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  1. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  2. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  3. Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ranke, M B; Saenger, P

    2001-07-28

    Before chromosomal analysis became available, the diagnosis of Turner's syndrome was based on the characteristics independently described by Otto Ullrich and Henry Turner, such as short stature, gonadal dysgenesis, typical, visible dysmorphic stigmata, and abnormalities in organs, which present in individuals with a female phenotype. Today, Turner's syndrome or Ullrich-Turner's syndrome may be defined as the combination of characteristic physical features and complete or part absence of one of the X chromosomes, frequently accompanied by cell-line mosaicism. The increasing interest in Turner's syndrome over the past two decades has been motivated both by the quest for a model by which the multi-faceted features of this disorder can be understood, and the endeavour to provide life-long support to the patient. New developments in research allow patients with Turner's syndrome to have multidisciplinary care.

  4. Transition in Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Management of the chromosomal condition Turner's syndrome requires consistent medical care, especially during the time when affected girls transition from childhood into adulthood. The medical problems that first develop during childhood of a patient with Turner's syndrome such as congenital heart disease, hearing loss, skeletal problems and dental and ophthalmological abnormalities, should be followed into adulthood. Providing the necessary continuum of care will require that medical centers develop teams with the appropriate expertise in treatment of Turner's syndrome. Now more than ever patients with Turner's syndrome have the capability of achieving their full potential, but it requires a multidisciplinary approach toward care throughout their lifetime.

  5. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion or Turner Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, T. J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Zackai, E. H.; Ross, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor…

  6. Genetic Features of Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Studies Publications Lab Staff Contact Info Links Genetic Features Quick Navigation Introduction X-monosomy X-mosaicism ... Figure 3. X Chromosome Abnormalities Figure 4. Mosaicism Genetic Features of Turner Syndrome Turner syndrome is a ...

  7. [Clinical guideline 'Turner syndrome'].

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Erica L T; van Alfen, A A E M Janiëlle; Sas, Theo C J; Kerstens, Michiel N; Cools, Martine; Lambalk, Cornelis B

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome occurs in women who are missing one X chromosome. The most obvious symptoms are small stature and ovarian failure. Turner patients have an increased risk of a large number of disorders, and should therefore have lifelong medical supervision. Recent insights into patient management have been incorporated into the guidelines. Patients are increasingly involved in their own treatment. In patients with 45,X karyotype, Y-chromosomal material is actively sought in a larger number of cells and/or other tissues, using FISH. Pubertal induction therapy, if required, is initiated at an appropriate age. Egg donation or vitrification are new therapeutic options for fertility treatment. Monitoring for cardiac and vascular disease using cardiac ultrasound and MRI is performed more often, partly in connection with the risk of aortal dissection. The coordination of care of patients with Turner syndrome is concentrated in specialized centres in the Netherlands and Belgium.

  8. [Current aspects of Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Battin, J

    1996-06-01

    Recent progress in the clinical, genetic and therapeutic knowledges of Turner's syndrome are presented. The quality of life of Turner's syndrome can be much improved by early treatment with recombinant human growth hormone which significantly increases the patient's final height, and appropriate oestrogenic therapy at pubertal and adult ages. However, this requires an early diagnosis. Consequently, a karyotype must be performed in every girl with delayed growth, even in the absence of clinical features of the Turner's syndrome.

  9. Overlapping Numerical Cognition Impairments In Children With Chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Or Turner Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Simon, T.J.; Takarae, Y.; DeBoer, T.; McDonald-McGinn; Zackai, E.H.; Ross, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Children with one of two genetic disorders (chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and Turner syndrome) as well typically developing controls, participated in three cognitive processing experiments. Two experiments were designed to test cognitive processes involved in basic aspects numerical cognition. The third was a test of simple manual motor reaction time. Despite significant differences in global intellectual abilities, as measured by IQ tests, performance on the two numerical cognition tasks differed little between the two groups of children with genetic disorders. However, both performed significantly more poorly than did controls. The pattern of results are consistent with the hypothesis that impairments were not due to global intellectual ability but arose in specific cognitive functions required by different conditions within the tasks. The fact that no group differences were found in the reaction time task, despite significant differences in the standardized processing speed measure, further supports the interpretation that specific cognitive processing impairments and not global intellectual or processing speed impairments explain the pattern of results. The similarity in performance on these tasks of children with unrelated genetic disorders counters the view that numerical cognition is under any direct genetic control. Instead, our findings are consistent with the view that disturbances in foundational spatiotemporal cognitive functions contribute to the development of atypical representations and processes in the domains of basic magnitude comparison and simple numerical enumeration. PMID:17920087

  10. Turner syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungmee; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoon, Jong Ho; Jeong, Woon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome has multiple comorbidities such as osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. As they are treatable conditions in Turner syndrome, early recognition and proper treatment should be needed. We report on a 23-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who presented with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. Laboratory tests showed elevated levels of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry showed severe osteopo-rosis (z score, -3.5). Ultrasound and 99mTc scintigraphy of parathyroid glands showed an adenoma in the right inferior gland. She was diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism due to an adenoma of the parathyroid gland. After excision of the adenoma, the patient's serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels returned to normal. Although only a few cases of Turners syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism have been reported, hyperparathyroidism should be considered in cases of Turner syndrome with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. PMID:24904858

  11. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118429

  13. Clinical Features of Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth is attenuated in utero, and statural growth lags during childhood and adolescence, resulting in adult heights ... easily treated with thyroid hormone supplements. Cognitive Function/Educational Issues In general, individuals with Turner syndrome have ...

  14. Anatomy of turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Granger, Andre; Zurada, Anna; Zurada-Zielińska, Agnieszka; Gielecki, Jerzy; Loukas, Marios

    2016-07-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common sex chromosome abnormalities and results from total or partial monosomy of the X chromosome. It occurs in 1 in 2000 newborn girls and is also believed to be present in a larger proportion of conceptuses. There are various anatomic anomalies that have been associated with TS and the consequences of late recognition of these anomalies can be devastating. Aortic dilation and dissection occur at increased rates in TS patients and contribute to the decreased life expectancy of these patients. Such cases have prompted the need for early identification and continuous monitoring. Other anatomic variations increase morbidity in this population, and negatively impact the social and reproductive aspects of their lives. In this review, we summarize the cardiovascular, neurological, genitourinary, otolaryngolical, craniofacial, and skeletal defects associated with TS. To elucidate these morphological variations, novel illustrations have also been constructed. Clin. Anat. 29:638-642, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Turner's syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Balachandran, Karthik; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Hamide, Abdoul

    2012-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30–40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner's syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:22837932

  16. Cognitive Profile of Turner Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, David; Kent, Jamie Scaletta; Kesler, Shelli

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder characterized by complete or partial monosomy-X in a phenotypic female. TS is associated with a cognitive profile that typically includes intact intellectual function and verbal abilities with relative weaknesses in visual-spatial, executive, and social cognitive domains. In this…

  17. Health supervision for children with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frías, Jaime L; Davenport, Marsha L

    2003-03-01

    This report is designed to assist the pediatrician in caring for the child in whom the diagnosis of Turner syndrome has been confirmed by karyotyping. The report is meant to serve as a supplement to the American Academy of Pediatrics' "Recommendations for Preventive Pediatric Care" and emphasizes the importance of continuity of care and the need to avoid its fragmentation by ensuring a medical home for every girl with Turner syndrome. The pediatrician's first contact with a child with Turner syndrome may occur during infancy or childhood. This report also discusses interactions with expectant parents who have been given the prenatal diagnosis of Turner syndrome and have been referred for advice.

  18. Reproductive Issues in Women with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Folsom, Lisal J; Fuqua, John S

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities affecting female infants. The severity of clinical manifestations varies and it affects multiple organ systems. Women with Turner syndrome have a 3-fold increase in mortality, which becomes even more pronounced in pregnancy. Reproductive options include adoption or surrogacy, assisted reproductive techniques, and in rare cases spontaneous pregnancy. Risks for women with Turner syndrome during pregnancy include aortic disorders, hepatic disease, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes, and cesarean section delivery. Providers must be familiar with the risks and recommendations in caring for women with Turner syndrome of reproductive age.

  19. Reproductive Issues in Women with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Folsom, Lisal J; Fuqua, John S

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities affecting female infants. The severity of clinical manifestations varies and it affects multiple organ systems. Women with Turner syndrome have a 3-fold increase in mortality, which becomes even more pronounced in pregnancy. Reproductive options include adoption or surrogacy, assisted reproductive techniques, and in rare cases spontaneous pregnancy. Risks for women with Turner syndrome during pregnancy include aortic disorders, hepatic disease, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes, and cesarean section delivery. Providers must be familiar with the risks and recommendations in caring for women with Turner syndrome of reproductive age. PMID:26568488

  20. Mosaic Turner syndrome associated with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sook Young; Park, Joo Won; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jun, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Seop; Lee, Ji Eun

    2014-03-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex-chromosome disorder; occurring in 1 in 2,500 female births. There are sporadic few case reports of concomitant Turner syndrome with schizophrenia worldwide. Most Turner females had a 45,X monosomy, whereas the majority of comorbidity between Turner syndrome and schizophrenia had a mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX). We present a case of a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX), showing mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. HOPA gene within Xq13 is related to mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. Our case may be a potential clue which supports the hypothesis for involvement of genes on X chromosome in development of schizophrenia. Further studies including comorbid cases reports are need in order to discern the cause of schizophrenia in patients having Turner syndrome.

  1. Mosaic Turner syndrome associated with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sook Young; Park, Joo Won; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jun, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Seop

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex-chromosome disorder; occurring in 1 in 2,500 female births. There are sporadic few case reports of concomitant Turner syndrome with schizophrenia worldwide. Most Turner females had a 45,X monosomy, whereas the majority of comorbidity between Turner syndrome and schizophrenia had a mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX). We present a case of a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX), showing mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. HOPA gene within Xq13 is related to mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. Our case may be a potential clue which supports the hypothesis for involvement of genes on X chromosome in development of schizophrenia. Further studies including comorbid cases reports are need in order to discern the cause of schizophrenia in patients having Turner syndrome. PMID:24926463

  2. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  3. Multimodality cardiac imaging in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Kristian H; Gopalan, Deepa; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2016-06-01

    Congenital and acquired cardiovascular diseases contribute significantly to the threefold elevated risk of premature death in Turner syndrome. A multitude of cardiovascular anomalies and disorders, many of which deleteriously impact morbidity and mortality, is frequently left undetected and untreated because of poor adherence to screening programmes and complex clinical presentations. Imaging is essential for timely and effective primary and secondary disease prophylaxis that may alleviate the severe impact of cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome. This review illustrates how cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome manifests in a complex manner that ranges in severity from incidental findings to potentially fatal anomalies. Recommendations regarding the use of imaging for screening and surveillance of cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome are made, emphasising the key role of non-invasive and invasive cardiovascular imaging to the management of all patients with Turner syndrome.

  4. An introduction to Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jacquie

    2006-12-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition affecting around 1 in 2,000 girls born in the UK. The severity of the problems experienced can be partly predicted by the child's karyotype but some are mediated by the social and other life experiences of the developing child. Management focuses on minimising the effects of the condition on the girls' lives and promoting their long term health and wellbeing. Nurses specialising in paediatric endocrinology have a valuable role in supporting the child and family and in educating families and colleagues with regard to the medical, psychosocial and educational needs of these children. PMID:17193920

  5. Language and Literacy in Turner Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Melissa M.

    2009-01-01

    Language problems can be associated with specific genetic syndromes, such as Klinefelter syndrome and fragile X syndrome, even in the absence of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Turner syndrome, a relatively common genetic disorder, is caused by the complete or partial absence of 1 of the 2 X chromosomes typically present in women. The…

  6. What Are the Symptoms of Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... at higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Thyroid. Many people with Turner syndrome have thyroid problems. The most common one is hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid gland. Cognitive. People with ...

  7. COGNITIVE PROFILE OF TURNER SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Hong, David; Kent, Jamie Scaletta; Kesler, Shelli

    2011-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder characterized by complete or partial monosomy-X in a phenotypic female. TS is associated with a cognitive profile that typically includes intact intellectual function and verbal abilities with relative weaknesses in visual–spatial, executive, and social cognitive domains. In this report, we review previous and current research related to the cognitive profile of TS. We also discuss how cognitive impairments in this syndrome may reflect integrative rather than modular deficits. For example, the less commonly reported areas of verbal difficulty in TS and certain visual–spatial deficits seem significantly influenced by impairments in executive function and spatially loaded stimuli. We provide a summary of cognitive testing measures used in the assessment of visual–spatial and executive skills, which includes test domain descriptions as well as a comprehensive examination of social cognitive function in TS. This review concludes with a discussion of ecological interpretations regarding the meaning of cognitive deficits in TS at the individual level. PMID:20014362

  8. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches.

  9. Fertility preservation in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Michaël; Bidet, Maud; Benard, Julie; Poulain, Marine; Sonigo, Charlotte; Cédrin-Durnerin, Isabelle; Polak, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency is a relatively rare condition that can appear early in life. In a non-negligible number of cases the ovarian dysfunction results from genetic diseases. Turner syndrome (TS), the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females, is associated with an inevitable premature exhaustion of the follicular stockpile. The possible or probable infertility is a major concern for TS patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The severely reduced follicle pool even during prepubertal life represents the major limit for fertility preservation and is the root of numerous questions regarding the competence of gametes or ovarian tissue crybanked. In addition, patients suffering from TS show higher than usual rates of spontaneous abortion, fetal anomaly, and maternal morbidity and mortality, which should be considered at the time of fertility preservation and before reutilization of the cryopreserved gametes. Apart from fulfillment of the desire of becoming genetic parents, TS patients may be potential candidates for egg donation, gestational surrogacy, and adoption. The present review discusses the different options for preserving female fertility in TS and the ethical questions raised by these approaches. PMID:26677790

  10. Anterior segment dysgenesis in mosaic Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, I; Haigh, P; Clayton-Smith, J; Clayton, P; Price, D; Ridgway, A; Donnai, D

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Females with Turner syndrome commonly exhibit ophthalmological abnormalities, although there is little information in the literature documenting findings specific to Turner syndrome mosaics. Ophthalmic findings are described in four patients with mosaic Turner syndrome. All had anterior chamber abnormalities and all four had karyotypic abnormalities with a 45, X cell line. The possible relation between the karyotypic and the phenotypic findings in these patients is discussed.
METHODS—Four girls with mosaic Turner syndrome underwent a full ophthalmological assessment, including examination under anaesthesia where indicated.
RESULTS—Three of the four patients presented with congenital glaucoma. Two had the karyotype 45, X/46, X, idic(Y) and one a 45, X/47, XXX karyotype. The remaining child had a Rieger malformation of the iris and the karyotype 45, X/46, X, r(X).
CONCLUSIONS—These findings suggest that Turner syndrome mosaicism (where there are two abnormal cell lines) is associated with anterior segment dysgenesis. The findings in these four patients are compared with those seen in other mosaic phenotypes and it is postulated that the presence of two or more genetically different cell lines may have an adverse effect on anterior segment development.

 PMID:9349149

  11. Coarctation repair in children with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beder, S D; Driscoll, D J; McNamara, D G; Cooley, D A

    1982-03-01

    Ravelo recently reported the results of surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta in eight patients with Turner's syndrome. Three of these patients had serious hemorrhagic complications. At Texas Children's Hospital, we have operated on four patients with Turner's syndrome and coarctation of the aorta without complications. Of the 12 patients in both series, nine patients had uncomplicated courses when they had Dacron aortoplasty (4/12) or end-to-end anastomosis (5/12). The three other patients with end-to-end anastomoses had significant perioperative hemorrhage. Whereas Ravelo reported serious complications in 38% (3/8), the combined series suggest that only about 25% (3/12) of patients with Turner's syndrome undergoing repair of coarctation of the aorta may experience significant perioperative hemorrhage. We conclude, as did Ravelo, that attention to technical details should keep surgical morbidity in these patients to a minimum.

  12. [Psychiatric symptoms can reveal Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Thusgaard, Helle; Arnfred, Sidse Marie H

    2013-02-01

    Turner syndrome is usually diagnosed by physical characteristics, i.e. low height and infertility. This case report presents a woman, who was referred to a chromosome analysis at the age of 35 years, due to a specific pattern of psychiatric symptoms. She felt childish, had strong emotional bonds to her family, yet lacked friendships and intimate relationships. She had moderate symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder with a sexual content. Confronted with this constellation of symptoms, psychiatrists and psychologists should be aware of Turner syndrome.

  13. Turner's syndrome, fibromuscular dysplasia, and stroke.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M; Mesropian, H; Serra, P; Granillo, R

    1991-02-01

    We report a 43-year-old woman who presented with a right frontoparietotemporal ischemic stroke. She had been diagnosed with Turner's syndrome during childhood and had a history of chronic estrogen therapy. Cerebral angiography showed lesions characteristics of fibromuscular dysplasia involving the right internal carotid and right vertebral arteries. We are not aware of any previous reports describing an association between fibromuscular dysplasia and Turner's syndrome. Although chronic estrogen therapy cannot be ruled out as a cause of this patient's stroke, we suggest a possible etiologic relation between these two entities.

  14. Turner syndrome and meningioma: support for a possible increased risk of neoplasia in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pier, Danielle B; Nunes, Fabio P; Plotkin, Scott R; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Kim, James C; Shih, Helen A; Brastianos, Priscilla; Lin, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Neoplasia is uncommon in Turner syndrome, although there is some evidence that brain tumors are more common in Turner syndrome patients than in the general population. We describe a woman with Turner syndrome (45,X) with a meningioma, in whom a second neoplasia, basal cell carcinomas of the scalp and nose, developed five years later in the absence of therapeutic radiation. Together with 7 cases of Turner syndrome with meningioma from a population-based survey in the United Kingdom, and 3 other isolated cases in the literature, we review this small number of patients for evidence of risk factors related to Turner syndrome, such as associated structural anomalies or prior treatment. We performed histological and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of 22q (NF2 locus) analyses of the meningeal tumor to search for possible molecular determinants. We are not able to prove causation between these two entities, but suggest that neoplasia may be a rare associated medical problem in Turner syndrome. Additional case reports and extension of population-based studies are needed.

  15. Neurodevelopmental and psychosocial aspects of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ross, J; Zinn, A; McCauley, E

    2000-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is the complex phenotype of human females with complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome, or monosomy X. A characteristic neurocognitive and psychosocial profile has also been described in TS females. Typically, specific deficits in visual-spatial/perceptual abilities, nonverbal memory function, motor function, executive function, and attentional abilities occur in TS children and adults of varying races and socioeconomic status. TS-associated psychosocial difficulties occur in the areas of maturity and social skills. We hypothesize that a subset of the neurocognitive deficits (visual-spatial/perceptual abilities) are genetically determined and result from abnormal expression of one or more X chromosome genes. In addition, a different subset of these neurocognitive deficits (memory, reaction time, and speeded motor function) result from estrogen deficiency and are at least somewhat reversible with estrogen treatment. The TS-associated psychosocial problems are most likely linked to these core neurocognitive deficits and do not reflect a separate and independent component of the syndrome. Turner syndrome research has progressed significantly over the last decade. The field has moved from descriptive reports based on single individuals or small clinical samples to the use of experimental designs with larger, more diverse and representative samples. This degree of variability among individuals with Turner syndrome in all domains (karyotype or genetic constitution, physical attributes, neurocognitive and social functioning) suggests the need to identify risk and protective factors contributing to the heterogeneity in the phenotype. Active education about TS and participation in patient advocacy groups such as the Turner Syndrome Society of the United States (http://www. turner-syndrome-us.org/) has provided new information for TS adults and families as well as a supportive peer group. MRDD Research Reviews 2000;6:135-141.

  16. Increasing School Nurse Awareness of Turner Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardary, Darlene A.

    2007-01-01

    Turner syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects only females, can cause various physical, emotional, and educational disabilities. This disorder may go undiagnosed until school age or later. Short stature and lack of spontaneous puberty are common characteristics and can lead to teasing by peers. Some experience attention deficit and the…

  17. Congenital cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Carolyn A

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS), or monosomy X, occurs in approximately 1/2000 live born females. Intelligence is normal and short stature is the most obvious and consistent feature of the syndrome. Congenital cardiovascular disease affects approximately 50% of individuals and is the major cause of premature mortality in adults. Unfortunately, this most important aspect of the syndrome has received little attention outside of pediatric medicine, and adult cardiological follow-up is seriously lacking. This review describes the spectrum of cardiovascular defects with particular attention to identifying risk factors for aortic dissection/rupture. X-chromosome genetic pathways implicated in Turner cardiovascular disease, including premature coronary artery disease, are discussed. Recent guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of girls and women with TS are reviewed.

  18. Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, P; Danda, Debashish; Danda, Sumita; Srivastava, Vivi M

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile ankylosing spondylitis (JAS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder which causes considerable morbidity when left untreated; it occurs predominantly in men. We describe an Asian Indian woman who had JAS with phenotypic features of Turner syndrome (TS) and was found to be a mosaic for 45, X/46, X, psu idic (X) (p11) by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies of peripheral blood. The absence of Y chromosome material was confirmed by FISH. Haplo-insufficiency of the X chromosome can predispose to autoimmunity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of JAS in association with mosaic Turner syndrome. This case highlights the possible effects of gene dosage in development of an autoimmune disease. PMID:25073991

  19. Ullrich-Turner syndrome and neurofibromatosis-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schorry, E.K.; Lovell, A.M.; Saal, H.M.; Milatovich, A.

    1996-12-30

    There is a well-known association between neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) and Noonan syndrome-like manifestations, including short stature, short broad neck, and hypertelorism. These anomalies are thought to be due to variable expression of the NF1 gene. We report on two girls with NF1 who were found to have the Ullrich-Turner syndrome. Case 1, a 12-year-old white girl, was followed in a Neurofibromatosis Clinic because of multiple cafe-au-lait spots and a family history of NF1 in her mother and sister. On examination, she had short stature, hypertelorism, and short neck with low posterior hairline. Karyotype was 86% 46,XY/14% 45,X. Case 2, the first child of a woman with NF1, presented at birth with lymphedema of hands and feet and a short broad neck. Karyotype was 45,X. At age 23 months she was short, had epicanthic folds, hypertelorism, narrow palate, right simian crease, 19 cafe-au-lait spots, and axillary freckling. We conclude that chromosome studies should be performed in girls with NF1 who have short stature and Noonan- or Ullrich-Turner-like findings. Dilemmas raised by the dual diagnoses of NF1 and Ullrich-Turner syndrome include potential risks of growth hormone therapy and estrogen replacement therapy. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Familial Turner syndrome: the importance of information.

    PubMed

    Periquito, Isabel; Carrusca, Catarina; Morgado, Joana; Robalo, Brígida; Pereira, Carla; de Lurdes Sampaio, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome is a common genetic disorder with an incidence of 1 in 2500 live births. Spontaneous fertility is rare in such patients and is most likely in women with mosaicism or very distal Xp deletions. The authors report an unusual case of familial Turner syndrome in a woman with mosaicism 45,X/46,Xdel(Xp) karyotype with three documented spontaneous pregnancies, which resulted in two daughters with 46,Xdel(X)(p11.4)mat karyotype and a healthy son. The mother was first diagnosed by the age of 11 and did not receive contraceptive medication, due to information that she would be infertile. Both daughters were referred to an endocrinology unit and are now under growth hormone treatment, and have been growing in the 3rd percentile. This family illustrates the complexity and difficulties in counseling, follow-up and treatment in Turner syndrome, namely referring to a tertiary center, fertility and treatment such as growth hormone and hormonal replacement, due to the heterogeneity of the clinical spectrum.

  1. The Turner Syndrome: Cognitive Deficits, Affective Discrimination, and Behavior Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCauley, Elizabeth; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The study attemped to link cognitive and social problems seen in girls with Turner syndrome by assessing the girls' ability to process affective cues. Seventeen 9- to 17-year-old girls diagnosed with Turner syndrome were compared to a matched control group on a task which required interpretation of affective intention from facial expression.…

  2. [Gonadal function in Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alves, Márcia; Bastos, Margarida; Almeida Santos, Teresa; Carrilho, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A síndrome de Turner caracteriza-se pela ausência, parcial ou total, de um cromossoma X no sexo feminino, sendo uma das cromossomopatias mais frequentes. O diagnóstico é realizado através do cariótipo e as suas manifestações incluem o hipogonadismo primário, antes ou após a puberdade (disgenesia gonadal). O grau de disfunção e a extensão dos defeitos gonadais são variáveis.Objectivos: Pretendeu-se avaliar a clínica, cariótipo, função gonadal e características ecográficas do útero e ovários de mulheres com síndrome de Turner.Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de doentes com síndrome de Turner, seguidas nos Serviços de Endocrinologia ou Reprodução Humana dos Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra - Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, E.P.E. Avaliou-se toda a amostra e consideraram-se o grupo 1 (com puberdade e menarca espontânea) e grupo 2 (sem puberdade espontânea). Parâmetros avaliados: idade do estudo inicial, puberdade, cariótipo, FSH, ecografia pélvica inicial e pós-pubertária, celioscopia e indução pubertária. Estudo estatístico: SPSS (20.0).Resultados: Amostra: 79 doentes, 14,7 ± 6,6 anos. Ausência de sinais pubertários em 57,1%, amenorreia primária 67,1% e secundária 6,6%. Cariótipo: monossomia X-37,2%, mosaico-37,2%, alterações estruturais de X-25,6%. Mediana da FSH 59,5mUI/mL. Ecografia inicial: útero normal-34,2%, atrófico-65,8%; ovários normais-21,6%, atróficos-78,4%, com folículos-5,1%. Ecografia pós-pubertária: útero normal-67,9%, atrófico-32,1%; ovários normais-36,4%, atróficos-63,6%. A laparoscopia realizada em 16 (20,3%) doentes confirmou os achados ecográficos. Duas mulheres com puberdade induzida engravidaram: uma espontaneamente, sem evolução; outra pordoação de ovócitos, evolutiva. Grupo 1 (com puberdade e menarca espontânea): 20 (25,3%) doentes, 16,1 ± 8,9 anos. Puberdade na avaliação inicial: M1-22,2%, M2-33,3%, M3-16,7%, M4-16,7%, M5-11,1%. Cari

  3. [Cephalometric analysis in patients with Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szentkirályi, P; Vitályos, G; Szilágyi, A; Márton, S; Keszthelyi, G; Madléna, M

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the cephalometric values of patients with Turner syndrome and to compare them to those of healthy patients in order to determine the severity of orthodontic anomalies and the possibilities of treatment. For our work the modified Ricketts analysis was used. Significant differences were found between the two groups regarding the B1, B2, P, AB ii angles and in relations of C:R. Early stomatologic treatment seems to be very important in this patient's group to prevent dental, periodontal and temporomandibular disorders.

  4. Turner Syndrome: Four Challenges Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Erica J; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Bondy, Carolyn A; Gollust, Sarah E; King, Donnice; Biesecker, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a sex chromosome condition that occurs in approximately 1/2500 live female births. Despite the prevalence of this chromosomal condition, the challenges these women face throughout their lives are not fully understood. This qualitative research study aimed to characterize the subjective experiences of individuals with Turner syndrome throughout their lifespan, to investigate their concerns and obstacles, and to offer insight into the strengths and weaknesses of health care delivery, as they perceived them. Ninety-seven girls and women with TS and 21 parents consented to participate in this interview study. Interviews were semi-structured and open-ended in design. Questions sought to elicit responses relating to existing concerns associated with their condition and positive and negative health care experiences. Participants were divided into four age categories (childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and mature adulthood) to facilitate a comparative analysis across the age spectrum. Regardless of age, infertility was the most frequently cited concern followed closely by short stature. Sexual development and function and general health were also viewed as challenges by a number of participants in each age group. Although the relative weight of these four concerns tended to shift based upon the individual’s age and life experiences, all four issues remained significant throughout the lifespan. Enhanced awareness of the evolving physical and psychological challenges faced by girls and women with TS may help health care providers improve the quality of life for these individuals. PMID:16252273

  5. Growth Curves for Girls with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bertapelli, Fabio; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Antonio, Maria Ângela Reis de Góes Monteiro; Barbeta, Camila Justino de Oliveira; de Lemos-Marini, Sofia Helena Valente

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the growth curves for Turner syndrome, evaluate the methodological and statistical quality, and suggest potential growth curves for clinical practice guidelines. The search was carried out in the databases Medline and Embase. Of 1006 references identified, 15 were included. Studies constructed curves for weight, height, weight/height, body mass index, head circumference, height velocity, leg length, and sitting height. The sample ranged between 47 and 1,565 (total = 6,273) girls aged 0 to 24 y, born between 1950 and 2006. The number of measures ranged from 580 to 9,011 (total = 28,915). Most studies showed strengths such as sample size, exclusion of the use of growth hormone and androgen, and analysis of confounding variables. However, the growth curves were restricted to height, lack of information about selection bias, limited distributional properties, and smoothing aspects. In conclusion, we observe the need to construct an international growth reference for girls with Turner syndrome, in order to provide support for clinical practice guidelines. PMID:24949463

  6. The current management of Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kriksciuniene, Ruta; Zilaitiene, Birute; Verkauskiene, Rasa

    2016-03-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a rare disease, with the incidence of 1 of 2500 life born females. Characteristic features are: growth retardation, gonadal dysgenesis and impairment, congenital and acquired cardiovascular disorders. New management possibilities in Turner Syndrome are coming along with the new scientific evidence on the pathogenesis of TS developmental, metabolic, cardiovascular and reproductive issues. Attitude to the growth retardation treatment and hormone replacement therapy is changing. The effectiveness of additional androgen doses for growth improvement and low estrogen doses in the early childhood for better puberty induction and metabolic outcomes has been demonstrated recently. There are some new concerns about pregnancy induced progression of cardiovascular pathology in TS. Inadequate follow-up despite strict and clear guidelines of TS patients is still an issue in the health care system in many countries. This rare disorder requires multidiscipline approach of experienced professionals. The aim of this review is to overview recent studies evaluating TS, to focus on the possibilities to avoid crucial outcomes of this disorder and to improve management and follow-up.

  7. Spontaneous pubertal development in Turner's syndrome. Italian Study Group for Turner's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pasquino, A M; Passeri, F; Pucarelli, I; Segni, M; Municchi, G

    1997-06-01

    The incidence of spontaneous puberty in Turner's syndrome is reported to be between 5-10% and, more recently in some series, as high as 20%. In an Italian retrospective multicenter study, of 522 patients older than 12 yr with Turner's syndrome, 84 patients (16, 1%) presented spontaneous pubertal development with menarche that occurred at a chronological age of 13.2 +/- 1.5 yr (mean +/- SD) and a bone age of 12.9 +/- 1.9 yr. Karyotype distribution in the whole group was as follows: 52.1% (272 patients) X-monosomy (45,X), 13.2% (69 patients) mosaicism characterized by X-monosomy and cellular line with no structural abnormalities of the second X, 19.9% (104 patients) mosaicism characterized by X-monosomy and cellular line with structural abnormalities of the second X, and 14.8% (77 patients) structural abnormalities of the second X. Menstrual cycles were still regular in 30 patients at 9.2 +/- 5.0 yr after menarche, 12 developed secondary amenorrhea 1.6 +/- 2.0 yr after menarche, and 19 had irregular menstrual cycles 0.9 +/- 1.8 yr after menarche. As signs of spontaneous puberty developed in 14.0% of X-monosomic patients and in 32.0% of patients with cell lines with more than one X, the presence of the second X seems to have a cardinal influence on the appearance of spontaneous puberty. Spontaneous pregnancy occurred in 3 patients (3.6%). The presence of chromosomal abnormalities and malformations in 2 of 3 pregnancies led us to agree with other investigators in discouraging unassisted pregnancies. Treatment with GH does not seem to exert any influence on either the age of onset or the prevalence of spontaneous pubertal development in Turner's syndrome. The increased percentage of spontaneous menarche is Turner's syndrome reported in the recent literature might be due to increased ascertainment by diligent screening for Turner's syndrome in girls with short stature and mild or no Turner's syndrome stigmata, even though they may be menstruating.

  8. The cognitive phenotype of Turner syndrome: Specific learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Michèle M M

    2006-10-01

    Global descriptors of the cognitive phenotype of Turner syndrome are well established and are thus commonly referred to. For example, Turner syndrome is a proposed etiology of the nonverbal learning disability - because of reported relative strengths in verbal skills, and relatively weaker nonverbal skills - particularly in arithmetic, select visuospatial skills, and processing speed. This profile is observed throughout and beyond the school age years. Reliance on this gross level description of the cognitive profile (e.g., nonverbal learning disability) may be helpful as a starting point when determining whether an individual with Turner syndrome has educational needs, but it carries limited practical significance when determining the specific nature of these needs. The limitations stem from the fact that the severity of the cognitive profile is highly variable among individuals with Turner syndrome; that the "nonverbal" difficulties are specific rather than widespread; and that any individual with Turner syndrome may also manifest cognitive characteristics independent of Turner syndrome. In view of the increased risk for specific cognitive difficulties, a detailed assessment prior to the onset of formal schooling (or at the time of diagnosis, when diagnosis occurs after 5 years of age) can play an important role in determining school readiness and potential need for educational support among individual girls with Turner syndrome.

  9. Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete Trovó

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the main results of the literature on genetic polymorphisms in Turner syndrome and their association with the clinical signs and the etiology of this chromosomal disorder. Data sources: The review was conducted in the PubMed database without any time limit, using the terms Turner syndrome and genetic polymorphism. A total of 116 articles were found, and based on the established inclusion and exclusion criteria 17 were selected for the review. Data synthesis: The polymorphisms investigated in patients with Turner syndrome were associated with growth deficit, causing short stature, low bone mineral density, autoimmunity and cardiac abnormalities, which are frequently found in patients with Turner syndrome. The role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the etiology of Turner syndrome, i.e., in chromosomal nondisjunction, was also confirmed. Conclusions: Genetic polymorphisms appear to be associated with Turner syndrome. However, in view of the small number of published studies and their contradictory findings, further studies in different populations are needed in order to clarify the role of genetic variants in the clinical signs and etiology of the Turner syndrome. PMID:25765448

  10. Recommendations for the diagnosis and management of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saenger, P; Wikland, K A; Conway, G S; Davenport, M; Gravholt, C H; Hintz, R; Hovatta, O; Hultcrantz, M; Landin-Wilhelmsen, K; Lin, A; Lippe, B; Pasquino, A M; Ranke, M B; Rosenfeld, R; Silberbach, M

    2001-07-01

    Comprehensive recommendations on the diagnosis of Turner syndrome (TS) and the care of affected individuals were published in 1994. In the light of recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of TS, an international multidisciplinary workshop was convened in March 2000, in Naples, Italy, in conjunction with the Fifth International Symposium on Turner Syndrome to update these recommendations. The present paper details the outcome from this workshop. The genetics and diagnosis of the syndrome are described, and practical treatment guidelines are presented.

  11. Fertility and Pregnancy in Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Godbout, Ariane; El Hachem, Hady; Lefebvre, Maude; Bérubé, Lyne; Dionne, Marie-Danielle; Kamga-Ngande, Carole; Lapensée, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) occurs in one in 2500 live female births and is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities in women. Pregnancies in women with TS, conceived with either autologous or donated oocytes, are considered high risk because of the associated miscarriages and life-threatening cardiovascular complications (aortic dissection, severe hypertension). Therefore, it is imperative to conduct a full preconception evaluation and counselling that includes cardiac assessment with Holter blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, and thoracic MRI. Abnormal findings, such an aortic dilatation, mandate close monitoring throughout the pregnancy and the immediate postpartum period and could possibly contraindicate pregnancy. When in vitro fertilization using donated oocytes is performed in these women, only a single embryo should be transferred. Women with a Turner mosaic karyotype appear to have a lower risk of obstetrical and cardiovascular complications but should nevertheless undergo the full preconception evaluation. In this article, we offer guidelines on the management of women with TS in the preconception period, during pregnancy, and postpartum. PMID:27638981

  12. Fertility and Pregnancy in Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Godbout, Ariane; El Hachem, Hady; Lefebvre, Maude; Bérubé, Lyne; Dionne, Marie-Danielle; Kamga-Ngande, Carole; Lapensée, Louise

    2016-08-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) occurs in one in 2500 live female births and is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities in women. Pregnancies in women with TS, conceived with either autologous or donated oocytes, are considered high risk because of the associated miscarriages and life-threatening cardiovascular complications (aortic dissection, severe hypertension). Therefore, it is imperative to conduct a full preconception evaluation and counselling that includes cardiac assessment with Holter blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography, and thoracic MRI. Abnormal findings, such an aortic dilatation, mandate close monitoring throughout the pregnancy and the immediate postpartum period and could possibly contraindicate pregnancy. When in vitro fertilization using donated oocytes is performed in these women, only a single embryo should be transferred. Women with a Turner mosaic karyotype appear to have a lower risk of obstetrical and cardiovascular complications but should nevertheless undergo the full preconception evaluation. In this article, we offer guidelines on the management of women with TS in the preconception period, during pregnancy, and postpartum.

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  14. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marin, A.; Weir-McCall, J.R.; Webb, D.J.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Mirsadraee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardiovascular risk stratification in Turner's syndrome is challenging and imaging is not systematically used. The aim of this article is to review cardiovascular risks in this group of patients and discuss a systematic imaging approach for early identification of cardiovascular disorders in these patients. PMID:25917542

  15. Turner syndrome masquerading as normal early puberty

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong Hee

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with Turner syndrome (TS) have complete loss of one X chromosome, whereas the rest of the patients with TS display mosaicism or structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. Most well-known common features are short stature and gonadal failure. Approximately one third of girls with TS may enter spontaneous puberty, but only half those completed with menarche. However, some atypical features of TS have been described. Many studies have been conducted to verify and delineate proposed loci for genes pertaining to the TS phenotype, and correlations between karyotype and phenotype. A few rare cases of precocious puberty with TS have been described. Here we describe a case of TS with the Xp22.1 deletion presenting with short final stature, early normal onset of spontaneous puberty, and Graves' disease, without short stature during puberty. PMID:25654070

  16. [Vulvar lichen sclerosus in a girl with Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Dolores; González, Verónica

    2014-08-01

    Dermatological complications in Turner syndrome are infrequent but occasionally cause significant morbidity. Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous affection characterized by pruritus in the anogenital area. It is yet not clear its pathophysiology but it's linked with genetic factors and autoimmunity. This is a case report of a girl with Turner syndrome with growth hormone treatment that started with vulvar pruritus and was diagnosed as lichen sclerosus. PMID:24955917

  17. CEREBRAL VENOUS THROMBOSIS AND TURNER SYNDROME: A RARE REPORTED ASSOCIATION.

    PubMed

    Guler, A; Alpaydin, S; Bademkiran, F; Sirin, H; Celebisoy, N

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is the only known viable chromosomal monosomy, characterised by the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. It's the most common chromosomal abnormality in females. Apart from the well known dysmorphic features of the syndrome, it has been associated with a number of vascular pathologies; mainly involving the cardiovascular, renovascular, peripheral vascular and cerebrovascular system. It seems striking that thromboembolism is not considered as a feature of the syndrome. Most of the thromboembolism cases are related to the arterial vascular system; except for some rare reported portal venous thrombosis cases, peripheral venous thrombosis cases and to the best of our knowledge a single case of cerebral venous thrombosis with Dandy Walker malformation and polymicrogyria. We herein report a cerebral venous thrombosis case with Turner Syndrome. With no other found underlying etiology, we want to highlight that Turner Syndrome, itself, may have a relationship not only with the cerebral arterial vascular system pathologies but also with the cerebral venous thrombosis.

  18. Down-Turner syndrome: case report and review.

    PubMed Central

    Van Buggenhout, G J; Hamel, B C; Trommelen, J C; Mieloo, H; Smeets, D F

    1994-01-01

    We present a male patient with Down-Turner mosaicism (45,X/46,X,+21/47,XY,+21) and review 27 similar cases reported so far. Clinical features of Down's syndrome were present in all cases, whereas a combination of features of both Ullrich-Turner syndrome and Down's syndrome was reported in 61% of the patients. However, one has to bear in mind that several stigmata of Ullrich-Turner syndrome can also be present in patients with Down's syndrome and vice versa. In most of the patients two different cell lines were encountered, although cases with one, three, and even four different cell lines have been reported. Of 28 patients, 21 showed female external genitalia, four were phenotypically male, and three showed ambiguous genitalia. Only six patients (21%) carried a Y chromosome, which is far less than expected. Images PMID:7837259

  19. Concurrent insulinoma with mosaic Turner syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAOYUN; YANG, LIJUAN; LI, JIE; MU, YIMING

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which the majority of patients have a 45XO karyotype, while a small number have a 45XO/47XXX karyotype. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia has been previously reported in patients with Turner syndrome. Although insulinomas are the most common type of functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and have been reported in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasias, the tumors have not been reported in patients with mosaic Turner syndrome. The present study reports the first case of an insulinoma in a patient with 45XO/47XXX mosaic Turner syndrome. The patient suffered from recurrent hypoglycemia, which was relieved following ingestion of glucose or food. A 5-h glucose tolerance test was performed and the levels of glucose, C-Peptide and insulin were detected. In addition, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound scanning were performed to evaluate the possibility of an insulinoma. Pathological examination and karyotyping were performed on a surgical specimen and a whole blood sample, respectively. The patient was found to suffer from premature ovarian failure, and a physical examination was consistent with a diagnosis of Turner syndrome. An ultrasound scan demonstrated streak ovaries and the patient was found to have a 45XO/47XXX karyotype. Furthermore, a lesion was detected in the pancreas following CT scanning, which was identified as an insulinoma following surgical removal and histological examination. In conclusion, the present study reports the first case of an insulinoma in a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome. Since mosaic Turner syndrome and insulinoma are rare diseases, an association may exist that has not been previously identified. PMID:25667631

  20. Multiple pterygium syndrome: mimicking the findings of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Güven, Ayla; Kirmizibekmez, Heves

    2011-01-01

    Multiple pterygium syndrome (MPS or Escobar syndrome) is a rare, generally autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital joint contractures and multiple skin webs. An 11.5-year-old girl with a working diagnosis of Turner syndrome (TS) was referred for her phenotypic features and growth retardation. Pterygium of the neck, low posterior hairline, widely spaced nipples, cubitus valgus, upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, micrognathia, low-set ears, downturning corners of the mouth, long philtrum, high-arched palate, digital and intercrural webbings, and aplasia of the labia majora were indicative of MPS (Escobar syndrome). Her mental status was normal. Facial asymmetry was present due to cervical webs. Normal karyotype, gonadal functions, and cardiac and urinary system findings helped in excluding TS. Genetic diseases associated with skin webs were revised in differential diagnosis. PMID:22308873

  1. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313. PMID:27523313

  2. Ganglioneuroma of adrenal gland in a patient with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Mnif, Mouna Feki; Rekik, Nabila; Belguith, Neila; Charfi, Nadia; Mnif, Lilia; Elleuch, Mouna; Mnif, Fatma; Kamoun, Thouraya; Mnif, Zeinab; Kamoun, Hassen; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahia; Hachicha, Mongia; Abid, Mohamed

    2010-04-01

    A 15-year-old girl with Turner syndrome was unexpectedly found to have a left suprarenal mass. Extensive investigations showed a clinically and biochemically inapparent mass. Computed tomography disclosed a well-defined solid lesion in the left adrenal measuring 6.5 x 5 cm with minimal contrast enhancement. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was done. Histologic examination revealed an encapsulated mass originated from the left adrenal medulla. Tumor tissue comprised abundant collagen fibers and spindloid cells admixed with mature ganglion cells. The tumor was diagnosed as left adrenal ganglioneuroma. According to literature, we report the eighth case of ganglioneuroma complicating Turner syndrome. Patients with this syndrome are predisposed to the development of neuroblastoma and related tumors. Reasons for this predisposition might relate to genetic and hormonal factors. Given that these tumors are often limited stage and of good prognosis, we recommend their screening in all patients with Turner syndrome.

  3. DESCRIBING LYMPHEDEMA IN FEMALES WITH TURNER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, J; Driver, S; Callender, L

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition affecting an estimated 1 in 2,500 girls where the second X chromosome is missing, or partially formed. This abnormality affects multiple body systems and can lead to short stature, cardiac, neural, and renal abnormalities. Due to the chronic, non-life threatening nature of lymphedema in comparison to other symptoms of TS, it is often ignored by girls and women with TS and their physicians. Consequently, little is known about how lymphedema affects girls and women with TS across the lifespan. Therefore, the objective of the study was to deliver an online survey for females with TS and caregivers in the US, UK, and Canada to provide a worldwide perspective on their current experience with lymphedema within the spectrum of TS. There were 219 participants who completed the survey, and we were able to identify incidence and characteristics of lymphedema across the lifespan. In addition, we found that females with 45,X karyotyping were more likely to report lymphedema symptoms. Lymphedema is not the most significant concern of females with TS, but education, physician evaluation, and assistance with referrals for treatment and management would improve the ease of managing lymphedema in girls and women with TS.

  4. DESCRIBING LYMPHEDEMA IN FEMALES WITH TURNER SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Rothbauer, J; Driver, S; Callender, L

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition affecting an estimated 1 in 2,500 girls where the second X chromosome is missing, or partially formed. This abnormality affects multiple body systems and can lead to short stature, cardiac, neural, and renal abnormalities. Due to the chronic, non-life threatening nature of lymphedema in comparison to other symptoms of TS, it is often ignored by girls and women with TS and their physicians. Consequently, little is known about how lymphedema affects girls and women with TS across the lifespan. Therefore, the objective of the study was to deliver an online survey for females with TS and caregivers in the US, UK, and Canada to provide a worldwide perspective on their current experience with lymphedema within the spectrum of TS. There were 219 participants who completed the survey, and we were able to identify incidence and characteristics of lymphedema across the lifespan. In addition, we found that females with 45,X karyotyping were more likely to report lymphedema symptoms. Lymphedema is not the most significant concern of females with TS, but education, physician evaluation, and assistance with referrals for treatment and management would improve the ease of managing lymphedema in girls and women with TS. PMID:26939161

  5. Epigenetic Dysfunction in Turner Syndrome Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Bradly J; Hong, Lee Kyung; Whitmire, Jason K; Su, Maureen A

    2016-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition associated with partial or complete absence of the X chromosome that involves characteristic findings in multiple organ systems. In addition to well-known clinical characteristics such as short stature and gonadal failure, TS is also associated with T cell immune alterations and chronic otitis media, suggestive of a possible immune deficiency. Recently, ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat on the X chromosome (UTX), a histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been identified as a downregulated gene in TS immune cells. Importantly, UTX is an X-linked gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation and thus is haploinsufficient in TS. Mice with T cell-specific UTX deficiency have impaired clearance of chronic viral infection due to decreased frequencies of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which are critical for B cell antibody generation. In parallel, TS patients have decreased Tfh frequencies in peripheral blood. Together, these findings suggest that haploinsufficiency of the X-linked UTX gene in TS T cells underlies an immune deficit, which may manifest as increased predisposition to chronic otitis media.

  6. Body composition in Egyptian Turner syndrome girls

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Moushira Erfan; Afifi, Hanan H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study was undertaken to construct the new body fat % curve and provide body composition reference data for adolescent girls with Turner syndrome (TS). They diagnosed cytogenetically by blood karyotyping and not treated with growth hormone (GH). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 70 TS girls from age 13 years to age 17 years. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance. Smoothed centile charts were derived by using the least mean square (LMS) method. RESULTS: The new body fat curves reflect the increase of body fat mass (FM) from age 13 years to age 17 years. Body FM % of Egyptian TS girls was lower when compared with age-matched American untreated TS girls. CONCLUSION: This study presents the new body fat curves and reference values of body composition for untreated Egyptian TS adolescent girls. The present charts can be used for direct assessment of body FM % for Egyptian TS girls and evaluation for cases on GH treatment or other growth promoting therapy. PMID:24019614

  7. Nested polymerase chain reaction study of 53 cases with Turner`s syndrome: Is cytogenetically undetected Y mosaicism common?

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, G.; Koch, A.; Ranke, M.B.

    1995-12-01

    Turner`s syndrome patients with Y mosaicism face a high risk of developing gonadoblastoma. Cytogenetic analysis can fail to detect rare cells bearing a normal or structurally abnormal Y chromosome (low level Y mosaicism). We screened 53 individuals with Turner`s syndrome for presence of sex-determining region Y (SRY), the testis-specific protein, Y encoded, gene, and the Y centromeric DYZ3 repeat using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty girls (57%) had the 45,X karyotype, determined through standard analysis of blood lymphocytes. The remaining 23 girls (43%) were mosaics and/or had structural abnormalities in 1 X-chromosome. Genomic DNA from blood leukocytes was amplified using 2 rounds of PCR. This method was sensitive enough to detect 0.0001% male DNA on a female background. None of 53 Turner`s syndrome cases was positive for Y-specific loci after the first round of PCR. After the second round, 2 of 53 Turner`s syndrome cases were positive for SRY mapping to the distal short arm of chromosome Y. In 1 SRY-positive subject, the karyotype was 45,X, and in the other, it was 46,Xi(Xq). None of 53 Turner`s syndrome individuals, including the 2 SRY-positive subjects, were positive for the testis-specific protein, Y encoded, gene on the proximal short arm of chromosome Y or the centromeric DYZ3 repeat. These data exclude low level Y mosaicism in almost all Turner`s syndrome cases tested. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Arousal Modulation in Females with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Murphy, Melissa M.; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine physiological arousal modulation (heart activity and skin conductance), across baseline and cognitive tasks, in females with fragile X or Turner syndrome and a comparison group of females with neither syndrome. Relative to the comparison group, for whom a greater increase in skin conductance was…

  9. A Rare Case of Acute Coronary Syndrome in a Patient With Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloglu, Tugba; Ozer, Nihat; Fikri Yapici, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In Turner syndrome, cardiovascular complications are the most important causes of early mortality. Congenital cardiovascular abnormalities are found in approximately one third of Turner syndrome patients. Developments in diagnosis and treatment have decreased the rate of mortality related to these abnormalities. In recent years, many papers have mentioned that coronary artery disease developing at early ages in patients with Turner syndrome causes sudden deaths. Case Presentation: The patient, a 27-year-old female was admitted to the emergency room with chest pain at rest. She was diagnosed with Turner Syndrome in her teenage years due to amenorrhea. Patients with ECG changes and cardiac enzyme elevations were treated with acute coronary syndrome. Conclusions: The young woman with Turner Syndrome have several risk factors for early Coronary Artery Disease development. In such cases, dramatic results like sudden death or heart attack at an early age may occur in cases of insufficient follow-up and treatment. PMID:26949693

  10. A rare case of Turner's syndrome presenting with Mullerian agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vaddadi, Suresh; Murthy, Ramana S. V.; Rahul, C. H.; Kumar, Vinod L.

    2013-01-01

    Turner's syndrome also called as Ullrich Turner's syndrome, is a disease of unclear pathogenesis characterized by complete or partial absence of one sex chromosome, with or without cell line mosaicism in a phenotypic female with short stature. Various anomalies result in a constellation of features, of which the most disturbing is primary amenorrhea due to gonadal dysgenesis. Hormone therapy in these patients can often result in successful menstruation, and scope for subsequent pregnancy because of anatomically normal uterus and vagina. Coexisting Mullerian agenesis in these patients can jeopardize the chances of future pregnancy as they have associated structural abnormalities of the uterus and vagina. We report a rare case of middle-aged female with Turner's syndrome and Mullerian agenesis having absent secondary sexual characters and missing uterus with incompletely formed vagina. PMID:24672170

  11. 45,X Turner's syndrome in monozygotic twin sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Pescia, G; Ferrier, P E; Wyss-Hutin, D; Klein, D

    1975-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital for anaemia, secondary to intestinal blood los (melaena). She was found to have 45,X Turner's syndrome. Her identical twin sister also had Turner's syndrome with a 45,X chromosome complement. According to various criteria the probability of monozygosity was 0.9905. Although the incidence of twinning is greater than usual in families of patients with Turner's syndrome, affected cases have only been observed in twin sisters on six occasions. It seems therefore that the 45,X chromosome complement itself is not a factor predisposing to twinning, but that in some families, a factor is at play, which cuases either twinning or the 45,X aneuploidy, or both. Images PMID:1240972

  12. Turner syndrome and osteoporosis: mechanisms and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, K

    1998-08-01

    Despite only limited reports of a greater number of fractures during childhood or adulthood, osteoporosis historically has been described as a feature in Turner syndrome, because of the frequent observation of radiographic osteopenia and the coarse trabecular pattern of the carpal bones on radiographs. The pathogenesis of the skeletal demineralization remains unclear, but the data support the concept of an intrinsic bone defect that is then exacerbated by a number of hormonal factors, including the growth-regulating hormones, the gonadal steroids, and possibly the calcium-regulating hormones. The advent of more refined methods, such as single- and dual-photon absorptiometry and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, has led to improved insights into bone mineral density (BMD) status in Turner syndrome (TS). A major limitation of these projection methods is that they report areal and not true volumetric BMD, resulting in an underestimation of the true BMD in smaller subjects. In assessing BMD in TS, various methods have been used to eliminate the confounding effect of bone size. Some consistent patterns do emerge in persons with TS who are not treated with long-term growth hormone (GH) or estrogen therapy. A significant deficit in cortical bone commonly appears in childhood and usually is associated with a low bone-turnover state. Significant osteopenia at predominantly trabecular sites develops during mid- to late adolescence and persists into adulthood, when it is associated with increased bone turnover. Preliminary BMD data on patients after long-term GH therapy show an absence of osteopenia. With respect to the impact of long-term estrogen therapy, the BMD deficit in adults with TS who have been treated adequately with estrogen, but who have not been treated with GH, is less than it is in those who have been insufficiently treated or not treated at all with estrogen. The available data indicate that long-term GH treatment during the prepubertal and early to

  13. Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycaemia in a Turner Syndrome with Ring (X)

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Michela; Graziani, Vanna; Pragliola, Antonella; Sensi, Alberto; Hussain, Khalid; Muratori, Claudia; Marchetti, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia (HH) is a group of clinically, genetically, and morphologically heterogeneous disorders characterized by dysregulation of insulin secretion by pancreatic beta cells. HH can either be congenital genetic hyperinsulinism or associated with metabolic disorder and syndromic condition. Early identification and meticulous management of these patients is vital to prevent neurological insult. There are only three reported cases of HH associated with a mosaic, r(X) Turner syndrome. We report the four cases of an infant with a mosaic r(X) Turner genotype and HH responsive to diazoxide therapy. PMID:26064751

  14. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joffily, Lucia; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP) represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP. PMID:24288639

  15. Impaired postural balance in turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, J; Sydsjö, G; Ledin, T; Bågesund, M; Ekman, B

    2013-07-01

    An impaired body balance has been found in Turner syndrome (TS) in clinical tests like Rombergs's test and walking on a balance beam. The aim of the study was to assess postural balance in TS subjects with specific balance testing using dynamic posturography and relate to body composition. Nineteen TS subjects (20-57 years) were included. Balance was measured with dynamic posturography (Equitest) and compared with 19 sex and age-matched controls (22-59 years). Equitest, visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems were provoked with increasing difficulty (6 tests, SO1-SO6) and body sway was measured with a dual forceplate. Body composition was measured with DXA. No difference was found between the TS subjects and the controls on fixed platform with open eyes (SO1), with closed eyes (SO2), with stable platform and visual disorientation (SO3), or on unstable platform with open eyes (SO4). In the difficult tests on unstable platform the TS subjects did worse compared with controls both in the test with eyes closed (SO5), p<0.01, and in the test with visual disorientation (SO6), p<0.05. Composite (a merge of all six recordings) was significantly lower in the TS-group, p<0.05. In the TS group high total body weight was related to worse outcome on tests SO5, SO6, and composite, while total bone mass, age, height, or waist showed no significant association with balance scores. Our findings indicate that TS could have an increased risk for falling due to impaired ability to manage complex coordination tasks. PMID:23389991

  16. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  17. The Psychoeducational Characteristics of Children with Turner Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovet, Joanne F.

