. For the differential diagnosis, we qualitatively and quantitatively assessed the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in PC and FP in the present study. This study included 32 PC and 18 FP patients with histological confirmation who underwent DCE-MRI and DWI. The time-signal intensity curve (TIC) of PC and FP were classified into 5 types according to the time of reaching the peak, namely, type I, II, III, IV, and V, respectively, and two subtypes, namely, subtype-a (washout type) and subtype-b (plateau type) according to the part of the TIC profile after the peak. Moreover, the mean and relative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value between PC and FP on DWI were compared. The type V TIC was only recognized in PC group (P < 0.01). Type IV b were more frequently observed in PC (P = 0.036), while type- IIa (P < 0.01), type- Ia (P = 0.037) in FP. We also found a significant difference in the mean and relative ADC value between PC and FP. The combined image set of DCE-MRI and DWI yielded an excellent sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy (96.9%, 94.4%, and 96.0%). The TIC of DCE-MRI and ADC value of DWI for pancreatic mass were found to provide reliable information in differentiating PC from FP, and the combination of DCE-MRI and DWI can achieve a higher sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27661003

  7. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and R2* values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher R2* and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in R2* and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2–8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced R2* and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies. PMID:26661253

  8. Quantitative assessment of microvasculopathy in arcAβ mice with USPIO-enhanced gradient echo MRI.

    PubMed

    Klohs, Jan; Deistung, Andreas; Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Seuwen, Aline; Kindler, Diana; Schweser, Ferdinand; Vaas, Markus; Kipar, Anja; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Rudin, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging employing administration of iron oxide-based contrast agents is widely used to visualize cellular and molecular processes in vivo. In this study, we investigated the ability of [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping to quantitatively assess the accumulation of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Gradient-echo data of mouse brains were acquired at 9.4 T after injection of USPIO. Focal areas with increased magnetic susceptibility and [Formula: see text] values were discernible across several brain regions in 12-month-old arcAβ compared to 6-month-old arcAβ mice and to non-transgenic littermates, indicating accumulation of particles after USPIO injection. This was concomitant with higher [Formula: see text] and increased magnetic susceptibility differences relative to cerebrospinal fluid measured in USPIO-injected compared to non-USPIO-injected 12-month-old arcAβ mice. No differences in [Formula: see text] and magnetic susceptibility were detected in USPIO-injected compared to non-injected 12-month-old non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis confirmed focal uptake of USPIO particles in perivascular macrophages adjacent to small caliber cerebral vessels with radii of 2-8 µm that showed no cerebral amyloid angiopathy. USPIO-enhanced [Formula: see text] and quantitative susceptibility mapping constitute quantitative tools to monitor such functional microvasculopathies.

  9. [Studies of three-dimensional cardiac late gadolinium enhancement MRI at 3.0 Tesla].

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masaru; Ikeda, Takayuki; Kawakami, Momoe

    2008-12-20

    Cardiac late Gadolinium enhancement MR imaging has been shown to allow assessment of myocardial viability in patients with ischemic heart disease. The current standard approach is a 3D inversion recovery sequence at 1.5 Tesla. The aims of this study were to evaluate the technique feasibility and clinical utility of MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla in patients with myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy. In phantom and volunteer studies, the inversion time required to suppress the signal of interests and tissues was prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. In the clinical study, the average inversion time to suppress the signal of myocardium at 3.0 Tesla with respect to MR viability imaging at 1.5 Tesla was at 15 min after the administration of contrast agent (304.0+/-29.2 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 283.9+/-20.9 at 1.5 Tesla). The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium was equal at both field strengths (4.06+/-1.30 at 3.0 Tesla vs. 4.42+/-1.85 at 1.5 Tesla). Even at this early stage, MR viability imaging at 3.0 Tesla provides high quality images in patients with myocardial infarction. The inversion time is significantly prolonged at 3.0 Tesla. The contrast between infarction and viable myocardium at 3.0 Tesla are equal to 1.5 Tesla. Further investigation is needed for this technical improvement, for clinical evaluation, and for limitations.

  10. Breast MRI fibroglandular volume and parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Michael J; Domchek, Susan M; Kontos, Despina; Conant, Emily; Chen, Jinbo; Weinstein, Susan

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to assess the difference in fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers on contrast-enhanced breast MRI (CE-MRI) performed before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). MATERIALS AND METHODS. We retrospectively compared fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in 55 female BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and after RRSO using standard BI-RADS categories and a paired Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U test. A two-sample Wilcoxon test was performed to compare fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in women with and without subsequent breast cancer diagnosis on follow-up. RESULTS. The median time to post-RRSO CE-MRI was 8 months (range, 1-40 months). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO (p = 0.65). The mean background parenchymal enhancement was 2.5 (range, 1-4) before and 1.5 (range, 1-4) after RRSO (overall range, -2.5 to 1.5; p = 0.0001). Breast cancer was detected in nine women at a median time of 4.8 years (range, 1.8-13.3 years) after RRSO. For women who received a diagnosis of breast cancer after RRSO compared with those who did not, mean background parenchymal enhancement before RRSO was 3 (range, 2-4) versus 2.5 (range, 1-4; p = 0.001), and mean background parenchymal enhancement after RRSO was 2.5 (range, 1.5-4) versus 1.5 (range 2-4; p = 0.0018). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO. CONCLUSION. In BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we observed a significant reduction in background parenchymal enhancement on the first CE-MRI after RRSO and no significant change in fibroglandular volume. Higher background parenchymal enhancement before and after RRSO was observed in women who subsequently received a diagnosis of breast cancer. This suggests that background parenchymal enhancement, rather than fibro-glandular volume, may be a

  11. A Feasibility Study to Determine whether Clinical Contrast-Enhanced MRI can Detect Increased Bladder Permeability in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Rheal A.; Wisniewski, Amy B.; Wu, Dee H.; Van Gordon, Samuel B.; Smith, Nataliya; North, Justin C.; McElhaney, Rayburt; Aston, Christopher E.; Shobeiri, S. Abbas; Kropp, Bradley P.; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Hurst, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a bladder pain disorder associated with voiding symptomatology and other systemic chronic pain disorders. Currently diagnosis of IC/BPS is complicated, as patients present with wide ranges of symptoms, physical examination findings, and clinical test responses. One hypothesis is that IC symptoms arise from increased bladder permeability to urine solutes. This study established the feasibility of using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to quantify bladder permeability in IC patients. Materials and Methods Permeability alterations in bladder urothelium were assessed with intravesical administration of a MRI contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) in a small cohort of patients. MRI signal intensities (SI) in IC patient and control bladders were compared regionally and for entire bladders. Results Quantitative assessment of MRI SI indicated a significant increase in SI within anterior bladder regions (p<0.01) compared to posterior regions in IC patients, and significant increases in SI within anterior bladder regions (p<0.001) and kurtosis (descriptor of shape of probability distribution) and skewness (measure of asymmetry of probability distribution) associated with contrast enhancement in total bladders (p<0.05) for IC patients compared to controls. Regarding symptomatology, IC cases differed significantly from controls for the SF-36, PPUF and ICPI questionnaires with no overlap in range of scores for each group, and were significantly different for ICSI but with a slight overlap in range of scores. Conclusions The data suggests that CE-MRI provides an objective, quantifiable measurement of bladder permeability that could be used to stratify bladder pain patients and monitor therapy. PMID:26307161

  12. Longitudinal Assessments of Normal and Perilesional Tissues in Focal Brain Ischemia and Partial Optic Nerve Injury with Manganese-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kevin C.; Zhou, Iris Y.; Liu, Stanley S.; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Fan, Shu-Juan; Hung, Victor K.; Chung, Sookja K.; Wu, Wu-tian; So, Kwok-fai; Wu, Ed X.

    2017-01-01

    Although manganese (Mn) can enhance brain tissues for improving magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments, the underlying neural mechanisms of Mn detection remain unclear. In this study, we used Mn-enhanced MRI to test the hypothesis that different Mn entry routes and spatiotemporal Mn distributions can reflect different mechanisms of neural circuitry and neurodegeneration in normal and injured brains. Upon systemic administration, exogenous Mn exhibited varying transport rates and continuous redistribution across healthy rodent brain nuclei over a 2-week timeframe, whereas in rodents following photothrombotic cortical injury, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, or neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, Mn preferentially accumulated in perilesional tissues expressing gliosis or oxidative stress within days. Intravitreal Mn administration to healthy rodents not only allowed tracing of primary visual pathways, but also enhanced the hippocampus and medial amygdala within a day, whereas partial transection of the optic nerve led to MRI detection of degrading anterograde Mn transport at the primary injury site and the perilesional tissues secondarily over 6 weeks. Taken together, our results indicate the different Mn transport dynamics across widespread projections in normal and diseased brains. Particularly, perilesional brain tissues may attract abnormal Mn accumulation and gradually reduce anterograde Mn transport via specific Mn entry routes. PMID:28230106

  13. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Gd-albumin Delivery to the Rat Hippocampus In Vivo by Convection-Enhanced Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Astary, Garrett W.; Nobrega, Tatiana L.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Carney, Paul R.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2013-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) shows promise in treating neurological diseases due to its ability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deliver therapeutics directly to the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a drug delivery method may be useful in treating CNS disorders involving the hippocampus such temporal lobe epilepsy and gliomas; however, the influence of anatomical structures on infusate distribution is not fully understood. As a surrogate for therapeutic agents, we used gadolinium-labeled-albumin (Gd-albumin) tagged with Evans blue dye to observe the time dependence of CED infusate distributions into the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). For finer anatomical detail, final distribution volumes (Vd) of the infusate were observed with high-resolution T1-weighted MR imaging and light microscopy of fixed brain sections. Dynamic images demonstrated that Gd-albumin preferentially distributed within the hippocampus along neuroanatomical structures with less fluid resistance and less penetration was observed in dense cell layers. Furthermore, significant leakage into adjacent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces such as the hippocampal fissure, velum interpositum and midbrain cistern occurred toward the end of infusion. Vd increased linearly with infusion volume (Vi) at a mean Vd/Vi ratio of 5.51 ± 0.55 for the dorsal hippocampus infusion and 5.30 ± 0.83 for the ventral hippocampus infusion. This study demonstrated the significant effects of tissue structure and CSF space boundaries on infusate distribution during CED. PMID:22687936

  14. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  15. Tracer kinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and CT bladder cancer data: A preliminary comparison to assess the magnitude of water exchange effects.

    PubMed

    Bains, Lauren J; McGrath, Deirdre M; Naish, Josephine H; Cheung, Susan; Watson, Yvonne; Taylor, M Ben; Logue, John P; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Waterton, John C; Buckley, David L

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of water exchange on tracer kinetic parameter estimates derived from T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data using a direct quantitative comparison with DCE-CT. Data were acquired from 12 patients with bladder cancer who underwent DCE-CT followed by DCE-MRI within a week. A two-compartment tracer kinetic model was fitted to the CT data, and two versions of the same model with modifications to account for the fast exchange and no exchange limits of water exchange were fitted to the MR data. The two-compartment tracer kinetic model provided estimates of the fractional plasma volume (v(p)), the extravascular extracellular space fraction (v(e)), plasma perfusion (F(p)), and the microvascular permeability surface area product. Our findings suggest that DCE-CT is an appropriate reference for DCE-MRI in bladder cancers as the only significant difference found between CT and MR parameter estimates were the no exchange limit estimates of v(p) (P = 0.002). These results suggest that although water exchange between the intracellular and extravascular-extracellular space has a negligible effect on DCE-MRI, vascular-extravascular-extracellular space water exchange may be more important.

  16. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, L. B.; Trandafir, D. L.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-11-01

    The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, 29Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T1 and RARE-T2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  17. Cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats correlates with nucleus accumbens activity on manganese-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Desai, Kirtan; Kohler, Robert J; Eapen, Ajay T; Lisieski, Michael J; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Bosse, Kelly E; Conti, Alana C; Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    A long-standing goal of substance abuse research has been to link drug-induced behavioral outcomes with the activity of specific brain regions to understand the neurobiology of addiction behaviors and to search for drug-able targets. Here, we tested the hypothesis that cocaine produces locomotor (behavioral) sensitization that correlates with increased calcium channel-mediated neuroactivity in brain regions linked with drug addiction, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAC), anterior striatum (AST) and hippocampus, as measured using manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Rats were treated with cocaine for 5 days, followed by a 2-day drug-free period. The following day, locomotor sensitization was quantified as a metric of cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in the presence of manganese. Immediately following behavioral testing, rats were examined for changes in calcium channel-mediated neuronal activity in the NAC, AST, hippocampus and temporalis muscle, which was associated with behavioral sensitization using MEMRI. Cocaine significantly increased locomotor activity and produced behavioral sensitization compared with saline treatment of control rats. A significant increase in MEMRI signal intensity was determined in the NAC, but not AST or hippocampus, of cocaine-treated rats compared with saline-treated control rats. Cocaine did not increase signal intensity in the temporalis muscle. Notably, in support of our hypothesis, behavior was significantly and positively correlated with MEMRI signal intensity in the NAC. As neuronal uptake of manganese is regulated by calcium channels, these results indicate that MEMRI is a powerful research tool to study neuronal activity in freely behaving animals and to guide new calcium channel-based therapies for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence.

  18. The Tofts model in frequency domain: fast and robust determination of pharmacokinetic maps for dynamic contrast enhancement MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajuvalli, Nithin N.; Chikkemenahally, Dharmendra Kumar K.; Nayak, Krupa N.; Bhosale, Manoj G.; Geethanath, Sairam

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a well-established method for non-invasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of pathologies through administration of intravenous contrast agent. Quantification of pharmacokinetic (PK) maps can be achieved through application of compartmental models relevant to the pathophysiology of the tissue under interrogation. The determination of PK parameters involves fitting of time-concentration data to these models. In this work, the Tofts model in frequency domain (TM-FD) is applied to a weakly vascularized tissue such as the breast. It is derived as a convolution-free model from the conventional Tofts model in the time domain (TM-TD). This reduces the dimensionality of the curve-fitting problem from two to one. The approaches of TM-FD and TM-TD were applied to two kinds of in silico phantoms and six in vivo breast DCE data sets with and without the addition of noise. The results showed that computational time taken to estimate PK maps using TM-FD was 16-25% less than with TM-TD. Normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) calculation and Pearson correlation analyses were performed to validate robustness and accuracy of the TM-FD and TM-TD approaches. These compared with ground truth values in the case of phantom studies for four different temporal resolutions. Results showed that NRMSE values for TM-FD were significantly lower than those of TM-TD as validated by a paired t-test along with reduced computational time. This approach therefore enables online evaluation of PK maps by radiologists in a clinical setting, aiding in the evaluation of 3D and/or increased coverage of the tissue of interest.

  19. Quantitative Perfusion Analysis of First-Pass Contrast Enhancement Kinetics: Application to MRI of Myocardial Perfusion in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Storey, Pippa; Iqbal, Sohah; Slater, James; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perfusion analysis from first-pass contrast enhancement kinetics requires modeling tissue contrast exchange. This study presents a new approach for numerical implementation of the tissue homogeneity model, incorporating flexible distance steps along the capillary (NTHf). Methods The proposed NTHf model considers contrast exchange in fluid packets flowing along the capillary, incorporating flexible distance steps, thus allowing more efficient and stable calculations of the transit of tracer through the tissue. We prospectively studied 8 patients (62 ± 13 years old) with suspected CAD, who underwent first-pass perfusion CMR imaging at rest and stress prior to angiography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) were estimated using both the NTHf and the conventional adiabatic approximation of the TH models. Coronary artery lesions detected at angiography were clinically assigned to one of three categories of stenosis severity (‘insignificant’, ‘mild to moderate’ and ‘severe’) and related to corresponding myocardial territories. Results The mean MBF (ml/g/min) at rest/stress and MPRI were 0.80 ± 0.33/1.25 ± 0.45 and 1.68 ± 0.54 in the insignificant regions, 0.74 ± 0.21/1.09 ± 0.28 and 1.54 ± 0.46 in the mild to moderate regions, and 0.79 ± 0.28/0.63 ± 0.34 and 0.85 ± 0.48 in the severe regions, respectively. The correlation coefficients of MBFs at rest/stress and MPRI between the NTHf and AATH models were r = 0.97/0.93 and r = 0.91, respectively. Conclusions The proposed NTHf model allows efficient quantitative analysis of the transit of tracer through tissue, particularly at higher flow. Results of initial application to MRI of myocardial perfusion in CAD are encouraging. PMID:27583385

  20. Use of preoperative FLAIR MRI and ependymal proximity of tumor enhancement as surrogate markers of brain tumor origin.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Abecassis, Josh; Das, Sunit; Chandler, James P

    2015-09-01

    Neural stem cells proliferate in the subventricular zone and give rise to progeny that differentiate and migrate throughout the brain. We aimed to test the hypothesis that glioma behavior and grade may correlate with the identity of the tumor cell of origin. We evaluated three preoperative radiographic features (fluid attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR] MRI characteristics, tumor proximity to ventricular ependyma, and subependymal representation) as surrogate markers of tumor origin using a retrospective cohort design. The medical records of 228 patients who underwent surgical resection of a glioma from January 2004 to August 2008 were reviewed. Average patient age was 54.5 years (standard deviation [SD] 15.3) with a male predominance (62.9%). World Health Organization glioma grades amongst the cohort were Grade IV (71.6%), Grade III (21.3%) and Grade II (7.1%). Mean survival was 11.2 months (SD 10.5) with a mean follow up of 12.8 months (SD 11.3). Glioma tumor grade was significantly correlated to FLAIR signal proximity to the ependymal surface (p<0.01) and inversely with proximity of tumor mass to the ependyma (p<0.01). The mean distance of tumor-associated FLAIR signal from the ependymal surface for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was 1.2mm (SD 3.3) compared to 4.8 (SD 6.5) for anaplastic astrocytomas and 6.6mm (SD 6.7; p<0.01) for low grade gliomas. Conversely, the mean distance of the enhancing tumor mass from the ependyma for GBM was 7.3mm (SD 9.4), Grade III glioma 2.3mm (SD 4.9), and Grade II glioma 3.8mm (SD 6.8; p<0.05). These findings suggest that higher grade gliomas might arise from less differentiated neuroepithelial cells in the subventricular zone that possess greater migratory potential.

  1. rf enhancement and shielding in MRI caused by conductive implants: dependence on electrical parameters for a tube model.

    PubMed

    Graf, Hansjörg; Steidle, Günter; Lauer, Ulrike A; Schick, Fritz

    2005-02-01

    Radio frequency (rf) eddy-currents induced in implants made of conductive material might cause significant image artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) such as shielding of the lumen of vascular stents. rf alteration near metal parts was assessed theoretically in the approximation of alternating current electrodynamics: The implant was modeled as tube with diameter d(o), resistance R, and reactance Y, constituting the secondary winding of a transformer. The transmitter coil of the scanner acted as primary winding and generated the linearly polarized rf field B1,app. Tube axis was assumed parallel to B1,app. The results of the calculations were as follows: Ninety percent of the applied rf-field amplitude is reached in the lumen at a ratio chi=R/Y approximately 2. A rapid drop occurs with the reduction of chi, whereas a further increase of chi causes only a small effect. With chi approximately 1/d(o)(Y approximately d2o,R approximately d(o)), conditions for rf alteration clearly depend on the diameter of the tube. Inside tubes with smaller diameter, rf shielding is less pronounced. rf alteration increases in good approximation with the square root of the strength of the static field B0. The following experiments were carried out: Tubes of similar diameter (d(o) approximately 8 mm) made of material of different conductivity (Cu, Nitinol, carbon fiber reinforced plastic with three different fiber structures) were examined at B0=0.2 and 1.5 T in water phantoms. Tube axis was aligned perpendicular to B0 and spin-echo technique was applied. Local rf enhancement near the outer surface of the metal tubes was detected applying manual reduction of the transmitter amplitude. Shielding inside a carbon fiber tube with d(o) approximately 8 mm and inside a smaller tube with d(o)=3.3 mm was compared. Both tubes showed the same wall structure and thickness (d(w)=0.4 mm). All measurements confirmed the theoretical results. Consequences for the construction of vascular stents

  2. Quantitative assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, without the need for arterial blood signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iguchi, Satoshi; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Shah, Nadim Jon; Yamada, Naoaki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-12-01

    In dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), an arterial input function (AIF) is usually obtained from a time-concentration curve (TCC) of the cerebral artery. This study was aimed at developing an alternative technique for reconstructing AIF from TCCs of multiple brain regions. AIF was formulated by a multi-exponential function using four parameters, and the parameters were determined so that the AIF curves convolved with a model of tissue response reproduced the measured TCCs for 20 regions. Systematic simulations were performed to evaluate the effects of possible error sources. DSC-MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies were performed on 14 patients with major cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were calculated from DSC-MRI data, using our novel method alongside conventional AIF estimations, and compared with those from 15O-PET. Simulations showed that the calculated CBF values were sensitive to variations in the assumptions regarding cerebral blood volume. Nevertheless, AIFs were reasonably reconstructed for all patients. The difference in CBF values between DSC-MRI and PET was -2.2 ± 7.4 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.55, p < 0.01) for our method, versus -0.2 ± 8.2 ml/100 g/min (r = 0.47, p = 0.01) for the conventional method. The difference in the ratio of affected to unaffected hemispheres between DSC-MRI and PET was 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for our method, versus 0.07 ± 0.09 (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) for the conventional method. The contrasts in CBF images from our method were the same as those from the conventional method. These findings suggest the feasibility of assessing CBF without arterial blood signals.

  3. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P.; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F.; Holden, Arun V.; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity. PMID:22021329

  4. Application of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI-based 3D reconstruction of the dural tail sign in meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    You, Binsheng; Cheng, Yanhao; Zhang, Jian; Song, Qimin; Dai, Chao; Heng, Xueyuan; Fei, Chang

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) MRI-based 3D reconstruction of dural tail sign (DTS) in meningioma resection. METHODS Between May 2013 and August 2014, 18 cases of convexity and parasagittal meningiomas showing DTS on contrast-enhanced T1W MRI were selected. Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction of DTS was conducted before surgical treatment. The vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR images and 3D reconstruction images were measured and compared. Surgical incisions were designed by referring to the 3D reconstruction and MR images, and then the efficiency of the 2 methods was evaluated with assistance of neuronavigation. RESULTS Three-dimensional reconstruction of DTS can reveal its overall picture. In most cases, the DTS around the tumor is uneven, whereas the DTS around the dural vessels presents longer extensions. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS measured on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR and 3D reconstruction images. The 3D images of DTS were more intuitive, and the overall picture of DTS could be revealed in 1 image, which made it easier to design the incision than by using the MR images. Meanwhile, assessment showed that the incisions designed using 3D images were more accurate than those designed using MR images (ridit analysis by SAS, F = 7.95; p = 0.008). Pathological examination showed that 34 dural specimens (except 2 specimens from 1 tumor) displayed tumor invasion. The distance of tumor cell invasion was 1.0-21.6 mm (5.4 ± 4.41 mm [mean ± SD]). Tumor cell invasion was not observed at the dural resection margin in all 36 specimens. CONCLUSIONS Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction can intuitively and accurately reveal the size and shape of DTS, and thus provides guidance for designing meningioma incisions.

  5. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  6. The electron-gas pair density and its geminal representation II. The long-range asymptotics of the Kimball-Overhauser geminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, P.

    2005-08-01

    In part I [phys. stat. sol. (b) 241, 3544 (2004)] it has been shown, for the homogeneous electron gas, how the momentum distribution n(k) determines the geminal occupancy (k), which appears in the Kimball-Overhauser partial-wave analysis of the pair density g(r). The Fermi surface singularities of n(k) cause singularities in (k). These singularities determine the large-r asymptotics of the 1-matrix and of the pair density, respectively. Because the pair-density geminals are scattering states, their asymptotic behavior is characterized by phase shifts. Whereas the normalization sum rule of g(r) leads to a Friedel-like phase-shift sum rule [Phys. Rev. B 67, 233102 (2003)], the plasmon sum rule cannot be satisfied by Kimball-Overhauser geminals. Possibilities to cure this failure are discussed.

  7. The Prognostic Value of Enhanced-MRI and Fluoroscopic Factors for Predicting the Effects of Transforaminal Steroid Injections on Lumbosacral Radiating Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive value of enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluoroscopic factors regarding the effects of transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) in low back pain (LBP) patients with lumbosacral radiating pain. Methods A total of 51 patients who had LBP with radiating pain were recruited between January 2011 and December 2012. The patient data were classified into the two groups ‘favorable group’ and ‘non-favorable group’ after 2 weeks of follow-up results. The favorable group was defined as those with a 50%, or more, reduction of pain severity according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) for back or leg pain. The clinical and radiological data were collected for univariate and multivariate analyses to determine the predictors of the effectiveness of TFESIs between the two groups. Results According to the back or the leg favorable-VAS group, the univariate analysis revealed that the corticosteroid approach for the enhanced nerve root, the proportion of the proximal flow, and the contrast dispersion of epidurography are respectively statistically significant relative to the other factors. Lastly, the multiple logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between the corticosteroid approach and the enhanced nerve root in the favorable VAS group. Conclusion Among the variables, MRI showed that the corticosteroid approach for the enhanced target root is the most important prognostic factor in the predicting of the clinical parameters of the favorable TFESIs group. PMID:28119838

  8. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI for evaluation of liver function: Comparison between signal-intensity-based indices and T1 relaxometry

    PubMed Central

    Haimerl, Michael; Verloh, Niklas; Zeman, Florian; Fellner, Claudia; Nickel, Dominik; Lang, Sven A.; Teufel, Andreas; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a paramagnetic hepatobiliary magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Due to its OATP1B1/B3-dependent hepatocyte-specific uptake and paramagnetic properties increasing evidence has emerged to suggest that Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI can be potentially used for evaluation of liver function. In this paper we compare the diagnostic performance of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced relaxometry-based and commonly used signal-intensity (SI)-based indices, including the hepatocellular uptake index (HUI) and SI-based indices corrected by spleen or muscle, for evaluation of liver function, determined using the Indocyanin green clearance (ICG) test. Simple linear regression model showed a significant correlation of the plasma disappearance rate of ICG (ICG-PDR) with all Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI-based liver function indices with a significantly better correlation of relaxometry-based indices on ICG-PDR compared to SI-based indices. Among SI-based indices, HUI achieved best correlation on ICG-PDR and no significant difference of respective correlations on ICG-PDR could be shown. Assessment of liver volume and consecutive evaluation of multiple linear regression model revealed a stronger correlation of ICG-PDR with both (SI)-based and T1 relaxometry-based indices. Thus, liver function can be estimated quantitatively from Gd-EOB-DTPA–enhanced MRI-based indices. Here, indices derived from T1 relaxometry are superior to SI-based indices, and all indices benefit from taking into account respective liver volumes. PMID:28266528

  9. SNR enhancement of highly-accelerated real-time cardiac MRI acquisitions based on non-local means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Naegel, Benoît; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Tognolini, Maurizio; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2009-08-01

    Real-time cardiac MRI appears as a promising technique to evaluate the mechanical function of the heart. However, ultra-fast MRI acquisitions come with an important signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty, which drastically reduces the image quality. Hence, a real-time denoising approach would be desirable for SNR amelioration. In the clinical context of cardiac dysfunction assessment, long acquisitions are required and for most patients the acquisition takes place with free breathing. Hence, it is necessary to compensate respiratory motion in real-time. In this article, a real-time and interactive method for sequential registration and denoising of real-time MR cardiac images is presented. The method has been experimented on 60 fast MRI acquisitions in five healthy volunteers and five patients. These experiments assessed the feasibility of the method in a real-time context.

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarization properties of nitroxyl radical in high viscous liquid using Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumara Dhas, M.; Utsumi, Hideo; Jawahar, A.; Milton Franklin Benial, A.

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) studies were carried out for 15N labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities (1.8 cP, 7 cP and 14 cP). The dependence of DNP parameters was demonstrated over a range of agent concentration, viscosities, RF power levels and ESR irradiation time. DNP spectra were also recorded for 2 mM concentration of 15N labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities. The DNP factors were measured as a function of ESR irradiation time, which increases linearly up to 2 mM agent concentration in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities. The DNP factor started declining in the higher concentration region (∼3 mM), which is due to the ESR line width broadening. The water proton spin-lattice relaxation time was measured at very low Zeeman field (14.529 mT). The increased DNP factor (35%) was observed for solvent 2 (η = 1.8 cP) compared with solvent 1 (η = 1 cP). The increase in the DNP factor was brought about by the shortening of water proton spin-lattice relaxation time of solvent 2. The decreased DNP factors (30% and 53%) were observed for solvent 3 (η = 7 cP) and solvent 4 (η = 14 cP) compared with solvent 2, which is mainly due to the low value of coupling parameter in high viscous liquid samples. The longitudinal relaxivity, leakage factor and coupling parameter were estimated. The coupling parameter values reveal that the dipolar interaction as the major mechanism. The longitudinal relaxivity increases with the increasing viscosity of pure water/glycerol mixtures. The leakage factor showed an asymptotic increase with the increasing agent concentration. It is envisaged that the results reported here may provide guidelines for the design of new viscosity prone nitroxyl radicals, suited to the biological applications of DNP.

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization properties of nitroxyl radical in high viscous liquid using Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI).

    PubMed

    Kumara Dhas, M; Utsumi, Hideo; Jawahar, A; Milton Franklin Benial, A

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) studies were carried out for (15)N labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities (1.8cP, 7cP and 14cP). The dependence of DNP parameters was demonstrated over a range of agent concentration, viscosities, RF power levels and ESR irradiation time. DNP spectra were also recorded for 2mM concentration of (15)N labeled carbamoyl-PROXYL in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities. The DNP factors were measured as a function of ESR irradiation time, which increases linearly up to 2mM agent concentration in pure water and pure water/glycerol mixtures of different viscosities. The DNP factor started declining in the higher concentration region (∼3mM), which is due to the ESR line width broadening. The water proton spin-lattice relaxation time was measured at very low Zeeman field (14.529mT). The increased DNP factor (35%) was observed for solvent 2 (η=1.8cP) compared with solvent 1 (η=1cP). The increase in the DNP factor was brought about by the shortening of water proton spin-lattice relaxation time of solvent 2. The decreased DNP factors (30% and 53%) were observed for solvent 3 (η=7cP) and solvent 4 (η=14cP) compared with solvent 2, which is mainly due to the low value of coupling parameter in high viscous liquid samples. The longitudinal relaxivity, leakage factor and coupling parameter were estimated. The coupling parameter values reveal that the dipolar interaction as the major mechanism. The longitudinal relaxivity increases with the increasing viscosity of pure water/glycerol mixtures. The leakage factor showed an asymptotic increase with the increasing agent concentration. It is envisaged that the results reported here may provide guidelines for the design of new viscosity prone nitroxyl radicals, suited to the biological applications of DNP.

  12. Nuclear Overhauser effect studies on the conformation of magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate bound to rabbit muscle creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rosevear, P.R.; Powers, V.M.; Dowhan, D.; Mildvan, A.S.; Kenyon, G.L.