    1993-01-01

    This study compared psychoeducational characteristics of 67 children (ages 6-16) with Turner syndrome and 27 nonaffected controls. Subjects exhibited selective impairments in visuospatial and memory areas; significant underachievement in arithmetic; poor social competence; and increased behavior problems, particularly in the area of hyperactivity.…

  18. Cognitive Ability and Everyday Functioning in Women with Turner Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Jennifer; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of 23 Turner syndrome (TUS) women with 23 women with constitutional short stature (CSS) found significant group differences for Performance and Full Scale IQ, largely due to TUS women's deficits in spatial and mathematical ability. TUS individuals had significantly lower educational and occupational attainment than CSS controls but did…

  19. Communication Problems in Turner Syndrome: A Sample Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Dhooge, Inge; Verhoye, Kristof; Derde, Kristel; Curfs, Leopold

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 128 females (ages 2-58) with Turner syndrome found almost one quarter were receiving or had received treatment for stuttering, articulation problems, and/or delayed language development, with the latter two disorders being checked most frequently. Only 4 or the 68 individuals receiving growth hormone treatment reported voice changes.…

  20. Cephalometric analysis of adults with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Svanberg, Christina; Norevall, Lars-Inge; Ekman, Bertil; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Bågesund, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder of females with a prevalence of 1/2000-3000 live female births. The aim of this study was to compare cephalometric variables from adult women diagnosed with TS to a standardized reference group of 31-year old healthy women, and to evaluate the possible effects of human growth hormone (hGH) therapy in women with TS. Registered TS subjects in the Southeast region of Sweden were invited to take part in the study. Twenty-one women aged 36 ± 13(18-57) years accepted participation. Lateral radiographs of the head were analyzed using standard cephalometric methods (Hasund analysis) and with the commercially available soft-ware program FACAD. Comparisons were made with roentgen-cephalometric standards from a reference group of nineteen 31-year old Swedish women. Analysis of the cephalometric radiographs from the TS subjects showed a more retrognathic maxilla (SNA 80.3 ± 5.4) (p = 0.0460) and mandible (SNB 77.0 ± 5.2) (p = 0.0014), and a correspondingly backward position of the chin (SN/Pg 78.9 ± 5.5) (p = 0.0046) as compared to the reference values of 31-year old women (SNA 83.2 ± 3.0, SN B 81.5 ± 2.3 and SNPg 83.0 ± 2.3, respectively). In addition there was an increased posterior inclination of the maxilla (SN/NL 8.6 ± 4.1), as compared to the reference values (SN/NL 5.3 ± 2.7) (p = 0.0048). There were no significant differences regarding sagittal or vertical jaw relations, mandibular inclination or cranial base angle between the TS-group and the 31-year olds with the reference values. No significant difference was seen in jaw relationship, as measured by the ANB value, however the Wits(index) (3.3 ± 3.5) was higher (p = 0.0001) than the reference values (-0.1 ± 1.8). Subjects with or without previous hGH administration did,not show any significant differences in cephalometric values. In conclusion, women with TS had a significantly more retrognathic maxilla (SNA) and mandible (SNB) and a correspondingly significantly

  1. Cephalometric analysis of adults with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Svanberg, Christina; Norevall, Lars-Inge; Ekman, Bertil; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Bågesund, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder of females with a prevalence of 1/2000-3000 live female births. The aim of this study was to compare cephalometric variables from adult women diagnosed with TS to a standardized reference group of 31-year old healthy women, and to evaluate the possible effects of human growth hormone (hGH) therapy in women with TS. Registered TS subjects in the Southeast region of Sweden were invited to take part in the study. Twenty-one women aged 36 ± 13(18-57) years accepted participation. Lateral radiographs of the head were analyzed using standard cephalometric methods (Hasund analysis) and with the commercially available soft-ware program FACAD. Comparisons were made with roentgen-cephalometric standards from a reference group of nineteen 31-year old Swedish women. Analysis of the cephalometric radiographs from the TS subjects showed a more retrognathic maxilla (SNA 80.3 ± 5.4) (p = 0.0460) and mandible (SNB 77.0 ± 5.2) (p = 0.0014), and a correspondingly backward position of the chin (SN/Pg 78.9 ± 5.5) (p = 0.0046) as compared to the reference values of 31-year old women (SNA 83.2 ± 3.0, SN B 81.5 ± 2.3 and SNPg 83.0 ± 2.3, respectively). In addition there was an increased posterior inclination of the maxilla (SN/NL 8.6 ± 4.1), as compared to the reference values (SN/NL 5.3 ± 2.7) (p = 0.0048). There were no significant differences regarding sagittal or vertical jaw relations, mandibular inclination or cranial base angle between the TS-group and the 31-year olds with the reference values. No significant difference was seen in jaw relationship, as measured by the ANB value, however the Wits(index) (3.3 ± 3.5) was higher (p = 0.0001) than the reference values (-0.1 ± 1.8). Subjects with or without previous hGH administration did,not show any significant differences in cephalometric values. In conclusion, women with TS had a significantly more retrognathic maxilla (SNA) and mandible (SNB) and a correspondingly significantly

  2. Math Achievement, Numerical Processing, and Executive Functions in Girls with Turner Syndrome: Do Girls with Turner Syndrome Have Math Learning Disability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Hanich, Laurie B.

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a common genetic disorder associated with select deficits in executive functions, working memory and mathematics. In Study 1, we examined growth trajectories of skills in these areas, from grades 1 to 6, among girls with or without Turner syndrome. Rates of growth and performance levels at 6th grade, on an untimed math…

  3. Neuroanatomical Spatial Patterns in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marzelli, Matthew J.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Hong, David S.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2011-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a highly prevalent genetic condition caused by partial or complete absence of one X-chromosome in a female and is associated with a lack of endogenous estrogen during development secondary to gonadal dysgenesis. Prominent cognitive weaknesses in executive and visuospatial function in the context of normal overall IQ also occur in affected individuals. Previous neuroimaging studies of TS point to a profile of neuroanatomical variation relative to age and sex matched controls. However, there are no neuroimaging studies focusing on young girls with TS before they receive exogenous estrogen treatment to induce puberty. Information obtained from young girls with TS may help to establish an early neural correlate of the cognitive phenotype associated with the disorder. Further, univariate analysis has predominantly been the method of choice in prior neuroimaging studies of TS. Univariate approaches examine between-group differences on the basis of individual image elements (i.e., a single voxel’s intensity or the volume of an a priori defined brain region). This is in contrast to multivariate methods that can elucidate complex neuroanatomical profiles in a clinical population by determining the pattern of between-group differences from many image elements evaluated simultaneously. In this case, individual image elements might not be significantly different between groups but can still contribute to a significantly different overall spatial pattern. In this study, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of high-resolution magnetic resonance images was used to investigate differences in brain morphology between 13 pediatric, pre-estrogen girls with monosomic TS and 13 age-matched typically developing controls (3.0T imaging: mean age 9.1 ± 2.1). A similar analysis was performed with an older cohort of 13 girls with monosomic TS and 13 age-matched typically developing controls (1.5T imaging: mean age 15.8 ± 4.5). A multivariate, linear support vector

  4. Growth curves for Turkish Girls with Turner Syndrome: Results of the Turkish Turner Syndrome Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Darendeliler, Feyza; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Bereket, Abdullah; Baş, Firdevs; Bundak, Rüveyde; Sarı, Erkan; Küçükemre Aydın, Banu; Darcan, Şükran; Dündar, Bumin; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Mazıcıoğlu, Mümtaz M.; Adal, Erdal; Akıncı, Ayşehan; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Demirel, Fatma; Çelik, Nurullah; Özkan, Behzat; Özhan, Bayram; Orbak, Zerrin; Ersoy, Betül; Doğan, Murat; Ataş, Ali; Turan, Serap; Gökşen, Damla; Tarım, Ömer; Yüksel, Bilgin; Ercan, Oya; Hatun, Şükrü; Şimşek, Enver; Ökten, Ayşenur; Abacı, Ayhan; Döneray, Hakan; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Keskin, Mehmet; Önal, Hasan; Akyürek, Nesibe; Bulan, Kezban; Tepe, Derya; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Demir, Korcan; Kızılay, Deniz; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal; Eren, Erdal; Özen, Samim; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Abalı, Saygın; Akın, Leyla; Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Kaba, Sultan; Anık, Ahmet; Baş, Serpil; Ünüvar, Tolga; Sağlam, Halil; Bolu, Semih; Özgen, Tolga; Doğan, Durmuş; Çakır, Esra Deniz; Şen, Yaşar; Andıran, Nesibe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Karagüzel, Gülay; Pirgon, Özgür; Çatlı, Gönül; Can, Hatice Dilek; Gürbüz, Fatih; Binay, Çiğdem; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Sağlam, Celal; Gül, Davut; Polat, Adem; Açıkel, Cengizhan; Cinaz, Peyami

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Children with Turner syndrome (TS) have a specific growth pattern that is quite different from that of healthy children. Many countries have population-specific growth charts for TS. Considering national and ethnic differences, we undertook this multicenter collaborative study to construct growth charts and reference values for height, weight and body mass index (BMI) from 3 years of age to adulthood for spontaneous growth of Turkish girls with TS. Methods: Cross-sectional height and weight data of 842 patients with TS, younger than 18 years of age and before starting any therapy, were evaluated. Results: The data were processed to calculate the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 97th percentile values for defined ages and to construct growth curves for height-for-age, weight-for-age and BMI-for-age of girls with TS. The growth pattern of TS girls in this series resembled the growth pattern of TS girls in other reports, but there were differences in height between our series and the others. Conclusion: This study provides disease-specific growth charts for Turkish girls with TS. These disease-specific national growth charts will serve to improve the evaluation of growth and its management with growth-promoting therapeutic agents in TS patients. PMID:26831551

  5. Epidemiological, endocrine and metabolic features in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2004-12-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the more common genetic disorders, associated with abnormalities of the X chromosome, and occurring in about 50 per 100 000 liveborn girls. Turner syndrome is usually associated with reduced adult height, gonadal dysgenesis and thus insufficient circulating levels of female sex steroids, and infertility. A number of other signs and symptoms are seen more frequently with the syndrome. Morbidity and mortality are increased. The average intellectual performance is within the normal range. A number of recent studies have provided new insights with respect to epidemiology, cardiology, endocrinology and metabolism. Treatment with GH during childhood and adolescence allows a considerable gain in adult height, although very-long-term consequences of this treatment are not clear. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy is given during the adult years. The proper dose of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has not been established, and, likewise, benefits and/or drawbacks from HRT have not been thoroughly evaluated. Since the risk of cardiovascular and endocrinological disease is clearly elevated, proper care during adulthood is emphasized. In summary, Turner syndrome is a condition associated with a number of diseases and conditions which are reviewed in the present paper.

  6. Fat distribution in overweight patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanaki, K; Ohzeki, T; Ishitani, N; Motozumi, H; Matsuda-Ohtahara, H; Shiraki, K

    1992-02-15

    Overweight patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) and control children with similar weight/height and indices of overweight were studied to clarify the unique fat distribution in the syndrome. Triceps and ulnar skin-fold thickness (SFT) in UTS patients was significantly less than that of obese children without the syndrome. The means of SFT at the subscapular and paraumbilical regions were also less in the patients than control girls, though significance was not documented. Thus, increased body weight in UTS children seems mainly to be due to excess of adipose tissue, not in the limbs but on the trunk, and/or due to the increment of lean body mass.

  7. Cognition and behavior in Turner syndrome: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Hong, D S; Reiss, A L

    2012-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that Turner syndrome is associated with a distinct pattern of cognitive and neurophysiological characteristics. Typically this has been characterized by relative strengths in verbal skills, contrasting with relative weaknesses in arithmetic, visuospatial and executive function domains. Potential differences in social cognitive processing have also been identified. More recently, applications of neuroimaging techniques have further elucidated underlying differences in brain structure, function and connectivity in individuals with Turner syndrome. Ongoing research in this area is focused on establishing a unified mechanistic model incorporating genetic influences from the X chromosome, sex hormone contributions, neuroanatomical variation and differences in cognitive processes. This review broadly covers current understanding of how X-monosomy impacts neurocognitive phenotype both from the perspective of cognitive-behavioral and neuroimaging studies. Furthermore, relevant clinical aspects of identifying potential learning difficulties and providing anticipatory guidance for affected individuals with TS, are briefly discussed.

  8. [Pemphigoid gestationis and Turner syndrome; an uncommon association].

    PubMed

    Cadoret, F; Lorenzini, F; Parant, O

    2015-09-01

    The authors report an uncommon case of a pregnant woman with Turner syndrome (TS) whose pregnancy (with favorable outcome) was complicated by a pemphigoid gestationis in third trimester. This case points out that monitoring of these pregnancies is not limited to cardiac monitoring. Prevalence of auto-immune diseases is increased in the TS. Auto-immune dermatoses, such as pemphigoid gestationis, are one of the potential complications during pregnancy and should be known to practitioners.

  9. Parsonage-Turner syndrome in second-degree contact burns.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao

    2014-01-01

    Literature on the complications of burns is abundant. However, there is a paucity of literature on Parsonage-Turner syndrome as a complication of contact burns. The authors described the case of a 27-year-old Chinese man who sustained contact burns on the left upper limb and the left side of the chest wall, presenting sharp intense pain and swelling of the left shoulder deriving from the diagnosis of Parsonage-Turner syndrome. On the basis of clinical findings, the authors selected conservative treatment both for the burns and brachial plexus injury. Approximately 10 days postinjury the patient was able to move his upper limb in the same range as the contralateral uninjured limb. The sensory function recovered and the numbness of the upper limb gradually disappeared. This case shows that Parsonage-Turner syndrome can occur even in second-degree burns with a small total body surface area. Therefore, careful physical examination, early recognition, and prompt treatment are essential for recovery of the injured limb. PMID:24879399

  10. Cytogenetic and molecular findings in patients with Turner's syndrome stigmata.

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetzova, T; Baranov, A; Schwed, N; Ivaschenko, T; Malet, P; Giollant, M; Savitsky, G A; Baranov, V

    1995-01-01

    Cytogenetic and DNA analysis in 12 people with stigmata of Turner's syndrome was carried out. Cytogenetic analysis of these patients showed two subjects with 46,X, i(Xq) karyotypes, one with 45,X/46,X, i(Xq), one with 46,X,t(X;Y), and eight with 45,X/46,X,mar. Molecular analysis of DNA samples was performed in nine out of 12 patients with marker chromosomes. PCR analysis with oligoprimers specific for SRY, DYZ1, or DYZ3 loci identified Y chromosome material in five patients in the latter group. The X chromosome origin of the marker chromosome was proved by FISH technique with biotin labelled pericentromeric X chromosome specific probe in four other patients. These results show that patients with a number of Turner's syndrome stigmata usually do not have a typical XO karyotype but have some structural chromosomal aberrations involving the X or Y chromosomes. Combined application of cytogenetic, molecular cytogenetic (FISH), and PCR techniques significantly improves the precision of marker chromosome identification and thus might be of practical importance for the proper management and treatment of affected patients. Peculiarities of pathological manifestations of different karyotypes bearing structural abnormalities of the X or Y chromosomes in patients with Turner's syndrome stigmata, as well as feasible genetic mechanisms of sex determination and differentiation abnormalities in these subjects, are briefly discussed. Images PMID:8825925

  11. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vineet V.; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH. PMID:26751945

  12. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vineet V; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH.

  13. Math Learning Disability and Math LD Subtypes: Evidence from Studies of Turner Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether indicators of math learning disability were observed in 35 5- and 6-year-olds with either neurofibromatosis, Turner Syndrome, or fragile X syndrome and compared to controls. Findings indicate that girls with fragile X or Turner syndrome but not neurofibromatosis are significantly more likely to have specific math…

  14. Mathematical Learning Disability in Girls with Turner Syndrome: A Challenge to Defining MLD and Its Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a common disorder with a prevalence of 1:2,500 live female births. Although not associated with mental retardation, there is an increased risk of learning difficulties in this population. In particular, mathematical learning difficulties among girls with Turner syndrome are prevalent, significant, and persistent. As such, the…

  15. Improved Spatial Ability Correlated with Left Hemisphere Dysfunction in Turner's Syndrome. Implications for Mechanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovet, Joanne F.

    This study contrasts the performance of a 17-year-old female subject with Turner's syndrome before and after developing left temporal lobe seizures, as a means of identifying the mechanism responsible for the Turner's syndrome spatial impairment. The results revealed a deficit in spatial processing before onset of the seizure disorder. Results…

  16. Mathematics Learning Disability in Girls with Turner Syndrome or Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Melissa M.; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Gerner, Gwendolyn; Henry, Anne E.

    2006-01-01

    Two studies were carried out to examine the persistence (Study 1) and characteristics (Study 2) of mathematics learning disability (MLD) in girls with Turner syndrome or fragile X during the primary school years (ages 5-9 years). In Study 1, the rate of MLD for each syndrome group exceeded the rate observed in a grade-matched comparison group,…

  17. Bone Fragility in Turner Syndrome: Mechanisms and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2016-01-01

    Bone fragility is recognized as one of the major comorbidities in Turner syndrome (TS). The mechanisms underlying bone impairment in affected patients are not clearly elucidated, but estrogen deficiency and X-chromosomal abnormalities represent important factors. Moreover, although many girls with TS undergo recombinant growth hormone therapy to treat short stature, the efficacy of this treatment on bone mineral density is controversial. The present review will focus on bone fragility in subjects with TS, providing an overview on the pathogenic mechanisms and some prevention strategies. PMID:27199891

  18. Bone Fragility in Turner Syndrome: Mechanisms and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2016-01-01

    Bone fragility is recognized as one of the major comorbidities in Turner syndrome (TS). The mechanisms underlying bone impairment in affected patients are not clearly elucidated, but estrogen deficiency and X-chromosomal abnormalities represent important factors. Moreover, although many girls with TS undergo recombinant growth hormone therapy to treat short stature, the efficacy of this treatment on bone mineral density is controversial. The present review will focus on bone fragility in subjects with TS, providing an overview on the pathogenic mechanisms and some prevention strategies. PMID:27199891

  19. Bone Fragility in Turner Syndrome: Mechanisms and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Ventura, Annamaria; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2016-01-01

    Bone fragility is recognized as one of the major comorbidities in Turner syndrome (TS). The mechanisms underlying bone impairment in affected patients are not clearly elucidated, but estrogen deficiency and X-chromosomal abnormalities represent important factors. Moreover, although many girls with TS undergo recombinant growth hormone therapy to treat short stature, the efficacy of this treatment on bone mineral density is controversial. The present review will focus on bone fragility in subjects with TS, providing an overview on the pathogenic mechanisms and some prevention strategies.

  20. An intriguing association of Turner syndrome with severe nephrotic syndrome: searching for a diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Minzala, G; Ismail, G

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease caused by an aberrant autoimmune response, with a large spectrum of clinical manifestations. It strikingly affects women. Recent papers reveal that the men with Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) have a higher incidence of lupus than the men in the general population, similar with that of genotypic females. On the other hand, there is a great lack of information regarding the association of SLE with Turner syndrome, but it seems to be a lower risk for females with Turner to develop SLE. We present a rare association of a Turner syndrome with SLE, with negative immunology for SLE and with diagnosis made on renal biopsy. These data suggest that the presence of two X chromosomes may predispose to SLE, the ligand (CD40 ligand) for one of the genes that contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE being located on the X chromosome.

  1. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with overlapping Perlman syndrome manifestation.

    PubMed

    Ferianec, Vladimír; Bartova, Michaela

    2014-10-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome known as exomphalos-macroglossia - gigantism syndrome. Prognosis is good, prenatal diagnosis is important for pregnancy management but might be difficult due to clinical overlap with other syndromes. Perlman syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome with high perinatal mortality, most frequent antenatal findings include polyhydramnios, macrosomia, visceromegaly, nephromegaly and foetal ascites. Authors present a case of prenatally diagnosed BWS with severe ascites as first antenatal finding and lethal course, signs more typical of Perlman syndrome. This combination of clinical signs has not been published yet and may contribute to specification of possible prenatal manifestation of BWS. PMID:24215131

  2. Widespread DNA hypomethylation and differential gene expression in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Trolle, Christian; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Skakkebæk, Anne; Lamy, Philippe; Vang, Søren; Hedegaard, Jakob; Nordentoft, Iver; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Adults with 45,X monosomy (Turner syndrome) reflect a surviving minority since more than 99% of fetuses with 45,X monosomy die in utero. In adulthood 45,X monosomy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, although strikingly heterogeneous with some individuals left untouched while others suffer from cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease and infertility. The present study investigates the leukocyte DNAmethylation profile by using the 450K-Illumina Infinium assay and the leukocyte RNA-expression profile in 45,X monosomy compared with karyotypically normal female and male controls. We present results illustrating that genome wide X-chromosome RNA-expression profile, autosomal DNA-methylation profile, and the X-chromosome methylation profile clearly distinguish Turner syndrome from controls. Our results reveal genome wide hypomethylation with most differentially methylated positions showing a medium level of methylation. Contrary to previous studies, applying a single loci specific analysis at well-defined DNA loci, our results indicate that the hypomethylation extend to repetitive elements. We describe novel candidate genes that could be involved in comorbidity in TS and explain congenital urinary malformations (PRKX), premature ovarian failure (KDM6A), and aortic aneurysm formation (ZFYVE9 and TIMP1). PMID:27687697

  3. [Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis due to Parsonage-Turner syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tissier-Ducamp, D; Martinez, S; Alagha, K; Charpin, D; Chanez, P; Palot, A

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 49-years-old patient who presented to the accident and emergency department with sudden onset dyspnea associated with acute shoulder pain. He was breathless at rest with supine hypoxemia. He had an amyotrophic left shoulder with localized paresis of the shoulder. Both hemi-diaphragms were elevated on chest X-rays. Pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive pattern and both phrenic nerve conduction velocities were decreased. At night, alveolar hypoventilation was evidenced by elevated mean capnography (PtcCO2: 57mmHg). Neuralgic amyotrophy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome was the final diagnosis. This syndrome is a brachial plexus neuritis with a predilection for the suprascapular and axillary nerves. Phrenic nerve involvement is rare but where present can be the most prominent clinical feature as in our case report.

  4. Kawasaki disease in a girl with turner syndrome: a remarkable association

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We describe a girl with Turner syndrome, a genetic disorder of the X chromosome in a phenotypic female at increased risk of autoimmune and immunological diseases, who developed Kawasaki disease at the age of four years. Given the possible relationship between these two disorders, we recommend suspecting Kawasaki disease in patients with Turner syndrome who present with persistent fever of unknown origin and who are not responsive to antibiotic therapy. Attention should be given to this phenomenon, as patients with Turner syndrome are themselves at higher risk of cardiovascular defects. Further studies are needed to better clarify this issue. PMID:24580845

  5. Generalized epilepsy in a patient with mosaic Turner syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reports on cases of epilepsy in Turner syndrome are rare and most of them have cortical developmental malformations. We report the case of a Taiwanese patient with mosaic Turner syndrome with generalized tonic–clonic epilepsy and asymmetrical lateral ventricles but no apparent cortical anomaly. Case presentation A 49-year-old Taiwanese woman without family history presented with infrequent generalized tonic–clonic epilepsy since she was 11 years old. On examination, her short stature, webbed neck, swelling of hands and feet, retrognathic face, and mild intellectual disability were noted. She had spontaneous menarche and regular menses. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed asymmetrical lateral ventricles and diffuse subcortical white matter T2-weighted hyperintensities. Chromosome studies disclosed low aneuploid (10%) 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX mosaic Turner syndrome. Conclusions There is increasing evidence that epilepsy can be an uncommon presentation of Turner syndrome. Mosaic Turner syndrome with 47, XXX probably increases the risk of epilepsy but more research is needed to reach a conclusion. This case also strengthens our knowledge that Turner syndrome can be one of the pathologic bases of asymmetrical lateral ventricles. When a patient has idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy or asymmetrical lateral ventricles on brain images, the presence of a mild Turner phenotype warrants further chromosome studies. PMID:24694237

  6. [Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome misdiagnosed as thyropenia: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xubiao; Li, Zhiming; Liu, Tingting; Wen, Zhiming

    2013-12-01

    A 21-year-old woman with a short stature presented with primary amenorrhoea and a 45X karyotype, and comparative genomic hybridization revealed 1p36 deletion and abnormal genes in multiple chromosomes to support the diagnosis of Turner syndrome and monosomy 1p36 deletion syndrome. The main clinical features of this condition include microsomia, poor sexual development, menoschesis, gigantorectum, absence of internal genitalia, sometimes with thyropenia and low intelligence. This disease can be easily diagnosed for its heterogeneous clinical manifestations.

  7. [Chronic type A aortic dissection associated with Turner syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideyuki; Kozaki, Tomofumi; Kume, Masazumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    Aortic dissection is a critical but rare complication of Turner syndrome. This report describes a case of chronic aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome. A 54-year-old woman, suffering from mild back pain for 1 month, was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of Stanford type A chronic aortic dissection and a bicuspid aortic valve with moderate regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed aortic dissection, involving all arch branches, extending from the ascending to the abdominal aorta. The true lumen of the brachial artery was nearly obstructed by the thrombosed false lumen. Elective aortic arch repair and aortic valve replacement were successfully performed. The patient was diagnosed with 45, XO Turner syndrome after surgery. Taking aortopathy of Turner syndrome into consideration, surveillance of the residual aorta was performed. No rapidly progressive dilatation of the residual aorta was detected during the 6 years' follow-up.

  8. Rub epilepsy in an infant with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Magara, Shin-Ichi; Kawashima, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Yu; Akasaka, Noriyuki; Yamazaki, Sawako; Tohyama, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of infantile refractory epilepsy associated with Turner syndrome (TS), showing very frequent, focal clonic seizures of the left upper extremity. Characteristically, in addition to spontaneous fits, her seizure was inducible by rubbing her left hand and forearm for a few seconds. Accordingly, she was diagnosed with a rare form of reflex epilepsy, "rub epilepsy". Neuroradiological investigation indicated the existence of cortical abnormalities, such as focal cortical dysplasia of the right parietal lobe. Patients with TS are reported to have neuroanatomical abnormalities, especially of the parietal lobe. Thus, our case may imply a causal relationship between potential cortical hyperexcitability of the parietal lobe and epilepsy in TS. This is the first reported infantile case of rub epilepsy, and more generally, reflex epilepsy associated with TS.

  9. Association of Turner Syndrome and Growth Hormone Deficiency: A Review.

    PubMed

    Marques, Jorge Sales; Aires, Sónia

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is an important cause of short stature in girls. Patients with TS most often do not have growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Testing GH secretion is not indicated despite the presence of short stature. In the last 20 years only three cases were reported with this association in Pubmed. We describe a case of an 11 year old girl with short stature and karyotype confirmed TS: 45,X(16)46,X,i(X)(ql0)(13). Because her growth velocity was low (-3 SD), we evaluated the GH response with stimulating tests and the results were under the normal range. These findings were compatible with GHD. It is important to check for GHD in patients with TS whenever the growth velocity is low for age and sex.

  10. Effects of sulpiride induced hyperprolactinaemia in patients with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Riolo, A; Bonomo, M; Ronzoni, M; Botalla, L; Gelli, D

    1980-07-01

    In order to evaluate the interference of prolactin (PRL) on some aspects of pituitary-gonadal derangement observed in patients with hyperprolactinaemic amenorrhoea (HA), a GnRH stimulation test (100 micrograms i.v.) was performed on twenty-one patients with hyperprolactinaemia without evidence of pituitary tumour and in nine subjects with Turner's syndrome (TS) before and after sulpiride administration (200 mg/day orally, for 3 months). In patients with HA an enhanced response of gonadotrophins to GnRH was observed. In patients with TS a further increase of the gonadotrophin hyper-responsiveness to the releasing hormone occurred when hyperprolactinaemia was induced by chronic sulpiride administration. Since, in these patients, appreciable ovarian steroidogenesis is lacking, a direct effect of the increased plasma PRL at the hypothalamo-pituitary level is likely. In hyperprolactinaemic amenorrhoea pituitary hyper-responsiveness may not be due to PRL effects on ovarian steroidogenesis.

  11. Turner syndrome and pregnancy: clinical practice. Recommendations for the management of patients with Turner syndrome before and during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cabanes, Laure; Chalas, Celine; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Donadille, Brun; Felten, Marie Louise; Gaxotte, Valerie; Jondeau, Guillaume; Lansac, Emmanuel; Lansac, Jacques; Letur, Hélène; N'Diaye, Tatia; Ohl, Jeanine; Pariente-Khayat, Anne; Roulot, Dominique; Thepot, François; Zénaty, Delphine

    2010-09-01

    Following the death in France by acute aortic dissection of two women with Turner syndrome who were pregnant following oocyte donation, the Director of the French Biomedicine Agency (Agence de la biomédecine) sent a letter to the President of the French College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (FCOG). He requested the College's expertise in reviewing point-by-point the cases and risk factors and in determining whether there are grounds to propose additional measures complementary to the recommendations made by the Haute autorité de santé or French National Authority for Health (HAS) in 2008 in terms of indication and monitoring of patients. A joint practice committee of the FCOG, the French Cardiologic Society, the French Chest and Cardiovascular Surgery Society, the French Society of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, the French Endocrine Society, the French study group for oocyte donation, and the Biomedicine Agency defined the exact questions to be put to the experts, chose these experts, followed them up and drafted the synthesis of recommendations resulting from their work. The questions concerned the check-up before pregnancy of Turner patients, contraindication and acceptance of pregnancy, information for the patients, and recommendations for antenatal care, delivery and postnatal follow-up.

  12. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p < 0.0001); SHOX was not differentially expressed. One of the most highly represented organ systems was the hematologic/immune system, distinguishing the Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome. PMID:24850140

  13. Prosthodontic treatment and medical considerations for a patient with Turner syndrome: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Caroline T; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2012-10-01

    This clinical report describes a multidisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation of a 23-year-old Caucasian woman affected with Turner's syndrome and subsequently diagnosed with T4 Giant cell reparative granuloma of the right maxillary sinus. The surgical treatment included a maxillectomy and infratemporal fossa dissection followed by a free fibula palatal reconstruction, fibula bone graft of the orbital floor, dental implant placement, and prosthodontic rehabilitation. Prosthodontic planning and treatment considerations in an adult patient with Turner Syndrome are discussed. PMID:22672559

  14. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p < 0.0001); SHOX was not differentially expressed. One of the most highly represented organ systems was the hematologic/immune system, distinguishing the Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  15. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby L.; Scholl, Thomas M.; Slonim, Donna K.; Wick, Heather C.; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Methods Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix® U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t-tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. Results There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p<0.0001); SHOX was not differentially expressed. One of the most highly represented organ systems was the hematologic/immune system, distinguishing the Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Conclusions Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome. PMID:24850140

  16. Arterial hypertension in Turner syndrome: a review of the literature and a practical approach for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Demulier, Laurent; De Backer, Julie; De Wolf, Daniel; De Schepper, Jean; Tʼsjoen, Guy; De Backer, Tine

    2015-07-01

    Turner syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder with complete or partial absence of one X chromosome that only occurs in women. Clinical presentation is variable, but congenital and acquired cardiovascular diseases are frequently associated diseases that add significantly to the increased morbidity and mortality in Turner syndrome patients. Arterial hypertension is reported in 13-58% of adult Turner syndrome patients and confers an increased risk for stroke and aortic dissection. Hypertension can be present from childhood on and is reported in one-quarter of the paediatric Turner syndrome patients. This article reviews the prevalence and cause of arterial hypertension in Turner syndrome and describes the relationship between blood pressure, aortic dilation and increased cardiovascular risk. We compare current treatment strategies and also propose an integrated practical approach for the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in Turner syndrome applicable in daily practice.

  17. Turner's syndrome and pregnancy: has the 45,X/47,XXX mosaicism a different prognosis? Own clinical experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Dimitraki, Marina; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Papoulidis, Ioannis; Maroulis, George; Liberis, Anastasios; Liberis, Vasileios

    2011-05-01

    Turner's syndrome is characterized by an ovarian failure which occurs in most cases before puberty and leads to infertility. In less than 10% of women with Turner syndrome, puberty may occur and spontaneous pregnancies is possible but with a high risk of fetal loss, chromosomal and congenital abnormalities. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with a mosaic Turner's syndrome karyotype 45,X/47,XXX who conceived spontaneously and had two successful pregnancies. Short stature was the only manifestation of Turner's syndrome. In the present report, we reviewed the available literature on the fertility of women with Turner's syndrome and the phenotypic effects of mosaicism for a 47,XXX cell line in Turner's syndrome.

  18. Mathematics Learning Disabilities in Girls with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome during Late Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Melissa M.; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on math and related skills among 32 girls with fragile X (n = 14) or Turner (n = 18) syndrome during late elementary school. Performance in each syndrome group was assessed relative to Full Scale IQ-matched comparison groups of girls from the general population (n = 32 and n = 89 for fragile X syndrome and Turner…

  19. Parsonage-Turner syndrome following post-exposure prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The ‘Parsonage-Turner syndrome’ (PTS) is a rare but distinct disorder with an abrupt onset of shoulder pain, followed by weakness and atrophy of the upper extremity musculature, and a slow recovery requiring months to years. To our best knowledge, this is the first case describing symptoms and signs of PTS following the administration of a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen against possible human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man presented with pain and unilateral scapular winging following PEP against possible HIV and HBV infection. Although atrophy and weakness were observed for the right supraspinatus muscle, a full range of motion was achievable. Neurological examination, plain radiography of the right shoulder and electromyography showed no additional abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with post-vaccination PTS and treated non-operatively. During the following 15 months the scapular winging receded and full muscle strength was regained. Conclusion Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare clinical diagnosis. The precise pathophysiological mechanism of PTS remains unclear, but it seems to involve an interaction between genetic predisposition, mechanical vulnerability and an autoimmune trigger. An immunological event, such as – in this case – a vaccination as part of PEP treatment, can trigger the onset of PTS. The clinical presentation is distinctive with acute severe pain followed by patchy paresis, atrophy and sensory symptoms that persist for months to years. No currently available tests can provide a definite confirmation or exclusion of PTS. Routine blood examination, electromyography (EMG), and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serve mainly to exclude other disorders. The recovery can be quite lengthy, non-operative treatment is the accepted practice. Supplementary administration of oral prednisolone could shorten the

  20. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Multiple Embolic Infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Cindy W.; Lee, Eungseok; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Park, Hee-Kwon; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of Turner syndrome (TS) with ischemic stroke have been reported. Various arteriopathies of the cerebral arteries, including fibromuscular dysplasia, congenital hypoplasia, moyamoya syndrome, and premature atherosclerosis have been assumed to be the cause of ischemic stroke in TS. There has been no case report of a TS patient presenting with an embolic stroke pattern without any cerebral arteriopathy. A 28-year-old woman with TS was referred to our hospital because of abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. She underwent brain MRI at the referring hospital because she experienced sudden-onset diffuse headache. Diffusion-weighted imaging revealed multiple acute embolic infarcts in different vascular territories. Intracranial and extracranial arterial disease was not detected on cerebral magnetic resonance angiography and carotid sonography. Embolic source workups, including transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, Holter monitoring, and transcranial Doppler shunt study, were all negative. Hypercoagulability and vasculitis panels were also negative. Our patient was diagnosed with cryptogenic embolic stroke. This is the first report of a TS patient with an embolic stroke pattern. Our case shows that ischemic stroke in TS could be due to embolism as well as the various cerebral arteriopathies documented in previous reports.

  1. Postsurgical Parsonage-Turner syndrome: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Verhasselt, Skrallan; Schelfaut, Sebastiaan; Bataillie, Filiep; Moke, Lieven

    2013-02-01

    Parsonage-Turner syndrome (PTS) is a distinct clinical syndrome, characterized by acute and severe (mostly) unilateral shoulder pain, followed by paresis and atrophy of the shoulder girdle, while the pain decreases. Most authors consider it as an immune-mediated disorder. PTS is notoriously unrecognised and is usually diagnosed with delay. A PTS may also occur following a surgical procedure. Postsurgical PTS is an under-recognised and challenging clinical entity, as illustrated in the case reported here of a 59-year-old man, 4 weeks after anterior discectomy and fusion C5C7. In such cases, the differential diagnosis must be made with a complication of surgery, such as postoperative C5 palsy due for instance to a migrated bone graft. Arguments for PTS are: a certain delay between surgery and symptoms, intolerable pain followed by weakness and improvement of pain complaints, divergent distribution of weakness, sensory deficit and pain, which may be confirmed by electrodiagnosis. Early recognition of postsurgical PTS may avoid unnecessary investigations or surgical exploration. It allows to treat the patient properly, leading to greater satisfaction of both surgeon and patient; pain management, physical therapy and reassurance are the cornerstones.

  2. Cytogenetic evaluation of patients with clinical spectrum of Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moka, Rajasekhar; Sreelakshmi, Kodandapani; Gopinath, Puthiya Mundyat; Satyamoorthy, Kapettu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: The objective of this study was to correlate the genotype, of female patients, withshort stature and primary amenorrhea. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and forty-six subjects were recruited during 2005-2012. Microscopic and automated karyotyping analyses were done by using chromosomes isolated from the lymphocytes using Giemsa banding (GTG) to identify chromosome abnormalities. RESULTS: A total of 146 clinically suspected Turner syndrome (TS) subjects were recruited for the study, of which, 61 patients were identified to have chromosome abnormalities. The chromosomal abnormalities detected were as follows: Monosomy X (n = 19, 13.01%), triple X syndrome (n = 4, 2.7%), mosaic TS (n = 12, 8.21%), XY gonadal dysgenesis (n = 13, 8.9%), and structural abnormalities including X chromosome (n = 15, 10.27%) and one patient each with autosomal changes involving 9qh inversion and translocation of chromosomes 12 and 14. CONCLUSION: Karyotype abnormalities accounting for 46% in this study emphasize the need for karyotype testing in cases of short stature with primary amenorrhea. PMID:24082654

  3. Long QT Interval in Turner Syndrome – A High Prevalence of LQTS Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H.; Pedersen, Lisbeth N.; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K.; Andersen, Niels H.; Gravholt, Claus H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Methods Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett’s (bQTc) and Hodges’s formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. Results The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0±25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4±17.8 ms) was prolonged (p<0.001) and did not change over time (416.9±22.6 vs. 415.6±25.5 ms; p = 0.4). 45,X karyotype was associated with increased hQTc prolongation compared to other Turner syndrome karyotypes (418.2±24.8 vs. 407.6±25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. Clinical Trial Registration NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E. PMID:23936059

  4. Metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome: an intriguing overlapping.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Donatella; Adducchio, Gloria; Picchia, Simona; Ralli, Eleonora; Matteucci, Eleonora; Moscarini, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is an increasing pathology in adults and in children, due to a parallel rise of obesity. Sedentary lifestyle, food habits, cultural influences and also a genetic predisposition can cause dyslipidemia, hypertension, abdominal obesity and insulin resistance which are the two main features of metabolic syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition directly associated with obesity, insulin resistance (HOMA index) and metabolic syndrome, and it is very interesting for its relationship and overlap with the metabolic syndrome. The relationship between the two syndromes is mutual: PCOS women have a higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome and also women with metabolic syndrome commonly present the reproductive/endocrine trait of PCOS. Prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome and PCOS are similar for various aspects. It is necessary to treat excess adiposity and insulin resistance, with the overall goals of preventing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes and improving reproductive failure in young women with PCOS. First of all, lifestyle changes, then pharmacological therapy, bariatric surgery and laparoscopic ovarian surgery represent the pillars for PCOS treatment.

  5. Turner syndrome with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min Kyung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Chae, Hyun Wook; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common chromosomal disorder and is associated with a range of comorbidities involving the cardiovascular system. Vascular abnormalities, in particular, are a common finding in cases of TS. However, dissection involving the vertebral arteries is rare. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with TS who had been treated with growth hormone replacement therapy for the past 3 years. She presented with weakness of both lower legs, and was ultimately diagnosed with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation. We treated her with intravenous high dose dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg) and she could walk without assistance after 6 days of treatment. In conclusion, when a patient with TS shows sudden weakness of the lower limbs, we should consider the possibility of spinal vessel rupture and try to take spine magnetic resonance imaging as soon as possible. We suggest a direction how to make a proper diagnosis and management of sudden vertebral artery hemorrhage in patients with TS.

  6. Fracture risk and bone mineral density in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bakalov, Vladimir K; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2008-06-01

    Bone health is a major lifelong concern in caring for women and girls with Turner syndrome (TS). There is an approximately 25% increase in fracture risk most of which is related to medium or high impact trauma. The long bones, especially of the forearm are predominantly affected. This fact may be due to a selective cortical bone deficiency in TS which is unrelated to hypogonadism. In addition, lack of adequate estrogen replacement can lead to trabecular bone deficiency and increase in vertebral compression fractures after age 45. Evaluation of bone density by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is important, however, it should be used judiciously in TS in view of its inherent tendency to underestimate the bone density of people with short stature. Bone size-independent methods, such as QCT or volumetric transformation of DEXA data should be used in individuals shorter than 150 cm. Achieving optimal bone density is of critical importance for fracture prevention in TS, and should be pursued by timely introduction of hormone replacement therapy, adequate dose of estrogens during the young adult life, optimal calcium and vitamin D intake and regular physical exercise. In addition, other measures to prevent fall and trauma should be considered, including optimizing hearing and vision, avoiding contact sports and exercise to improve coordination. PMID:18415020

  7. Turner syndrome with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min Kyung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common chromosomal disorder and is associated with a range of comorbidities involving the cardiovascular system. Vascular abnormalities, in particular, are a common finding in cases of TS. However, dissection involving the vertebral arteries is rare. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with TS who had been treated with growth hormone replacement therapy for the past 3 years. She presented with weakness of both lower legs, and was ultimately diagnosed with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation. We treated her with intravenous high dose dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg) and she could walk without assistance after 6 days of treatment. In conclusion, when a patient with TS shows sudden weakness of the lower limbs, we should consider the possibility of spinal vessel rupture and try to take spine magnetic resonance imaging as soon as possible. We suggest a direction how to make a proper diagnosis and management of sudden vertebral artery hemorrhage in patients with TS. PMID:26817012

  8. Reduced Functional Connectivity during Working Memory in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dunkin, Bria; Hong, David S.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2011-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder affecting females, resulting from the complete or partial absence of an X chromosome. The cognitive profile of TS shows relative strengths in the verbal domain and weaknesses in the procedural domain, including working memory. Neuroimaging studies have identified differences in the morphology of the parietal lobes, and white matter pathways linking frontal and parietal regions, as well as abnormal activation in dorsal frontal and parietal regions. Taken together these findings suggest that abnormal functional connectivity between frontal and parietal regions may be related to working memory impairments in TS, a hypothesis we tested in the present study. We scanned TS and typically developing participants with functional magnetic resonance imaging while they performed visuospatial and phonological working memory tasks. We generated a seed region in parietal cortex based on structural differences in TS and found that functional connectivity with dorsal frontal regions was reduced during working memory in TS. Finally, we found that connectivity was correlated with task performance in TS. These findings suggest that structural brain abnormalities in TS affect not only regional activity but also the functional interactions between regions and that this has important consequences for behavior. PMID:21441396

  9. The Patient with Turner Syndrome: Puberty and Medical Management Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Luisa; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2013-01-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) affects approximately 1 in 2500 liveborn females and is characterized by loss or structural anomalies of an X chromosome. Clinical features vary among patients; multiple organ systems can be affected. Endocrinologists are involved in the management of short stature, delayed puberty, and infertility. Endocrine therapies can include growth hormone, estrogen, and progestagen to promote linear growth and pubertal development. The duration of estrogen and progestagen treatment (HRT) is generally more than 40 years. There is not one standard HRT protocol that is suitable for all women. Thus, general guidelines are provided for HRT to induce pubertal development. Additional considerations regarding choice of HRT include thrombotic risk and disorders associated with thrombophila. Involvement of cardiologists is important because approximately 50% of patients with TS have congenital structural cardiac anomalies linked to an increased risk for aortic dissection and rupture. Although oocyte donation offers the chance to carry a pregnancy, accumulating information has highlighted the potential dangers associated with pregnancy. Advances in the care of infants, girls, and women with TS have been achieved. Management of infants, girls, and women with TS involves coordinated care from a multi-disciplinary team including endocrinologists, cardiologists, geneticists, otolaryngologists, behavioral health experts, nurse educators, and social workers. PMID:22884020

  10. Occlusal molar surfaces in females with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maćesić, Mihajlo; Kaić, Zvonimir; Dumancić, Jelena; Poje, Zvonko; Dumić, Miroslav

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the molar occlusal features in 73 subjects with the Turner's syndrome (TS) and compared to a control group (CG) of 322 healthy females. The occlusal features were scored on dental plaster casts using the Scoring Procedures for Key Morphological Traits of the Permanent Dentition: The Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System (ASU). The results were analyzed through frequency, percentage and chi 2-test. TS subjects have more frequent reduction of cusp number, distolingual cusp on the upper molars and distal cusp on the lower molar, with the consequent reduction of the occlusal surface. Reduced size of occlusal surface and number cusps on upper molars resulted in the transformation of rhomboid occlusal shape into triangular, with the consequent loss of H-shaped groove system (in the upper right first molars H-shaped groove system was significantly less frequently found in TS (p < 0.05); in the upper left second molars H-shaped groove system was significantly less frequently found in TS (p < 0.01). The X-chromosome aneuploidy can cause a decrease in developmental homeostasis, which results in the alteration of apposition of the enamel and in consequently substantial changes of the molar occlusal morphological features.

  11. Turner syndrome: don't forget the vulva

    PubMed Central

    Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Bakolas, George

    2016-01-01

    Summary Turner syndrome (TS) has been linked to a number of autoimmune conditions, including lichen sclerosus (LS), at an estimated prevalence of 17%. LS is a known precursor to vulvar cancer. We present a case of vulvar cancer in a 44-year-old woman, who had previously complained of pruritus in the area, a known symptom of LS. Histology confirmed a squamous cell carcinoma with underlying LS. Vulvar assessment for the presence of LS should be undertaken regularly as part of the routine assessments proposed for adult TS women. If LS is identified, then the patient should be warned of the increased risk of vulvar cancer progression and should be monitored closely for signs of the condition. Learning points Patients with TS are at increased risk of developing LS.LS is a known precursor to vulvar cancer.TS women with LS may be at risk of developing vulvar cancer and should be offered annual vulvar screening and also be aware of signs and symptoms of early vulvar cancer. PMID:27252865

  12. Evaluation of cardiovascular anomalies in patients with asymptomatic turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ji Mi; Song, Min Seob; Choi, Seok jin; Chung, Woo Yeong

    2013-08-01

    Turner syndrome is well known to be associated with significant cardiovascular abnormalities. This paper studied the incidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic adolescent patients with Turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) instead of echocardiography. Twenty subjects diagnosed with Turner syndrome who had no cardiac symptoms were included. Blood pressure and electrocardiography (ECG) was checked. Cardiovascular abnormalities were checked by MDCT. According to the ECG results, 11 had a prolonged QTc interval, 5 had a posterior fascicular block, 3 had a ventricular conduction disorder. MDCT revealed vascular abnormalities in 13 patients (65%). Three patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery, 2 had dilatation of left subclavian artery, and others had an aortic root dilatation, aortic diverticulum, and abnormal left vertebral artery. As for venous abnormalities, 3 patients had partial anomalous pulmonary venous return and 2 had a persistent left superior vena cava. This study found cardiovascular abnormalities in 65% of asymptomatic Turner syndrome patients using MDCT. Even though, there are no cardiac symptoms in Turner syndrome patients, a complete evaluation of the heart with echocardiography or MDCT at transition period to adults must be performed.

  13. Evaluation of Cardiovascular Anomalies in Patients with Asymptomatic Turner Syndrome Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ji Mi; Song, Min Seob; Choi, Seok jin

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome is well known to be associated with significant cardiovascular abnormalities. This paper studied the incidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic adolescent patients with Turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) instead of echocardiography. Twenty subjects diagnosed with Turner syndrome who had no cardiac symptoms were included. Blood pressure and electrocardiography (ECG) was checked. Cardiovascular abnormalities were checked by MDCT. According to the ECG results, 11 had a prolonged QTc interval, 5 had a posterior fascicular block, 3 had a ventricular conduction disorder. MDCT revealed vascular abnormalities in 13 patients (65%). Three patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery, 2 had dilatation of left subclavian artery, and others had an aortic root dilatation, aortic diverticulum, and abnormal left vertebral artery. As for venous abnormalities, 3 patients had partial anomalous pulmonary venous return and 2 had a persistent left superior vena cava. This study found cardiovascular abnormalities in 65% of asymptomatic Turner syndrome patients using MDCT. Even though, there are no cardiac symptoms in Turner syndrome patients, a complete evaluation of the heart with echocardiography or MDCT at transition period to adults must be performed. PMID:23960443

  14. Coarctation resection in children with Turner's syndrome: a note of caution.

    PubMed

    Ravelo, H R; Stephenson, L W; Friedman, S; Chatten, J; Rashkind, W J; Vidas, M; Edmunds, L H

    1980-09-01

    Eight children were recognized to have Turner's syndrome, among 353 patients over 1 year of age who had undergone surgical treatment for coarctation of the aorta. Of these eight children, three developed a significant perioperative hemorrhage from aortic rupture, resulting in one death and one instance of paraparesis related to a period of prolonged hypotension. In two of the other five patients with Turner's syndrome, a decision was made to perform an angioplasty rather than a resection of the coarctation because of apparent friability of the aortic wall. In contrast, only one of the 345 patients without Turner's syndrome died as a result of surgical treatment, and none developed spontaneous perioperative aortic rupture or neurologic deficit. This experience suggests that the operative risk for coarctation of the aorta in this subgroup of patients is considerably greater than that in patients without Turner's syndrome (p < 0.001). Special precautions should include use of rubber-jaw vascular clamps, choice of technique to avoid tension at the anastomotic suture line, and careful control of systemic blood pressure intraoperatively and postoperatively. Indications for surgical treatment of coarctation as well as the type of operative procedure must be individualized cautiously in patients with Turner's syndrome.

  15. Empathy, autistic traits, and motor resonance in adults with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lepage, Jean-François; Lortie, Mélissa; Deal, Cheri L; Théoret, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic condition resulting from the partial or complete absence of an X-chromosome in phenotypic females. Individuals with Turner syndrome often display social difficulties that are reminiscent of those associated with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), conditions associated with empathy and mirror-neuron system (MNS) deficits. The goal of the present study was (1) to investigate the extent to which adults with Turner syndrome display autistic and empathic traits, and (2) to probe the integrity of the MNS in this neurogenetic disorder. Sixteen individuals with Turner syndrome and 16 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched controls took part in a neuropsychological assessment where the Weschler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, the Autism Spectrum Quotient and the Empathy Quotient were administered. Functioning of the MNS was assessed by measuring motor cortex activity with transcranial magnetic stimulation during an action-observation task. Results show that individuals with Turner syndrome do not differ significantly from controls regarding autistic or empathic traits, and present normal functioning of the MNS during action observation. Correlational analysis showed a significant positive relationship between scores on the Empathy Quotient and motor facilitation during action observation, bringing further support to the hypothesis that MNS activity is related to sociocognitive competence.

  16. Behavioral Assessment of Social Anxiety in Females with Turner or Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesniak-Karpiak, Katarzyna; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Ross, Judith L.

    2003-01-01

    This study compared 29 females with Turner syndrome and 21 females with fragile X syndrome (ages 6-22) on a videotaped role-play interaction with 34 females in a comparison group. Three of eight behavioral measures of social skills differentiated the participant groups. Fragile-X subjects required more time to initiate interactions and Turner…

  17. Moyamoya disease associated with asymptomatic mosaic Turner syndrome: a rare cause of hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Manjila, Sunil; Miller, Benjamin R; Rao-Frisch, Anitha; Otvos, Balint; Mitchell, Anna; Bambakidis, Nicholas C; De Georgia, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly involving the intracranial carotid arteries that can present clinically with either ischemic or hemorrhagic disease. Moyamoya syndrome, indistinguishable from moyamoya disease at presentation, is associated with multiple clinical conditions including neurofibromatosis type 1, autoimmune disease, prior radiation therapy, Down syndrome, and Turner syndrome. We present the first reported case of an adult patient with previously unrecognized mosaic Turner syndrome with acute subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial manifestation of moyamoya syndrome. A 52-year-old woman was admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage with associated flame-shaped intracerebral hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe. Physical examination revealed short stature, pectus excavatum, small fingers, micrognathia, and mild facial dysmorphism. Cerebral angiography showed features consistent with bilateral moyamoya disease, aberrant intrathoracic vessels, and an unruptured 4-mm right superior hypophyseal aneurysm. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of mosaic Turner syndrome. Our case report is the first documented presentation of adult moyamoya syndrome with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage as the initial presentation of mosaic Turner syndrome. It illustrates the utility of genetic evaluation in patients with cerebrovascular disease and dysmorphism.

  18. [Genetic analysis of Turner syndrome: 89 cases in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Kammoun, I; Chaabouni, M; Trabelsi, M; Ouertani, I; Kraoua, L; Chelly, I; M'rad, R; Ben Jemaa, L; Maâzoul, F; Chaabouni, H

    2008-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) affects about 1/2500 female infants born alive. The syndrome results from total or partial absence of one of the two X chromosomes normally present in females. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of 89 cases of TS observed during a six-year period (2000-2005). The patients' age ranged from two days to 51 years at the time of this analysis. Most patients were adults (48%). The aim of this study is to ascertain the principal clinical features leading to a request for a karyotype, searching for a possible relationship between chromosomal anomalies and clinical expression of TS. Pediatric patients were referred for statural retardation or dysmorphic features, while reproduction anomalies were the main indication for karyotyping in patients aged over 20 years. Mosaicism was prevalent (47%), whereas the homogeneous karyotype 45,X was found in only 32% of the patients; structural anomalies were found in 21%. Regarding the advanced age of our patients, we established a relationship between chromosome anomalies and the clinical expression of TS, based on an analysis of stature and reproduction disorders. Short stature and primary amenorrhea were correlated with total deletion of one chromosome X or imbalanced gene dosage due to structural X anomalies. Whereas cases of infertility, recurrent miscarriages and secondary amenorrhea were associated with a mosaic karyotype pattern (45,X/46,XX or 45,X/46,XX/47,XXX ...), with a slight mosaicism in most cases. Thus, chromosome investigations should be performed in cases of reproduction failure even for women with normal stature.

  19. Atypical Functional Brain Activation during a Multiple Object Tracking Task in Girls with Turner Syndrome: Neurocorrelates of Reduced Spatiotemporal Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Elliott A.; Stoddard, Joel; Lai, Song; Lackey, John; Shi, Jianrong; Ross, Judith L.; Simon, Tony J.

    2010-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with spatial and numerical cognitive impairments. We hypothesized that these nonverbal cognitive impairments result from limits in spatial and temporal processing, particularly as it affects attention. To examine spatiotemporal attention in girls with Turner syndrome versus typically developing controls, we used a…

  20. Deletions of Yq11 associated with short stature and the Turner syndrome. Tentative mapping of a region associated with specific Turner stigmata to proximal interval 5.

    SciTech Connect

    McElreavey, K.; Barbaux, S.; Vilain, E.

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human phenotype, commonly associated with a 45,X karyotype. Mapping the Turner phenotype is difficult since hidden mosaicisms, partial monosomy and complex rearrangements are present in many affected individuals. In addition, attempts to map the genes involved to the X chromosome have failed to yield a consistent localisation. An alternative approach to map and identify Turner genes is to study XY individuals, with sex chromosome abnormalities, who present with or without characteristic Turner stigmata. We report the analysis of 4 individuals with terminal deletions of Yq. The individuals were azoospermic males without phenotypic abnormalities (2 cases) and azoospermic males presenting with a specific subset of Turner stigmata (2 cases). Breakpoints in each of the cytogenetically detectable Yq deletions were mapped by Southern analysis and Y chromosome-specific sequence tagged sites (STS). Correlation between the patients phenotypes and the extent of their deletion indicate a critical region associated with specific Turner stigmata (cubitus valgus, shield chest, short fourth metacarpals) and growth retardation at Yq at proximal interval 5. These data provide evidence that the somatic features of the Turner syndrome are most likely caused by haploinsufficiency of genes at several loci.

  1. Mixed gonadal dysgenesis in 45,X Turner syndrome with SRY gene.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Yeop; Yang, Sohyoung; Jeong, Eun-Hwan; Lee, Ho-Chang; Lee, Yong-Moon; Han, Heon-Seok; Yi, Kyung Hee

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in girls. Various phenotypic features show depending upon karyotype from normal female through ambiguous genitalia to male. Usually, Turner girls containing 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, or sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene may have mixed gonadal dysgenesis with various external sexual differentiation. We experienced a short statured 45,X Turner girl with normal external genitalia. Because SRY gene was positive, laparoscopic gonadectomy was performed. The dysgenetic gonads revealed bilateral ovotesticular tissues. The authors report a mixed gonadal dysgenesis case found in clinical 45,X Turner patient with positive SRY gene. Screening for SRY gene should be done even the karyotype is 45,X monosomy and external genitalia is normal.

  2. Mixed gonadal dysgenesis in 45,X Turner syndrome with SRY gene

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Yeop; Yang, Sohyoung; Jeong, Eun-Hwan; Lee, Ho-Chang; Lee, Yong-Moon; Han, Heon-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in girls. Various phenotypic features show depending upon karyotype from normal female through ambiguous genitalia to male. Usually, Turner girls containing 45,X/46,XY mosaicism, or sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene may have mixed gonadal dysgenesis with various external sexual differentiation. We experienced a short statured 45,X Turner girl with normal external genitalia. Because SRY gene was positive, laparoscopic gonadectomy was performed. The dysgenetic gonads revealed bilateral ovotesticular tissues. The authors report a mixed gonadal dysgenesis case found in clinical 45,X Turner patient with positive SRY gene. Screening for SRY gene should be done even the karyotype is 45,X monosomy and external genitalia is normal. PMID:26817010

  3. Prenatal diagnosis and management of monozygotic twins discordant for turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gou, Chenyu; Gao, Yu; Chen, Baojiang; Fang, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Discordance for Turner syndrome in monozygotic (MZ) twins, which is known as heterokaryotypia, is very rare in MZ pregnancies. The combined effect of idiochromosome loss due to an anaphase lag and the relocation of discordant blastomeres may trigger the twinning procedure and discordance of Turner syndrome. We present 2 cases of MZ twins discordant for Turner syndrome that were diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound and cytogenetic studies (one fetus was 45,X and the other 46,XX). Both cases, which involved monochorionic (MC) diamniotic twins, underwent selective feticide and had favorable outcomes for the remaining twin. Ultrasound, amniocentesis of both sacs (dual amniocentesis) and zygosity determination are indispensable in diagnosing heterokaryotypia. Selective feticide is a treatment option in cases of heterokaryotypic MC diamniotic twins, and in our cases, it resulted in favorable outcomes for the remaining twin.

  4. An Unusual Occurrence of Hepatic Granulomas and Secondary Sitosterolemia in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pragnesh R.; Riley, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Although abnormal liver function tests occur in 50–80% of cases with Turner syndrome, there are no previous reports of overt hepatic disease or hepatic granulomas associated with Turner's syndrome. We report three cases of Turner syndrome associated with hepatic granulomas with a wide range of liver dysfunction. Of the three patients, first patient underwent liver transplantation; second patient remained stable on immunosuppressants; and third patient died from complications of decompensated liver cirrhosis as she declined liver transplantation due to multiple comorbidities. One patient had sitosterolemia, a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of cholesterol metabolism, after she ingested β-sitosterol supplement and had worsening liver function tests and lipid panel. She had remarkably abnormal lipid panel that responded to ezetimibe and by stopping the β-sitosterol supplement. PMID:25705228

  5. Fertility Preservation in Women with Turner Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review and Practical Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Kutluk; Bedoschi, Giuliano; Berkowitz, Karen; Bronson, Richard; Kashani, Banafsheh; McGovern, Peter; Pal, Lubna; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Rubin, Karen

    2016-10-01

    In this article we review the existing fertility preservation options for women diagnosed with Turner syndrome and provide practical guidelines for the practitioner. Turner syndrome is the most common sex chromosome abnormality in women, occurring in approximately 1 in 2500 live births. Women with Turner syndrome are at extremely high risk for primary ovarian insufficiency and infertility. Although approximately 70%-80% have no spontaneous pubertal development and 90% experience primary amenorrhea, the remainder might possess a small residual of ovarian follicles at birth or early childhood. The present challenge is to identify these women as early in life as is possible, to allow them to benefit from a variety of existing fertility preservation options. To maximize the benefits of fertility preservation, all women with Turner syndrome should be evaluated by an expert as soon as possible in childhood because the vast majority will have their ovarian reserve depleted before adulthood. Cryopreservation of mature oocytes and embryos is a proven fertility preservation approach, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is a promising technique with a growing number of live births, but remains investigational. Oocyte cryopreservation has been performed in children with Turner syndrome as young as 13 years of age and ovarian tissue cryopreservation in affected prepubertal children. However, current efficacy of these approaches is unknown in this cohort. For those who have already lost their ovarian reserve, oocyte or embryo donation and adoption are strategies that allow fulfillment of the desire for parenting. For those with Turner syndrome-related cardiac contraindications to pregnancy, use of gestational surrogacy allows the possibility of biological parenting using their own oocytes. Alternatively, gestational surrogacy can serve to carry pregnancy resulting from the use of donor oocytes or embryos, if needed.

  6. Fertility Preservation in Women with Turner Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review and Practical Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Kutluk; Bedoschi, Giuliano; Berkowitz, Karen; Bronson, Richard; Kashani, Banafsheh; McGovern, Peter; Pal, Lubna; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Rubin, Karen

    2016-10-01

    In this article we review the existing fertility preservation options for women diagnosed with Turner syndrome and provide practical guidelines for the practitioner. Turner syndrome is the most common sex chromosome abnormality in women, occurring in approximately 1 in 2500 live births. Women with Turner syndrome are at extremely high risk for primary ovarian insufficiency and infertility. Although approximately 70%-80% have no spontaneous pubertal development and 90% experience primary amenorrhea, the remainder might possess a small residual of ovarian follicles at birth or early childhood. The present challenge is to identify these women as early in life as is possible, to allow them to benefit from a variety of existing fertility preservation options. To maximize the benefits of fertility preservation, all women with Turner syndrome should be evaluated by an expert as soon as possible in childhood because the vast majority will have their ovarian reserve depleted before adulthood. Cryopreservation of mature oocytes and embryos is a proven fertility preservation approach, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is a promising technique with a growing number of live births, but remains investigational. Oocyte cryopreservation has been performed in children with Turner syndrome as young as 13 years of age and ovarian tissue cryopreservation in affected prepubertal children. However, current efficacy of these approaches is unknown in this cohort. For those who have already lost their ovarian reserve, oocyte or embryo donation and adoption are strategies that allow fulfillment of the desire for parenting. For those with Turner syndrome-related cardiac contraindications to pregnancy, use of gestational surrogacy allows the possibility of biological parenting using their own oocytes. Alternatively, gestational surrogacy can serve to carry pregnancy resulting from the use of donor oocytes or embryos, if needed. PMID:26485320

  7. Repair of coarctation of the aorta in children with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brandt, B; Heintz, S E; Rose, E F; Ehrenhaft, J L; Clark, E B

    1984-01-01

    Increased risk of perioperative hemorrhage has been described in patients with Turner syndrome and coarctation of the aorta. We have operated on 11 patients with Turner syndrome and coarctation of the aorta, two of whom developed bleeding. One patient died. End-to-end anastomosis was performed in all patients. Histologic studies of resected specimens did not reveal any abnormalities. The risk of bleeding was not related to age at the time of repair or postoperative hypertension. Although no specific abnormality has been identified in these patients, the risk of serious hemorrhage appears increased.

  8. Delayed diagnosis of congenital factor IX deficiency (Christmas disease) in a girl with Turner's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, G; Monagle, P; Barnes, C

    2006-10-01

    Patients with Turner's syndrome are at risk of X-linked recessive disorders. We report a case of a young girl with Turner's syndrome with persistent mildly abnormal coagulation studies associated with a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis. The abnormalities were initially attributed to intrahepatic cholestasis and were partially responsive to vitamin K. After an interval of several years an episode of unexplained iron deficiency anaemia prompted re-investigation of the mild coagulopathy. Disproportionate reduction in the factor IX concentration and restoration of haemostasis with factor IX concentrate lead to a revised provisional diagnosis of mild haemophilia B which was subsequently confirmed by sequencing the factor IX gene.

  9. Gonadoblastoma in patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Gabriela; López Marti, Jessica M; Marino, Roxana; Garcia de Dávila, Maria T; Gallego, Marta S

    2015-01-01

    Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) is a common chromosomal abnormality caused by partial or complete X chromosome monosomy. One half of the patients have a 45,X karyotype, whereas the remaining patients display other X chromosome anomalies. In 6% to 11% of UTS, a normal or partly deleted Y chromosome has been found. A 10% to 30% risk of developing gonadoblastoma was found in the latter patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of Y chromosome-derived material, the occurrence of gonadoblastoma, and the incidence of possible neoplasms in patients with UTS. Of 217 patients studied with UTS and chromosome analysis of peripheral-blood lymphocytes, Y chromosome material was found in 20 patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing was performed to characterize the structurally abnormal Y chromosome in 13 cases. Molecular analysis of the SRY gene could only be performed in 20 patients with 45,X karyotype. Two patients had the SRY genomes. Of the 20 patients with Y chromosome-derived material, 17 underwent gonadectomy. The incidence of gonadoblastoma development in our series was 35.5%. Furthermore, 1 patient also showed a pure dysgerminoma, and another showed a mixed dysgerminoma and embryonal carcinoma. We emphasize the importance of complete processing of the gonadectomy specimen, including step sections, molecular studies, and FISH, in addition to the classic cytogenetic searching for Y chromosome sequences, in patients who present with a nonmosaic 45,X karyotype. Finally, we propose to routinely collect a sample for storage in the tumor bank for future studies.

  10. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta E; Cleemann, Line; Gravholt, Claus H

    2012-05-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by numerous medical challenges during adolescence and adulthood. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should continue during adult years. These issues are normally dealt with by the paediatrician, but once a TS female enters adulthood it is less clear who should be the primary care giver. Morbidity and mortality is increased, especially due to the risk of dissection of the aorta and other cardiovascular diseases, as well as the risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, thyroid disease and other diseases. The proper dose of HRT with female sex steroids has not been established, and, likewise, benefits and/or drawbacks from HRT have not been thoroughly evaluated. The transition period from paediatric to adult care seems to be especially vulnerable and the proper framework for transition has not yet been established. Likewise, no framework is in place for continuous follow-up during adult years in many countries. Today, most treatment recommendations are based on expert opinion and are unfortunately not evidence based, although more areas, such as growth hormone and oxandrolone treatment for increasing height, are becoming well founded. Osteoporosis, diabetes, both type 1 and 2, hypothyroidism, obesity and a host of other endocrine diseases and conditions are seen more frequently in TS. Prevention, intervention and proper treatment is only just being recognized. Hypertension is frequent and can be a forerunner of cardiovascular disease. The description of adult life with TS has been broadened and medical, social and psychological aspects are being added at a compelling pace. Proper care during adulthood should be studied and a framework for care should be in place, since most morbidity potentially is amenable to intervention. In summary, TS is a condition associated with a number of diseases and conditions which need the attention of a multi-disciplinary team during

  11. Otolaryngologic markers for the early diagnosis of Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Tomoko; King, Kelly; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher K; Butman, John; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Bondy, Carolyn; Griffith, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify and characterize otolaryngologic markers for the early diagnosis of Turner Syndrome (TS). Study Design Prospective cohort survey. Methods Setting Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Patients Ninety-one females, 7 - 61 years old (average = 28.7 y), enrolled in a multidisciplinary study of karyotype-phenotype correlations in TS. Main Outcome Measures Age at diagnosis, X chromosome karyotype, history of chronic or recurrent otitis media (OM), sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), palate dysmorphism, pinna deformity, pterygium colli, low posterior hairline, low-set ears, and micrognathia. Results Sixty-nine (76%) patients had a history of chronic or recurrent OM, 62 (68%) had a dysmorphic palate, 57 (63%) had SNHL, and 90 (99%) had one or more of these findings. 83 (91%; average age at diagnosis = 9.4 y) had one or more external craniofacial signs: pinna abnormalities, pterygium colli, low-set ears, micrognathia or a low posterior hairline. Eight patients (average age at diagnosis = 13.2 y) had no external craniofacial signs, although seven (88%) of these eight patients had a history of chronic or recurrent OM, dysmorphic palate or SNHL. The age at diagnosis was not significantly different between groups with or without external craniofacial signs (P = 0.126). Conclusions Patients with mild or incompletely penetrant TS phenotypes often present with otitis media, hearing loss, or both before the diagnosis of TS is established. Palatal dysmorphism, including ogival morphology, is another otolaryngologic marker for TS. Prompt recognition of these manifestations of TS could hasten its diagnosis and appropriate medical care. PMID:19732968

  12. Skeletal muscle microvascular function in girls with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    West, Sarah L.; O'Gorman, Clodagh S.; Elzibak, Alyaa H.; Caterini, Jessica; Noseworthy, Michael D.; Rayner, Tammy; Hamilton, Jill; Wells, Greg D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance is prevalent in individuals with Turner Syndrome (TS). We recently demonstrated that girls with TS have normal aerobic but altered skeletal muscle anaerobic metabolism compared to healthy controls (HC). The purpose of this study was to compare peripheral skeletal muscle microvascular function in girls with TS to HC after exercise. We hypothesized that girls with TS would have similar muscle blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal responses during recovery from exercise compared to HC. Methods Thirteen TS participants and 8 HC completed testing. BOLD MRI was used to measure skeletal muscle microvascular response during 60 second recovery, following 60 s of exercise at 65% of maximal workload. Exercise and recovery were repeated four times, and the BOLD signal time course was fit to a four-parameter sigmoid function. Results Participants were 13.7 ± 3.1 years old and weighed 47.9 ± 14.6 kg. The mean change in BOLD signal intensity following exercise at the end of recovery, the mean response time of the function/the washout of deoxyhemoglobin, and the mean half-time of recovery were similar between the TS and HC groups. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that compared to HC, peripheral skeletal muscle microvascular function following exercise in girls with TS is not impaired. General significance This study supports the idea that the aerobic energy pathway is not impaired in children with TS in response to submaximal exercise. Other mechanisms are likely responsible for exercise intolerance in TS; this needs to be further investigated. PMID:26676172

  13. Cytogenetics findings at Turner Syndrome and their correlation with clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Catović, Amra

    2005-08-01

    Turner Syndrome is a genetic condition in females that results from an abnormal chromosome. One of the X chromosomes is missing or misshapen in the most cells of the body. Three classics clinical symptoms of the syndrome are: incomplete sexual maturation, short stature and pterygium colli. Turner Syndrome is diagnosed by karyotyping. In the retrospective study for a twelve years period (1991-2002) correlation between clinical and cytogenetics findings was established in our Center among 47 examinees from all parts of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, who had suspect clinical diagnosis of Turner Syndrome. The syndrome was demonstrated by cytogenetics examinations in 30(63,8%) examinees and excluded in 17 (36,2%) examinees. The most frequent karyotype is monosomy of X chromosome (45,X) found at 63,3%, than isochromosome of Xq (46,XisoXq) found at 16,7%, mosaic form (46,XX/45,X) and deletion of Xp (46,XdelXp) both at 6,7%, than deletion of Xq (46,XdelXq) and ring of Xp (46,XX/46,XringXp) both at 3,3%. Our results suggest that promptly and exactly diagnosis of Turner syndrome is very important due to introducing growth hormone therapy and estrogen therapy at a very young age.

  14. Effect of oxandrolone therapy on adult height in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheanon, Nicole M; Backeljauw, Philippe F

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which there is complete or partial absence of the X chromosome. Turner syndrome effects 1 in every 2000 live births. Short stature is a cardinal feature of Turner Syndrome and the standard treatment is recombinant human growth hormone. When growth hormone is started at an early age a normal adult height can be achieved. With delayed diagnosis young women with Turner Syndrome may not reach a normal height. Adjuvant therapy with oxandrolone is used but there is no consensus on the optimal timing of treatment, the duration of treatment and the long term adverse effects of treatment. The objective of this review and meta-analysis is to examine the effect of oxandrolone on adult height in growth hormone treated Turner syndrome patients. Eligible trials were identified by a literature search using the terms: Turner syndrome, oxandrolone. The search was limited to English language randomized-controlled trials after 1980. Twenty-six articles were reviewed and four were included in the meta-analysis. A random effects model was used to calculate an effect size and confidence interval. The pooled effect size of 2.0759 (95 % CI 0.0988 to 4.0529) indicates that oxandrolone has a positive effect on adult height in Turner syndrome when combined with growth hormone therapy. In conclusion, the addition of oxandrolone to growth hormone therapy for treatment of short stature in Turner syndrome improves adult height. Further studies are warranted to investigate if there is a subset of Turner syndrome patients that would benefit most from growth hormone plus oxandrolone therapy, and to determine the optimal timing and duration of such therapy.

  15. Effect of oxandrolone therapy on adult height in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sheanon, Nicole M; Backeljauw, Philippe F

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality in which there is complete or partial absence of the X chromosome. Turner syndrome effects 1 in every 2000 live births. Short stature is a cardinal feature of Turner Syndrome and the standard treatment is recombinant human growth hormone. When growth hormone is started at an early age a normal adult height can be achieved. With delayed diagnosis young women with Turner Syndrome may not reach a normal height. Adjuvant therapy with oxandrolone is used but there is no consensus on the optimal timing of treatment, the duration of treatment and the long term adverse effects of treatment. The objective of this review and meta-analysis is to examine the effect of oxandrolone on adult height in growth hormone treated Turner syndrome patients. Eligible trials were identified by a literature search using the terms: Turner syndrome, oxandrolone. The search was limited to English language randomized-controlled trials after 1980. Twenty-six articles were reviewed and four were included in the meta-analysis. A random effects model was used to calculate an effect size and confidence interval. The pooled effect size of 2.0759 (95 % CI 0.0988 to 4.0529) indicates that oxandrolone has a positive effect on adult height in Turner syndrome when combined with growth hormone therapy. In conclusion, the addition of oxandrolone to growth hormone therapy for treatment of short stature in Turner syndrome improves adult height. Further studies are warranted to investigate if there is a subset of Turner syndrome patients that would benefit most from growth hormone plus oxandrolone therapy, and to determine the optimal timing and duration of such therapy. PMID:26322078

  16. Ocular Motor Indicators of Executive Dysfunction in Fragile X and Turner Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Adrian G.; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Zee, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Fragile X and Turner syndromes are two X-chromosome-related disorders associated with executive function and visual spatial deficits. In the present study, we used ocular motor paradigms to examine evidence that disruption to different neurological pathways underlies these deficits. We tested 17 females with fragile X, 19 females with Turner…

  17. Social Functioning among Girls with Fragile X or Turner Syndrome and Their Sisters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Baumgardner, Thomas; Freund, Lisa S.; Reiss, Allan L.

    1998-01-01

    Social behaviors among girls (ages 6-16) with fragile X (n=8) or Turner syndrome (n=9) were examined to address the role of family environment versus biological determinants of social dysfunction. Compared to their sisters, subjects had lower IQS and higher rating of social and attention problems. (Author/CR)

  18. Experience in management of diminished growth in adolescent Turner's syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Tuschy, U

    1992-01-01

    The aim in the management of patients with Turner's syndrome, besides substitution of sexual steroids, is the attempt to improve their final height. The data allow therapeutic recommendations, which, however, realize only the first intention. The final height, indeed, cannot be improved by traditional methods. Further two alternatives remain to be tested: long time low dose estrogen therapy, and high dosed HGH application.

  19. Comparison of Visual-Spatial Performance Strategy Training in Children with Turner Syndrome and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Janet K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen females with Turner syndrome, 13 females with nonverbal learning disabilities, and 14 males with nonverbal learning disabilities, ages 7-14, were taught via a cognitive behavioral modification approach to verbally mediate a spatial matching task. All three groups showed significant task improvement after the training, with no significant…

  20. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Essandoh, Michael; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Portillo, Juan Guillermo; Crestanello, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair. PMID:26664864

  1. Turner Syndrome: Genetic and Hormonal Factors Contributing to a Specific Learning Disability Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovet, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder affecting primarily females. It arises from a loss of X-chromosome material, most usually one of the two X chromosomes. Affected individuals have a number of distinguishing somatic features, including short stature and ovarian dysgenesis. Individuals with TS show a distinct neurocognitive profile…

  2. Response to three years of growth hormone therapy in girls with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong Kyu; Lee, Hae Sang; Ko, Jung Hee; Hwang, Il Tae

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Short stature is the most common finding in patients with Turner syndrome. Improving the final adult height in these patients is a challenge both for the patients and physicians. We investigated the clinical response of patients to growth hormone treatment for height improvement over the period of three years. Methods Review of medical records from 27 patients with Turner syndrome treated with recombinant human growth hormone for more than 3 years was done. Differences in the changes of height standard deviation scores according to karyotype were measured and factors influencing the height changes were analyzed. Results The response to recombinant human growth hormone was an increase in the height of the subjects to a mean value of 1.1 standard deviation for subjects with Turner syndrome at the end of the 3-year treatment. The height increment in the first year was highest. The height standard deviation score in the third year was negatively correlated with the age at the beginning of the recombinant human growth hormone treatment. Different karyotypes in subjects did not seem to affect the height changes. Conclusion Early growth hormone administration in subjects with Turner syndrome is helpful to improve height response to the treatment. PMID:24904845

  3. Successful Advanced Maternal Age Pregnancy with Mosaic Turner Syndrome Conceived after Ovulation Induction with Clomiphene Citrate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Masahiro; Hinokio, Kenji; Kiyokawa, Machiko; Morine, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    Turner women typically experience gonadal dysfunction that results in amenorrhea and sterility. We encountered a case of mosaic Turner syndrome where conception was possible after ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate (CC). The patient's ovaries were overresponsive to induction with CC. The challenges and successful outcome are reported. PMID:25018883

  4. Genotype/phenotype correlation in women with nonmosaic X chromosome deletions and Turner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, A.R.

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human developmental disorder associated with the absence of the second sex chromosome (monosomy X). Cardinal features of the Turner phenotype include high intrauterine lethality, growth retardation, gonadal failure, and the variable presence of specific somatic abnormalities such as webbed neck, lymphedema, and skeletal abnormalities. Recent observations support the hypothesis that the phenotype associated with monosomy X results from haploid dosage of genes common the X and Y chromosomes that escape X-inactivation ({open_quotes}Turner genes{close_quotes}). Apart from a locus causing short stature that maps to the pseudoautosomal region on the distal short arm, the location of X-linked Turner genes is not known. Karyotype/phenotype correlations in women with partial X deletions have been inconsistent. However, previous studies have focused on sporadic sex chromosome aberrations and may have been confounded by occult mosaicism. In addition, mapping of deletions was limited by the resolution of cytogenetic techniques. I am reexamining genotype/phenotype correlations in partial X monosomy, focusing on a subset of cases in which mosaicism is highly unlikely (e.g., unbalanced X-autosome translocations, familial X deletions), and using molecular techniques to map deletions. I have collected eight cases of nonmosaic X deletions in women with varied manifestations of Turner syndrome. Cytogenetic data suggests that genes responsible for Turner anatomic abnormalities may lie within a critical region of the very proximal portion of the short arm (Xp11). Molecular characterization of the deletions is in progress. Methods include (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads from patient-derived cell lines, using cosmid probes that map to known locations on Xp, and (2) sequence tagged site (STS) content mapping of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted X chromosomes derived from these cell lines.

  5. Serum LH and FSH Responses to Synthetic LH-RH in Normal Infants, Children and Patients With Turner's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Seizo; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) on LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release were studied in 26 normal children and six patients (from 1-to 14-years-old) with Turner's syndrome. (Author)

  6. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed. PMID:26948383

  7. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed.

  8. False aneurysm on distal part of coarctation of the aorta in a parous Turner syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Oi, Keiji; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Takeshita, Masashi; Tsuruta, Goro

    2013-09-01

    False aneurysm associated with untreated coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is an uncommon vascular complication. We present a 41-year-old woman with mosaic Turner syndrome who had CoA complicated with a small false aneurysm on descending aorta just distal to the coarctation. The patient had not been diagnosed with Turner syndrome despite several physical characteristics of the syndrome because she had histories of natural childbirth. The false aneurysm was resected with the coarctation through a thoracotomy and proximal aorta was directly anastomosed to distal aorta. Endovascular therapy has become preferred method in recent years in treatment for coarctation of the aorta. However, careful consideration should be given to the irregularities on the aorta with the coarctation for diagnosis of false aneurysm.

  9. Turner syndrome in Albania and the efficacy of its treatment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Petrit; Babameto-Laku, Anila; Vyshka, Gentian; Gjoka, Klodiana; Minxuri, Dorina; Myrtaj, Elira; Çakërri, Luljeta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of Turner syndrome inside the Albanian population, its clinical, cytological and genetic characteristics, the accompanying pathologies, and the efficacy of the treatment with the growth hormone. We performed a retrospective analysis of 59 patients suffering from this syndrome (aging from 5 to 23 years old). The diagnosis of female patients suffering from Turner syndrome is delayed, with a mean age at the moment of diagnosis of 13.74 years (5-23 years). The main reason for seeking medical advice was the growth retardation or a delayed puberty. Available data for 52 patients showed that the most frequent accompanying pathologies were the following: thyroid autoimmune disorders (59%), cardiovascular anomalies (43%), renal pathologies (41%), hearing impairment (4.3%) and hypertension (3.3%). Follow-up for the growth rate was possible for 52 patients out of the total of 59 patients. Twenty-five of the female patients suffering Turner syndrome and forming part of our study sample were treated with growth hormone for a period averaging 3 years and 4 months. A variety of reasons was identified as responsible for the missed treatment in 27 patients. We saw an enhanced growth (in terms of body height) within the treated subgroup, when compared with the untreated subgroup (27 patients), especially during the first 3 years of the follow-up. No side effects of this treatment were reported. Both groups of patients initiated as well a sexual hormone therapy (estrogens and progesterone) for inducing puberty at the age of 12 years. Further work is needed for an early diagnosis of this syndrome, the prompt treatment with growth hormone and the monitoring of accompanying disorders. This will ensure a better quality of life and an improvement of the longevity of patients suffering from the Turner syndrome. PMID:26181044

  10. Turner syndrome in Albania and the efficacy of its treatment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Hoxha, Petrit; Babameto-Laku, Anila; Vyshka, Gentian; Gjoka, Klodiana; Minxuri, Dorina; Myrtaj, Elira; Çakërri, Luljeta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of Turner syndrome inside the Albanian population, its clinical, cytological and genetic characteristics, the accompanying pathologies, and the efficacy of the treatment with the growth hormone. We performed a retrospective analysis of 59 patients suffering from this syndrome (aging from 5 to 23 years old). The diagnosis of female patients suffering from Turner syndrome is delayed, with a mean age at the moment of diagnosis of 13.74 years (5-23 years). The main reason for seeking medical advice was the growth retardation or a delayed puberty. Available data for 52 patients showed that the most frequent accompanying pathologies were the following: thyroid autoimmune disorders (59%), cardiovascular anomalies (43%), renal pathologies (41%), hearing impairment (4.3%) and hypertension (3.3%). Follow-up for the growth rate was possible for 52 patients out of the total of 59 patients. Twenty-five of the female patients suffering Turner syndrome and forming part of our study sample were treated with growth hormone for a period averaging 3 years and 4 months. A variety of reasons was identified as responsible for the missed treatment in 27 patients. We saw an enhanced growth (in terms of body height) within the treated subgroup, when compared with the untreated subgroup (27 patients), especially during the first 3 years of the follow-up. No side effects of this treatment were reported. Both groups of patients initiated as well a sexual hormone therapy (estrogens and progesterone) for inducing puberty at the age of 12 years. Further work is needed for an early diagnosis of this syndrome, the prompt treatment with growth hormone and the monitoring of accompanying disorders. This will ensure a better quality of life and an improvement of the longevity of patients suffering from the Turner syndrome.

  11. A Turner Syndrome Patient Carrying a Mosaic Distal X Chromosome Marker

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaschi, Roberto L. P.; Taylor, Juliet; Robertson, Stephen P.; Love, Donald R.; George, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    A skin sample from a 17-year-old female was received for routine karyotyping with a set of clinical features including clonic seizures, cardiomyopathy, hepatic adenomas, and skeletal dysplasia. Conventional karyotyping revealed a mosaic Turner syndrome karyotype with a cell line containing a small marker of X chromosome origin. This was later confirmed on peripheral blood cultures by conventional G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and microarray analysis. Similar Turner mosaic marker chromosome cases have been previously reported in the literature, with a variable phenotype ranging from the mild “classic” Turner syndrome to anencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, complex heart malformation, and syndactyly of the fingers and toes. This case report has a phenotype that is largely discordant with previously published cases as it lies at the severe end of the Turner variant phenotype scale. The observed cytogenetic abnormalities in this study may represent a coincidental finding, but we cannot exclude the possibility that the marker has a nonfunctioning X chromosome inactivation locus, leading to functional disomy of those genes carried by the marker. PMID:24778889

  12. Pilot Study of Blood Pressure in Girls With Turner Syndrome: An Awareness Gap, Clinical Associations, and New Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Los, Evan; Quezada, Emilio; Chen, Zunqiu; Lapidus, Jodi; Silberbach, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major factor that reduces lifespan in Turner syndrome. High blood pressure (BP) is common in Turner syndrome and is the most easily treatable cardiovascular risk factor. We studied the prevalence of elevated screening systemic BP, awareness of the problem, and its clinical associations in a large group of girls attending the annual meeting of the Turner Syndrome Society of the United States. Among 168 girls aged 2 to 17 years, 42% had elevated screening BP (systolic and diastolic), yet only 8% reported a previous diagnosis of hypertension. History of aortic coarctation repair (17%) was positively associated with elevated systolic BP (52% versus 32%; P<0.05). Elevated systolic BP was positively associated with obesity (56% versus 31%; P<0.05). Because the prevalence of obesity in the studied population was similar to Center for Disease Control published data for obesity in all girls and the prevalence of increased BP is approximately twice that of the general population, the Turner syndrome phenotype/genotype probably includes an intrinsic risk for hypertension. Obesity and repaired aortic coarctation increase this risk further. There seems to be a BP awareness gap in girls with Turner syndrome. Because girls living with Turner syndrome are a sensitized population for hypertension, further study may provide clues to genetic factors leading to a better understanding of essential hypertension in the general population.

  13. Pilot Study of Blood Pressure in Girls With Turner Syndrome: An Awareness Gap, Clinical Associations, and New Hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Los, Evan; Quezada, Emilio; Chen, Zunqiu; Lapidus, Jodi; Silberbach, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major factor that reduces lifespan in Turner syndrome. High blood pressure (BP) is common in Turner syndrome and is the most easily treatable cardiovascular risk factor. We studied the prevalence of elevated screening systemic BP, awareness of the problem, and its clinical associations in a large group of girls attending the annual meeting of the Turner Syndrome Society of the United States. Among 168 girls aged 2 to 17 years, 42% had elevated screening BP (systolic and diastolic), yet only 8% reported a previous diagnosis of hypertension. History of aortic coarctation repair (17%) was positively associated with elevated systolic BP (52% versus 32%; P<0.05). Elevated systolic BP was positively associated with obesity (56% versus 31%; P<0.05). Because the prevalence of obesity in the studied population was similar to Center for Disease Control published data for obesity in all girls and the prevalence of increased BP is approximately twice that of the general population, the Turner syndrome phenotype/genotype probably includes an intrinsic risk for hypertension. Obesity and repaired aortic coarctation increase this risk further. There seems to be a BP awareness gap in girls with Turner syndrome. Because girls living with Turner syndrome are a sensitized population for hypertension, further study may provide clues to genetic factors leading to a better understanding of essential hypertension in the general population. PMID:27217413

  14. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives.

  15. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27672470

  16. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27672470

  17. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  18. Acromegaly accompanied by Turner syndrome with 47,XXX/45,X/46,XX mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masanori; Sato, Ai; Nishio, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Teiji; Miyamoto, Takahide; Katai, Miyuki; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman was hospitalized for examination of edematous laryngopharynx. She was acromegalic. A pituitary adenoma with elevated serum levels of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was detected, indicating acromegaly caused by GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. Multiple pigmented nevi were also noted without overt short stature and cubitus valgus. Chromosome analysis revealed that she had contracted Turner syndrome with 47,XXX/45,X/46,XX mosaicism. Transsphenoidal resection of the tumor decreased serum GH and IGF-I levels, but the edema was not improved. Both premature ovarian failure and hypertension appeared after surgery. This case may indicate the important relationships between GH/IGF-I and Turner syndrome.

  19. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  20. A pharmacogenomic approach to the treatment of children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P; Chatelain, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Ambler, G R; Belgorosky, A; Quinteiro, S; Deal, C; Stevens, A; Raelson, J; Croteau, P; Destenaves, B; Olivier, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective Individual sensitivity to recombinant human GH (r-hGH) is variable. Identification of genetic factors contributing to this variability has potential use for individualization of treatment. The objective of this study was to identify genetic markers and gene expression profiles associated with growth response on r-hGH therapy in treatment-naïve, prepubertal children with GH deficiency (GHD) or Turner syndrome (TS). Design A prospective, multicenter, international, open-label pharmacogenomic study. Methods The associations of genotypes in 103 growth- and metabolism-related genes and baseline gene expression profiles with growth response to r-hGH (cm/year) over the first year were evaluated. Genotype associations were assessed with growth response as a continuous variable and as a categorical variable divided into quartiles. Results Eleven genes in GHD and ten in TS, with two overlapping between conditions, were significantly associated with growth response either as a continuous variable (seven in GHD, two in TS) or as a categorical variable (four more in GHD, eight more in TS). For example, in GHD, GRB10 was associated with high response (≥Q3; P=0.0012), while SOS2 was associated with low response (≤Q1; P=0.006), while in TS, LHX4 was associated with high response (P=0.0003) and PTPN1 with low response (P=0.0037). Differences in expression were identified for one of the growth response-associated genes in GHD (AKT1) and for two in TS (KRAS and MYOD1). Conclusions Carriage of specific growth-related genetic markers is associated with growth response in GHD and TS. These findings indicate that pharmacogenomics could have a role in individualized management of childhood growth disorders. PMID:23761422

  1. Severe aortic regurgitation and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in a Turner syndrome patient

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kanhua; Li, Jun; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common sex chromosome diseases. Short stature (if untreated) and ovarian dysgenesis (streak ovary) are two typical clinical manifestations of these patients. A variety of cardiovascular abnormalities has been found associated with TS. We report a 29-year-old TS patient with severe aortic regurgitation, bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC). We discuss the diagnostic and surgical management of cardiovascular complications in TS patients. PMID:26716053

  2. Mechanisms of enhanced osteoclastogenesis in girls and young women with Turner's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Brunetti, Giacomina; Ventura, Annamaria; Piacente, Laura; Messina, Maria Francesca; De Luca, Filippo; Ciccarelli, Maria; Oranger, Angela; Mori, Giorgio; Natale, Maria Pia; Gigante, Margherita; Ranieri, Elena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Subjects with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism due to Turner's syndrome show low cortical mineral density, osteoporosis and risk of fractures. It is not clear if this bone fragility derives from chromosomal abnormalities or is the result of inadequate bone formation due to estrogen deficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying bone fragility in subjects with Turner's syndrome before induction of puberty and after hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). For this purpose, we have evaluated the osteoclastogenic potential of non-fractioned and T-cell depleted cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) belonging to girls with Turner's syndrome who had not been treated with HRT yet, girls and young women who were on HRT and age-matched controls. Untreated subjects showed high FSH serum levels, whereas the other subjects displayed normal FSH serum levels. T-cell immunophenotype was analyzed through flow cytometry. Biochemical and DXA analyses were performed. Spontaneous osteoclastogenesis in non-fractioned and T-cell depleted cultures of PBMC belonging to girls with high FSH levels was more evident than in cultures of subjects with normal FSH levels. In the former, osteoclastogenesis was sustained by monocytes expressing high levels of c-fms, TNF-α and RANK, and T-cells producing high RANKL and TNF-α; in the latter it was supported by T-cells expressing high RANKL levels. CD4(+)CD25(high) T-cells were reduced in all subjects, whereas CD3(+)/CD16(+)/CD56(+) NKT-cells were increased in those with high FSH levels. High RANKL and CTX levels were detected in the sera. Bone impairment was already detectable by DXA in subjects aged under 10, although it became more evident with aging. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that bone fragility in subjects with Turner's syndrome is associated to enhanced osteoclastogenesis. This process seems to be due to high FSH serum levels before HRT, whereas it is caused by high RANKL during

  3. AB155. Clinical presentation and its relationship with chromosomal abnormalities in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Bui Phuong; Dung, Vu Chi; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Hoan, Nguyen Thi; Phuong, Nguyen Thi

    2015-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is a relatively common chromosomal disorder. The disease affects only females, causing hypogonadism and short stature. Early treatment can improve short stature and hypogonadism. The study aims to describe chromosomal abnormalities, clinical characteristics and its relationship with chromosomal abnormalities in patients with Turner syndrome. Methods A total of 213 patients with Turner syndrome diagnosed in National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi. A cross section study was used. Results Mean age on diagnosis was 12.2±4.9 years. Monosomy 45,XO occupied 54,31%; 45,X/46,XX was seen in 14.66%; 27.59% had structural disorders of chromosome X. Short stature was found in all patients aged more than 15 years. Severity of short stature and percentage of patients with short stature went up with age. There was no difference in term of height between karyotype groups. In group aged ≥12 years, 95.2% of cases had hypogonadism. Other symptoms frequently seen were nail hypoplasia (77.4%), cubitus valgus (74.7%), broad chest (69.2%)/abnormalities in face and neck were epicanthic fold (55.6%), low posterior line (51.3%), excessive skin in the back of the neck/webbed neck (42.5%). In a group aged <1 year, lymphoedema of hands/feet, epicanthic fold, broad chest, cubitus valgus were found in 100%. Majority of symptoms, congenital defects of heart/kidney were seen more frequently in 45,X group. Conclusions Lymphoedema of hands/feet in infants, low growth velocity, delayed puberty, abnormalities in face and neck, and other symptoms should be checked to early diagnose and treat Turner syndrome. Patients with 45,X had more severe presentation compared to patients with 45,X/46,XX and structural abnormalities of X chromosome.

  4. The lymphatic phenotype in Turner syndrome: an evaluation of nineteen patients and literature review.

    PubMed

    Atton, Giles; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ostergaard, Pia; Mortimer, Peter; Mansour, Sahar

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex disorder caused by an absent or abnormal sex chromosome. It affects 1/2000-1/3000 live-born females. Congenital lymphoedema of the hands, feet and neck region (present in over 60% of patients) is a common and key diagnostic indicator, although is poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyse the medical records of a cohort of 19 Turner syndrome patients attending three specialist primary lymphoedema clinics, to elucidate the key features of the lymphatic phenotype and provide vital insights into its diagnosis, natural history and management. The majority of patients presented at birth with four-limb lymphoedema, which often resolved in early childhood, but frequently recurred in later life. The swelling was confined to the legs and hands with no facial or genital swelling. There was only one case of suspected systemic involvement (intestinal lymphangiectasia). The lymphoscintigraphy results suggest that the lymphatic phenotype of Turner syndrome may be due to a failure of initial lymphatic (capillary) function.

  5. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  6. The lymphatic phenotype in Turner Syndrome: an evaluation of nineteen patients and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Atton, Giles; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ostergaard, Pia; Mortimer, Peter; Mansour, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    Turner Syndrome is a complex disorder caused by an absent or abnormal sex chromosome. It affects 1/2000-1/3000 live-born females. Congenital lymphoedema of the hands, feet and neck region (present in over 60% of patients) is a common and key diagnostic indicator, though is poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyse the medical records of a cohort of 19 Turner Syndrome patients attending three specialist primary lymphoedema clinics, to elucidate the key features of the lymphatic phenotype and provide vital insights into its diagnosis, natural history and management. The majority of patients presented at birth with 4-limb lymphoedema, which often resolved in early childhood, but frequently recurred in later life. The swelling was confined to the legs and hands with no facial or genital swelling. There was only one case of suspected systemic involvement (intestinal lymphangiectasia). The lymphoscintigraphy results suggest that the lymphatic phenotype of Turner Syndrome may be due to a failure of initial lymphatic (capillary) function. PMID:25804399

  7. A case report of severe panhypopituitarism in a newborn delivered by a women with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Marta; Kiełbasa, Grzegorz; Wójcik, Małgorzata; Zygmunt-Górska, Agata; Starzyk, Jerzy B

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a congenital disease caused by absence or structural abnormalities of sex chromosomes resulting in gonadal dysgenesis. Spontaneous pregnancies occur in 2-8% of patients, especially with mosaic kariotypes, however they are associated with increased risk of poor outcome both for mother and fetus. We report a 4-day-old male infant delivered by women with mosaic TS who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit and presented with severe panhypopituitarism as the early manifestation of pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of severe panhypopituitarism in a newborn borne by women with TS. PMID:26921572

  8. [Lichen ruber planus--lupus erythematosus/overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stary, A; Schwarz, T; Duschet, P; Gschnait, F

    1987-03-01

    Lichen planus/lupus erythematosus/overlap syndrome (OS) comprises those dermatoses which show the clinical, histologic, and immunopathologic characteristics of both diseases. On account of this heterogeneity, the diagnosis of OS may be difficult. About 35 cases have been reported on in the literature so far. We are going to discuss the clinical, histologic, and immunofluorescence findings in OS in detail.

  9. Risk of solid tumors and hematological malignancy in persons with Turner and Klinefelter syndromes: A national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianguang; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2016-08-15

    The risk of solid and hematological malignancy in patients with Turner syndrome, characterized by X chromosome monosomy in women, and Klinefelter syndrome, characterized with two and more X chromosomes in men, is not well established, but such evidence may have etiological implications on cancer development. We identified a total of 1,409 women with Turner syndrome and 1,085 men with Klinefelter syndrome from the Swedish Hospital Discharge and Outpatient Register. These individuals were further linked to the Swedish Cancer Register to examine the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer using the general population without Turner and Klinefelter syndromes as reference. The overall risk of cancer was 1.34 for women with Turner syndrome; it was increased only for solid tumors. For a specific type of tumor, the risk of melanoma and central nervous system tumor was significantly increased. For persons with Klinefelter syndrome, the risk of solid tumors was decreased (SIR = 0.66), whereas the risk of hematological malignancy was increased (SIR = 2.72). Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia showed an increased SIR of 3.02 and 3.62, respectively. Our study supported the hypothesis that X chromosome plays an important role in the etiology of solid tumors. The underlying mechanisms for the increased incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and leukemia in persons with Klinefelter syndrome need to be investigated further.

  10. Cornelia de Lange syndrome with NIPBL mutation and mosaic Turner syndrome in the same individual

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism, growth and cognitive impairment, limb malformations and multiple organ involvement. Mutations in NIPBL gene account for about 60% of patients with CdLS. This gene encodes a key regulator of the Cohesin complex, which controls sister chromatid segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. Turner syndrome (TS) results from the partial or complete absence of one of the X chromosomes, usually associated with congenital lymphedema, short stature, and gonadal dysgenesis. Case presentation Here we report a four-year-old female with CdLS due to a frameshift mutation in the NIPBL gene (c.1445_1448delGAGA), who also had a tissue-specific mosaic 45,X/46,XX karyotype. The patient showed a severe form of CdLS with craniofacial dysmorphism, pre- and post-natal growth delay, cardiovascular abnormalities, hirsutism and severe psychomotor retardation with behavioural problems. She also presented with minor clinical features consistent with TS, including peripheral lymphedema and webbed neck. The NIPBL mutation was present in the two tissues analysed from different embryonic origins (peripheral blood lymphocytes and oral mucosa epithelial cells). However, the percentage of cells with monosomy X was low and variable in tissues. These findings indicate that, ontogenically, the NIPBL mutation may have appeared before the mosaic monosomy X. Conclusions The coexistence in several patients of these two rare disorders raises the issue of whether there is indeed a cause-effect association. The detailed clinical descriptions indicate predominant CdLS phenotype, although additional TS manifestations may appear in adolescence. PMID:22676896

  11. Cryptic mosaicism involving a second chromosome X in patients with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araújo, A; Ramos, E S

    2008-05-01

    The high abortion rate of 45,X embryos indicates that patients with Turner syndrome and 45,X karyotype could be mosaics, in at least one phase of embryo development or cellular lineage, due to the need for the other sex chromosome presence for conceptus to be compatible with life. In cases of structural chromosomal aberrations or hidden mosaicism, conventional cytogenetic techniques can be ineffective and molecular investigation is indicated. Two hundred and fifty patients with Turner syndrome stigmata were studied and 36 who had female genitalia and had been cytogenetically diagnosed as having "pure" 45,X karyotype were selected after 100 metaphases were analyzed in order to exclude mosaicism and the presence of genomic Y-specific sequences (SRY, TSPY, and DAZ) was excluded by PCR. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and screened by the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. The HUMARA gene has a polymorphic CAG repeat and, in the presence of a second chromosome with a different HUMARA allele, a second band will be amplified by PCR. Additionally, the CAG repeats contain two methylation-sensitive HpaII enzyme restriction sites, which can be used to verify skewed inactivation. Twenty-five percent (9/36) of the cases showed a cryptic mosaicism involving a second X and approximately 14% (5/36), or 55% (5/9) of the patients with cryptic mosaicism, also presented skewed inactivation. The laboratory identification of the second X chromosome and its inactivation pattern are important for the clinical management (hormone replacement therapy, and inclusion in an oocyte donation program) and prognostic counseling of patients with Turner syndrome.

  12. Complexity in the diagnosis and management of 45,X Turner Syndrome mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Andrew C; Sauder, Christina; Rehm, Jennifer L; McKenna, Patrick H

    2014-10-01

    Diagnosis, decision making, and counseling for patients with disorders of sexual development pose challenges for physicians and families. Accurate antenatal evaluation combined with effective communication between the family and multidisciplinary team is important to provide the best patient outcome. We reviewed 2 cases from our institution that illustrate the complexity of antenatal and postnatal management in Turner Syndrome patients who have 45,X mosaicism. We concluded that because of the complexity involved in providing appropriate care to these individuals, it is critical that accurate and universally accessible counseling materials are available to providers and families at the time of diagnosis and management decision making.

  13. Genomic-based nursing care for women with Turner Syndrome: genomic-based nursing care.

    PubMed

    Flória-Santos, Milena; Ramos, Ester Silveira

    2006-01-01

    Biologic and technologic advances generated from The Human Genome Project are having a dramatic impact on the expanding role of nurses in current health care practice. New genetic research needs to be transformed rapidly into clinical protocols with recommendations for delivering care to targeted populations. Nurses can contribute significantly, as part of an interdisciplinary approach, to translate genome-based knowledge into benefits for health care and society. In this context, we describe a clinical-genetic investigation protocol, as well nursing diagnosis, interventions and outcomes for clients with Turner Syndrome (TS) at risk for develop gonadal tumors, due the presence of a normal or abnormal Y chromosome.

  14. Major depressive disorder in an adolescent with Turner syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shujiong; Sun, Liying; Li, Rong; Zhao, Zhengyan; Yang, Rongwang

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal abnormality, of which the presence and impact of coexisting psychiatric morbidity has received little attention. The present report describes an adolescent with mosaic karyotype TS who had major depressive disorder with the predisposing cause of psychosocial burden, and relieved with the treatment of sertraline and complete remission with combined use of estradiol valerate. The report suggests us to pay more attention on the mood disorders in children with TS, especially in adolescents. For treatment aspect, medications for improving the puberty development and short stature should be added to in addition to antidepressants if they had mood disorders.

  15. Unreliability of aortic size index to predict risk of aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nijs, Jan; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Maessen, Jos G; Meir, Mark La

    2014-01-01

    Aortic size index (ASI) has been proposed as a reliable criterion to predict risk for aortic dissection in Turner syndrome with significant thresholds of 20-25 mm/m2. We report a case of aortic arch dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome who, from the ASI thresholds proposed, was deemed to be at low risk of aortic dissection or rupture and was not eligible for prophylactic surgery. This case report strongly supports careful monitoring and surgical evaluation even when the ASI is < 20 mm/m2 if other significant risk factors are present. PMID:24944765

  16. Bilateral coxitis in scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Berrada, Khadija; Abourazzak, Fatima Ezzahra; Houssaini, Ghita Sqalli; Kadi, Nadira; Tahiri, Latifa; Amrani, Kawthar; Khammar, Zineb; Lahlou, Meriam; Berrady, Rhizlane; Rabhi, Samira; Tizniti, Siham; Bono, Wafaa; Harzy, Taoufik

    2014-01-01

    Joint manifestations in scleroderma (Scl) and polymyositis (PM) are dominated by inflammatory arthralgia. Arthritis is less common and preferentially affects the hands, wrists, knees, and ankles. Involvement of the hip has been rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of coxitis diagnosed in a patient suffering from scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome successfully treated by ultrasound-guided infiltration of triamcinolone hexacetonide PMID:27708891

  17. The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-asthma overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braman, Sidney S

    2015-01-01

    When asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occur together the term COPD-asthma overlap syndrome has been applied. To date, there is no universally accepted definition of this overlap syndrome, just as there is no blood test or other technologic assessment that provides a simple way to distinguish asthma from COPD. One practical approach to the overlap diagnosis has been to include patients with a diagnosis of COPD by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria and asthma defined by subject report of a physician diagnosis of asthma before the age of 40 years. Alternatively, it includes patients who meet criteria for COPD (fixed airflow obstruction) and who also have typical features of asthma (wheezing, atopy, eosinophilia, and positive bronchodilator response on spirometry). Compared with patients with COPD alone, the overlap patients are younger with less smoking intensity, have higher health-care utilization, have a worse disease-related quality of life, and have a higher mortality. Treatment with corticosteroids earlier in the course of the disease compared with the patient with only COPD has been recommended.

  18. [Frequency of prevalence of Turner syndrome in fetuses of patients referred to genetic amniocentesis in 2007-2011].

    PubMed

    Chuchracki, Marek; Szczepaniak, Aleksandra; Sedziak, Anna; Ziółkowska, Katarzyna; Opala, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic diseases caused by an aberration of sex chromosomes. It is conditioned by structural and/or quantitative aberration of one of the two X chromosomes, with frequent presence of mosaicism in cells. Since there are a few types of the syndrome, its diagnosis is often difficult and, as a consequence, a lot of people live without knowing of their disease. It is only during puberty that symptoms occur, or when full maturity begins it possible to diagnose the disease and start treatment. Genetic amniocentesis is a method thanks to which a material for cytogenetic test is obtained. The method involves puncturing amniotic sac and aspiration of fluid under the control of ultrasound for diagnostic purposes. Microscopic analysis of the chromosomes makes it possible to recognize aberration of one chromosome X which indicates Tuner syndrome phenotype. The objective of the study was the analysis of the frequency of prevalence of Turner syndrome in the patients' fetuses referred for genetic amniocentesis in 2007-2011. The most frequent cause of Turner syndrome in girls is missing one of two chromosomes X. the analysis shows that in 1815 tests Turner syndrome was confirmed in 46 cases which constitutes 2.5%. It is mostly young women, aged 25-29 that are at risk of having a child with this aberration. Indications which were later confirmed by the cases of fetuses with this syndrome included fetal hydrops, cystic hygroma and abnormalities in ultrasound image. In case of indications such as genetic defects in the family, incorrect result of triple test are not confirmed by Turner syndrome. PMID:23421081

  19. Severe hemophilia in a girl infant with mosaic Turner syndrome and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Bazrafshan, Asghar; Moghadam, Mohamad; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-04-01

    A 6-month-old girl was referred by an ophthalmologist because of postoperative bleeding. She was scheduled for operation because of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Workups were done and prolonged partial thromboplastin time with normal platelet count, normal bleeding time, and prothrombin time were detected. There was negative family history of bleeding tendency in both maternal and paternal family, so at the first step, Factor XI assay was requested which was normal. Then, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII were assayed which was 127% and less than 1%, respectively. Severe factor VIII deficiency was not suspected in a girl unless in siblings of a hemophilic patient who gets married with her carrier cousin. Chromosomal study and genetic testing were requested and mosaic Turner syndrome (45 XO) with ring X (p22, 2q13) along with inversion 22 (hemizygote) was detected. Abdominal and pelvic sonography showed absence of both ovaries with presence of infantile uterus. Maternal genetic study was in favor of carrier of hemophilia (heterozygote inversion 22). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of association of Turner syndrome with severe hemophilia A and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  20. Genotype, phenotype, and karyotype correlation in the XO mouse model of Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Probst, Frank J; Cooper, Mitchell Lance; Cheung, Sau Wai; Justice, Monica J

    2008-01-01

    The murine model for Turner Syndrome is the XO mouse. Unlike their human counterparts, XO mice are typically fertile, and their lack of a second sex chromosome can be transmitted from one generation to the next as an X-linked dominant trait with male lethality. The introduction of an X-linked coat-color marker (tabby) has greatly facilitated the maintenance of this useful mouse strain. XO mice can be produced in large numbers, generation after generation, and rapidly identified on the basis of their sex and coat color. Although this breeding scheme appears to be effective at the phenotype level, its utility has never been conclusively proved at the molecular or cytogenetic levels. Here, we clone and sequence the tabby deletion break point and present a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based assay for the tabby mutation. By combining the results of this assay with whole-chromosome painting data, we demonstrate that genotype, phenotype, and karyotype all show perfect correlation in the publicly available XO breeding stock. This work lays the foundation for the use of this strain to study Turner Syndrome in particular and the X chromosome in general. PMID:18499648

  1. Frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche in Turner syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Kohno, Hitoshi; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The Growject® database on human GH treatment in Turner syndrome was analyzed in the Turner Syndrome Research Collaboration, and the relationships of the frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche with karyotype and GH treatment were investigated. One hundred and three cases started GH treatment with 0.5 IU/kg/ week (0.5 IU group), and their dose was increased to 0.35 mg/kg/wk midway through the treatment course. Another 109 cases started GH at a dose of 0.35 mg/kg/wk (0.35 mg group). Spontaneous breast development was observed in 77 (36.3%) of the 212 patients, and spontaneous menarche occurred in 31 patients (14.6%). The frequency of spontaneous breast development was significantly lower in patients with the 45,X karyotype and significantly higher in patients with a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome. The frequency of spontaneous menarche was significantly higher in patients with mosaicism characterized by X monosomy and a cellular line with no structural abnormality of the X chromosome. No significant differences in frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche were observed between the two dose groups, indicating that GH treatment does not increase the frequency of spontaneous puberty.