    1987-08-25

    Nuclear Overhauser effects were used to determine interproton distances on MgATP bound to rabbit muscle creatine kinase. The internuclear distances were used in a distance geometry program that objectively determines both the conformation of the bound MgATP and its uniqueness. Two classes of structures were found that satisfied the measured interproton distances. Both classes had the same anti glycosidic torsional angle (X = 78 +/- 10/sup 0/) but differed in their ribose ring puckers (O1'-endo or C4'-exo). The uniqueness of the glycosidic torsional angle is consistent with the preference of creatine kinase for adenine nucleotides. One of these conformations of MgATP bound to creatine kinase is indistinguishable from the conformation found for Co(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/ ATP bound to the catalytic subunit of protein kinase, which also has a high specificity for adenine nucleotides. Distance geometry calculations also suggest that upper limit distances, when low enough (less than or equal to 3.4 A), can be used instead of measured distances to define, within experimental error, the glycosidic torsional angle of bound nucleotides. However, this approach does not permit an evaluation of the ribose ring pucker.

  13. A nuclear Overhauser effect investigation of the molecular and electronic structure of the heme crevice in lactoperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Thanabal, V.; La Mar, G.N. )

    1989-08-22

    The proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser effect, NOE, in conjunction with paramagnetic-induced dipolar relaxation, is utilized to assign resonances and to probe the molecular and electronic structures of the heme cavity in the low-spin cyanide complex of resting-state bovine lactoperoxidase, LPO-CN. Predominantly primary NOEs were detected in spite of the large molecular weight of the enzyme, which demonstrates again the advantage of paramagnetism suppressing spin diffusion in large proteins. Both of the nonlabile ring protons of a coordinated histidine are located at resonance positions consistent with a deprotonated imidazole. Several methylene proton pairs are identified, of which the most strongly hyperfine-shifted pair is assigned to the unusual chemically functionalized 8-(mercaptomethylene) group of the prosthetic group. The large 8-(mercaptomethylene) proton contact shifts relative to that of the only resolved heme methyl signal are rationalized by the additive perturbations on the rhombic asymmetry of the functionalization of the 8-position and the alignment of the axial histidyl imidazole projection along a vector passing through pyrrole A and C of the prosthetic group. Such a stereochemistry is consistent with the resolution of only a single heme methyl group, 3-CH{sub 3}, as observed. A pair of hyperfine-shifted methylene protons, as well as a low-field hyperfine-shifted labile proton signal, exhibit dipolar connectivities similar to those previously reported for the distal arginine and histidine, respectively, of horseradish peroxidase suggesting that these catalytically relevant residues may also exist in LPO.

  14. Singular spectrum analysis and adaptive filtering enhance the functional connectivity analysis of resting state fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Piaggi, Paolo; Menicucci, Danilo; Gentili, Claudio; Handjaras, Giacomo; Gemignani, Angelo; Landi, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Sources of noise in resting-state fMRI experiments include instrumental and physiological noises, which need to be filtered before a functional connectivity analysis of brain regions is performed. These noisy components show autocorrelated and nonstationary properties that limit the efficacy of standard techniques (i.e. time filtering and general linear model). Herein we describe a novel approach based on the combination of singular spectrum analysis and adaptive filtering, which allows a greater noise reduction and yields better connectivity estimates between regions at rest, providing a new feasible procedure to analyze fMRI data.

  15. Relationships Between MRI Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) Lexicon Descriptors and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Internal Enhancement is Associated with Luminal B Subtype.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Lars J; Zhang, Jing; Baker, Jay A; Soo, Mary S; Johnson, Karen S; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this study was to determine the associations between breast MRI findings using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon descriptors and breast cancer molecular subtypes. In this retrospective, IRB-approved, single institution study MRIs from 278 women with breast cancer were reviewed by one of six fellowship-trained breast imagers. Readers reported BI-RADS descriptors for breast masses (shape, margin, internal enhancement) and non-mass enhancement (distribution, internal enhancement). Pathology reports were reviewed for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Surrogates were used to categorize tumors by molecular subtype: ER/PR+, HER2- (luminal A); ER/PR+, HER2+ (luminal B); ER/PR-, HER2+ (HER2); ER/PR/HER2- (basal). A univariate logistic regression model was developed to identify associations between BI-RADS descriptors and molecular subtypes. Internal enhancement for mass and non-mass enhancement was combined for analysis. There was an association between mass shape and basal subtype (p = 0.039), which was more frequently round (17.1%) than other subtypes (range: 0-8.3%). In addition, there was an association between mass margin and HER2 subtype (p = 0.040), as HER2 cancers more frequently had a smooth margin (33.3%) than other subtypes (range: 4.2-17.1%). Finally, there was an association between internal enhancement and luminal B subtype (p = 0.003), with no cases of luminal B cancer demonstrating homogeneous internal enhancement versus a range of 10.9-23.5% for other subtypes. There are associations between breast cancer molecular subtypes and lesion appearance on MRI using the BI-RADS lexicon.

  16. The role of Gd-enhanced three-dimensional MRI fast low-angle shot (FLASH) in the evaluation of symptomatic lumbosacral nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, I; Sugimoto, H; Saita, K; Ookami, H; Nakama, S; Hoshino, Y

    2001-01-01

    In the field of lumbar spine disorders, three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can clearly depict a lumbar nerve root from the distal region to the dorsal root ganglion. In this study, we used a gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced-three-dimensional (3-D) fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence when examining lumbosacral disorders. The subjects were 33 patients (14 men and 19 women) in whom lumbosacral neural compression had been diagnosed clinically. Twenty-one patients had lumbar disc herniation, 11 had lumbar spinal stenosis, and 1 had lumbar radiculopathy caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Five subjects with low back pain were also studied as a control group. In all patients and in all 5 of the controls, the dorsal root ganglion of every root was enhanced clearly. There was no root enhancement in the 5 controls. Enhancement of the symptomatic nerve roots, caused by compression, was found in 11 of the 33 patients. All 11 patients had radiculopathy, and muscle weakness was more frequent in patients with enhanced nerve roots than in those without enhancement. There was no enhancement of the cauda equina, even in the patients with cauda syndrome. The enhancement effect may reflect some pathological condition of the compressed nerve root and needs to be studied further.

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. Material/Methods A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. Conclusions All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the

  18. Value of intravoxel incoherent motion and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for predicting the early and short-term responses to chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Yu, Xiaoping; Hu, Yin; Li, Feiping; Xiang, Wang; Wang, Lanlan; Wang, Hui; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhongping; Zeng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the value of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (IVIM-DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in predicting the early and short-term responses to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty-three NPC patients underwent IVIM-DWI and DCE-MRI at baseline (pretreatment) and after the first cycle of induction chemotherapy (posttreatment). Based on whether locoregional lesions were identified, patients were divided into the residual and nonresidual groups at the end of CRT and into the good-responder and poor-responder groups 6 months after the end of CRT. The pretreatment and posttreatment IVIM-DWI parameters (ADC, D, D∗, and f) and DCE-MRI parameters (Ktrans, Kep, and Ve) values and their percentage changes (Δ%) were compared between the residual and nonresidual groups and between the good-responder and poor-responder groups. None of perfusion-related parametric values derived from either DCE-MRI or IVIM-DWI showed significant differences either between the residual and nonresidual groups or between the good-responder and poor-responder groups. The nonresidual group exhibited lower pre-ADC, lower pre-D, and higher Δ%D values than did the residual group (all P <0.05). The good-responder group had lower pre-D and pre-ADC values than did the poor-responder group (both P <0.05). Based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, pre-D had the highest area under the curve in predicting both the early and short-term responses to CRT for NPC patients (0.817 and 0.854, respectively). IVIM-DWI is more valuable than DCE-MRI in predicting the early and short-term response to CRT for NPC, and furthermore diffusion-related IVIM-DWI parameters (pre-ADC, pre-D, and Δ%D) are more powerful than perfusion-related parameters derived from both IVIM-DWI and DCE-MRI. PMID:27583847

  19. Evaluation of myocardial viability in old myocardial infarcted patients with CHF: delayed enhancement MRI vs. low-dose dobutamine stress speckle tracking echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaofan; Han, Shuguang; Xu, Tongda; Wang, Fengli; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Jing; Hu, Chunfeng; Li, Dongye

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the significance of delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) combined with two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) and low dose dobutamine stress echocardiography (LDDSE) to assess viable myocardium (VM) in the patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI) associated with congestive heart failure (CHF). Thirty five hospitalized OMI patients with regional wall motion abnormalities and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < 50% were recruited based on routine echocardiography. The results showed that DE-MRI facilitated the detection of VM, with a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 92.41%, 89.19% and 91.32%, respectively. In a parallel test of the two main parameters in STE, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were improved from baseline to LDDSE (71.72% vs. 91.72%, 70.27% vs. 85.14%, and 71.23% vs. 89.50%, P < 0.05). A parallel test involving STE with LDDSE showed high sensitivity for VM. However its specificity and accuracy were lower than DE-MRI, even when combined with LDDSE. Therefore, combining these two methods, improves the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for assessment of VM. The combination approach is the best option for the evaluation of VM using serial test. It provides further treatment options and prognosis of patients with OMI. LVEF is improved significantly after PCI in OMI patients with VM and CHF. PMID:27725854

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in the Study of Brain Tumors. Comparison Between the Extended Tofts-Kety Model and a Phenomenological Universalities (PUN) Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Roccatagliata, Luca

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a well-established technique for studying blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability that allows measurements to be made for a wide range of brain pathologies, including multiple sclerosis and brain tumors (BT). This latter application is particularly interesting, because high-grade gliomas are characterized by increased microvascular permeability and a loss of BBB function due to the structural abnormalities of the endothelial layer. In this study, we compared the extended Tofts-Kety (ETK) model and an extended derivate class from phenomenological universalities called EU1 in 30 adult patients with different BT grades. A total of 75 regions of interest were manually drawn on the MRI and subsequently analyzed using the ETK and EU1 algorithms. Significant linear correlations were found among the parameters obtained by these two algorithms. The means of R (2) obtained using ETK and EU1 models for high-grade tumors were 0.81 and 0.91, while those for low-grade tumors were 0.82 and 0.85, respectively; therefore, these two models are equivalent. In conclusion, we can confirm that the application of the EU1 model to the DCE-MRI experimental data might be a useful alternative to pharmacokinetic models in the study of BT, because the analytic results can be generated more quickly and easily than with the ETK model.

  1. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  2. Motion-compensated compressed sensing for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using regional spatiotemporal sparsity and region tracking: Block LOw-rank Sparsity with Motion-guidance (BLOSM)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Salerno, Michael; Yang, Yang; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the heart is well-suited for acceleration with compressed sensing (CS) due to its spatiotemporal sparsity; however, respiratory motion can degrade sparsity and lead to image artifacts. We sought to develop a motion-compensated CS method for this application. Methods A new method, Block LOw-rank Sparsity with Motion-guidance (BLOSM), was developed to accelerate first-pass cardiac MRI, even in the presence of respiratory motion. This method divides the images into regions, tracks the regions through time, and applies matrix low-rank sparsity to the tracked regions. BLOSM was evaluated using computer simulations and first-pass cardiac datasets from human subjects. Using rate-4 acceleration, BLOSM was compared to other CS methods such as k-t SLR that employs matrix low-rank sparsity applied to the whole image dataset, with and without motion tracking, and to k-t FOCUSS with motion estimation and compensation that employs spatial and temporal-frequency sparsity. Results BLOSM was qualitatively shown to reduce respiratory artifact compared to other methods. Quantitatively, using root mean squared error and the structural similarity index, BLOSM was superior to other methods. Conclusion BLOSM, which exploits regional low rank structure and uses region tracking for motion compensation, provides improved image quality for CS-accelerated first-pass cardiac MRI. PMID:24243528

  3. MR Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) Complements Conventional Contrast Enhanced T1 Weighted MRI in Characterizing Brain Abnormalities of Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiani; Yu, Yingjian; Juhasz, Csaba; Kou, Zhifeng; Xuan, Yang; Latif, Zahid; Kudo, Kohsuke; Chugani, Harry T.; Haacke, E. Mark

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the efficacy of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in comparison to standard T1 weighted post gadolinium contrast (T1-Gd) MRI in patients with Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Twelve children (mean age 5.6 years) with the diagnosis of SWS and unilateral hemispheric involvement were recruited prospectively and examined with high resolution 3D SWI and conventional T1-Gd. Both SWI and T1-Gd images were evaluated using a four-grade scoring system according to six types of imaging findings (enlargement of transmedullary veins, periventricular veins and choroid plexus, as well as leptomeningeal abnormality, cortical gyriform abnormality, and gray matter/white matter junctional abnormality). The scores of SWI vs. T1-Gd images were then compared for each type of abnormality. RESULTS SWI was superior to T1-Gd in identifying the enlarged transmedullary veins (p=0.0020), abnormal periventricular veins (p=0.0078), cortical gyriform abnormalities (p=0.0020), and grey matter/white matter junction abnormalities (p=0.0078). Conversely, T1-Gd was better than SWI in identifying enlarged choroid plexus (p=0.0050) and leptomeningeal abnormalities (p=0.0050). CONCLUSION SWI can provide useful and unique information complementary to conventional contrast enhanced T1 weighted MRI for characterizing SWS. Therefore, SWI should be integrated into routine clinical MRI protocols for suspected SWS. PMID:18666142

  4. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; Macleod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-02-23

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  5. Intra-Tumor Distribution and Test-Retest Comparisons of Physiological Parameters quantified by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Rat U251 Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Madhava P.; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N.; Brown, Stephen L.; Lu, Mei; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ding, Guangliang; Panda, Swayamprava; Keenan, Kelly; Cabral, Glauber; Mikkelsen, Tom; Ewing, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parametric estimates in a rat U251 glioma model was analyzed. Using Magnevist as contrast agent (CA), 17 nude rats implanted with U251 cerebral glioma were studied by DCE-MRI twice in a 24 h interval. A data-driven analysis selected one of three models to estimate either: 1) CA plasma volume (vp), 2) vp and forward volume transfer constant (Ktrans; or 3) vp, Ktrans, and interstitial volume fraction (ve), constituting Models 1, 2 and 3, respectively. CA interstitial distribution volume (VD) was estimated in Model 3 regions by Logan plots. Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by model. In the Model 3 ROI, descriptors of parameter distributions – mean, median, variance and skewness – were calculated and compared between the two time points for repeatability. All distributions of parametric estimates in Model 3 ROIs were positively skewed. Test-retest differences between population summaries for any parameter were not significant (p≥0.10; Wilcoxon signed-rank and paired t tests). This and similar measures of parametric distribution and test-retest variance from other tumor models can be used to inform the choice of biomarkers that best summarize tumor status and treatment effects. PMID:25125367

  6. Alertness in Young Healthy Subjects: An fMRI Study of Brain Region Interactivity Enhanced by a Warning Signal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, B.; Godefroy, O.; Fall, S.; de Marco, G.

    2010-01-01

    An effective connectivity study was carried out on 16 young, healthy subjects performing an alertness task. The objective of this study was to develop and to evaluate a putative network model of alertness by adapting structural equation modeling to fMRI data. This study was designed to evaluate the directed interactivity of an attentional network…

  7. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the assessment of Pc 4-sensitized photodynamic therapy of a U87-derived glioma model in the athymic nude rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anka, Ali; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Zhang, Ruozhen; Cross, Nathan; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide a means of tracking the outcome of Pc 4-sensitized photodynamic therapy (PDT) in deeply placed lesions (e.g., brain tumors). We previously determined that 150 μL of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA) produces optimal enhancement of U87-derived intracerebral tumors in an athymic nude rat glioma model. We wish to determine how consistently DCE-MRI enhancement will detect an increase in Gd-enhancement of these tumors following Pc 4-PDT. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 6 athymic nude rats. After 7-8 days pre-Pc 4 PDT peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0T microMRI scanner before and after administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated on Days 11, 12, and 13 following Pc 4-PDT (Day 8 or 9). Results: Useful DCE-MRI data were obtained for these animals before and after Pc 4- PDT. In the pre-Pc 4-PDT DCE-MRI scans an average normalized peak Gd enhancement was observed in tumor tissue that was 1.297 times greater than baseline (0.035 Standard Error [SE]). The average normalized peak Gd enhancement in the tumor tissue in the scan following PDT (Day 11) was 1.537 times greater than baseline (0.036 SE), a statistically significant increase in enhancement (p = 0.00584) over the pre-PDT level. Discussion: A 150 μL Gd dose appears to provide an unambiguous increase in signal indicating Pc 4-PDT-induced necrosis of the U87-derived tumor. Our DCEMRI protocol may allow the development of a clinically robust, unambiguous, non-invasive technique for the assessment of PDT outcome.

  8. Visual spatial attention enhances the amplitude of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimulation in an eccentricity-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, David W.; Fortenbaugh, Francesca C.; Robertson, Lynn C.; Silver, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous visual spatial attention improves perception and enhances neural responses to visual stimuli at attended locations. Although many aspects of visual processing differ significantly between central and peripheral vision, little is known regarding the neural substrates of the eccentricity dependence of spatial attention effects. We measured amplitudes of positive and negative fMRI responses to visual stimuli as a function of eccentricity in a large number of topographically-organized cortical areas. Responses to each stimulus were obtained when the stimulus was attended and when spatial attention was directed to a stimulus in the opposite visual hemifield. Attending to the stimulus increased both positive and negative response amplitudes in all cortical areas we studied: V1, V2, V3, hV4, VO1, LO1, LO2, V3A/B, IPS0, TO1, and TO2. However, the eccentricity dependence of these effects differed considerably across cortical areas. In early visual, ventral, and lateral occipital cortex, attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater for central compared to peripheral eccentricities. The opposite pattern was observed in dorsal stream areas IPS0 and putative MT homolog TO1, where attentional enhancement of positive responses was greater in the periphery. Both the magnitude and the eccentricity dependence of attentional modulation of negative fMRI responses closely mirrored that of positive responses across cortical areas. PMID:23562388

  9. Water-Exchange-Modified Kinetic Parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI as Prognostic Biomarkers of Survival in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Antiangiogenic Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ho; Hayano, Koichi; Zhu, Andrew X.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background To find prognostic biomarkers in pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) water-exchange-modified (WX) kinetic parameters for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with antiangiogenic monotherapy. Methods Twenty patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI and were subsequently treated with sunitinib. Pretreatment DCE-MRI data on advanced HCC were analyzed using five different WX kinetic models: the Tofts-Kety (WX-TK), extended TK (WX-ETK), two compartment exchange, adiabatic approximation to tissue homogeneity (WX-AATH), and distributed parameter (WX-DP) models. The total hepatic blood flow, arterial flow fraction (γ), arterial blood flow (BFA), portal blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, permeability-surface area product, fractional interstitial volume (vI), extraction fraction, mean intracellular water molecule lifetime (τC), and fractional intracellular volume (vC) were calculated. After receiver operating characteristic analysis with leave-one-out cross-validation, individual parameters for each model were assessed in terms of 1-year-survival (1YS) discrimination using Kaplan-Meier analysis, and association with overall survival (OS) using univariate Cox regression analysis with permutation testing. Results The WX-TK-model-derived γ (P = 0.022) and vI (P = 0.010), and WX-ETK-model-derived τC (P = 0.023) and vC (P = 0.042) were statistically significant prognostic biomarkers for 1YS. Increase in the WX-DP-model-derived BFA (P = 0.025) and decrease in the WX-TK, WX-ETK, WX-AATH, and WX-DP-model-derived vC (P = 0.034, P = 0.038, P = 0.028, P = 0.041, respectively) were significantly associated with an increase in OS. Conclusions The WX-ETK-model-derived vC was an effective prognostic biomarker for advanced HCC treated with sunitinib. PMID:26366997

  10. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Assessing the Antiangiogenic Effect of Silencing HIF-1α with Targeted Multifunctional ECO/siRNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Malamas, Anthony S; Jin, Erlei; Gujrati, Maneesh; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-07-05

    Stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), a biomarker of hypoxia, in hypoxic tumors mediates a variety of downstream genes promoting tumor angiogenesis and cancer cell survival as well as invasion, and compromising therapeutic outcome. In this study, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with a biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent was used to noninvasively assess the antiangiogenic effect of RGD-targeted multifunctional lipid ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles in a mouse HT29 colon cancer model. The RGD-targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles resulted in over 50% reduction in tumor size after intravenous injection at a dose of 2.0 mg of siRNA/kg every 3 days for 3 weeks compared to a saline control. DCE-MRI revealed significant decline in vascularity and over a 70% reduction in the tumor blood flow, permeability-surface area product, and plasma volume fraction vascular parameters in the tumor treated with the targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles. The treatment with targeted ECO/siRNA nanoparticles resulted in significant silencing of HIF-1α expression at the protein level, which also significantly suppressed the expression of VEGF, Glut-1, HKII, PDK-1, LDHA, and CAIX, which are all important players in tumor angiogenesis, glycolytic metabolism, and pH regulation. By possessing the ability to elicit a multifaceted effect on tumor biology, silencing HIF-1α with RGD-targeted ECO/siHIF-1α nanoparticles has great promise as a single therapy or in combination with traditional chemotherapy or radiation strategies to improve cancer treatment.

  11. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI.

  12. Identification of localized redox states in plant-type two-iron ferrodoxins using the nuclear Overhauser effect

    SciTech Connect

    Dugad, L.B.; La Mar, G.N. ); Banci, L.; Bertini, I. )

    1990-03-06

    The homonuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), in conjunction with nonselective spin-lattice relaxation measurements, has been employed to assign the contact-shifted resonances for the reduced form of two typical plant-type two-iron ferrodoxins from the algae Spirulina platensis and Porphyra umbilicalis. These results demonstrate that the NOE should have broad general applicability for the assignments and electronic structural elucidation of diverse subclasses of paramagnetic iron-sulfur cluster proteins. NOE connectivities were detected only among sets of resonances exhibiting characteristically different deviations from Curie behavior, providing strong support for the applicability of the spin Hamiltonian formulation for the NMR properties of the antiferromagnetically coupled iron clusters. The geminal {beta}-methylene protons for the two cysteines bound to the iron(II) center were clearly identified, as well as the C{sub {alpha}}H and one C{sub {beta}}H for each of the cysteines bound to the iron(III). The identification of the iron bound to cysteines 41 and 46 as the iron(II) in the reduced protein was effected on the basis of dipolar contacts between the bound cysteines. Resolved labile proton contact-shifted resonances are attributed to hydrogen bonding to the iron(III) center, and it is concluded that the contact-shifted resonances for the more numerous hydrogen bonds to the iron(II) center are not resolved from the diamagnetic envelope. The identification of the iron closer to the protein surface as the more reducible one is consistent with predictions based on a larger number of hydrogen bonds to this center.

  13. Adenosine conformations of nucleotides bound to methionyl tRNA synthetase by transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Murali, N; Lin, Y; Mechulam, Y; Plateau, P; Rao, B D

    1997-01-01

    The conformations of MgATP and AMP bound to a monomeric tryptic fragment of methionyl tRNA synthetase have been investigated by two-dimensional proton transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (TRNOESY). The sample protocol was chosen to minimize contributions from adventitious binding of the nucleotides to the observed NOE. The experiments were performed at 500 MHz on three different complexes, E.MgATP, E.MgATP.L-methioninol, and E.AMP.L-methioninol. A starter set of distances obtained by fitting NOE build-up curves (not involving H5' and H5") were used to determine a CHARMm energy-minimized structure. The positioning of the H5' and H5" protons was determined on the basis of a conformational search of the torsion angle to obtain the best fit with the observed NOEs for their superposed resonance. Using this structure, a relaxation matrix was set up to calculate theoretical build-up curves for all of the NOEs and compare them with the observed curves. The final structures deduced for the adenosine moieties in the three complexes are very similar, and are described by a glycosidic torsion angle (chi) of 56 degrees +/- 5 degrees and a phase angle of pseudorotation (P) in the range of 47 degrees to 52 degrees, describing a 3(4)T-4E sugar pucker. The glycosidic torsion angle, chi, deduced here for this adenylyl transfer enzyme and those determined previously for three phosphoryl transfer enzymes (creatine kinase, arginine kinase, and pyruvate kinase), and one pyrophosphoryl enzyme (PRibPP synthetase), are all in the range 52 degrees +/- 8 degrees. The narrow range of values suggests a possible common motif for the recognition and binding of the adenosine moiety at the active sites of ATP-utilizing enzymes, irrespective of the point of cleavage on the phosphate chain. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:9129831

  14. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with VEGFR2-Targeted Microbubbles for Monitoring Regorafenib Therapy Effects in Experimental Colorectal Adenocarcinomas in Rats with DCE-MRI and Immunohistochemical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Clevert, Dirk-Andre; Hirner-Eppeneder, Heidrun; Ingrisch, Michael; Moser, Matthias; Schuster, Jessica; Tadros, Dina; Schneider, Moritz; Kazmierczak, Philipp Maximilian; Reiser, Maximilian; Cyran, Clemens C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles for monitoring therapy effects of regorafenib on experimental colon carcinomas in rats with correlation to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods Human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts (HT-29) were implanted subcutaneously in n = 21 (n = 11 therapy group; n = 10 control group) female athymic nude rats (Hsd: RH-Foxn1rnu). Animals were imaged at baseline and after a one-week daily treatment with regorafenib or a placebo (10 mg/kg bodyweight), using CEUS with VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles and DCE-MRI. In CEUS tumor perfusion was assessed during an early vascular phase (wash-in area under the curve = WiAUC) and VEGFR2-specific binding during a late molecular phase (signal intensity after 8 (SI8min) and 10 minutes (SI10min)), using a conventional 15L8 linear transducer (transmit frequency 7 MHz, dynamic range 80 dB, depth 25 mm). In DCE-MRI functional parameters plasma flow (PF) and plasma volume (PV) were quantified. For validation purposes, CEUS parameters were correlated with DCE-MRI parameters and immunohistochemical VEGFR2, CD31, Ki-67 and TUNEL stainings. Results CEUS perfusion parameter WiAUC decreased significantly (116,989 ± 77,048 a.u. to 30,076 ± 27,095a.u.; p = 0.005) under therapy with no significant changes (133,932 ± 65,960 a.u. to 84,316 ± 74,144 a.u.; p = 0.093) in the control group. In the therapy group, the amount of bound microbubbles in the late phase was significantly lower in the therapy than in the control group on day 7 (SI8min: 283 ± 191 vs. 802 ± 460 a.u.; p = 0.006); SI10min: 226 ± 149 vs. 645 ± 461 a.u.; p = 0.009). PF and PV decreased significantly (PF: 147 ± 58 mL/100 mL/min to 71 ± 15 mL/100 mL/min; p = 0.003; PV: 13 ± 3% to 9 ± 4%; p = 0.040) in the therapy group. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly fewer VEGFR2 (7.2 ± 1.8 vs. 17.8 ± 4.6; p < 0.001), CD31 (8.1 ± 3.0 vs

  15. Enhanced contrast efficiency in MRI by PEGylated magnetoliposomes loaded with PEGylated SPION: effect of SPION coating and micro-environment.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A; Martins, M B F; Corvo, M L; Feio, G

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic core coatings modify the efficiency of nanoparticles used as contrast agents for MRI. In studies of these phenomena, care should be given to take into account possible effects of the specific micro-environment where coated nanoparticles are embedded. In the present work, the longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with short-chain polyethylene glycol molecules (PEGylated SPIONs) were measured in a 7T magnetic field. PEGylated SPIONs with two different diameters (5 and 10nm) were studied. Two different PEGylated magnetoliposomes having liposome bilayer membranes composed of egg-phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy PEG-2000] were also studied for their relaxivities, after being loaded with the PEGylated SPION of 5 or 10nm. This type of liposomes is known to have long residence time in bloodstream that leads to an attractive option for therapeutic applications. The influence of the magnetic core coating on the efficiency of the nanosystem as a negative contrast agent for MRI was then compared to the cumulative effect of the coating plus the specific micro-environment components. As a result, it was found that the PEGylated magnetoliposomes present a 4-fold higher efficiency as negative contrast agents for MRI than the PEGylated SPION.

  16. Enhancing insight in scientific problem solving by highlighting the functional features of prototypes: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xin; Cui, Shuai; Li, Wenfu; Yang, Wenjing; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-10-09

    Insight can be the first step toward creating a groundbreaking product. As evident in anecdotes and major inventions in history, heuristic events (heuristic prototypes) prompted inventors to acquire insight when solving problems. Bionic imitation in scientific innovation is an example of this kind of problem solving. In particular, heuristic prototypes (e.g., the lotus effect; the very high water repellence exhibited by lotus leaves) help solve insight problems (e.g., non-stick surfaces). We speculated that the biological functional feature of prototypes is a critical factor in inducing insightful scientific problem solving. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we selected scientific innovation problems and utilized "learning prototypes-solving problems" two-phase paradigm to test the supposition. We also explored its neural mechanisms. Functional MRI data showed that the activation of the middle temporal gyrus (MTG, BA 37) and the middle occipital gyrus (MOG, BA 19) were associated with the highlighted functional feature condition. fMRI data also indicated that the MTG (BA 37) could be responsible for the semantic processing of functional features and for the formation of novel associations based on related functions. In addition, the MOG (BA 19) could be involved in the visual imagery of formation and application of function association between the heuristic prototype and problem. Our findings suggest that both semantic processing and visual imagery could be crucial components underlying scientific problem solving.

  17. Background Parenchymal Enhancement and Fibroglandular Tissue Proportion on Breast MRI: Correlation with Hormone Receptor Expression and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Mesut; Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Süllü, Yurdanur; Tomak, Leman; Polat, Ayfer Kamalı

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) proportion on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hormone receptor expression and molecular subtypes in invasive breast cancer. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 75 breast cancer patients who underwent breast MRI before treatment. T1-weighted images were reviewed to determine the FGT proportion, and contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images were reviewed to determine BPE. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor 2-neu (HER2) status, and molecular subtypes of the tumors were compared with the BPE and FGT proportions. Results Women with high BPE tended to have increased rate of ER and PR positive tumors (p=0.018 and p=0.013). FGT proportion was associated with ER positivity (p=0.009), but no significant differences between FGT proportion and PR positivity were found (p=0.256). There was no significant difference between HER2 status and any of the imaging features (p=0.453 and p=0.922). For premenopausal women, both FGT proportion and BPE were associated with molecular subtypes (p=0.025 and p=0.042). FGT proportion was also associated with BPE (p<0.001). Conclusion In women with invasive breast cancer, both high FGT containing breasts and high BPE breasts tended to have ER positive tumors.

  18. A facile synthesis of versatile Cu2-xS nanoprobe for enhanced MRI and infrared thermal/photoacoustic multimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Mou, Juan; Liu, Chengbo; Li, Pei; Chen, Yu; Xu, Huixiong; Wei, Chenyang; Song, Liang; Shi, Jianlin; Chen, Hangrong

    2015-07-01

    A novel type of intelligent nanoprobe by using single component of Cu2-xS for multimodal imaging has been facilely and rapidly synthesized in scale via thermal decomposition followed by biomimetic phospholipid modification, which endows them with uniform and small nanoparticle size (ca.15 nm), well phosphate buffer saline (PBS) dispersity, high stability, and excellent biocompatibility. The as-synthesized Cu2-xS nanoprobes (Cu2-xS NPs) are capable of providing contrast enhancement for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as demonstrated by the both in vitro and in vivo imaging investigations for the first time. In addition, due to their strong near infrared (NIR) optical absorption, they can also serve as a candidate contrast agent for enhanced infrared thermal/photoacoustic imaging, to meet the shortfalls of MRI. Hence, complementary and potentially more comprehensive information can be acquired for the early detection and accurate diagnosis of cancer. Furthermore, negligible systematic side effects to the blood and tissue were observed in a relatively long period of 3 months. The distinctive multimodal imaging capability with excellent hemo/histocompatibility of the Cu2-xS NPs could open up a new molecular imaging possibility for detecting and diagnosing cancer or other diseases in the future.