  2. Abnormal Methylation Status of the GNAS Exon 1A Region in Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism Combined With Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Dong; Ren, An; Xing, Yan; Zhang, Dongliang; Wei, Jun; Yu, Ning; Xing, Xuenong; Ye, Shandong

    2015-12-01

    Pseudohypohyperparathyroidism (PHHP) is a rare type of pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP), which seems to have a normal skeletal response to parathyroid hormone but shows renal resistance. Almost all patients with PHHP have PHP Ib, a subtype of PHP that is usually caused by GNAS methylation defects, often in exon 1A. Some features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy can occasionally be found in patients with PHHP, but these features are also common in Turner syndrome. The authors report on an extremely rare case of a patient with PHHP and Turner syndrome, a 47-year-old woman who sought medical attention for hypocalcemia and elevated parathyroid hormone. She had no family history of hypocalcemia and no STX16 gene deletions. She had a mosaic karyotype of 46, X, del(X)(p11.4)/45, XO. Pyrosequencing was performed to determine the GNAS exon 1A methylation. The degree of methylation found in exon 1A of the patient was lower than her unaffected relatives. PMID:26488942

  3. Favorable Impact of Growth Hormone Treatment on Cholesterol Levels in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujieda, Kenji; Fujita, Keinosuke; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu; Yorifuji, Toru; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients with Turner syndrome (TS) are prone to having metabolic abnormalities, such as obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus, resulting in increased risks of developing atherosclerotic diseases. Objective: To determine the effect of growth hormone (GH) therapy on serum cholesterol levels in prepubertal girls with TS enrolled in the Turner syndrome Research Collaboration (TRC) in Japan. Patients and methods: Eighty-one girls with TS were enrolled in the TRC, and their total cholesterol (TC) levels before GH therapy were compared with reported levels of healthy school-aged Japanese girls. TC levels after 1, 2 and 3 yr of GH treatment were available for 28 of the 81 patients with TS. GH was administered by daily subcutaneous injections, 6 or 7 times/wk, with a weekly dose of 0.35 mg/kg body weight. Results: Baseline TC levels revealed an age-related increase in TS that was in contrast to healthy girls showing unchanged levels. During GH therapy, TC decreased significantly after 1 yr of GH treatment and remained low thereafter. Conclusions: Girls with untreated TS showed an age-related increase in TC that was a striking contrast to healthy girls, who showed unchanged levels. GH therapy in girls with TS brought about a favorable change in TC that indicates the beneficial impact of GH on atherogenic risk. PMID:23926408

  4. Frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche in Turner syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Kohno, Hitoshi; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The Growject® database on human GH treatment in Turner syndrome was analyzed in the Turner Syndrome Research Collaboration, and the relationships of the frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche with karyotype and GH treatment were investigated. One hundred and three cases started GH treatment with 0.5 IU/kg/ week (0.5 IU group), and their dose was increased to 0.35 mg/kg/wk midway through the treatment course. Another 109 cases started GH at a dose of 0.35 mg/kg/wk (0.35 mg group). Spontaneous breast development was observed in 77 (36.3%) of the 212 patients, and spontaneous menarche occurred in 31 patients (14.6%). The frequency of spontaneous breast development was significantly lower in patients with the 45,X karyotype and significantly higher in patients with a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome. The frequency of spontaneous menarche was significantly higher in patients with mosaicism characterized by X monosomy and a cellular line with no structural abnormality of the X chromosome. No significant differences in frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche were observed between the two dose groups, indicating that GH treatment does not increase the frequency of spontaneous puberty. PMID:26568657

  5. Turner syndrome presented with tall stature due to overdosage of the SHOX gene

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Go Hun; Kang, Eungu; Cho, Ja Hyang; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal disorders. It is caused by numerical or structural abnormalities of the X chromosome and results in short stature and gonadal dysgenesis. The short stature arises from haploinsufficiency of the SHOX gene, whereas overdosage contributes to tall stature. This report describes the first Korean case of Turner syndrome with tall stature caused by SHOX overdosage. The patient presented with primary amenorrhea and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism at the age of 17 years. Estrogen replacement therapy was initiated at that time. She displayed tall stature from childhood, with normal growth velocity, and reached a final height of 190 cm (standard deviation score, 4.3) at the age of 30 years. Her karyotype was 46,X, psu idic(X)(q21.2), representing partial monosomy of Xq and partial trisomy of Xp. Analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a duplication at Xp22.3-Xp22.2, encompassing the PPP2R3 gene near the 5'-end of the SHOX gene through the FANCD gene at Xp22.2. PMID:26191517

  6. Primary leiomyosarcoma of a horseshoe kidney in a woman with Turner syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is characterized by complete or partial X-chromosome monosomy and has various clinical features, including horseshoe kidney. Leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare tumor that accounts for only 0.1% of all invasive renal tumors. Case presentation A 50-year-old Japanese woman presented at a community hospital with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a horseshoe kidney with a hypovascular tumor (size, 9 × 7 cm) showing calcification in the upper pole of the right kidney. Open right heminephrectomy and division of the isthmus were performed. Histological examination revealed alternating fascicles of spindle cells with blunt ended non-tapering nuclei and eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumor had high mitotic activity with a mitotic count of 8 mitoses/10 high-power fields. On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed the patient as having leiomyosarcoma. Conclusion Primary leiomyosarcoma of the horseshoe kidney in a patient with Turner syndrome is a very rare occurrence. PMID:25090932

  7. Frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche in Turner syndrome in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Kohno, Hitoshi; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The Growject® database on human GH treatment in Turner syndrome was analyzed in the Turner Syndrome Research Collaboration, and the relationships of the frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche with karyotype and GH treatment were investigated. One hundred and three cases started GH treatment with 0.5 IU/kg/ week (0.5 IU group), and their dose was increased to 0.35 mg/kg/wk midway through the treatment course. Another 109 cases started GH at a dose of 0.35 mg/kg/wk (0.35 mg group). Spontaneous breast development was observed in 77 (36.3%) of the 212 patients, and spontaneous menarche occurred in 31 patients (14.6%). The frequency of spontaneous breast development was significantly lower in patients with the 45,X karyotype and significantly higher in patients with a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome. The frequency of spontaneous menarche was significantly higher in patients with mosaicism characterized by X monosomy and a cellular line with no structural abnormality of the X chromosome. No significant differences in frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche were observed between the two dose groups, indicating that GH treatment does not increase the frequency of spontaneous puberty. PMID:26568657

  8. Simultaneous adrenocortical carcinoma and ganglioneuroblastoma in a child with Turner syndrome and germline p53 mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Pivnick, E K; Furman, W L; Velagaleti, G V; Jenkins, J J; Chase, N A; Ribeiro, R C

    1998-01-01

    The predisposition to malignancy that is dominantly inherited in Li-Fraumeni syndrome is associated with germline mutations of the tumour suppressor gene p53. Although second malignant neoplasms have been described in children with p53 mutations, the synchronous occurrence of two embryologically different tumours in these children has not been reported. A 20 month old girl with failure to thrive and congenital heart defects was found to have unilateral adrenal masses which, at surgical removal, proved to be an adrenocortical carcinoma and a ganglioneuroblastoma. Further investigation showed a germline p53 mutation and Turner syndrome. It remains to be determined what effect the 45,X chromosomal complement may have on the expression of neoplasms seen in patients with p53 germline mutations. Images PMID:9598730

  9. White matter microstructural abnormalities in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Fragile X or Turner syndrome as evidenced by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villalon, Julio; Jahanshad, Neda; Beaton, Elliott; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Children with chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), or Turner Syndrome (TS) are considered to belong to distinct genetic groups, as each disorder is caused by separate genetic alterations. Even so, they have similar cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, particularly in visuospatial and numerical abilities. To assess evidence for common underlying neural microstructural alterations, we set out to determine whether these groups have partially overlapping white matter abnormalities, relative to typically developing controls. We scanned 101 female children between 7 and 14 years old: 25 with 22q11.2DS, 18 with FXS, 17 with TS, and 41 aged-matched controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Anisotropy and diffusivity measures were calculated and all brain scans were nonlinearly aligned to population and site-specific templates. We performed voxel-based statistical comparisons of the DTI-derived metrics between each disease group and the controls, while adjusting for age. Girls with 22q11.2DS showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) than controls in the association fibers of the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the corticospinal tract. FA was abnormally lower in girls with FXS in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, posterior thalami, and precentral gyrus. Girls with TS had lower FA in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right internal capsule and left cerebellar peduncle. Partially overlapping neurodevelopmental anomalies were detected in all three neurogenetic disorders. Altered white matter integrity in the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and thalamic to frontal tracts may contribute to the behavioral characteristics of all of these disorders. PMID:23602925

  10. Cleft posterior mitral valve leaflet in an adult with Turner syndrome diagnosed with the use of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Negrea, Stefania Luminita; Alexandrescu, Clara; Sabatier, Michel; Dreyfus, Gilles D

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a monosomy (45,X karyotype) in which the prevalence of cardiovascular anomalies is high. However, this aspect of Turner syndrome has received little attention outside of the pediatric medical literature, and the entire spectrum of cardiovascular conditions in adults remains unknown. We present the case of a 34-year-old woman who had Turner syndrome. When she was a teenager, her native bicuspid aortic valve was replaced with a mechanical prosthesis. Fifteen years later, during preoperative examination for prosthesis-patient mismatch, severe mitral regurgitation was detected, and a congenital cleft in the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve was diagnosed with use of 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. The patient underwent concurrent mitral valve repair and aortic valve replacement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cleft in the posterior mitral valve leaflet as a cardiovascular defect observed in Turner syndrome, and the first such instance to have been diagnosed with the use of 3-dimensional echocardiography.

  11. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed.

  12. Nevus comedonicus in oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1: a new finding or overlapping syndromes?

    PubMed

    Baker, Lauren A; Agim, Nnenna G

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFDS1) who exhibited features overlapping those of nevus comedonicus syndrome, an unusual presentation that may potentially represent a new variant of OFDS1. OFDS1 and nevus comedonicus syndrome represent two rare syndromes with numerous overlapping features that have yet to be described in relation to one another. The features present in our patient led us to propose the possibility of a new variant of OFDS1 in which nevus comedonicus represents a cutaneous manifestation of the syndrome. Knowledge of this potential relationship is important for identification and management of the syndromes' accompanying manifestations in affected patients and may offer further insight into crossroads of pathogenesis. PMID:24517846

  13. An unusual presentation of Kabuki syndrome: clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Judith M A; Oostdijk, Wilma; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Cecilia E J; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; van Bever, Yolande

    2014-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies, including short stature, peculiar facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, a variety of visceral malformations and abnormal dermatoglyphic patterns. We describe a case of Kabuki syndrome presenting with atypical features, consisting of bilateral microphthalmia, coloboma, anal atresia and panhypopituitarism, showing considerable phenotypic overlap with CHARGE syndrome. This report demonstrates that clinical follow-up and molecular genetic testing can be useful for establishing the correct diagnosis. PMID:24862881

  14. Prediction of aortic dilation in Turner syndrome - enhancing the use of serial cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of the subset females with Turner syndrome who face especially high risk of aortic dissection is difficult, and more optimal risk assessment is pivotal in order to improve outcomes. This study aimed to provide comprehensive, dynamic mathematical models of aortic disease in Turner syndrome by use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods A prospective framework of long-term aortic follow-up was used, which comprised diameters of the thoracic aorta prospectively assessed at nine positions by CMR at the three points in time (baseline [n = 102, age 38 ± 11 years], follow-up [after 2.4 ± 0.4 years, n = 80] and end-of-study [after 4.8 ± 0.5 years, n = 78]). Mathematical models were created that cohesively integrated all measurements at all positions, from all visits and for all participants, and using these models cohesive risk factor analyses were conducted based on which predictive modeling was performed on which predictive modelling was performed. Results The cohesive models showed that the variables with effect on aortic diameter were aortic coarctation (P < 0.0001), bicuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001), age (P < 0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.0008), body surface area (P = 0.015) and antihypertensive treatment (P = 0.005). Oestrogen replacement therapy had an effect of borderline significance (P = 0.08). From these data, mathematical models were created that enabled preemption of aortic dilation from CMR derived aortic diameters in scenarios both with and without known risk factors. The fit of the models to the actual data was good. Conclusion The presented cohesive model for prediction of aortic diameter in Turner syndrome could help identifying females with rapid growth of aortic diameter, and may enhance clinical decision-making based on serial CMR. PMID:23742092

  15. Detection of Turner Syndrome by quantitative PCR of SHOX and VAMP7 genes.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Ramírez, Marisol; Zamudio-Osuna, Michelle Jesús; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Gallardo-Blanco, Hugo Leonid; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo Martin; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo; Martínez-de-Villarreal, Laura Elia

    2015-02-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is an unfavorable genetic condition with a prevalence of 1:2500 in newborn girls. Prompt and effective diagnosis is very important to appropriately monitor the comorbidities. The aim of the present study was to propose a feasible and practical molecular diagnostic tool for newborn screening by quantifying the gene dosage of the SHOX, VAMP7, XIST, UBA1, and SRY genes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in individuals with a diagnosis of complete X monosomy, as well as those with TS variants, and then compare the results to controls without chromosomal abnormalities. According to our results, the most useful markers for these chromosomal variants were the genes found in the pseudoautosomic regions 1 and 2 (PAR1 and PAR2), because differences in gene dosage (relative quantification) between groups were more evident in SHOX and VAMP7 gene expression. Therefore, we conclude that these markers are useful for early detection in aneuploidies involving sex chromosomes.

  16. Why Treat girls with Turner Syndrome with Growth Hormone? Growth and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Ranke, Michael B

    2015-06-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a rare disorder, characterized by numerous signs and symptoms, which are also highly variable in their expression in individuals. The understanding of the genetic basis of the phenotype has advanced greatly during the past decades. The most consistent features, which negatively affect the quality of life in these individuals, are short stature and impaired gonadal function. After recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) became available and was shown to improve height, it was then approved and has been used widely. Yet it remains a challenge to decide on the optimal treatment modality for individuals with TS and to evaluate the benefits and risks also in terms of karyotype of GH on growth and on other organ systems. This article reviews some of the major aspects related to these issues.

  17. How do you monitor the patient with Turner's syndrome in adulthood?

    PubMed

    Conway, Gerard S; Band, Margaret; Doyle, Jacqueline; Davies, Melanie C

    2010-12-01

    Within endocrinology, the long-term management of Turner syndrome (TS) in adults is fast becoming a specialist subject in its own right. The complications of TS can affect every system in the body, and the main reason why it falls to endocrinologists to coordinate health care is that many features are clearly within the endocrine remit: hypothyroidism, diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, hypogonadism. Endocrinologists as general physicians can often cover surveillance of problems in other areas such as congenital heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease and deafness, calling upon specialist input only if the need arises. In this way, a simple 'one stop shop' can offer a well-woman service for women with TS in a cost-effective manner. Such a service requires a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:20718775

  18. Molecular analysis of genes on Xp controlling Turner syndrome and premature ovarian failure (POF).

    PubMed

    Zinn, A R; Ross, J L

    2001-06-01

    Monosomy X has been known to be the chromosomal basis of Turner syndrome (TS) for more than four decades. A large body of cytogenetic data indicates that most TS features are due to reduced dosage of genes on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp). Phenotype mapping studies using molecular cytogenetic and genetic techniques are beginning to localize the Xp genes that are important for various TS features, and a comprehensive catalog of candidate genes is becoming available through the Human Genome Project and related research. It is now possible to assess the contributions of individual genes to the TS phenotype by mutational analysis of karyotypically normal persons with specific TS features. This strategy has succeeded in identifying a gene involved in short stature and is being applied to premature ovarian failure and other TS phenotypes.

  19. A girl with increased writing and painting activities associated with Turner's syndrome and autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Ahouee, Shohreh Mohseni; Shooshtari, Mitra Hakim; Bidaki, Reza

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the findings on the evaluation of a 9-year-old girl with disabling and pronounced increased writing and painting activities associated with Turner's syndrome and autistic spectrum disorder. She spent most of the time doing these activities which affected not only her academic performance, but also social relationships. A comprehensive treatment plan consists of both biological and psychological aspects, is the main point of this case. Low dose of risperidone (0.5 mg/day) was started to decrease the patient's stereotypic behaviors. Sertraline (12.5 mg/day) was prescribed for her phobia. She was also referred to an occupational therapist in order to improve her social skills.

  20. Increased frequency of HLA B17 antigen in girls with Turner syndrome and their fathers.

    PubMed

    Dacou-Voutetakis, C; Georgopoulos, N; Pappa, H; Vlachos, K; Tarassi, K; Chryssovergi, D; Papasteriades, C

    1993-12-01

    HLA-A, -B and -DR antigen distribution was studied in 49 girls with Turner Syndrome (TS), in 43 of their parents, as well as in 433 controls. No increased frequency of DR3, DR4 was found in our group. However, an increased frequency of HLA B17 antigen was disclosed (18.3% in TS versus 6.4% in the controls, p < 0.001 and pc < 0.01). Furthermore, the HLA B17 antigen was of paternal origin in 77.7% of the cases. The interpretation of the present findings is quite difficult. Most likely, the findings are related to the chromosomal abnormality rather than to autoimmunity. It is quite possible that genes within the region of class I genes create unfavorable circumstances leading to the loss of the sex chromosome or, alternatively, genes in this region confer protection and prevent miscarriage of the affected fetus.

  1. PTU-associated vasculitis in a girl with Turner Syndrome and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Olga T; Smolinski, Kara N; Yan, Albert C; Grimberg, Adda

    2006-01-01

    Palpable purpura is a concerning clinical finding in pediatric patients and can have many causes, including infectious and autoimmune processes. A rare cause, drug-induced vasculitis, may result from the production of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) in response to a medication. We report a girl with Turner syndrome and Graves' disease who presented with palpable purpuric lesions. The diagnosis of propylthiouracil (PTU)-associated vasculitis was made by observation of consistent clinical features, the detection of elevated ANA and ANCA in the blood, and the observed clinical resolution of symptoms following withdrawal of PTU. Subsequent treatment of persistent hyperthyroidism with radioablation did not result in an exacerbation of the vasculitis, a complication described in prior case reports.

  2. Why Treat girls with Turner Syndrome with Growth Hormone? Growth and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Ranke, Michael B

    2015-06-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a rare disorder, characterized by numerous signs and symptoms, which are also highly variable in their expression in individuals. The understanding of the genetic basis of the phenotype has advanced greatly during the past decades. The most consistent features, which negatively affect the quality of life in these individuals, are short stature and impaired gonadal function. After recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) became available and was shown to improve height, it was then approved and has been used widely. Yet it remains a challenge to decide on the optimal treatment modality for individuals with TS and to evaluate the benefits and risks also in terms of karyotype of GH on growth and on other organ systems. This article reviews some of the major aspects related to these issues. PMID:26182480

  3. PARSONAGE-TURNER SYNDROME: CASE REPORT OF A HIV-SEROPOSITIVE PATIENT

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Saulo Gomes de; Pombo, Eduardo Hosken; Batista, Priscila Rossi de; Cardoso, Igor Machado; Rezende, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Parsonage-Turner Syndrome is a rare disease that affects the musculature of the scapular girdle, leading to muscle atrophy and large motor deficit. The etiology is uncertain, but it is believed that infectious and autoimmune factors are involved. The diagnosis is made by exclusion, and the main differential diagnoses are cervical disc hernias, rotator cuff injuries and rheumatic diseases. During diagnostic investigations, we perform laboratory tests, radiographs and MRI on the shoulders and cervical spine, with emphasis on electroneuromyography to help in making a definitive diagnosis. This case report is presented because it shows a disease that is rarely associated with HIV seropositivity and the importance of early diagnosis for better treatment of these patients. PMID:27022580

  4. Pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor in Turner syndrome: How a tumor bends to a genetic disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, Marco; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Merante-Boschin, Isabella; Fassan, Matteo; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Rugge, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) are uncommon tumors of the pancreatic corpus/tail occurring mostly in middle-aged women, with a variable clinico-biological behavior. On histology, MCNs concurrently show an epithelial mucosecreting component with ovarian-type stromal cells. PRESENTATION OF CASE This report describes the first case of a pancreatic MCN with no ovarian-type stroma in a patient with Turner syndrome (TS). DISCUSSION The mesenchymal component of MCN presumably results from the intra-pancreatic entrapment of ovarian stroma during embryogenesis. In our case, the absence of such stromal component may relate to the “dysgenetic” changes in the ovary involved in TS. CONCLUSION The present case of primary pancreatic MCN arising in a TS-patient triggers some original speculation on the morphogenesis of pancreatic MCN, also expanding the current clinico-pathological knowledge of this extremely rare entity. PMID:24096346

  5. Small intestinal tubular adenoma in a pediatric patient with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Ying; Chen, Lian; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kui-Ran

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a female chromosomal disorder caused by the lack of an X chromosome. The loss of this chromosome may result in the deficiency of tumor-suppressive or DNA repair genes, leading to tumorigenesis. Recombinant human growth hormone (GH) has been popularly used for treatment in TS patients for growth promotion. Although treatment with GH has been correlated with precancerous and cancerous lesions in TS children, its associations with gastric or colonic tumors, especially ileal tubular adenomas, have not been reported frequently. We here report a case of a 16-year-old patient with TS and tubular adenoma of the small intestine. Whether the ileal adenoma was caused by TS itself or GH therapy was discussed. PMID:23599636

  6. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-yearold woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries. PMID:26131874

  7. A Case of Turner Syndrome with Concomitant Transient Hypogammaglobulinaemia of Infancy and Central Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Hüseyin Anıl; Özkan, Behzat; Hazan, Filiz; Büyükinan, Muammer; Çelik, Tanju

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder that affects development in females and is characterized by the complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome, or monosomy X. TS is associated with abnormalities in lymphatic and skeletal development, in growth, and in gonadal function. Cardiac and renal malformations and a number of specific cognitive findings may also be encountered in these patients. An increased risk for hypothyroidism, sensorineural hearing loss, hypertension, and other problems has also been reported. We present the case of a patient with TS accompanied by transient hypogammaglobulinaemia of infancy (THI) and central diabetes insipidus, which we believe is the first reported TS patient with these concomitant disorders. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419422

  8. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with questions about grants, contracts & research areas Training, Education & Career Development Support for Training at Universities & Other Institutions Extramural training, fellowships & career development opportunities Training at ...

  9. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure Diabetes Thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) Widening of the aorta and narrowing of the aortic valve Cataracts Obesity Other issues may include: Weight management Exercise Transition to adulthood Stress and depression over changes

  10. Delayed β-cell response and glucose intolerance in young women with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate glucose homeostasis in detail in Turner syndrome (TS), where impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes are frequent. Methods Cross sectional study of women with Turner syndrome (TS)(n = 13) and age and body mass index matched controls (C) (n = 13), evaluated by glucose tolerance (oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (OGTT and IVGTT)), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp), beta-cell function (hyperglycaemic clamp, arginine and GLP-1 stimulation) and insulin pulsatility. Results Fasting glucose and insulin levels were similar. Higher glucose responses was seen in TS during OGTT and IVGTT, persisting after correction for body weight or muscle mass, while insulin responses were similar in TS and C, despite the higher glucose level in TS, leading to an insufficient increase in insulin response during dynamic testing. Insulin sensitivity was comparable in the two groups (TS vs. control: 8.6 ± 1.8 vs. 8.9 ± 1.8 mg/kg*30 min; p = 0.6), and the insulin responses to dynamic β-cell function tests were similar. Insulin secretion patterns examined by deconvolution analysis, approximate entropy, spectral analysis and autocorrelation analysis were similar. In addition we found low IGF-I, higher levels of cortisol and norepinephrine and an increased waist-hip ratio in TS. Conclusions Young normal weight TS women show significant glucose intolerance in spite of normal insulin secretion during hyperglycaemic clamping and normal insulin sensitivity. We recommend regularly testing for diabetes in TS. Trial Registration Registered with http://clinicaltrials.com, ID nr: NCT00419107 PMID:21406078

  11. Reference values for body proportions and body composition in adult women with Ullrich-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gravholt, C H; Weis Naeraa, R

    1997-11-12

    This cross sectional study was undertaken to establish reference values for adult women with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) verified cytogenetically by blood karyotyping and not treated with growth hormone during childhood and adolescence, with respect to anthropometric and body composition measurements, for future evaluations of growth promoting therapy. All members of the Danish Turner Association were invited, and 79 women with UTS participated. Forty-two had the 45,X karyotype and the other 37 had different karyotypes. Outcome measures were height, sitting height, arm span, length of hand and foot, biacromial and biiliac diameter, and hip, waist, and head circumference. Bioelectrical impedance was performed, and total body water, lean body mass, and fat mass were calculated. Results give a very distinct anthropometric picture of adult women with the UTS, with a mean height of 146.8+/-6.7 cm (mean+/-SD), sitting height of 78.6+/-3.6 cm, arm span measurements of 147.9+/-7.1 cm, being between 3 and 4 standard deviation scores (SDS) below average; with a mean hand length of 17.0+/-1.1 cm and foot length of 22.4+/-1.2 cm, being around 1.5 SDS below average; a mean weight of 56.3+/-12.8 kg, head circumference of 55.3+/-2.0 cm and biacromial diameter of 36.5+/-2.0 cm, being around 0 SDS; and finally, biiliacal diameter of 29.5+/-2.2 cm, being 1.4 SDS above average. The average body mass index (BMI) in the study was 26.3+/-5.3 kg/m2. As a group, females with UTS are overweight when compared with a group of "normal" women, with a higher fat mass, a lower lean body mass, but with a comparable amount of total body water (in %). This study presents the first comprehensive reference data on body proportions in the adult UTS. It shows that adult women with the Ullrich-Turner syndrome has a characteristic anthropometric shape. The data should be of use for future evaluations of growth hormone treatment or other growth promoting therapy in the UTS on anthropometric and body

  12. Alexithymia, emotion perception, and social assertiveness in adult women with Noonan and Turner syndromes.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Renée L; Wingbermühle, Ellen; Freriks, Kim; Verhaak, Chris M; Kessels, Roy P C; Egger, Jos I M

    2015-04-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and Turner syndrome (TS) are associated with cognitive problems and difficulties in affective information processing. While both phenotypes include short stature, facial dysmorphisms, and a webbed neck, genetic etiology and neuropsychological phenotype differ significantly. The present study examines putative differences in affective information processing and social assertiveness between adult women with NS and TS. Twenty-six women with NS, 40 women with TS, and 40 female controls were matched on age and intelligence, and subsequently compared on (1) alexithymia, measured by the Bermond-Vorst Alexithymia Questionnaire, (2) emotion perception, evaluated by the Emotion Recognition Task, and (3) social assertiveness and social discomfort, assessed by the Scale for Interpersonal Behavior. Women with TS showed higher levels of alexithymia than women with NS and controls (P-values < 0.001), whereas women with NS had more trouble recognizing angry facial expressions in comparison with controls (P = 0.01). No significant group differences were found for the frequency of social assertiveness and the level of social discomfort. Women with NS and TS demonstrated different patterns of impairment in affective information processing, in terms of alexithymia and emotion perception. The present findings suggest neuropsychological phenotyping to be helpful for the diagnosis of specific cognitive-affective deficits in genetic syndromes, for the enhancement of genetic counseling, and for the development of personalized treatment plans. PMID:25711203

  13. An Overlapping Syndrome of Allergy and Immune Deficiency in Children

    PubMed Central

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent airway inflammations in children are an important clinical problem in pediatric practice. An essential challenge is differentiation between allergic background and immune deficiency, which is a difficult task taking into consideration individual predisposition to atopy, immune system maturation in the early childhood, as well as exposition to environmental allergens and microbial antigens. In this paper relationship between selected elements of innate and adaptive immunity, such as pattern-recognition receptors, complement components, dendritic cells, as well as immunoglobulins, and regulatory T lymph cells has been discussed. Particular attention has been paid to these mechanisms of the immune response which, depending on settings and timing of activation, predispose to allergy or contribute to tolerogenic phenotype. In the context of multifactorial conditioning of the innate and adaptive immunity governing the ultimate response and associations between allergy and immune deficiencies, these phenomena should be considered as pathogenetically not precluding, but as an overlapping syndrome. PMID:21918651

  14. Metolazone Associated Stevens Johnson Syndrome-Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ajay; Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Tandon, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) are severe mucocutaneous disease with high mortality rate. It is characterised by severe necrosis and detachment of the epidermis. Drugs are the most common triggering agent for SJS/TEN. These are commonly reported with the use of aromatic antiepileptics, antiretrovirals, allopurinol, NSAID’S and sulfonamide antibiotics. Non antibiotic sulfonamides rarely cause SJS/TEN. Metolazone is a well known diuretic and is extensively used by clinicians. Although this drug is in market for last several decades, no case of SJS/TEN has been reported till date. We report a rare case of metolazone induced SJS/TEN overlap in a 55-year-old lady. PMID:27134890

  15. Voriconazole-induced periostitis in a patient with overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Keisho; Yasoda, Akihiro; Fujii, Toshihito; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-03-05

    A 52-year-old woman with overlap syndrome and interstitial pneumonia underwent immunosuppressive therapy and she was suspected to suffer from pulmonary aspergillosis. Oral voriconazole was initiated, and a rapid elevation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) occurred after 4 weeks. After 2 months, the patient presented diffuse pain in bilateral skeletal regions, and bone scintigraphy revealed bilateral multiple areas of increased radiotracer uptake. We suspected the skeletal involvement as voriconazole-induced periostitis. Actually, the plasma fluoride level was increased. Voriconazole was replaced with itraconazole, and after 3 weeks, the patient stopped complaining of bone pain concomitant with the decrease in ALP. Voriconazole-induced periostitis is a rare condition but had previously been reported in solid organ or patients with bone marrow transplant who received a long-term voriconazole therapy. Our present case is distinctive of previous ones, because it occurred in a patient with connective tissue disease which had its rapid progression.

  16. Analysis of airway resistance and hypoxemia in overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Yao, Lusu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize overlap syndrome, investigate its impact on airflow limitation and blood oxygen condition, and detect the risk factors that affect its airway resistance. Methods: We reviewed retrospectively the clinical data of 158 patients with overlap syndrome (OS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), treated in the Critical Care Medicine Department of the People’s Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng, China from May 2014 to March 2015. The lowest and average oxyhemoglobin saturation were measured using polysomnography. The pulmonary functions were tested using the cardiopulmonary measuring instruments, and the viscous resistance at oscillation frequencies of 5, 10, 15, 20 Hz was measured using the impulse oscillation system for all the patients. Results: The values of forced expiratory volume (FEV)1/FVC, FEV1% predicted, and the lowest SaO2 in the OS group were significantly lower than those in the OSA (p<0.01, p<0.01, p=0.01), or the COPD group (p=0.03, p=0.02, p=0.03), but the value of viscous resistance at 5 Hz was significantly higher than that in the 2 groups (p<0.01). Old age, body mass index, and smoking history were significantly correlated with the viscous resistance in OS patients, at an oscillation frequency of 5Hz (p=0.03, p=0.04). Conclusion: The OS patients present with higher viscous resistance and more severe oxygen deficit, when compared with OSA and COPD patients, and weight decrease and smoking cessation are necessary for these patients. PMID:27381535

  17. [Ischemic stroke in a young woman of Turner syndrome with T1-weighted imaging-pulvinar sign].

    PubMed

    Sangkyun, Ko; Kawano, Akiko; Yamanoi, Takahiko; Tokunaga, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman developed right hemiparesis in a few days. Magnetic resonance images revealed cerebral infarction in the territory of the left lenticulostriate artery, and MR angiography showed severe stenosis of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries and moderate one of the vertebral arteries. Bilateral and symmetric T1 hyperintensity in the pulvinar (T1-weighted imaging-pulvinar sign; "T1 pulvinar sign") was detected, which is recognized as a key imaging of Fabry disease. The α-galactosidase A gene analysis, however, showed no mutation. Although specific physical symptoms were solely short stature and oligomenorrhea, the diagnosis of Turner syndrome was confirmed by the chromosome analysis which showed mosaicism of 45XO and 46X,r(X) (60%:40%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Turner syndrome with "T1 pulvinar sign".

  18. Failure of Marfan anatomic criteria to predict risk of aortic dissection in Turner syndrome: necessity of specific adjusted risk thresholds†

    PubMed Central

    Maureira, Juan-Pablo; Vanhuyse, Fabrice; Lekehal, Malik; Hubert, Thierry; Vigouroux, Charlène; Mattei, Marie-Françoise; Grandmougin, Daniel; Villemot, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are prompt to develop spontaneous acute aortic dissection following insidious aortic dilatation, with abnormal cardiovascular anatomy and consequently require specific guidelines for regular surveillance since they represent a subset of high-risk young patients. We report a rare and uncommon case of spontaneous acute aortic dissection in a 48-year old female patient with Turner syndrome who was not apparently eligible for a prophylactic surgery. A CT scan showed a Stanford type A aortic dissection and was urgently referred for surgical management. We operated on the patient under deep hypothermia (18°C) and circulatory arrest with a retrograde cerebroplegia as the primary entry tear was located in the arch. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged at the eighth postoperative day. Following description of this case, special attention was paid to determine predisposing risk factors for aortic dissection to be specifically adjusted to TS patients. PMID:22286600

  19. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of unsuspected cases of Parsonage-Turner syndrome: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of shoulder pain, especially in the diagnosis of rotator cuff injuries and conditions that mimic them. Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a well-defined clinical entity that presents with acute-onset shoulder pain and weakness, often first recognized on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Case presentation We studied magnetic resonance imaging features of two Asian men (ages 24 and 31 years) who presented with variable-onset shoulder pain and weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased T2-weighted signal intensity of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles in both patients. Conclusion Magnetic resonance imaging findings are distinctive, although nonspecific, in cases of Parsonage-Turner syndrome, and knowledge of the imaging and clinical features of this disease enable clinicians to arrive at the correct diagnosis and guide appropriate management. PMID:24199631

  20. Dilation of the ascending aorta in Turner syndrome - a prospective cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk of aortic dissection is 100-fold increased in Turner syndrome (TS). Unfortunately, risk stratification is inadequate due to a lack of insight into the natural course of the syndrome-associated aortopathy. Therefore, this study aimed to prospectively assess aortic dimensions in TS. Methods Eighty adult TS patients were examined twice with a mean follow-up of 2.4 ± 0.4 years, and 67 healthy age and gender-matched controls were examined once. Aortic dimensions were measured at nine predefined positions using 3D, non-contrast and free-breathing cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Transthoracic echocardiography and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were also performed. Results At baseline, aortic diameters (body surface area indexed) were larger at all positions in TS. Aortic dilation was more prevalent at all positions excluding the distal transverse aortic arch. Aortic diameter increased in the aortic sinus, at the sinotubular junction and in the mid-ascending aorta with growth rates of 0.1 - 0.4 mm/year. Aortic diameters at all other positions were unchanged. The bicuspid aortic valve conferred higher aortic sinus growth rates (p < 0.05). No other predictors of aortic growth were identified. Conclusion A general aortopathy is present in TS with enlargement of the ascending aorta, which is accelerated in the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:21527014

  1. 45,X/46,XY Turner Syndrome: A Psu dic(y) can appear normal by G-banding

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.V.; Gutai, J.; Shreeve, J.

    1994-09-01

    Mosaic Turner syndrome is a common finding with 50% of the individuals with Turner syndrome having a second cell line. In rare cases, the additional chromosome is reported to be a Y or variant of the Y chromosome. We report a female with Turner Syndrome, who has a mosaic pattern, with the Y chromosome by GTL-banding appearing entirely normal, about the length of chromosome 22. Quinicrine-banding revealed no heterochromatic region. The father of the girl was unavailable for analysis. C-banding resulted in the determination of two centromeric regions, one active at the primary constriction and the second was inactive. The Y centromeric probe (Oncor) showed both the active and inactive centromeres to be of Y origin. Painting using whole chromosome Y paint (Imagenetics) revealed only Y material. In cases of males and females where 45,X/46,X,dic(Y) has been reported, a mosaic pattern has resulted from both centromeres being active in early embryogenesis. In this case the resulting chromosome looks to be a normal Y in both shape and size but with a mosaic pattern. Clearly, G-banding is not always adequate to determine a dic(Y). This suggests that any 45,X/46,SY mosaic pattern in either males or females should be evaluated for a possible dicentric Y chromosome.

  2. Trisomy 13, 18, 21, Triploidy and Turner syndrome: the 5T’s. Look at the hands

    PubMed Central

    Witters, G.; Van Robays, J.; Willekes, C.; Coumans, A.; Peeters, H.; Gyselaers, W.; Fryns, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    First trimester spontaneous abortions occur in 15 to 20% of all clinically recognized pregnancies. Chromosomal anomalies are responsible for more than 50% of spontaneous abortions. The majority (90%) of these chromosomal anomalies are numerical, particularly autosomal trisomies (involving chromosomes 13,16, 18, 21, 22), polyploidy and monosomy X. At birth chromosomal anomalies are still an important cause of congenital malformations occurring in 0,55% of newborns (autosomal: 0,40%, sex chromosomal: 0,15%). Autosomal trisomies result from maternal meiotic nondisjunction of gametogenesis and the risk increases with maternal age. Polyploidy (triploidy (3n = 69) or tetraploidy (4n = 92)), results from a contribution of one or more extra haploid chromosome sets at fertilization. Unlike the risk for autosomal trisomies, the risk for polyploidies and for monosomy X (Turner syndrome) does not increase with maternal age. In the prenatal period the ultrasonographic diagnosis of some autosomal trisomies such as trisomy 13 and 18 is feasible based on the frequently seen major malformations while the diagnosis of trisomy 21 often remains challenging due to the absence of major malformations in > 50% of cases. For Turner syndrome (monosomy X), the lethal form will present with cystic hygroma colli and hydrops but the non lethal form is difficult to recognize by ultrasound in the second trimester. The 5 frequently encountered chromosomal anomalies (Trisomy 13, 18, 21, Turner syndrome and Triploidy) referred here as the 5T’s have specific hand features which will be discussed. PMID:24753843

  3. Scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome associated with anti-Ku antibody and rimmed vacuole formation.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Y; Maeda, H; Katayama, S; Ishioka, S; Yamakido, M

    1996-11-01

    Scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome is strongly associated with certain autoantibodies, such as anti-PM-Scl antibody and anti-Ku antibody. We describe a case of scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome associated with anti-Ku antibody, which revealed rimmed vacuole formation in addition to intranuclear and intracytoplasmic filamentous inclusions in muscle biopsy specimens.

  4. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 manifested as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency, in Turner syndrome woman, with onset following introduction of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Cyniak-Magierska, Anna; Lasoń, Agnieszka; Smyczyńska, Joanna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of simultaneous insufficiencies of several endocrine glands. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS 2) may be diagnosed when the adrenocortical insufficiency is associated with an autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease), and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in females, caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy. We present the case of a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, in whom APS 2 (Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency) has been diagnosed after introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. In Turner syndrome, examination of the patient must regularly be conducted in order to diagnose a possible onset of autoimmune diseases; respective treatment must be applied as soon as the diagnosis is established. In particular, therapy of rhGH, used for short stature treatment, may be a trigger factor of adrenal insufficiency. The cortisol level in blood should be assessed before rhGH administration and carefully monitored during the therapy, especially in case of autoimmune thyroid disease coexistence.

  5. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 manifested as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency, in Turner syndrome woman, with onset following introduction of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Cyniak-Magierska, Anna; Lasoń, Agnieszka; Smyczyńska, Joanna; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a constellation of signs and symptoms of simultaneous insufficiencies of several endocrine glands. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 (APS 2) may be diagnosed when the adrenocortical insufficiency is associated with an autoimmune thyroid disease (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease), and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Turner syndrome is the most common chromosomal disorder in females, caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy. We present the case of a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, in whom APS 2 (Hashimoto's thyroiditis and adrenocortical insufficiency) has been diagnosed after introduction of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. In Turner syndrome, examination of the patient must regularly be conducted in order to diagnose a possible onset of autoimmune diseases; respective treatment must be applied as soon as the diagnosis is established. In particular, therapy of rhGH, used for short stature treatment, may be a trigger factor of adrenal insufficiency. The cortisol level in blood should be assessed before rhGH administration and carefully monitored during the therapy, especially in case of autoimmune thyroid disease coexistence. PMID:26071578

  6. Understanding asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wurst, Keele E; Kelly-Reif, Kaitlin; Bushnell, Greta A; Pascoe, Steven; Barnes, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS) is a loosely-defined clinical entity referring to patients who exhibit characteristics of both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Clinical definitions and classifications for ACOS vary widely, which impacts our understanding of prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of the condition. This literature review was therefore conducted to characterize the prevalence of ACOS and the effect of different disease definitions on these estimates, as this has not previously been explored. From an analysis of English language literature published from 2000 to 2014, the estimated prevalence of ACOS ranges from 12.1% to 55.2% among patients with COPD and 13.3%-61.0% among patients with asthma alone. This variability is linked to differences in COPD and asthma diagnostic criteria, disease ascertainment methods (spirometry-based versus clinical or symptom-based diagnoses and claims data), and population characteristics including age, gender and smoking. Understanding the reasons for differences in prevalence estimates of ACOS across the literature may help guide decision making on the most appropriate criteria for defining ACOS and aid investigators in designing future ACOS clinical studies aimed at effective treatment.

  7. Altered inorganic composition of dental enamel and dentin in primary teeth from girls with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rizell, Sara; Kjellberg, Heidrun; Dietz, Wolfram; Norén, Jörgen G; Lundgren, Ted

    2010-04-01

    In Turner syndrome (TS) one X-chromosome is missing or defective. The amelogenin gene, located on the X-chromosome, plays a key role during the formation of dental enamel. The aim of this study was to find support for the hypothesis that impaired expression of the X-chromosome influences mineral incorporation during amelogenesis and, indirectly, during dentinogenesis. Primary tooth enamel and dentin from girls with TS were analysed and compared with the enamel and dentin of primary teeth from healthy girls. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the composition of TS enamel were found, in addition to morphological differences. Higher frequencies of subsurface lesions and rod-free zones were seen in TS enamel using polarized light microscopy. Similarly, scanning electron microscopy showed that the enamel rods from TS teeth were of atypical sizes and directions. Using X-ray microanalysis, high levels of calcium and phosphorus, and low levels of carbon, were found in both TS enamel and dentin. Using microradiography, a lower degree of mineralization was found in TS enamel. Rule induction analysis was performed to identify characteristic element patterns for TS. Low values of carbon were the most critical attributes for the outcome TS. The conclusion was that impaired expression of the X-chromosome has an impact on dental hard tissue formation.

  8. Chiropractic management of a 30-year-old patient with Parsonage-Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient presenting with right arm paralysis and a diagnosis of Parsonage-Turner syndrome. Clinical Features After receiving nerve entrapment release surgery, a 30-year-old man presented with a right arm contracture, atrophy, and weakness with general paralysis of the forearm and index finger of 6 weeks' duration. Intervention and Outcome The patient was provided chiropractic care that included high-velocity/low-amplitude spinal manipulation based upon applied kinesiology manual muscle testing, soft tissue trigger point therapy, exercises, and stretches. The patient demonstrated improvement in range of motion after the first treatment session. By the eighth treatment, he was able to fully straighten his arm. Three years later, the patient reported that he was able to do mountain climbing and that his arm was fully functional and pain-free. Conclusion For this patient, chiropractic care seemed to be successful in relieving his right arm paralysis and restoring normal arm movement. PMID:22654689

  9. Aortic dissection in children and adolescents with Turner syndrome: risk factors and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Turtle, E J; Sule, A A; Webb, D J; Bath, L E

    2015-07-01

    There is a general lack of awareness of the risk of aortic dissection in Turner syndrome (TS) from both patients with TS and their physicians. Patients often ignore symptoms for up to 24 h before seeking medical advice, significantly increasing their risk of death. A clinical profile of those at risk of dissection is emerging and includes the presence of congenital heart defects, aortic dilatation and hypertension. MRI has revolutionised the visualisation of cardiovascular anatomy in TS but remains underutilised, especially in children and adolescents, and there is currently little guidance on blood pressure (BP) assessment or hypertension management. Children and adolescents with TS at risk of dissection could be easily identified by timely imaging and BP assessment. This would allow medical management or surgical intervention to be put in place to reduce the risk of this major, and often fatal, complication. Since guidance is lacking, we have reviewed the literature on the risk factors for dissection in TS during childhood and adolescence, and make recommendations on the assessment and management of these patients.

  10. Prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete Trovó; da Silva-Grecco, Roseane Lopes; Balarin, Marly Aparecida Spadotto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome (TS) using molecular techniques. Data source: A literature search was performed in Pubmed, limiting the period of time to the years 2005–2014 and using the descriptors: TS and Y sequences (n=26), and TS and Y-chromosome material (n=27). The inclusion criteria were: articles directly related to the subject and published in English or Portuguese. Articles which did not meet these criteria and review articles were excluded. After applying these criteria, 14 papers were left. Data synthesis: The main results regarding the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences in TS were: (1) about 60% of the studies were conducted by Brazilian researchers; (2) the prevalence varied from 4.6 to 60%; (3) the most frequently investigated genes were SRY, DYZ3 and TSPY; (4) seven studies used only polymerase chain reaction, while in the remaining seven it was associated with FISH. Nine of the 14 studies reported gonadectomy and gonadoblastoma. The highest prevalence of gonadoblastoma (33%) was found in two studies. In five out of the nine papers evaluated the prevalence of gonadoblastoma was 10–25%; in two of them it was zero. Conclusions: According to these data, molecular analysis to detect Y-chromosome sequences in TS patients is indicated, regardless of their karyotype. In patients who test positive for these sequences, gonadoblastoma needs to be investigated. PMID:26525685

  11. Turner syndrome: review of clinical, neuropsychiatric, and EEG status: an experience of tertiary center.

    PubMed

    Saad, Khaled; Abdelrahman, Ahmed A; Abdel-Raheem, Yasser F; Othman, Essam R; Badry, Reda; Othman, Hisham A K; Sobhy, Karema M

    2014-03-01

    We reviewed the clinical, neuropsychiatric, and EEG status of 53 turner syndrome (TS) females, aged 3-16 years, in Assiut university hospitals, Upper Egypt. The diagnosis and care of patients with TS in Egypt is still in the developing stage. Hence this study was undertaken to review the details of patients with TS with respect to the pattern of cognitive, psychiatric, and motor dysfunction. We aimed to provide a comprehensive data about the experience of our center comparable to previous studies, which have been published in this field. This will contribute to a better definition of the neuropsychiatric features that may be specific to TS that allows early and better detection and management of these cases. We found FSIQ and verbal IQ that seem to be at a nearly normal level and a decreased performance IQ. ADHD and autistic symptoms were found in 20.70 and 3.77 % of our cohort, respectively. The motor performance in TS was disturbed, with some neurological deficits present in 17 % (reduced muscle tone and reduced muscle power). In addition, females with TS in our study exhibit social and emotional problems, including anxiety (5.66 %) and depression (11.30 %). The EEG results revealed abnormalities in seven patients (13.20 %). One patient presenting with generalized tonic-clonic seizures showed generalized epileptiform activity, and six patients presenting with intellectual disabilities showed abnormal EEG background activity.

  12. [Osteoporosis in Turner syndrome with chromosomal mosaicism (45,XO/46,XY). A case report].

    PubMed

    Mikosch, P; Gallowitsch, H J; Kresnik, E; Lind, P

    2000-01-01

    We report a rare case of Turner's syndrome (UTS) due to a gonosomal mosaic 45,X0/46,XY with the main clinical feature of several fractures in the course of osteoporosis. The bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and the hip measured by DXA showed osteoporosis. The other clinical investigations including laboratory parameters presented beside an estrogen deficiency due to primary amenorrhea, a small thyroid with hypothyroidism, increased renal calciuria and increased markers of bone metabolism. Beside the supplementation of estrogen and thyroid hormone deficits, only a combination of different bone-associated drugs could normalize the bone mineral density and the bone turnover. During a two years' follow-up period no further fractures occurred. Furthermore, theories regarding the occurrence of osteoporosis and other complex pathologies in UTS are discussed with the conclusion that osteopenia in UTS is probably based on a multifactorial genesis. Due to these complex pathologies during adulthood, patients with UTS should get multidisciplinary care in order to reduce morbidity and preserve quality of life.

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array Genotyping is Equivalent to Metaphase Cytogenetics for Diagnosis of Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth; Guo, Dongchuan; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Silberbach, Michael; Investigators, GenTAC; Milewicz, Dianna; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder caused by partial or complete monosomy for the X chromosome in 1:2500 females. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array genotyping can provide superior resolution in comparison to metaphase karyotype analysis to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlations. Methods We genotyped 187 TS patients with 733,000 SNP marker arrays. All cases met diagnostic criteria for TS based on karyotypes (60%) or characteristic physical features. SNP array results confirmed the diagnosis of TS in 100% of cases. Results We identified a single X chromosome (45,X) in 113 cases. In 58 additional cases (31%), other mosaic cell lines were present including isochromosomes (16%), rings (5%) and Xp deletions (8%). The remaining cases were mosaic for monosomy X and normal male or female cell lines. Array-based models of X chromosome structure were compatible with karyotypes in 104 of 116 comparable cases (90%). We found that SNP array data did not detect X;autosome translocations (3 cases), but did identify 2 derivative Y chromosomes and 13 large copy number variants that were not detected by karyotyping. Conclusions Our data is the first systematic comparison between the two methods and supports the utility of SNP array genotyping to address clinical and research questions in TS. PMID:23743550

  14. Cardiometabolic and vascular risks in young and adolescent girls with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mavinkurve, Meenal; O'Gorman, Clodagh S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is the most common chromosomal abnormality in females and is associated with several co-morbidities. It commonly results from X monosomy which is diagnosed on a 30 cell karyotype. Congenital heart disease is a clinical feature in 30% of cases. It is becoming evident that TS patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Scope of review This review provides a detailed overview of the literature surrounding cardiometabolic health in childhood and adolescent TS. In addition, the review also summarises the current data on the impact of growth hormone (GH) therapy on cardiometabolic risk in paediatric TS patients. Major conclusions Current epidemiological evidence suggests that young women and girls with TS have unfavourable cardiometabolic risk factors which predispose them to adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular outcomes in young adulthood. It remains unclear whether this risk is the result of unidentified factors which are intrinsic to TS, or whether modifiable risk factors (obesity, hypertension, hyperglycaemia) are contributing to this risk. General significance From a clinical perspective, this review highlights the importance of regular screening and pro-active management of cardiometabolic risk from childhood in TS cohorts and that future research should aim to address whether modification of these variables at a young age can alter the disease process and atherosclerotic outcomes in adulthood. PMID:26673162

  15. Interpreting gaze in Turner syndrome: impaired sensitivity to intention and emotion, but preservation of social cueing.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Kate; Campbell, Ruth; Swettenham, John; Terstegge, Janneke; Akers, Rebecca; Coleman, Michael; Skuse, David

    2003-01-01

    Women with Turner's syndrome (TS), who lack a complete X-chromosome, show an impairment in remembering faces and in classifying "fear" in face images. Could their difficulties extend to the processing of gaze? Three tasks, all of which rely on the ability to make use of the eye-region of a pictured face, are reported. Women with TS were impaired at judging mental state from images of the upper face ("reading the mind in the eyes"). They were also specifically impaired at interpreting "fear" from displays of the eye-region of the face. However, they showed normal susceptibility to direction of gaze as an attentional cue (social cueing), since they were as sensitive as controls to the validity of the cue, under conditions where it should be ignored. In this task, unlike those of reading the upper face for intention or expression, PIQ accounted for a significant amount of individual variance in task performance. The processing of displays of the eye region affording social and affective information is specifically affected in TS. We speculate that amygdala dysfunction is likely to be implicated in this anomalous behaviour. The presence in the female karyotype of two complete X-chromosomes is protective for some socio-cognitive abilities related to the modulation of behaviour by the interpretation of gaze. PMID:12667526

  16. Polymorphisms in folate pathway genes are not associated with somatic nondisjunction in turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Adriana Valéria Sales; dos Santos, Luana Oliveira; de Barros, Juliana Vieira; Duarte, Andrea Rezende; Araújo, Jacqueline; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Santos, Neide

    2015-07-01

    Folate metabolism dysfunction can lead to DNA hypomethylation and abnormal chromosomal segregation. Previous investigations of this association have produced controversial results. Here we performed a case-control study in patients with Turner syndrome (TS) to determine the effects of genetic polymorphisms of folate pathway genes as potential risk factors for somatic chromosomal nondisjunction. TS is a useful model for this investigation because patients with TS show a high frequency of chromosome mosaicism. Here we investigated the possible association of polymorphisms of the MTHFR gene with TS risk, which has been previously investigated with controversial results. We also examined the effects of MTR, RFC1, and TYMS gene polymorphisms in TS for the first time. The risk was evaluated according to allelic and genotype (independent and combined) frequencies among 70 patients with TS and 144 age-matched healthy control subjects. Polymorphism genotyping was performed by PCR, PCR-RFLP, and PCR-ASA. The polymorphisms MTHFR 677C>T and 1298A>C, MTR 2756A>G, RFC1 80G>A, and TYMS 2R/3R-alone or in combinations-were not associated with the risk of chromosomal aneuploidy in TS. In conclusion, our present findings did not support a link between impaired folate metabolism and abnormal chromosome segregation leading to somatic nondisjunction in TS patients. PMID:25858821

  17. Aberrant neurocognitive processing of fear in young girls with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Signe; Haas, Brian W.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    Appraisal of fearful stimuli is an integral aspect of social cognition. Neural circuitry underlying this phenomenon has been well-described and encompasses a distributed network of affective and cognitive nodes. Interestingly, this ability to process fearful faces is impaired in Turner syndrome (TS), a genetic disorder of females in which all or part of an X chromosome is missing. However, neurofunctional correlates for this impairment have not been well-studied, particularly in young girls. Given that the core features of TS include X chromosome gene haploinsufficiency and secondary sex hormone deficiencies, investigation of fearful face processing may provide insights into the influence of X chromosome gene expression on this network. Therefore, we examined behavioral and neural responses during an explicit emotional face labeling task in 14 prepubertal girls with TS and 16 typically developing age-matched controls (6–13 years). We demonstrate that girls with TS have a specific impairment in the identification of fearful faces and show decreased activation in several cognitive control regions, including the anterior dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate gyrus. Our results indicate that aberrant functional activation in dorsal cognitive regions plays an integral role in appraisal of, and regulation of response to fear in TS. PMID:23171616

  18. Renal anomalies in patients with turner syndrome: Is scintigraphy superior to ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Hamza, Rasha T; Shalaby, Mennatallah H; Hamed, Laith S; Abdulla, Dunya B A; Elfekky, Sahar M; Sultan, Omar M

    2016-02-01

    Renal anomalies are present in up to 30% of patients with Turner syndrome (TS). Renal ultrasound (U/S) detects anatomical renal anomalies only while renal scintigraphy detects anomalies, detects early renal malfunction, and estimates glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Thus, we aimed to assess frequency of renal abnormalities detected by scintigraphy in comparison to renal U/S in TS patients. Ninety TS patients were subjected to auxological assessment, measurement of serum creatinine; and renal U/S and scintigraphy. Renal U/S detected renal anomalies in 22.22% of patients versus 17.78 % detected by scintigraphy (P = 0.035). Scintigraphy detected renal functional abnormalities in 44.44% of patients in the form of subnormal total GFR, abnormal renogram curve pattern, improper tracer handling and perfusion; and difference in split renal function >10% between both kidneys. Patients with a 45,X karyotype had more renal functional abnormalities (56%) than those with mosaic karyotype (33.33%), P = 0.04. In conclusion, renal scintigraphy is not superior to U/S in detection of renal anomalies but is a reliable method for early detection of renal malfunction in TS patients especially those with 45,X to ensure early management to offer a better quality of life.

  19. Unusual Turner syndrome mosaic with a triple x cell line (47,X/49,XXX) in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Bradford, Carol M; Tupa, Lynn; Wiese, Debbie; Hurley, Timothy J; Zimmerman, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    A 29-yr-old female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was evaluated for low fertility and a midterm abortion. Laboratory testing included karyotyping, which revealed an unusual mosaicism for Turner syndrome with Triple X (47,X/49,XXX). This appears to be the first report of Turner syndrome in a great ape. In humans, Turner syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 3,000 females, with half of those monosomic for the X chromosome. A small proportion is mosaic for a triple X cell line (3-4%). In humans, Turner syndrome is associated with characteristic phenotype including short stature, obesity, a broad chest with widely spaced nipples, webbing of the neck, and anteverted ears. This individual gorilla is significantly shorter in stature than conspecifics and is obese despite normal caloric intake. Individuals with Turner syndrome should also be screened for common health issues, including congenital heart defects, obesity, kidney abnormalities, hypertension, hypothyroidism, and diabetes mellitus. Animals with decreased fertility, multiple miscarriages, fetal losses, unusual phenotypes, or a combination of these symptoms should be evaluated for genetic abnormalities.

  20. Influence of the X-chromosome on neuroanatomy: evidence from Turner and Klinefelter syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hong, David S; Hoeft, Fumiko; Marzelli, Matthew J; Lepage, Jean-Francois; Roeltgen, David; Ross, Judith; Reiss, Allan L

    2014-03-01

    Studies of sex effects on neurodevelopment have traditionally focused on animal models investigating hormonal influences on brain anatomy. However, more recent evidence suggests that sex chromosomes may also have direct upstream effects that act independently of hormones. Sex chromosome aneuploidies provide ideal models to examine this framework in humans, including Turner syndrome (TS), where females are missing one X-chromosome (45X), and Klinefelter syndrome (KS), where males have an additional X-chromosome (47XXY). As these disorders essentially represent copy number variants of the sex chromosomes, investigation of brain structure across these disorders allows us to determine whether sex chromosome gene dosage effects exist. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate this hypothesis in a large sample of children in early puberty, to compare regional gray matter volumes among individuals with one (45X), two (typically developing 46XX females and 46XY males), and three (47XXY) sex chromosomes. Between-group contrasts of TS and KS groups relative to respective sex-matched controls demonstrated highly convergent patterns of volumetric differences with the presence of an additional sex chromosome being associated with relatively decreased parieto-occipital gray matter volume and relatively increased temporo-insular gray matter volumes. Furthermore, z-score map comparisons between TS and KS cohorts also suggested that this effect occurs in a linear dose-dependent fashion. We infer that sex chromosome gene expression directly influences brain structure in children during early stages of puberty, extending our understanding of genotype-phenotype mechanisms underlying sex differences in the brain. PMID:24599451

  1. Influence of the X-Chromosome on Neuroanatomy: Evidence from Turner and Klinefelter Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hoeft, Fumiko; Marzelli, Matthew J.; Lepage, Jean-Francois; Roeltgen, David; Ross, Judith; Reiss, Allan L.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of sex effects on neurodevelopment have traditionally focused on animal models investigating hormonal influences on brain anatomy. However, more recent evidence suggests that sex chromosomes may also have direct upstream effects that act independently of hormones. Sex chromosome aneuploidies provide ideal models to examine this framework in humans, including Turner syndrome (TS), where females are missing one X-chromosome (45X), and Klinefelter syndrome (KS), where males have an additional X-chromosome (47XXY). As these disorders essentially represent copy number variants of the sex chromosomes, investigation of brain structure across these disorders allows us to determine whether sex chromosome gene dosage effects exist. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate this hypothesis in a large sample of children in early puberty, to compare regional gray matter volumes among individuals with one (45X), two (typically developing 46XX females and 46XY males), and three (47XXY) sex chromosomes. Between-group contrasts of TS and KS groups relative to respective sex-matched controls demonstrated highly convergent patterns of volumetric differences with the presence of an additional sex chromosome being associated with relatively decreased parieto-occipital gray matter volume and relatively increased temporo-insular gray matter volumes. Furthermore, z-score map comparisons between TS and KS cohorts also suggested that this effect occurs in a linear dose-dependent fashion. We infer that sex chromosome gene expression directly influences brain structure in children during early stages of puberty, extending our understanding of genotype–phenotype mechanisms underlying sex differences in the brain. PMID:24599451

  2. What pulmonologists think about the asthma–COPD overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, Marc; Alcázar, Bernardino; Alvarez, Francisco Javier; Bazús, Teresa; Calle, Myriam; Casanova, Ciro; Cisneros, Carolina; de-Torres, Juan P; Entrenas, Luis M; Esteban, Cristóbal; García-Sidro, Patricia; Cosio, Borja G; Huerta, Arturo; Iriberri, Milagros; Izquierdo, José Luis; López-Viña, Antolín; López-Campos, José Luis; Martínez-Moragón, Eva; Pérez de Llano, Luis; Perpiñá, Miguel; Ros, José Antonio; Serrano, José; Soler-Cataluña, Juan José; Torrego, Alfons; Urrutia, Isabel; Plaza, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background Some patients with COPD may share characteristics of asthma; this is the so-called asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). There are no universally accepted criteria for ACOS, and most treatments for asthma and COPD have not been adequately tested in this population. Materials and methods We performed a survey among pulmonology specialists in asthma and COPD aimed at collecting their opinions about ACOS and their attitudes in regard to some case scenarios of ACOS patients. The participants answered a structured questionnaire and attended a face-to-face meeting with the Metaplan methodology to discuss different aspects of ACOS. Results A total of 26 pulmonologists with a mean age of 49.7 years participated in the survey (13 specialists in asthma and 13 in COPD). Among these, 84.6% recognized the existence of ACOS and stated that a mean of 12.6% of their patients might have this syndrome. In addition, 80.8% agreed that the diagnostic criteria for ACOS are not yet well defined. The most frequently mentioned characteristics of ACOS were a history of asthma (88.5%), significant smoking exposure (73.1%), and postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.7 (69.2%). The most accepted diagnostic criteria were eosinophilia in sputum (80.8%), a very positive bronchodilator test (69.2%), and a history of asthma before 40 years of age (65.4%). Up to 96.2% agreed that first-line treatment for ACOS was the combination of a long-acting β2-agonist and inhaled steroid, with a long-acting antimuscarinic agent (triple therapy) for severe ACOS. Conclusion Most Spanish specialists in asthma and COPD agree that ACOS exists, but the diagnostic criteria are not yet well defined. A previous history of asthma, smoking, and not fully reversible airflow limitation are considered the main characteristics of ACOS, with the most accepted first-line treatment being long-acting β2-agonist/inhaled corticosteroids. PMID:26270415

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosusmyositis overlap syndrome: report of 6 cases

    PubMed Central

    Maazoun, Fatma; Frikha, Faten; Snoussi, Mouna; Kaddour, Neila; Masmoudi, Hatem; Bahloul, Zouhir

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of myositis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is low among different series. Here we attempt to describe the main features of SLE/myositis overlap syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 174 patients with SLE seen over 15-year period. All the patients fulfilled the revised American Rheumatology Association criteria for SLE. Patients who met The Bohan and Peter criteria for definite myositis were included in this study. Among those patients, six patients had an associated myositis (3.4% overall). They were 6 women with a mean age of 29 years (20–41 years). At the initial evaluation, 3 patients (50%) were complained from myalgia, and all patients had symmetrical muscle weakness (proximal muscle weakness in 6 cases with distal muscle weakness in 2 cases). The muscle disease was severe in 1 case. Involvements of muscles of the pharynx and upper esophagus were noted in 4 patients (66.6%). The creatine kinase (CK) levels were elevated in 4 cases with a mean rate of 2153.5 UI/L. The electromyogram (EMG) revealed signs of myositis in 5 cases. Muscle biopsy, performed in 5 patients, revealed an inflammatory myopathy changes in 4 cases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were positive in all cases. All our patients were treated with high doses of corticosteroids with favorable outcome. Relapse of SLE disease had occurred in 2 patients. The association SLE-myositis is rare with heterogeneous presentation. Through our observations and literature data we will specify the characteristics of this association. PMID:24765389

  4. Inflammatory biomarkers in asthma-COPD overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Yamanda, Shinsuke; Ishida, Masatsugu; Yanai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical phenotypes and underlying mechanisms of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate a comparison of COPD patients with and without ACOS, focusing on inflammatory biomarkers, in an outpatient COPD cohort. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study analyzing prospectively collected data from the Ishinomaki COPD Network registry. All participants were diagnosed with COPD, confirmed by using spirometry, and were aged 40–90 years and former smokers. Patients with features of asthma including both variable respiratory symptoms and variable expiratory airflow limitation were identified and defined as having ACOS. Then, the inflammatory biomarkers such as fractional exhaled nitric oxide level, blood eosinophil count and percentage, total immunoglobulin E (IgE) level, and presence of antigen-specific IgE were evaluated. Results A total of 257 patients with COPD were identified, including 37 (14.4%) with ACOS. Patients with ACOS tended to be younger, have a shorter smoking history, and use more respiratory medications, especially inhaled corticosteroids and theophylline. Mean fractional exhaled nitric oxide level was significantly higher in those with ACOS than in those without ACOS (38.5 parts per billion [ppb] vs 20.3 ppb, P<0.001). Blood eosinophil count and percentage were significantly increased in those with ACOS (295/mm3 vs 212/mm3, P=0.032; 4.7% vs 3.2%, P=0.003, respectively). Total IgE level was also significantly higher, and presence of antigen-specific IgE was observed more frequently in patients with ACOS. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers were relatively low, but combinations of these biomarkers showed high specificity for ACOS diagnosis. Conclusion These results provide evidence that these inflammatory biomarkers can be used to support the diagnosis of ACOS.

  5. Characterization of sputum biomarkers for asthma–COPD overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Koskela, Jukka; Alenius, Harri; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki; Laitinen, Tarja; Mazur, Witold; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) is a commonly encountered chronic airway disease. However, ACOS is still a consensus-based clinical phenotype and the underlying inflammatory mechanisms are inadequately characterized. To clarify the inflammatory mediatypical for ACOS, five biomarkers, namely interleukin (IL)-13, myeloperoxidase (MPO), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), chitinase-like protein (YKL-40), and IL-6, were selected. This study hypothesized that sputum biomarkers relevant for airway inflammation in asthma (IL-13), COPD (MPO, NGAL), or in both asthma and COPD (YKL-40, IL-6) could be used to differentiate ACOS from COPD and asthma. The aim of this study was to characterize the inflammatory profile and improve the recognition of ACOS. Induced sputum levels of IL-13, MPO, NGAL, YKL-40, and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/Luminex assay in a Finnish discovery cohort (n=90) of nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with asthma, COPD, and ACOS and validated in a Japanese cohort (n=135). The classification accuracy of potential biomarkers was compared with area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. Only sputum NGAL levels could differentiate ACOS from asthma (P<0.001 and P<0.001) and COPD (P<0.05 and P=0.002) in the discovery and replication cohorts, respectively. Sputum NGAL levels were independently correlated with the percentage of pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted in multivariate analysis in the discovery and replication cohorts (P=0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). In conclusion, sputum biomarkers reflecting both airway inflammation and remodeling of the tissue show potential in differentiation between asthma, COPD, and ACOS. PMID:27757028

  6. Inflammatory biomarkers in asthma-COPD overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Yamanda, Shinsuke; Ishida, Masatsugu; Yanai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical phenotypes and underlying mechanisms of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate a comparison of COPD patients with and without ACOS, focusing on inflammatory biomarkers, in an outpatient COPD cohort. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study analyzing prospectively collected data from the Ishinomaki COPD Network registry. All participants were diagnosed with COPD, confirmed by using spirometry, and were aged 40–90 years and former smokers. Patients with features of asthma including both variable respiratory symptoms and variable expiratory airflow limitation were identified and defined as having ACOS. Then, the inflammatory biomarkers such as fractional exhaled nitric oxide level, blood eosinophil count and percentage, total immunoglobulin E (IgE) level, and presence of antigen-specific IgE were evaluated. Results A total of 257 patients with COPD were identified, including 37 (14.4%) with ACOS. Patients with ACOS tended to be younger, have a shorter smoking history, and use more respiratory medications, especially inhaled corticosteroids and theophylline. Mean fractional exhaled nitric oxide level was significantly higher in those with ACOS than in those without ACOS (38.5 parts per billion [ppb] vs 20.3 ppb, P<0.001). Blood eosinophil count and percentage were significantly increased in those with ACOS (295/mm3 vs 212/mm3, P=0.032; 4.7% vs 3.2%, P=0.003, respectively). Total IgE level was also significantly higher, and presence of antigen-specific IgE was observed more frequently in patients with ACOS. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of these biomarkers were relatively low, but combinations of these biomarkers showed high specificity for ACOS diagnosis. Conclusion These results provide evidence that these inflammatory biomarkers can be used to support the diagnosis of ACOS. PMID:27660429

  7. Lichen planus-like drug reaction associated with recombinant human growth hormone therapy in a child patient with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mariana Quirino Silveira; Mendonca, Elismauro Fancisco

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disease with an incidence rate of between 1:2000 and 1:5000 live female births. The treatment of TS differs according to age and Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (RHGH) therapy is usually given for the treatment of short stature in girls with TS in childhood. We describe the first case of a TS patient who presented with a clinical picture compatible with oral and palmoplantar lichen planus-like reaction during RHGH therapy; spontaneous remission occurred after therapy suspension. PMID:27136634

  8. Lichen planus-like drug reaction associated with recombinant human growth hormone therapy in a child patient with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mariana Quirino Silveira; Mendonca, Elismauro Fancisco

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disease with an incidence rate of between 1:2000 and 1:5000 live female births. The treatment of TS differs according to age and Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (RHGH) therapy is usually given for the treatment of short stature in girls with TS in childhood. We describe the first case of a TS patient who presented with a clinical picture compatible with oral and palmoplantar lichen planus-like reaction during RHGH therapy; spontaneous remission occurred after therapy suspension.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of female monozygotic twins discordant for Turner syndrome: implications for prenatal genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B; Yardin, C; Briault, S; Belin, V; Lienhardt, A; Aubard, Y; Battin, J; Servaud, M; Philippe, H J; Lacombe, D

    2002-08-01

    We describe a set of monozygotic (MZ) female twins, one of whom presented with a typical Turner syndrome (TS) phenotype and the other a normal female phenotype. Prenatal fetal ultrasonographic examination showed a monochorial diamniotic pregnancy with a hygroma colli and growth delay in Twin A and no anomalies in Twin B. Karyotypic analysis performed on fetal blood samples demonstrated a 46,XX/45,X (23/2) mosaicism in Twin A and a normal 46,XX chromosome constitution in Twin B. At birth, Twin A presented with a typical TS and Twin B had a normal female phenotype. Postnatal cytogenetic investigation of blood lymphocytes showed the same 46,XX/45,X mosaicism in both twins: 46,XX/45,X (40/7) in Twin A and 46,XX/45,X (40/5) in Twin B. Further investigations at the age of 10 months showed in Twin A a 46,XX/45,X (98/2) mosaicism in lymphocytes and 100% of 45,X (50 analysed cells) in fibroblasts, and in Twin B a normal 46,XX (100 analysed cells) chromosome constitution in lymphocytes but a mild 46,XX/45,X (78/2) mosaicism in fibroblasts. Monozygosity was confirmed by molecular analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of prenatal diagnosis of MZ female twins discordant for TS. Review of reported sets of MZ female twins (eight cases) or triplets (one case) discordant for TS shows, as in the present case, that the phenotype correlates better with the chromosomal distribution of mosaicism in fibroblasts than in lymphocytes. In the blood of MZ twins chimerism may modify the initial allocation of the mosaicism. These results suggest that, in cases of prenatal diagnosis of MZ female twins discordant for TS, the phenotype of each twin would be better predicted from karyotype analysis of cells from amniotic fluid than from fetal blood.

  10. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  11. [Procreation in Turner's syndrome: which recommendations before, during and after pregnancy?].

    PubMed

    Fénichel, P; Letur, H

    2008-09-01

    Turner's Syndrome (TS) is characterized by an ovarian failure which occurs in most cases before puberty and leads to infertility. In less than 10% of women with TS, puberty may occur and spontaneous pregnancies are possible with a high risk of fetal loss, chromosomal and congenital abnormalities. Fertile women with TS should therefore be counselled with regard to these increased risks and be offered prenatal diagnosis testing. For all the other women with TS, in vitro fertilization with oocyte donation (OD) has dramatically transformed the prognosis of infertility. However, in the same time, it has become obvious that pregnancies in TS either spontaneous or obtained after oocyte donation are at very high risk of possible sudden death. Miscarriages are very frequent probably linked to uterine abnormalities. The most specific risks lie in cardiovascular complications involving aortic root dissection, severe hypertension (HTA) or ventricular insufficiency. In fact pregnancies in TS women cumulate the risk of congenital heart defects and HTA associated to TS, the risk of preeclampsia associated to oocyte donation and the increased cardiac work necessary for pregnancy. It is therefore absolutely necessary for all women with TS to undergo a full cardiological assessment before seeking to become pregnant including echocardiography, thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to verify aortic root, cardiac valves and left ventricular function, hypertension monitoring and treatment. Single embryo transfer must definitively be considered. Cardiovascular surveillance during pregnancy has to be enhanced especially at the third trimester and during the peripartum period, most women requiring caesarean section for delivery because of cephalopelvic disproportion and/or aortic root dilatation risk.

  12. Ambulatory blood pressure and subclinical cardiovascular disease in children with turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akyürek, Nesibe; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Eklioglu, Beray Selver; Alp, Hayrullah

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome (TS) have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity. 29 TS and 25 healthy control subjects (CS) were included in the study. We investigated body mass index, waist circumference, fasting glucose and insulin, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, serum lipids, oral glucose tolerance test, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and compared them with CS. 28 % (N = 7) of TS had insulin resistance (IR), and 36 % (N = 9) had IGT. Mean systolic BP and diastolic BP (DBP) dip were 7.24 ± 3.97 % and 11.84 ± 6.2 %, respectively. CIMT was greater in TS than in CS (p = 0.00). CIMT was correlated positively with fasting insulin, HOMA index, and insulin-sensitivity check index (r = 0.563, p = 0.015; r = 0.603, p = 0.008; and r = 0.623, p = 0.006, respectively) and negatively with fasting glucose-to-insulin ratio and DBP dipping (r = -0.534, p = 0.022; r = -0.534, p = 0.00, respectively) in the two groups combined. These results provide additional evidence for the presence of subclinical cardiovascular disease and its relation to hypertension in TS. They also indicate a significant relation between DBP dipping and increased arterial stiffness. It is also important to note that our findings show significant relationships between insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular changes and underline the importance of insulin resistance for predicting cardiovascular disease.

  13. Face perception in women with Turner syndrome and its underlying factors.

    PubMed

    Anaki, David; Zadikov Mor, Tal; Gepstein, Vardit; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2016-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition that affects development in females. It is characterized by short stature, ovarian failure and other congenital malformations, due to a partial or complete absence of the sex chromosome. Women with TS frequently suffer from various physical and hormonal dysfunctions, along with impairments in visual-spatial processing and social cognition difficulties. Previous research has also shown difficulties in face and emotion perception. In the current study we examined two questions: First, whether women with TS, that are impaired in face perception, also suffer from deficits in face-specific processes. The second question was whether these face impairments in TS are related to visual-spatial perceptual dysfunctions exhibited by TS individuals, or to impaired social cognition skills. Twenty-six women with TS and 26 control participants were tested on various cognitive and psychological tests to assess visual-spatial perception, face and facial expression perception, and social cognition skills. Results show that women with TS were less accurate in face perception and facial expression processing, yet they exhibited normal face-specific processes (configural and holistic processing). They also showed difficulties in spatial perception and social cognition capacities. Additional analyses revealed that their face perception impairments were related to their deficits in visual-spatial processing. Thus, our results do not support the claim that the impairments in face processing observed in TS are related to difficulties in social cognition. Rather, our data point to the possibility that face perception difficulties in TS stem from visual-spatial impairments and may not be specific to faces. PMID:27565637

  14. Face perception in women with Turner syndrome and its underlying factors.

    PubMed

    Anaki, David; Zadikov Mor, Tal; Gepstein, Vardit; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2016-09-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal condition that affects development in females. It is characterized by short stature, ovarian failure and other congenital malformations, due to a partial or complete absence of the sex chromosome. Women with TS frequently suffer from various physical and hormonal dysfunctions, along with impairments in visual-spatial processing and social cognition difficulties. Previous research has also shown difficulties in face and emotion perception. In the current study we examined two questions: First, whether women with TS, that are impaired in face perception, also suffer from deficits in face-specific processes. The second question was whether these face impairments in TS are related to visual-spatial perceptual dysfunctions exhibited by TS individuals, or to impaired social cognition skills. Twenty-six women with TS and 26 control participants were tested on various cognitive and psychological tests to assess visual-spatial perception, face and facial expression perception, and social cognition skills. Results show that women with TS were less accurate in face perception and facial expression processing, yet they exhibited normal face-specific processes (configural and holistic processing). They also showed difficulties in spatial perception and social cognition capacities. Additional analyses revealed that their face perception impairments were related to their deficits in visual-spatial processing. Thus, our results do not support the claim that the impairments in face processing observed in TS are related to difficulties in social cognition. Rather, our data point to the possibility that face perception difficulties in TS stem from visual-spatial impairments and may not be specific to faces.

  15. A Highly Sensitive, High-Throughput Assay for the Detection of Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Karl; Hosono, Seiyu; Wise, Anastasia; Li, Peining; Rinder, Henry M.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Turner syndrome (TS) occurs when an X-chromosome is completely or partially deleted or when X-chromosomal mosaicism is present. Girls with TS benefit from early diagnosis and treatment with GH; however, many girls with TS are not detected until after 10 yr of age, resulting in delayed evaluation and treatment. Methods: We developed a high-throughput test for TS, based on a quantitative method of genotyping to detect X-chromosome abnormalities. This test uses pyrosequencing to quantitate relative allele strength (RAS) from single-nucleotide polymorphisms using 18 informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms markers that span the X-chromosome and one marker for the detection of Y-chromosome material. Results: Cutoff ranges for heterozygous, homozygous, or out-of-range RAS values were established from a cohort of 496 males and females. Positive TS scoring criteria were defined as the presence of homozygosity for all 18 markers or the presence of at least one out-of-range RAS value. To determine the validity of this rapid test for TS detection, we undertook a large-scale study using DNA from 132 females without TS and 74 females with TS for whom karyotypes were available. TS was identified with 96.0% sensitivity and 97.0% specificity in this cohort. We also tested buccal swab DNA from a group of 19 females without TS and 69 females with TS. In this group, TS was identified with 97.1% sensitivity and 84.2% specificity. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the validity of a high-throughput, pyrosequencing based test for the accurate detection of TS, providing a potential alternative to karyotype testing. PMID:21177792

  16. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  17. High Levels of Education and Employment Among Women with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Harley N.; Bakalov, Vladimir K.; Tankersley, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Turner Syndrome (TS) is due to X chromosome monosomy and affects ∼1 per 2500 females at birth. The major features are short stature and primary ovarian failure. Short stature and monosomy for a maternal X chromosome have been implicated in impaired functionality in adult life; however, data on adult outcomes in TS are limited. In this study we evaluated the influence of adult height and parental origin of the single X chromosome on education, employment, and marital outcomes among women with TS. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 240 women (25–67 years old) with TS participating in an intramural National Institutes of Health (NIH) study. Parental origin of the single X chromosome was determined by genotyping proband and parental genomic DNA. Information on education, employment, and family status was self reported. Normative data was obtained from the U.S. Bureaus of Census and Labor and Statistics. Results Seventy percent of the TS group had a baccalaureate degree or higher, compared with 30% of U.S. women (p<0.0001). Eighty percent of the TS group was employed compared with 70% of the U.S. female population. Approximately 50% of the TS group had ever married, compared with 78% of the general female population (p<0.0001). Height and parental origin of the single normal X chromosome had no association with education, employment, or marital status. Conclusion Women with TS currently achieve education and employment levels higher than the female U.S. population but are less likely to marry. Neither adult height nor parental origin of the single X chromosome influenced outcomes in education, employment, or marriage. PMID:23421579

  18. AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS IN WOMEN WITH TURNER SYNDROME AND WOMEN WITH KARYOTYPICALLY NORMAL PRIMARY OVARIAN INSUFFICIENCY

    PubMed Central

    Bakalov, Vladimir K.; Gutin, Liat; Cheng, Clara M; Zhou, Jian; Sheth, Puja; Shah, Kavita; Arepalli, Sruthi; Vanderhoof, Vien; Nelson, Lawrence M.; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    The higher prevalence of autoimmune diseases in women compared to men could be due to effects of ovarian hormones, pregnancy and/or the presence of a 2nd X chromosome. To elucidate the role of these factors, we investigated the prevalence and spectrum of autoimmune diagnoses in women with primary ovarian insufficiency associated with X chromosome monosomy (Turner syndrome, TS, n=244) and women with karyotypically normal (46,XX) primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, n=457) in a prospective study, conducted at the National Institutes of Health. We compared the study group prevalence to normative data for the U.S. population of women. Chronic lymphocytic (Hashimoto’s) thyroiditis (HT) occurred in 37% of women with TS vs. 15% with POI (P<0.0001); HT prevalence in both ovarian insufficiency groups significantly exceeded that in U.S. population of women (5.8%). Inflammatory bowel (IBD, 4%) and celiac disease (CD, 2.7%) were significantly increased in TS, but not in POI. No other autoimmune diagnosis, including Graves’ disease or Type 1 diabetes appears to be significantly increased in either group. Women with TS had higher pro-inflammatory IL6 and TGF β1 levels (p<0.0001 for both), and lower anti-inflammatory IL10 and TGF β2 levels (p<0.005 for both) compared to POI and to normal volunteers. Lifetime estrogen exposure and parity were significantly lower in TS compared to POI, which were in turn lower than the general population of women. The finding that lymphocytic thyroiditis is greatly increased in both women with TS and POI suggests that factors associated with ovarian insufficiency per se promote this form of autoimmunity. The absence of a normal second X-chromosome further contributes to increased autoimmunity in TS. PMID:22342295

  19. A Rare Combination: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due To 21 Hydroxylase Deficiency and Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Aycan, Zehra; Çetinkaya, Semra; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Önder, Aşan

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Turner syndrome (TS) and classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is rare. A one-day-old newborn was referred to our hospital with ambiguous genitalia. The parents were third-degree relatives. The infant’s weight was 3350g (50-75p), and the head circumference was 34.5cm (50p). The gonads were nonpalpable. Presence of a 3 cm phallus, one urogenital opening into the perineum, and incomplete labial fusion were identified. Laboratory tests revealed a classical type of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Karyotyping revealed a 45X0(35)/46XX(22) pattern with negative sex-determining region Y (SRY) on gene analysis. At the most recent follow-up visit, the patient appeared to be in good health - her height was 70.4 cm [-1.5 standard deviation (SD)] and her weight was 9.8 kg (0.3 SD). She was receiving hydrocortisone in a dose of 10 mg/m2/day, fludrocortisone acetate in a dose of 0.075 mg/day, and oral salt of 1 g/day. System examinations were normal. The patient’s electrolyte levels were found to be normal and she was in good metabolic control. The findings of this patient demonstrate that routine karyotyping during investigation of patients with sexual differentiation disorders can reveal TS. Additionally, signs of virilism should always be investigated at diagnosis or during physical examinations for follow-up of TS cases. [i][/i]SRY analysis should be performed primarily when signs of virilism are observed. CAH should also be considered in patients with negative [i]SRY[/i]. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23261864

  20. Turner Syndrome Genotype and phenotype and their effect on presenting features and timing of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Al Alwan, I; M, Khadora; Amir; G, Nasrat; A, Omair; L, Brown; M, Al Dubayee; M, Badri

    2014-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder caused by abnormalities of the X chromosome. We aimed to describe the phenotypic characteristics of TS patients and evaluate their association with presenting clinical characteristics and time at diagnosis. Methods We studied females diagnosed with TS at King Abdul Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh between 1983 and 2010. Patients were classified based upon karyotype into females with classical monosomy 45,X (group A) and females with other X chromosome abnormalities (mosaic 45,X/46,XX, Xqisochromosomes, Xp or Xq deletion) (group B). Clinical features of the two groups were analyzed. Results Of the 52 patients included in the study, 16(30.8%) were diagnosed with classical monosomy 45,X and the rest with other X chromosome abnormalities. Only 19(36.5%) patients were diagnosed in infancy and the remaining during childhood or later (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5,95%CI 1.27–15.90, p=0.02). Short stature was universal in group A versus 77.8% in group B. All patients in group A had primary amenorrhea compared with 63.2% of those in group B (P = 0.04); the rest of group B had secondary amenorrhea. Cardiovascular abnormalities were higher in group A (OR=3.50, 95%CI 0.99–12.29, p-value =0.05). Renal defects and recurrent otitis media were similar in both groups. Conclusion This study suggests that karyotype variations might affect the phenotype of TS; however, it may not reliably predict the clinical presentation. Chromosomal analysis for all suspected cases of TS should be promptly done at childhood in order to design an appropriate management plan early in life. PMID:25246887

  1. Unusual association of Turner syndrome and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meena, Alpana; Daga, Mradul Kumar; Dixit, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Gonadal dysgenesis and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) are the most common causes of primary amenorrhoea. Patients with gonadal dysgenesis present with primary amenorrhoea and lack of secondary sexual characteristics, which, in contrast, are present in patients with MRKHS. The coexistence of the 2 syndromes has been reported in only a few studies so far. We describe a case of a 15-year-old girl who presented with short stature and primary amenorrhoea. Investigations revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and absence of the uterus, and upper two-thirds of the vagina, with presence of the rudimentary lower third of the vagina and non-visualised bilateral ovaries on imaging. Karyotyping obtained by lymphocyte culture GTG banding revealed 45X/46XX. The patient was diagnosed as having a rare case of gonadal dysgenesis with MRKH. She was started on growth hormone therapy. The association of these syndromes is uncommon, and has further implications on fertility and pregnancy, affecting the quality of life. PMID:27207981

  2. Unusual association of Turner syndrome and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meena, Alpana; Daga, Mradul Kumar; Dixit, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Gonadal dysgenesis and Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) are the most common causes of primary amenorrhoea. Patients with gonadal dysgenesis present with primary amenorrhoea and lack of secondary sexual characteristics, which, in contrast, are present in patients with MRKHS. The coexistence of the 2 syndromes has been reported in only a few studies so far. We describe a case of a 15-year-old girl who presented with short stature and primary amenorrhoea. Investigations revealed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, and absence of the uterus, and upper two-thirds of the vagina, with presence of the rudimentary lower third of the vagina and non-visualised bilateral ovaries on imaging. Karyotyping obtained by lymphocyte culture GTG banding revealed 45X/46XX. The patient was diagnosed as having a rare case of gonadal dysgenesis with MRKH. She was started on growth hormone therapy. The association of these syndromes is uncommon, and has further implications on fertility and pregnancy, affecting the quality of life.

  3. X-inactivation pattern in an Ullrich-Turner syndrome patient with a small ring X and normal intelligence.

    PubMed

    Zenger-Hain, J L; Wiktor, A; Goldman, J; Van Dyke, D L; Weiss, L

    1993-09-15

    In a description of 8 girls who had Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) with a small r(X), mental retardation, and other unusual findings, it was hypothesized that the distinctive phenotype was associated with the loss of the X inactivation center from the r(X) and lack of genetic inactivation of the ring [Van Dyke et al., 1992]. Here, we present a 17-year-old young woman with 45,X/46,X,r(X)(?p11q13) mosaicism, Ullrich-Turner syndrome, and normal intelligence. In situ hybridization with the X-centromere DNA probe DXZ1 (Oncor, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD) was performed on previously G-banded slides, and the probe hybridized to the centromere regions of the normal X and the ring. The r(X) appears to be inactivated since a buccal smear demonstrated 5% Barr bodies. Furthermore, DAPI stain and FISH analysis with the X-centromere DNA probe DXZ1 was employed to distinguish the inactive X from the active X, and verified the presence of a sex chromatin mass in fibroblasts. These observations are consistent with the active-ring-X-and-mental-retardation hypothesis since the ring in this patient, although very small, appears to be normally inactivated and she has normal intelligence.

  4. A Case of Fisher-Bickerstaff Syndrome Overlapped by Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Daiki; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Takahasi, Yosiaki; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Abe, Koji

    2012-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old woman with overlapping Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE). She developed diplopia and unsteady gait a week after an upper respiratory infection on day 1. She had weakness of both upper limbs on day 3 and became drowsy, and her respiratory status worsened on day 5. Neurologic examination revealed ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, symmetrical weakness, areflexia, and consciousness disturbance. We diagnosed her with MFS on day 1, GBS on day 3 and overlapping BBE on day 5. She underwent immunoadsorption therapy and two courses of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Ten months after onset, her symptoms had fully recovered. Anti-GM1 IgG, GD1a IgG, GQ1b IgG, and GT1a IgG antibodies were positive. Our case supports the notion that MFS, GBS, and BBE are all part of a continuous clinical spectrum, which is an antibody-mediated process. PMID:23275783

  5. Psychological and behavioural aspects of patients with Turner syndrome from childhood to adulthood: a review of the clinical literature.

    PubMed

    Christopoulos, P; Deligeoroglou, E; Laggari, V; Christogiorgos, S; Creatsas, G

    2008-03-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal abnormality, which occurs in approximately one of every 2500 female births. Short stature, infertility, additional physical abnormalities, skeletal and medical problems may be present. Genetic, hormonal, and medical problems associated with TS are likely to affect psychosexual development of female adolescent patients, and thus influence their psychological functioning, behavior patterns, social interactions and learning ability. Although TS constitutes a chronic medical condition, with possible physical, social and psychological complications in a woman's life, hormonal and estrogen replacement therapy and assisted reproduction, are treatments that can be helpful for TS patients and improve their quality of life. Authors report on a review of the research literature clinical aspects of the syndrome as well as the beneficial effect of hormonal therapy in such patients.

  6. Parsonage-Turner syndrome and a localised swelling around the extensor tendons of the hand: a clinical sign indicating increased risk of rupture of the tendon.

    PubMed

    Vedung, Torbjörn

    2012-10-01

    Two patients presented with intense pain in the shoulder followed by weakness and paralysis of muscles in the shoulder and arm, together with a peculiar swelling on the hand. The swelling seems to predispose to rupture of the extensor tendon. If this tumour is a regular finding in Parsonage-Turner syndrome, it may also help in making a definitive diagnosis.

  7. Precocious puberty in Turner Syndrome: report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Turner Syndrome (TS) is caused by monosomy or structural abnormalities of the X chromosome, with a prevalence of about 1/2000 females live birth. Most important clinical features of TS are short stature and gonadal failure. Approximately one third of girls with TS may undergo spontaneous puberty. Here we report on the case of a girl with a rare 45X0/47XXX mosaic TS exhibiting a precocious puberty. Case report The patient was diagnosed with TS at the age of 4 years, upon a diagnostic work-up for dysmorphic features. Chromosome analysis revealed a mosaic karyotype (45X0/47XXX). She presented with normal height and normal growth velocity so that Growth Hormone (GH) therapy was not started. She was referred to our Department at the age of 7 years and 10 months, because of vaginal bleeding. A physical examination revealed a Tanner stage III for breast and Tanner stage III for pubic hair development. Height and weight were within the normal range for age. Psychological evaluation showed moderate global developmental delay, together with emotional and social immaturity and reading difficulties. The growth rate was accelerated. Her bone age was 10 years. Pelvic ultrasound demonstrated increased size for age of both the uterus and the ovaries, with bilateral ovarian follicles. GnRH stimulation test revealed pubertal response of gonadotropins (peak LH 22.5 mIU/ml). MRI of the brain was normal. These clinical, radiologic and laboratory findings were consistent with a diagnosis of idiopathic central precocious puberty; therefore, GnRH analog therapy was started, in order to slow pubertal progression and to preserve adult stature. Furthermore, GH treatment was added to further improve adult height. Conclusion Our case highlights the possibility of precocious puberty as an atypical clinical feature of TS. Thus, precocious puberty may occur in TS girls when a dosage compensation by the cell line with more than two X chromosomes allows normal ovarian function. Gn

  8. Turner Syndrome and Associated Problems in Turkish Children: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Bereket, Abdullah; Darendeliler, Feyza; Baş, Firdevs; Poyrazoğlu, Şükran; Küçükemre Aydın, Banu; Darcan, Şükran; Dündar, Bumin; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Sarı, Erkan; Adal, Erdal; Akıncı, Ayşehan; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Demirel, Fatma; Çelik, Nurullah; Özkan, Behzat; Özhan, Bayram; Orbak, Zerrin; Ersoy, Betül; Doğan, Murat; Ataş, Ali; Turan, Serap; Gökşen, Damla; Tarım, Ömer; Yüksel, Bilgin; Ercan, Oya; Hatun, Şükrü; Şimşek, Enver; Ökten, Ayşenur; Abacı, Ayhan; Döneray, Hakan; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Keskin, Mehmet; Önal, Hasan; Akyürek, Nesibe; Bulan, Kezban; Tepe, Derya; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Demir, Korcan; Kızılay, Deniz; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal; Eren, Erdal; Özen, Samim; Abalı, Saygın; Akın, Leyla; Selver Eklioğlu, Beray; Kaba, Sultan; Anık, Ahmet; Baş, Serpil; Ünüvar, Tolga; Sağlam, Halil; Bolu, Semih; Özgen, Tolga; Doğan, Durmuş; Çakır, Esra Deniz; Şen, Yaşar; Andıran, Nesibe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Karagüzel, Gülay; Pirgon, Özgür; Çatlı, Gönül; Can, Hatice Dilek; Gürbüz, Fatih; Binay, Çiğdem; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Fidancı, Kürşat; Polat, Adem; Gül, Davut; Açıkel, Cengizhan; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Cinaz, Peyami; Bondy, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Turner syndrome (TS) is a chromosomal disorder caused by complete or partial X chromosome monosomy that manifests various clinical features depending on the karyotype and on the genetic background of affected girls. This study aimed to systematically investigate the key clinical features of TS in relationship to karyotype in a large pediatric Turkish patient population. Methods: Our retrospective study included 842 karyotype-proven TS patients aged 0-18 years who were evaluated in 35 different centers in Turkey in the years 2013-2014. Results: The most common karyotype was 45,X (50.7%), followed by 45,X/46,XX (10.8%), 46,X,i(Xq) (10.1%) and 45,X/46,X,i(Xq) (9.5%). Mean age at diagnosis was 10.2±4.4 years. The most common presenting complaints were short stature and delayed puberty. Among patients diagnosed before age one year, the ratio of karyotype 45,X was significantly higher than that of other karyotype groups. Cardiac defects (bicuspid aortic valve, coarctation of the aorta and aortic stenosis) were the most common congenital anomalies, occurring in 25% of the TS cases. This was followed by urinary system anomalies (horseshoe kidney, double collector duct system and renal rotation) detected in 16.3%. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was found in 11.1% of patients, gastrointestinal abnormalities in 8.9%, ear nose and throat problems in 22.6%, dermatologic problems in 21.8% and osteoporosis in 15.3%. Learning difficulties and/or psychosocial problems were encountered in 39.1%. Insulin resistance and impaired fasting glucose were detected in 3.4% and 2.2%, respectively. Dyslipidemia prevalence was 11.4%. Conclusion: This comprehensive study systematically evaluated the largest group of karyotype-proven TS girls to date. The karyotype distribution, congenital anomaly and comorbidity profile closely parallel that from other countries and support the need for close medical surveillance of these complex patients throughout their lifespan. PMID:25800473

  9. Assessment of Turner's syndrome by molecular analysis of the X chromosome in growth-retarded girls.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Gaston, V; Cabrol, S; Le Bouc, Y

    1998-05-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) is a common disorder (1/2500 to 1/5000 female births) which is diagnosed at birth in approximately 20% of patients and during childhood or at puberty for the rest. Growth retardation is the most frequent clinical feature of TS, so we systematically searched for TS in female patients referred to our center because of short stature. Three hundred seventy-five female patients, 1 month to 18 yr old (mean +/- SD = 9(7/12) +/- 3(9/12), with growth retardation (less than -2 SD) and/or decreased height velocity were included in the study. Mean growth retardation was -2.57 SD +/- 0.79 (range: -1 to -7). Thirty-two percent of the patients had reached puberty. GH provocative tests were performed in 329 patients (87.7%), and 36 of these patients (11%) had impaired GH secretion (5 complete and 31 partial GH deficiency). TS was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of leukocyte DNA using a multiallelic polymorphic X chromosome marker (88% heterozygosity rate). Y chromosome PCR analysis was carried out if a pattern indicative of TS was obtained. Leukocyte DNA analysis produced an abnormal restriction pattern for 20 of the 375 cases (5.3%). There was a single hybridizing band in 13 cases, an allelic disproportion indicative of mosaicism in 6 cases, and 3 hybridizing bands in 1 case. One patient tested positive in the Y chromosome PCR analysis. Cytogenetic analysis showed 47 XXX trisomy in the patient with a 3-hybridizing-band pattern and confirmed the diagnosis of TS for 17 of the 19 suspected cases: 45 X: n = 7; 45 X/46 Xi(Xq): n = 4; 45 X/46 XX: n = 2; 46 Xi(Xq): n = 1; 45 X/46 Xr(X): n = 1; 45 X/46 XX/47 XXX: n = 1; 45 X/46 XY: n = 1. Cytogenetic analysis was normal (46 XX) for the 2 other patients. The TS phenotype is variable: dysmorphism is often missing or mild (particularly in cases of mosaicism), but growth is reduced in virtually all patients. Screening of 375 growth-retarded girls identified 18 cases of TS, of which 17 were diagnosed by molecular

  10. The clinical and genetic features of the COPD asthma overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Beaty, Terri; Ramsdell, Joe; Bhatt, Surya; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with COPD and asthma are an important but poorly characterized group. The genetic determinants of COPD-asthma overlap have not been studied. Objective Identify clinical features and genetic risk factors for COPD-asthma overlap. Methods Subjects were current or former smoking non-Hispanic whites (NHW) or African-Americans (AA) with COPD. Overlap subjects reported a history of physician-diagnosed asthma before the age of 40. We compared clinical and radiographic features between COPD and overlap subjects. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the NHW and AA populations, and combined these results in a meta-analysis. Results More women and African Americans reported a history of asthma. Overlap subjects had more severe and more frequent respiratory exacerbations, less emphysema, and greater airway wall thickness compared to subjects with COPD alone. The NHW GWAS identified SNPs in CSMD1 (rs11779254, P=1.57×10−6) and SOX5(rs59569785, P=1.61×10−6) and the meta-analysis identified SNPs in the gene GPR65 (rs6574978, P=1.18×10−7) associated with COPD-asthma overlap. Conclusions Overlap subjects have more exacerbations, less emphysema and more airway disease for any degree of lung function impairment compared to COPD alone. We identified novel genetic variants associated with this syndrome. COPD-asthma overlap is an important syndrome and may require distinct clinical management. PMID:24876173

  11. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AITP) and thyroid autoimmune disease (TAD): overlapping syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Cordiano, I; Betterle, C; Spadaccino, C A; Soini, B; Girolami, A; Fabris, F

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia associated with TAD and the occurrence of overlapping traits between TAD and AITP are still a matter of debate. For this reason, we investigated for the presence and specificity of platelet and thyroid autoantibodies in 18 TAD patients with thrombocytopenia, 19 TAD patients without thrombocytopenia and in 22 patients with primary AITP without clinical signs of TAD. Platelet-associated IgG and/or specific circulating platelet autoantibodies were detected in 83% of patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, in 10% of patients with TAD without thrombocytopenia and in 86% of patients with primary AITP. The reactivity of serum autoantibodies, assayed by MoAb immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA), was directed against platelet glycoproteins Ib and/or IIb/IIIa in 50% of the patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, as in 46% of the patients with primary AITP. Thyroid autoantibodies were found in 89% of patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, in 95% of patients with TAD without thrombocytopenia, and in 18% of patients with primary AITP. Thyrotropin (TSH) levels determined in three of four AITP patients with thyroid autoantibodies revealed a subclinical hyperthyroidism in one patient. The present study supports the autoimmune aetiology of thrombocytopenia associated with TAD, since the prevalence and specificity of platelet autoantibodies are similar in TAD and primary AITP. The results indicate also that there exists an overlap between thyroid and platelet autoimmunity with or without clinical manifestations. PMID:9737665

  12. Orthostatic intolerance: postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with overlapping vasovagal syncope.

    PubMed

    Skerk, Vedrana; Pintarić, Hrvoje; Delić-Brkljacić, Diana; Popović, Zvonimir; Hećimović, Hrvoje

    2012-03-01

    A 28-year-old female with a history of situational syncope and a new-onset right sided hemiparesis is described. Tilt-up table test revealed the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome followed by vasovagal syncope. Neurological and internal medicine tests showed no particular disorders. The patient underwent autonomic physical training and the tilt-up test performed three months later showed improvement of the autonomic system in terms of lower heart beat rate of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and longer duration of the test. This case report describes longstanding idiopathic dysautonomia that can be improved by nonpharmacological treatment, while reminding that this medical condition may also be the cause of syncope.

  13. Rapp-Hodgkin ectodermal dysplasia syndrome: the clinical and molecular overlap with Hay-Wells syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kannu, Peter; Savarirayan, Ravi; Ozoemena, Linda; White, Susan M; McGrath, John A

    2006-04-15

    We report on the clinical and molecular abnormalities in a 7-month-old girl and her mother with an ectodermal dysplasia disorder that most closely resembles Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS). At birth, the child had bilateral cleft palate, a narrow pinched nose, small chin, and hypoplastic nipples, and suffered from respiratory distress, feeding difficulties, and poor weight gain, although developmental progress was normal. Her mother had a cleft palate, sparse hair, high forehead, dental anomalies, a narrow nose, dysplastic nails, and reduced sweating. Sequencing of the p63 gene in genomic DNA from both individuals revealed a heterozygous frameshift mutation, 1721delC, in exon 14. This mutation has not been described previously and is the seventh report of a pathogenic p63 gene mutation in RHS. The frameshift results in changes to the tail of p63 with the addition of 90 missense amino acids downstream and a delayed termination codon that extends the protein by 21 amino acids. This mutation is predicted to disrupt the normal repressive function of the transactivation inhibitory domain leading to gain-of-function for at least two isoforms of the p63 transcription factor. The expanding p63 mutation database demonstrates that there is considerable overlap between the molecular pathology of RHS and Hay-Wells syndrome, with identical mutations in some cases, and that these two disorders may in fact be synonymous.

  14. Successful Pregnancy in Autoimmune Hepatitis/Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Overlap Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subarna; Nayak, Prasanta Kumar; Padma, Alaganandam; Kurian, George

    2012-01-01

    Medical literature on pregnancy outcomes in hepatic overlap syndromes is limited. Autoimmune liver diseases are associated with sub-fertility and pregnancy is usually dissuaded in presence of portal hypertension and cirrhosis due to guarded prognosis for the pregnancy as well as the liver disease. We report a 24-year-old primigravida with autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome who had a successful pregnancy owing to intensive monitoring and meticulous treatment with drugs like immunosuppressants and ursodeoxycholic acid. She developed preterm prelabour rupture of membranes and delivered at 35 weeks without any major obstetric or hepatic complications.

  15. LHON/MELAS overlap syndrome associated with a mitochondrial MTND1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Blakely, Emma L; de Silva, Rajith; King, Andrew; Schwarzer, Verena; Harrower, Tim; Dawidek, Gervase; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2005-05-01

    Pathogenic point mutations in the mitochondrial MTND1 gene have previously been described in association with two distinct clinical phenotypes -- Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). Here we report the first heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutation (3376G>A) in the MTND1 gene associated with an overlap syndrome comprising the clinical features of both LHON and MELAS. Muscle histochemistry revealed subtle mitochondrial abnormalities, while biochemical analysis showed an isolated complex I deficiency. Our findings serve to highlight the growing importance of mutations in mitochondrial complex I structural genes in MELAS and its associated overlap syndromes.

  16. A rare case of solitary brain Langerhans cell histiocytosis with intratumoral hemorrhage in a patient affected by Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Francesca; Morabito, Rosa; Grasso, Giovanni; Alafaci, Elisabetta; Salpietro, Francesco M.; Alafaci, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease involving clonal proliferation of cells with characteristics similar to bone marrow-derived Langerhans cells. The case of a young woman, affected by Turner syndrome and a solitary intraparenchymal LCH associated with an osteolytic lesion of the overlying skull, is presented. Case Description: The patient, with an insidious history of headache and a growing soft mass in the left frontal region, presented with a sudden generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizure. Neuroradiological investigations showed an osteolytic lesion of the left frontal bone and an underlying brain lesion associated with recent signs of bleeding. The patient was operated on with a complete removal of the lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful. Conclusions: The clinical, neuroradiological, and intraoperative findings are presented, along with a review of the literature. Although rare, LCH should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a scalp lesion occurs with a progressive growing. PMID:27127696

  17. Anti-AMPA-Receptor Encephalitis Presenting as a Rapid-Cycling Bipolar Disorder in a Young Woman with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune encephalitis is a disorder characterised by the subacute onset of seizures, short-term memory loss, and psychiatric and behavioural symptoms. Initially, it was recognised as a paraneoplastic disorder, but recently a subgroup of patients without systemic cancer was identified. Case Description. We describe a 20-year-old woman with Turner syndrome presenting with a treatment-resistant rapid cycling bipolar disorder with cognitive impairment. She was diagnosed with anti-AMPA-receptor encephalitis. She showed marked improvement after starting memantine and valproic acid. Conclusion. This case description emphasises the importance of timely recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalitis in patients with psychiatric manifestations and a possible predisposition to autoimmune conditions, in order to rule out malignancy and to quickly initiate treatment. PMID:26495149

  18. Ascites in the Puerperium in the Context of a Woman with Turner Syndrome Who Conceived through Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Tsagkas, Nikolaos; Valasoulis, George; Zikopoulos, Konstantinos; Zerzi, Calliope; Mitselos, Ioannis; Koutoulakis, Ioannis; Tzampouras, Nikolaos; Stefos, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    The case is about a young female who delivered twins by caesarean section (CS). On the 4th postoperative day, she presented with ascites which was resistant to empirical antibiotic and diuretic treatment. The woman was affected by Turner syndrome (TS); she had a medical background of chronic use of hormonal medication since puberty and conceived through ART- (assisted reproduction techniques-) IVF-oocyte donation. It is important to exhibit high suspicion for clot formation in the hepatic vasculature during the puerperium, especially in the case of history of chronic hormone treatment. Ascites albumin gradient and Doppler values lead to the diagnosis of thrombosis and the administration of high doses of anticoagulants is considered to be fundamental. PMID:26579320

  19. Ullrich-Turner Syndrome and Tumor Risk: Is There Another Chance to Early Gonadectomy in Positive TSPY and SRY Patients?

    PubMed

    Silveri, Massimiliano; Grossi, Armando; Bassani, Francesca; Orazi, Cinzia; Camassei, Francesca Diomedi; Zaccara, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of the Y chromosome in the karyotype of patients with disorders of sex differentiation is significantly associated with an increased risk to develop specific types of malignancies, predominantly type II germ cell tumors (GCTs). Gonadoblastoma in the gonads without an obvious testicular differentiation and intratubular germ cell neoplasia of unclassified type in testicular tissue are the precursor lesions of most GCTs. Gonadal dysgenesis, the characteristic feature of Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS), further contributes to increase this tumor risk. The reported incidence of Y chromosome material in UTS is 6 to 8% and in these cases an early gonadectomy is strongly recommended to prevent the risk of a malignancy. The aim of this work was to retrospectively analyze the clinical outcome and the histopathological and cytogenetic findings of our UTS patients who underwent gonadectomy to establish strict selection criteria aimed at promoting an organ-sparing surgery.

  20. Gene dosage as a relevant mechanism contributing to the determination of ovarian function in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castronovo, Chiara; Rossetti, Raffaella; Rusconi, Daniela; Recalcati, Maria P.; Cacciatore, Chiara; Beccaria, Elena; Calcaterra, Valeria; Invernizzi, Pietro; Larizza, Daniela; Finelli, Palma; Persani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What is the burden of X chromosome mosaicism in the occurrence of spontaneous menarche (SM) in Turner syndrome (TS)? SUMMARY ANSWER SM was significantly associated with X chromosome mosaicism in the TS patients; a mosaicism with around 10% euploid cell line may predict spontaneous pubertal development when determined by molecular-cytogenetic techniques on uncultivated tissues. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Spontaneous puberty can be observed in a minority of patients with TS, more frequently, but not exclusively, in those with a high level of 46,XX/45,X mosaicism at standard karyotype. The genetic mechanisms contributing to ovarian function in TS patients are still not determined. However, submicroscopic X-linked and autosomal copy number variations (CNVs) have recently emerged as an important genetic risk category for premature ovarian insufficiency and may be involved in modulating the TS ovarian phenotype. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A group of 40 patients with a diagnosis of TS at conventional karyotyping participated in the study; 6 patients had SM and 34 patients had primary amenorrhoea (PA). All clinical data and the patients’ DNA samples were collected over the years at a single paediatric clinic. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The patients' samples were used to perform both genetic (Copy Number Assay) and molecular-cytogenetic (array-CGH and iFISH, interphase-FISH) analyses in order to evaluate the X chromosome mosaicism rate and to detect possible rare CNVs of genes with a known or predicted role in female fertility. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE All TS patients showed variable percentages of the 46,XX lineage, but these percentages were higher in the SM group (P < 0.01). A mosaicism around 10% for the euploid cell line may predict spontaneous pubertal development when determined by molecular-cytogenetic techniques performed in uncultivated tissues. A few CNVs involving autosomal and X-linked ovary-related loci were identified by

  1. Therapeutic approaches in myelofibrosis and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Andrew L; Fischer, Melissa A; Savona, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of JAK2V617F a decade ago led to optimism for a rapidly developing treatment revolution in Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms. Unlike BCR–ABL, however, JAK2 was found to have a more heterogeneous role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, for years, development of new therapies was slow, despite standard treatment options that did not address the overwhelming symptom burden in patients with primary myelofibrosis (MF), post-essential thrombocythemia MF, post-polycythemia vera MF, and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) syndromes. JAK–STAT inhibitors have changed this, drastically ameliorating symptoms and ultimately beginning to show evidence of impact on survival. Now, the genetic foundations of myelofibrosis and MDS/MPN are rapidly being elucidated and contributing to targeted therapy development. This has been empowered through updated response criteria for MDS/MPN and refined prognostic scoring systems in these diseases. The aim of this article is to summarize concisely the current and rationally designed investigational therapeutics directed at JAK–STAT, hedgehog, PI3K–Akt, bone marrow fibrosis, telomerase, and rogue epigenetic signaling. The revolution in immunotherapy and novel treatments aimed at previously untargeted signaling pathways provides hope for considerable advancement in therapy options for those with chronic myeloid disease. PMID:27143923

  2. Spontaneous uterine rupture at 14 weeks gestation during a pregnancy consecutive to an oocyte donation in a woman with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Masia, Florent; Zoric, Lana; Ripart-Neveu, Sylvie; Marès, Pierre; Ripart, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    We describe a spontaneous uterine rupture at 14 weeks gestation in a Turner patient. A 39 year-old patient was admitted for abdominal pain and hypotension at 14 weeks of pregnancy. The pregnancy had been obtained by oocyte donation and in vitro fertilization (IVF) because of Turner's syndrome. The abdominal ultrasound scan showed a normal pregnancy and a conserved foetal cardiac activity. It also showed a large amount of free fluid in the perihepatic space. Haemoglobin was 11.2 g/dL. After hemodynamic degradation, urgent laparoscopy showed an unrepairable uterine rupture with partial exteriorisation of the pregnancy, and placenta percreta. Urgent conversion to laparotomy allowed haemostatic hysterectomy. Uterine rupture during pregnancy obtained by oocyte donation in Turner's syndrome may be life threatening. The possibility of such a complication should be considered before oocyte donation for IVF in Turner's patients. Early spontaneous uterine rupture (second trimester) is a challenging diagnostic that should be evoked in case of non-specific abdominal pain in the presence of risk factors. PMID:25858617

  3. Direct acting antiviral therapy is curative for chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahebjam, Farhad; Hajdu, Cristina H; Nortey, Esther; Sigal, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena are common in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Management of chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis syndrome has until recently been problematic due to the adverse effects of interferon on autoimmune processes and immunosuppression on viral replication. In this report we describe 3 patients with chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome who responded rapidly to direct acting anti-viral therapy. The resolution of the autoimmune process supports a direct viral role in its pathophysiology. PMID:27190580

  4. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  5. [Mosaic isochromosome Xq and microduplication 17p13.3p13.2 in a patient with Turner syndrome and congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Rojas Martínez, Jorge A; Acosta Guio, Johanna C

    2015-01-01

    The combination of Turner syndrome with other genetic disorders such as congenital cataract has been reported, but its association with a congenital form with autosomal dominant inheritance and incomplete penetrance has not been previously reported in the literature. There are no reports on its presentations with rearrangements on chromosome 17. We report the exceptional case of a 20 months old girl with a constellation of major and minor anomalies, diagnosed with mosaic Turner syndrome by isochromosome Xq associated with a microduplication 17p13.3p13.2, who also had bilateral congenital nuclear cataract autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance. We reviewed in the literature the origin and cause of these genetic alterations and we provided an approach to the hypothesis of the pathogenesis of the association of two of these genetic disorders in the same patient.