  19. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  20. Iterative approach of dual regression with a sparse prior enhances the performance of independent component analysis for group functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Junghoe; Lee, Jong-Hwan

    2012-12-01

    This study proposes an iterative dual-regression (DR) approach with sparse prior regularization to better estimate an individual's neuronal activation using the results of an independent component analysis (ICA) method applied to a temporally concatenated group of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data (i.e., Tc-GICA method). An ordinary DR approach estimates the spatial patterns (SPs) of neuronal activation and corresponding time courses (TCs) specific to each individual's fMRI data with two steps involving least-squares (LS) solutions. Our proposed approach employs iterative LS solutions to refine both the individual SPs and TCs with an additional a priori assumption of sparseness in the SPs (i.e., minimally overlapping SPs) based on L(1)-norm minimization. To quantitatively evaluate the performance of this approach, semi-artificial fMRI data were created from resting-state fMRI data with the following considerations: (1) an artificially designed spatial layout of neuronal activation patterns with varying overlap sizes across subjects and (2) a BOLD time series (TS) with variable parameters such as onset time, duration, and maximum BOLD levels. To systematically control the spatial layout variability of neuronal activation patterns across the "subjects" (n=12), the degree of spatial overlap across all subjects was varied from a minimum of 1 voxel (i.e., 0.5-voxel cubic radius) to a maximum of 81 voxels (i.e., 2.5-voxel radius) across the task-related SPs with a size of 100 voxels for both the block-based and event-related task paradigms. In addition, several levels of maximum percentage BOLD intensity (i.e., 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0%) were used for each degree of spatial overlap size. From the results, the estimated individual SPs of neuronal activation obtained from the proposed iterative DR approach with a sparse prior showed an enhanced true positive rate and reduced false positive rate compared to the ordinary DR approach. The estimated TCs of the

  1. Enhanced multi-protocol analysis via intelligent supervised embedding (EMPrAvISE): detecting prostate cancer on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Currently, there is significant interest in developing methods for quantitative integration of multi-parametric (structural, functional) imaging data with the objective of building automated meta-classifiers to improve disease detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. Such techniques are required to address the differences in dimensionalities and scales of individual protocols, while deriving an integrated multi-parametric data representation which best captures all disease-pertinent information available. In this paper, we present a scheme called Enhanced Multi-Protocol Analysis via Intelligent Supervised Embedding (EMPrAvISE); a powerful, generalizable framework applicable to a variety of domains for multi-parametric data representation and fusion. Our scheme utilizes an ensemble of embeddings (via dimensionality reduction, DR); thereby exploiting the variance amongst multiple uncorrelated embeddings in a manner similar to ensemble classifier schemes (e.g. Bagging, Boosting). We apply this framework to the problem of prostate cancer (CaP) detection on 12 3 Tesla pre-operative in vivo multi-parametric (T2-weighted, Dynamic Contrast Enhanced, and Diffusion-weighted) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, in turn comprising a total of 39 2D planar MR images. We first align the different imaging protocols via automated image registration, followed by quantification of image attributes from individual protocols. Multiple embeddings are generated from the resultant high-dimensional feature space which are then combined intelligently to yield a single stable solution. Our scheme is employed in conjunction with graph embedding (for DR) and probabilistic boosting trees (PBTs) to detect CaP on multi-parametric MRI. Finally, a probabilistic pairwise Markov Random Field algorithm is used to apply spatial constraints to the result of the PBT classifier, yielding a per-voxel classification of CaP presence. Per-voxel evaluation of detection results against ground truth for Ca

  2. Correcting for Blood Arrival Time in Global Mean Regression Enhances Functional Connectivity Analysis of Resting State fMRI-BOLD Signals.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Sinem B; Tong, Yunjie; Hocke, Lia M; Lindsey, Kimberly P; deB Frederick, Blaise

    2016-01-01

    Resting state functional connectivity analysis is a widely used method for mapping intrinsic functional organization of the brain. Global signal regression (GSR) is commonly employed for removing systemic global variance from resting state BOLD-fMRI data; however, recent studies have demonstrated that GSR may introduce spurious negative correlations within and between functional networks, calling into question the meaning of anticorrelations reported between some networks. In the present study, we propose that global signal from resting state fMRI is composed primarily of systemic low frequency oscillations (sLFOs) that propagate with cerebral blood circulation throughout the brain. We introduce a novel systemic noise removal strategy for resting state fMRI data, "dynamic global signal regression" (dGSR), which applies a voxel-specific optimal time delay to the global signal prior to regression from voxel-wise time series. We test our hypothesis on two functional systems that are suggested to be intrinsically organized into anticorrelated networks: the default mode network (DMN) and task positive network (TPN). We evaluate the efficacy of dGSR and compare its performance with the conventional "static" global regression (sGSR) method in terms of (i) explaining systemic variance in the data and (ii) enhancing specificity and sensitivity of functional connectivity measures. dGSR increases the amount of BOLD signal variance being modeled and removed relative to sGSR while reducing spurious negative correlations introduced in reference regions by sGSR, and attenuating inflated positive connectivity measures. We conclude that incorporating time delay information for sLFOs into global noise removal strategies is of crucial importance for optimal noise removal from resting state functional connectivity maps.

  3. An adaptive model for rapid and direct estimation of extravascular extracellular space in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, Azimeh N V; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Ewing, James R; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan

    2017-02-14

    Extravascular extracellular space (ve ) is a key parameter to characterize the tissue of cerebral tumors. This study introduces an artificial neural network (ANN) as a fast, direct, and accurate estimator of ve from a time trace of the longitudinal relaxation rate, ΔR1 (R1  = 1/T1 ), in DCE-MRI studies. Using the extended Tofts equation, a set of ΔR1 profiles was simulated in the presence of eight different signal to noise ratios. A set of gain- and noise-insensitive features was generated from the simulated ΔR1 profiles and used as the ANN training set. A K-fold cross-validation method was employed for training, testing, and optimization of the ANN. The performance of the optimal ANN (12:6:1, 12 features as input vector, six neurons in hidden layer, and one output) in estimating ve at a resolution of 10% (error of ±5%) was 82%. The ANN was applied on DCE-MRI data of 26 glioblastoma patients to estimate ve in tumor regions. Its results were compared with the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of ve . The two techniques showed a strong agreement (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Results implied that the perfected ANN was less sensitive to noise and outperformed the MLE method in estimation of ve .

  4. Enhancement of Odor-Induced Activity in the Canine Brain by Zinc Nanoparticles: A Functional MRI Study in Fully Unrestrained Conscious Dogs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hao; Pustovyy, Oleg M; Wang, Yun; Waggoner, Paul; Beyers, Ronald J; Schumacher, John; Wildey, Chester; Morrison, Edward; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Using noninvasive in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we demonstrate that the enhancement of odorant response of olfactory receptor neurons by zinc nanoparticles leads to increase in activity in olfaction-related and higher order areas of the dog brain. To study conscious dogs, we employed behavioral training and optical motion tracking for reducing head motion artifacts. We obtained brain activation maps from dogs in both anesthetized state and fully conscious and unrestrained state. The enhancement effect of zinc nanoparticles was higher in conscious dogs with more activation in higher order areas as compared with anesthetized dogs. In conscious dogs, voxels in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus showed higher activity to odorants mixed with zinc nanoparticles as compared with pure odorants, odorants mixed with gold nanoparticles as well as zinc nanoparticles alone. These regions have been implicated in odor intensity processing in other species including humans. If the enhancement effect of zinc nanoparticles observed in vivo are confirmed by future behavioral studies, zinc nanoparticles may provide a way for enhancing the olfactory sensitivity of canines for detection of target substances such as explosives and contraband substances at very low concentrations, which would otherwise go undetected.

  5. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with t1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in brain tumors: a comparative study with two different algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Saitta, Laura; Barletta, Laura; Bonzano, Laura; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Castellan, Lucio; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Roccatagliata, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of measuring different permeability parameters with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to investigate the blood brain-barrier permeability associated with different brain tumors. The Patlak algorithm and the extended Tofts-Kety model were used to this aim. Twenty-five adult patients with tumors of different histological grades were enrolled in this study. MRI examinations were performed at 1.5 T. Multiflip angle, fast low-angle shot, and axial 3D T1-weighted images were acquired to calculate T1 maps, followed by a DCE acquisition. A region of interest was placed within the tumor of each patient to calculate the mean value of different permeability parameters. Differences in permeability measurements were found between different tumor grades, with higher histological grades characterized by higher permeability values. A significant difference in transfer constant (K (trans)) values was found between the two methods on high-grade tumors; however, both techniques revealed a significant correlation between the histological grade of tumors and their K (trans) values. Our results suggest that DCE acquisition is feasible in patients with brain tumors and that K (trans) maps can be easily obtained by these two algorithms, even if the theoretical model adopted could affect the final results.

  6. In Vivo Tracking of Phagocytic Immune Cells Using a Dual Imaging Probe with Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI and Near-Infrared Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joong; Bhuniya, Sankarprasad; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Hyun Min; Shin, Weon Sup; Kim, Jong Seung; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-04-27

    A novel dual imaging probe for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging was developed by combining gadolinium (Gd)-chelating MR probe and a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore, aza-BODIPY (AB; BODIPY = boron-dipyrromethene). This aza-BODIPY-based bimodal contrast agent (AB-BCA) showed a significant fluorescence emission around the NIR range and an enhanced longitudinal relaxivity in MR modality. The probe was easily delivered to phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, together with macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), and presented high-performance fluorescence and MR imaging without obvious cytotoxicity. For in vivo visualization of AB-BCA using MRI and optical imaging, bone marrow-derived DCs were labeled and injected into the footpad of mice, and labeled DCs were tracked in vivo. We observed the migration of AB-BCA-labeled DCs into the lymph nodes via lymphatic vessels using NIR fluorescence and T1-weighted MR images. This dual-modality imaging probe was used for noninvasive monitoring of DC migration into lymph nodes and could be useful for investigating advanced cellular immunotherapy.

  7. Restructuring Reward Mechanisms in Nicotine Addiction: A Pilot fMRI Study of Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement for Cigarette Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, A. R.; McConnell, P. A.; Eichberg, C.; Saladin, M. E.; Carpenter, M. J.; Garland, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    The primary goal of this pilot feasibility study was to examine the effects of Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), a behavioral treatment grounded in dual-process models derived from cognitive science, on frontostriatal reward processes among cigarette smokers. Healthy adult (N = 13; mean (SD) age 49 ± 12.2) smokers provided informed consent to participate in a 10-week study testing MORE versus a comparison group (CG). All participants underwent two fMRI scans: pre-tx and after 8-weeks of MORE. Emotion regulation (ER), smoking cue reactivity (CR), and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) were assessed at each fMRI visit; smoking and mood were assessed throughout. As compared to the CG, MORE significantly reduced smoking (d = 2.06) and increased positive affect (d = 2.02). MORE participants evidenced decreased CR-BOLD response in ventral striatum (VS; d = 1.57) and ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC; d = 1.7) and increased positive ER-BOLD in VS (dVS = 2.13) and vPFC (dvmPFC = 2.66). Importantly, ER was correlated with smoking reduction (r's = .68 to .91) and increased positive affect (r's = .52 to .61). These findings provide preliminary evidence that MORE may facilitate the restructuring of reward processes and play a role in treating the pathophysiology of nicotine addiction. PMID:28373890

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as a valuable non-invasive tool to evaluate tissue perfusion of free flaps: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Claudia; Jung, Ernst M; Prantl, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of a compromised circulation of free flaps and an immediate revision may lead to higher rates of flap salvage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perfusion of the entire flap using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DCE was performed in 11 patients after flap transplantation using an optimized 3D gradient echo sequence to cover the whole flap. The percentage increase of signal intensity over time was evaluated for the free flap as well as for a reference tissue. Furthermore, normalized signal increase was calculated as the ratio of signal increase within the flaps to the signal increase in the reference tissue. Signal increase in free flaps and reference tissue was compared using the Wilcoxon-test (p < 0.05), normalized signal increase in normally perfused (n = 9) and in flaps with compromised perfusion (n = 2) using Mann-Whitney-test (p < 0.05). Signal increase within normally perfused flaps was similar to the reference tissue. In flaps with compromised perfusion the increase was significantly lower than in reference tissue. Normalized signal increase in adequately perfused flaps and flaps with compromised perfusion also showed a significant difference. DCE MRI may be a valuable non-invasive tool to evaluate tissue perfusion of the complete free flap.

  9. Optimization of saturation-recovery dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI acquisition protocol: monte carlo simulation approach demonstrated with gadolinium MR renography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Conlin, Chris C.; Carlston, Kristi; Xie, Luke; Kim, Daniel; Morrell, Glen; Morton, Kathryn; Lee, Vivian S.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI is widely used for the measurement of tissue perfusion and to assess organ function. MR renography, which is acquired using a DCE sequence, can measure renal perfusion, filtration and concentrating ability. Optimization of the DCE acquisition protocol is important for the minimization of the error propagation from the acquired signals to the estimated parameters, thus improving the precision of the parameters. Critical to the optimization of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted protocols is the balance of the T1-shortening effect across the range of gadolinium (Gd) contrast concentration in the tissue of interest. In this study, we demonstrate a Monte Carlo simulation approach for the optimization of DCE MRI, in which a saturation-recovery T1-weighted gradient echo sequence is simulated and the impact of injected dose (D) and time delay (TD, for saturation recovery) is tested. The results show that high D and/or high TD cause saturation of the peak arterial signals and lead to an overestimation of renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). However, the use of low TD (e.g. 100 ms) and low D leads to similar errors in RPF and GFR, because of the Rician bias in the pre-contrast arterial signals. Our patient study including 22 human subjects compared TD values of 100 and 300 ms after the injection of 4 mL of Gd contrast for MR renography. At TD = 100 ms, we computed an RPF value of 157.2 ± 51.7 mL/min and a GFR of 33.3 ± 11.6 mL/min. These results were all significantly higher than the parameter estimates at TD = 300 ms: RPF = 143.4 ± 48.8 mL/min (p = 0.0006) and GFR = 30.2 ± 11.5 mL/min (p = 0.0015). In conclusion, appropriate optimization of the DCE MRI protocol using simulation can effectively improve the precision and, potentially, the accuracy of the measured parameters. PMID:27200499

  10. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome and associated changes in the blood-brain barrier following Pc 4-PDT of glioma in an athymic nude rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Vaijayantee; Anka, Ali; Cross, Nathan; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Gray, Kayla; Zhang, Ruozhen; Xu, Yueshuo; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) appears to provide an unambiguous means of tracking the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumors with the photosensitizer Pc 4. The increase in Gd enhancement observed after Pc 4-PDT may be due to a temporary opening of the blood-brain-barrier which, as noted by others, may offer a therapeutic window. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 9 athymic nude rats. After 8-9 days peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0 T microMRI scanner before and after the administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated three times following Pc 4-PDT. Results: The average, normalized peak enhancement in the tumor region, approximately 30-90 seconds after Gd administration, was 1.31 times greater than baseline (0.03 Standard Error [SE]) prior to PDT and was 1.44 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the first Post-PDT scans (Day 11), a statistically significant (p ~ 0.014, N=8) increase over the Pre- PDT scans, and was 1.38 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the second scans (Day 12), also a statistically significant (p ~ 0.008, N=7) increase. Observations were mixed in the third Post-PDT scans (Day 13), averaging 1.29 (0.03 SE) times baseline (p ~ 0.66, N=7). Overall a downward trend in enhancement was observed from the first to the third Post-PDT scans. Discussion: DCE-MRI may provide an unambiguous indication of brain tumor PDT outcome. The initial increase in DCE-MRI signal may correlate with a temporary, PDT-induced opening of the blood-brain-barrier, creating a potential therapeutic window.

  11. Biventricular apical thrombi demonstrated by contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI following anteroapical STEMI and unsuccessful reperfusion therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, William; VonderMuhll, Isabelle; Paterson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can define the territory and extent of myocardial infarction from patterns of late gadolinium enhancement. Following failure to reperfuse with thrombolytic therapy, a case of myocardial infarction is described in which ongoing symptoms and an electrocardiogram change led to a diagnostic dilemma. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed an apical infarction, an aneurysm and acute pericarditis. In addition, late gadolinium enhancement unexpectedly revealed the presence of biventricular apical thrombi. The prevalence of cardiac thrombi and pulmonary emboli may be greater than generally appreciated. PMID:18685749

  12. Assessment of the Precision and Reproducibility of Ventricular Volume, Function and Mass Measurements with Ferumoxytol-Enhanced 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hanneman, Kate; Kino, Aya; Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the precision and inter-observer agreement of ventricular volume, function and mass quantification by three-dimensional time-resolved (4D) flow MRI relative to cine steady state free precession (SSFP). Materials and Methods With research board approval, informed consent, and HIPAA compliance, 22 consecutive patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) (10 males, 6.4±4.8 years) referred for 3T ferumoxytol-enhanced cardiac MRI were prospectively recruited. Complete ventricular coverage with standard 2D short-axis cine SSFP and whole chest coverage with axial 4D flow were obtained. Two blinded radiologists independently segmented images for left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) myocardium at end systole (ES) and end diastole (ED). Statistical analysis included linear regression, ANOVA, Bland-Altman (BA) analysis, and intra-class correlation (ICC). Results Significant positive correlations were found between 4D flow and SSFP for ventricular volumes (r = 0.808–0.972, p<0.001), ejection fraction (EF) (r = 0.900–928, p<0.001), and mass (r = 0.884–0.934, p<0.001). BA relative limits of agreement for both ventricles were between −52% to 34% for volumes, −29% to 27% for EF, and −41% to 48% for mass, with wider limits of agreement for the RV compared to the LV. There was no significant difference between techniques with respect to mean square difference of ED-ES mass for either LV (F=2.05, p=0.159) or RV (F=0.625, p=0.434). Inter-observer agreement was moderate to good with both 4D flow (ICC 0.523–0.993) and SSFP (ICC 0.619–0.982), with overlapping confidence intervals. Conclusion Quantification of ventricular volume, function and mass can be accomplished with 4D flow MRI with precision and inter-observer agreement comparable to that of cine SSFP. PMID:26871420

  13. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Soo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Lee, Phil Hye; Ju, Young-Su; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Materials and Methods Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Results Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min-1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min-1, p = 0.661 for Ktrans; 0.30 ± 0.05 min-1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min-1, p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. PMID:27587960

  14. A model-constrained Monte Carlo method for blind arterial input function estimation in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: I. Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schabel, Matthias C; Fluckiger, Jacob U; DiBella, Edward V R

    2010-08-21

    Widespread adoption of quantitative pharmacokinetic modeling methods in conjunction with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has led to increased recognition of the importance of obtaining accurate patient-specific arterial input function (AIF) measurements. Ideally, DCE-MRI studies use an AIF directly measured in an artery local to the tissue of interest, along with measured tissue concentration curves, to quantitatively determine pharmacokinetic parameters. However, the numerous technical and practical difficulties associated with AIF measurement have made the use of population-averaged AIF data a popular, if sub-optimal, alternative to AIF measurement. In this work, we present and characterize a new algorithm for determining the AIF solely from the measured tissue concentration curves. This Monte Carlo blind estimation (MCBE) algorithm estimates the AIF from the subsets of D concentration-time curves drawn from a larger pool of M candidate curves via nonlinear optimization, doing so for multiple (Q) subsets and statistically averaging these repeated estimates. The MCBE algorithm can be viewed as a generalization of previously published methods that employ clustering of concentration-time curves and only estimate the AIF once. Extensive computer simulations were performed over physiologically and experimentally realistic ranges of imaging and tissue parameters, and the impact of choosing different values of D and Q was investigated. We found the algorithm to be robust, computationally efficient and capable of accurately estimating the AIF even for relatively high noise levels, long sampling intervals and low diversity of tissue curves. With the incorporation of bootstrapping initialization, we further demonstrated the ability to blindly estimate AIFs that deviate substantially in shape from the population-averaged initial guess. Pharmacokinetic parameter estimates for K(trans), k(ep), v(p) and v(e) all showed relative biases and

  15. Deficits in axonal transport in hippocampal-based circuitry and the visual pathway in APP knock-out animals witnessed by manganese enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Joseph J; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ziomek, Gregory J; Jacobs, Russell E; Bearer, Elaine L

    2012-04-15

    Mounting evidence implicates axonal transport defects, typified by the presence of axonal varicosities with aberrant accumulations of cargo, as an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Work identifying amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a vesicular motor receptor for anterograde axonal transport further implicates axonal transport in AD. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) detects axonal transport dynamics in preclinical studies. Here we pursue an understanding of the role of APP in axonal transport in the central nervous system by applying MEMRI to hippocampal circuitry and to the visual pathway in living mice homozygous for either wild type or a deletion in the APP gene (n=12 for each genotype). Following intra-ocular or stereotaxic hippocampal injection, we performed time-lapse MRI to detect Mn(2+) transport. Three dimensional whole brain datasets were compared on a voxel-wise basis using within-group pair-wise analysis. Quantification of transport to structures connected to injection sites via axonal fiber tracts was also performed. Histology confirmed consistent placement of hippocampal injections and no observable difference in glial-response to the injections. APP-/- mice had significantly reduced transport from the hippocampus to the septal nuclei and amygdala after 7h and reduced transport to the contralateral hippocampus after 25 h; axonal transport deficits in the APP-/- animals were also identified in the visual pathway. These data support a system-wide role for APP in axonal transport within the central nervous system and demonstrate the power of MEMRI for assessing neuronal circuitry involved in memory and learning.

  16. Organic Nitrate Maintains Bone Marrow Blood Perfusion in Ovariectomized Female Rats: A Dynamic, Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Ko, Chun Hay; Griffith, James F.; Deng, Min; Wong, Hing Lok; Gu, Tao; Huang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of nitrate on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow perfusion in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, and also the effects of nitrate on in vitro osteoblastic activity and osteoclastic differentiation of murine monocyte/macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into OVX + nitrate group (isosorbide-5-mononitrate, ISM, 150 mg/kg/ day b.i.d), OVX + vehicle group, and control group. Lumbar spine CT bone densitometry and perfusion MRI were performed on the rats at baseline and week 8 post-OVX. The OVX rats’ BMD decreased by 22.5% ± 5.7% at week 8 (p < 0.001); while the OVX + ISM rats’ BMD decreased by 13.1% ± 2.7% (p < 0.001). The BMD loss difference between the two groups of rats was significant (p = 0.018). The OVX rats’ lumbar vertebral perfusion MRI maximum enhancement (Emax) decreased by 10.3% ± 5.0% at week 8 (p < 0.005), while in OVX + ISM rats, the Emax increased by 5.5% ± 6.9% (p > 0.05). The proliferation of osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells increased significantly with ISM treatment at 0.78 µM to 50 μM. Treatment of UMR-106 cells with ISM also stimulated the BrdU uptake. After the RAW 264.7 cells were co-treated with osteoclastogenesis inducer RANKL and 6.25 μM ~ 100 μM of ISM for 3 days, a trend of dose-dependent increase of osteoclast number was noted. PMID:24300395

  17. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  18. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  19. Shoulder MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the shoulder uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  20. Knee MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the knee uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  1. MRI findings in Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Raval, Monali; Kumari, Rima; Dung, Aldrin Anthony Dung; Guglani, Bhuvnesh; Gupta, Nitij; Gupta, Rohit

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7), abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  2. MRI renaissance.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S

    1997-12-01

    A few years ago, magnetic resonance imaging was healthcare's version of a foreign sports car-flashy, expensive and impractical. Now, after years in the doldrums, sales of MRI systems are roaring back. An aging fleet of MRI scanners due for replacement and a hearty increase in doctors' use of the versatile imaging tools are combining to fuel the surge in demand, vendors and customers say.

  3. Repeat Targeted Prostate Biopsy under Guidance of Multiparametric MRI-Correlated Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Patients with Previous Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Ryul; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kiwook; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine whether multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) - contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) correlated, imaging-guided target biopsy (TB) method could improve the detection of prostate cancer in re-biopsy setting of patients with prior negative biopsy. Methods From 2012 to 2014, a total of 42 Korean men with a negative result from previous systematic biopsy (SB) and elevated prostate-specific antigen underwent 3T mpMRI and real-time CEUS guided TB. Target lesions were determined by fusion of mpMRI and CEUS. Subsequently, 12-core SB was performed by a different radiologist. We compared core-based cancer detection rates (CaDR) using the generalized linear mixed model (GLIMMIX) for each biopsy method. Results Core-based CaDR was higher in TB (17.92%, 38 of 212 cores) than in SB (6.15%, 31 of 504 cores) (p < 0.0001; GLIMMIX). In the cancer-positive TB cores, CaDR with suspicious lesions by mpMRI was higher than that by CEUS (86.8% vs. 60.5%, p= 0.02; paired t-test) and concordant rate between mpMRI and CEUS was significantly different with discordant rate (48% vs. 52%, p=0.04; McNemar’s test). Conclusion The mpMRI-CEUS correlated TB technique for the repeat prostate biopsy of patients with prior negative biopsy can improve CaDR based on the number of cores taken. PMID:26083348

  4. Computerized Interpretation of Dynamic Breast MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    malignant and benign lesions. Keywords: Fuzzy c- means , breast cancer, contrast-enhanced MRI, tumor heterogeneity, computer-aided diag- nosis (CAD) 1...applications. tumor response to therapy[3]. Furthermore, breast MRI can In this paper, we present a fast fuzzy c- means (FCM) based be used for quantitative...use of a fuzzy c- means (FCM) algorithm for the assessment of 3-D tumor extent from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (CE-MRI) of the breast

  5. Three-dimensional inversion recovery manganese-enhanced MRI of mouse brain using super-resolution reconstruction to visualize nuclei involved in higher brain function.

    PubMed

    Poole, Dana S; Plenge, Esben; Poot, Dirk H J; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Niessen, Wiro J; Meijering, Erik; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-07-01

    The visualization of activity in mouse brain using inversion recovery spin echo (IR-SE) manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) provides unique contrast, but suffers from poor resolution in the slice-encoding direction. Super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) is a resolution-enhancing post-processing technique in which multiple low-resolution slice stacks are combined into a single volume of high isotropic resolution using computational methods. In this study, we investigated, first, whether SRR can improve the three-dimensional resolution of IR-SE MEMRI in the slice selection direction, whilst maintaining or improving the contrast-to-noise ratio of the two-dimensional slice stacks. Second, the contrast-to-noise ratio of SRR IR-SE MEMRI was compared with a conventional three-dimensional gradient echo (GE) acquisition. Quantitative experiments were performed on a phantom containing compartments of various manganese concentrations. The results showed that, with comparable scan times, the signal-to-noise ratio of three-dimensional GE acquisition is higher than that of SRR IR-SE MEMRI. However, the contrast-to-noise ratio between different compartments can be superior with SRR IR-SE MEMRI, depending on the chosen inversion time. In vivo experiments were performed in mice receiving manganese using an implanted osmotic pump. The results showed that SRR works well as a resolution-enhancing technique in IR-SE MEMRI experiments. In addition, the SRR image also shows a number of brain structures that are more clearly discernible from the surrounding tissues than in three-dimensional GE acquisition, including a number of nuclei with specific higher brain functions, such as memory, stress, anxiety and reward behavior.

  6. Characterizing tumor changes during neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced breast cancer patients (LABC) using dynamic-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, Oana I.; Jones, Ellen L.; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Rosen, Eric L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; MacFall, James R.; Liotcheva, Vlayka; Lora-Michiels, Michael; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2005-04-01

    At Duke University Medical Center, selective LABC patients were treated on a protocol using neoadjuvant Myocet/Paclitaxel (ChT) and HT. With the purpose of generating perfusion/permeability parametric maps and to use gadolinium (Gd) enhancement curves to score and predict response to neoadjuvant treatment, a study was designed to acquire 3 sets of DE-MRI images along the 4 cycles of combined ChT and HT. A T1-weighted three-dimensional fast gradient echo technique was used over 30 minutes following bolus injection of Gd-based contrast agent. Perfusion/permeability maps were generated by fitting the signal intensity to a double exponential curve that generates washin (WiP) and washout (WoP), parameters that are associated with the tumors vascularity/permeability and cellularity. Based on the values of the WiP, the tumors were divided in lowWI (WiP < 100), mediumWI (100 200). During the HT treatments temperatures in the breast were measured invasively via a catheter inserted under CT guidance. Although minimum sampled temperatures give a crude indication of the temperature distribution, several thermal dose metrics were calculated for each of the HT fractions (e.g. T90, T50, T10). As expected, tumors that were more vascularized (i.e. higher WiP) heated less than tumors with low WiP, a degree on average. The adjuvant treatment also changed the shape and inhomogeneity of the perfusion/permeability maps, with dramatic changes after the first fraction in responders. The correlation between the thermal metrics and pathological response will be discussed, as well as possible correlation with other tumor physiology parameters. In conclusion, the Gd-enhancement analysis of DE-MRI images is able to generate information related to the tumor vascularity, permeability and cellularity that can correlate with the tumor's response to the neoadjuvant treatment in general, and to HT in particular. Work supported by a grant from the NCI CA42745.

  7. Pair dynamics and the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) in liquids analysed by simulation and model theories: Application to an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Gabl, Sonja; Schröder, Christian; Braun, Daniel; Steinhauser, Othmar; Weingärtner, Hermann

    2014-05-14

    Combining simulation and model theories, this paper analyses the impact of pair dynamics on the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) in liquids. For the first time, we give a distance resolved NOE. When applied to the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate the NOE turns out to be of long-range nature. This behaviour translates to the experimentally measured cross- and longitudinal relaxation rates. We were able to calculate the heteronuclear NOE from simulation data, despite the high computational effort. Model theories are computationally less demanding and cover the complete frequency range of the respective spectral density function, they are usually based on a very simple pair distribution function and the solution of the diffusion equation. In order to model the simulated data sufficiently, these simplifications in structure and dynamics have to be generalised considerably.

  8. The importance of suppressing spin diffusion effects in the accurate determination of the spatial structure of a flexible molecule by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodov, I. A.; Efimov, S. V.; Klochkov, V. V.; Batista de Carvalho, L. A. E.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy is applied to the elucidation of conformation distribution of small molecules in solution. An essential influence of the nonlinear multistep magnetization transfer (spin diffusion) on the NMR-based analysis of conformers distribution for small druglike molecules in solution was revealed. Therefore, the spin diffusion should be eliminated from the obtained NMR data in order to obtain accurate results. Efficiency of QUIET-NOESY spectroscopy in solving the problem of accurate determination of inter-proton distances in a small molecule was shown in a study of ibuprofen. Although it requires much experimental time, this technique was found to be helpful to solve the spin diffusion problem.

  9. Conformation of methyl beta-lactoside bound to the ricin B-chain: Interpretation of transferred nuclear Overhauser effects facilitated by spin simulation and selective deuteration

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, V.L.; Thomson, D.S.; Prestegard, J.H. )

    1990-06-12

    Spin simulation and selective deuteration have been used to aid in the interpretation of 1D transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) NMR experiments on ricin B-chain/ligand systems. Application of these methods has revealed a change in the conformation of deuterated methyl beta-lactoside upon binding to the ricin B-chain which results in a slight change in glycosidic torsional angels which appear to dominate in the solution conformation. The combination of simulation and experiment also shows an important sensitivity of TRNOE magnitudes to dissociation rate constants and available spin-diffusion pathways for the ricin B-chain/ligand systems under study. The sensitivity to dissociation rates allows determination of rate constants for methyl beta-lactoside and methyl beta-galactoside of 50 and 300 s-1, respectively.

  10. Accuracy of percentage of signal intensity recovery and relative cerebral blood volume derived from dynamic susceptibility-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI in the preoperative diagnosis of cerebral tumours

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Timothy; Chaganti, Joga

    2015-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for diagnosis of cerebral tumours, and has become an increasingly powerful tool for their evaluation; however, the diagnosis of common contrast-enhancing lesions can be challenging, as it is sometimes impossible to differentiate them using conventional imaging. Histopathological analysis of biopsy specimens is the gold standard for diagnosis; however, there are significant risks associated with the invasive procedure and definitive diagnosis is not always achieved. Early accurate diagnosis is important, as management differs accordingly. Advanced MRI techniques have increasing utility for aiding diagnosis in a variety of clinical scenarios. Dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) MRI is a perfusion imaging technique and a potentially important tool for the characterisation of cerebral tumours. The percentage of signal intensity recovery (PSR) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) derived from DSC MRI provide information about tumour capillary permeability and neoangiogenesis, which can be used to characterise tumour type and grade, and distinguish tumour recurrence from treatment-related effects. Therefore, PSR and rCBV potentially represent a non-invasive means of diagnosis; however, the clinical utility of these parameters has yet to be established. We present a review of the literature to date. PMID:26475485

  11. When the brain is prepared to learn: enhancing human learning using real-time fMRI.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Julie J; Hinds, Oliver; Ofen, Noa; Thompson, Todd W; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Triantafyllou, Christina; Gabrieli, John D E

    2012-01-02

    The rate of learning or memory formation varies over time for any individual, partly due to moment-to-moment fluctuation of brain state. Functional neuroimaging has revealed the neural correlates of learning and memory, but here we asked if neuroimaging can causally enhance human learning by detection of brain states that reveal when a person is prepared or not prepared to learn. The parahippocampal cortex (PHC) is essential for memory formation for scenes. Here, activation in PHC was monitored in real-time, and scene presentations were triggered when participants entered "good" or "bad" brain states for learning of novel scenes. Subsequent recognition memory was more accurate for scenes presented in "good" than "bad" brain states. These findings show that neuroimaging can identify in real-time brain states that enhance or depress learning and memory formation, and knowledge about such brain states may be useful for accelerating education and training. Further, the use of functional neuroimaging as a causal, rather than correlative, tool to study the human brain may open new insights into the neural basis of human cognition.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Macromolecular Concentration during Direct Infusion into an Agarose Hydrogel Phantom using Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoming; Astary, Garrett W.; Sepulveda, Hector; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2011-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED), i.e., direct tissue infusion, has emerged as a promising local drug delivery method for treating diseases of the nervous system. Determination of the spatial distribution of therapeutic agents after infusion is important in evaluating the efficacy of treatment, optimizing infusion protocols, and improving the understanding of drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, we provide a methodology to determine the concentration distribution of Gd-labeled tracers during infusion using contrast-enhanced MR imaging. To the best of our knowledge, MR studies that quantify concentration profiles for CED have not been previously reported. The methodology utilizes intrinsic material properties (T1 and R1) and reduces the effect of instrumental factors (e.g., inhomogeneity of MR detection field). As a methodology investigation, this study used an agarose hydrogel phantom as a tissue substitute for infusion. An 11.1 T magnet system was used to image infusion of Gd-DTPA labeled albumin (Gd-albumin) into the hydrogel. By using data from preliminary scans, Gd-albumin distribution was determined from the signal intensity of the MR images. As a validation test, MR-derived concentration profiles were found comparable to both results measured directly using quantitative optical imaging and results from a computational transport model in porous media. In future studies, the developed methodology will be used to quantitatively monitor the distribution of Gd-tracer following infusion directly into tissues. PMID:18583082

  13. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Vinh, Nguyen Quoc; Naka, Shigeyuki; Cabral, Horacio; Murayama, Hiroyuki; Kaida, Sachiko; Kataoka, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tani, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt)] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or saline controls. Our results suggest that Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles are a promising approach for effective diagnosis and treatment of advanced HCC.

  14. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  15. Augmenting atypical antipsychotics with a cognitive enhancer (donepezil) improves regional brain activity in schizophrenia patients: a pilot double-blind placebo controlled BOLD fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Ziad; George, Mark S; Horner, Michael D; Markowitz, John S; Li, Xingbao; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Owens, Susan D; McGurk, Susan; DeVane, Lindsay; Risch, S Craig

    2003-06-01

    Cognitive impairments are cardinal features of schizophrenia and predictors of poor vocational and social outcome. Imaging studies with verbal fluency tasks (VFT) lead some to suggest that in schizophrenia, the combination of a failure to deactivate the left temporal lobe and a hypoactive frontal lobe reflects a functional disconnectivity between the left prefrontal cortex and temporal lobe. Others have theorized that an abnormal cingulate gyrus modulates such fronto-temporal connectivity. Thus addition of a cognitive enhancing medication to current antipsychotic therapy might improve functionality of networks necessary in working memory and internal concept generation. To test this hypothesis, we serially measured brain activity in 6 subjects on stable atypical antipsychotics performing a VFT, using BOLD fMRI. Measurements were made at baseline and again after groups were randomized to receive 12 weeks of donepezil (an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and placebo in a blind cross-over design. Donepezil addition provided a functional normalization with an increase in left frontal lobe and cingulate activity when compared to placebo and from baseline scans. This pilot study supports the cingulate's role in modulating cognition and neuronal connectivity in schizophrenia.

  16. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  17. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  18. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  19. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI detects early response to adoptive NK cellular immunotherapy targeting the NG2 proteoglycan in a rat model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rygh, Cecilie Brekke; Wang, Jian; Thuen, Marte; Gras Navarro, Andrea; Huuse, Else Marie; Thorsen, Frits; Poli, Aurelie; Zimmer, Jacques; Haraldseth, Olav; Lie, Stein Atle; Enger, Per Øyvind; Chekenya, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no established radiological parameters that predict response to immunotherapy. We hypothesised that multiparametric, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of physiological parameters and pharmacokinetic models might detect early biological responses to immunotherapy for glioblastoma targeting NG2/CSPG4 with mAb9.2.27 combined with natural killer (NK) cells. Contrast enhanced conventional T1-weighted MRI at 7±1 and 17±2 days post-treatment failed to detect differences in tumour size between the treatment groups, whereas, follow-up scans at 3 months demonstrated diminished signal intensity and tumour volume in the surviving NK+mAb9.2.27 treated animals. Notably, interstitial volume fraction (ve), was significantly increased in the NK+mAb9.2.27 combination therapy group compared mAb9.2.27 and NK cell monotherapy groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.017 respectively) in cohort 1 animals treated with 1 million NK cells. ve was reproducibly increased in the combination NK+mAb9.2.27 compared to NK cell monotherapy in cohort 2 treated with increased dose of 2 million NK cells (p<0.0001), indicating greater cell death induced by NK+mAb9.2.27 treatment. The interstitial volume fraction in the NK monotherapy group was significantly reduced compared to mAb9.2.27 monotherapy (p<0.0001) and untreated controls (p = 0.014) in the cohort 2 animals. NK cells in monotherapy were unable to kill the U87MG cells that highly expressed class I human leucocyte antigens, and diminished stress ligands for activating receptors. A significant association between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water and ve in combination NK+mAb9.2.27 and NK monotherapy treated tumours was evident, where increased ADC corresponded to reduced ve in both cases. Collectively, these data support histological measures at end-stage demonstrating diminished tumour cell proliferation and pronounced apoptosis in the NK+mAb9.2.27 treated tumours compared to the other groups. In

  20. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Detects Early Response to Adoptive NK Cellular Immunotherapy Targeting the NG2 Proteoglycan in a Rat Model of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Thuen, Marte; Gras Navarro, Andrea; Huuse, Else Marie; Thorsen, Frits; Poli, Aurelie; Zimmer, Jacques; Haraldseth, Olav; Lie, Stein Atle; Enger, Per Øyvind; Chekenya, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no established radiological parameters that predict response to immunotherapy. We hypothesised that multiparametric, longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of physiological parameters and pharmacokinetic models might detect early biological responses to immunotherapy for glioblastoma targeting NG2/CSPG4 with mAb9.2.27 combined with natural killer (NK) cells. Contrast enhanced conventional T1-weighted MRI at 7±1 and 17±2 days post-treatment failed to detect differences in tumour size between the treatment groups, whereas, follow-up scans at 3 months demonstrated diminished signal intensity and tumour volume in the surviving NK+mAb9.2.27 treated animals. Notably, interstitial volume fraction (ve), was significantly increased in the NK+mAb9.2.27 combination therapy group compared mAb9.2.27 and NK cell monotherapy groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.017 respectively) in cohort 1 animals treated with 1 million NK cells. ve was reproducibly increased in the combination NK+mAb9.2.27 compared to NK cell monotherapy in cohort 2 treated with increased dose of 2 million NK cells (p<0.0001), indicating greater cell death induced by NK+mAb9.2.27 treatment. The interstitial volume fraction in the NK monotherapy group was significantly reduced compared to mAb9.2.27 monotherapy (p<0.0001) and untreated controls (p = 0.014) in the cohort 2 animals. NK cells in monotherapy were unable to kill the U87MG cells that highly expressed class I human leucocyte antigens, and diminished stress ligands for activating receptors. A significant association between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water and ve in combination NK+mAb9.2.27 and NK monotherapy treated tumours was evident, where increased ADC corresponded to reduced ve in both cases. Collectively, these data support histological measures at end-stage demonstrating diminished tumour cell proliferation and pronounced apoptosis in the NK+mAb9.2.27 treated tumours compared to the other groups. In

  1. Correlation of p63 immunohistochemistry with histology and contrast enhanced MRI in characteristic lesions induced by minimally invasive thermal treatments in a dog prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, A.; Butts-Pauly, K.; Plata, J.; Sommer, G.; Daniel, B.; Bouley, D. M.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal ablation techniques are important tools to treat low grade tumors in the prostate gland. The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been an excellent tool to visualize and assess the thermally ablated areas in real time. In this study slides from dog prostates previously treated with cryoablation or High Intensity Focal Ultrasound (HIFU) were immunohistochemically stained with the biomarker p63, in order to determine if this marker would be helpful for differentiatiating between viable, sub lethally damaged and normal glands. Digitized slides were analyzed using Sedeen Viewer software, and compared with corresponding representative H&E slides and MR images. p63 staining in the cryoablated acute duration prostates was negative in the coagulation necrosis zone (region of interest subjected to the coldest temperatures). In acute duration HIFU treated prostates, the central heat-fixed zone (region of interest subjected to the hottest temperatures) still displayed + p63 staining. Cryoablated or HIFU subacute duration treated prostates were very hemorrhagic, but presented the same stain pattern in the treated areas as the acute duration prostates, and in chronic duration prostates, whether treated with cryo or HIFU, glands displayed robust p63 staining most prevalent in the outer edges of the lesion where there was extensive glandular regeneration. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the value of p63 IHC and its usefulness in detecting viable prostate basal cells in normal dog prostates following either cryoablation of HIFU. Our results suggest that the portions of the lesion with complete loss of p63 staining correspond well to the non-enhancing region in cryoablated prostates, as viewed with MRI. However, p63 staining in the heat-fixed zone in acute harvested HIFU treated prostates remains positive, suggesting either inadequate heat to destroy basal cells, or heat-fixation of the p63 antigen and false positive staining. Therefore p63 staining does not

  2. AUR memorial award--1988. MRI enhancement of perfused tissues using chromium labeled red blood cells as an intravascular contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, A.D.; Conturo, T.E.; Price, R.R.; Holburn, G.E.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that chromium (Cr) labeling significantly decreases the relaxation times of packed red blood cells (RBCs). In this study, the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of human red cells was shortened from 836 ms to 29 ms and the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) shortened from 134 ms to 18 ms, when the cells were labeled at a Cr incubation concentration of 50 mM. Labeling of canine cells at 50 mM resulted in a T1 of 36 ms and a T2 of 26 ms. A labeling concentration of 10 mM produced similar relaxation enhancement, with uptake of 47% of the available Cr, and was determined to be optimal. The enhancement of longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates (1/T1,-1/T2) per amount of hemoglobin-bound Cr are 6.9 s-1 mM-1 and 9.8 s-1 mM-1 respectively, different from those of a pure Cr+3 solution. Labeling cells at 10 mM decreased the survival half-time in vivo from 16.6 days to 4.7 days in dogs. No difference in red cell survival was found with the use of hetero-transfusion versus auto-transfusion of labeled RBCs. Significant shortening of the T1 (912 ms to 266 ms, P = .03) and T2 (90 ms to 70 ms, P = .006) of spleen and the T1 (764 ms to 282 ms, P = .005) and the T2 (128 ms to 86 ms, P = .005) of liver occurred when 10% of the RBC mass of dogs was exchanged with Cr labeled cells. Liver and spleen spin density changes (P greater than 0.23) and muscle spin density and relaxation changes (P greater than 0.4) were insignificant. The in vivo T1 of a canine spleen which had been infarcted did not change following transfusion with labeled cells, where the T1 of liver did shorten. We believe this preliminary study suggests that Cr labeled red cells may have the potential to become an intravascular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

  3. Characterization of t1 relaxation and blood-myocardial contrast enhancement of NC100150 injection in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Wagenseil, J E; Johansson, L O; Lorenz, C H

    1999-11-01

    A new ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (Clariscan; NC100150 Injection) was studied in domestic farm pigs. The T1 effects were characterized for blood and myocardium and the blood-myocardial contrast was measured in T1-weighted cine images. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured at baseline and contrast doses of 1 and 5 mg Fe/kg body weight (bw) at end diastole and late systole. The T1 values for blood and myocardium were reduced by 97 and 43%, respectively, from baseline to 5 mg Fe/kg bw. The CNR was significantly improved with contrast at end diastole and late systole. The maximum improvement shown was 202% at 5 mg Fe/kg bw in late systole. The percent SNR enhancement was significantly higher in blood than myocardium at late systole. NC100150 Injection is an effective T1 shortening agent and can be used to improve blood-myocardial contrast in cine images of the heart. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:784-789.

  4. Functional connectivity changes during consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory in rats: a manganese-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Hsin; Chen, Der-Yow; Liang, K C

    2013-10-31

    Consolidation of memory involves transfer of encoded information into a durable neural representation, but how this is transacted in the nervous system remains elusive. It has been proposed that memory consolidation is subserved by formation of a cell assembly due to coincidence of pre- and post-synaptic activity therein after learning. To capture such off-line changes, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) was used to trace brain activity during the memory consolidation period. Male Wistar rats were trained on the one-trial inhibitory avoidance task and received intraventricular infusion of manganese ion shortly after training. The MEMRI taken 1 day later showed that brain areas including the prelimbic, insular and anterior pirifrom cortices of the learning group had significantly lower memory-related MEMRI signal than those of the control group. The functional network was revealed by correlating the MEMRI signals among regions followed by graph theoretical analysis. Learning sculpted the non-discriminative connectivity among many brain regions in the controls into a network in the trained rats with selected connectivity among regions implicated in inhibitory avoidance learning. The network could be organized into three clusters presumably subserving different functions. The results suggest that the brain prunes excessive functional connectivity in a cell assembly to consolidate new memory.

  5. Neural correlates of retrieval-based memory enhancement: an fMRI study of the testing effect.

    PubMed

    Wing, Erik A; Marsh, Elizabeth J; Cabeza, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    Restudying material is a common method for learning new information, but not necessarily an effective one. Research on the testing effect shows that practice involving retrieval from memory can facilitate later memory in contrast to passive restudy. Despite extensive behavioral work, the brain processes that make retrieval an effective learning strategy remain unclear. In the present experiment, we explored how initially retrieving items affected memory a day later as compared to a condition involving traditional restudy. In contrast to restudy, initial testing that contributed to future memory success was associated with engagement of several regions including the anterior hippocampus, lateral temporal cortices, and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Additionally, testing enhanced hippocampal connectivity with ventrolateral PFC and midline regions. These findings indicate that the testing effect may be contingent on processes that are typically thought to support memory success at encoding (e.g. relational binding, selection and elaboration of semantically-related information) in addition to those more often associated with retrieval (e.g. memory search).

  6. Neural correlates of retrieval-based memory enhancement: An fMRI study of the testing effect

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Erik A.; Marsh, Elizabeth J.; Cabeza, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Restudying material is a common method for learning new information, but not necessarily an effective one. Research on the testing effect shows that practice involving retrieval from memory can facilitate later memory in contrast to passive restudy. Despite extensive behavioral work, the brain processes that make retrieval an effective learning strategy remain unclear. In the present experiment, we explored how initially retrieving items affected memory a day later as compared to a condition involving traditional restudy. In contrast to restudy, initial testing that contributed to future memory success was associated with engagement of several regions including the anterior hippocampus, lateral temporal cortices, and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Additionally, testing enhanced hippocampal connectivity with ventrolateral PFC and midline regions. These findings indicate that the testing effect may be contingent on processes that are typically thought to support memory success at encoding (e.g. relational binding, selection and elaboration of semantically-related information) in addition to those more often associated with retrieval (e.g. memory search). PMID:23607935

  7. Mapping of pain circuitry in early post-natal development using manganese-enhanced MRI in rats.

    PubMed

    Sperry, M M; Kandel, B M; Wehrli, S; Bass, K N; Das, S R; Dhillon, P S; Gee, J C; Barr, G A

    2017-04-06

    Premature or ill full-term infants are subject to a number of noxious procedures as part of their necessary medical care. Although we know that human infants show neural changes in response to such procedures, we know little of the sensory or affective brain circuitry activated by pain. In rodent models, the focus has been on spinal cord and, more recently, midbrain and medulla. The present study assesses activation of brain circuits using manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Uptake of manganese, a paramagnetic contrast agent that is transported across active synapses and along axons, was measured in response to a hindpaw injection of dilute formalin in 12-day-old rat pups, the age at which rats begin to show aversion learning and which is roughly the equivalent of full-term human infants. Formalin induced the well-reported biphasic response at this age and induced a conditioned aversion to cues associated with its injection, thus demonstrating the aversiveness of the stimulation. Morphometric analyses, structural equation modeling and co-expression analysis showed that limbic and sensory paths were activated, the most prominent of which were the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hypothalamus, several brainstem structures, and the cerebellum. Therefore, both sensory and affective circuits, which are activated by pain in the adult, can also be activated by noxious stimulation in 12-day-old rat pups.

  8. Endolymphatic Hydrops Reversal following Acetazolamide Therapy: Demonstration with Delayed Intravenous Contrast-Enhanced 3D-FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Sepahdari, A R; Vorasubin, N; Ishiyama, G; Ishiyama, A

    2016-01-01

    Endolymphatic hydrops, the primary pathologic alteration in Menière disease, can be visualized by using delayed intravenous contrast-enhanced 3D-FLAIR MR imaging. It is not known whether MR imaging-demonstrable changes of hydrops fluctuate with disease activity or are fixed. We describe the results of baseline and posttreatment MR imaging studies in a group of subjects with Menière disease with hydrops who were treated with acetazolamide. Seven subjects with untreated Menière disease with MR imaging evidence of hydrops had repeat MR imaging during acetazolamide treatment. Symptoms and imaging findings were assessed at each time point. Five subjects showed symptom improvement, of whom 3 had improvement or resolution of hydrops. One subject had recurrent symptoms with recurrent hydrops after discontinuing therapy. Two had unchanged hydrops despite symptom improvement. Subjects with unchanged symptoms had unchanged hydrops. Hydrops reversal may be seen with acetazolamide treatment in Menière disease. MR imaging may provide an additional biomarker of disease.

  9. A model-constrained Monte Carlo method for blind arterial input function estimation in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: II. In vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schabel, Matthias C.; DiBella, Edward V. R.; Jensen, Randy L.; Salzman, Karen L.

    2010-08-01

    Accurate quantification of pharmacokinetic model parameters in tracer kinetic imaging experiments requires correspondingly accurate determination of the arterial input function (AIF). Despite significant effort expended on methods of directly measuring patient-specific AIFs in modalities as diverse as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), and perfusion computed tomography (CT), fundamental and technical difficulties have made consistent and reliable achievement of that goal elusive. Here, we validate a new algorithm for AIF determination, the Monte Carlo blind estimation (MCBE) method (which is described in detail and characterized by extensive simulations in a companion paper), by comparing AIFs measured in DCE-MRI studies of eight brain tumor patients with results of blind estimation. Blind AIFs calculated with the MCBE method using a pool of concentration-time curves from a region of normal brain tissue were found to be quite similar to the measured AIFs, with statistically significant decreases in fit residuals observed in six of eight patients. Biases between the blind and measured pharmacokinetic parameters were the dominant source of error. Averaged over all eight patients, the mean biases were +7% in K trans, 0% in kep, -11% in vp and +10% in ve. Corresponding uncertainties (median absolute deviation from the best fit line) were 0.0043 min-1 in K trans, 0.0491 min-1 in kep, 0.29% in vp and 0.45% in ve. The use of a published population-averaged AIF resulted in larger mean biases in three of the four parameters (-23% in K trans, -22% in kep, -63% in vp), with the bias in ve unchanged, and led to larger uncertainties in all four parameters (0.0083 min-1 in K trans, 0.1038 min-1 in kep, 0.31% in vp and 0.95% in ve). When blind AIFs were calculated from a region of tumor tissue, statistically significant decreases in fit residuals were observed in all eight patients despite larger

  10. Optimization of rs-fMRI Pre-processing for Enhanced Signal-Noise Separation, Test-Retest Reliability, and Group Discrimination.

    PubMed

    Shirer, William R; Jiang, Heidi; Price, Collin M; Ng, Bernard; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-08-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has become an increasingly important tool in mapping the functional networks of the brain. This tool has been used to examine network changes induced by cognitive and emotional states, neurological traits, and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, noise that remains in the rs-fMRI data after preprocessing has limited the reliability of individual-subject results, wherein scanner artifacts, subject movements, and other noise sources induce non-neural temporal correlations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) timeseries. Numerous preprocessing methods have been proposed to isolate and remove these confounds; however, the field has not coalesced around a standard preprocessing pipeline. In comparisons, these preprocessing methods are often assessed with only a single metric of rs-fMRI data quality, such as reliability, without considering other aspects in tandem, such as signal-to-noise ratio and group discriminability. The present study seeks to identify the data preprocessing pipeline that optimizes rs-fMRI data across multiple outcome measures. Specifically, we aim to minimize the noise in the data and maximize result reliability, while retaining the unique features that characterize distinct groups. We examine how these metrics are influenced by bandpass filter selection and noise regression in four datasets, totaling 181 rs-fMRI scans and 38 subject-driven memory scans. Additionally, we perform two different rs-fMRI analysis methods - dual regression and region-of-interest based functional connectivity - and highlight the preprocessing parameters that optimize both approaches. Our results expand upon previous reports of individual-scan reliability, and demonstrate that preprocessing parameter selection can significantly change the noisiness, reliability, and heterogeneity of rs-fMRI data. The application of our findings to rs-fMRI data analysis should improve the validity and reliability of rs-fMRI

  11. Oxygen-17 dynamic nuclear polarisation enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy at 18.8 T.

    PubMed

    Brownbill, Nick J; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Blanc, Frédéric

    2017-02-23

    We report (17)O dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) enhanced solid-state NMR experiments at 18.8 T. Several formulations were investigated on the Mg(OH)2 compound. A signal enhancement factor of 17 could be obtained when the solid particles were incorporated into a glassy o-terphenyl matrix doped with BDPA using the Overhauser polarisation transfer scheme whilst the cross effect mechanism enabled by TEKPol yielded a slightly lower enhancement but more time efficient data acquisition.

  12. Classification of small lesions in dynamic breast MRI: Eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation through spatio-temporal analysis of contrast enhancement over time.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Huber, Markus B; Schlossbauer, Thomas; Leinsinger, Gerda; Krol, Andrzej; Wismüller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Characterizing the dignity of breast lesions as benign or malignant is specifically difficult for small lesions; they don't exhibit typical characteristics of malignancy and are harder to segment since margins are harder to visualize. Previous attempts at using dynamic or morphologic criteria to classify small lesions (mean lesion diameter of about 1 cm) have not yielded satisfactory results. The goal of this work was to improve the classification performance in such small diagnostically challenging lesions while concurrently eliminating the need for precise lesion segmentation. To this end, we introduce a method for topological characterization of lesion enhancement patterns over time. Three Minkowski Functionals were extracted from all five post-contrast images of sixty annotated lesions on dynamic breast MRI exams. For each Minkowski Functional, topological features extracted from each post-contrast image of the lesions were combined into a high-dimensional texture feature vector. These feature vectors were classified in a machine learning task with support vector regression. For comparison, conventional Haralick texture features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were also used. A new method for extracting thresholded GLCM features was also introduced and investigated here. The best classification performance was observed with Minkowski Functionals area and perimeter, thresholded GLCM features f8 and f9, and conventional GLCM features f4 and f6. However, both Minkowski Functionals and thresholded GLCM achieved such results without lesion segmentation while the performance of GLCM features significantly deteriorated when lesions were not segmented (p < 0.05). This suggests that such advanced spatio-temporal characterization can improve the classification performance achieved in such small lesions, while simultaneously eliminating the need for precise segmentation.

  13. Battlefield MRI

    DOE PAGES

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  14. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  15. Sodium MRI.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Sodium ((23)Na) imaging has a place somewhere between (1)H-MRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Like MRS it potentially provides information on metabolic processes, but only one single resonance of ionic (23)Na is observed. Therefore pulse sequences do not need to code for a chemical shift dimension, allowing (23)Na images to be obtained at high resolutions as compared to MRS. In this chapter the biological significance of sodium in the brain will be discussed, as well as methods for observing it with (23)Na-MRI. Many vital cellular processes and interactions in excitable tissues depend on the maintenance of a low intracellular and high extracellular sodium concentration. Healthy cells maintain this concentration gradient at the cost of energy. Leaky cell membranes or an impaired energy metabolism immediately leads to an increase in cytosolic total tissue sodium. This makes sodium a biomarker for ischemia, cancer, excessive tissue activation, or tissue damage as might be caused by ablation therapy. Special techniques allow quantification of tissue sodium for the monitoring of disease or therapy in longitudinal studies or preferential observation of the intracellular component of the tissue sodium. New methods and high-field magnet technology provide new opportunities for (23)Na-MRI in clinical and biomedical research.

  16. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI protocol with improved spatial and time resolution for in vivo microimaging of the mouse with a 1.5-T body scanner and a superconducting surface coil.

    PubMed

    Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Robert, Philippe; Darrasse, Luc

    2005-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is well suited for small animal model investigations to study various human pathologies. However, the assessment of microscopic information requires a high-spatial resolution (HSR) leading to a critical problem of signal-to-noise ratio limitations in standard whole-body imager. As contrast mechanisms are field dependent, working at high field do not allow to derive MRI criteria that may apply to clinical settings done in standard whole-body systems. In this work, a contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI protocol with improved spatial and time resolution was used to perform in vivo tumor model imaging on the mouse at 1.5 T. The needed sensitivity is provided by the use of a 12-mm superconducting surface coil operating at 77 K. High quality in vivo images were obtained and revealed well-defined internal structures of the tumor. A 3-D HSR sequence with voxels of 59x59x300 microm3 encoded within 6.9 min and a 2-D sequence with subsecond acquisition time and isotropic in-plane resolution of 234 microm were used to analyze the contrast enhancement kinetics in tumoral structures at long and short time scales. This work is a first step to better characterize and differentiate the dynamic behavior of tumoral heterogeneities.

  17. Dynamic susceptibility contrast and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI characteristics to distinguish microcystic meningiomas from traditional Grade I meningiomas and high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S; Moisi, Marc D; Keogh, Bart; McCullough, Brendan J; Rostad, Steven; Newell, David; Gwinn, Ryder; Foltz, Gregory; Mayberg, Marc; Aguedan, Brian; Good, Valerie; Fouke, Sarah J

    2016-06-10

    OBJECTIVE Microcystic meningioma (MM) is a meningioma variant with a multicystic appearance that may mimic intrinsic primary brain tumors and other nonmeningiomatous tumor types. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI techniques provide imaging parameters that can differentiate these tumors according to hemodynamic and permeability characteristics with the potential to aid in preoperative identification of tumor type. METHODS The medical data of 18 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of MM were identified through a retrospective review of procedures performed between 2008 and 2012; DSC imaging data were available for 12 patients and DCE imaging data for 6. A subcohort of 12 patients with Grade I meningiomas (i.e., of meningoepithelial subtype) and 54 patients with Grade IV primary gliomas (i.e., astrocytomas) was also included, and all preoperative imaging sequences were analyzed. Clinical variables including patient sex, age, and surgical blood loss were also included in the analysis. Images were acquired at both 1.5 and 3.0 T. The DSC images were acquired at a temporal resolution of either 1500 msec (3.0 T) or 2000 msec (1.5 T). In all cases, parameters including normalized cerebral blood volume (CBV) and transfer coefficient (kTrans) were calculated with region-of-interest analysis of enhancing tumor volume. The normalized CBV and kTrans data from the patient groups were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, and post hoc statistical comparisons among groups were conducted with the Bonferroni adjustment. RESULTS Preoperative DSC imaging indicated mean (± SD) normalized CBVs of 5.7 ± 2.2 ml for WHO Grade I meningiomas of the meningoepithelial subtype (n = 12), 4.8 ± 1.8 ml for Grade IV astrocytomas (n = 54), and 12.3 ± 3.8 ml for Grade I meningiomas of the MM subtype (n = 12). The normalized CBV measured within the enhancing portion of the tumor was significantly higher in the MM subtype than in typical meningiomas and Grade

  18. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu )

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Frank, Steven J.; Song, Juhee; Ding, Yao; Ger, Rachel; Court, Laurence E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Hazle, John D.; Wang, Jihong; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Colen, Rivka R.; Elshafeey, Nabil; Elbanan, Mohamed; Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Lewin, Jan S.; Chambers, Mark S.; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  20. Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) Shows No Change in Cartilage Structural Composition after Viscosupplementation in Patients with Early-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel, Jasper; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Hermans, Job; van Buul, Gerben M.; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Weinans, Harrie; Kotek, Gyula; Oei, Edwin H. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) of osteoarthritic (OA) knee joints has a well-established positive effect on clinical symptoms. This effect, however, is only temporary and the working mechanism of HA injections is not clear. It was suggested that HA might have disease modifying properties because of its beneficial effect on cartilage sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a highly reproducible, non-invasive surrogate measure for sGAG content and hence composition of cartilage. The aim of this study was to assess whether improvement in cartilage structural composition is detected using dGEMRIC 14 weeks after 3 weekly injections with HA in patients with early-stage knee OA. Methods In 20 early-stage knee OA patients (KLG I-II), 3D dGEMRIC at 3T was acquired before and 14 weeks after 3 weekly injections with HA. To evaluate patient symptoms, the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) and a numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain were recorded. To evaluate cartilage composition, six cartilage regions in the knee were analyzed on dGEMRIC. Outcomes of dGEMRIC, KOOS and NRS before and after HA were compared using paired t-testing. Since we performed multiple t-tests, we applied a Bonferroni-Holm correction to determine statistical significance for these analyses. Results All KOOS subscales (‘pain’, ‘symptoms’, ‘daily activities’, ‘sports’ and ’quality of life’) and the NRS pain improved significantly 14 weeks after Viscosupplementation with HA. Outcomes of dGEMRIC did not change significantly after HA compared to baseline in any of the cartilage regions analyzed in the knee. Conclusions Our results confirm previous findings reported in the literature, showing persisting improvement in symptomatic outcome measures in early-stage knee OA patients 14 weeks after Viscosupplementation. Outcomes of dGEMRIC, however, did not change after Viscosupplementation

  1. Multiparametric Breast MRI of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Habib; Partridge, Savannah C.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Breast MRI has increased in popularity over the past two decades due to evidence for its high sensitivity for cancer detection. Current clinical MRI approaches rely on the use of a dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI) acquisition that facilitates morphologic and semi-quantitative kinetic assessments of breast lesions. The use of more functional and quantitative parameters, such as pharmacokinetic features from high temporal resolution DCE-MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) on diffusion weighted MRI, and choline concentrations on MR spectroscopy, hold promise to broaden the utility of MRI and improve its specificity. However, due to wide variations in approach among centers for measuring these parameters and the considerable technical challenges, robust multicenter data supporting their routine use is not yet available, limiting current applications of many of these tools to research purposes. PMID:26613883

  2. MRI Biomarkers in Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori; Dula, Adrienne; Quarles, C. Chad; Stokes, Ashley; Weis, Jared; Whisenant, Jennifer; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Zhukov, Igor; Williams, Jason; Yankeelov, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have the ability to quantitatively report various pathophysiological processes associated with cancer. These measures have been shown to provide complementary information to that typically obtained from standard morphologically based criteria (e.g., size) and, furthermore, have been shown to outperform sized based measures in certain applications. In this review, we discuss eight areas of quantitative MRI that are either currently employed in clinical trials, or are emerging as promising techniques for both diagnosing cancer as well as assessing—or even predicting—the response of cancer to various therapies. The currently employed methods include the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST), dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). The emerging techniques covered are chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI (CEST-MRI), elastography, hyperpolarized MRI, and multi-parameter MRI. After a brief introduction to each technique, we present a small number of illustrative applications before noting the existing limitations of each method and what must be done to move each to more routine clinical application. PMID:26613873

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in mouse tumors at 11.7 T: comparison of three contrast agents with different molecular weights to assess the early effects of combretastatin A4.