  6. Christmas disease (haemophilia B) in a girl with deletion of the short arm of one X-chromosome (functional Turner syndrome).

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A; Schmid, W; Straub, P W

    1976-09-01

    A I-year-old girl with severe Christmas disease and a factor IX content less than I% of normal is described. The family history was negative and coagulation studies on her relatives were normal. Genetic investigation showed an XXp-karyotype with deletion of the short arm of one X-chromosome, a cytogenetic variant of Turner syndrome. The transmission pathway of the haemophilia gene is discussed.

  7. A case of overlap syndrome with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turkcapar, Nuran; Olmez, Umit; Ozer, Didem; Duzgun, Nursen; Duman, Murat

    2006-07-01

    We report an unusual case of overlap syndrome that had the coexistence of five autoimmune diseases. A 45-year-old woman initially developed seropositive erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 11 years ago. She then developed progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) (including pulmonary hypertension, esophageal dysfunction, cardiac involvement and sclerodactilitis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (including photosensitivity, nephritis, leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia and Coombs positive hemolytic anemia and positive anti-dsDNA), and secondary Sjögren's syndrome (SSS) in the last 7 years before she was admitted to our clinic. The patient fulfilled classification criteria for RA, SLE, PSS and SSS, as determined by American College of Rheumatology. Hypothyroidism with positive autoantibodies due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the beginning of which could not be defined, was coexistent with this overlap syndrome. In the literature, although overlap syndromes in different combinations were reported, we very rarely observed a complex case like this patient. In our opinion, this is the first well-documented case of RA, PSS, SLE, SSS and Hashimoto's thyroiditis existing together in the same patient. Although immunosuppressive therapy was administered, the disease rapidly deteriorated and the patient died.

  8. Experience with growth hormone therapy in Turner syndrome in a single centre: low total height gain, no further gains after puberty onset and unchanged body proportions.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, R; Ranke, M B; Binder, G; Herdach, F; Zapadlo, M; Grauer, M L; Schwarze, C P; Wollmann, H A

    2000-01-01

    The experience gained since 1987, through observation of 85 girls with Turner syndrome under growth hormone (GH) treatment, has enabled the analysis of one of the largest cohorts. Our results show that age, karyotype and height reflect the heterogeneity of the patients examined at our growth centre. In 47 girls, followed over 4 years on GH (median dose 0.72 IU/kg/week), the median age was 9.4 years and mean height SDS was -3.55 (Prader) and -0.14 (Turner-specific), while height and other anthropometrical parameters [weight, body mass index, sitting height (SH), leg length (LL) SH/LL, head circumference, arm span] were documented and compared to normative data as well as to Turner-specific references established on the basis of a larger (n = 165) untreated cohort from Tübingen. The latter data are also documented in this article. Although there was a trend towards normalization of these parameters during the observation period, no inherent alterations in the Turner-specific anthropometric pattern occurred. In 42 girls who started GH treatment at a median age of 11.8 years, final height (bone age >15 years) was achieved at 16.7 years. The overall gain in height SDS (Turner) from start to end of GH therapy was 0.7 (+/- 0.8) SD, but 0.9 (+/- 0.6) SD from GH start to onset of puberty (spontaneous 12.2 years, induced 13.9 years) and -0.2 (+/- 0.8) from onset of puberty to end of growth. Height gain did not occur in 12 patients (29%) and a gain of > 5 cm was only observed in 16 patients (38%). Height gain correlated positively with age at puberty onset, duration, and dose of GH, and negatively with height and bone age at the time GH treatment started. Final height correlated positively with height SDS at GH start and negatively with the ratio of SH/LL (SDS). We conclude that, in the future, GH should be given at higher doses, but oestrogen substitution should be done cautiously, owing to its potentially harmful effect on growth. LL appears to determine height variation

  9. Y chromosome in Turner syndrome: detection of hidden mosaicism and the report of a rare X;Y translocation case.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Adriana Valéria Sales; Burégio-Frota, Pollyanna; Oliveira dos Santos, Luana; Leal, Gabriela Ferraz; Duarte, Andrea Rezende; Araújo, Jacqueline; Cavalcante da Silva, Vanessa; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Liehr, Thomas; Santos, Neide

    2014-10-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder in females associated with the absence of complete or parts of a second sex chromosome. In 5-12% of patients, mosaicism for a cell line with a normal or structurally abnormal Y chromosome is identified. The presence of Y-chromosome material is of medical importance because it results in an increased risk of developing gonadal tumours and virilisation. Molecular study and fluorescence in situ hybridisation approaches were used to study 74 Brazilian TS patients in order to determine the frequency of hidden Y-chromosome mosaicism, and to infer the potential risk of developing malignancies. Additionally, we describe one TS girl with a very uncommon karyotype 46,X,der(X)t(X;Y)(p22.3?2;q11.23) comprising a partial monosomy of Xp22.3?2 together with a partial monosomy of Yq11.23. The presence of cryptic Y-chromosome-specific sequences was detected in 2.7% of the cases. All patients with Y-chromosome-positive sequences showed normal female genitalia with no signs of virilisation. Indeed, the clinical data from Y-chromosome-positive patients was very similar to those with Y-negative results. Therefore, we recommend that the search for hidden Y-chromosome mosaicism should be carried out in all TS cases and not be limited to virilised patients or carriers of a specific karyotype.

  10. The association with Turner syndrome significantly affects the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis in children, irrespective of karyotype.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Tommaso; Messina, Maria Francesca; Mazzanti, Laura; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Mussa, Alessandro; Faienza, Maria Felicia; Scarano, Emanuela; De Luca, Filippo; Wasniewska, Malgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Only few studies have investigated to now whether the association with Turner syndrome (TS) may affect the course of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in children. Aim of this study was to ascertain whether the presentation and long-term course of HT in TS children may be characterized by a peculiar and atypical pattern. The clinical and biochemical findings at HT diagnosis in 90 TS children (group A) were compared with those recorded in 449 girls with HT but without TS (group B); in group A patients, thyroid function tests were re-evaluated after a median time interval of 4.9 years. At HT diagnosis median TSH levels and the rate of cases presenting with a thyroid dysfunction picture were significantly lower in group A, irrespective of karyotype abnormalities. In group A only 34.8 % of the girls who had initially presented with euthyroidism remained euthyroid even at re-evaluation, whilst 67.7 % of those who had presented with subclinical hypothyroidism became overtly hypothyroid over time; also such evolutive pattern was irrespective of karyotype abnormalities. (1) In TS girls, HT presents with a milder hormonal pattern, which often deteriorates over time; (2) these biochemical features are not necessarily linked with a specific karyotype.

  11. Quality of medical follow-up of young women with Turner syndrome treated in one clinical center.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Aneta; Kaczor, Barbara; Kaminska, Halla; Zachurzok-Buczynska, Agnieszka; Gawlik, Tomasz; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    For Turner syndrome (TS) patients, smooth transition from pediatric to adult health care is a critical point. The study objective was to evaluate the medical follow-up of young women with TS in one clinical center 3 years after the latest guidelines had been introduced by the TS Study Group. A questionnaire study was performed in 59 TS adults selected from a database of 117 patients. Twenty-two of them, aged 23.0 ± 2.8 years, consented to participate. Nineteen responders (86.4%) were followed up by general practitioners who were not aware of the TS diagnosis in 14 (63.6%) cases. Eight (36.4%) were seen regularly by the relevant specialists. Adequate medical assessment varied from 5% (celiac serology) to 74% (gynecology assessment) and 82% (ear-nose-throat) of participants. None of the patients had undergone all of the recommended investigations according to recommendation. Height deficiency, body mass index, age at TS diagnosis and level of education did not correlate with the number of assessments performed (p = 0.687, p = 0.810, p = 0.641, and p = 0.568, respectively). Three years after the introduction of the current guidelines, medical follow-up in the transition phase is still inadequate. Improvement in transitional health care is warranted through better patient education, referring to physicians caring for adults with TS and better cooperation with general practitioners with wider popularization of the TS recommendations among them.

  12. Analysis of Turner syndrome patients within the Jordanian population, with a focus on four patients with Y chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daggag, H; Srour, W; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings in Turner syndrome (TS) patients from the Jordanian population, with focus on 4 patients with Y chromosomal abnormalities. From 1989 to 2011, 504 patients with TS stigmata were referred to our institute for karyotyping, resulting in 142 positive TS cases. Of these, 62 (43.7%) had the typical 45,X karyotype and the remaining individuals (56.3%) were found to be mosaics. Fifteen TS patients (10.5%) carried a structural abnormality of the Y chromosome and presented with the mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype. From these, 4 TS cases were investigated further. Karyotyping revealed that 1 patient carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome, whereas cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that 3 patients carried 2 copies of the SRY gene. Further analysis by SRY sequencing revealed no mutations within the gene. The analyzed patients were found to be phenotypically either females or males, depending on the predominance of the cell line carrying the Y chromosome. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic analysis (such as FISH) in TS patients, and it also emphasizes the need for molecular analysis (such as PCR and sequencing) when fragments of the Y chromosome are present.

  13. Quality of medical follow-up of young women with Turner syndrome treated in one clinical center.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Aneta; Kaczor, Barbara; Kaminska, Halla; Zachurzok-Buczynska, Agnieszka; Gawlik, Tomasz; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    For Turner syndrome (TS) patients, smooth transition from pediatric to adult health care is a critical point. The study objective was to evaluate the medical follow-up of young women with TS in one clinical center 3 years after the latest guidelines had been introduced by the TS Study Group. A questionnaire study was performed in 59 TS adults selected from a database of 117 patients. Twenty-two of them, aged 23.0 ± 2.8 years, consented to participate. Nineteen responders (86.4%) were followed up by general practitioners who were not aware of the TS diagnosis in 14 (63.6%) cases. Eight (36.4%) were seen regularly by the relevant specialists. Adequate medical assessment varied from 5% (celiac serology) to 74% (gynecology assessment) and 82% (ear-nose-throat) of participants. None of the patients had undergone all of the recommended investigations according to recommendation. Height deficiency, body mass index, age at TS diagnosis and level of education did not correlate with the number of assessments performed (p = 0.687, p = 0.810, p = 0.641, and p = 0.568, respectively). Three years after the introduction of the current guidelines, medical follow-up in the transition phase is still inadequate. Improvement in transitional health care is warranted through better patient education, referring to physicians caring for adults with TS and better cooperation with general practitioners with wider popularization of the TS recommendations among them. PMID:22538845

  14. Increased hGH production rate after low-dose estrogen therapy in prepubertal girls with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mauras, N; Rogol, A D; Veldhuis, J D

    1990-12-01

    Low-dose estrogen therapy significantly increases radioimmunoassayable serum hGH concentrations in the prepubertal hypogonadal female. In this study, we have examined the effects of short- and long-term low-dose ethinyl estradiol therapy on the endogenous production rates and metabolic clearance rates of hGH. We used deconvolution mathematical modeling to provide quantitative estimates of individual secretory parameters and to calculate subject-specific hGH metabolic clearance rates, by using all serum hGH concentrations and their variances considered simultaneously. Nine girls with Turner's syndrome (mean age 7.7 +/- 0.5 y) were studied on three separate nights by drawing blood every 20 min from 2200 to 0800 h before (I), after 1 wk (II), and 5 wk (III) of 100 ng/kg/d ethinyl estradiol therapy orally. We found that the endogenous hGH production rate more than doubled in all patients studied after 5 wk of ethinyl estradiol therapy (194 +/- 22 (I), 290 +/- 43 (II), and 412 +/- 66 (III) micrograms/L/12 h; p less than 0.05 for I and III). The half-life of endogenous hGH was not altered in the estrogen treatment paradigm with a mean of 19 +/- 1.6 min in study I and 18 +/- 1.2 min in both studies II and III. Our results suggest that even prepubertal concentrations of gonadal steroids in the hypogonadal female may be physiologically relevant to the maintenance of normal somatotrope secretory function.

  15. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome concomitant with immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans syndrome).

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Huseyin; Bugdaci, Mehmet Sait; Temel, Tuncer; Dagli, Mehmet; Karabagli, Pinar

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) associated with Evans syndrome; combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 53-year-old patient who presented with weakness, myalgia, arthralgia, shortness of breath and purpura. Initial laboratory investigations revealed liver dysfunction, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Anti-nuclear (ANA) and antimitochondrial M2 (AMA M2) antibodies were positive. Diagnose of PBC-AIH overlap was made by clinical, serological and histological investigations. AIHA and ITP was identified with clinical-laboratory findings and bone marrow puncture. She was treated with IVIG followed by prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid. Hemoglobin-thrombocytes increased rapidly and transaminases improved at day 8. We have reported the first case in the literature with AIH-PBC overlap syndrome concurrent by ITP and AIHA which suggest the presence of shared genetic susceptibility factors in multiple autoimmune conditions including AIH, PBC, ITP and AIHA.

  16. Systemic lupus erythematosus associated with ANCA-associated vasculitis: an overlapping syndrome?

    PubMed

    Hervier, B; Hamidou, M; Haroche, J; Durant, C; Mathian, A; Amoura, Z

    2012-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and small-sized vessel vasculitis are usually two distinguishable autoimmune diseases. However, a vasculitis may be found in the course SLE but rarely corresponds to an ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). We report four cases of de novo SLE associated with AAV, our aim being to discuss the clinical significance of this association. We included four patients fulfilling the criteria for both SLE and AAV and followed in two different university hospitals between 1996 and 2009. In light of a 20-year literature review (25 described clinical cases), we discussed the etiopathogeny of such an association. All patients presented a severe renal involvement (creatininemia ranging from 120 to 370 μmol/l) and thrombopenia (ranging from 45,000 to 137,000 platelets/mm(3)). The other main clinical symptoms were arthritis (n = 3), serositis (n = 2) and intra-alveolar hemorrhage (n = 2). An inflammatory syndrome was noticed at diagnosis in all cases. ANCAs were MPO-ANCAs in all cases. Two out of these four patients were also diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome. The frequency of this association seems not fortuitous. Although the etiopathogenic mechanisms of such an association remain to be more precisely described, several clinical, histological and immunological features support the hypothesis of the existence of a SLE-AAV overlapping syndrome. Moreover, clinicians must be aware of such an overlapping syndrome, notably because its initial presentation can be very severe.

  17. Bicuspid aortic valve and aortic coarctation are linked to deletion of the X chromosome short arm in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bondy, Carolyn; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Cheng, Clara; Olivieri, Laura; Rosing, Douglas R; Arai, Andrew E

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a cardinal feature of X chromosome monosomy, or Turner syndrome (TS). Haploinsufficiency for gene(s) located on Xp have been implicated in the short stature characteristic of the syndrome, but the chromosomal region related to the CHD phenotype has not been established. Design We used cardiac MRI to diagnose cardiovascular abnormalities in four non-mosaic karyotype groups based on 50-metaphase analyses: 45,X (n=152); 46,X,del(Xp) (n=15); 46,X,del(Xq) (n=4); and 46,X,i(Xq) (n=14) from peripheral blood cells. Results Bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) were found in 52/152 (34%) 45,X study subjects and aortic coarctation (COA) in 19/152 (12.5%). Isolated anomalous pulmonary veins (APV) were detected in 15/152 (10%) for the 45,X study group, and this defect was not correlated with the presence of BAV or COA. BAVs were present in 28.6% of subjects with Xp deletions and COA in 6.7%. APV were not found in subjects with Xp deletions. The most distal break associated with the BAV/COA trait was at cytologic band Xp11.4 and ChrX:41,500 000. One of 14 subjects (7%) with the 46,X,i(Xq) karyotype had a BAV and no cases of COA or APV were found in this group. No cardiovascular defects were found among four patients with Xq deletions. Conclusions The high prevalence of BAV and COA in subjects missing only the X chromosome short arm indicates that haploinsufficiency for Xp genes contributes to abnormal aortic valve and aortic arch development in TS. PMID:23825392

  18. Expiratory Time Constant and Sleep Apnea Severity in the Overlap Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wiriyaporn, Darunee; Wang, Lu; Aboussouan, Loutfi S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Lung mechanics in the overlap of COPD and sleep apnea impact the severity of sleep apnea. Specifically, increased lung compliance with hyperinflation protects against sleep apnea, whereas increased airway resistance worsens sleep apnea. We sought to assess whether the expiratory time constant, which reflects lung mechanics, is associated with sleep apnea severity in such patients. Methods: Polysomnographies in 34 subjects with the overlap syndrome were reviewed. Three time constants were measured for each of up to 5 stages (wake, NREM stages, and REM). The time constants were derived by fitting time and pressure coordinates on the expiratory portion of a nasal pressure signal along an exponentially decaying equation, and solving for the time constant. Demographics, morphometrics, wake end-tidal CO2, right diaphragmatic arc on a chest radiograph, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were recorded. Results: The time constant was not associated with age, gender, body mass index, right diaphragmatic arc, or wake end-tidal CO2, and was not significantly different between sleep stages. A mean time constant (TC) was therefore obtained. Subjects with a TC > 0.5 seconds had a greater AHI than those with a TC ≤ 0.5 seconds (median AHI 58 vs. 18, respectively, p = 0.003; Odds ratio of severe sleep apnea 10.6, 95% CI 3.9–51.1, p = 0.005). Conclusions: A larger time constant in the overlap syndrome is associated with increased odds of severe sleep apnea, suggesting a greater importance of airway resistance relative to lung compliance in sleep apnea causation in these subjects. Citation: Wiriyaporn D, Wang L, Aboussouan LS. Expiratory time constant and sleep apnea severity in the overlap syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):327–332. PMID:26414979

  19. [Catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome in view of a psychopathological and pathophysiological overlap: a brief review].

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Zoltán; Egervári, Luca; Andrássy, Gábor; Faludi, Gábor; Frecska, Ede

    2014-03-01

    Catatonia was first described in the 19th century as a syndrome with motor, affective and behavioral symptoms. During the 20th century it was rather regarded as a rare motoric manifestation of schizophrenia and that classification has almost resulted in the disappearance of catatonia among patients outside of the schizophrenia spectrum. With the introduction of neuroleptics, the incidence of catatonic schizophrenia also declined which was attributed to effective treatment. Simultaneously, neuroleptic malignant syndrome was described, which shows many similarities with catatonia. Recently, several researchers suggested a common origin of the two disorders. In this paper we review case reports of the last five years, in which both neuroleptic malignant syndrome and catatonia had emerged as a diagnosis. Additionally, based on the relevant literature, we propose a common hypothetical pathomechanism with therapeutic implications for the two syndromes. Besides underlining the difficulties of differential diagnosis, the reviewed cases demonstrate a transition between the two illnesses. The similarities and the possible shifts may suggest a neuropathological and pathophysiological overlap in the background of the two syndromes. Electroconvulsive therapy and benzodiazepines seem to be an effective treatment in both syndromes. These two treatment approaches can be highly valuable in clinical practice, especially if one considers the difficulties of differential diagnosis.

  20. Overlap of functional heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Edoardo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Marchi, Santino

    2013-09-21

    Several studies indicate a significant degree of overlap between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Likewise, both functional heartburn (FH) and IBS are functional digestive disorders that may occur in the same patients. However, data establishing a solid link between FH and IBS are lacking, mainly because the clinical definition of FH has undergone substantial changes over the years. The available literature on the overlap between GERD or FH and IBS highlights considerable heterogeneity in terms of the criteria and diagnostic procedures used to assess heartburn and IBS. In particular, several epidemiological studies included patients with concomitant IBS and GERD without any attempt to distinguish FH (as defined by the Rome III criteria) from GERD via pathophysiological investigations. Independent of these critical issues, there is preliminary evidence supporting a significant degree of FH-IBS overlap. This underscores the need for studies based on updated diagnostic criteria and accurate pathophysiological classifications, particularly to distinguish FH from GERD. This distinction would represent an essential starting point to achieving a better understanding of pathophysiology in the subclasses of patients with GERD and FH and properly assessing the different degrees of overlap between IBS and the subcategories of heartburn.The present review article intends to appraise and critically discuss current evidence supporting a possible concomitance of GERD or FH with IBS in the same patients and to highlight the pathophysiological relationships between these disorders.

  1. Deletion of 19q13 reveals clinical overlap with Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Urquhart, Jill E; Williams, Simon G; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S; Bowers, Naomi; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Newman, William G

    2015-12-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a presumed autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities: microcephaly, learning and developmental delay, growth failure, and a predisposition to allergies and eczema. There have been more than 150 individuals reported to have this diagnosis, but no unifying genetic alteration has been identified indicating genetic heterogeneity. We report on a pair of monozygotic twins diagnosed clinically with Dubowitz syndrome by Professor Dubowitz over 30 years ago and identified to have a de novo heterozygous 3.2-Mb deletion at 19q13.11q13.12. Exome sequencing did not identify either a putative pathogenic variant on the trans allele supporting recessive inheritance or any other causative sequence variants. Comparison of the phenotype in our cases shows considerable overlap with the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome, suggesting that a subset of individuals diagnosed with Dubowitz syndrome may be due to deletions at 19q13. Our finding further reinforces the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of Dubowitz syndrome. PMID:26377242

  2. Marked overlap of four genetic syndromes with dyskeratosis congenita confounds clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Walne, Amanda J.; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Plagnol, Vincent; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Patıroglu, Turkan; Akar, Haluk; Godfrey, Keith; Carter, Tina; Marafie, Makia; Vora, Ajay; Sundin, Mikael; Vulliamy, Thomas; Tummala, Hemanth; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a highly pleotropic genetic disorder. This heterogeneity can lead to difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis and delays in appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the underlying genetic basis in patients presenting with features of dyskeratosis congenita and who were negative for mutations in the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes. By whole exome and targeted sequencing, we identified biallelic variants in genes that are not associated with dyskeratosis congenita in 17 individuals from 12 families. Specifically, these were homozygous variants in USB1 (8 families), homozygous missense variants in GRHL2 (2 families) and identical compound heterozygous variants in LIG4 (2 families). All patients had multiple somatic features of dyskeratosis congenita but not the characteristic short telomeres. Our case series shows that biallelic variants in USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2, the genes mutated in poikiloderma with neutropenia, LIG4/Dubowitz syndrome and the recently recognized ectodermal dysplasia/short stature syndrome, respectively, cause features that overlap with dyskeratosis congenita. Strikingly, these genes also overlap in their biological function with the known dyskeratosis congenita genes that are implicated in telomere maintenance and DNA repair pathways. Collectively, these observations demonstrate the marked overlap of dyskeratosis congenita with four other genetic syndromes, confounding accurate diagnosis and subsequent management. This has important implications for establishing a genetic diagnosis when a new patient presents in the clinic. Patients with clinical features of dyskeratosis congenita need to have genetic analysis of USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2 in addition to the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes and telomere length measurements. PMID:27612988

  3. Novel karyotype in the Ullrich-Turner syndrome - 45,X/46,X,r(X)/46,X,dic(X) - investigated with fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, L.; Jackson, J.; Cowell, C.; Sillence, D.; Smith, A.

    1994-04-15

    A 10-year-old girl with Ullrich-Turner syndrome was found to have the novel karyotype 45,X/46,X,r(X)(p11q11)/46,X,dic(X)(p11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the {alpha} satellite X centromere probe established the origin of the small ring chromosome. Scanning a large number of cells by interphase FISH showed that the dicentric (X) was the least prevalent cell line. The common breakpoint of Xp11 suggests a sequence of errors as the mechanism whereby these 3 distinct cell lines have arisen. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Tocilizumab in the treatment of mixed connective tissue disease and overlap syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Natalia; Duquesne, Agnes; Desjonquères, Marine; Larbre, Jean-Paul; Lega, Jean-Christophe; Fabien, Nicole; Belot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Arthritis is one of the main manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and overlap syndrome in children and can be responsible for functional disability. We report on 2 children with arthritis that were dramatically improved by a treatment with interleukin-6 (IL-6) blockers in the context of connective tissue disease. However, in both cases, other systemic autoimmune symptoms were not modified by the treatment and autoantibodies tend to increase, suggesting a differential effect of IL-6 inhibition on articular inflammation and systemic autoimmunity. PMID:27738519

  5. Telomeric fusion and chromosome instability in multiple tissues of a patient with mosaic Ullrich-Turner syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.R.; North, P.E.; Hassed, S.J.

    1997-04-14

    We describe the cytogenetic evolution of multiple cell lines in the gonadal tissue of a 10-year-old girl with mosaic Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) involving clonal telomeric associations (tas) of the Y chromosome. G-band analysis of all tissues showed at least 2 cell lines; 45,X and 46,X,tas(Y;21)(q12;p13). However, analysis of left gonadal tissue of this patient showed the evolution of 2 additional cell lines, one designated 45,X,tas(Y;21)(q12;p13),-22 and the other 46,X,tas(Y;21)(q12;p13),+tas(Y;14)(q12;p13),-22. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of interphase nuclei from uncultured gonadal tissue confirmed the findings of aneuploidy in the left gonadal tissue and extended the findings of aneuploidy to the tissue of the right gonad. The chromosome findings in the gonadal tissue of this patient suggest a preneoplastic karyotype relating to several distinct tumor associations. The clonal evolution of telomeric fusions indicates chromosome instability and suggests the extra copy of the Y chromosome may have resulted from a fusion-related malsegregation. In addition, the extra Y suggests low-level amplification of a putative gonadoblastoma gene, while the loss of chromosome 22 suggests the loss of heterozygosity for genes on chromosome 22. This case demonstrates the utility of the study of gonadal tissue in 45X46,XY UTS patients, and provides evidence that clonal telomeric fusions may, in rare cases, be associated with chromosomal malsegregation and with the subsequent evolution of unstable karyotypes. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Anthropometric findings from birth to adulthood and their relation with karyotpye distribution in Turkish girls with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sari, Erkan; Bereket, Abdullah; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Baş, Firdevs; Bundak, Rüveyde; Aydın, Banu Küçükemre; Darcan, Şükran; Dündar, Bumin; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Adal, Erdal; Akıncı, Ayşehan; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Demirel, Fatma; Çelik, Nurullah; Özkan, Behzat; Özhan, Bayram; Orbak, Zerrin; Ersoy, Betül; Doğan, Murat; Ataş, Ali; Turan, Serap; Gökşen, Damla; Tarım, Ömer; Yüksel, Bilgin; Ercan, Oya; Hatun, Şükrü; Şimşek, Enver; Ökten, Ayşenur; Abacı, Ayhan; Döneray, Hakan; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Keskin, Mehmet; Önal, Hasan; Akyürek, Nesibe; Bulan, Kezban; Tepe, Derya; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Demir, Korcan; Kızılay, Deniz; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal; Eren, Erdal; Özen, Samim; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Abalı, Saygın; Akın, Leyla; Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Kaba, Sultan; Anık, Ahmet; Baş, Serpil; Unuvar, Tolga; Sağlam, Halil; Bolu, Semih; Özgen, Tolga; Doğan, Durmuş; Çakır, Esra Deniz; Şen, Yaşar; Andıran, Nesibe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Karagüzel, Gülay; Pirgon, Özgür; Çatlı, Gönül; Can, Hatice Dilek; Gürbüz, Fatih; Binay, Çiğdem; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Fidancı, Kürşat; Gül, Davut; Polat, Adem; Acıkel, Cengizhan; Cinaz, Peyami; Darendeliler, Feyza

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the anthropometric features of girls with Turner syndrome (TS) at birth and presentation and the effect of karyotype on these parameters. Data were collected from 842 patients with TS from 35 different centers, who were followed-up between 1984 and 2014 and whose diagnosis age ranged from birth to 18 years. Of the 842 patients, 122 girls who received growth hormone, estrogen or oxandrolone were excluded, and 720 girls were included in the study. In this cohort, the frequency of small for gestational age (SGA) birth was 33%. The frequency of SGA birth was 4.2% (2/48) in preterm and 36% (174/483) in term neonates (P < 0.001). The mean birth length was 1.3 cm shorter and mean birth weight was 0.36 kg lower than that of the normal population. The mean age at diagnosis was 10.1 ± 4.4 years. Mean height, weight and body mass index standard deviation scores at presentation were -3.1 ± 1.7, -1.4 ± 1.5, and 0.4 ± 1.7, respectively. Patients with isochromosome Xq were significantly heavier than those with other karyotype groups (P = 0.007). Age at presentation was negatively correlated and mid-parental height was positively correlated with height at presentation. Mid-parental height and age at presentation were the only parameters that were associated with height of children with TS. The frequency of SGA birth was found higher in preterm than term neonates but the mechanism could not be clarified. We found no effect of karyotype on height of girls with TS, whereas weight was greater in 46,X,i(Xq) and 45,X/46,X,i(Xq) karyotype groups.

  7. Neonatal detection of Turner syndrome by real-time PCR gene quantification of the ARSE and MAGEH1 genes.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, S C; Rocha, M N; Richeti, F; Kochi, C; Silva E Lima, L A; Magalhães, M; Longui, C A

    2014-10-31

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by the presence of one full X chromosome and total or partial deletion of the second sex chromosome. Diagnosis of TS is often delayed, resulting in inappropriate treatment. Early diagnosis of TS using a neonatal screening test may improve preventive measures and treatment, thus improving patient quality of life. The goal of this study was to standardize a neonatal TS screening algorithm. Two study genes (ARSE and MAGEH1) and 1 normalizing gene (HBB) were used to detect the second X chromosome. We screened 996 newborns whose peripheral blood was collected and stored in filter paper. In addition, samples from 20 patients with confirmed diagnosis of TS were included in the study. Relative amounts of ARSE/HBB were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The cutoff at the 5th percentile was arbitrarily set to indicate repetition of the test. The test was repeated in 51/1016 patients with ARSE/HBB < 0.81. For 10 samples with values persistently <0.81, we quantified the MAGEH1/HBB ratio. Values below the 95th percentile in TS patients (MAGEH1/HBB < 1.24) were considered to be inadequate. Only 6/996 NB showed inadequate values for the 2 studied genes, which were recalled for clinical evaluation and karyotype testing. Analysis of 20 patients diagnosed with TS allowed for identification of false-negatives and true-positives, establishing 95% sensitivity when the indicated cutoff values were used. In conclusion, our algorithm reached 95% detection sensitivity with an acceptable recall rate (0.6%), allowing for the detection of suspected TS cases in the neonatal period.

  8. Aberrant Parietal Cortex Developmental Trajectories in Girls With Turner Syndrome and Related Visual–Spatial Cognitive Development: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Tamar; Chromik, Lindsay C.; Mazaika, Paul K.; Fierro, Kyle; Raman, Mira M.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Hong, David S.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) arises from partial or complete absence of the X-chromosome in females. Girls with TS show deficits in visual–spatial skills as well as reduced brain volume and surface area in the parietal cortex which supports these cognitive functions. Thus, measuring the developmental trajectory of the parietal cortex and the associated visual–spatial cognition in TS may provide novel insights into critical brain-behavior associations. In this longitudinal study, we acquired structural MRI data and assessed visual–spatial skills in 16 (age: 8.23 ±2.5) girls with TS and 13 age-matched controls over two time-points. Gray and white matter volume, surface area and cortical thickness were calculated from surfaced based segmentation of bilateral parietal cortices, and the NEPSY Arrows subtest was used to assess visual–spatial ability. Volumetric and cognitive scalars were modeled to obtain estimates of age-related change. The results show aberrant growth of white matter volume (P =0.011, corrected) and surface area (P =0.036, corrected) of the left superior parietal regions during childhood in girls with TS. Other parietal sub-regions were significantly smaller in girls with TS at both time-points but did not show different growth trajectories relative to controls. Furthermore, we found that visual–spatial skills showed a widening deficit for girls with TS relative to controls (P =0.003). Young girls with TS demonstrate an aberrant trajectory of parietal cortical and cognitive development during childhood. Elucidating aberrant neurodevelopmental trajectories in this population is critical for determining specific stages of brain maturation that are particularly dependent on TS-related genetic and hormonal factor. PMID:25044604

  9. Thoracic aortopathy in Turner syndrome and the influence of bicuspid aortic valves and blood pressure: a CMR study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate aortic dimensions in women with Turner syndrome (TS) in relation to aortic valve morphology, blood pressure, karyotype, and clinical characteristics. Methods and results A cross sectional study of 102 women with TS (mean age 37.7; 18-62 years) examined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR- successful in 95), echocardiography, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Aortic diameters were measured by CMR at 8 positions along the thoracic aorta. Twenty-four healthy females were recruited as controls. In TS, aortic dilatation was present at one or more positions in 22 (23%). Aortic diameter in women with TS and bicuspid aortic valve was significantly larger than in TS with tricuspid valves in both the ascending (32.4 ± 6.7 vs. 26.0 ± 4.4 mm; p < 0.001) and descending (21.4 ± 3.5 vs. 18.8 ± 2.4 mm; p < 0.001) aorta. Aortic diameter correlated to age (R = 0.2 - 0.5; p < 0.01), blood pressure (R = 0.4; p < 0.05), a history of coarctation (R = 0.3; p = 0.01) and bicuspid aortic valve (R = 0.2-0.5; p < 0.05). Body surface area only correlated with descending aortic diameter (R = 0.23; p = 0.024). Conclusions Aortic dilatation was present in 23% of adult TS women, where aortic valve morphology, age and blood pressure were major determinants of the aortic diameter. PMID:20222980

  10. Anthropometric findings from birth to adulthood and their relation with karyotpye distribution in Turkish girls with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sari, Erkan; Bereket, Abdullah; Yeşilkaya, Ediz; Baş, Firdevs; Bundak, Rüveyde; Aydın, Banu Küçükemre; Darcan, Şükran; Dündar, Bumin; Büyükinan, Muammer; Kara, Cengiz; Adal, Erdal; Akıncı, Ayşehan; Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Demirel, Fatma; Çelik, Nurullah; Özkan, Behzat; Özhan, Bayram; Orbak, Zerrin; Ersoy, Betül; Doğan, Murat; Ataş, Ali; Turan, Serap; Gökşen, Damla; Tarım, Ömer; Yüksel, Bilgin; Ercan, Oya; Hatun, Şükrü; Şimşek, Enver; Ökten, Ayşenur; Abacı, Ayhan; Döneray, Hakan; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Keskin, Mehmet; Önal, Hasan; Akyürek, Nesibe; Bulan, Kezban; Tepe, Derya; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Demir, Korcan; Kızılay, Deniz; Topaloğlu, Ali Kemal; Eren, Erdal; Özen, Samim; Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Abalı, Saygın; Akın, Leyla; Eklioğlu, Beray Selver; Kaba, Sultan; Anık, Ahmet; Baş, Serpil; Unuvar, Tolga; Sağlam, Halil; Bolu, Semih; Özgen, Tolga; Doğan, Durmuş; Çakır, Esra Deniz; Şen, Yaşar; Andıran, Nesibe; Çizmecioğlu, Filiz; Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Karagüzel, Gülay; Pirgon, Özgür; Çatlı, Gönül; Can, Hatice Dilek; Gürbüz, Fatih; Binay, Çiğdem; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Fidancı, Kürşat; Gül, Davut; Polat, Adem; Acıkel, Cengizhan; Cinaz, Peyami; Darendeliler, Feyza

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the anthropometric features of girls with Turner syndrome (TS) at birth and presentation and the effect of karyotype on these parameters. Data were collected from 842 patients with TS from 35 different centers, who were followed-up between 1984 and 2014 and whose diagnosis age ranged from birth to 18 years. Of the 842 patients, 122 girls who received growth hormone, estrogen or oxandrolone were excluded, and 720 girls were included in the study. In this cohort, the frequency of small for gestational age (SGA) birth was 33%. The frequency of SGA birth was 4.2% (2/48) in preterm and 36% (174/483) in term neonates (P < 0.001). The mean birth length was 1.3 cm shorter and mean birth weight was 0.36 kg lower than that of the normal population. The mean age at diagnosis was 10.1 ± 4.4 years. Mean height, weight and body mass index standard deviation scores at presentation were -3.1 ± 1.7, -1.4 ± 1.5, and 0.4 ± 1.7, respectively. Patients with isochromosome Xq were significantly heavier than those with other karyotype groups (P = 0.007). Age at presentation was negatively correlated and mid-parental height was positively correlated with height at presentation. Mid-parental height and age at presentation were the only parameters that were associated with height of children with TS. The frequency of SGA birth was found higher in preterm than term neonates but the mechanism could not be clarified. We found no effect of karyotype on height of girls with TS, whereas weight was greater in 46,X,i(Xq) and 45,X/46,X,i(Xq) karyotype groups. PMID:26788866

  11. Efficacy of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on uterine growth and acquisition of bone mass in patients with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomomi; Tsuburai, Taku; Tokinaga, Aya; Nakajima, Izumi; Kitayama, Reiko; Imai, Yuichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Hirahara, Fumiki; Sakakibara, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) is necessary for uterine development and bone mass acquisition in women with Turner syndrome (TS) suffering from ovarian insufficiency. However, adequate ERT regimens have not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ERT for both uterine development and bone mass acquisition. One hundred TS patients from Yokohama City University Hospital (88 with primary amenorrhea (PA) and 12 patients with spontaneous menstrual cycles (MC)) were enrolled after obtaining consent. Clinical profiles, uterine length (UL) measured by ultrasonic examination, and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar vertebrae (L2-4) assessed by DEXA were evaluated. At the time of the first visit, the ULs of patients in the PA group were significantly shorter than those in the MC group. After receiving ERT, there were no significant differences in UL between patients with PA and MC. Forty-seven patients for whom the ERT initiation age was known were investigated to clarify the influence on BMD. The results showed that the BMD in the late initiation (18 years or older) group at the latest visit (0.770 ± 0.107 g/cm2: n = 16) was significantly lower than that in the early initiation (under 18 years) group (0.858 ± 0.119 g/cm2: n = 21) or the MC group (0.941 ± 0.118 g/cm2: n = 10). No significant differences were seen between the early initiation and MC group. ERT was effective in increasing UL and BMD. However, early initiation of ERT is necessary to increase BMD. PMID:26289838

  12. Impact of Growth Hormone on Adult Bone Quality in Turner Syndrome: A HR-pQCT Study.

    PubMed

    Nour, Munier A; Burt, Lauren A; Perry, Rebecca J; Stephure, David K; Hanley, David A; Boyd, Steven K

    2016-01-01

    Women with Turner syndrome (TS) are known to be at risk of osteoporosis. While childhood growth hormone (GH) treatment is common in TS, the impact of this therapy on bone health has been poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of childhood GH treatment on adult bone quality in women with TS. 28 women aged 17-45 with confirmed TS (12 GH-treated) agreed to participate in this cross-sectional study. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of lumbar spine, hip, and radius and high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) scans of the radius and tibia were used to determine standard morphological and micro-architectural parameters of bone health. Finite element (FE) analysis and polar moment of inertia (pMOI) were used to estimate bone strength. GH-treated subjects were +7.4 cm taller (95% CI 2.5-12.3 cm, p = 0.005). DXA-determined areal BMD of hip, spine, and radius was similar between treatment groups. Both tibial and radial total bone areas were greater among GH-treated subjects (+20.4 and +21.2% respectively, p < 0.05), while other micro-architectural results were not different between groups. pMOI was significantly greater among GH-treated subjects (radius +35.0%, tibia +34.0%, p < 0.05). Childhood GH treatment compared to no treatment in TS was associated with an increased height, larger bones, and greater pMOI, while no significant difference in DXA-derived BMD, HR-pQCT micro-architectural parameters, or FE-estimated bone strength was detected. The higher pMOI and greater bone size may confer benefit for fracture reduction in these GH-treated patients.

  13. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J.

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An Autoimmune Myositis-Overlap Syndrome Associated With Autoantibodies to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Jean-Luc; Isabelle, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Targoff, Ira N.; Goldstein, Rose; Gagné, Michel; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Joyal, France; Troyanov, Yves; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune myositis encompasses various myositis-overlap syndromes, each being identified by the presence of serum marker autoantibodies. We describe a novel myositis-overlap syndrome in 4 patients characterized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes. The clinical phenotype was characterized by prominent myositis in association with erosive, anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, trigeminal neuralgia, mild interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, and weight loss. The myositis was typically chronic, relapsing, and refractory to corticosteroids alone, but remitted with the addition of a second immunomodulating drug. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence for liver disease. The prognosis was good with 100% long-term survival (mean follow-up 19.5 yr). By indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, sera from all 4 patients displayed a high titer of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) with a distinct punctate peripheral (rim) fluorescent pattern of the nuclear envelope characteristic of nuclear pore complexes. Reactivity with nuclear pore complexes was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. In a cohort of 100 French Canadian patients with autoimmune myositis, the nuclear pore complex fluorescent ANA pattern was restricted to these 4 patients (4%). It was not observed in sera from 393 adult patients with systemic sclerosis (n = 112), mixed connective tissue disease (n = 35), systemic lupus (n = 94), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), or other rheumatic diseases (n = 107), nor was it observed in 62 normal adults. Autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes were predominantly of IgG isotype. No other IgG autoantibody markers for defined connective tissue diseases or overlap syndromes were present, indicating a selective and highly focused immune response. In 3 patients, anti-nuclear pore complex autoantibody titers varied in parallel with myositis activity, suggesting a pathogenic

  15. Twenty-one years to the right diagnosis - clinical overlap of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knopp, C; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Zerres, K; Gencik, M; Spengler, S; Eggermann, T

    2015-01-01

    Clinical overlap makes the diagnosis of overgrowth syndromes challenging. Clinical overlap exists between Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) which share pre- and postnatal overgrowth, macroglossia, umbilical hernia, organomegaly, ear lobe creases, and occurrence of embryonal tumors as characteristic features. Based on the clinical history of a patient, who was diagnosed with BWS shortly after birth and reassessed and rediagnosed with SGBS at age 21 years, particular attention should be paid to developing facial dysmorphia. In addition, we delineate further clinical findings that may allow differentiation between both conditions. PMID:25339544

  16. Twenty-one years to the right diagnosis - clinical overlap of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Knopp, C; Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Zerres, K; Gencik, M; Spengler, S; Eggermann, T

    2015-01-01

    Clinical overlap makes the diagnosis of overgrowth syndromes challenging. Clinical overlap exists between Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) which share pre- and postnatal overgrowth, macroglossia, umbilical hernia, organomegaly, ear lobe creases, and occurrence of embryonal tumors as characteristic features. Based on the clinical history of a patient, who was diagnosed with BWS shortly after birth and reassessed and rediagnosed with SGBS at age 21 years, particular attention should be paid to developing facial dysmorphia. In addition, we delineate further clinical findings that may allow differentiation between both conditions.

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease overlap syndrome: pieces of the puzzle are falling into place

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Rani, Rafiz; Raja Ali, Raja Affendi

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common gastrointestinal disorder involving the gut-brain axis, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder, are both increasing in incidence and prevalence in Asia. Both have significant overlap in terms of symptoms, pathophysiology, and treatment, suggesting the possibility of IBS and IBD being a single disease entity albeit at opposite ends of the spectrum. We examined the similarities and differences in IBS and IBD, and offer new thoughts and approaches to the disease paradigm. PMID:27799880

  18. Therapeutic approaches to asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    The recognition that there are some patients with features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has highlighted the need to develop more specific treatments for these clinical phenotypes. Some patients with COPD have predominantly eosinophilic inflammation and might respond to high doses of inhaled corticosteroids and newly developed specific antieosinophil therapies, including blocking antibodies against IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, as well as oral chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells antagonists. Other patients have severe asthma or are asthmatic patients who smoke with features of COPD-induced inflammation and might benefit from treatments targeting neutrophils, including macrolides, CXCR2 antagonists, phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors, p38 mitogen-activating protein kinase inhibitors, and antibodies against IL-1 and IL-17. Other patients appear to have largely fixed obstruction with little inflammation and might respond to long-acting bronchodilators, including long-acting muscarinic antagonists, to reduce hyperinflation. Highly selected patients with severe asthma might benefit from bronchial thermoplasty. Some patients with overlap syndromes can be conveniently treated with triple fixed-dose combination inhaler therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting β2-agonist, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist, several of which are now in development. Corticosteroid resistance is a feature of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and understanding the various molecular mechanisms of this resistance has identified novel therapeutic targets and presented the prospect of therapies that can restore corticosteroid responsiveness. PMID:26343937

  19. BMP9 mutations cause a vascular-anomaly syndrome with phenotypic overlap with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Wooderchak-Donahue, Whitney L; McDonald, Jamie; O'Fallon, Brendan; Upton, Paul D; Li, Wei; Roman, Beth L; Young, Sarah; Plant, Parker; Fülöp, Gyula T; Langa, Carmen; Morrell, Nicholas W; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Stevenson, David A; Runo, James R; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar

    2013-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), the most common inherited vascular disorder, is caused by mutations in genes involved in the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway (ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4). Yet, approximately 15% of individuals with clinical features of HHT do not have mutations in these genes, suggesting that there are undiscovered mutations in other genes for HHT and possibly vascular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. The genetic etiology for 191 unrelated individuals clinically suspected to have HHT was investigated with the use of exome and Sanger sequencing; these individuals had no mutations in ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. Mutations in BMP9 (also known as GDF2) were identified in three unrelated probands. These three individuals had epistaxis and dermal lesions that were described as telangiectases but whose location and appearance resembled lesions described in some individuals with RASA1-related disorders (capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome). Analyses of the variant proteins suggested that mutations negatively affect protein processing and/or function, and a bmp9-deficient zebrafish model demonstrated that BMP9 is involved in angiogenesis. These data confirm a genetic cause of a vascular-anomaly syndrome that has phenotypic overlap with HHT.

  20. [A case of clinical overlap syndrome of rheumatoid arthritis and amyopathic dermatomyositis with multiple pulmonary injuries].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; An, Yuan; Jia, Yuan; Li, Zhan-guo

    2014-10-18

    Autoimmune diseases can cause various kinds of lung injuries. Clinical features of a case of overlap syndrome with multiple pulmonary injuries were investigated, and the treatment experiences discussed. The patient suffered from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at first, and then had a lobectomy surgery due to the rheumatoid nodules in her right lung. A year later her disease was diagnosed as amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) with typical Gottron's sign, craftsmen hands and rapid-progressive organizing pneumonia (OP). After a combined treatment with glucocorticoids (GCs) and cyclophosphamide (CTX), her OP became better but lung infections progressed. Her lung infections eventually were cured after we used antibiotics and antifungal treatment while we ceased to use CTX and reduced the dosage of GCs. The clinical feature of the patient was overlap syndrome with a variety of lung injuries, such as pulmonary rheumatoid nodules, OP, secondary bronchopleural fistula and lung infections. Its diagnosis and treatment experiences could improve our understanding of pulmonary manifestations of connective tissue disease and improve our diagnosis and treatment level.

  1. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy.

    PubMed

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  2. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels. PMID:26078744

  3. Oocyte cryopreservation for fertility preservation in post-pubertal female children at risk for premature ovarian failure due to accelerated follicle loss in Turner Syndrome or cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, K; Bedoschi, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective To preliminarily study the feasibility of oocyte cryopreservation in post-pubertal girls aged between 13 and 15 years who were at risk for premature ovarian failure due to the accelerated follicle loss associated with Turner’s Syndrome or cancer treatments. Design Retrospective cohort and review of literature. Setting Academic fertility preservation unit. Participants Three girls diagnosed with Turner syndrome, one girl diagnosed with germ-cell tumor and one girl diagnosed with lymphoblastic leukemia. Interventions Assessment of ovarian reserve, ovarian stimulation, oocyte retrieval, in vitro maturation, and mature oocyte cryopreservation. Main Outcome Measure Response to ovarian stimulation, number of mature oocytes cryopreserved and complications, if any. Results Mean AMH, baseline FSH, Estradiol and antral follicle counts were 1.30 ± 0.39, 6.08 ± 2.63, 41.39 ± 24.68, 8.0 ± 3.2; respectively. In Turner girls the ovarian reserve assessment indicated already diminished ovarian reserve. Ovarian stimulation and oocyte cryopreservation was successfully performed in all female children referred for fertility preservation. A range of 4–11 mature oocytes (mean 8.1 ± 3.4) was cryopreserved without any complications. All girls tolerated the procedure well. Conclusions Oocyte cryopreservation is a feasible technique in selected female children at risk for premature ovarian failure. Further studies would be beneficial to test the success of oocyte cryopreservation in young girls. PMID:25214440

  4. Human 45,X Fibroblast Transcriptome Reveals Distinct Differentially Expressed Genes Including Long Noncoding RNAs Potentially Associated with the Pathophysiology of Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patowary, Ashok; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Deobagkar, Deepti D.

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality characterized by the absence of whole or part of the X chromosome in females. This X aneuploidy condition is associated with a diverse set of clinical phenotypes such as gonadal dysfunction, short stature, osteoporosis and Type II diabetes mellitus, among others. These phenotypes differ in their severity and penetrance among the affected individuals. Haploinsufficiency for a few X linked genes has been associated with some of these disease phenotypes. RNA sequencing can provide valuable insights to understand molecular mechanism of disease process. In the current study, we have analysed the transcriptome profiles of human untransformed 45,X and 46,XX fibroblast cells and identified differential expression of genes in these two karyotypes. Functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressing genes are associated with bone differentiation, glucose metabolism and gonadal development pathways. We also report differential expression of lincRNAs in X monosomic cells. Our observations provide a basis for evaluation of cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in the establishment of Turner syndrome phenotypes. PMID:24932682

  5. Are depression and frailty overlapping syndromes in mid- and late-life? A latent variable analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mezuk, Briana; Lohman, Matt; Dumenci, Levent; Lapane, Kate L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression and frailty both predict disability and morbidity in later life. However, it is unclear to what extent these common geriatric syndromes represent overlapping constructs. Objective To examine the joint relationship between the constructs of depression and frailty. Methods Data come from 2004/5 wave of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study and analysis is limited to participants aged 40 and older with complete data on frailty and depression indicators (N = 683). Depression was measured using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule and frailty was indexed by modified Fried criteria. A series of confirmatory latent class analyses (LCA) were used to assess the degree to which depression and frailty syndromes identify the same populations. A latent Kappa coefficient (Кl) was also estimated between the constructs. Results Confirmatory LCA indicated that depression and frailty represent distinct syndromes rather than a single construct. The joint modeling of the two constructs supported a three class solution for depression and two class solution for frailty, with 2.9% categorized as severe depression, 19.4% as mild depression, and 77.7% as not depressed, and 21.1% categorized as frail and 78.9% as not frail. The chance-corrected agreement statistic indicated moderate correspondence between the depression and frailty constructs (Кl: 66, 95% CI: 0.58 – 0.74). Conclusions Results suggest that depression and frailty are interrelated concepts, yet their operational criteria identify substantively overlapping subpopulations. These findings have implications for understanding factors that contribute to the etiology and prognosis of depression and frailty in later life. PMID:23567406

  6. Gene localisation for Wilson-Turner syndrome (WTS:MIM 309585)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-12

    The gene for this syndrome of X-linked mental retardation with gynecomastia, obesity, speech difficulties, tapering fingers and small feet was mapped between Xp21.1 and Xq22. Linkage to DXS255 at Xp11 was firmly established, with no recombination. Subsequent characterization of numerous microsatellite markers and development of the background genetic map in this region of the X chromosome has enabled significant reduction to the localization of the gene for WTS in the one family so far reported. The new linkage data were obtained as described previously and are presented in Table I. The closest flanking markers are DXS426 at Xp11.3 and DXS990 at Xq21.3. The regional localization is significantly reduced from the previous interval of 66 cM to an interval of 25 cM. The maximum two-point lod score is now 6.07 at AR. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis Overlap Syndrome in Patients With Biopsy-Proven Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Jarrot, Pierre-Andre; Chiche, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Daniel, Laurent; Vuiblet, Vincent; Bardin, Nathalie; Bertin, Daniel; Terrier, Benjamin; Amoura, Zahir; Andrés, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Halfon, Philippe; Daugas, Eric; Dussol, Bertrand; Puéchal, Xavier; Kaplanski, Gilles; Jourde-Chiche, Noemie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to report the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of patients with glomerulonephritis (GN) secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)/antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) overlap syndrome. A nationwide survey was conducted to identify cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. Data were collected from SLE and AAV French research groups. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of both SLE and AAV according to international classification criteria and biopsy-proven GN between 1995 and 2014. Additional cases were identified through a systematic literature review. A cohort of consecutive biopsy-proven GN was used to study the prevalence of overlapping antibodies and/or overlap syndrome. The national survey identified 8 cases of SLE/AAV overlap syndrome. All patients were female; median age was 40 years. AAV occurred before SLE (n = 3), after (n = 3), or concomitantly (n = 2). Six patients had rapidly progressive GN and 3/8 had alveolar hemorrhage. All patients had antinuclear antibodies (ANA); 7/8 had p-ANCA antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. Renal biopsies showed lupus nephritis (LN) or pauci-immune GN. Remission was obtained in 4/8 patients. A literature review identified 31 additional cases with a similarly severe presentation. In the GN cohort, ANCA positivity was found in 30% of LN, ANA positivity in 52% of pauci-immune GN, with no correlation with pathological findings. The estimated prevalence for SLE/AAV overlap syndrome was 2/101 (2%). In patients with GN, SLE/AAV overlap syndrome may occur but with a low prevalence. Most patients have an aggressive renal presentation, with usually both ANA and anti-MPO antibodies. Further studies are needed to assess shared pathogenesis and therapeutic options. PMID:27258503

  8. [A case of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episode/Leigh overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Jun; Takano, Tomoyuki; Ryujin, Fukiko; Anzai, Yuko; Yoshioka, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Goto, Yuichi

    2014-09-01

    We experienced a case in which mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was identified as complications following the onset of Leigh syndrome along with a 10191 T>C mutation of the mitochondrial gene. The case pertains to a 26-year-old woman. The disease appeared when she was 11 years old due to divergent strabismus, at which point a diagnosis of juvenile Leigh syndrome was made. Many infraction images not conforming to the vessel region were observed upon a brain MRI which was performed at 26 years of age, thus leading to her being diagnosed with MELAS as a complication. Upoon bibliographical consideration, it was speculated that the clinical features of MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome clearly differ from Leigh syndrome in terms of age of onset, symptoms, and prognosis. Pleiotropic genetic factors including heteroplasmy were presumed to be involved in the diverse phenotype of overlap syndrome.

  9. Definition of 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome reveals overlap with CHARGE syndrome and 22q11 deletion syndrome phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Snijders Blok, Charlotte; Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; FitzPatrick, David R; Romano, Corrado; Fichera, Marco; Vitello, Girolamo Aurelio; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Schoots, Jeroen; Pfundt, Rolph; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Hoefsloot, Lies; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2014-11-01

    Microdeletions of the 5q11.2 region are rare; in literature only two patients with a deletion in this region have been reported so far. In this study, we describe four additional patients and further define this new 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. A comparison of the features observed in all six patients with overlapping 5q11.2 deletions showed a phenotypic spectrum that overlaps with CHARGE syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome including choanal atresia, developmental delay, heart defects, external ear abnormalities, and short stature. No colobomas or abnormalities of semicircular canals and olfactory nerves were reported. Two male patients had genital abnormalities. We estimated a 2.0 Mb (53.0-55.0 Mb) Shortest Region of Overlap (SRO) for the main clinical characteristics of the syndrome. This region contains nine genes and two non-coding microRNAs. In this region DHX29 serves as the candidate gene as it encodes an ATP-dependent RNA-helicase that is involved in the initiation of RNA translation. Screening a small cohort of 14 patients who presented the main features, however, did not reveal any pathogenic abnormalities of DHX29.