    PubMed

    Fruytier, A-C; Magat, J; Neveu, M-A; Karroum, O; Bouzin, C; Feron, O; Jordan, B; Cron, G O; Gallez, B

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is useful to assess the early effects of drugs acting on tumor vasculature, namely anti-angiogenic and vascular disrupting agents. Ultra-high-field MRI allows higher-resolution scanning for DCE-MRI while maintaining an adequate signal-to-noise ratio. However, increases in susceptibility effects, combined with decreases in longitudinal relaxivity of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GdCAs), make DCE-MRI more challenging at high field. The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of using DCE-MRI at 11.7 T to assess the tumor hemodynamics of mice. Three GdCAs possessing different molecular weights (gadoterate: 560 Da, 0.29 mmol Gd/kg; p846: 3.5 kDa, 0.10 mmol Gd/kg; and p792: 6.47 kDa, 0.15 mmol Gd/kg) were compared to see the influence of the molecular weight in the highlight of the biologic effects induced by combretastatin A4 (CA4). Mice bearing transplantable liver tumor (TLT) hepatocarcinoma were divided into two groups (n = 5-6 per group and per GdCA): a treated group receiving 100 mg/kg CA4, and a control group receiving vehicle. The mice were imaged at 11.7 T with a T1 -weighted FLASH sequence 2 h after the treatment. Individual arterial input functions (AIFs) were computed using phase imaging. These AIFs were used in the Extended Tofts Model to determine K(trans) and vp values. A separate immunohistochemistry study was performed to assess the vascular perfusion and the vascular density. Phase imaging was used successfully to measure the AIF for the three GdCAs. In control groups, an inverse relationship between the molecular weight of the GdCA and K(trans) and vp values was observed. K(trans) was significantly decreased in the treated group compared with the control group for each GdCA. DCE-MRI at 11.7 T is feasible to assess tumor hemodynamics in mice. With K(trans) , the three GdCAs were able to track the early vascular effects induced by CA4 treatment.

  4. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  5. Physiological noise correction using ECG-derived respiratory signals for enhanced mapping of spontaneous neuronal activity with simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Rodolfo; Nunes, Sandro; Leal, Alberto; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-08-12

    The study of spontaneous brain activity based on BOLD-fMRI may be seriously compromised by the presence of signal fluctuations of non-neuronal origin, most prominently due to cardiac and respiratory mechanisms. Methods used for modeling and correction of the so-called physiological noise usually rely on the concurrent measurement of cardiac and respiratory signals. In simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings, which are primarily aimed at the study of spontaneous brain activity, the electrocardiogram (ECG) is typically measured as part of the EEG setup but respiratory data are not generally available. Here, we propose to use the ECG-derived respiratory (EDR) signal estimated by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) as a surrogate of the respiratory signal, for retrospective physiological noise correction of typical simultaneous EEG-fMRI data. A physiological noise model based on these physiological signals (P-PNM) complemented with fMRI-derived noise regressors was generated, and evaluated, for 17 simultaneous EEG-fMRI datasets acquired from a group of seven epilepsy patients imaged at 3T. The respiratory components of P-PNM were found to explain BOLD variance significantly in addition to the cardiac components, suggesting that the EDR signal was successfully extracted from the ECG, and P-PNM outperformed an image-based model (I-PNM) in terms of total BOLD variance explained. Further, the impact of the correction using P-PNM on fMRI mapping of patient-specific epileptic networks and the resting-state default mode network (DMN) was assessed in terms of sensitivity and specificity and, when compared with an ICA-based procedure and a standard pre-processing pipeline, P-PNM achieved the best performance. Overall, our results support the feasibility and utility of extracting physiological noise models of the BOLD signal resorting to ECG data exclusively, with substantial impact on the simultaneous EEG-fMRI mapping of resting-state networks, and, most importantly, epileptic networks

  6. Power Doppler ultrasonography of painful Achilles tendons and entheses in patients with and without spondyloarthropathy: a comparison with clinical examination and contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria; Møller, Jakob M; Nørregaard, Jesper; Terslev, Lene; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at painful Achilles tendons and entheses in patients with and without spondyloarthropathy (SpA and non-SpA) and healthy control persons (CTRLs). Particularly, we aimed to investigate if any changes differentiate SpA from non-SpA. Finally, we investigated the reliability of US compared to clinical examination of Achilles tendinopathy, using MRI as gold standard reference. Twelve SpA patients and 15 non-SpA patients with pain and tenderness at at least one Achilles tendon and/or enthesis due to sports-related causes and 10 CTRLs were examined at the Achilles tendons and entheses with US, MRI and clinical assessment. Intratendinous changes, entheseal changes, bursitis and peritendonitis were assessed. An US interobserver substudy was performed in nine persons. US findings showed high agreement between observers (median 89 %, κ = 0.64) and with MRI (median 89 %, κ = 0.74). All inflammatory intratendinous changes were less frequent in SpA than non-SpA patients (p < 0.05). Entheseal changes and bursitis were found equally frequent in both patient groups except for enthesophytes, which were most common in the SpA group (p < 0.01). No findings were exclusively found in SpA. When MRI was considered gold standard, US showed higher sensitivity for intratendinous and entheseal changes than clinical examination (median sensitivity 0.83 versus 0.66). Especially, entheseal changes had higher sensitivity than clinical examination without loss of specificity. In conclusion, US performed by a trained operator can be a useful adjunct to clinical examination for improved assessment of Achilles tendons and entheses.

  7. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates.

  8. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  9. A case report of pseudoprogression followed by complete remission after proton-beam irradiation for a low-grade glioma in a teenager: the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Meyzer, Candice; Dhermain, Frédéric; Ducreux, Denis; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Varlet, Pascale; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Dufour, Christelle; Grill, Jacques

    2010-02-04

    A fourteen years-old boy was treated post-operatively with proton therapy for a recurrent low-grade oligodendroglioma located in the tectal region. Six months after the end of irradiation (RT), a new enhancing lesion appeared within the radiation fields. To differentiate disease progression from radiation-induced changes, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSCE) MRI was used with a T2* sequence to study perfusion and permeability characteristics simultaneously. Typically, the lesion showed hypoperfusion and hyperpermeability compared to the controlateral normal brain. Without additional treatment but a short course of steroids, the image disappeared over a six months period allowing us to conclude for a pseudo-progression. The patient is alive in complete remission more than 2 years post-RT.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) in a glioma model of the rat brain using a conventional receive-only surface coil with a inner diameter of 47 mm at a clinical 1.5 T scanner.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Stephan; Reeh, Matthias; Krause, Joerg; Herdegen, Thomas; Heldt-Feindt, Janka; Jansen, Olav; Rohr, Axel

    2008-07-30

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in animal models is usually performed in expensive dedicated small bore animal scanners of limited availability. In the present study a standard clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was used for morphometric and dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted MR imaging (DSC-MRI) of a glioma model of the rat brain. Ten male Wistar rats were examined with coronal T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images (matrix 128 x 128, FOV 64 mm) after implantation of an intracerebral tumor xenografts (C6) using a conventional surface coil. For DSC-MRI a T2*-weighted sequence (TR/TE=30/14 ms, matrix 64 x 64, FOV 90 mm; slice thickness of 1.5mm) was performed. Regions of interest were defined within the tumor and the non-affected contralateral hemisphere and the mean transit time (MTT) was determined. Tumor dimensions in MR predicted well its real size as proven by histology. The MTT of contrast agent passing through the brain was significantly decelerated in the tumor compared to the unaffected hemisphere (p<0.001, paired t-test), which is most likely due to the leakage of contrast agent through the disrupted blood brain barrier. This setup offers advanced MR imaging of small animals without the need for dedicated animal scanners or dedicated custom-made coils.

  11. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... sinuses. The test is noninvasive. MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves instead of radiation. Signals from ... in the eyes. Because the MRI contains a magnet, metal-containing objects such as pens, pocketknives, and ...

  12. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  13. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 20 to 40 minutes. top of page Contrast material For some MRI exams, a contrast material called gadolinium will need to be injected into a vein in the arm. While contrast material sometimes improves the MRI images, during pregnancy the ...

  14. The Contrast Enhancement of Intracranial Arterial Wall on High-resolution MRI and Its Clinical Relevance in Patients with Moyamoya Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maoxue; Yang, Yongbo; Zhou, Fei; Li, Ming; Liu, Renyuan; Guan, Maobin; Li, Rui; He, Le; Xu, Yun; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Bin; Zhao, Xihai

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of intracranial vessel wall enhancement and its relationship with ischemic infarction in patients with Moyamoya vasculopathy (MMV). Forty-seven patients with MMV confirmed by angiography were enrolled in this study. The vessel wall enhancement of the distal internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery was classified into eccentric and concentric patterns, as well as divided into three grades: grade 0, grade 1 and grade 2. The relationship between ischemic infarction and vessel wall enhancement was also determined. Fifty-six enhanced lesions were found in patients with (n = 25) and without acute infarction (n = 22). The incidence of lesions with grade 2 enhancement in patients with acute infarction was greater than that in those without acute infarction (p = 0.011). In addition, grade 2 enhancement of the intracranial vessel wall was significantly associated with acute ischemic infarction (Odds ratio, 26.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.8–258.2; p = 0.005). Higher-grade enhancement of the intracranial vessel wall is independently associated with acute ischemic infarction in patients with MMV. The characteristics of intracranial vessel wall enhancement may serve as a marker of its stability and provide important insight into ischemic stroke risk factors. PMID:28276529

  15. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  16. MRI of osteoarthritis: the challenges of definition and quantification.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daichi; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W

    2012-11-01

    The ability of MRI to visualize the joint as a "whole organ" and to directly and three-dimensionally assess cartilage morphology and composition has given it a crucial role in discovering the natural history of osteoarthritis (OA). Morphological analysis can be semiquantitative or quantitative. Compositional analysis such as delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping allows quantitative evaluation of tissue ultrastructure and can detect premorphological changes of cartilage and other tissues. Contrast-enhanced MRI can accurately assess the true extent of synovial inflammation. Most MRI-based studies so far have focused on knee OA, but with the availability of new semiquantitative scoring systems for hand and hip OA, studies of these joints have begun to appear. Because of the technical complexity of MRI and ever increasing number of new and sophisticated imaging sequences and protocols, the specific MRI technique in any OA study needs to be carefully tailored to the aims of the study.

  17. Clinical utility of multimodality imaging with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of neck control in oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wang, Hung-Ming; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of pretreatment imaging techniques for predicting neck control in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) treated with chemoradiation remains unclear. In this prospective study, we investigated the role of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE-PWI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)/CT derived imaging markers for the prediction of neck control in OHSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with untreated OHSCC scheduled for chemoradiation between August, 2010 and July, 2012 were eligible for the study. Clinical variables and the following imaging parameters of metastatic neck lymph nodes were examined in relation to neck control: transfer constant, volume of blood plasma, and volume of extracellular extravascular space (Ve) on DCE-PWI; apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI; maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis on 18F-FDG PET/CT. There were 69 patients (37 with oropharynx SCC and 32 with hypopharynx SCC) with successful pretreatment DCE-PWI and DWI available for analysis. After a median follow-up of 31 months, 25 (36.2%) participants had neck failure. Multivariate analysis identified hemoglobin level <14.3 g/dL (P = 0.019), Ve <0.23 (P = 0.040), and ADC >1.14×10-3 mm2/s (P = 0.003) as independent prognostic factors for 3-year neck control. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the three significant predictors of neck control. Patients with scores of 2-3 had significantly poorer neck control and overall survival rates than patients with scores of 0-1. We conclude that hemoglobin levels, Ve, and ADC are independent pretreatment prognostic factors for neck control in OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination may identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of developing neck failure.

  18. Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) and functional MRI in awake rabbits during somatosensory stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Matthew P.; Weiss, Craig; Procissi, Daniel; Wang, Lei; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Activity-induced manganese-dependent MRI (AIM-MRI) is a powerful tool to track system-wide neural activity using high resolution, quantitative T1-weighted MRI in animal models and has significant advantages for investigating neural activity over other modalities including BOLD fMRI. With AIM-MRI, Mn2+ ions enter neurons via voltage-gated calcium channels preferentially active during the time of experimental exposure. A broad range of AIM-MRI studies using different species studying different phenomena have been performed, but few of these studies provide a systematic evaluation of the factors influencing the detection of Mn2+ such as dosage and the temporal characteristics of Mn2+ uptake. We identified an optimal dose of Mn2+ (25 mg/kg, s.c.) in order to characterize the time-course of Mn2+ accumulation in active neural regions in the rabbit. T1-weighted MRI and functional MRI were collected 0–3, 6–9, and 24–27 h post-Mn2+ injection while the vibrissae on the right side were vibrated. Significant BOLD activation in the left somatosensory (SS) cortex and left ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus was detected during whisker vibration. T1-weighted signal intensities were extracted from these regions, their corresponding contralateral regions and the visual cortex (to serve as controls). A significant elevation in T1-weighted signal intensity in the left SS cortex (relative to right)was evident 6–9 and 24–27 h post-Mn2+ injection while the left VPM thalamus showed a significant enhancement (relative to the right) only during the 24–27 h session. Visual cortex showed no hemispheric difference at any timepoint. Our results suggest that studies employing AIM-MRI would benefit by conducting experimental manipulations 6–24 h after subcutaneous MnCl2 injections to optimize the concentration of contrast agent in the regions active during the exposure. PMID:26589332

  19. A single dose of the serotonin neurotransmission agonist paroxetine enhances motor output: double-blind, placebo-controlled, fMRI study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Pariente, Jérémie; Boulanouar, Kader; Carel, Christophe; Manelfe, Claude; Rascol, Olivier; Celsis, Pierre; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Since serotonin (5-HT) stimulates motor function, pharmacological potentiation of 5-HT neurotransmission may improve motor function in healthy subjects and, possibly, recovery in post-stroke patients. Indeed, fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), increased activation in executive motor areas of healthy subjects as fenozolone, a releaser of monoamines (including noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin) from intracellular stores. This study is intended to test the hypothesis that paroxetine can likewise modulate brain motor activity in a dose-dependent manner in healthy subjects. In a double-blind counterbalanced study, six subjects underwent functional MRI examinations on three sessions 1 week apart (E1, E2, and E3) at the time of peak plasma concentrations (5 h after drug intake, i.e., either 20 or 60 mg of paroxetine or placebo) with a complex sequential opposition task. Rest and activation alternated in a block design. During activation, subjects performed, with the right hand, a 1-Hz-paced task that alternated two fist closings with a sequential opposition task. Paroxetine elicited effects similar to those reported for fluoxetine; notable changes were hyperactivation in the contralateral S1/M1, and posterior SMA and widespread hypoactivation of basal ganglia and cerebellum. There was an inverse correlation between dose and effect: significantly greater effects were observed with the 20-mg dose compared with 60 mg. Paroxetine dose-dependently modulates activation of the entire motor pathway in a way that favors motor output. Thus, a single dose of the SSRI paroxetine reorganized motor processing.

  20. MRI of neuronal plasticity in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Pelled, Galit

    2011-01-01

    Modifications in the behavior and architecture of neuronal networks are well documented to occur in association with learning and memory, as well as following injury. These plasticity mechanisms are crucial to ensure adequate processing of stimuli, and they also dictate the degree of recovery following peripheral or central nervous system injury. Nevertheless, the underlying neuronal mechanisms that determine the degree of plasticity of neuronal pathways are not fully understood. Recent developments in animal-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and related hardware afford a high spatial and temporal resolution, making functional MRI and manganese-enhanced MRI emerging tools for studying reorganization of neuronal pathways in rodent models. Many of the observed changes in neuronal functions in rodent's brains following injury discussed here agree with clinical human fMRI findings. This demonstrates that animal model imaging can have a significant clinical impact in the neuronal plasticity and rehabilitation arenas.

  1. MRI of nasopharyngeal adenoid hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Surov, Alexey; Ryl, Ina; Bartel-Friedrich, Sylvia; Wienke, Andreas; Kösling, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    Nasopharyngeal adenoid hypertrophy (NAH) is a typical benign lesion. Due to involution, nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue usually is not found in adults beyond the 30th to 40th year of life. However, occasionally NAH has been recognized after the 50th or 60th year. The aim of this study is to identify the frequency of NAH and to analyze its MRI findings in different age groups. From 2007 to 2011, 6693 MR investigations of the head were performed at our institution. MRI was obtained with a 1.5 T MRI device. NAH was identified in 18.0% of the patients. The frequency of NAH varied from 60.3% to 1.0% in the different age groups. The mean size of NAH was 23.2 ± 4.5 mm in cranio-caudal, 31.1 ± 5.2 mm in left-right, and 14.2 ± 4.1 mm in the anterior-posterior direction. The left-right and cranio-caudal sizes of NAH were largest in the 0-9 age group and decreased with age. On T1-w images most lesions (95.4%) were hypointense in comparison to the adjacent musculature. On T2-w fat-saturated images 82.4% of the lesions were hyperintense. After intravenous administration of contrast medium most lesions showed a slight enhancement (58.6%). Moderate enhancement was seen in 32.4% and a marked enhancement was identified in 9.0%. In the 0-9 age group most lesions showed a slight enhancement. Cysts within NAH were identified in 433 cases (35.9%). The frequency of cysts increased continuously with age, namely from 10.9% to 65.2%.

  2. Emerging MRI methods in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Camilo G; Mountz, James M; Mountz, John D

    2011-02-01

    New MRI techniques have been developed to assess not only the static anatomy of synovial hyperplasia, bone changes and cartilage degradation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but also the activity of the physiological events that cause these changes. This enables an estimation of the rate of change in the synovium, bone and cartilage as a result of disease activity or in response to therapy. Typical MRI signs of RA in the pre-erosive phase include synovitis, bone marrow edema and subchondral cyst formation. Synovitis can be assessed by T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI or diffusion tensor imaging. Bone marrow edema can be detected on fluid-sensitive sequences such as short-tau inversion recovery or T2-weighted fast-spin echo sequences. Detection of small bone erosions in the early erosive phase using T1-weighted MRI has sensitivity comparable to CT. Numerous MRI techniques have been developed for quantitative assessment of potentially pathologic changes in cartilage composition that occur before frank morphologic changes. In this Review, we summarize the advances and new directions in the field of MRI, with an emphasis on their current state of development and application in RA.

  3. "Dropped-head" syndrome due to isolated myositis of neck extensor muscles: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, Michele; Mazziotti, Silvio; Toscano, Antonio; Rodolico, Carmelo; Mazzeo, Anna; Blandino, Alfredo

    2006-02-01

    MRI findings of a patient with dropped-head syndrome due to focal myositis of the neck extensor muscles are presented. MRI showed oedematous changes and marked enhancement of the neck extensor muscles. After therapy MRI demonstrated disappearance of the abnormal findings.

  4. In vivo prostate cancer detection and grading using restriction spectrum imaging-MRI

    PubMed Central

    McCammack, KC; Kane, CJ; Parsons, JK; White, NS; Schenker-Ahmed, NM; Kuperman, JM; Bartsch, H; Desikan, RS; Rakow-Penner, RA; Adams, D; Liss, MA; Mattrey, RF; Bradley, WG; Margolis, DJA; Raman, SS; Shabaik, A; Dale, AM; Karow, DS

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a robust, noninvasive method for detecting and characterizing prostate cancer (PCa), but limitations remain in its ability to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous tissue. We evaluated the performance of a novel MRI technique, restriction spectrum imaging (RSI-MRI), to quantitatively detect and grade PCa compared with current standard-of-care MRI. METHODS In a retrospective evaluation of 33 patients with biopsy-proven PCa who underwent RSI-MRI and standard MRI before radical prostatectomy, receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed for RSI-MRI and each quantitative MRI term, with area under the ROC curve (AUC) used to compare each term’s ability to differentiate between PCa and normal prostate. Spearman rank-order correlations were performed to assess each term’s ability to predict PCa grade in the radical prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS RSI-MRI demonstrated superior differentiation of PCa from normal tissue, with AUC of 0.94 and 0.85 for RSI-MRI and conventional diffusion MRI, respectively (P = 0.04). RSI-MRI also demonstrated superior performance in predicting PCa aggressiveness, with Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients of 0.53 (P = 0.002) and − 0.42 (P = 0.01) for RSI-MRI and conventional diffusion MRI, respectively, with tumor grade. CONCLUSIONS RSI-MRI significantly improves upon current noninvasive PCa imaging and may potentially enhance its diagnosis and characterization. PMID:26754261

  5. What Effects Does Necrotic Area of Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Osteoporotic Vertebral Fracture Have on Further Compression and Clinical Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ja Myoung; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won; Kang, Dong Ho; Lee, Shin Heon

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the correlation between further compression and necrotic area in osteoporotic vertebral fracture (OVF) patients with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI). In addition, we investigated the radiological and clinical outcome according to the range of the necrotic area. Methods Between 2012 and 2014, the study subjects were 82 OVF patients who did not undergo vertebroplasty or surgical treatment. The fracture areas examined on CEMRI at admission were defined as edematous if enhancement was seen and as necrotic if no enhancement was seen. The correlation between further compression and the necrotic and edematous areas of CEMRI, age, and bone mineral density was examined. Also, necrotic areas were classified into those with less than 25% (non-necrosis group) and those with more than 25% (necrosis group) according to the percentages of the entire vertebral body. For both groups, further compression and the changes in wedge and kyphotic angles were examined at admission and at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after admission, while the clinical outcomes were compared using the visual analog scale (VAS) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status grade. Results Further compression was 14.78±11.11% at 1 month and 21.75±14.43% at 6 months. There was a very strong correlation between the necrotic lesion of CEMRI and further compression (r=0.690, p<0.001). The compression of the necrosis group was 33.52±12.96%, which was higher than that of the non-necrosis group, 14.96±10.34% (p<0.005). Also, there was a statistically significantly higher number of intervertebral cleft development and surgical treatments being performed in the necrosis group than in the non-necrosis group (p<0.005). Moreover, there was a statistical difference in the decrease in the height of the vertebral body, and an increase was observed in the kyphotic change of wedge angle progression. There was also a difference

  6. DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and MRS in Cancer: Challenges and Advantages of Implementing Qualitative and Quantitative Multi-parametric Imaging in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, Jessica M.; Payne, Geoffrey S.; Weller, Alex; deSouza, Nandita M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) offers a unique insight into tumor biology by combining functional MRI techniques that inform on cellularity (diffusion-weighted MRI), vascular properties (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), and metabolites (magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and has scope to provide valuable information for prognostication and response assessment. Challenges in the application of mpMRI in the clinic include the technical considerations in acquiring good quality functional MRI data, development of robust techniques for analysis, and clinical interpretation of the results. This article summarizes the technical challenges in acquisition and analysis of multi-parametric MRI data before reviewing the key applications of multi-parametric MRI in clinical research and practice. PMID:27748710

  7. Mesentery neurilemmoma: CT, MRI and angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Lao, Wilson T; Yang, Shih-Hung; Chen, Chi-Long; Chan, Wing P

    2011-01-01

    Mesenteric neurilemmoma is extremely rare. We present a case of a 45-year-old man with mesenteric neurilemmoma, with CT, MRI and angiographic findings. The patient was healthy and had had no symptoms previously. CT and MRI images revealed a 2.2-cm well-defined, soft-tissue mass adjacent to the posterior border of the left lobe of the liver. The tumor mass displayed a heterogenous low signal on T2-weighted image and peripheral enhancement after gadolinium administration. Angiography showed a hypervascular mass beneath the tail of pancreas, which was supplied by small branches of middle splenic artery. Histopathology revealed a mesentery neurilemmoma composed of spindle tumor cells.

  8. Spatial memory training induces morphological changes detected by manganese-enhanced MRI in the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminal zone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binbin; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Tjio, Ci'en; Chen, Way Cherng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Routtenberg, Aryeh

    2016-03-01

    Hippocampal mossy fibers (MFs) can show plasticity of their axon terminal arbor consequent to learning a spatial memory task. Such plasticity is seen as translaminar sprouting from the stratum lucidum (SL) of CA3 into the stratum pyramidale (SP) and the stratum oriens (SO). However, the functional role of this presynaptic remodeling is still obscure. In vivo imaging that allows longitudinal observation of such remodeling could provide a deeper understanding of this presynaptic growth phenomenon as it occurs over time. Here we used manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), which shows a high-contrast area that co-localizes with the MFs. This technique was applied in the detection of learning-induced MF plasticity in two strains of rats. Quantitative analysis of a series of sections in the rostral dorsal hippocampus showed increases in the CA3a' area in MEMRI of trained Wistar rats consistent with the increased SO+SP area seen in the Timm's staining. MF plasticity was not seen in the trained Lister-Hooded rats in either MEMRI or in Timm's staining. This indicates the potential of MEMRI for revealing neuro-architectures and plasticity of the hippocampal MF system in vivo in longitudinal studies.

  9. Central Nervous Activity upon Systemic Salicylate Application in Animals with Kanamycin-Induced Hearing Loss--A Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Study.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Moritz; Götze, Romy; Müller, Susanne; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of systemic salicylate on central auditory and non-auditory structures in mice. Since cochlear hair cells are known to be one major target of salicylate, cochlear effects were reduced by using kanamycin to remove or impair hair cells. Neuronal brain activity was measured using the non-invasive manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technique. For all brain structures investigated, calcium-related neuronal activity was increased following systemic application of a sodium salicylate solution: probably due to neuronal hyperactivity. In addition, it was shown that the central effect of salicylate was not limited to the auditory system. A general alteration of calcium-related activity was indicated by an increase in manganese accumulation in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, as well as in the amygdala. The present data suggest that salicylate-induced activity changes in the auditory system differ from those shown in studies of noise trauma. Since salicylate action is reversible, central pharmacological effects of salicylate compared to those of (permanent) noise-induced hearing impairment and tinnitus might induce different pathophysiologies. These should therefore, be treated as different causes with the same symptoms.

  10. Sector-Based Assessment of Infarct Size on Late-Gadolinium-Enhancement MRI in a Mouse Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheongsoo; Park, Eun-Hye; Chang, Kiyuk; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2016-12-02

    Scoring of myocardial infarction (MI) disease extent in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images has been generally presented in terms of area-based infarct size. However, gradual thinning of the infarcted wall and compensatory hypertrophy of the noninfarcted remote wall during left ventricular (LV) remodeling after MI complicate the accuracy of infarct size measurement. In this study, we measured and compared infarct sizes in mice on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images using area-, length-, and radial sector-based methods.MI was induced by permanent ligation of the left coronary artery (n = 6). LGE images were acquired 30 minutes after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA-BMA. Percentages of infarct size (%Area, %Length, and %Sector) on the LGE images were calculated and compared with histological findings.Infarct sizes obtained by an area-based approach were smaller than those obtained by other measurements. The area-based approach underestimated infarct size compared with the length-based approach. Most infarct sizes measured by each method demonstrated a similar trend, with maximum values determined by sector-based measurements using a mean + SD threshold. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated that the 3 measurements were strongly correlated (P < 0.05) to each other. Significant differences and trends were observed between sector-based infarct sizes with different thresholds when 16 or more sectors were used.In conclusion, our study demonstrated that methods used for the histological calculation of infarct size could be applied to CMR analysis. Moreover, our results showed a similar trend to histological assessment. Sector-based CMR approaches can be useful for infarct size measurement.

  11. The initial Trinidad experience with Cine MRI in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C N; Maharaj, P; Bodapati, S; John, R; Rahaman, R; Henry, R; Brann, S

    2002-03-01

    We describe the initial Trinidad experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Cine MRI as a diagnostic tool in clinical cardiology. Six patients from the following categories were referred for Cine MRI evaluation: congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, aortic diseases, cardiomyopathy and intracardiac mass. All patients underwent echocardiography. MRI and Cine MRI were performed on all patients using a Siemens Magnetom 1.0 Tesla MR system at MRI Trinidad and Tobago Ltd. Selected patients underwent Angiography and/or computed tomography (CT) scanning. Clinical data and images of the six patients evaluated are described. MRI and Cine MRI provided excellent anatomical and functional details of the heart and aorta in five patients with dissection of the aorta, aneurysm of the ascending aorta, suspected left ventricular apical thrombus, infiltrative cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Technical difficulty was experienced with one patient who had a congenital defect (common atrium). In this study, Cine MRI provided excellent images in all but one patient. This new noninvasive technique enhanced diagnostic capabilities and facilitated management in patients with certain cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  13. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  14. MRI of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems (in men)Path to improved healthIf your primary care doctor determines that you should have an MRI, ... may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to ...

  17. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the breast uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  18. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  19. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  20. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  1. Non-invasive breast biopsy method using GD-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI series and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso William

    This study was undertaken to develop a nonsurgical breast biopsy from Gd-DTPA Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (CE-MR) images and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. A five-step process was developed to accomplish this. (1) Dynamic PET series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using a finite element method (FEM) based registration that requires fiducial skin markers to sample the displacement field between image frames. A commercial FEM package (ANSYS) was used for meshing and FEM calculations. Dynamic PET image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements SAVD and NCC. (2) Dynamic CE-MR series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using two registration methods: a multi-resolution free-form deformation (FFD) registration driven by normalized mutual information, and a FEM-based registration method. Dynamic CE-MR image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements, localization measurements, and qualitative comparison of motion artifacts. FFD registration was found to be superior to FEM-based registration. (3) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the PET/CT volume of activity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartmental Patlak model. Three parameters for this model were fitted; two of them describe the activity levels in the blood and in the cellular compartment, while the third characterizes the washout rate of F-18-FDG from the cellular compartment. (4) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the MR volume of signal intensity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartment Brix model. Three parameters for this model were fitted: rate of Gd exiting the compartment, representing the extracellular space of a lesion; rate of Gd exiting a blood compartment; and a parameter that characterizes the strength of signal intensities. Curve fitting used for PET/CT and MR series was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt nonlinear regression

  2. Molecular fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bartelle, Benjamin B.; Barandov, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of brain function depends on understanding the dynamics of diverse neural signaling processes over large tissue volumes in intact animals and humans. Most existing approaches to measuring brain signaling suffer from limited tissue penetration, poor resolution, or lack of specificity for well-defined neural events. Here we discuss a new brain activity mapping method that overcomes some of these problems by combining MRI with contrast agents sensitive to neural signaling. The goal of this “molecular fMRI” approach is to permit noninvasive whole-brain neuroimaging with specificity and resolution approaching current optical neuroimaging methods. In this article, we describe the context and need for molecular fMRI as well as the state of the technology today. We explain how major types of MRI probes work and how they can be sensitized to neurobiological processes, such as neurotransmitter release, calcium signaling, and gene expression changes. We comment both on past work in the field and on challenges and promising avenues for future development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Brain researchers currently have a choice between measuring neural activity using cellular-level recording techniques, such as electrophysiology and optical imaging, or whole-brain imaging methods, such as fMRI. Cellular level methods are precise but only address a small portion of mammalian brains; on the other hand, whole-brain neuroimaging techniques provide very little specificity for neural pathways or signaling components of interest. The molecular fMRI techniques we discuss have particular potential to combine the specificity of cellular-level measurements with the noninvasive whole-brain coverage of fMRI. On the other hand, molecular fMRI is only just getting off the ground. This article aims to offer a snapshot of the status and future prospects for development of molecular fMRI techniques. PMID:27076413

  3. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  4. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  5. MRI in acoustic neuroma: a review of 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Curati, W L; Graif, M; Kingsley, D P; King, T; Scholtz, C L; Steiner, R E

    1986-01-01

    This retrospective study is aimed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in relation to contrast enhanced CT and air-CT-cisternography. MRI examinations were performed in 35 patients with suspected neurosensorial damage and suggestive of acoustic neuroma: 27 presented on MRI with unilateral tumors, 3 patients had a bilateral tumor and 5 patients were negative on all imaging modalities. The total number of acoustic neuromas detected was therefore 33. To date microscopic analysis has been performed on 12 tumors and histological data based on type Antoni A and Antoni B classification is available. Contrast enhanced CT detected 19 tumors, yielding an overall sensitivity rate of 58%. Air-CT cisternography identified an additional 5 tumors with a sensitivity rate of 100%. MRI identified 33 acoustic neuromas in 30 patients and was negative in 5 patients (sensitivity and accuracy 100%). Considering sensitivity in relation to location, MRI was much better than contrast enhanced CT for internal auditory canal (IAC) tumors (100% versus 36%) and better for cerebello-pontine angle tumors (CPA) tumors (100% versus 68%). The evolution of MRI technique, the various pulse sequences used and their actual selection is discussed. Seven patients received a paramagnetic contrast agent (Gadolinium-DTPA) with the additional benefit of a better demonstration of the tumor. The results suggest that MRI is the best non invasive technique for demonstrating acoustic neuromas.

  6. Feasibility of 10-Minute Delayed Hepatocyte Phase Imaging Using a 30° Flip Angle in Gd-EOB-DTPA-Enhanced Liver MRI for the Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis or Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Inhwan; Kim, Joo Hee; Kim, Dae Jung; Yu, Jeong-Sik; Chung, Jae-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare 10-minute (min) delayed hepatocyte phase imaging (HPI) using a 30° flip angle (FA) (10m-FA30) and 20-min delayed HPI using a 10° FA (20m-FA10) or 30° FA (20m-FA30) in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI in patients with chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, in terms of lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and detection sensitivity for focal hepatic lesions (FHLs). Materials and Methods One hundred and four patients with 168 HCCs and 55 benign FHLs who underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI with 10m-FA30, 20m-FA10, and 20m-FA30 were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups according to the Child-Pugh classification: group A with chronic hepatitis or Child-Pugh A cirrhosis and group B with Child-Pugh B or C cirrhosis. Lesion-to-liver CNR for HCCs was compared between 10m-FA30 and 20m-FA10 or 20m-FA30 for each group. The presence of FHLs was evaluated using a four-point scale by two independent reviewers, and the detection sensitivity was analyzed. Results In group A, the CNR for HCCs (n = 86) on 10m-FA30 (165.8 ± 99.7) was significantly higher than that on 20m-FA10 (113.4 ± 71.4) and lower than that of 20m-FA30 (210.2 ± 129.3). However, there was no significant difference in the sensitivity of FHL detection between 10m-FA30 (mean 95.0% for two reviewers) and 20m-FA10 (94.7%) or 20m-FA30 (94.7%). In group B, the CNR (54.0 ± 36.4) for HCCs (n = 57) and the sensitivity (94.2%) of FHL detection for 10m-FA30 were significantly higher than those for 20m-FA10 (41.8 ± 36.4 and 80.8%, respectively) and were not different from those for 20m-FA30 (62.7 ± 44.4 and 93.3%, respectively). Conclusion The diagnostic performance of 10m-FA30 was similar to or higher than 20m-FA10 or 20m-FA30 in both groups A and B. This finding indicates that 10m-FA30 could replace 20-min delayed HPI regardless of patient liver function and reduce the delay time by 10 minutes. PMID:27936106

  7. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm(3)) versus the infused volume (mm(3)) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min(-1)) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min(-1) functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application.

  8. Benchmarking the ERG valve tip and MRI Interventions Smart Flow neurocatheter convection-enhanced delivery system's performance in a gel model of the brain: employing infusion protocols proposed for gene therapy for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillay, Karl; Schomberg, Dominic; Hinchman, Angelica; Kumbier, Lauren; Ross, Chris; Kubota, Ken; Brodsky, Ethan; Miranpuri, Gurwattan

    2012-04-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an advanced infusion technique used to deliver therapeutic agents into the brain. CED has shown promise in recent clinical trials. Independent verification of published parameters is warranted with benchmark testing of published parameters in applicable models such as gel phantoms, ex vivo tissue and in vivo non-human animal models to effectively inform planned and future clinical therapies. In the current study, specific performance characteristics of two CED infusion catheter systems, such as backflow, infusion cloud morphology, volume of distribution (mm3) versus the infused volume (mm3) (Vd/Vi) ratios, rate of infusion (µl min-1) and pressure (mmHg), were examined to ensure published performance standards for the ERG valve-tip (VT) catheter. We tested the hypothesis that the ERG VT catheter with an infusion protocol of a steady 1 µl min-1 functionality is comparable to the newly FDA approved MRI Interventions Smart Flow (SF) catheter with the UCSF infusion protocol in an agarose gel model. In the gel phantom models, no significant difference was found in performance parameters between the VT and SF catheter. We report, for the first time, such benchmark characteristics in CED between these two otherwise similar single-end port VT with stylet and end-port non-stylet infusion systems. Results of the current study in agarose gel models suggest that the performance of the VT catheter is comparable to the SF catheter and warrants further investigation as a tool in the armamentarium of CED techniques for eventual clinical use and application.

  9. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  10. Quantification of in vivo pH-weighted amide proton transfer (APT) MRI in acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Iris Y.; Igarashi, Takahiro; Guo, Yingkun; Sun, Phillip Z.

    2015-03-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging is a specific form of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI that probes the pH-dependent amide proton exchange.The endogenous APT MRI is sensitive to tissue acidosis, which may complement the commonly used perfusion and diffusion scans for characterizing heterogeneous ischemic tissue damage. Whereas the saturation transfer asymmetry analysis (MTRasym) may reasonably compensate for direct RF saturation, in vivo MTRasym is however, susceptible to an intrinsically asymmetric shift (MTR'asym). Specifically, the reference scan for the endogenous APT MRI is 7 ppm upfield from that of the label scan, and subjects to concomitant RF irradiation effects, including nuclear overhauser effect (NOE)-mediated saturation transfer and semisolid macromolecular magnetization transfer. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis could not fully compensate for such slightly asymmetric concomitant RF irradiation effects, and MTRasym has to be delineated in order to properly characterize the pH-weighted APT MRI contrast. Given that there is very little change in relaxation time immediately after ischemia and the concomitant RF irradiation effects only minimally depends on pH, the APT contrast can be obtained as the difference of MTRasym between the normal and ischemic regions. Thereby, the endogenous amide proton concentration and exchange rate can be solved using a dual 2-pool model, and the in vivo MTR'asym can be calculated by subtracting the solved APT contrast from asymmetry analysis (i.e., MTR'asym =MTRasym-APTR). In addition, MTR'asym can be quantified using the classical 2-pool exchange model. In sum, our study delineated the conventional in vivo pH-sensitive MTRasym contrast so that pHspecific contrast can be obtained for imaging ischemic tissue acidosis.

  11. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA for Detection Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): A Comparative Study with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CT)

    PubMed Central

    Imbriaco, Massimo; De Luca, Serena; Coppola, Milena; Fusari, Mario; Klain, Michele; Puglia, Marta; Mainenti, Pierpaolo; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Maurea, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background To compare the diagnostic accuracy of hepato-biliary (HB) phase with gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCEMRI) and contrast-enhanced CT (DCECT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) detection. Material/Methods 73 patients underwent DCECT and Gd-EOB-DTPA-3T-MR. Lesions were classified using a five-point confidence scale. Reference standard was a combination of pathological evidence and tumor growth at follow-up CT/MR at 12 months. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained. Results A total of 125 lesions were confirmed in 73 patients. As many as 74 were HCCs and 51 were benign. Area under the curve (AUC) was 0.984 for DCEMRI+HB phase vs. 0.934 for DCEMRI (p<0.68) and 0.852 for DCECT (p<0.001). For lesions >20 mm (n.40), AUC was 0.984 for DCEMRI+HB phase, 0.999 for DCEMRI, and 0.913 for DCECT, (p=n.s.). For lesions <20 mm (n.85) AUC was 0.982 for DCEMRI+HB phase vs. 0.910 for DCEMRI (p<0.01) and 0.828 for DCECT (p<0.001). Conclusions The addition of HB phase to DCEMRI provides an incremental accuracy of 4.5% compared to DCEMRI and DCECT for HCC detection. The accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-3T-MR significantly improves for lesions <20 mm. No significant improvement is observed for lesions >20 mm and patients with Child-Pugh class B or C. PMID:28217239

  13. Leptomeningeal metastasis from gynecologic cancers diagnosed by brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Masafumi; Tsuji, Keita; Shigeta, Shogo; Tokunaga, Hideki; Ito, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Yoh; Yoshinaga, Kosuke; Otsuki, Takeo; Niikura, Hitoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) is rarely observed in gynecologic cancers. As gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) is highly effective for diagnosing LM, the aim of this study is to describe the clinical behaviors and outcomes of LM patients who were diagnosed by Gd-MRI. After securing institutional review board approvals, we retrospectively reviewed patient records. Eight patients were found to have LM from gynecological malignancies. Primary tumors included three ovarian cancers, one tubal cancer, one peritoneal cancer, two endometrial cancers, and one cervical cancer. Gd-MRI of the brain and the spine is indicated as the high-priority inspection for the diagnosis of this devastating complication.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the MRI table. A specially trained technician (or "tech") operates the MRI machine. He or she may ... can't stay still during MRI. Sometimes MRI techs sedate teens who have trouble relaxing inside the ...

  15. Techniques for Fast Stereoscopic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Stereoscopic MRI can impart 3D perception with only two image acquisitions. This economy over standard multiplanar 3D volume renderings allows faster frame rates, which are needed for real-time imaging applications. Real-time 3D perception may enhance the appreciation of complex anatomical structures, and may improve hand-eye coordination while manipulating a medical device during an image-guided interventional procedure. To this goal, a system is being developed to acquire and display stereoscopic MR images in real-time. A clinically used, fast gradient-recalled echo-train sequence has been modified to produce stereo image pairs. Features have been added for depth cueing, view sharing, and bulk signal suppression. A workstation was attached to a clinical MR scanner for fast data extraction, image reconstruction and stereoscopic image display. PMID:11477636

  16. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  17. [MRI of the prostate: optimization of imaging protocols].

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O

    2006-02-01

    This article details the imaging protocols for prostate MRI and the influence on image quality of each particular setting: type of coils to be used (endorectal or external phased-array coils?), patient preparation, type of sequences, spatial resolution parameters. The principle and technical constraints of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI are also presented, as well as the predictable changes due to the introduction of high-field strength (3T) scanners.

  18. Enhancement of the Two-Dimensional Conduction Electron Zeeman Energy Near v=1 by Optical Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, C.R.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Vitkalov, S.A.

    1998-11-06

    Enhancement of the Zeeman energy of 2D conduction electrons near v = 1 by optical dynamic nuclear polarization (lINP), as observed by the Overhauser shift of the transport detected electron spin resonance, is measured quantitatively for the first time in GaAs/AIGaAs mukiquantum wells. The NMR signal enhancement is obtained under similar conditions in the same sample, allowing the hyperke coupling constant of 3.7T between between the nuclei and 2D conduction electrons to be measured for the first time. The potential to suppress the Zeeman energy by optical DNP is discussed in the context of its potential influence on Skyrmion formation.

  19. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  20. [Pathophysiological diagnosis of facial paralysis using 3-D MRI].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, T; Hirata, K; Yuki, N; Sato, T

    2001-04-01

    Bilateral facial paralysis(facial diplesia) is often observed in Guillain-Barré syndrome(GBS) and Fisher's syndrome (FS). We tried to observe injured facial nerves using three-dimensional(3-D) MRI in facial diplesia due to GBS and its variants and examined function of blood nerve barrier and clinical use of 3-D MRI for detecting injured facial nerves. In the four patients with GBS and its variants(GBS three cases, FS one case), while routine brain MRI did not show any abnormal findings, contrast-enhanced 3-D MRI revealed Gd-enhancement of the facial nerves. On the other hand, only one case showed visualization using contrast-enhanced 3-D MRI in twelve cases of Bell's palsy. Therefore, it may be presumed that the reason why the significantly higher rate of visualization in facial paralysis in GBS and its variants than in Bell's palsy is attributable to a difference in the mechanism of injury or the extreme seriousness of the disease. In conclusion, the observation of facial nerve using 3-D MRI was very useful to know the condition of the facial diplesia in GBS and its variants.

  1. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  2. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  3. MRI findings in aphasic status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Manuel; Munuera, Josep; Sueiras, Maria; Rovira, Rosa; Alvarez-Sabín, José; Rovira, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Ictal-MRI studies including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and MR-angiography (MRA) in patients with aphasic status epilepticus (ASE) are lacking. In this report, we aim to describe the consequences of the ASE on DWIs and its impact on cerebral circulation. We retrospectively studied eight patients with ASE confirmed by ictal-EEG, who underwent ictal-MRI shortly after well-documented onset (mean time delay 3 h). ASE consisted in fluctuating aphasia, mostly associated with other subtle contralateral neurological signs such as hemiparesia, hemianopia, or slight clonic jerks. In MRI, six patients showed cortical temporoparietal hyperintensity in DWI and four of them had also ipsilateral pulvinar lesions. Five patients showed close spatial hyperperfusion areas matching the DWI lesions and an enhanced blow flow in the middle cerebral artery. Parenchymal lesions and hemodynamic abnormalities were not associated with seizure duration or severity in any case. The resolution of DWI lesions at follow-up MRI depended on the length of the MRIs interval. In patients with ASE, lesions on DWI in the temporo-parietal cortex and pulvinar nucleus combined with local hyperperfusion can be observed, even when they appear distant from the epileptic focus or the language areas.

  4. Biparametric versus multiparametric MRI in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logager, Vibeke; Baslev, Ingerd; Møller, Jakob M; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2016-01-01

    Background Since multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) of the prostate exceeds 30 min, minimizing the evaluation time of significant (Gleason scores > 6) prostate cancer (PCa) would be beneficial. A reduced protocol might be sufficient for the diagnosis. Purpose To study whether a short unenhanced biparametric MRI (bp-MRI) matches mp-MRI in detecting significant PCa. Material and Methods A total of 204 men (median age, 65 years; mean ± SD, 64.1; range 45–75 years; median serum PSA level, 14 ng/mL; range, 2.2–120 ng/mL; median prostate volume, 60 mL; range, 23–263 mL) fulfilled the criteria for being enrolled. They underwent mp-MRI and prostate biopsy from January through June 2014. Of the included patients, 9.3% underwent prostatectomy, 90.7% had TRUS-bx, and 10.8 had MRI-targeted TRUS-bx. Two radiologists separately assessed the mp-MRI examination (T2-weighted [T2W] imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI], apparent diffusion coefficient map [ADC-map] and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging [DCE]). Two months later, the bp-MRI version (T2W imaging, DWI, and ADC-map) was evaluated. Results Reader 1: Assessing mp-MRI: 0 false negatives, sensitivity of 1, and specificity 0.04. Assessing bp-MRI: four false negatives, sensitivity of 0.94, and specificity 0.15. Reader 2: Assessing mp-MRI: five false negatives, sensitivity of 0.93, and specificity 0.16. Assessing bp-MRI: three false negatives, sensitivity of 0.96, and specificity 0.15. Intra-reader agreement Cohen’s Kappa (κ) was 0.87 for reader 1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–0.92) and 0.84 for reader 2 (95% CI 0.78–0.89). Conclusion Bp-MRI is as good as mp-MRI at detecting PCa. A large prospective study seems to be strongly warranted. PMID:27583170

  5. Evolving role of MRI in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Joseph H; Obara, Piotr; Oto, Aytekin

    2013-06-01

    MR enterography is playing an evolving role in the evaluation of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD). Standard MR enterography includes a combination of rapidly acquired T2 sequence, balanced steady-state acquisition, and contrast enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. The diagnostic performance of these sequences has been shown to be comparable, and in some respects superior, to other small bowel imaging modalities. The findings of CD on MR enterography have been well described in the literature. New and emerging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), cinematography, and magnetization transfer, may lead to improved accuracy in characterizing the disease. These advanced techniques can provide quantitative parameters that may prove to be useful in assessing disease activity, severity, and response to treatment. In the future, MR enterography may play an increasing role in management decisions for patients with small bowel CD; however, larger studies are needed to validate these emerging MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers.

  6. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  7. Sodium MRI: Methods and applications

    PubMed Central

    Madelin, Guillaume; Lee, Jae-Seung; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2014-01-01

    Sodium NMR spectroscopy and MRI have become popular in recent years through the increased availability of high-field MRI scanners, advanced scanner hardware and improved methodology. Sodium MRI is being evaluated for stroke and tumor detection, for breast cancer studies, and for the assessment of osteoarthritis and muscle and kidney functions, to name just a few. In this article, we aim to present an up-to-date review of the theoretical background, the methodology, the challenges and limitations, and current and potential new applications of sodium MRI. PMID:24815363

  8. Whole-body MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI compared with 5-HTP PET/CT in the detection of neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Carlbom, Lina; Caballero-Corbalán, José; Granberg, Dan; Sörensen, Jens; Eriksson, Barbro; Ahlström, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    Aim We wanted to explore if whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted (DW) and liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging could be valuable in lesion detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NET). [11C]-5-Hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography/computed tomography (5-HTP PET/CT) was used for comparison. Materials and methods Twenty-one patients with NET were investigated with whole-body MRI, including DW imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver, and whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Seven additional patients underwent upper abdomen MRI including DWI, liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging, and 5-HTP PET/CT. Results There was a patient-based concordance of 61% and a lesion-based concordance of 53% between the modalities. MRI showed good concordance with PET in detecting bone metastases but was less sensitive in detecting metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes. MRI detected more liver metastases than 5-HTP PET/CT. Conclusion Whole-body MRI with DWI did not detect all NET lesions found with whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Our findings indicate that MRI of the liver including liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging and DWI could be a useful complement to whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. PMID:27894208

  9. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  10. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Watts, Lora T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the 2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity. PMID:26981069

  11. A nuclear Overhauser enhancement study on the imino proton resonances of a DNA pentadecamer comprising the specific target site of the cyclic AMP receptor protein in the ara BAD operon.

    PubMed

    Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Jones, M B; Jiricny, J

    1984-01-09

    A 500 MHz 1H-NMR study on a synthetic DNA pentadecamer comprising the specific target site of the cAMP receptor protein in the ara BAD operon is presented. Using pre-steady state NOE measurements, unambiguous assignments of all the imino proton resonances and associated adenine (H2) resonances are obtained. From the NOE data interbase pair interproton distances involving the imino and adenine (H2) protons are determined. It is shown that these distances are very similar to those expected for classical B DNA (RMS difference of 0.5 A), but are significantly different from those expected for classical A DNA (RMS difference of 1.1 A).

  12. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim; Kondziella, Daniel; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kerrn-Jespersen, Bjørg Morell; Lindelof, Mette; Lassmann, Hans; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. Methods: We performed a detailed neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. Results: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots. There was no evidence of lymphoma in any of the 4 patients. The 7.0T MRI in clinical remission also revealed supratentorial lesions and perivascular pathology in vivo with contrast-enhancing lesions centered around a small venous vessel. Ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T disclosed prominent T1 hypointensities in the brainstem, which were not seen on 3.0T MRI. This corresponded to neuropathologic detection of axonal injury in the autopsy case. Conclusion: Our findings suggest more widespread perivascular inflammation and postinflammatory axonal injury in patients with CLIPPERS. PMID:27144217

  13. Hyperpolarized and inert gas MRI: the future.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Blasiak, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Fox, Matthew S; Dowhos, Krista M; Albert, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potentially ideal imaging modality for noninvasive, nonionizing, and longitudinal assessment of disease. Hyperpolarized (HP) agents have been developed in the past 20 years for MR imaging, and they have the potential to vastly improve MRI sensitivity for the diagnosis and management of various diseases. The polarization of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-sensitive nuclei other than (1)H (e.g., (3)He, (129)Xe) can be enhanced by a factor of up to 100,000 times above thermal equilibrium levels, which enables direct detection of the HP agent with no background signal. In this review, a number of HP media applications in MR imaging are discussed, including HP (3)He and (129)Xe lung imaging, HP (129)Xe brain imaging, and HP (129)Xe biosensors. Inert fluorinated gas MRI, which is a new lung imaging technique that does not require hyperpolarization, is also briefly discussed. This technique will likely be an important future direction for the HP gas lung imaging community.

  14. Cyclic generalized projection MRI.

    PubMed

    Sarty, Gordon E

    2015-04-01

    Progress in the development of portable MRI hinges on the ability to use lightweight magnets that have non-uniform magnetic fields. An image encoding method and mathematical procedure for recovering the image from the NMR signal from non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours is given. Individual frequencies in an NMR signal from an object in a non-uniform magnetic field give rise to integrals of the object along contours of constant magnetic field: generalized projections. With closed isomagnetic field contours a simple, cyclic, direct reconstruction of the image from the generalized projections is possible when the magnet and RF transmit coil are held fixed relative to the imaged object while the RF receive coil moves. Numerical simulations, using the Shepp and Logan mathematical phantom, were completed to show that the mathematical method works and to illustrate numerical limitations. The method is numerically verified and exact reconstruction demonstrated for discrete mathematical image phantoms. Correct knowledge of the RF receive field is necessary or severe image distortions will result. The cyclic mathematical reconstruction method presented here will be useful for portable MRI schemes that use non-uniform magnets with closed isomagnetic contours along with mechanically or electronically moving the RF receive coils.

  15. Prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): multidisciplinary standpoint.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Liang; Feng, Zhaoyan; Hu, Zhiquan; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xianglin; Wang, He; Hu, Daoyu

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men and a leading cause of death. Accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection of prostate cancer. There are several parameters and nomograms to differentiate between patients with clinically insignificant disease and patients in need of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique which provides more detailed anatomical images due to high spatial resolution, superior contrast resolution, and multiplanar capability. State-of-the-art MRI techniques, such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), improve interpretation of prostate cancer imaging. In this article, we review the major role of MRI in the advanced management of prostate cancer to noninvasively improve tumor staging, biologic potential, treatment planning, therapy response, local recurrence, and to guide target biopsy for clinical suspected cancer with previous negative biopsy. Finally, future challenges and opportunities in prostate cancer management in the area of functional MRI are discussed as well.

  16. Exceedingly small iron oxide nanoparticles as positive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T; Kaul, Michael G; Hansen, Eric C; Barch, Mariya; Wiśniowska, Agata; Chen, Ou; Chen, Yue; Li, Nan; Okada, Satoshi; Cordero, Jose M; Heine, Markus; Farrar, Christian T; Montana, Daniel M; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald; Jasanoff, Alan; Nielsen, Peter; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2017-02-28

    Medical imaging is routine in the diagnosis and staging of a wide range of medical conditions. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for visualizing soft tissue and organs, with over 60 million MRI procedures performed each year worldwide. About one-third of these procedures are contrast-enhanced MRI, and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are the mainstream MRI contrast agents used in the clinic. GBCAs have shown efficacy and are safe to use with most patients; however, some GBCAs have a small risk of adverse effects, including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the untreatable condition recently linked to gadolinium (Gd) exposure during MRI with contrast. In addition, Gd deposition in the human brain has been reported following contrast, and this is now under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To address a perceived need for a Gd-free contrast agent with pharmacokinetic and imaging properties comparable to GBCAs, we have designed and developed zwitterion-coated exceedingly small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ZES-SPIONs) consisting of ∼3-nm inorganic cores and ∼1-nm ultrathin hydrophilic shell. These ZES-SPIONs are free of Gd and show a high T1 contrast power. We demonstrate the potential of ZES-SPIONs in preclinical MRI and magnetic resonance angiography.

  17. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques.

  18. MRI atlas of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. ); Bydder, G. )

    1990-01-01

    Since most radiologists will start from a basic of familiarity with pathophysiology of disease and a knowledge of cross-sectional imaging (at least in the transaxial plane), they are in a good position to recognize and diagnose many of the abnormalities we can currently see with CT. The appearance of these lesions on MRI is the basis for the majority of the images in this book. Chapters on Tumors, Infarcts and Ischemia, Demyelination and Infection. Hydrocephalus, and Pediatrics feature multiple images displaying the MR appearance of many common lesions with minimal associated text. Instead of focusing on pathophysiology, attention is directed to the variable appearance of these disease states using various MR imaging techniques. Although the MR contrast agent, Gadolinium-DTPA, has similar behavior (physiologically) to meglumine diatrizoate in CT, the MR techniques which result in optimal visualization of enhancing lesions are nonintuitive and are discussed. Similarly, the appearance of flowing blood and CSF and hemorrhage does not follow easily from a pre-existing CT base, therefore additional text has been devoted to these subjects.

  19. MRI atlas of ectopic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Dallaudière, B; Salut, C; Hummel, V; Pouquet, M; Piver, P; Rouanet, J-P; Maubon, A

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic endometriosis is a common condition which is often underdiagnosed, where MRI can help make a diagnosis simply, non-invasively and without irradiation. However, imagery signs of it are enormously polymorphic with a wide range of possible locations. In this paper, we have tried to illustrate comprehensively all its MRI appearances depending on the different locations where it occurs.

  20. Perception of dim targets on dark backgrounds in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisdall, M. Dylan; Atkins, M. Stella

    2007-03-01

    Some diagnostic tasks in MRI involve determining the presence of a faint feature (target) relative to a dark background. In MR images produced by taking pixel magnitudes it is well known that the contrast between faint features and dark backgrounds is reduced due to the Rician noise distribution. In an attempt to enhance detection we implemented three different MRI reconstruction algorithms: the normal magnitude, phase-corrected real, and a wavelet thresholding algorithm designed particularly for MRI noise suppression and contrast enhancement. To compare these reconstructions, we had volunteers perform a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) signal detection task. The stimuli were produced from high-field head MRI images with synthetic thermal noise added to ensure realistic backgrounds. Circular targets were located in regions of the image that were dark, but next to bright anatomy. Images were processed using one of the three reconstruction techniques. In addition we compared a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to the human observers in this task. We measured the percentage correct in both the human and model observer experiments. Our results showed better performance with the use of magnitude or phase-corrected real images compared to the use of the wavelet algorithm. In particular, artifacts induced by the wavelet algorithm seem to distract some users and produce significant inter-subject variability. This contradicts predictions based only on SNR. The CHO matched the mean human results quite closely, demonstrating that this model observer may be used to simulate human response in MRI target detection tasks.

  1. Restriction spectrum imaging improves MRI-based prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; White, Nathan S.; Best, Shaun R.; Marks, Robert M.; Heimbigner, Jared; Kane, Christopher J.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Desikan, Rahul S.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A.; Liss, Michael A.; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Raman, Steven S.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Dale, Anders M.; Karow, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), with that of conventional multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer (PCa) detection in a blinded reader-based format. Methods Three readers independently evaluated 100 patients (67 with proven PCa) who underwent MP-MRI and RSI within 6 months of systematic biopsy (N = 67; 23 with targeting performed) or prostatectomy (N = 33). Imaging was performed at 3 Tesla using a phased-array coil. Readers used a five-point scale estimating the likelihood of PCa present in each prostate sextant. Evaluation was performed in two separate sessions, first using conventional MP-MRI alone then immediately with MP-MRI and RSI in the same session. Four weeks later, another scoring session used RSI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) without conventional diffusion-weighted or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Reader interpretations were then compared to prostatectomy data or biopsy results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed, with area under the curve (AUC) used to compare across groups. Results MP-MRI with RSI achieved higher AUCs compared to MP-MRI alone for identifying high-grade (Gleason score greater than or equal to 4 + 3=7) PCa (0.78 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level; P < 0.001 and 0.85 vs. 0.79 at the hemigland level; P = 0.04). RSI and T2WI alone achieved AUCs similar to MP-MRI for high-grade PCa (0.71 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level). With hemigland analysis, high-grade disease results were similar when comparing RSI + T2WI with MP-MRI, although with greater AUCs compared to the sextant analysis (0.80 vs. 0.79). Conclusion Including RSI with MP-MRI improves PCa detection compared to MP-MRI alone, and RSI with T2WI achieves similar PCa detection as MP-MRI. PMID:26910114

  2. Sphenoid sinus ectopic pituitary adenomas: CT and MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B T; Chong, V F H; Wang, Z C; Xian, J F; Chen, Q H

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic pituitary adenomas (EPAs) are rare lesions. The purpose of this study was to describe the CT and MRI features of sphenoid sinus EPAs. Eight patients with histology-proven EPAs in the sphenoid sinus, all of whom underwent CT and MRI, were reviewed retrospectively. The following imaging features were analysed: (i) size, (ii) margin, (iii) CT attenuation characteristics and (iv) MRI signal intensity. In addition, the involvement of adjacent structures and the time–intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were analysed. All EPAs had well-defined margins and showed no relationship to the intrasellar pituitary gland. The mean size was 28 mm (range, 20–46 mm). On non-enhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to grey matter in 7 (88%) patients and hypodense in 1 (12%) patient. Only two patients underwent post-contrast CT, and they showed moderate enhancement. On T1 weighted images, EPAs appeared isointense in 6 (75%) patients and hypointense in 2 (25%). On T2 weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense in 2 (25%) patients and isointense in 6 (75%). EPAs showed mild to moderate heterogeneous contrast enhancement and exhibited a cribriform-like appearance. Two patients underwent DCE MRI; the TIC showed a rapidly enhancing and slow washout pattern. The following features were also seen: an empty sella, bone changes and involvement of the cavernous sinus (5 patients; 62.5%). In conclusion, a high index of suspicion for EPA and a familiarity with the imaging findings may help to diagnose this rare entity accurately. PMID:19651706

  3. MRI of plants and foods.

    PubMed

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  4. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  5. Comparison of CT and MRI brain tumor imaging using a canine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Whelan, H T; Clanton, J A; Wilson, R E; Tulipan, N B

    1988-01-01

    A canine gliosarcoma model was used to study the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast enhancement in defining the histologic margins of brain tumors. The effectiveness of this technique was compared to conventional computed tomography (CT) using iodinated contrast enhancement. Cultured canine gliosarcoma cells were injected into the left hemisphere of adult mongrel dogs. The dogs developed brain tumors and progressive clinical signs. Serial MRI with and without gadolinium diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid was compared to serial CT with and without sodium iothalamate obtained on the same days. After the final scans, animals were sacrificed; the brains were removed and processed for routine histopathologic study. All tumors were visualized with contrast-enhanced MRI which proved most sensitive. Gadolinium di-ethylene triamine penta-acetic acid caused bright enhancement of tumors in a distribution that consistently corresponded to areas of pathologically proved tumor infiltration. Gross and microscopic autopsy findings correlated better with MRI than with CT which tended to produce poorer resolution and underrepresent the size of viable tumor. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is more accurate than unenhanced MRI, unenhanced CT, or enhanced CT in defining the histologic margins of tumors.