  10. The asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: do we really need another syndrome in the already complex matrix of airway disease?

    PubMed Central

    Kostikas, Konstantinos; Clemens, Andreas; Patalano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) is one of multiple terms used to describe patients with characteristics of both COPD and asthma, representing ~20% of patients with obstructive airway diseases. The recognition of both sets of morbidities in patients is important to guide practical treatment decisions. It is widely recognized that patients with COPD and coexisting asthma present with a higher disease burden, despite the conceptual expectation that the “reversible” or “treatable” component of asthma would allow for more effective management and better outcomes. However, subcategorization into terms such as ACOS is complicated by the vast spectrum of heterogeneity that is encapsulated by asthma and COPD, resulting in different clinical clusters. In this review, we discuss the possibility that these different clusters are suboptimally described by the umbrella term “ACOS”, as this additional categorization may lead to clinical confusion and potential inappropriate use of resources. We suggest that a more clinically relevant approach would be to recognize the extreme variability and the numerous phenotypes encompassed within obstructive airway diseases, with various degrees of overlapping in individual patients. In addition, we discuss some of the evidence to be considered when making practical decisions on the treatment of patients with overlapping characteristics between COPD and asthma, as well as the potential options for phenotype and biomarker-driven management of airway disease with the aim of providing more personalized treatment for patients. Finally, we highlight the need for more evidence in patients with overlapping disease characteristics and to facilitate better characterization of potential treatment responders. PMID:27366057

  11. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of children with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Weibin; Li, Shuxian; Shen, Qiong; Guo, Xiuxia; Rong, Huijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolisms of Turner syndrome (TS). Metho d s: Total 45 patients with TS admitted between Jul. 2008 and Jun. 2011 were involved in this study. All patients received the clinical evaluation of body fat, plasma lipids, proteins and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) before and after rhGH therapy. Results : Our results indicated a significant decrease of body fat (FAT%) from 23.56±4.21 to 18.71±2.23 but no obvious change on the level of fat mass (FM) (p>0.05) was observed after rhGH therapy. We also detected significant changes on plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) from (1.65±0.58 mmol/L) to (2.20±0.65 mmol/L) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDH-C) from (2.55±0.55 mmol/L) to (2.10±0.54 mmol/L) after rhGH exposure. However, no statistical significance was detected on the level of plasma triglyceride (TG), cholesterol (CHO). Interestingly, the levels of plasma retinol binding protein (RbP) (32.55±4.28mg/L), transferrin (TRF) (2.95±0.40 mg/L), serum albumin (PRE) (250.00±45.50 mg/L) and albumin (propagated) (33.58±4.25 mg/L) were significantly increased. When it goes to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) test, there were 10 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) cases among all patients before and after rhGH therapy. No significant change was observed on homeostasis model assessment- insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) level during rhGH intervention. Conclusion : Abnormal lipid and protein metabolisms of the children with TS can be improved with rhGH therapy for 6 months. PMID:25097506

  12. Females with de novo aberrations in PHF6: clinical overlap of Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zweier, Christiane; Rittinger, Olaf; Bader, Ingrid; Berland, Siren; Cole, Trevor; Degenhardt, Franziska; Di Donato, Nataliya; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Hoyer, Juliane; Lynch, Sally Ann; Vlasak, Ingrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2014-09-01

    Recently, de novo aberrations in PHF6 were identified in females with intellectual disability and with a distinct phenotype including a characteristic facial gestalt with bitemporal narrowing, prominent supraorbital ridges, synophrys, a short nose and dental anomalies, tapering fingers with brachytelephalangy, clinodactyly and hypoplastic nails, short toes with hypoplastic nails, and linear skin hyperpigmentation. In adolescent or older patients, this phenotype overlaps but is not identical with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome in males, caused by X-linked recessive mutations in PHF6. In younger girls there seems to be a striking phenotypic overlap with Coffin-Siris syndrome, which is characterized by intellectual disability, sparse hair and hypoplastic nails. This review will summarize and characterize the female phenotype caused by de novo aberrations in PHF6 and will discuss the overlapping and distinguishing features with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

  13. What is asthma-COPD overlap syndrome? Towards a consensus definition from a round table discussion.

    PubMed

    Sin, Don D; Miravitlles, Marc; Mannino, David M; Soriano, Joan B; Price, David; Celli, Bartolome R; Leung, Janice M; Nakano, Yasutaka; Park, Hye Yun; Wark, Peter A; Wechsler, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS) have been largely excluded from pivotal therapeutic trials and, as a result, its treatment remains poorly defined and lacking firm evidence. To date, there is no universally accepted definition of ACOS, which has made it difficult to understand its epidemiology or pathophysiology. Despite many uncertainties, there is emerging agreement that some of the key features of ACOS include persistent airflow limitation in symptomatic individuals 40 years of age and older, a well-documented history of asthma in childhood or early adulthood and a significant exposure history to cigarette or biomass smoke. In this perspective, we propose a case definition of ACOS that incorporates these key features in a parsimonious algorithm that may enable clinicians to better diagnose patients with ACOS and most importantly enable researchers to design therapeutic and clinical studies to elucidate its epidemiology and pathophysiology and to ascertain its optimal management strategies.

  14. What is asthma-COPD overlap syndrome? Towards a consensus definition from a round table discussion.

    PubMed

    Sin, Don D; Miravitlles, Marc; Mannino, David M; Soriano, Joan B; Price, David; Celli, Bartolome R; Leung, Janice M; Nakano, Yasutaka; Park, Hye Yun; Wark, Peter A; Wechsler, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS) have been largely excluded from pivotal therapeutic trials and, as a result, its treatment remains poorly defined and lacking firm evidence. To date, there is no universally accepted definition of ACOS, which has made it difficult to understand its epidemiology or pathophysiology. Despite many uncertainties, there is emerging agreement that some of the key features of ACOS include persistent airflow limitation in symptomatic individuals 40 years of age and older, a well-documented history of asthma in childhood or early adulthood and a significant exposure history to cigarette or biomass smoke. In this perspective, we propose a case definition of ACOS that incorporates these key features in a parsimonious algorithm that may enable clinicians to better diagnose patients with ACOS and most importantly enable researchers to design therapeutic and clinical studies to elucidate its epidemiology and pathophysiology and to ascertain its optimal management strategies. PMID:27338195

  15. MERRF/MELAS overlap syndrome due to the m.3291T>C mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiming; Zhao, Hui; Ji, Kunqian; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old Chinese female harboring the m.3291T>C mutation in the MT-TL1 gene encoding the mitochondrial transfer RNA for leucine. She presented with a complex phenotype characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, frequent myoclonus seizures, recurrent stroke-like episodes, migraine-like headaches with nausea and vomiting, and elevated resting lactate blood level. It is known that the myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is characterized by cerebellar ataxia and myoclonus epilepsy, while that the mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is characterized by recurrent stroke-like episodes, migraine-like headaches, and elevated resting lactate blood level. So the patient's clinical manifestations suggest the presence of a MERRF/MELAS overlap syndrome. Muscle biopsy of the patient showed the presence of numerous scattered ragged-red fibers, some cytochrome c oxidase-deficient fibers, and several strongly succinate dehygrogenase-reactive vessels, suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder. Direct sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome of the proband revealed no mutations other than the T-to-C transition at nucleotide position 3291. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the proband and her family revealed maternal inheritance of the mutation in a heteroplasmic manner. The analysis of aerobic respiration and glycolysis demonstrated that the fibroblasts from the patient had mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the m.3291T>C is pathogenic. This study is the first to describe the m.3291T>C mutation in association with the MERRF/MELAS overlap syndrome.

  16. Development of systemic sclerosis in patients with autoimmune hepatitis: an emerging overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Assandri, Roberto; Monari, Marta; Montanelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We described two case reports of AIH/SSc overlap syndrome and reviewed literatures regarding this issue. Background: AIH is a chronic hepatitis of unknown aetiology characterized by continuing hepatocellular necrosis and inflammation. AIH overlap syndromes have been reported with other autoimmune diseases. Patients and methods: According to the classification criteria for SSc, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 35 cases with biopsy-proven AIH over the past 5 years at our institution. We reviewed the MEDLINE database using the appropriate key-words. Results: A chart review of 35 cases (M/F ratio 1:2, mean age 47.6±10.3 years) revealed nine patients (9/35, 25.7%) with CTD (four males and three females with a mean age of 45.1±8.4 years). All patients had ANA. Four patients were SSA/Ro positive UCTD (1/35, 2.85%), and six patients developed SLE (6/35, 17.1%). Only two female patients (2/35, 5.7%) with specific SSc AAb developed a systemic sclerosis. We described a patient with AIH who was diagnosed with diffuse systemic sclerosis-sine scleroderma with positive anti-centromere B and SSA/Ro52 KDa antibodies. We also reported a patient with AIH who was diagnosed limited SSc with contemporary presence of anti-centromere A and anti-RNA polymerase III antibody. Conclusion: We suggest that SSc may be considered to be one of the manifestations associated with AIH. Patients with AIH may have an increased risk to develop SSc and should be followed, especially when Raynaud phenomenon was found. PMID:27458514

  17. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K

    2015-12-10

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins.

  18. Mixed partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage coexistent with an aortic valve abnormality - analysis of ultrasound diagnostics in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mądry, Wojciech; Karolczak, Maciej A; Komarnicka, Justyna; Mirecka, Małgorzata

    2014-03-01

    The authors present a case of echocardiographic diagnosis of a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in the form of mixed partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome and congenital mild stenosis of insufficient bicuspid aortic valve, made while diagnosing the causes of intestinal tract bleeding. The article presents various diagnostic difficulties leading to the delayed determination of a correct diagnosis, resulting from the absence of symptoms of circulatory failure in the early stage of the disease and the occurrence of severe and dominant auscultatory phenomena typical for congenital aortic valve defect which effectively masked the syndromes of increased pulmonary flow. The authors discuss the role of the impact of phenotypic characteristics of the Turner syndrome, in particular a short webbed neck restricting the suprasternal echocardiographic access and the presence of psychological factors associated with a long-term illness. The importance of indirect echocardiographic symptoms suggesting partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in the presence of bicuspid aortic valve, e.g. enlargement of the right atrium and right ventricle, and paradoxical interventricular septum motion were emphasized in patients lacking ASD, pulmonary hypertension or tricupid and pulmonary valve abnormalities. The methodology of echocardiographic examination enabling direct visualization of the abnormal vascular structures was presented. Special attention was paid to the significance of highly sensitive echocardiographic projections: high right and left parasternal views in sagittal and transverse planes with patient lying on the side, with the use of two-dimensional imaging and color Doppler. Finally, the limitations of echocardiography resulting from the visualization and tracking of abnormal vascular structures hidden behind ultrasound non-conductive tissues were indicated, as was the role of other diagnostic modalities, such as angio

  19. Mixed partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage coexistent with an aortic valve abnormality – analysis of ultrasound diagnostics in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karolczak, Maciej A.; Komarnicka, Justyna; Mirecka, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a case of echocardiographic diagnosis of a rare congenital cardiovascular anomaly in the form of mixed partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in a 10-year-old girl with Turner syndrome and congenital mild stenosis of insufficient bicuspid aortic valve, made while diagnosing the causes of intestinal tract bleeding. The article presents various diagnostic difficulties leading to the delayed determination of a correct diagnosis, resulting from the absence of symptoms of circulatory failure in the early stage of the disease and the occurrence of severe and dominant auscultatory phenomena typical for congenital aortic valve defect which effectively masked the syndromes of increased pulmonary flow. The authors discuss the role of the impact of phenotypic characteristics of the Turner syndrome, in particular a short webbed neck restricting the suprasternal echocardiographic access and the presence of psychological factors associated with a long-term illness. The importance of indirect echocardiographic symptoms suggesting partial anomalous pulmonary veins connection in the presence of bicuspid aortic valve, e.g. enlargement of the right atrium and right ventricle, and paradoxical interventricular septum motion were emphasized in patients lacking ASD, pulmonary hypertension or tricupid and pulmonary valve abnormalities. The methodology of echocardiographic examination enabling direct visualization of the abnormal vascular structures was presented. Special attention was paid to the significance of highly sensitive echocardiographic projections: high right and left parasternal views in sagittal and transverse planes with patient lying on the side, with the use of two-dimensional imaging and color Doppler. Finally, the limitations of echocardiography resulting from the visualization and tracking of abnormal vascular structures hidden behind ultrasound non-conductive tissues were indicated, as was the role of other diagnostic modalities, such as angio

  20. A unique case of Turner syndrome accompanying prolactinoma and unexpected elongated styloid process: Clinical and cone-beam computed tomographic features

    PubMed Central

    Tatli, Ufuk; Yazicioglu, Iffet; Evlice, Ahmet; Oztunc, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities, with an estimated frequency among female live births of 1/2,000-3,000. The syndrome is characterized by the partial or complete absence of one X chromosome (45,X karyotype). We reported a unique case of a 40-year-old woman with TS accompanying unexpected elongated styloid process specific to Eagle syndrome (ES) and followed up-prolactinoma. The present article is the first report to define the cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) features of TS accompanying ES. Patients with TS carry various risks that make treatment more complicated; thus advanced imaging techniques for proper treatment and follow-up are extremely important. In the light of CBCT examination, craniofacial abnormalities specific to TS and accompanying syndromes such as the crowding of teeth especially in the maxillary anterior region caused by maxillary narrowness, micrognatic maxilla and mandible, relative mandibular retrusion, malocclusion, open-bite, and an elongated styloid process (length of 32.7 mm) on the right side were illustrated in detail. PMID:23807938

  1. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Condition Information What are common symptoms? How many people are affected? What causes it? How is it ... Overview Condition Information What are common symptoms? How many people are affected? What causes it? How is it ...

  2. Turner Syndrome (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... girls do have problems with body image or self-esteem and some also might be hyperactive. Despite these ... help build a more positive body image and self-esteem. Encourage participation in activities in which height isn' ...

  3. Turner Syndrome (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... girls may have problems with body image or self-esteem. People with TS are all different. Some may ... volunteer work. Helping other people can boost your self-esteem and your confidence, too. Consider talking to a ...

  4. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for Teachers Genomic Careers National DNA Day Online Education Kit Online Genetics Education ... Subjects Research Informed Consent for Genomics Research Intellectual ...

  5. Disease progression in systemic sclerosis-overlap syndrome is significantly different from limited and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moinzadeh, Pia; Aberer, Elisabeth; Ahmadi-Simab, Keihan; Blank, Norbert; Distler, Joerg H W; Fierlbeck, Gerhard; Genth, Ekkehard; Guenther, Claudia; Hein, Ruediger; Henes, Joerg; Herich, Lena; Herrgott, Ilka; Koetter, Ina; Kreuter, Alexander; Krieg, Thomas; Kuhr, Kathrin; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Meier, Florian; Melchers, Inga; Mensing, Hartwig; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Pfeiffer, Christiane; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Sárdy, Miklós; Schmalzing, Marc; Sunderkoetter, Cord; Susok, Laura; Tarner, Ingo H; Vaith, Peter; Worm, Margitta; Wozel, Gottfried; Zeidler, Gabriele; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Ahrazoglu, Nil Mona

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc)-overlap syndromes are a very heterogeneous and remarkable subgroup of SSc-patients, who present at least two connective tissue diseases (CTD) at the same time, usually with a specific autoantibody status. Objectives To determine whether patients, classified as overlap syndromes, show a disease course different from patients with limited SSc (lcSSc) or diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). Methods The data of 3240 prospectively included patients, registered in the database of the German Network for Systemic Scleroderma and followed between 2003 and 2013, were analysed. Results Among 3240 registered patients, 10% were diagnosed as SSc-overlap syndrome. Of these, 82.5% were female. SSc-overlap patients had a mean age of 48±1.2 years and carried significantly more often ‘other antibodies’ (68.0%; p<0.0001), including anti-U1RNP, -PmScl, -Ro, -La, as well as anti-Jo-1 and -Ku antibodies. These patients developed musculoskeletal involvement earlier and more frequently (62.5%) than patients diagnosed as lcSSc (32.2%) or dcSSc (43.3%) (p<0.0001). The onset of lung fibrosis and heart involvement in SSc-overlap patients was significantly earlier than in patients with lcSSc and occurred later than in patients with dcSSc. Oesophagus, kidney and PH progression was similar to lcSSc patients, whereas dcSSc patients had a significantly earlier onset. Conclusions These data support the concept that SSc-overlap syndromes should be regarded as a separate SSc subset, distinct from lcSSc and dcSSc, due to a different progression of the disease, different proportional distribution of specific autoantibodies, and of different organ involvement. PMID:24389298

  6. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K

    2015-12-01

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins. PMID:26690475

  7. Startling Mosaicism of the Y-Chromosome and Tandem Duplication of the SRY and DAZ Genes in Patients with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Premi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Jyoti; Panneer, Ganesan; Ali, Sher

    2008-01-01

    Presence of the human Y-chromosome in females with Turner Syndrome (TS) enhances the risk of development of gonadoblastoma besides causing several other phenotypic abnormalities. In the present study, we have analyzed the Y chromosome in 15 clinically diagnosed Turner Syndrome (TS) patients and detected high level of mosaicisms ranging from 45,XO:46,XY = 100:0% in 4; 45,XO:46,XY:46XX = 4:94:2 in 8; and 45,XO:46,XY:46XX = 50:30:20 cells in 3 TS patients, unlike previous reports showing 5–8% cells with Y- material. Also, no ring, marker or di-centric Y was observed in any of the cases. Of the two TS patients having intact Y chromosome in >85% cells, one was exceptionally tall. Both the patients were positive for SRY, DAZ, CDY1, DBY, UTY and AZFa, b and c specific STSs. Real Time PCR and FISH demonstrated tandem duplication/multiplication of the SRY and DAZ genes. At sequence level, the SRY was normal in 8 TS patients while the remaining 7 showed either absence of this gene or known and novel mutations within and outside of the HMG box. SNV/SFV analysis showed normal four copies of the DAZ genes in these 8 patients. All the TS patients showed aplastic uterus with no ovaries and no symptom of gonadoblastoma. Present study demonstrates new types of polymorphisms indicating that no two TS patients have identical genotype-phenotype. Thus, a comprehensive analysis of more number of samples is warranted to uncover consensus on the loci affected, to be able to use them as potential diagnostic markers. PMID:19030103

  8. Overlap of clinical features of Smith-Magenis & Down Syndrome in newborns and infants

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, K.A.; Finucane, B.M.; Bauer, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) frequently goes unrecognized in newborns and infants as these patients do not yet demonstrate the characteristic behavioral phenotype and may only present with developmental delay and physical dysmorphism. Six of Hall`s ten cardinal features of trisomy 21 in the newborn are also frequently found in newborns with SMS, leading to an early presumptive diagnosis of DS in many of these patients. CASE No. 1: Based on clinical findings, a presumptive diagnosis of DS was given to the patient in the newborn period. Chromosome analysis of peripheral blood revealed a normal 46,XX karyotype. Given this result, the possibility of mosaic DS was raised, and a skin fibroblast study done. Again, the karyotype was reported as normal. Clinical features and cytogenetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of SMS when the patient was 8 years old. CASE No. 2: A presumptive diagnosis of DS was made in an infant with hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms and congenital heart defects. A routine chromosome analysis was ordered, which revealed a 46,XY,del(17)(p11.2p11.2) karyotype. Indeed, approximately 38% of blood samples referred to our laboratory to rule out DS in an infant failed to demonstrate trisomy for chromosome 21. Given the high degree of clinical overlap with Down Syndrome, the diagnosis of SMS should be considered in all such patients. Additional analysis should be done to look for deletion 17p11.2 when faced with a {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} karyotype in an infant referred to rule out DS.

  9. Asthma, COPD and overlap syndrome: a longitudinal study in young European adults.

    PubMed

    de Marco, Roberto; Marcon, Alessandro; Rossi, Andrea; Antó, Josep M; Cerveri, Isa; Gislason, Thorarinn; Heinrich, Joachim; Janson, Christer; Jarvis, Deborah; Kuenzli, Nino; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Svanes, Cecilie; Wjst, Matthias; Burney, Peter

    2015-09-01

    We compared risk factors and clinical characteristics, 9-year lung function change and hospitalisation risk across subjects with the asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS), asthma or COPD alone, or none of these diseases.Participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey in 1991-1993 (aged 20-44 years) and 1999-2001 were included. Chronic airflow obstruction was defined as pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity

  10. Possible overlap between reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and symptomatic vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Forget, Patrice; Goffette, Pierre; van de Wyngaert, Françoise; Raftopoulos, Christian; Hantson, Philippe

    2009-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a previous history of severe headache ("thunderclap") was admitted with a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The patient developed symptomatic vasospasm on day 5 that resolved rapidly after having increased arterial blood pressure. She experienced also short-lasting excruciating headache. On day 12, while velocities had normalised, as revealed by transcranial Doppler (TCD), for more than 48 h, she developed aphasia and right hemiplegia associated with diffuse segmental vasospasm on the left middle cerebral artery. Intra-arterial infusion of vasodilatory agents was required. Recurrence of symptomatic vasospasm was noted on day 25, with a great number of territories involved as shown in the cerebral angiogram. A second intra-arterial treatment was needed. The patient complained of multiple episodes of extremely severe headache ("thunderclap"), with also transient dysarthria and hemiparesia on day 30. She was discharged on day 38 after full recovery. The clinical and TCD/radiological findings were consistent with a reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome overlapping SAH related symptomatic vasospasm. PMID:19381433

  11. Anti-Ku antibody-positive scleroderma-dermatomyositis overlap syndrome developing Graves' disease and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Nozomu; Yamane, Kiminori; Yamashita, Yasuyo; Nakanishi, Shuhei; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Rumi; Hiyama, Keiko; Ishioka, Shinichi; Mendoza, Ciro; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2002-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) has been reported to be frequently complicated with other autoimmune diseases. However, it is rarely complicated with scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome. Recently, we encountered a 35-year-old woman who developed GD and immune thrombocytopenic purpura during follow-up observation of scleroderma-dermatomyositis overlap syndrome. Platelet counts recovered after high-dose gamma-globulin therapy and bolus methylprednisolone therapy. The present case is the first report of a combination of scleroderma, dermatomyositis, GD, and immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The patient was anti-Ku antibody-positive and had relatively low natural killer T cell counts, both of which might contribute to the complication of multiple autoimmune diseases.

  12. Overlap between Majewski and hydrolethalus syndromes: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K; Phadke, S; Chandra, K; Upreti, M; Khan, E M; Naveed, M; Agarwal, S S

    1992-08-01

    We present 2 unrelated fetuses with manifestations of both the hydrolethalus syndrome and the short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type Majewski. It is proposed that cases of hydrolethalus syndrome with short limbs constitute a separate type of lethal osteochondrodysplasia mimicking short rib-polydactyly syndromes.

  13. Asthma–Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome Associated with Risk of Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a cohort study to clarify this relationship between asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods From the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, we identified patients who had a diagnosis of asthma and a diagnosis of COPD (defined as ACOS) and concurrent treatment between January 1999 and December 2009 (ACOS cohort: n = 14,150; non-ACOS cohort: n = 55,876). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for PE of the ACOS cohort compared with the non-ACOS cohort. Results Comparing the ACOS cohort with the non-ACOS cohort, the aHR of PE was 2.08 (95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 1.56–2.76). The risk of PE was higher in ACOS cohort than non-ACOS cohort, regardless of age, sex, comorbidity, inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and oral steroids (OSs) used. For ages ranging from 20 to 65 years, the aHR of PE was 2.53 (95% CI: 1.44–4.44) in the ACOS cohort. ACOS patients using ICSs (aHR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.29–3.01) or OSs (aHR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.46–2.65), the risk of PE was higher than in the non-ACOS cohort. The risk of PE increased with the number of outpatient visits and hospitalizations necessitated, ranging from 2.32 (95% CI: 1.54–3.52) in patients having 3–9 visits to 4.20 (95% CI: 2.74–6.44) for those having >9 visits. Conclusions ACOS is associated with increased risk of PE, particularly patients with a high frequency of AE—even in young adults or people without comorbidities. PMID:27611495

  14. Clinical, physiological, and radiological features of asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tada, Yuji; Kawata, Naoko; Matsuura, Yukiko; Ikari, Jun; Kasahara, Yasunori; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) is associated with rapid decline in lung function, poorer health-related quality-of-life outcomes, and frequent exacerbations, compared to COPD alone. Although the numbers of patients with ACOS have increased, there is little established evidence regarding diagnostic criteria and treatment options. Thus, the aim of our study was to clarify the clinical, physiological, and radiological features of patients with ACOS. Methods We examined a total of 100 patients with COPD and 40 patients with ACOS, who were selected based on clinical criteria. All patients underwent baseline testing, including a COPD assessment test, pulmonary function tests, and multidetector row computed tomography imaging. Percentage of low attenuation volume, percentage of wall area, and percentage of total cross-sectional area of pulmonary vessels less than 5 mm2 (%CSA <5) were determined using multidetector row computed tomography. ACOS patients were administered a fixed dose of budesonide/formoterol (160/4.5 μg, two inhalations; twice daily) for 12 weeks, after which the ACOS patients underwent multidetector row computed tomography to measure the same parameters. Results At baseline, the ACOS patients and COPD patients had a similar degree of airflow limitation, vital capacity, and residual volume. ACOS patients had higher COPD assessment test scores, percentage of wall area, and %CSA <5 than COPD patients. Compared to baseline, budesonide/formoterol treatment significantly increased the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and decreased the degree of airway wall thickness (percentage of wall area) as well as pulmonary microvascular density (%CSA <5) in ACOS patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that ACOS is characterized by an airway lesion–dominant phenotype, in contrast to COPD. Higher %CSA <5 might be a characteristic feature of ACOS. PMID:26028967

  15. Overlapping irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: less to this than meets the eye?

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Though distinct in terms of pathology, natural history and therapeutic approach, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have some features in common. These include shared symptomatology and largely similar demographics. However, in most instances, clinical presentation, together with laboratory, imaging and endoscopic findings will readily permit the differentiation of active IBD from IBS. More problematic is the situation where a subject with IBD, in apparent remission, continues to complain of symptoms which, in aggregate, satisfy commonly employed criteria for the diagnosis of IBS. Access to methodologies, such the assay for levels of calprotectin in feces, now allows identification of ongoing inflammation in some such individuals and prompts appropriate therapy. More challenging is the IBD patient with persisting symptoms and no detectable evidence of inflammation; is this coincident IBS, IBS triggered by IBD or an even more subtle level of IBD activity unrecognized by available laboratory or imaging methods? Arguments can be advanced for each of these proposals; lacking definitive data, this issue remains unresolved. The occurrence of IBS-type symptoms in the IBD patient, together with some data suggesting a very subtle level of ‘inflammation‘ or ‘immune activation‘ in IBS, raises other questions: is IBS a prodromal form of IBD; and are IBS and IBD part of the spectrum of the same disease? All of the available evidence indicates that the answer to both these questions should be a resounding ‘no’. Indeed, the whole issue of overlap between IBS and IBD should be declared moot given their differing pathophysiologies, contrasting natural histories and divergent treatment paths. The limited symptom repertoire of the gastrointestinal tract may well be fundamental to the apparent confusion that has, of late, bedeviled this area. PMID:26929782

  16. Biomarker-based detection of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome in COPD populations.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Takahashi, Tsuneyuki; Matsunaga, Kazuto; Kimura, Keiji; Katsumata, Uichiro; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Ohta, Ken; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) was proposed by the science committees of both Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). However, the definition of ACOS has remained unclear all over the world, and the prevalence rate of ACOS is basically dependent on the patient's symptoms or the physician's opinion, based on questionnaire testing. In the current case report, we investigated the prevalence rate of COPD patients with high levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) or immunoglobulin E (IgE) as candidate markers of ACOS in COPD, as a multicenter, cross-sectional study. Outpatients with COPD were enrolled from Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan, and five hospitals (Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Japan; NTT East Tohoku Hospital, Sendai, Japan; Wakayama Medical University Hospital, Kimiidera, Japan; Hiraka General Hospital, Yokote, Japan; Iwate Prefectural Isawa Hospital, Oshu, Japan) with pulmonary physicians from March 1, 2013 to February 28, 2014. When they were estimated using 35 ppb as the cutoff value of FENO, the prevalence rate of ACOS was 16.3% in COPD. When estimated by both FENO and IgE, the high-FENO/high-IgE group was 7.8% in COPD. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to detect the prevalence rate of ACOS in COPD populations by using objective biomarkers. The results from the current study should be useful to identify the subgroup requiring early intervention by inhaled corticosteroids/long-acting beta agonist combination in COPD in order to improve the long-term management for ACOS. PMID:26491283

  17. Common and specific impairments in attention functioning in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion, fragile X or Turner syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), fragile X syndrome (FXS), and Turner syndrome (TS) are complex and variable developmental syndromes caused by different genetic abnormalities; yet, they share similar cognitive impairments in the domains of numbers, space, and time. The atypical development of foundational neural networks that underpin the attentional system is thought to result in further impairments in higher-order cognitive functions. The current study investigates whether children with similar higher-order cognitive impairments but different genetic disorders also show similar impairments in alerting, orienting, and executive control of attention. Methods Girls with 22q11.2DS, FXS, or TS and typically developing (TD) girls, aged 7 to 15 years, completed an attention network test, a flanker task with alerting and orienting cues. Exploration of reaction times and accuracy allowed us to test for potential commonalities in attentional functioning in alerting, orienting, and executive control. Linear regression models were used to test whether the predictors of group and chronological age were able to predict differences in attention indices. Results Girls with 22q11.2DS, FXS, or TS demonstrated unimpaired function of the alerting system and impaired function of the executive control system. Diagnosis-specific impairments were found such that girls with FXS made more errors and had a reduced orienting index, while girls with 22q11.2DS showed specific age-related deficits in the executive control system. Conclusions These results suggest that the control but not the implementation of attention is selectively impaired in girls with 22q11.2DS, TS or FXS. Additionally, the age effect on executive control in girls with 22q11.2DS implies a possible altered developmental trajectory. PMID:24628892

  18. In antisynthetase syndrome, ACPA are associated with severe and erosive arthritis: an overlapping rheumatoid arthritis and antisynthetase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Alain; Lefevre, Guillaume; Bierry, Guillaume; Duval, Aurélie; Ottaviani, Sébastien; Meyer, Olivier; Tournadre, Anne; Le Goff, Benoit; Messer, Laurent; Buchdahl, Anne Laure; De Bandt, Michel; Deligny, Christophe; Dubois, Matthieu; Coquerelle, Pascal; Falgarone, Géraldine; Flipo, René-Marc; Mathian, Alexis; Geny, Bernard; Amoura, Zahir; Benveniste, Olivier; Hachulla, Eric; Sibilia, Jean; Hervier, Baptiste

    2015-05-01

    follow-up, extra-articular outcomes and survival were not different. ACPA-positive ASS patients showed an overlapping RA-ASS syndrome, were at high risk of refractory erosive arthritis, and might experience ASS flare when treated with antitumor necrosis factor drugs. In contrast, other biologics such as anti-CD20 mAb were effective in this context, without worsening systemic involvements.

  19. Multiple Contingency Table Analyses of the Deviance Syndrome: How Much Overlap Is There?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwyn, Robert Flynn; Benda, Brent B.

    1999-01-01

    Surveys adolescents (N=1,621) attending southern, metropolitan secondary schools to determine how much overlap there is in individuals who smoke, get drunk, use marijuana, and have sexual intercourse; and determine if overlap is according to age, gender, race, and family structure. Reports there are relationships between activities, although most…

  20. Pharmacological Management of Elderly Patients with Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome: Room for Speculation?

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Daniela; Battaglia, Salvatore; Benfante, Alida; Sorino, Claudio; Scichilone, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two distinct diseases that share a condition of chronic inflammation of the airways and bronchial obstruction. In clinical settings, it is not rare to come across patients who present with clinical and functional features of both diseases, posing a diagnostic dilemma. The overlap condition has been termed asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS), and mainly occurs in individuals with long-standing asthma, especially if they are also current or former smokers. Patients with ACOS have poorer health-related quality of life and a higher exacerbation rate than subjects with asthma or COPD alone. Whether ACOS is a distinct nosological entity with genetic variants or rather a condition of concomitant diseases that overlap is still a matter of debate. However, there is no doubt that extended life expectancy has increased the prevalence of asthma and COPD in older ages, and thus the probability that overlap conditions occur in clinical settings. In addition, age-associated changes of the lung create the basis for the two entities to converge on the same subject. ACOS patients may benefit from a stepwise treatment similar to that of asthma and COPD; however, the proposed therapeutic algorithms are only speculative and extrapolated from studies that are not representative of the ACOS population. Inhaled corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy, and always in conjunction with long-acting bronchodilators. The potential heterogeneity of the overlap syndrome in terms of inflammatory features (T helper-1 vs. T helper-2 pathways) may be responsible for the different responses to treatments. The interaction between respiratory drugs and concomitant diseases should be carefully evaluated. Similarly, the effect of non-respiratory drugs, such as aspirin, statins, and β-blockers, on lung function needs to be properly assessed. PMID:27138954

  1. Quantitative computed tomography measurements of emphysema for diagnosing asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mengshuang; Wang, Wei; Dou, Shuang; Cui, Liwei; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnostic criteria of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) are controversial. Emphysema is characteristic of COPD and usually does not exist in typical asthma patients. Emphysema in patients with asthma suggests the coexistence of COPD. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) allows repeated evaluation of emphysema noninvasively. We investigated the value of quantitative CT measurements of emphysema in the diagnosis of ACOS. Methods This study included 404 participants; 151 asthma patients, 125 COPD patients, and 128 normal control subjects. All the participants underwent pulmonary function tests and a high-resolution CT scan. Emphysema measurements were taken with an Airway Inspector software. The asthma patients were divided into high and low emphysema index (EI) groups based on the percentage of low attenuation areas less than −950 Hounsfield units. The characteristics of asthma patients with high EI were compared with those having low EI or COPD. Results The normal value of percentage of low attenuation areas less than −950 Hounsfield units in Chinese aged >40 years was 2.79%±2.37%. COPD patients indicated more severe emphysema and more upper-zone-predominant distribution of emphysema than asthma patients or controls. Thirty-two (21.2%) of the 151 asthma patients had high EI. Compared with asthma patients with low EI, those with high EI were significantly older, more likely to be male, had more pack-years of smoking, had more upper-zone-predominant distribution of emphysema, and had greater airflow limitation. There were no significant differences in sex ratios, pack-years of smoking, airflow limitation, or emphysema distribution between asthma patients with high EI and COPD patients. A greater number of acute exacerbations were seen in asthma patients with high EI compared with those with low EI or COPD. Conclusion Asthma patients with high EI fulfill the features of ACOS, as described in the Global Initiative for Asthma and Global

  2. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Saich, Rebecca; Chapman, Roger

    2008-01-01

    in patients with IBD, with up to 16% of patients with AIH also having ulcerative colitis. A small subgroup of patients have a AIH-PSC overlap syndrome and the management of these patients depends on liver histology, serum IgM levels, autoantibodies, degree of biochemical cholestasis and cholangiography as some of these patients may respond to immunosupression. PMID:18200656

  3. The proportion of diploid 46,XX cells increases with time in women with Turner syndrome--a 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Denes, Anna-Maria; Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin; Wettergren, Yvonne; Bryman, Inger; Hanson, Charles

    2015-02-01

    In the normal population, loss of one of the sex chromosomes leading to monosomy (45,X) is a part of the aging process. In Turner syndrome (TS), the classic karyotype 45,X is found in up to 50% at birth, and others have a second cell line; mosaicism. The aim was to study if the chromosomal pattern in TS women changes over time. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on buccal smear cells obtained twice, 10 years apart, from 42 women with TS aged 26-66 years (mean±standard deviation: 42.0±11.6). DNA probes specific for chromosomes X (DXZ1) and Y (DYZ3) were used and >100 cells were analyzed/patient. Nineteen women had monosomy (45,X) (<10% 46,XX), nine had 45,X/46,XX mosaicism, and 14 had iso, ring, or a marker chromosome at baseline. At 10 years, the percentage of diploid cells had increased in 29 of 42 women (69%), with an average increase of 5.7±13.0%. There was a positive correlation between age and % change in diploid 46,XX or 46,XY cells (r=0.38, p=0.023). This new finding might have relevance for the life expectancy in TS.

  4. Safety and efficacy of oxandrolone in growth hormone-treated girls with Turner syndrome: evidence from recent studies and recommendations for use.

    PubMed

    Sas, T C J; Gault, E J; Bardsley, M Zeger; Menke, L A; Freriks, K; Perry, R J; Otten, B J; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; Timmers, H; Wit, J M; Ross, J L; Donaldson, M D C

    2014-01-01

    There has been no consensus regarding the efficacy and safety of oxandrolone (Ox) in addition to growth hormone (GH) in girls with Turner syndrome (TS), the optimal age of starting this treatment, or the optimal dose. This collaborative venture between Dutch, UK and US centers is intended to give a summary of the data from three recently published randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies on the effects of Ox. The published papers from these studies were reviewed within the group of authors to reach consensus about the recommendations. The addition of Ox to GH treatment leads to an increase in adult height, on average 2.3–4.6 cm. If Ox dosages<0.06 mg/kg/day are used, side effects are modest. The most relevant safety concerns are virilization(including clitoromegaly and voice deepening) and a transient delay of breast development. We advise monitoring signs of virilization breast development and possibly blood lipids during Ox treatment, in addition to regular follow-up assessments for TS. In girls with TS who are severely short for age, in whom very short adult stature is anticipated,or in whom the growth rate is modest despite good compliance with GH, adjunctive treatment with Ox at a dosage of 0.03–0.05 mg/kg/day starting from the age of 8–10 years onward scan be considered. PMID:24776783

  5. Serum FSH level below 10 mIU/mL at twelve years old is an index of spontaneous and cyclical menstruation in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aso, Keiko; Koto, Shinobu; Higuchi, Asako; Ariyasu, Daisuke; Izawa, Masako; Miyamoto Igaki, Junko; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2010-01-01

    The gonadal function of patients with Turner syndrome (TS) is variable. Individuals with mosaicism characterized by 45,X/46,XX or 45,X/47,XXX are more likely to experience spontaneous menarche compared with other karyotypes. Prepubertal gonadotropins of TS patients with spontaneous menarche are reportedly normal or significantly lower than those of patients with induced menarche. The present study investigated an index of spontaneous and cyclical menstruation at 10-12 years old in TS. Subjects comprised 50 patients with TS, divided into three groups: Group A (n=7), with spontaneous menarche before 16 years old and regular menstruation for at least 1 year and 6 months; Group B (n=6), with irregular menstruation since menarche leading to secondary amenorrhea despite spontaneous menarche before 16 years old; and Group C (n=37), without spontaneous breast budding before 14 years old or without spontaneous menarche before 16 years old. Karyotype, LH and FSH concentrations at 10 and 12 years old were analyzed retrospectively. Spontaneous and cyclical menstruation was more frequently observed in TS with mosaicism characterized by 45,X/46,XX or 45,X/47,XXX than in TS with other karyotypes, as previously described. Spontaneous and cyclical menstruation in TS was observed when serum FSH level was <10 mIU/mL at 12 years old, suggesting this FSH level as an index of spontaneous and cyclical menstruation in TS. PMID:20798475

  6. Pharmacogenomics of insulin-like growth factor-I generation during GH treatment in children with GH deficiency or Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Clayton, P; Tatò, L; Yoo, H W; Rodriguez-Arnao, M D; Skorodok, J; Ambler, G R; Zignani, M; Zieschang, J; Della Corte, G; Destenaves, B; Champigneulle, A; Raelson, J; Chatelain, P

    2014-01-01

    Individual responses to growth hormone (GH) treatment are variable. Short-term generation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is recognized as a potential marker of sensitivity to GH treatment. This prospective, phase IV study used an integrated genomic analysis to identify markers associated with 1-month change in IGF-I (ΔIGF-I) following initiation of recombinant human (r-h)GH therapy in treatment-naïve children with GH deficiency (GHD) (n=166) or Turner syndrome (TS) (n=147). In both GHD and TS, polymorphisms in the cell-cycle regulator CDK4 were associated with 1-month ΔIGF-I (P<0.05). Baseline gene expression was also correlated with 1-month ΔIGF-I in both GHD and TS (r=0.3; P<0.01). In patients with low IGF-I responses, carriage of specific CDK4 alleles was associated with MAPK and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in GHD, and with p53 and Wnt signaling pathways in TS. Understanding the relationship between genomic markers and early changes in IGF-I may allow development of strategies to rapidly individualize r-hGH dose. PMID:23567489

  7. The mitochondrial DNA 10197 G > A mutation causes MELAS/Leigh overlap syndrome presenting with acute auditory agnosia.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yinglin; Liu, Yuhe; Fang, Xiaojing; Li, Yao; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Yun; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes/Leigh (MELAS/LS) overlap syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder subtype with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that are characteristic of both MELAS and Leigh syndrome (LS). Here, we report an MELAS/LS case presenting with cortical deafness and seizures. Cranial MRI revealed multiple lesions involving bilateral temporal lobes, the basal ganglia and the brainstem, which conformed to neuroimaging features of both MELAS and LS. Whole mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and PCR-RFLP revealed a de novo heteroplasmic m.10197 G > A mutation in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 gene (ND3), which was predicted to cause an alanine to threonine substitution at amino acid 47. Although the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation has been reported in association with LS, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia, it has never been linked with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. Our patient therefore expands the phenotypic spectrum of the mtDNA m.10197 G > A mutation.

  8. Growth Hormone Treatment Does Not Affect Incidences of Middle Ear Disease or Hearing Loss in Infants and Toddlers with Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Marsha L.; Roush, Jackson; Liu, Chunhua; Zagar, Anthony J.; Eugster, Erica; Travers, Sharon; Fechner, Patricia Y.; Quigley, Charmian A.

    2010-01-01

    Context No randomized, controlled, prospective study has evaluated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on the rates of middle ear (ME) disease and hearing loss in girls with Turner syndrome (TS). Design A 2-year, prospective, randomized, controlled, open-label, multicenter, clinical trial (‘Toddler Turner Study’; August 1999 to August 2003) was carried out. Setting The study was conducted at 11 US pediatric endocrine centers. Subjects Eighty-eight girls with TS, aged 9 months to 4 years, were enrolled. Intervention The interventions comprised recombinant GH (50 μg/kg/day, n = 45) or no treatment (n = 43) for 2 years. Main Outcome Measures The outcome measures included occurrence rates of ear-related problems, otitis media (OM) and associated antibiotic treatments, tympanometric assessment of ME function and hearing assessment by audiology. Results At baseline, 57% of the girls (mean age = 1.98 ± 1.00 years) had a history of recurrent OM, 33% had undergone tympanostomy tube (t-tube) insertion and 27% had abnormal hearing. There was no significant difference between the treatment groups for annual incidence of OM episodes (untreated control: 1.9 ± 1.4; GH-treated: 1.5 ± 1.6, p = 0.17). A quarter of the subjects underwent ear surgeries (mainly t-tube insertions) during the study. Recurrent or persistent abnormality of ME function on tympanometry was present in 28–45% of the girls without t-tubes at the 6 postbaseline visits. Hearing deficits were found in 19–32% of the girls at the annual postbaseline visits. Most of these were conductive deficits, however, 2 girls had findings consistent with sensorineural hearing loss, which was evident before 3 years of age. Conclusions Ear and hearing problems are common in infants and toddlers with TS and are not significantly influenced by GH treatment. Girls with TS need early, regular and thorough ME monitoring by their primary care provider and/or otolaryngologist, and at least annual hearing evaluations by a

  9. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  10. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Faizan; Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  11. Genomic profile of a Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome patient with a 45,X/46,XX karyotype, presenting neither mutations in TP53 nor clinical stigmata of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basso, Tatiane R; Villacis, Rolando A R; Canto, Luisa M; Alves, Vinicius M F; Lapa, Rainer M L; Nóbrega, Amanda F; Achatz, Maria I; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2015-06-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a hereditary disorder that predisposes patients to several types of cancer and is associated with TP53 germline mutations. Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common aneuploidies in women. Patients with TS have a higher risk of developing cancer, although multiple malignant tumors are extremely rare. Herein, we describe a patient with a 45,X/46,XX karyotype with no classic phenotype of TS. She presented with a clinical diagnosis of Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (LFL), showing papillary thyroid carcinoma and fibrosarcoma of the left flank, and had no TP53 germline mutations. Genome-wide analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) was assessed in DNA from peripheral blood cells and saliva. A total of 109 rare CNVs in the blood cells, including mosaic loss of the X chromosome (76% of cells), were identified. In saliva, three rare CNVs were detected, all of them were also detected in the blood cells: loss of 8q24.11 (EXT1), gain of 16q24.3 (PRDM7 and GAS8), and the mosaic loss of the X chromosome (50% of cells). Results of conventional G-banding confirmed the 45,X/46,XX karyotype. Surprisingly, the patient presented with an apparently normal phenotype. The PRDM and GAS8 genes are potential candidates to be associated with the risk of developing cancer in this LFL/TS patient.

  12. Overlap between functional GI disorders and other functional syndromes: what are the underlying mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    KIM, S. E.; CHANG, L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome and other gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI disorders such as functional dyspepsia, fibromyalgia, temporomandibular joint disorder, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and chronic fatigue syndrome are known as functional pain syndromes. They commonly coexist within the same individual. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, but it has been hypothesized that they share a common pathogenesis. Purpose The objective of this review is to discuss the proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms, which have been similarly studied in these conditions. These mechanisms include enhanced pain perception, altered regional brain activation, infectious etiologies, dysregulations in immune and neuroendocrine function, and genetic susceptibility. Studies suggest that these functional disorders are multifactorial, but factors which increase the vulnerability of developing these conditions are shared. PMID:22863120

  13. Polyangitis overlap syndrome: a fatal case combined with adult Henoch-Schönlein purpura and polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuo; Abe, Hiroyuki; Mishima, Tomoko; Ogura, Go; Suzuki, Toshimitsu

    2003-08-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a rather common disease characterized by systemic hypersensitivity vasculitis in the skin and other visceral organs. It has a favorable prognosis unless it is complicated by severe glomerular disease. We report a distinctive fatal case of systemic vasculitis combined with HSP and polyarteritis nodosa (PN) in a 56-year-old man who died of progressive renal failure one month after the onset of the disease. He complained of arthralgia, purpura of both lower extremities, nasal bleeding and tarry stool, and acute renal failure was noted at the time of admission to hospital. A skin biopsy from the purpura lesion exhibited leucocytoclastic vasculitis with IgA deposition, and HSP was considered. However, renal failure progressed rapidly and subsequently was complicated by acute myocardial infarction. Postmortem examination revealed PN type necrotizing vasculitis in the kidneys, heart and mesentery resulting in acute multiple infarctions of these organs. We think the current case was a polyangitis overlap syndrome. It is important to suspect the polyangitis overlap syndrome positively when progressive acute renal failure is seen in a patient with HSP and to begin appropriate therapy immediately.

  14. Touched by Turner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This is a personal reflection on an encounter with the works of the nineteenth-century painter J. M. W. Turner in London's Tate Britain exhibition "Late Turner: Painting Set Free". The article discusses the deeply subjective nature of engaging with artworks, and touches upon theories that might account for the ineffable but moving…

  15. Phenotypic patterns of MELAS/LS overlap syndrome associated with m.13513G>A mutation, and neuropathological findings in one autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoxia; Qi, Xiao Kun; Yao, Sheng; Chen, Bin; Luan, Xinghua; Zhang, Wei; Han, Manfu; Yuan, Yun

    2010-12-01

    The 13513G>A mutation in the ND5 gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is usually associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactate acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), or Leigh syndrome (LS). In this study, we describe three young Chinese patients with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome who carried the m.13513G>A mutation. Clinical and MRI features were characteristic of both MELAS and LS. Interestingly, the clinical presentation of this overlap syndrome could be variable depending on the degree of relative contribution of MELAS and LS, that is, MELAS as the initial presenting syndrome, LS as the predominant syndrome, or both MELAS and LS appearing at the same time. The final brain MRI showed findings characteristic of both MELAS and LS, with asymmetrical lesions in the cortex and subcortical white matter of the occipital, temporal, and frontal lobes (MELAS), and bilateral and symmetrical lesions in the basal ganglia and brainstem (LS). Brain autopsy in one case revealed infarct-like lesions in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and brainstem, providing further insight into the distribution of the pathological lesions in MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. This is the first report of the brain pathological changes in a patient with m.13513G>A mutation. The spatial distribution of infarct-like lesions in the brain could explain the symptoms in MELAS/LS overlap syndrome.

  16. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease, Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, and Overlap Syndromes in Rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Pepmueller, Peri Hickman

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases often have overlapping symptoms and laboratory somewhat unfamiliar to the non-rheumatologist. Characteristic signs, symptoms, and autoantibodies define specific connective tissue diseases. Some patients have some characteristic symptoms, but cannot be definitively classified. Still other patients meet criteria for more than one specific connective tissue disease. These patients can be confusing with regard to diagnosis and prognosis. Clarification of each patient's condition can lead to improved patient care.

  17. [Functional somatic pain syndromes: summary of hypotheses of their overlap and etiology].

    PubMed

    Henningsen, P; Derra, C; Türp, J C; Häuser, W

    2004-04-01

    Currently it is unclear whether functional somatic syndromes can be explained by one common underlying functional syndrome. In any case it does not seem justified to view functional somatic syndromes as purely psychological disorders (somatized anxiety or depression). Psychiatric comorbidity and life time stress including traumatisations are mainly, but not exclusively responsible for triggering health care utilisation. The lowered pain threshold that can be demonstrated clinically and experimentally in fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, tension headache and temporomandibular disorders is currently seen primarily as result of an altered central nervous processing of nociceptive input. In addition some results also hint at a disturbance in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. The predominance of female patients can be due to gender specific illness behaviour as well as to estrogen-induced changes in pain sensitivity. In sum, functional somatic syndromes currently are best explained by a biopsychosocial model of predisposing, triggering and maintaining factors. More research is needed particularly to clarify the role of genetic and of cultural factors. PMID:15067534

  18. Long-term effects of oxandrolone treatment in childhood on neurocognition, quality of life and social-emotional functioning in young adults with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Freriks, K; Verhaak, C M; Sas, T C J; Menke, L A; Wit, J M; Otten, B J; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; Smeets, D F C M; Netea-Maier, R T; Hermus, A R M M; Kessels, R P C; Timmers, H J L M

    2015-03-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is the result of (partial) absence of one X-chromosome. Besides short stature, gonadal dysgenesis and other physical aspects, TS women have typical psychological features. Since psychological effects of androgen exposure in childhood probably are long-lasting, we explored long-term psychological functioning after oxandrolone (Ox) therapy during childhood in adults with TS in terms of neurocognition, quality of life and social-emotional functioning. During the initial study, girls were treated with growth hormone (GH) combined with placebo (Pl), Ox 0.03 mg/kg/day, or Ox 0.06 mg/kg/day from the age of eight, and estrogen from the age of twelve. Sixty-eight women participated in the current double-blinded follow-up study (mean age 24.0 years, mean time since stopping GH/Ox 8.7 years). We found no effects on neurocognition. Concerning quality of life women treated with Ox had higher anxiety levels (STAI 37.4 ± 8.4 vs 31.8 ± 5.0, p=0.002) and higher scores on the depression subscale of the SCL-90-R (25.7 ± 10.7 vs 20.5 ± 4.7, p=0.01). Regarding social-emotional functioning, emotion perception for fearful faces was lower in the Ox-treated patients, without effect on interpersonal behavior. Our exploratory study is the first to suggest that androgen treatment in adolescence possibly has long-term effects on adult quality of life and social-emotional functioning. However, differences are small and clinical implications of our results seem limited. Therefore we would not recommend against the use of Ox in light of psychological consequences. PMID:25562712

  19. Long-term effects of oxandrolone treatment in childhood on neurocognition, quality of life and social-emotional functioning in young adults with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Freriks, K; Verhaak, C M; Sas, T C J; Menke, L A; Wit, J M; Otten, B J; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; Smeets, D F C M; Netea-Maier, R T; Hermus, A R M M; Kessels, R P C; Timmers, H J L M

    2015-03-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is the result of (partial) absence of one X-chromosome. Besides short stature, gonadal dysgenesis and other physical aspects, TS women have typical psychological features. Since psychological effects of androgen exposure in childhood probably are long-lasting, we explored long-term psychological functioning after oxandrolone (Ox) therapy during childhood in adults with TS in terms of neurocognition, quality of life and social-emotional functioning. During the initial study, girls were treated with growth hormone (GH) combined with placebo (Pl), Ox 0.03 mg/kg/day, or Ox 0.06 mg/kg/day from the age of eight, and estrogen from the age of twelve. Sixty-eight women participated in the current double-blinded follow-up study (mean age 24.0 years, mean time since stopping GH/Ox 8.7 years). We found no effects on neurocognition. Concerning quality of life women treated with Ox had higher anxiety levels (STAI 37.4 ± 8.4 vs 31.8 ± 5.0, p=0.002) and higher scores on the depression subscale of the SCL-90-R (25.7 ± 10.7 vs 20.5 ± 4.7, p=0.01). Regarding social-emotional functioning, emotion perception for fearful faces was lower in the Ox-treated patients, without effect on interpersonal behavior. Our exploratory study is the first to suggest that androgen treatment in adolescence possibly has long-term effects on adult quality of life and social-emotional functioning. However, differences are small and clinical implications of our results seem limited. Therefore we would not recommend against the use of Ox in light of psychological consequences.

  20. No influence of parental origin of intact X chromosome and/or Y chromosome sequences on three-year height response to growth hormone therapy in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Jin; Jung, Hae Woon; Lee, Gyung Min; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whether parental origin of the intact X chromosome and/or the presence of Y chromosome sequences (Yseq) play a role in three-year height response to growth hormone (GH) were investigated. Methods Paternal (Xp) or maternal (Xm) origin of X chromosome was assessed by microsatellite marker analysis and the presence of hidden Yseq was analyzed. The first-, second-, and third-year GH response was measured as a change in height z-score (Z_Ht) in Turner syndrome (TS) patients with 45,Xp (n=10), 45,Xm (n=15), and 45,X/46,X,+mar(Y) (Xm_Yseq) (n=8). Results The mean baseline Z_Ht did not differ according to Xp or Xm origin, however the mean baseline Z_Ht was higher in the Xm_Yseq group than in Xm group, after adjusting for bone age delay and midparental Z_Ht (P=0.04). There was no difference in the height response to GH between the 3 groups. The height response to GH decreased progressively each year (P<0.001), such that the third-year increase in Z_Ht was not significant. This third-year decrease in treatment response was unaffected by Xp, Xm, and Xm_Yseq groups. Increasing GH dosage from the second to third-year of treatment positively correlated with the increase in Z_Ht (P=0.017). Conclusion There was no evidence of X-linked imprinted genes and/or Yseq affecting height response to 3 years of GH therapy. Increasing GH dosages may help attenuate the decrease in third-year GH response in TS patients with 45,X and/or 46,X/+mar(Y). PMID:25346916

  1. Combining multicriteria decision analysis, ethics and health technology assessment: applying the EVIDEM decisionmaking framework to growth hormone for Turner syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To test and further develop a healthcare policy and clinical decision support framework using growth hormone (GH) for Turner syndrome (TS) as a complex case study. Methods The EVIDEM framework was further developed to complement the multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) Value Matrix, that includes 15 quantifiable components of decision clustered in four domains (quality of evidence, disease, intervention and economics), with a qualitative tool including six ethical and health system-related components of decision. An extensive review of the literature was performed to develop a health technology assessment report (HTA) tailored to each component of decision, and content was validated by experts. A panel of representative stakeholders then estimated the MCDA value of GH for TS in Canada by assigning weights and scores to each MCDA component of decision and then considered the impact of non-quantifiable components of decision. Results Applying the framework revealed significant data gaps and the importance of aligning research questions with data needs to truly inform decision. Panelists estimated the value of GH for TS at 41% of maximum value on the MCDA scale, with good agreement at the individual level (retest value 40%; ICC: 0.687) and large variation across panelists. Main contributors to this panel specific value were "Improvement of efficacy", "Disease severity" and "Quality of evidence". Ethical considerations on utility, efficiency and fairness as well as potential misuse of GH had mixed effects on the perceived value of the treatment. Conclusions This framework is proposed as a pragmatic step beyond the current cost-effectiveness model, combining HTA, MCDA, values and ethics. It supports systematic consideration of all components of decision and available evidence for greater transparency. Further testing and validation is needed to build up MCDA approaches combined with pragmatic HTA in healthcare decisionmaking. PMID:20377888

  2. Women with Turner syndrome are at high risk of lifestyle-related disease -From questionnaire surveys by the Foundation for Growth Science in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hanew, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Horikawa, Reiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yokoya, Susumu

    2016-05-31

    In this study, the prevalence of obesity and complications of lifestyle-related diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and liver dysfunction, as well as the relationship with karyotypes, were investigated in 492 patients with Turner syndrome (TS) aged 17 years or older. Data were obtained through questionnaire surveys administered by attending physicians throughout Japan. Collected data were compared with data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey. Patient ages ranged from 17.1 to 42.5 years (mean ± standard error, 26.6±0.2). The prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases at age 20 or over was 6.3% for diabetes, 8.7% for hypertension, 20.2% for dyslipidemia and 12.4% for liver dysfunction. These four diseases were clearly associated with severity of obesity. Obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m(2)) was observed in 106 out of 426 patients with TS aged 15 to 39 years (24.7%) and the prevalence was significantly higher than that of the general female population (9.4%). The mean BMI in age subgroups without any complications ranged from 21.2 to 22.7, which although was within normal ranges was significantly higher than that in the general female population (20.3-21.3). In this study population, patients with TS had more complications related to lifestyle-related diseases that were highly related to obesity. Few associations between complications and karyotypes were found. In the follow-up of patients with TS, the presence of lifestyle-related disease should be considered in the evaluation and treatment of the disease.