  6. [Value of MRI findings in Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lenz, V; Vargas, M I; Bin, J F; Bogorin, A; Grebici-Guessoum, M; Jacques, C; Marin, H; Zöllner, G; Dietemann, J L

    2002-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is related to thiamine deficiency. We report the MRI findings in four patients with visualization of bilateral and symmetrical hyperintense foci on T2W and FLAIR images involving the periaqueductal gray matter, the mamillary bodies and around the third ventricle. Diffusion weighted images obtained in two patients demonstrated mild hypersignal in the same areas. Contrast enhancement within the mamillary bodies was noted in one patient. Follow-up MRI obtained in three patients showed rapid regression of signal abnormalities without correlation with good clinical outcome.

  7. MRI Meets MPI: a bimodal MPI-MRI tomograph.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Lother, Steffen; Rückert, Martin A; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Fidler, Florian; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    While magnetic particle imaging (MPI) constitutes a novel biomedical imaging technique for tracking superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vivo, unlike magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it cannot provide anatomical background information. Until now these two modalities have been performed in separate scanners and image co-registration has been hampered by the need to reposition the sample in both systems as similarly as possible. This paper presents a bimodal MPI-MRI-tomograph that combines both modalities in a single system.MPI and MRI images can thus be acquired without moving the sample or replacing any parts in the setup. The images acquired with the presented setup show excellent agreement between the localization of the nanoparticles in MPI and the MRI background data. A combination of two highly complementary imaging modalities has been achieved.

  8. MRI in necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities.

    PubMed

    Ali, S Z; Srinivasan, S; Peh, W C G

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft-tissue infection of bacterial origin, which involves mainly the deep fascia. Early recognition of this condition may be hampered by the uncommon nature of the disease and non-specificity of initial clinical signs and symptoms in less fulminant cases, making the role of imaging important. MRI is the most useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The presence of thick (>3 mm) hyperintense signal in the deep fascia (particularly intermuscular fascia) on fat-suppressed T2 weighted or short tau inversion-recovery images is an important marker for necrotizing fasciitis. Contrast enhancement of the thickened necrotic fascia can be variable, with a mixed-pattern of enhancement being more commonly encountered. Involvement of multiple musculofascial compartments increases the likelihood of necrotizing fasciitis. It is important to remember that T2-hyperintense signal in the deep fascia is not specific to necrotizing fasciitis and can also be seen in cases such as non-infective inflammatory fasciitis or muscle tear. In this pictorial essay, we aim to review the MRI findings in necrotizing fasciitis, discuss its limitations and pitfalls and identify differentiating features from non-necrotizing soft-tissue infections, such as cellulitis and infective myositis/pyomyositis, conditions which may clinically mimic necrotizing fasciitis.

  9. MRI Technologies in Recent Human Brain Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yuka

    The recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology and techniques used in human brain mapping are remarkable. They are getting, faster, stronger and better. The advanced MRI technologies and techniques include, but not to limited to, the magnetic resonance imaging at higher magnetic field strengths, diffusion tensor imaging, multimodal neuroimaging, and monkey functional MRI. In this article, these advanced MRI techniques are briefly overviewed.

  10. [Standartization of MRI studies in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bryukhov, V V; Krotenkova, I A; Morozova, S N; Krotenkova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis has markedly increased in recent years. The main task of the MRI studies after the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is to assess the dynamics of MRI for determining disease progression and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In this regard, it is very important to obtain the most identical baseline and follow-up MRI that is possible when a single standard protocol is used. This article presents the protocol of brain MRI and spinal cord MRI and interpretation of MRI studies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  11. Arteriovenous fistula complication following MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Danielle; Junglee, Naushad; Mullins, Paul; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Health professionals should be aware of medical procedures that cause vascular access complications. This case describes a haemodialysis patient who experienced pain, swelling and bruising over a radiocephalic fistula following MRI. Exactly the same signs and symptoms were evident following a second scan performed 3 months later. Plausible explanations include a radio frequency-induced electrical current being formed at the arteriovenous fistula, or varying gradients of the MRI sequence stimulating peripheral nerves, leading to a site of increased tissue stimulation. Of note, a juxta-anastomotic venous stenosis was confirmed by fistulogram 4 days after the second scan, although whether this access failure was due to the MRI scan per se could not be ascertained. Nevertheless, these previously undocumented observations suggest that careful patient and fistula monitoring is required when completing MRI scans in those with an arteriovenous fistula. PMID:22927271

  12. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Instead, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, rapidly changing magnetic fields, and a computer to ... in most of the body's tissues. The applied radio waves then cause these protons to produce signals that ...

  16. A tonsillolith seen on MRI.

    PubMed

    el-Sherif, I; Shembesh, F M

    1997-01-01

    A case of a large tonsillolith visualized by magnetic resonance imaging is presented. Although otolaryngologists are well aware of this entity, few radiologists are. The importance of distinguishing tonsilloliths from other structures by MRI is discussed.

  17. Preprocedural MRI and MRA in planning fibroid embolization

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Cristina; Tang, Yen Zhi; Sahdev, Anju; Madureira, António Miguel; Vilares-Morgado, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to discuss and illustrate the up-to-date use of preprocedural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in selecting patients and planning uterine artery embolization (UAE). The merits of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in demonstrating the pelvic vasculature to guide UAE are highlighted. MRI features of fibroids and their main differential diagnoses are presented. Fibroid characteristics, such as location, size, and enhancement, which may impact patient selection and outcome, are presented based on recent literature. Pelvic arterial anatomy relevant to UAE, including vascular variants are illustrated, with conventional angiography and MRA imaging correlation. MRA preprocedural determination of the optimal projection angles for uterine artery catheterization is straightforward and constitutes an important strategy to minimize ionizing radiation exposure during UAE. A reporting template for MRI/MRA preassessement of UAE for fibroid treatment is provided. PMID:28163256

  18. Potential Clinical Applications for Spinal Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Mackey, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is a noninvasive technique for obtaining information regarding spinal cord neuronal function. This article provides a brief overview of recent developments in spinal cord fMRI and outlines potential applications, as well as the limitations that must be overcome, for using spinal fMRI in the clinic. This technique is currently used for research purposes, but significant potential exists for spinal fMRI to become an important clinical tool. PMID:17504642

  19. MRI breast screening in high-risk women: cancer detection and survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, D Gareth; Gareth, Evans D; Kesavan, Nisha; Nisha, Kesavan; Lim, Yit; Yit, Lim; Gadde, Soujanye; Soujanye, Gadde; Hurley, Emma; Emma, Hurley; Massat, Nathalie J; Maxwell, Anthony J; Ingham, Sarah; Sarah, Ingham; Eeles, Rosalind; Rosalind, Eeles; Leach, Martin O; Howell, Anthony; Anthony, Howell; Duffy, Stephen W; Stephen, Duffy

    2014-06-01

    Women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer tend to develop the disease at a younger age with denser breasts making mammography screening less effective. The introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for familial breast cancer screening programs in recent years was intended to improve outcomes in these women. We aimed to assess whether introduction of MRI surveillance improves 5- and 10-year survival of high-risk women and determine the accuracy of MRI breast cancer detection compared with mammography-only or no enhanced surveillance and compare size and pathology of cancers detected in women screened with MRI + mammography and mammography only. We used data from two prospective studies where asymptomatic women with a very high breast cancer risk were screened by either mammography alone or with MRI also compared with BRCA1/2 carriers with no intensive surveillance. 63 cancers were detected in women receiving MRI + mammography and 76 in women receiving mammography only. Sensitivity of MRI + mammography was 93 % with 63 % specificity. Fewer cancers detected on MRI were lymph node positive compared to mammography/no additional screening. There were no differences in 10-year survival between the MRI + mammography and mammography-only groups, but survival was significantly higher in the MRI-screened group (95.3 %) compared to no intensive screening (73.7 %; p = 0.002). There were no deaths among the 21 BRCA2 carriers receiving MRI. There appears to be benefit from screening with MRI, particularly in BRCA2 carriers. Extended follow-up of larger numbers of high-risk women is required to assess long-term survival.

  20. Self-regulation of human brain activity using simultaneous real-time fMRI and EEG neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Zotev, Vadim; Phillips, Raquel; Yuan, Han; Misaki, Masaya; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2014-01-15

    Neurofeedback is a promising approach for non-invasive modulation of human brain activity with applications for treatment of mental disorders and enhancement of brain performance. Neurofeedback techniques are commonly based on either electroencephalography (EEG) or real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI). Advances in simultaneous EEG-fMRI have made it possible to combine the two approaches. Here we report the first implementation of simultaneous multimodal rtfMRI and EEG neurofeedback (rtfMRI-EEG-nf). It is based on a novel system for real-time integration of simultaneous rtfMRI and EEG data streams. We applied the rtfMRI-EEG-nf to training of emotional self-regulation in healthy subjects performing a positive emotion induction task based on retrieval of happy autobiographical memories. The participants were able to simultaneously regulate their BOLD fMRI activation in the left amygdala and frontal EEG power asymmetry in the high-beta band using the rtfMRI-EEG-nf. Our proof-of-concept results demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous self-regulation of both hemodynamic (rtfMRI) and electrophysiological (EEG) activities of the human brain. They suggest potential applications of rtfMRI-EEG-nf in the development of novel cognitive neuroscience research paradigms and enhanced cognitive therapeutic approaches for major neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression.

  1. [Recent advances in newborn MRI].

    PubMed

    Morel, B; Hornoy, P; Husson, B; Bloch, I; Adamsbaum, C

    2014-07-01

    The accurate morphological exploration of the brain is a major challenge in neonatology that advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now provide. MRI is the gold standard if an hypoxic ischemic pathology is suspected in a full term neonate. In prematures, the specific role of MRI remains to be defined, secondary to US in any case. We present a state of the art of hardware and software technical developments in MRI. The increase in magnetic field strength (3 tesla) and the emergence of new MRI sequences provide access to new information. They both have positive and negative consequences on the daily clinical data acquisition use. The semiology of brain imaging in full term newborns and prematures is more extensive and complex and thereby more difficult to interpret. The segmentation of different brain structures in the newborn, even very premature, is now available. It is now possible to dissociate the cortex and basal ganglia from the cerebral white matter, to calculate the volume of anatomical structures, which improves the morphometric quantification and the understanding of the normal and abnormal brain development. MRI is a powerful tool to analyze the neonatal brain. The relevance of the diagnostic contribution requires an adaptation of the parameters of the sequences to acquire and of the image processing methods.

  2. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  3. Cerebral Blood Volume MRI with Intravascular Superparamagentic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Harel, Noam; Jin, Tao; Kim, Tae; Lee, Phil; Zhao, Fuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a crucial physiological indicator of tissue viability and vascular reactivity. Thus, non-invasive CBV mapping has been of great interest. For this, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) including monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION) can be used as long half-life, intravascular susceptibility agents of CBV MRI measurements. Also, CBV-weighted fMRI with USPIO provides enhanced sensitivity, reduced large vessel contribution, and improved spatial specificity compared to conventional blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) fMRI, and measures a single physiological parameter that is easily interpretable. We review physiochemical and magnetic properties as well as pharmacokinetics of USPIO in brief. We then extensively discuss quantifications of baseline CBV, vessel size index, and functional CBV change. We also provide reviews of dose-dependent sensitivity, vascular filter function, specificity, characteristics, and impulse response function of CBV fMRI. Examples of CBV fMRI specificity at the laminar and columnar resolution are provided. Finally, we briefly review application of CBV measurements to functional and pharmacological studies in animals. Overall, the use of USPIO can determine baseline CBV and its changes induced by functional activity and pharmacological interventions. PMID:23208650

  4. Quantitative functional MRI: concepts, issues and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Pike, G Bruce

    2012-08-15

    Since its inception 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the human brain based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast phenomenon has proliferated and matured. Today it is the predominant functional brain imaging modality with the majority of applications being in basic cognitive neuroscience where it has primarily been used as a tool to localize brain activity. While the magnitude of the BOLD response is often used in these studies as a surrogate for the level of neuronal activity, the link between the two is, in fact, quite indirect. The BOLD response is dependent upon hemodynamic (blood flow and volume) and metabolic (oxygen consumption) responses as well as acquisition details. Furthermore, the relationship between neuronal activity and the hemodynamic response, termed neurovascular coupling, is itself complex and incompletely understood. Quantitative fMRI techniques have therefore been developed to measure the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to modulations in brain activity. These methods have not only helped clarify the behaviour and origins of the BOLD signal under normal physiological conditions but they have also provided a potentially valuable set of tools for exploring pathophysiological conditions. Such quantitative methods will be critical to realize the potential of fMRI in a clinical context, where simple BOLD measurements cannot be uniquely interpreted, and to enhance the power of fMRI in basic neuroscience research. In this article, recent advances in human quantitative fMRI methods are reviewed, outstanding issues discussed and future challenges and opportunities highlighted.

  5. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T

    PubMed Central

    Denysenkov, V.; Terekhov, M.; Maeder, R.; Fischer, S.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, T.; Prisner, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels. PMID:28290535

  6. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T.

    PubMed

    Denysenkov, V; Terekhov, M; Maeder, R; Fischer, S; Zangos, S; Vogl, T; Prisner, T F

    2017-03-14

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels.

  7. Continuous-flow DNP polarizer for MRI applications at 1.5 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denysenkov, V.; Terekhov, M.; Maeder, R.; Fischer, S.; Zangos, S.; Vogl, T.; Prisner, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    Here we describe a new hyperpolarization approach for magnetic resonance imaging applications at 1.5 T. Proton signal enhancements of more than 20 were achieved with a newly designed multimode microwave resonator situated inside the bore of the imager and used for Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization of the water proton signal. Different from other approaches in our setup the hyperpolarization is achieved continuously by liquid water flowing through the polarizer under continuous microwave excitation. With an available flow rate of up to 1.5 ml/min, which should be high enough for DNP MR angiography applications in small animals like mice and rats. The hyperpolarized liquid cooled to physiological temperature can be routed by a mechanical switch to a quartz capillary for injection into the blood vessels of the target object. This new approach allows hyperpolarization of protons without the need of an additional magnet and avoids the losses arising from the transfer of the hyperpolarized solution between magnets. The signal-to-noise improvement of this method is demonstrated on two- and three-dimensional phantoms of blood vessels.

  8. MRI virtual biopsy and treatment of brain metastatic tumors with targeted nanobioconjugates: nanoclinic in the brain.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rameshwar; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Gangalum, Pallavi R; Ding, Hui; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Wagner, Shawn; Inoue, Satoshi; Konda, Bindu; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Chesnokova, Alexandra; Markman, Janet L; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Li, Debiao; Prasad, Ravi S; Black, Keith L; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2015-05-26

    Differential diagnosis of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement(s) remains a significant problem, which may be difficult to resolve without biopsy, which can be often dangerous or even impossible. Such MRI enhancement(s) can result from metastasis of primary tumors such as lung or breast, radiation necrosis, infections, or a new primary brain tumor (glioma, meningioma). Neurological symptoms are often the same on initial presentation. To develop a more precise noninvasive MRI diagnostic method, we have engineered a new class of poly(β-l-malic acid) polymeric nanoimaging agents (NIAs). The NIAs carrying attached MRI tracer are able to pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and specifically target cancer cells for efficient imaging. A qualitative/quantitative "MRI virtual biopsy" method is based on a nanoconjugate carrying MRI contrast agent gadolinium-DOTA and antibodies recognizing tumor-specific markers and extravasating through the BBB. In newly developed double tumor xenogeneic mouse models of brain metastasis this noninvasive method allowed differential diagnosis of HER2- and EGFR-expressing brain tumors. After MRI diagnosis, breast and lung cancer brain metastases were successfully treated with similar tumor-targeted nanoconjugates carrying molecular inhibitors of EGFR or HER2 instead of imaging contrast agent. The treatment resulted in a significant increase in animal survival and markedly reduced immunostaining for several cancer stem cell markers. Novel NIAs could be useful for brain diagnostic MRI in the clinic without currently performed brain biopsies. This technology shows promise for differential MRI diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases and other pathologies when biopsies are difficult to perform.

  9. Diagnostic Value of 3D Fast Low-Angle Shot Dynamic MRI of Breast Papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kwak, Jin Young; Jeong, Joon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the value of breast MRI in analysis of papillomas of the breast. Materials and Methods From 1996 to 2004, 94 patients underwent surgery due to papillomas of the breast. Among them, 21 patients underwent 3D fast low angle shot (FLASH) dynamic breast MRI. Eight masses were palpable and 11 of 21 patients had nipple discharge. Two radiologists indifferently analyzed the location, size of the lesions and shape, margin of the masses, multiplicity and ductal relation. The MRI findings were categorized according to breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon. The amount and pattern of enhancement and associated findings were also evaluated according to BI-RADS. We then compared the MRI findings with galactography, mammography and breast ultrasonography (US) and examined histopathologic correlation. Results On breast MRI, the lesion size was 0.4-1.59 cm, and 18 patients showed subareolar location. On 4.25 cm (mean 1.54) dynamic enhanced images, imaging findings showed mass (n = 10), intracystic mass (n = 3), focus (n = 5), ductal enhancement (n = 2), and segmental enhancement (n = 1). In cases of the masses, the shapes of the masses were round (n = 4), lobulated (n = 3), and irregular (n = 6), and margins were circumscribed (n = 6), microlobulated (n = 5), and indistinct (n = 2). The enhancement patterns were homogeneous enhancement (n = 7), heterogeneous (n = 3) or rim enhancement (n = 3). Conclusion The contrast enhanced dynamic breast MRI was highly sensitive for diagnosis of breast papillomas. MRI could play a key role in the pre-operative work-up for multiple papillomas and papillomatosis. PMID:20046427

  10. Review of treatment assessment using DCE-MRI in breast cancer radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet; Chang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    As a noninvasive functional imaging technique, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is being used in oncology to measure properties of tumor microvascular structure and permeability. Studies have shown that parameters derived from certain pharmacokinetic models can be used as imaging biomarkers for tumor treatment response. The use of DCE-MRI for quantitative and objective assessment of radiation therapy has been explored in a variety of methods and tumor types. However, due to the complexity in imaging technology and divergent outcomes from different pharmacokinetic approaches, the method of using DCE-MRI in treatment assessment has yet to be standardized, especially for breast cancer. This article reviews the basic principles of breast DCE-MRI and recent studies using DCE-MRI in treatment assessment. Technical and clinical considerations are emphasized with specific attention to assessment of radiation treatment response. PMID:25332905

  11. Cell tracking with caged xenon: using cryptophanes as MRI reporters upon cellular internalization.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Stefan; Döpfert, Jörg; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Kunth, Martin; Rossella, Federica; Schnurr, Matthias; Witte, Christopher; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-01-07

    Caged xenon has great potential in overcoming sensitivity limitations for solution-state NMR detection of dilute molecules. However, no application of such a system as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent has yet been performed with live cells. We demonstrate MRI localization of cells labeled with caged xenon in a packed-bed bioreactor working under perfusion with hyperpolarized-xenon-saturated medium. Xenon hosts enable NMR/MRI experiments with switchable contrast and selectivity for cell-associated versus unbound cages. We present MR images with 10(3) -fold sensitivity enhancement for cell-internalized, dual-mode (fluorescence/MRI) xenon hosts at low micromolar concentrations. Our results illustrate the capability of functionalized xenon to act as a highly sensitive cell tracer for MRI detection even without signal averaging. The method will bridge the challenging gap for translation to in vivo studies for the optimization of targeted biosensors and their multiplexing applications.

  12. Multispectral optoacoustic and MRI coregistration for molecular imaging of orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Tay, Hui Chien; Burton, Neal C; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modality imaging methods are of great importance in oncologic studies for acquiring complementary information, enhancing the efficacy in tumor detection and characterization. We hereby demonstrate a hybrid non-invasive in vivo imaging approach of utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) for molecular imaging of glucose uptake in an orthotopic glioblastoma in mouse. The molecular and functional information from MSOT can be overlaid on MRI anatomy via image coregistration to provide insights into probe uptake in the brain, which is verified by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and histological validation. In vivo MSOT and MRI imaging of an orthotopic glioma mouse model injected with IRDye800-2DG. Image coregistration between MSOT and MRI enables multifaceted (anatomical, functional, molecular) information from MSOT to be overlaid on MRI anatomy images to derive tumor physiological parameters such as perfusion, haemoglobin and oxygenation.

  13. Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Michal; Horev, Judith; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Navon, Gil

    2013-10-01

    The two glucose analogs 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) are preferentially taken up by cancer cells, undergo phosphorylation and accumulate in the cells. Owing to their exchangeable protons on their hydroxyl residues they exhibit significant chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effect in MRI. Here we report CEST-MRI on mice bearing orthotopic mammary tumors injected with 2-DG or FDG. The tumor exhibited an enhanced CEST effect of up to 30% that persisted for over one hour. Thus 2-DG/FDG CEST MRI can replace PET/CT or PET/MRI for cancer research in laboratory animals, but also has the potential to be used in the clinic for the detection of tumors and metastases, distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors and monitoring tumor response to therapy as well as tumors metabolism noninvasively by using MRI, without the need for radio-labeled isotopes.

  14. Cardiac calcified amorphous tumors: CT and MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Ravza; Demir, Ali Aslan; Önür, İmran; Yılbazbayhan, Dilek; Dursun, Memduh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cardiac calcified amorphous tumors (CATs). METHODS CT and MRI findings of cardiac CATs in 12 patients were included. We retrospectively examined patient demographics, location, size, shape configuration, imaging features, calcification distribution of tumors, and accompanying medical problems. RESULTS There was a female predominance (75%), with a mean age at presentation of 65 years. Patients were mostly asymptomatic on presentation (58.3%). The left ventricle of the heart was mostly involved (91%). CT findings of CATs were classified as partial calcification with a hypodense mass in four patients or a diffuse calcified form in eight. Calcification was predominant with large foci appearance as in partially calcified masses. On T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, CATs appeared hypointense and showed no contrast enhancement. CONCLUSION The shape and configuration of cardiac CATs are variable with a narrow spectrum of CT and MRI findings, but large foci in a partially calcified mass or diffuse calcification of a mass on CT is very important in the diagnosis of cardiac CATs. Masses show a low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images with no contrast enhancement on MRI. PMID:27705878

  15. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  16. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  17. Multi-Parametric MRI and Texture Analysis to Visualize Spatial Histologic Heterogeneity and Tumor Extent in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Leland S.; Ning, Shuluo; Eschbacher, Jennifer M.; Gaw, Nathan; Dueck, Amylou C.; Smith, Kris A.; Nakaji, Peter; Plasencia, Jonathan; Ranjbar, Sara; Price, Stephen J.; Tran, Nhan; Loftus, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert; O’Neill, Brian P.; Elmquist, William; Baxter, Leslie C.; Gao, Fei; Frakes, David; Karis, John P.; Zwart, Christine; Swanson, Kristin R.; Sarkaria, Jann; Wu, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM). Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) targets enhancing core (ENH) but yields adequate tumor in only ~60% of cases. Further, CE-MRI poorly localizes infiltrative tumor within surrounding non-enhancing parenchyma, or brain-around-tumor (BAT), despite the importance of characterizing this tumor segment, which universally recurs. In this study, we use multiple texture analysis and machine learning (ML) algorithms to analyze multi-parametric MRI, and produce new images indicating tumor-rich targets in GBM. Methods We recruited primary GBM patients undergoing image-guided biopsies and acquired pre-operative MRI: CE-MRI, Dynamic-Susceptibility-weighted-Contrast-enhanced-MRI, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Following image coregistration and region of interest placement at biopsy locations, we compared MRI metrics and regional texture with histologic diagnoses of high- vs low-tumor content (≥80% vs <80% tumor nuclei) for corresponding samples. In a training set, we used three texture analysis algorithms and three ML methods to identify MRI-texture features that optimized model accuracy to distinguish tumor content. We confirmed model accuracy in a separate validation set. Results We collected 82 biopsies from 18 GBMs throughout ENH and BAT. The MRI-based model achieved 85% cross-validated accuracy to diagnose high- vs low-tumor in the training set (60 biopsies, 11 patients). The model achieved 81.8% accuracy in the validation set (22 biopsies, 7 patients). Conclusion Multi-parametric MRI and texture analysis can help characterize and visualize GBM’s spatial histologic heterogeneity to identify regional tumor-rich biopsy targets. PMID:26599106

  18. Syringomyelia associated with adhesive spinal arachnoiditis: MRI.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Nemoto, Y; Ohata, K; Daikokuya, H; Hakuba, A; Tashiro, T; Shakudo, M; Nagai, K; Nakayama, K; Yamada, R

    2001-04-01

    We reviewed the MRI of seven patients with syringomyelia associated with surgically proven adhesive spinal arachnoiditis to describe clinical and MRI findings in this condition. Using 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 tesla units, we obtained sagittal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo and axial T1-weighted images. Additional sagittal T2-weighted images were obtained without using motion-artefact suppression. Contrast medium was given intravenously to five patients. The syrinx cavities were thoracic in five cases, cervicothoracic in one, and extended from C4 to L1 in one. No Chiari malformation or craniovertebral junction anomaly was demonstrated. Meningeal thickening was seen on T2-weighted sagittal images only in one case. Cord deformity due to adhesion or displacement due to an associated arachnoid cyst was seen in all cases best demonstrated on axial images. Focal blurring of the syrinx wall on axial images was seen in six patients. Flow voids were seen in the syrinx fluid in all cases on T2-weighted images obtained without motion-artefact suppression. No abnormal contrast enhancement was demonstrated.

  19. MRI in treatment of adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Henson, John W; Gaviani, Paola; Gonzalez, R Gilberto

    2005-03-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas of the adult cerebral hemispheres are unique among tumours in human beings in the extent to which their imaging features are related to histopathological characteristics and clinical behaviour. However, understanding is still restricted about the value of imaging features in the measurement of response and of progression in these tumours. The present approach used in clinical trials, which consists of an anatomical measurement of the enhancing tumour on MRI, has many problems, and might not be acceptable as a surrogate endpoint for survival in patients with glioblastoma who are enrolled in clinical trials. Dynamic imaging techniques, such as capillary permeability mapping, are being used in studies of new drugs that target specific molecular features of gliomas; however, the validity of these techniques has not been elucidated. Diffusion imaging can be valuable for fibre-tract mapping to assist surgical planning and might become useful in measuring early response to treatment in densely cellular tumours. Functional imaging techniques can be used to localise motor, sensory, and language-control areas before surgery. Intraoperative MRI has produced improvements in the extent of tumour resection, and molecular imaging is another technique on the horizon, which could come to have a role in clinical trials in the near future. Thus, as a rapidly expanding sphere of investigation, brain-tumour imaging is producing great excitement. The aim of these new techniques is to aid the identification of more effective treatments.

  20. Vascular assessment of liver disease—towards a new frontier in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Manil D; Lythgoe, Mark F; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P

    2016-01-01

    Complex haemodynamic phenomena underpin the pathophysiology of chronic liver disease. Non-invasive MRI-based assessment of hepatic vascular parameters therefore has the potential to yield meaningful biomarkers for chronic liver disease. In this review, we provide an overview of vascular sequelae of chronic liver disease amenable to imaging evaluation and describe the current supportive evidence, strengths and the limitations of MRI methodologies, including dynamic contrast-enhanced, dynamic hepatocyte-specific contrast-enhanced, phase-contrast, arterial spin labelling and MR elastography in the assessment of hepatic vascular parameters. We review the broader challenges of quantitative hepatic vascular MRI, including the difficulties of motion artefact, complex post-processing, long acquisition times, validation and limitations of pharmacokinetic models, alongside the potential solutions that will shape the future of MRI and deliver this new frontier to the patient bedside. PMID:27115318

  1. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noel, Camille E; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J

    2014-01-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC(intraobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD(intraobserver) = 3.6mm ± 1.5, DC(interobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD(interobserver) = 3.2mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  2. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Camille E.; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y.; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J.

    2014-10-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC{sub intraobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD{sub intraobserver} = 3.6 mm ± 1.5, DC{sub interobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD{sub interobserver} = 3.2 mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4 mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  3. Two pitfalls of BOLD fMRI magnitude-based neuroimage analysis: non-negativity and edge effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-08-15

    BOLD fMRI is accepted as a noninvasive imaging modality for neuroimaging and brain mapping. A BOLD fMRI dataset consists of magnitude and phase components. Currently, only the magnitude is used for neuroimage analysis. In this paper, we show that the fMRI-magnitude-based neuroimage analysis may suffer two pitfalls: one is that the magnitude is non-negative and cannot differentiate positive from negative BOLD activity; the other is an edge effect that may manifest as an edge enhancement or a spatial interior dip artifact at a local uniform BOLD region. We demonstrate these pitfalls via numeric simulations using a BOLD fMRI model and also via a phantom experiment. We also propose a solution by making use of the fMRI phase image, the counterpart of the fMRI magnitude.

  4. Raman spectroscopy detects distant invasive brain cancer cells centimeters beyond MRI capability in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Leblond, Frederic; Petrecca, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of brain cancer is limited by the inability of current imaging capabilities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect the entirety of this locally invasive cancer. This results in residual cancer cells remaining following surgery, leading to recurrence and death. We demonstrate that intraoperative Raman spectroscopy can detect invasive cancer cells centimeters beyond pathological T1-contrast-enhanced and T2-weighted MRI signals. This intraoperative optical guide can be used to detect invasive cancer cells and minimize post-surgical cancer burden. The detection of distant invasive cancer cells beyond MRI signal has the potential to increase the effectiveness of surgery and directly lengthen patient survival. PMID:28018730

  5. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  6. [MRI of the pineal gland].

    PubMed

    Langevad, Line; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel; Siebner, Hartwig; Garde, Ellen

    2014-11-10

    The pineal gland (CP) is located centrally in the brain and produces melatonin. Cysts and concrements are frequent findings on MRI but their significance is still unclear. The visualization of CP is difficult due to its location and surrounding structures and so far, no standardized method exists. New studies suggest a correlation between CP-morphology and melatonin secretion as well as a connection between melatonin, disturbed circadian rhythm, and the development of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, underlining the need for a standardized approach to CP on MRI.

  7. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  8. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  10. MRI appearances of an ectopic pituitary adenoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Slonim, S M; Haykal, H A; Cushing, G W; Freidberg, S R; Lee, A K

    1993-01-01

    MR images of an ectopic pituitary adenoma have been published in only a single case, a suprasellar mass. We present a patient with Cushing's disease in whom MRI revealed a pituitary adenoma within the sphenoid sinus. Radiologic characteristics of ectopic pituitary adenomas are reviewed, with emphasis on MRI, which demonstrates a soft tissue mass, isointense with gray matter on T1-weighted images, which enhances in a heterogeneous manner.

  11. The Efficiency of Diffusion Weighted MRI and MR Spectroscopy On Breast MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Canan; Balcı, Pınar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiologically routine is to establish an imaging protocol that will create high quality images with a short period of time. Fort this purpose, an imaging protocol should include a conventional breast MRI and contrast enhanced sequences. Proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are important MR techniques for evaluation to complicated breast lesions. In this article, we will evaluate that technical properties of the MRS and DWI as additional MR imaging.

  12. MRI-based Preplanning Using CT and MRI Data Fusion in Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With 3D-based Brachytherapy: Feasibility and Accuracy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zizka, Jan; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kohlova, Tereza; Kroulik, Tomas; Spitzer, Dusan; Ryska, Pavel; Tichy, Michal; Kostal, Milan; Jalcova, Lubica

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-assisted radiation treatment planning enables enhanced target contouring. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility and accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI data fusion for MRI-based treatment planning in an institution where an MRI scanner is not available in the radiotherapy department. Methods and Materials: The registration inaccuracy of applicators and soft tissue was assessed in 42 applications with CT/MRI data fusion. The absolute positional difference of the center of the applicators was measured in four different planes from the top of the tandem to the cervix. Any inaccuracy of registration of soft tissue in relation to the position of applicators was determined and dose-volume parameters for MRI preplans and for CT/MRI fusion plans with or without target and organs at risk (OAR) adaptation were evaluated. Results: We performed 6,132 measurements in 42 CT/MRI image fusions. Median absolute difference of the center of tandem on CT and MRI was 1.1 mm. Median distance between the center of the right ovoid on CT and MRI was 1.7 and 1.9 mm in the laterolateral and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Corresponding values for the left ovoid were 1.6 and 1.8 mm. Rotation of applicators was 3.1 Degree-Sign . Median absolute difference in position of applicators in relation to soft tissue was 1.93, 1.50, 1.05, and 0.84 mm in the respective transverse planes, and 1.17, 1.28, 1.27, and 1.17 mm in selected angular directions. The dosimetric parameters for organs at risk on CT/MRI fusion plans without OAR adaptation were significantly impaired whereas the target coverage was not influenced. Planning without target adaptation led to overdosing of the target volume, especially high-risk clinical target volume - D{sub 90} 88.2 vs. 83.1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI-based preplanning with consecutive CT/MRI data fusion can be safe and feasible, with an acceptable inaccuracy of soft tissue registration.

  13. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  14. In Vivo Molecular MRI Imaging of Prostate Cancer by Targeting PSMA with Polypeptide-Labeled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunkai; Sun, Ying; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Weiyong; Jiang, Jun; Guan, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhongyang; Duan, Yourong

    2015-01-01

    The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is broadly overexpressed on prostate cancer (PCa) cell surfaces. In this study, we report the synthesis, characterization, in vitro binding assay, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of PSMA targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). PSMA-targeting polypeptide CQKHHNYLC was conjugated to SPIONs to form PSMA-targeting molecular MRI contrast agents. In vitro studies demonstrated specific uptake of polypeptide-SPIONs by PSMA expressing cells. In vivo MRI studies found that MRI signals in PSMA-expressing tumors could be specifically enhanced with polypeptide-SPION, and further Prussian blue staining showed heterogeneous deposition of SPIONs in the tumor tissues. Taken altogether, we have developed PSMA-targeting polypeptide-SPIONs that could specifically enhance MRI signal in tumor-bearing mice, which might provide a new strategy for the molecular imaging of PCa. PMID:25927579

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need for contrast material. See the MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. ...

  16. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  17. Multimodal Functional Neuroimaging: Integrating Functional MRI and EEG/MEG

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Liu, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles; it is followed by a review of major progresses in understanding and modeling the neurovascular coupling, methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG integration and EEG-fMRI simultaneous recording; finally, important remaining issues and perspectives (including brain connectivity imaging) are summarized. PMID:20634915

  18. Frequency-Offset Cartesian Feedback for MRI Power Amplifier Linearization

    PubMed Central

    Zanchi, Marta Gaia; Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John Mark; Scott, Greig Cameron

    2011-01-01

    High-quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires precise control of the transmit radio-frequency field. In parallel excitation applications such as transmit SENSE, high RF power linearity is essential to cancel aliased excitations. In widely-employed class AB power amplifiers, gain compression, cross-over distortion, memory effects, and thermal drift all distort the RF field modulation and can degrade image quality. Cartesian feedback (CF) linearization can mitigate these effects in MRI, if the quadrature mismatch and DC offset imperfections inherent in the architecture can be minimized. In this paper, we present a modified Cartesian feedback technique called “frequency-offset Cartesian feedback” (FOCF) that significantly reduces these problems. In the FOCF architecture, the feedback control is performed at a low intermediate frequency rather than DC, so that quadrature ghosts and DC errors are shifted outside the control bandwidth. FOCF linearization is demonstrated with a variety of typical MRI pulses. Simulation of the magnetization obtained with the Bloch equation demonstrates that high-fidelity RF reproduction can be obtained even with inexpensive class AB amplifiers. Finally, the enhanced RF fidelity of FOCF over CF is demonstrated with actual images obtained in a 1.5 T MRI system. PMID:20959264

  19. Simulating the Effect of Spectroscopic MRI as a Metric for Radiation Therapy Planning in Patients with Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Kandula, Shravan; Gurbani, Saumya; Zhong, Jim; Tejani, Mital; Kayode, Oluwatosin; Patel, Kirtesh; Prabhu, Roshan; Schreibmann, Eduard; Crocker, Ian; Holder, Chad A.; Shim, Hyunsuk; Shu, Hui-Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Due to glioblastoma’s infiltrative nature, an optimal radiation therapy (RT) plan requires targeting infiltration not identified by anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, high-resolution, whole-brain spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) is used to describe tumor infiltration alongside anatomical MRI and simulate the degree to which it modifies RT target planning. In 11 patients with glioblastoma, data from preRT sMRI scans were processed to give high-resolution, whole-brain metabolite maps normalized by contralateral white matter. Maps depicting choline to N-Acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios were registered to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted RT planning MRI for each patient. Volumes depicting metabolic abnormalities (1.5−, 1.75−, and 2.0-fold increases in Cho/NAA ratios) were compared with conventional target volumes and contrast-enhancing tumor at recurrence. sMRI-modified RT plans were generated to evaluate target volume coverage and organ-at-risk dose constraints. Conventional clinical target volumes and Cho/NAA abnormalities identified significantly different regions of microscopic infiltration with substantial Cho/NAA abnormalities falling outside of the conventional 60 Gy isodose line (41.1, 22.2, and 12.7 cm3, respectively). Clinical target volumes using Cho/NAA thresholds exhibited significantly higher coverage of contrast enhancement at recurrence on average (92.4%, 90.5%, and 88.6%, respectively) than conventional plans (82.5%). sMRI-based plans targeting tumor infiltration met planning objectives in all cases with no significant change in target coverage. In 2 cases, the sMRI-modified plan exhibited better coverage of contrast-enhancing tumor at recurrence than the original plan. Integration of the high-resolution, whole-brain sMRI into RT planning is feasible, resulting in RT target volumes that can effectively target tumor infiltration while adhering to conventional constraints. PMID:28105468

  20. Value of pre-operative breast MRI for the size assessment of ductal carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Proulx, Francesca; Correa, José A; Ferré, Romuald; Omeroglu, Atilla; Aldis, Ann; Meterissian, Sarkis

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative breast MRI and mammography in determining the size of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) compared with the histopathological results. Methods: 79 patients [mean age: 56.5 (standard deviation 10.2) years] with pathologically proven DCIS (79 lesions) obtained a bilateral mammogram and a pre-operative contrast-enhanced MRI. The accuracy of MRI and mammography to detect tumour size were estimated and compared, using histopathological size as the gold standard, on the subjects with measurements with both modalities (n = 60). Results: MRI detected 67 (85%) lesions, mammography detected 72 (91%) and both modalities detected 60 (76%). Median DCIS size detected by mammography vs MRI was smaller (1.55 vs 1.65 cm). Out of these 60 cases, compared with the histopathological size, the accuracy of MRI and mammography was 0.66 and 0.56, respectively (p = 0.045). MRI showed better accuracy than mammography for younger patients (age ≤ 50 years, p = 0.003). For tumour nuclear grade, there was a statistically significant difference for the intermediate level, with higher accuracy for MRI (p = 0.03). Conclusion: MRI was more accurate than mammography in DCIS size assessment when visible, particularly in lesions of intermediate grade and in patients less than 50 years of age. Advances in knowledge: Breast MRI may help in management of DCIS of intermediate grade and in females less than 50 years of age. PMID:26568438

  1. Computerized breast parenchymal analysis on DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Yuan, Yading; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Lan, Li; Bhooshan, Neha; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, and MRI has been recommended for high-risk women screening, however, it is still unknown how the breast parenchymal enhancement on DCE-MRI is associated with breast density and breast cancer risk. Ninety-two DCE-MRI exams of asymptomatic women with normal MR findings were included in this study. The 3D breast volume was automatically segmented using a volume-growing based algorithm. The extracted breast volume was classified into fibroglandular and fatty regions based on the discriminant analysis method. The parenchymal kinetic curves within the breast fibroglandular region were extracted and categorized by use of fuzzy c-means clustering, and various parenchymal kinetic characteristics were extracted from the most enhancing voxels. Correlation analysis between the computer-extracted percent dense measures and radiologist-noted BIRADS density ratings yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.76 (p<0.0001). From kinetic analyses, 70% (64/92) of most enhancing curves showed persistent curve type and reached peak parenchymal intensity at the last postcontrast time point; with 89% (82/92) of most enhancing curves reaching peak intensity at either 4th or 5th post-contrast time points. Women with dense breast (BIRADS 3 and 4) were found to have more parenchymal enhancement at their peak time point (Ep) with an average Ep of 116.5% while those women with fatty breasts (BIRADS 1 and 2) demonstrated an average Ep of 62.0%. In conclusion, breast parenchymal enhancement may be associated with breast density and may be potential useful as an additional characteristic for assessing breast cancer risk.

  2. Classifying Glioblastoma Multiforme Follow-Up Progressive vs. Responsive Forms Using Multi-Parametric MRI Features

    PubMed Central

    Ion-Mărgineanu, Adrian; Van Cauter, Sofie; Sima, Diana M.; Maes, Frederik; Sunaert, Stefan; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is discriminating between tumor progression and response to treatment based on follow-up multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data retrieved from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. Materials and Methods: Multi-parametric MRI data consisting of conventional MRI (cMRI) and advanced MRI [i.e., perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) and diffusion kurtosis MRI (DKI)] were acquired from 29 GBM patients treated with adjuvant therapy after surgery. We propose an automatic pipeline for processing advanced MRI data and extracting intensity-based histogram features and 3-D texture features using manually and semi-manually delineated regions of interest (ROIs). Classifiers are trained using a leave-one-patient-out cross validation scheme on complete MRI data. Balanced accuracy rate (BAR)–values are computed and compared between different ROIs, MR modalities, and classifiers, using non-parametric multiple comparison tests. Results: Maximum BAR–values using manual delineations are 0.956, 0.85, 0.879, and 0.932, for cMRI, PWI, DKI, and all three MRI modalities combined, respectively. Maximum BAR–values using semi-manual delineations are 0.932, 0.894, 0.885, and 0.947, for cMRI, PWI, DKI, and all three MR modalities combined, respectively. After statistical testing using Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Dunn-Šidák analysis we conclude that training a RUSBoost classifier on features extracted using semi-manual delineations on cMRI or on all MRI modalities combined performs best. Conclusions: We present two main conclusions: (1) using T1 post-contrast (T1pc) features extracted from manual total delineations, AdaBoost achieves the highest BAR–value, 0.956; (2) using T1pc-average, T1pc-90th percentile, and Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) 90th percentile extracted from semi-manually delineated contrast enhancing ROIs, SVM-rbf, and RUSBoost achieve BAR–values of 0.947 and 0.932, respectively. Our findings show that AdaBoost, SVM-rbf, and

  3. cMRI-BED: A novel informatics framework for cardiac MRI biomarker extraction and discovery applied to pediatric cardiomyopathy classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a rare, yet heterogeneous group of pathologies of the myocardium that are routinely examined clinically using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI). This gold standard powerful non-invasive tool yields high resolution temporal images that characterize myocardial tissue. The complexities associated with the annotation of images and extraction of markers, necessitate the development of efficient workflows to acquire, manage and transform this data into actionable knowledge for patient care to reduce mortality and morbidity. Methods We develop and test a novel informatics framework called cMRI-BED for biomarker extraction and discovery from such complex pediatric cMRI data that includes the use of a suite of tools for image processing, marker extraction and predictive modeling. We applied our workflow to obtain and analyze a dataset of 83 de-identified cases and controls containing cMRI-derived biomarkers for classifying positive versus negative findings of cardiomyopathy in children. Bayesian rule learning (BRL) methods were applied to derive understandable models in the form of propositional rules with posterior probabilities pertaining to their validity. Popular machine learning methods in the WEKA data mining toolkit were applied using default parameters to assess cross-validation performance of this dataset using accuracy and percentage area under ROC curve (AUC) measures. Results The best 10-fold cross validation predictive performance obtained on this cMRI-derived biomarker dataset was 80.72% accuracy and 79.6% AUC by a BRL decision tree model, which is promising from this type of rare data. Moreover, we were able to verify that mycocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) status, which is known to be an important qualitative factor in the classification of cardiomyopathies, is picked up by our rule models as an important variable for prediction. Conclusions Preliminary results show the feasibility of our framework

  4. The study of cerebral hemodynamic and neuronal response to visual stimulation using simultaneous NIR optical tomography and BOLD fMRI in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Toronov, Vladislav Y.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of near-infrared (NIR) and functional MRI (fMRI) studies is potentially a powerful method to investigate the physiological mechanism of human cerebral activity. However, current NIR methodologies do not provide adequate accuracy of localization and are not fully integrated with MRI in the sense of mutual enhancement of the two imaging modalities. Results are presented to address these issues by developing an MRI-compatible optical probe and using diffuse optical tomography for optical image reconstruction. We have developed a complete methodology that seamlessly integrates NIR tomography with fMRI data acquisition. In this paper, we apply this methodology to determine both hemodynamic and early neuronal responses in the visual cortex in humans. Early results indicate that the changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration from optical data are co-localized with fMRI BOLD signal changes, but changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration (not measurable using fMRI) show interesting spatial differences. PMID:21776185

  5. The study of cerebral hemodynamic and neuronal response to visual stimulation using simultaneous NIR optical tomography and BOLD fMRI in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Toronov, Vladislav Y.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Webb, Andrew G.

    2005-04-01

    The integration of near-infrared (NIR) and functional MRI (fMRI) studies is potentially a powerful method to investigate the physiological mechanism of human cerebral activity. However, current NIR methodologies do not provide adequate accuracy of localization and are not fully integrated with MRI in the sense of mutual enhancement of the two imaging modalities. Results are presented to address these issues by developing an MRI-compatible optical probe and using diffuse optical tomography for optical image reconstruction. We have developed a complete methodology that seamlessly integrates NIR tomography with fMRI data acquisition. In this paper, we apply this methodology to determine both hemodynamic and early neuronal responses in the visual cortex in humans. Early results indicate that the changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration from optical data are co-localized with fMRI BOLD signal changes, but changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration (not measurable using fMRI) show small spatial differences.

  6. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, NJ; Eu, P; Cowell, SF

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging. There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI. In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  7. [Clinical features of NMO according to brain MRI findings].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuko

    2010-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a severe inflammatory, demyelinating disease, and its clinical characteristics include recurrent optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. The NMO-immunoglobulin (Ig) G auto-antibody (Ab), which binds to the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel protein, is a marker for NMO. These clinical and immunological features have been used to distinguish NMO from multiple sclerosis (MS). In 1999, Wingerchuk et al. broadened the clinical criteria for diagnosing NMO to include "negative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at onset." However, after NMO-IgG/AQP4-Ab became a supportive criterion for diagnosing NMO, patients with NMO were frequently found to have symptomatic or asymptomatic brain lesions. In 2006, Pittock et al. reported that asymptomatic brain lesions were common in NMO, and that NMO brain lesions characteristically occurred in the hypothalamus and periventricular areas, which correspond to brain regions with high levels of AQP4 expression. Furthermore, Nakashima et al. detected abnormalities on brain MRI in 71% of NMO-IgG-positive Japanese patients. Patients with NMO have unique brain lesions that are clearly different from the lesions of patients with MS. In patients with NMO, involvement of the dorsal portion of the medulla oblongata causes intractable hiccups and nausea. Some studies described a hypothalamic lesion, and hypothalamic dysfunction could cause symptomatic hypersomnia, narcolepsy, and endocrinopathies. In some patients with NMO and NMO spectrum disorder who experience blood pressure fluctuations, vasogenic edema, manifesting as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, may occur. In a recent report highlighting brain MRI with contrast enhancement, the most prominent feature that appeared to be a specific finding in NMO was "cloud-like enhancement" with multiple patchy enhancing lesions with a blurred margin. Another report showed that acute, large, edematous callosal lesions with

  8. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  9. Features of Occult Invasion in Biopsy-Proven DCIS at Breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Dorota Jakubowski; Hwang, E. Shelley; Chang, C. Belinda; Tso, Hilda H.; Joe, Bonnie N.; Lessing, Juan N.; Lu, Ying; Hylton, Nola M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if MRI BI-RADS criteria or radiologist perception correlate with presence of invasive cancer after initial core biopsy of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Materials and Methods Retrospective search spanning 2000-2007 identified all core-biopsy diagnoses of pure DCIS that coincided with preoperative MRI. Two radiologists fellowship-trained in breast imaging categorized lesions according to ACR MRI-BIRADS lexicon and estimated likelihood of occult invasion. Semi-quantitative signal enhancement ratio (SER) kinetic analysis was also performed. Results were compared to histopathology. Results 51 consecutive patients with primary core biopsy-proven DCIS and concurrent MRI were identified. Of these, 13 patients (25%) had invasion at excision. Invasion correlated significantly with presence of a mass for both readers (p=0.012, 0.001), rapid initial enhancement for Reader 1 (p=0.001), and washout kinetics for Reader 2 (p=0.012). Significant correlation between washout and invasion was confirmed by SER (p=0.006) when threshold percent enhancement was sufficiently high (130%), corresponding to rapidly enhancing portions of the lesion. Radiologist perception of occult invasion was strongly correlated to true presence of invasion. Conclusion These results provide evidence that certain BI-RADS MRI criteria, as well as radiologist perception, correlate with occult invasion after an initial core biopsy of DCIS. PMID:24165314

  10. Features of occult invasion in biopsy-proven DCIS at breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Dorota Jakubowski; Hwang, E Shelley; Chang, C Belinda; Tso, Hilda H; Joe, Bonnie N; Lessing, Juan N; Lu, Ying; Hylton, Nola M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if MRI BI-RADS criteria or radiologist perception correlate with presence of invasive cancer after initial core biopsy of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Retrospective search spanning 2000-2007 identified all core-biopsy diagnoses of pure DCIS that coincided with preoperative MRI. Two radiologists fellowship-trained in breast imaging categorized lesions according to ACR MRI BI-RADS lexicon and estimated likelihood of occult invasion. Semiquantitative signal enhancement ratio (SER) kinetic analysis was also performed. Results were compared with histopathology. 51 consecutive patients with primary core biopsy-proven DCIS and concurrent MRI were identified. Of these, 13 patients (25%) had invasion at excision. Invasion correlated significantly with presence of a mass for both readers (p = 0.012 and 0.001), rapid initial enhancement for Reader 1 (p = 0.001), and washout kinetics for Reader 2 (p = 0.012). Significant correlation between washout and invasion was confirmed by SER (p = 0.006) when threshold percent enhancement was sufficiently high (130%), corresponding to rapidly enhancing portions of the lesion. Radiologist perception of occult invasion was strongly correlated with true presence of invasion. These results provide evidence that certain BI-RADS MRI criteria, as well as radiologist perception, correlate with occult invasion after an initial core biopsy of DCIS.

  11. Feasibility study on energy prediction of microwave ablation upon uterine adenomyosis and leiomyomas by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xia, M; Zhi-yu, H; Jian-ming, C; Hong-yu, Z; Rui-fang, X; Yu, Y; Yan-li, H; Bao-wei, D

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of energy prediction of percutaneous microwave ablation (PMWA) upon uterine leiomyomas and adenomyosis by MRI. Methods: 63 patients (49 patients with 49 uterine leiomyomas and 14 patients with adenomyosis) who underwent ultrasound-guided PMWA treatment were studied during the period from June 2011 to December 2012. Before PMWA, contrast-enhanced MRI (ceMRI) was performed for all of the patients. Based on the signal intensity (SI) of T2 weighted MRI, uterine leiomyomas were classified as hypointense, isointense and hyperintense. During ablation, the output energy of the microwave was set at 50 W, and T11a microwave antennas were used. ceMRI was performed within 7 days after PMWA treatment. Non-perfused volume and energy required per unit volume were analysed statistically. Results: When unit volume of lesions was ablated, uterine adenomyosis needed more energy than did uterine leiomyomas, and hyperintense uterine leiomyomas needed more energy than did hypointense pattern. Conclusions: MRI SI of uterine leiomyomas and uterine adenomyosis can be used to predict PMWA energy. Advances in knowledge: The conclusions indicate that MRI SI can be used to perform pre-treatment planning, which will make the treatment more precise. PMID:24947033

  12. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI with and Without Contrast in Diagnosis of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Shad, Ali Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most common causes of severe disability and mortality after trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify different levels of SCI, but sometimes unable to detect the associated soft tissue injuries. The role of MRI with contrast in patients with SCI has not been studied. This is the first study in human to compare the efficacy of MRI with and without contrast in diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of SCIs. In this cross-sectional diagnostic study, MRI with and without contrast was performed on 40 patients with acute spinal injury. In these patients, 3 different types of MRI signal patterns were detected and compared. The most common cases of spinal injuries were accident (72.5%) and the after fall (27.5%). The prevalence of lesions detected includes spine fracture (70%), spinal stenosis (32.5%), soft tissue injuries (30%), and tearing of the spinal cord (2.5%). A classification was developed using 3 patterns of SCIs. Type I, seen in 2 (5.0%) of the patients, demonstrated a decreased signal intensity consistent with acute intraspinal hemorrhage. Type II, seen in 8 (20.0%) of the patients, demonstrated a bright signal intensity consistent with acute cord edema. Type III, seen in 1 (2.5%) of the patients, demonstrated a mixed signal of hypointensity centrally and hyperintensity peripherally consistent with contusion. In the diagnosis of all injuries, MRI with contrast efficacy comparable to noncontrast MRI, except in the diagnosis of soft tissue, which was significantly higher sensitivity (P < 0.05). So given that is not significant differences between noncontrast and contrast-enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of major injuries (hematoma, edema, etc.) and contrast-enhanced MRI just better in soft tissues. We recommend to the MRI with contrast only used in cases of suspected severe soft tissue injury, which have been ignored by detection MRI without contrast. PMID:26512624

  13. Multimodal MRI of experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. Brain imaging data from experimental stroke models and stroke patients have shown that there is often a gradual progression of potentially reversible ischemic injury toward infarction. Reestablishing tissue perfusion and/or treating with neuroprotective drugs in a timely fashion are expected to salvage some ischemic tissues. Diffusion-weighted imaging based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in which contrast is based on water motion can detect ischemic injury within minutes after onsets, whereas computed tomography and other imaging modalities fail to detect stroke injury for at least a few hours. Along with quantitative perfusion imaging, the perfusion-diffusion mismatch which approximates the ischemic penumbra could be imaged non-invasively. This review describes recent progresses in the development and application of multimodal MRI and image analysis techniques to study ischemic tissue at risk in experimental stroke in rats. PMID:24323751

  14. Feature extraction for MRI segmentation.

    PubMed

    Velthuizen, R P; Hall, L O; Clarke, L P

    1999-04-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the brain are segmented to measure the efficacy of treatment strategies for brain tumors. To date, no reproducible technique for measuring tumor size is available to the clinician, which hampers progress of the search for good treatment protocols. Many segmentation techniques have been proposed, but the representation (features) of the MRI data has received little attention. A genetic algorithm (GA) search was used to discover a feature set from multi-spectral MRI data. Segmentations were performed using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique. Seventeen MRI data sets from five patients were evaluated. The GA feature set produces a more accurate segmentation. The GA fitness function that achieves the best results is the Wilks's lambda statistic when applied to FCM clusters. Compared to linear discriminant analysis, which requires class labels, the same or better accuracy is obtained by the features constructed from a GA search without class labels, allowing fully operator independent segmentation. The GA approach therefore provides a better starting point for the measurement of the response of a brain tumor to treatment.

  15. PET-MRI Findings of Two Patients with Breast Carcinoma before Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Filiz; Köksal, Ülkühan; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Çetin; Sarsenov, Dauren; İlgün, Serkan; Çabuk, Fatmagül Kuşku; Alço, Gül; Özdil, Güzide; Erdoğan, Zeynep; Özmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) is a new hybrid simultaneous imaging modality with higher soft tissue contrast and lower radiation doses compared with PET-CT. Two patients who were referred to our hospital with left breast masses that were pathologically diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma. The women were then scanned using the first PET-MRI system in Turkey, which was established in our department. In this case report, we aimed to determine the advantages of PET-MRI in staging, follow-up, neoadjuvant chemotherapy response, and to compare the usefulness of this modality with PET-CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

  16. MRI of the lung gas-space at very low-field using hyperpolarized noble gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Arvind K.; Zhang, Adelaide X.; Mansour, Joey; Kubatina, Lyubov; Oh, Chang Hyun; Blasche, Gregory; Selim Unlu, M.; Balamore, Dilip; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2003-01-01

    In hyperpolarized (HP) noble-gas magnetic resonance imaging, large nuclear spin polarizations, about 100,000 times that ordinarily obtainable at thermal equilibrium, are created in 3He and 129Xe. The enhanced signal that results can be employed in high-resolution MRI studies of void spaces such as in the lungs. In HP gas MRI the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends only weakly on the static magnetic field (B(0)), making very low-field (VLF) MRI possible; indeed, it is possible to contemplate portable MRI using light-weight solenoids or permanent magnets. This article reports the first in vivo VLF MR images of the lungs in humans and in rats, obtained at a field of only 15 millitesla (150 Gauss).

  17. A comparison of multiparametric MRI modalities to discriminate prostate cancer tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Carvajal, R. E.; Fargeas, A.; Gnep, K.; Rolland, Y.; Acosta, O.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2015-01-01

    Using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) protocols to monitor prostate cancer could provide new insights into the biological mechanisms of developing tumours. Automatically discriminating tumour regions active area of research due to the complexity and plurality of cancer behaviour. This work evaluates four different Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) image modalities, namely: Diffusion-Weighted Imaging evaluated at b = {0, 100, 1000}, Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI, by extracting texture and functional features and then selecting the optimal ones to discriminate anatomical prostate regions in each modality. The images used were taken prior to radiotherapy from eight patients previously diagnosed with moderate risk of recurrent cancer. Finally, we compared the relevance of each modality to discriminate between healthy tissue and tumour cells.

  18. Pieces-of-parts for supervoxel segmentation with global context: Application to DCE-MRI tumour delineation.

    PubMed

    Irving, Benjamin; Franklin, James M; Papież, Bartłomiej W; Anderson, Ewan M; Sharma, Ricky A; Gleeson, Fergus V; Brady, Sir Michael; Schnabel, Julia A

    2016-08-01

    Rectal tumour segmentation in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a challenging task, and an automated and consistent method would be highly desirable to improve the modelling and prediction of patient outcomes from tissue contrast enhancement characteristics - particularly in routine clinical practice. A framework is developed to automate DCE-MRI tumour segmentation, by introducing: perfusion-supervoxels to over-segment and classify DCE-MRI volumes using the dynamic contrast enhancement characteristics; and the pieces-of-parts graphical model, which adds global (anatomic) constraints that further refine the supervoxel components that comprise the tumour. The framework was evaluated on 23 DCE-MRI scans of patients with rectal adenocarcinomas, and achieved a voxelwise area-under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.97 compared to expert delineations. Creating a binary tumour segmentation, 21 of the 23 cases were segmented correctly with a median Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.63, which is close to the inter-rater variability of this challenging task. A second study is also included to demonstrate the method's generalisability and achieved a DSC of 0.71. The framework achieves promising results for the underexplored area of rectal tumour segmentation in DCE-MRI, and the methods have potential to be applied to other DCE-MRI and supervoxel segmentation problems.

  19. Decision forests for learning prostate cancer probability maps from multiparametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenberg, Henry R.; Cornfeld, Daniel; Nawaf, Cayce B.; Sprenkle, Preston C.; Duncan, James S.

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: Advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and ultrasound/MRI fusion imaging offer a powerful alternative to the typical undirected approach to diagnosing prostate cancer. However, these methods require the time and expertise needed to interpret mpMRI image scenes. In this paper, a machine learning framework for automatically detecting and localizing cancerous lesions within the prostate is developed and evaluated. Methods: Two studies were performed to gather MRI and pathology data. The 12 patients in the first study underwent an MRI session to obtain structural, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast enhanced image vol- umes of the prostate, and regions suspected of being cancerous from the MRI data were manually contoured by radiologists. Whole-mount slices of the prostate were obtained for the patients in the second study, in addition to structural and diffusion-weighted MRI data, for pathology verification. A 3-D feature set for voxel-wise appear- ance description combining intensity data, textural operators, and zonal approximations was generated. Voxels in a test set were classified as normal or cancer using a decision forest-based model initialized using Gaussian discriminant analysis. A leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme was used to assess the predictions against the expert manual segmentations confirmed as cancer by biopsy. Results: We achieved an area under the average receiver-operator characteristic curve of 0.923 for the first study, and visual assessment of the probability maps showed 21 out of 22 tumors were identified while a high level of specificity was maintained. In addition to evaluating the model against related approaches, the effects of the individual MRI parameter types were explored, and pathological verification using whole-mount slices from the second study was performed. Conclusions: The results of this paper show that the

  20. Renal compartment segmentation in DCE-<