  3. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease.

    PubMed

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient's clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient's 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician's history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient's rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient's family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case. PMID:27635185

  4. Symptomatic overlap in patients with diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome and microscopic colitis in a sub group of Bangladeshi population.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Raihan, A S M A; Ahamed, D S; Masud, H; Safiullah, A B M; Khair, K B; Salimullah, A S M; Islam, M M S

    2012-04-01

    Microscopic Colitis (MC) and diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) has almost similar clinical feature but MC is diagnosed by histologic criteria and IBS is diagnosed by symptom-based criteria. There is ongoing debate about the importance of biopsies from endoscopically normal colonic mucosa in the investigation of patients with IBS-D. Aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MC in patient with IBS-D and to determine the distribution of MC in the colon. This observational study was conducted in department of Gastroenterology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2008 to December 2009. Patients were evaluated thoroughly & who meet Rome-II criteria with normal routine laboratory tests, were included in the study. Colonoscopy was done and biopsies were taken from the caecum, transverse colon, descending colon, and rectum. Out of total 60 patients, 22 had Lymphocytic Colitis (LC), 28 had nonspecific microscopic colitis (NSMC) and 10 had irritable bowel syndrome noninflamed (IBSNI). The distribution of LC was restricted to proximal colon in 15 patients, in the left colon in 2 patients and diffuses throughout the colon in 5 patients. There is considerable symptom overlap between the patients of IBS-D and patients with microscopic colitis. Without colonoscopic biopsy from multiple sites, possibility of MC cannot be excluded in patients with IBS-D and it can be said that clinical symptom based criteria for irritable bowel syndrome are not sufficient enough to rule out the diagnosis of microscopic colitis.

  5. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF): two "fatigue" syndromes with overlapping symptoms and possibly related aetiologies.

    PubMed

    Rovigatti, Ugo

    2012-12-01

    In July 2010, at the Muscle Fatigue Meeting, I presented an overview of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Cancer Related Fatigue, emphasizing a critical interpretation of the potential association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Cancer Related Fatigue and a newly discovered retrovirus: Xenotropic Murine Related Virus. Since this association was hotly debated at that time, I suggested at the Meeting that it was wrong and most likely due to the identification of the wrong virus culprit. Today, 20 months after the Meeting, the first part of our prediction has turned out to be correct, as Xenotropic Murine Related Virus was shown to be a laboratory-created artefact. Still, the potential association of fatigue-syndromes with an infection (most likely viral) is sustained by a plethora of evidence and this overview will initially summarize data suggesting prior viral infection(s). The principal hypothesized mechanisms for both peripheral and central Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Cancer Related Fatigue will be then summarized, also indicating plausible associations and triggering factors. All evidence accrued so far suggests that further research work should be performed in this interesting area and in order to identify an infectious agent for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Cancer Related Fatigue. One candidate RNA virus, Micro-Foci inducing Virus, will be described in this overview.

  6. An unusual case of Sweet syndrome in a child: overlapping presentation with erythema elevatum diutinum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Liu, Hongjie; Wang, Lin; Guo, Zaipei; Li, Li

    2014-06-01

    In 1964, Sweet described an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis. It is now widely accepted that Sweet syndrome is one of the associated neutrophilic dermatoses. Herein, we describe an unusual case of Sweet syndrome in a 5-year-old child who suffered from recurrent papules, plaques, and blisters on his face and trunk after the initial onset of fever without an obvious cause. Two skin biopsies were performed. The histopathological findings of the left arm biopsy showed a subepidermal blister with dense infiltrating neutrophils within the blister that were superficial to the middle layer of the dermis. The biopsy from a plaque on the left leg showed a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and a large number of infiltrating histiocytes superficial to the middle layer of the dermis. Direct immunofluorescence of a skin biopsy from the left arm confirmed that immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, IgA, and C3 expression were negative.

  7. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient’s clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient’s 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician’s history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient’s rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient’s family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case.

  8. An Overlapping Case of Alport Syndrome and Thin Basement Membrane Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alganabi, Mashriq; Eter, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 48-year-old male who presented with hematuria of at least 10 years, and has a daughter with hematuria as well. The patient has a history of degenerative hearing loss, decreased vision and cataract formation, but no diabetes, hypertension or proteinuria. A full serology and urology workup was negative for any abnormality. A kidney biopsy for the patient revealed a diagnosis of Alport syndrome but was unable to rule out thin basement membrane disease. The biopsy was inconclusive in making the diagnosis but the patient’s clinical presentation led to the diagnosis of Alport syndrome. The patient’s 10-year-old daughter also has hematuria with no clear etiology but now can subsequently be anticipatorily managed for Alport syndrome progression. Due to the rarity of the disease, diagnosis is often missed or delayed by primary care providers especially when no associated proteinuria has yet developed. This can lead to confusion and misdiagnosis with thin basement membrane disease, a generally benign hematuria without kidney failure progression. Additionally, biopsy can be inconclusive in these patients, relying on the physician’s history and physical examination findings to diagnose. It is important to appropriately diagnose Alport syndrome not only to manage the patient’s rate of kidney failure progression but also allow for a higher degree of suspicion, screening and intervention in the patient’s family members. Both the inconclusive nature of kidney biopsies and the usefulness of diagnosis for family member screening are often overlooked in medical literature but are explored in this case. PMID:27635185

  9. Dubowitz syndrome is a complex comprised of multiple, genetically distinct and phenotypically overlapping disorders.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Douglas R; Pemov, Alexander; Johnston, Jennifer J; Sapp, Julie C; Yeager, Meredith; He, Ji; Boland, Joseph F; Burdett, Laurie; Brown, Christina; Gatti, Richard A; Alter, Blanche P; Biesecker, Leslie G; Savage, Sharon A

    2014-01-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister) and an unpublished patient (Patient 3). Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T) that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002) and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼ 3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463-65,963,102, hg18), which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤ 1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of phenotypically

  10. Dubowitz Syndrome Is a Complex Comprised of Multiple, Genetically Distinct and Phenotypically Overlapping Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Douglas R.; Pemov, Alexander; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Yeager, Meredith; He, Ji; Boland, Joseph F.; Burdett, Laurie; Brown, Christina; Gatti, Richard A.; Alter, Blanche P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister) and an unpublished patient (Patient 3). Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T) that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002) and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463–65,963,102, hg18), which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of phenotypically

  11. Inflammatory myopathies and overlap syndromes: Update on histological and serological profile.

    PubMed

    Colafrancesco, Serena; Priori, Roberta; Valesini, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The term 'inflammatory myopathies' (IMs) comprise a group of muscle diseases formed by four main categories known as polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), inclusion body myositis (IBM) and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). Due to the increasing evidence of IMs over the course of different autoimmune diseases, the overlap myositis (OM) has been recently recognized as a possible stand-alone entity. IMs are characterized by a wide spectrum of autoantibodies, and the panel of myositis-associated autoantibodies (MAA) has dramatically increased over the last years giving the clinicians a further crucial support to differentiate the different types of myositis. This study aims to collect the most relevant evidence published up to date on the most commonly described OM with a particular emphasis on their histological aspects and also serological features. PMID:27107515

  12. Comment on Turner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Yerker; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Four writers (Yerker Andersson, Trevor Johnston, Leila Monaghan, and Brian Street) respond to Graham Turner's discussion of deaf culture, considering labeling categories and approaches to definitions of "deaf culture." (Contains 24 references.) (LB)

  13. Size of the exon 1-CAG repeats of the androgen receptor gene employed as a molecular marker in the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in girls with short stature.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, C C; Kochi, C; Longui, C A; Rocha, M N; Richeti, F; Evangelista, N M A; Calliari, L E P; Monte, O

    2008-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities among girls. Complete monosomy of X chromosome is responsible for almost 50% of all cases of TS, and mosaicism and X anomaly are detected in the other half. It has already been demonstrated that early diagnosis of these children allows appropriate growth hormone treatment with better final height prognosis and introduction of estrogen at an ideal chronological age. Sixty-four short-stature girls were selected and the clinical data obtained were birth weight and height, weight and height at the first medical visit and target height. Other clinical data including cardiac and renal abnormalities, otitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, cubitus valgus, short neck, widely separated nipples, and pigmented nevi were obtained from the patients' medical records. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the screening of a group of short-stature girls for TS based on the number of CAG repeats of the androgen receptor gene analyzed by GeneScan software. Patient samples with two alleles (heterozygous) were 49/64 (76.5%) and with one allele (homozygous) were 15/64 (23.5%). A karyotype was determined in 30 patients, 9 homozygous and 21 heterozygous. In the homozygous group, 6/9 were 45,X and 3/9 were 46,XX. In the heterozygous group, 17/21 were 46,XX, and 4/21 were TS patients with mosaicism (45,X/46,XX; 45,X/46XiXq; 46XdelXp). The pattern obtained by GeneScan in two patients with mosaicism in the karyotype was an imbalance between the peak heights of the two alleles, suggesting that this imbalance could be present when there is a mosaicism. The frequency of TS abnormalities (18.7%) did not differ between TS and 46,XX girls. Thus, it is important to accurately assess the incidence of TS in growth-retarded girls, even in the absence of other dysmorphisms. In this study, we diagnosed 6 cases of TS 45,X (9.4%) by molecular analysis, with a 100% sensitivity and 85% specificity. This molecular analysis was able to

  14. Parsonage–Turner syndrome☆

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto; dos Santos, Saulo Monteiro; Carneiro Leal, Flávio José Câmara; Lins, Otávio Gomes; Magalhães, Carmem; Mertens Fittipaldi, Ricardo Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical, electrophysiological and imaging findings from Parsonage–Turner syndrome and evaluate the results from conservative treatment. Methods Eight cases were studied between February 2010 and February 2012, with a minimum follow-up of one year (mean of 14 months). All the patients answered a clinical questionnaire and underwent functional evaluation using the Constant and Murley score. After clinical suspicion was raised, an electromyography examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Results Eight patients (mean age of 29 years) were evaluated. The right side was affected in 70% of the cases, and the dominant side in 80% of the cases. All the patients reported that their shoulder pain had started suddenly, lasting from one to five days in six cases and up to 15 days in two cases. In three cases, severe atrophy of the deltoid muscle was observed. Hypotrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles was observed in three cases. A winged scapula was observed in the two remaining cases. Electromyography demonstrated involvement of the long thoracic nerve in these last two cases and confirmed the involvement of the axillary and suprascapular nerves in the remaining six cases. The mean score on the Constant and Murley scale was 96 at the end of the conservative treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physiotherapy. Six of the eight patients presented good recovery of muscle strength. Conclusions In the majority of the cases, the functional recovery was good, although muscle strength was not completely restored in some of them. PMID:26229940

  15. Molecular definition of the smallest region of deletion overlap in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, K.Y.; Gibson, L.; Meyn, M.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1992-09-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), associated with a deletion of chromosome 4p, is characterized by mental and growth retardation and typical dysmorphism. A girl with clinical features of WHS was found to carry a subtle deletion of chromosome 4p. Initially suggested by high-resolution chromosome analysis, her deletion was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid probes, E13, and Y2, of D4S113. To delineate this 4p deletion, the authors performed a series of FISH and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis by using probes from 4p16.3. A deletion of [approximately]2.5 Mb with the breakpoint at [approximately]80 kb distal to D4S43 was defined in this patient and appears to be the smallest WHS deletion so far identified. To further refine the WHS critical region, they have studied three unrelated patients with presumptive 4p deletions, two resulting from unbalanced segregations of parental chromosomal translocations and one resulting from an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation. Larger deletions were identified in two patients with WHS. One patient who did not clinically present with WHS had a smaller deletion that thus eliminates the distal 100-300 kb from the telomere as being part of the WHS region. This study has localized the WHS region to [approximately]2 MB between D4S43 and D4S142. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Status of diagnostic approaches to AQP4-IgG seronegative NMO and NMO/MS overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Juryńczyk, Maciej; Weinshenker, Brian; Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Asgari, Nasrin; Barnes, David; Boggild, Mike; Chaudhuri, Abhijit; D'hooghe, Marie; Evangelou, Nikos; Geraldes, Ruth; Illes, Zsolt; Jacob, Anu; Kim, Ho Jin; Kleiter, Ingo; Levy, Michael; Marignier, Romain; McGuigan, Christopher; Murray, Katy; Nakashima, Ichiro; Pandit, Lekha; Paul, Friedemann; Pittock, Sean; Selmaj, Krzysztof; de Sèze, Jérôme; Siva, Aksel; Tanasescu, Radu; Vukusic, Sandra; Wingerchuk, Dean; Wren, Damian; Leite, Isabel; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing aquaporin-4 IgG(AQP4-IgG)-negative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) from opticospinal predominant multiple sclerosis (MS) is a clinical challenge with important treatment implications. The objective of the study was to examine whether expert clinicians diagnose and treat NMO/MS overlapping patients in a similar way. 12 AQP4-IgG-negative patients were selected to cover the range of clinical scenarios encountered in an NMO clinic. 27 NMO and MS experts reviewed their clinical vignettes, including relevant imaging and laboratory tests. Diagnoses were categorized into four groups (NMO, MS, indeterminate, other) and management into three groups (MS drugs, immunosuppression, no treatment). The mean proportion of agreement for the diagnosis was low (p o = 0.51) and ranged from 0.25 to 0.73 for individual patients. The majority opinion was divided between NMOSD versus: MS (nine cases), monophasic longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) (1), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) (1) and recurrent isolated optic neuritis (RION) (1). Typical NMO features (e.g., LETM) influenced the diagnosis more than features more consistent with MS (e.g., short TM). Agreement on the treatment of patients was higher (p o = 0.64) than that on the diagnosis with immunosuppression being the most common choice not only in patients with the diagnosis of NMO (98 %) but also in those indeterminate between NMO and MS (74 %). The diagnosis in AQP4-IgG-negative NMO/MS overlap syndromes is challenging and diverse. The classification of such patients currently requires new diagnostic categories, which incorporate lesser degrees of diagnostic confidence. Long-term follow-up may identify early features or biomarkers, which can more accurately distinguish the underlying disorder.

  17. Status of diagnostic approaches to AQP4-IgG seronegative NMO and NMO/MS overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Weinshenker, Brian; Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Asgari, Nasrin; Barnes, David; Boggild, Mike; Chaudhuri, Abhijit; D’hooghe, Marie; Evangelou, Nikos; Geraldes, Ruth; Illes, Zsolt; Jacob, Anu; Kim, Ho Jin; Kleiter, Ingo; Levy, Michael; Marignier, Romain; McGuigan, Christopher; Murray, Katy; Nakashima, Ichiro; Pandit, Lekha; Paul, Friedemann; Pittock, Sean; Selmaj, Krzysztof; de Sèze, Jérôme; Siva, Aksel; Tanasescu, Radu; Vukusic, Sandra; Wingerchuk, Dean; Wren, Damian; Leite, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing aquaporin-4 IgG(AQP4-IgG)-negative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) from opticospinal predominant multiple sclerosis (MS) is a clinical challenge with important treatment implications. The objective of the study was to examine whether expert clinicians diagnose and treat NMO/MS overlapping patients in a similar way. 12 AQP4-IgG-negative patients were selected to cover the range of clinical scenarios encountered in an NMO clinic. 27 NMO and MS experts reviewed their clinical vignettes, including relevant imaging and laboratory tests. Diagnoses were categorized into four groups (NMO, MS, indeterminate, other) and management into three groups (MS drugs, immunosuppression, no treatment). The mean proportion of agreement for the diagnosis was low (po = 0.51) and ranged from 0.25 to 0.73 for individual patients. The majority opinion was divided between NMOSD versus: MS (nine cases), monophasic longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) (1), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) (1) and recurrent isolated optic neuritis (RION) (1). Typical NMO features (e.g., LETM) influenced the diagnosis more than features more consistent with MS (e.g., short TM). Agreement on the treatment of patients was higher (po = 0.64) than that on the diagnosis with immunosuppression being the most common choice not only in patients with the diagnosis of NMO (98 %) but also in those indeterminate between NMO and MS (74 %). The diagnosis in AQP4-IgG-negative NMO/MS overlap syndromes is challenging and diverse. The classification of such patients currently requires new diagnostic categories, which incorporate lesser degrees of diagnostic confidence. Long-term follow-up may identify early features or biomarkers, which can more accurately distinguish the underlying disorder. PMID:26530512

  18. Redox Proteomics Analysis to Decipher the Neurobiology of Alzheimer-like Neurodegeneration: Overlaps in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Di Domenico, Fabio; Swomley, Aaron M.; Head, Elizabeth; Perluigi, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage is a common feature of neurodegeneration that together with mitochondrial dysfunction point to the fact that reactive oxygen species are major contributors to loss of neuronal homeostasis and cell death. Among several targets of oxidative stress, free radical-mediated damage to proteins is particularly important in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In the majority of cases, oxidative stress mediated post-translational modifications cause non-reversible modifications of protein structure that consistently lead to impaired function. Redox proteomics methods are powerful tools to unravel the complexity of neurodegeneration, by identifying brain proteins with oxidative post-translational modifications that are detrimental for protein function. The present review discusses the current literature showing evidence of impaired pathways linked to oxidative stress possibly involved in the neurodegenerative process leading to the development of Alzheimer-like dementia. In particular, we focus attention on dysregulated pathways that underlie neurodegeneration in both aging adults with Down syndrome (DS) and AD. Since AD pathology is age-dependent in DS and shows similarities with AD, identification of common oxidized proteins by redox proteomics in both DS and AD can improve our understanding of the overlapping mechanisms that lead from normal aging to development of AD. The most relevant proteomics findings highlight that disturbance of protein homeostasis and energy production are central mechanisms of neurodegeneration and overlap in aging DS and AD. Protein oxidation impacts crucial intracellular functions and may be considered a “leitmotif” of degenerating neurons. Therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing/reducing multiple components of processes leading to accumulation of oxidative damage will be critical in future studies. PMID:25242166

  19. Effects of Low-Dose Estrogen Replacement During Childhood on Pubertal Development and Gonadotropin Concentrations in Patients With Turner Syndrome: Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaohai; Garg, Sipi; Kowal, Karen; Cutler, Gordon B.; Ross, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The optimal approach to estrogen replacement in girls with Turner syndrome has not been determined. Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the effects of an individualized regimen of low-dose ethinyl estradiol (EE2) during childhood from as early as age 5, followed by a pubertal induction regimen starting after age 12 and escalating to full replacement over 4 years. Design: This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: The study was conducted at two US pediatric endocrine centers. Subjects: Girls with Turner syndrome (n = 149), aged 5.0–12.5 years, were enrolled; data from 123 girls were analyzable for pubertal onset. Intervention(s): Interventions comprised placebo or recombinant GH injections three times a week, with daily oral placebo or oral EE2 during childhood (25 ng/kg/d, ages 5–8 y; 50 ng/kg/d, ages >8–12 y); after age 12, all patients received escalating EE2 starting at a nominal dosage of 100 ng/kg/d. Placebo/EE2 dosages were reduced by 50% for breast development before age 12 years, vaginal bleeding before age 14 years, or undue advance in bone age. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures for this report were median ages at Tanner breast stage ≥2, median age at menarche, and tempo of puberty (Tanner 2 to menarche). Patterns of gonadotropin secretion and impact of childhood EE2 on gonadotropins also were assessed. Results: Compared with recipients of oral placebo (n = 62), girls who received childhood low-dose EE2 (n = 61) had significantly earlier thelarche (median, 11.6 vs 12.6 y, P < 0.001) and slower tempo of puberty (median, 3.3 vs 2.2 y, P = 0.003); both groups had delayed menarche (median, 15.0 y). Among childhood placebo recipients, girls who had spontaneous breast development before estrogen exposure had significantly lower median FSH values than girls who did not. Conclusions: In addition to previously reported effects on cognitive measures and GH

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancies that do not survive to term (miscarriages and stillbirths). Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic conditions more common ...

  1. Asthma–Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases Overlap Syndrome Increases the Risk of Incident Tuberculosis: A National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) and tuberculosis (TB) has yet to be studied. Methods The newly diagnosed TB patients (age > 20 y) treated from January 2000 to December 2008 were included (ACOS cohort, n = 10 751; non-ACOS cohort, n = 42 966). The non-ACOS cohort involved patients with confirmed absence of ACOS. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for TB in the ACOS and non-ACOS cohorts by using poisson regression analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to determine the adjusted HR (aHR) for TB in the ACOS cohort compared with the non-ACOS cohort. Results The aHR for TB was 2.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.19–2.66) in the ACOS cohort. The TB risk was significantly higher in the ACOS cohort than in the non-ACOS cohort when stratified by age, sex, comorbidities, and atopy. Within the ACOS cohort, the aHR was higher among patients receiving SABAs+SAMAs, LABAs+LAMAs, and ICSs (aHR [95% CI]: 3.06 [2.75–3.41], 3.68 [2.93–4.61], and 2.79 [1.25–6.22], respectively; all P < .05). Furthermore, patients with more than 15 outpatient visits and hospitalizations per year demonstrated the highest aHR (8.09; 95% CI, 6.85–9.56). Conclusions ACOS cohort potentially develop incident TB, regardless of the age,sex, comorbidities and atopy; even without receiving the inhalers.This risk is higher, especially in the ACOS cohort have a high frequency of medical services or receiving the inhalers such as SABAs+SAMAs, LABAs+LAMAs and ICSs. PMID:27448309

  2. Importance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in the differentiation of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome, asthma, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng-jia; Huang, Xin-yan; Liu, Yang-li; Lin, Geng-peng; Xie, Can-mao

    2016-01-01

    Background Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is an easy, sensitive, reproducible, and noninvasive marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation. Accordingly, FeNO is extensively used to diagnose and manage asthma. Patients with COPD who share some of the features of asthma have a condition called asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). The feasibility of using FeNO to differentiate ACOS patients from asthma and COPD patients remains unclear. Methods From February 2013 to May 2016, patients suspected with asthma and COPD through physician’s opinion were subjected to FeNO measurement, pulmonary function test (PFT), and bronchial hyperresponsiveness or bronchodilator test. Patients were divided into asthma alone group, COPD alone group, and ACOS group according to a clinical history, PFT values, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness or bronchodilator test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained to elucidate the clinical functions of FeNO in diagnosing ACOS. The optimal operating point was also determined. Results A total of 689 patients were enrolled in this study: 500 had asthma, 132 had COPD, and 57 had ACOS. The FeNO value in patients with ACOS was 27 (21.5) parts per billion (ppb; median [interquartile range]), which was significantly higher than that in the COPD group (18 [11] ppb). The area under the ROC curve was estimated to be 0.783 for FeNO. Results also revealed an optimal cutoff value of >22.5 ppb FeNO for differentiating ACOS from COPD patients (sensitivity 70%, specificity 75%). Conclusion FeNO measurement is an easy, noninvasive, and sensitive method for differentiating ACOS from COPD. This technique is a new perspective for the management of COPD patients. PMID:27713629

  3. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis.

  4. Functional Dyspepsia: Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Overlap with Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Population of African Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks; Ijoma, Uchenna; Obienu, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Background. Functional dyspepsia is the prototype functional gastrointestinal disorder. This study was designed to determine its prevalence, subtypes, and risk factors associated with the subtypes. Method. Patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms who presented for endoscopy were administered a questionnaire containing the functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome modules of the Rome III diagnostic criteria. Results. Of 192 patients who had functional dyspepsia, epigastric pain syndrome, postprandial distress syndrome, and combination of the two subtypes accounted for 79.2%, 62.5%, and 50%, respectively. Multivariate analysis of the risk factors showed that independent predictors of postprandial distress syndrome were alcohol and irritable bowel syndrome while irritable bowel syndrome was independent predictor of epigastric pain syndrome. Alcohol, smoking, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were independent predictors of cooccurrence of postprandial distress syndrome and epigastric pain syndrome. Conclusion. Functional dyspepsia accounts for 62.5% of dyspepsia in a population of black African patients. Regarding symptomatology, epigastric pain syndrome, postprandial distress syndrome, and combination of the two subtypes account for 79.2%, 62.5%, and 50%, respectively. Risk factors for functional dyspepsia are irritable bowel syndrome, alcohol, smoking, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23213327

  5. Characteristics of reversible and nonreversible COPD and asthma and COPD overlap syndrome patients: an analysis of salbutamol Easyhaler data.

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Orosz, Márta; Kováts, Zsuzsanna; Odler, Balázs; Selroos, Olof; Tamási, Lilla

    2016-01-01

    The choice of inhaler device for bronchodilator reversibility is crucial since suboptimal inhalation technique may influence the result. On the other hand, bronchodilator response also varies from time to time and may depend on patient characteristics. In this study, patients with airway obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]/forced vital capacity [FVC] ratio <70% in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]; <80% in asthma) were included (n=121, age: 57.8±17.3 years). Bronchodilator reversibility (American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria) was tested in patients with COPD (n=63) and asthma and COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS; n=12). Forty-six asthmatics served as controls. Reversibility was tested with 400 µg salbutamol dry powder inhaler (Buventol Easyhaler, Orion Pharma Ltd, Espoo, Finland). Demographic data and patients' perceptions of Easyhaler compared with β2-agonist pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) were analyzed. American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guideline defined reversibility was found in 21 out of 63 COPD patients and in two out of 12 ACOS patients. Airway obstruction was more severe in COPD patients as compared with controls (mean FEV1 and FEV1% predicted both P<0.0001). Average response to salbutamol was significantly lower in COPD patients compared with asthma controls (P<0.0001). Reversibility was equally often found in smokers as in never-smokers (33% vs 34%). Nonreversible COPD patients had higher mean weight, body mass index, and FEV1/FVC compared with reversible COPD patients. Most patients preferred Easyhaler and defined its use as simpler and more effective than use of a pMDI. Never-smokers and patients with asthma experienced Easy-haler somewhat easier to use than smokers and patients with COPD. In conclusion, a substantial part of patients with COPD or ACOS showed reversibility to salbutamol dry powder inhaler. Nonreversible patients with COPD were characterized by higher

  6. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  7. Unusual cutaneous features associated with a heterozygous gain-of-function mutation in IFIH1: overlap between Aicardi–Goutières and Singleton–Merten syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bursztejn, A.-C.; Briggs, T.A.; del Toro Duany, Y.; Anderson, B.H.; O’Sullivan, J.; Williams, S.G.; Bodemer, C.; Fraitag, S.; Gebhard, F.; Leheup, B.; Lemelle, I.; Oojageer, A.; Raffo, E.; Schmitt, E.; Rice, G.I.; Hur, S.; Crow, Y.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous lesions described as chilblain lupus occur in the context of familial chilblain lupus or Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. To date, seven genes related to Aicardi–Goutières syndrome have been described. The most recently described encodes the cytosolic double-stranded RNA receptor IFIH1 (also known as MDA5), a key component of the antiviral type I interferon-mediated innate immune response. Enhanced type I interferon signalling secondary to gain-of-function mutations in IFIH1 can result in a range of neuroinflammatory phenotypes including classical Aicardi–Goutières syndrome. It is of note that none of the patients with a neurological phenotype so far described with mutations in this gene was reported to demonstrate cutaneous involvement. We present a family segregating a heterozygous pathogenic mutation in IFIH1 showing dermatological involvement as a prominent feature, variably associated with neurological disturbance and premature tooth loss. All three affected individuals exhibited increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in whole blood, and the mutant protein resulted in enhanced interferon signalling in vitro, both in the basal state and following ligand stimulation. Our results further extend the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in IFIH1, indicating that the disease can be confined predominantly to the skin, while also highlighting phenotypic overlap with both Aicardi–Goutières syndrome and Singleton–Merten syndrome. PMID:26284909

  8. AB031. Validation of claims approach to identify asthma and COPD overlap syndrome patients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; De Pietro, Michael; Wu, Bingcao; Tunceli, Ozgur; Turner, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increasing recognition of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) and its significant disease and economic burden, knowledge about real-world patient characteristics and how they are treated is needed to aid in better understanding this phenotype. However, ACOS patient identification is challenging. Currently, there is no validated claims-based ACOS patient selection algorithm available to assist this type of research. To assess the validity of a retrospective claims-based algorithm to identify high likelihood ACOS patients using patient medical records as the criterion. Methods Patients were identified from the US based HealthCore Integrated Research Database (HIRD) between January 1, 2006 and October 31, 2014. A claims-based algorithm to identify high likelihood ACOS patients was based on the following inclusion criteria: age ≥40 years, ≥2 ICD-9 diagnoses (≥30 days apart) for asthma, (ICD-9 CM: 493.xx), ≥2 diagnoses (≥30 days apart) for COPD (ICD-9 CM: 491.xx, 492.xx, and 496.xx), ≥2 ICD-9 procedure, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), or Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes (≥30 days apart) for COPD-related procedures, ≥3 prescription fills (≥30 days apart) for asthma/COPD medication, and ≥2 CPT codes for spirometry test. Patients were indexed on the earliest date when all of the inclusion criteria were met. Patients diagnosed with cancer (ICD-9 CM: 140.xx–209.3x, 230.xx–234.xx) during the 12-month pre-index period were excluded. Outpatient medical records closest to (before or after) the index date were abstracted. Based on the chart review, at least 2 features (positive history of allergic rhinitis, chronic sinusitis, eczema, positive skin test to environmental allergens or desensitization to environmental allergens, diagnosis of asthma or past medical history for asthma before 40 years of age, or family history of asthma) were needed to confirm the asthma

  9. Breakpoint analysis of Turner patients with partial Xp deletions: implications for the lymphoedema gene location

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, C.; Sargent, C.; Ogata, T.; Affara, N.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Turner syndrome is characterised by a 45,X karyotype and a variety of skeletal, lymphoedemic, and gonadal anomalies. Genes involved in the Turner phenotype are thought to be X/Y homologous with the X genes escaping X inactivation. Haploinsufficiency of the SHOX gene has been reported to cause the short stature seen in Turner syndrome patients. More recently, mutations of this gene have been shown to be associated with other skeletal abnormalities, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of SHOX causes all the Turner skeletal anomalies. No such gene has yet been identified for the lymphoedemic features.
METHODS—Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis with PAC clones on nine patients with partially deleted X chromosomes was performed.
RESULTS/DISCUSSION—The Turner syndrome stigmata for each patient are described and correlation between the breakpoint and the phenotype discussed. A lymphoedema critical region in Xp11.4 is proposed and its gene content discussed with respect to that in the previously reported Yp11.2 lymphoedema critical region.


Keywords: Turner syndrome; lymphoedema; Xp11.4 PMID:11546827

  10. Overlapping Phenotypes in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison of Motor and Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, Emma; Leonard, Hayley C.; Hill, Elisabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    Motor and social difficulties are often found in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), to varying degrees. This study investigated the extent of overlap of these problems in children aged 7-10 years who had a diagnosis of either ASD or DCD, compared to typically-developing controls.…

  11. Scleroderma-polymyositis overlap syndrome versus idiopathic polymyositis and systemic sclerosis: a descriptive study on clinical features and myopathology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The objective was to characterize the clinical and myopathologic features of patients with scleroderma-polymyositis (SSc-PM) overlap compared with a population of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and polymyositis (PM). Methods A three-way comparison of patients with SSc-PM overlap (n = 25) with patients with SSc (n = 397) and PM (n = 40) on clinical and myopathologic features and causes of death. One neuropathologist blinded for the diagnosis evaluated all recent available muscle biopsies. Biopsies were scored for presence of inflammation, necrotic muscle fibers, rimmed vacuoles, fibrosis, and immunohistochemical staining. Clinical or myopathologic characteristics were compared by using the χ2 test or one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results The prevalence of SSc-PM overlap in the Nijmegen Systemic Sclerosis cohort was 5.9%. The mortality was 32% (eight of 25) in SSc-PM, of which half was related to cardiac diseases. The prevalence of pulmonary fibrosis was significantly increased in SSc-PM (83%) (P = 0.04) compared with SSc (49%) and PM (53%). SSc or myositis-specific antibodies were nearly absent in the SSc-PM group. In almost all biopsies (96%) of SSc-PM patients, necrotic muscle fibers were present, which was significantly increased compared with PM patients (P = 0.02). Conclusions Patients with SSc-PM have increased prevalence of pulmonary fibrosis and cardiac disease as the cause of death compared with patients with SSc and PM . In addition, we found that necrotizing muscle fibers with inflammation characterize SSc-PM overlap in muscle biopsies. Further research should focus on underlying mechanisms causing necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis and their relation to pulmonary involvement and mortality in patients with SSc-PM overlap. PMID:24886750

  12. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  13. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients. PMID:27561113

  14. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Natália Duarte; Freire, Maíra Cristina Menezes; Cardenas, Raony Guimarães Corrêa do Carmo Lisboa; Pena, Heloisa Barbosa; Lachlan, Katherine; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bacino, Carlos; Delobel, Bruno; James, Paul; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Pena, Sérgio D J

    2016-01-01

    Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES) analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS), we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients.

  15. Proceedings from the Turner Resource Network symposium: the crossroads of health care research and health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Backeljauw, Philippe F; Bondy, Carolyn; Chernausek, Steven D; Cernich, Joseph T; Cole, David A; Fasciano, Laura P; Foodim, Joan; Hawley, Scott; Hong, David S; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Kruszka, Paul; Lin, Angela E; Lippe, Barbara M; Lorigan, Gary A; Maslen, Cheryl L; Mauras, Nelly; Page, David C; Pemberton, Victoria L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Quigley, Charmian A; Ranallo, Kelly C; Reiss, Allan L; Sandberg, David E; Scurlock, Cindy; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome, a congenital condition that affects ∼1/2,500 births, results from absence or structural alteration of the second sex chromosome. There has been substantial effort by numerous clinical and genetic research groups to delineate the clinical, pathophysiological, cytogenetic, and molecular features of this multisystem condition. Questions about the molecular-genetic and biological basis of many of the clinical features remain unanswered, and health care providers and families seek improved care for affected individuals. The inaugural "Turner Resource Network (TRN) Symposium" brought together individuals with Turner syndrome and their families, advocacy group leaders, clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, trainees and other stakeholders with interest in the well-being of individuals and families living with the condition. The goal of this symposium was to establish a structure for a TRN that will be a patient-powered organization involving those living with Turner syndrome, their families, clinicians, and scientists. The TRN will identify basic and clinical questions that might be answered with registries, clinical trials, or through bench research to promote and advocate for best practices and improved care for individuals with Turner syndrome. The symposium concluded with the consensus that two rationales justify the creation of a TRN: inadequate attention has been paid to the health and psychosocial issues facing girls and women who live with Turner syndrome; investigations into the susceptibility to common disorders such as cardiovascular or autoimmune diseases caused by sex chromosome deficiencies will increase understanding of disease susceptibilities in the general population.

  16. Proceedings from the Turner Resource Network symposium: the crossroads of health care research and health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Backeljauw, Philippe F; Bondy, Carolyn; Chernausek, Steven D; Cernich, Joseph T; Cole, David A; Fasciano, Laura P; Foodim, Joan; Hawley, Scott; Hong, David S; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Kruszka, Paul; Lin, Angela E; Lippe, Barbara M; Lorigan, Gary A; Maslen, Cheryl L; Mauras, Nelly; Page, David C; Pemberton, Victoria L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Quigley, Charmian A; Ranallo, Kelly C; Reiss, Allan L; Sandberg, David E; Scurlock, Cindy; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Turner syndrome, a congenital condition that affects ∼1/2,500 births, results from absence or structural alteration of the second sex chromosome. There has been substantial effort by numerous clinical and genetic research groups to delineate the clinical, pathophysiological, cytogenetic, and molecular features of this multisystem condition. Questions about the molecular-genetic and biological basis of many of the clinical features remain unanswered, and health care providers and families seek improved care for affected individuals. The inaugural "Turner Resource Network (TRN) Symposium" brought together individuals with Turner syndrome and their families, advocacy group leaders, clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, trainees and other stakeholders with interest in the well-being of individuals and families living with the condition. The goal of this symposium was to establish a structure for a TRN that will be a patient-powered organization involving those living with Turner syndrome, their families, clinicians, and scientists. The TRN will identify basic and clinical questions that might be answered with registries, clinical trials, or through bench research to promote and advocate for best practices and improved care for individuals with Turner syndrome. The symposium concluded with the consensus that two rationales justify the creation of a TRN: inadequate attention has been paid to the health and psychosocial issues facing girls and women who live with Turner syndrome; investigations into the susceptibility to common disorders such as cardiovascular or autoimmune diseases caused by sex chromosome deficiencies will increase understanding of disease susceptibilities in the general population. PMID:25920614

  17. Overlap of Juvenile polyposis syndrome and Cowden syndrome due to de novo chromosome 10 deletion involving BMPR1A and PTEN: implications for treatment and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Adebisi; Weeth-Feinstein, Lauren A; Stettner, Amy; Caldera, Freddy; Weiss, Jennifer M

    2015-06-01

    We describe a patient with a severe juvenile polyposis phenotype, due to a de novo deletion of chromosome 10q22.3-q24.1. He was initially diagnosed with Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) at age four after presenting with hematochezia due to multiple colonic juvenile polyps. He then re-presented at 23 years with recurrent hematochezia from juvenile polyps in his ileoanal pouch. He is one of the earliest reported cases of JPS associated with a large deletion of chromosome 10. Since his initial diagnosis of JPS further studies have confirmed an association between JPS and mutations in BMPR1A in chromosome band 10q23.2, which is in close proximity to PTEN. Mutations in PTEN cause Cowden syndrome (CS) and other PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes. Due to the chromosome 10 deletion involving contiguous portions of BMPR1A and PTEN in our patient, he may be at risk for CS associated cancers and features, in addition to the polyps associated with JPS. This case presents new challenges in developing appropriate surveillance algorithms to account for the risks associated with each syndrome and highlights the importance of longitudinal follow-up and transitional care between pediatric and adult gastroenterology for patients with hereditary polyposis syndromes.

  18. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1A - evidence for “double trouble” overlapping syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report on a patient with genetically confirmed overlapping diagnoses of CMT1A and FSHD. This case adds to the increasing number of unique patients presenting with atypical phenotypes, particularly in FSHD. Even if a mutation in one disease gene has been found, further genetic testing might be warranted in cases with unusual clinical presentation. Case presentation The reported 53 years old male patient suffered from walking difficulties and foot deformities first noticed at age 20. Later on, he developed scapuloperoneal and truncal muscle weakness, along with atrophy of the intrinsic hand and foot muscles, pes cavus, claw toes and a distal symmetric hypoesthesia. Motor nerve conduction velocities were reduced to 20 m/s in the upper extremities, and not educible in the lower extremities, sensory nerve conduction velocities were not attainable. Electromyography showed both, myopathic and neurogenic changes. A muscle biopsy taken from the tibialis anterior muscle showed a mild myopathy with some neurogenic findings and hypertrophic type 1 fibers. Whole-body muscle MRI revealed severe changes in the lower leg muscles, tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles were highly replaced by fatty tissue. Additionally, fatty degeneration of shoulder girdle and straight back muscles, and atrophy of dorsal upper leg muscles were seen. Taken together, the presenting features suggested both, a neuropathy and a myopathy. Patient’s family history suggested an autosomal dominant inheritance. Molecular testing revealed both, a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type 1A (HMSN1A, also called Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy 1A, CMT1A) due to a PMP22 gene duplication and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) due to a partial deletion of the D4Z4 locus (19 kb). Conclusion Molecular testing in hereditary neuromuscular disorders has led to the identification of an increasing number of atypical phenotypes. Nevertheless, finding the right diagnosis is crucial

  19. Clinical and laboratory features of overlap syndromes of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, or rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aguila, Lisbeth Aranbicia; Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Pretti, Flavia Zon; Sampaio-Barros, Percival Degrava; Carlos de Souza, Fernando Henrique; Borba, Eduardo Ferreira; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Because overlap syndromes (OSs) are rarely described, we analyzed retrospectively their frequencies and correlations in Brazilian series of 31 patients with dermatomyositis (DM)/polymyositis (PM) associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) attended at a referral single center. Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs: anti-Jo-1, anti-PL-7, anti-PL-12, anti-EJ, anti-OJ, anti-SRP, anti-Mi-2) and myositis-associated autoantibodies (MAAs: anti-PM-Scl75, anti-PM-Scl100, anti-Ku) as well as specific autoantibodies related to SLE, SSc, and RA were investigated. The mean age of the OS patients (9 DM and 22 PM) was 44.6 ± 15.4 years, with a predominance of women (83.9 %) and white ethnicity (58.1 %). PM was the most frequent inflammatory myopathy, and the clinical presentation of DM/PM was significantly different among the OS groups. Overlap was found with SSc (48.4 %), SLE (29.0 %), and RA (22.6 %). The clinical manifestations of DM/PM were identified simultaneously with SSc and RA in the majority of cases, in contrast to identification in the SLE group (p < 0.05). All patients were positive for antinuclear antibodies, and the prevalence of MSA and MAA was 38.8 % in all OS groups, mutually exclusive, and more frequent in the SSc group. Comparing the clinical and laboratory features, there was a higher frequency of vascular (skin ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon) and pulmonary (interstitial lung disease) involvement in the SSc group (p < 0.05). Moreover, there were no differences among the groups in relation to disease relapse and deaths. Concluding, this is the first study to show the different characteristics of a series of patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-OS in the heterogeneous Brazilian population.

  20. Autoantibodies to RNA polymerase II are common in systemic lupus erythematosus and overlap syndrome. Specific recognition of the phosphorylated (IIO) form by a subset of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, M; Ajmani, A K; Ogasawara, T; Langdon, J J; Hirakata, M; Wang, J; Reeves, W H

    1994-01-01

    Autoantibodies to RNA polymerases (RNAP) I, II, and III are reported to be highly specific for the diagnosis of scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, SSc). In the present study, the specificity of autoantibodies to RNAP I and III for SSc was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled proteins. However, we report here the previously unrecognized production of anti-RNAP II autoantibodies by 9-14% of patients with SLE and mixed connective tissue disease/overlap syndrome. 12 out of 32 anti-RNAP II positive sera (group 1) immunoprecipitated a diffuse 220-240-kD band identified as the largest subunit of RNAP II whereas the remaining 20 (group 2) immunoprecipitated preferentially the 240-kD phosphorylated (IIo) form of the large subunit. After pulse labeling, group 1 sera immunoprecipitated only the 220-kD (IIa) RNAP II subunit, whereas the diffuse IIa/IIo band plus the 145-kD second largest RNAP II subunit (IIc) were immunoprecipitated after several hours of cold chase, suggesting that these sera recognized primarily the largest subunit of RNAP II. Group 2 sera recognized the IIc subunit after pulse labeling, and immunoprecipitated the IIc and IIo, but not the IIa, subunits after cold chase. Although it has been suggested that autoantibodies to RNAP II are usually accompanied by anti-RNAP I/III in SSc, all but one of the anti-RNAP II positive sera from SLE or mixed connective tissue disease/overlap syndrome patients, as well as most of the SSc sera, were negative for anti-RNAP I/III. Moreover, in contrast to previous reports suggesting that anti-RNAP antibodies rarely coexist with other SSc subset marker antibodies, anti-RNAP II antibodies were often accompanied by anti-Ku, anti-nRNP, or anti-topoisomerase I autoantibodies in the present study. We conclude that autoantibodies to RNAP II are not a specific marker for SSc, whereas autoantibodies to RNAP I/III are associated primarily with SSc. In addition, we have identified two distinctive patterns of RNAP II antigen

  1. Cullen Sign and Grey Turner Sign Revisited.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F

    2016-06-01

    Cullen sign and Grey Turner sign, named after Thomas Stephen Cullen, MB, and George Grey Turner, MBBS, respectively, are signs of abdominal wall hemorrhage and are generally associated with acute pancreatitis. However, the research from which these signs arose was documented long before Cullen and Grey Turner made their contributions. The present article examines the history, pathologic mechanisms, and clinical application of these signs in relation to acute pancreatitis and ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27214777

  2. A juvenile case of overlap syndrome of systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, later accompanied by systemic sclerosis with the development of anti-Scl 70 and anti-Ku antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Y; Muramatsu, M

    2000-01-01

    We describe a 16-year-old girl with an overlap syndrome consisting of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) from the age of 7 and polymyositis (PM) from the age of 10, later accompanied by systemic sclerosis (SSc) from the age of 15. She was diagnosed as having SLE with exudative malar erythema, photosensitivity, and discoid rashes with positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-DNA antibody titers. The diagnosis of PM was also made in accordance with findings of a high titer of muscle enzymes and a muscle biopsy specimen demonstrating marked degeneration of the muscle fibers and perivascular infiltration of mononuclear cells. She developed Raynaud's phenomenon and pitting ulcers on her fingers with positive anti-Scl 70 and anti-Ku antibodies, leading to a diagnosis of SSc. The patient was treated with prednisolone. To our knowledge this is the youngest case of SLE-PM overlap syndrome later accompanied by SSc.

  3. Turner Syndrome: A Guide for Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysgenesis) of the ovaries (female organs that store eggs and produce sex hormones; also known as gonads ), ... another. The reproductive cells (sperm in men and eggs/ova in women) contain only 23 chromosomes, one ...

  4. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tadahiro; Camargo, Carlos A; Hasegawa, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies propose TH2-mediated inflammation in patients with asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, little is known about whether fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) differs between patients with ACOS and those with COPD alone. To address this knowledge gap, a nationally representative sample was analyzed to determine the difference in FeNO levels between patients with ACOS and those with COPD alone in the US population. Patients and methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 through 2012. All subjects aged ≥40 years with COPD were identified. ACOS was defined as self-reported wheezing in past 12 months plus bronchodilator response (forced expiratory volume increase of >200 mL and >12%) or self-reported physician diagnosis of asthma. Results A total of 197 subjects with COPD were identified in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Of these, 23% met the criteria of ACOS. The FeNO level was higher in subjects with ACOS compared with those with COPD alone in both unadjusted (mean 21.2 ppb vs 13.0 ppb; difference, 8.2 [95% CI, 0.2 to 16.2]; P=0.045) and adjusted (difference, 8.2 [95% CI, 0.9 to 15.5]; P=0.03) analyses. Although there was no significant difference among current smokers, the FeNO level was significantly higher in non-current smokers with ACOS than nonsmokers with COPD alone (mean 31.9 ppb vs 20.3 ppb; adjusted difference, 20.5 [95% CI, 4.4 to 36.6]; P=0.02). In a sensitivity analysis using an alternative definition of ACOS, the results did not change materially. The diagnostic value of FeNO to discriminate ACOS from COPD alone was not sufficient, with the area under the curve of 0.63 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.72). Conclusion By using nationally representative US data, it was found that 23% of COPD subjects met the ACOS criteria and also that the FeNO level was higher in subjects with ACOS compared with those with

  5. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tadahiro; Camargo, Carlos A; Hasegawa, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies propose TH2-mediated inflammation in patients with asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, little is known about whether fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) differs between patients with ACOS and those with COPD alone. To address this knowledge gap, a nationally representative sample was analyzed to determine the difference in FeNO levels between patients with ACOS and those with COPD alone in the US population. Patients and methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 through 2012. All subjects aged ≥40 years with COPD were identified. ACOS was defined as self-reported wheezing in past 12 months plus bronchodilator response (forced expiratory volume increase of >200 mL and >12%) or self-reported physician diagnosis of asthma. Results A total of 197 subjects with COPD were identified in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Of these, 23% met the criteria of ACOS. The FeNO level was higher in subjects with ACOS compared with those with COPD alone in both unadjusted (mean 21.2 ppb vs 13.0 ppb; difference, 8.2 [95% CI, 0.2 to 16.2]; P=0.045) and adjusted (difference, 8.2 [95% CI, 0.9 to 15.5]; P=0.03) analyses. Although there was no significant difference among current smokers, the FeNO level was significantly higher in non-current smokers with ACOS than nonsmokers with COPD alone (mean 31.9 ppb vs 20.3 ppb; adjusted difference, 20.5 [95% CI, 4.4 to 36.6]; P=0.02). In a sensitivity analysis using an alternative definition of ACOS, the results did not change materially. The diagnostic value of FeNO to discriminate ACOS from COPD alone was not sufficient, with the area under the curve of 0.63 (95% CI, 0.54 to 0.72). Conclusion By using nationally representative US data, it was found that 23% of COPD subjects met the ACOS criteria and also that the FeNO level was higher in subjects with ACOS compared with those with

  6. Differences in the effects of Asian dust on pulmonary function between adult patients with asthma and those with asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Sano, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yasuto; Mikami, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Kato, Kazuhiro; Konishi, Tatsuya; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Eiji; Kitano, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    Background Asian dust (AD) exposure exacerbates pulmonary dysfunction in patients with asthma. Asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS), characterized by coexisting symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is considered a separate disease entity. Previously, we investigated the effects of AD on pulmonary function in adult patients with asthma. Here, we present the findings of our further research on the differences in the effects of AD exposure on pulmonary function between patients with asthma alone and those with ACOS. Methods Between March and May 2012, we conducted a panel study wherein we monitored daily peak expiratory flow (PEF) values in 231 adult patients with asthma. These patients were divided into 190 patients with asthma alone and 41 patients with ACOS in this study. Daily AD particle levels were measured using light detection and ranging systems. Two heavy AD days (April 23 and 24) were determined according to the Japan Meteorological Agency definition. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the association between PEF and AD exposure. Results Increments in the interquartile range of AD particles (0.018 km−1) led to PEF changes of −0.50 L/min (95% confidence interval, −0.98 to −0.02) in patients with asthma alone and −0.11 L/min (−0.11 to 0.85) in patients with ACOS. The PEF changes after exposure to heavy AD were −2.21 L/min (−4.28 to −0.15) in patients with asthma alone and −2.76 L/min (−6.86 to 1.35) in patients with ACOS. In patients with asthma alone, the highest decrease in PEF values was observed on the heavy AD day, with a subsequent gradual increase over time. Conclusion Our results suggest that the effects of AD exposure on pulmonary function differ between patients with asthma alone and ACOS, with the former exhibiting a greater likelihood of decreased pulmonary function after AD exposure. PMID:26869784

  7. Effect of chromosome constitution variations on the expression of Turner phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bispo, A V S; Dos Santos, L O; Burégio-Frota, P; Galdino, M B; Duarte, A R; Leal, G F; Araújo, J; Gomes, B; Soares-Ventura, E M; Muniz, M T C; Santos, N

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chronic disease related to haploinsufficiency of genes that are normally expressed in both X chromosomes in patients with female phenotype that is associated with a wide range of somatic malformations. We made detailed cytogenetic and clinical analysis of 65 patients with TS from the region of Recife, Brazil, to determine the effects of different chromosome constitutions on expression of the TS phenotype. Overall, patients with X-monosomy exhibited a tendency to have more severe phenotypes with higher morbidity, showing its importance in TS prognosis. Additionally, we found rare genetic and phenotypic abnormalities associated with this syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of 45,X,t(11;12)(q22;q22) described as a TS karyotype. Turner patients usually have normal intelligence; however, moderate to severe levels of mental retardation were found in 5 TS cases, which is considerate a very uncommon feature in this syndrome. PMID:23546984

  8. Proceedings From the Turner Resource Network Symposium: The Crossroads of Health Care Research and Health Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Backeljauw, Philippe F.; Bondy, Carolyn; Chernausek, Steven D.; Cernich, Joseph T.; Cole, David A.; Fasciano, Laura P.; Foodim, Joan; Hawley, Scott; Hong, David S.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.; Kruszka, Paul; Lin, Angela E.; Lippe, Barbara M.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Mauras, Nelly; Page, David C.; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Quigley, Charmian A.; Ranallo, Kelly C.; Reiss, Allan L.; Sandberg, David E.; Scurlock, Cindy; Silberbach, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome, a congenital condition that affects ∼1/2,500 births, results from absence or structural alteration of the second sex chromosome. There has been substantial effort by numerous clinical and genetic research groups to delineate the clinical, pathophysiological, cytogenetic, and molecular features of this multisystem condition. Questions about the molecular-genetic and biological basis of many of the clinical features remain unanswered, and health care providers and families seek improved care for affected individuals. The inaugural “Turner Resource Network (TRN) Symposium” brought together individuals with Turner syndrome and their families, advocacy group leaders, clinicians, basic scientists, physician-scientists, trainees and other stakeholders with interest in the well-being of individuals and families living with the condition. The goal of this symposium was to establish a structure for a TRN that will be a patient-powered organization involving those living with Turner syndrome, their families, clinicians, and scientists. The TRN will identify basic and clinical questions that might be answered with registries, clinical trials, or through bench research to promote and advocate for best practices and improved care for individuals with Turner syndrome. The symposium concluded with the consensus that two rationales justify the creation of a TRN: inadequate attention has been paid to the health and psychosocial issues facing girls and women who live with Turner syndrome;investigations into the susceptibility to common disorders such as cardiovascular or autoimmune diseases caused by sex chromosome deficiencies will increase understanding of disease susceptibilities in the general population. PMID:25920614

  9. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  10. The quality of life of Turner women in comparison with grown-up GH-deficient women.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y

    1994-08-01

    Various aspects of the way of life in 20 adult patients (mean age: 25.7 +/- 6.0) with Turner syndrome were studied for their quality of life (QOL). The study found that many more Turner women went on to university (P < 0.01) than the general population, whereas GH-deficient women did not. The employment status of both Turner and GH-deficient women does not differ from that of the general population. Only 7 of the 12 Turner and 5 of the 15 GH-deficient employees are satisfied with their present jobs, but 10 of the former and 7 of the latter women think that their jobs are worthwhile. The total annual income of 3 of 19 Turner women exceeded 3 million yen, but not that of any of 10 GH-deficient women who answered the question on their income. Half of the Turner and GH-deficient women complained of shoulder stiffness and one fourth of the Turner and one fifth of the GH-deficient women have a sense of despair and irritability. Seven Turner and 9 GH-deficient women have anxiety about their body, and 6 of the former and 8 of the latter have anxiety about marriage. Only 4 Turner and 3 GH-deficient women are married. Three of the former marriages were arranged by their parents, but all 3 GH-deficient women got married after falling in love. These marriage rates are significantly lower (P < 0.005) than that of the age-matched general population. Most of the unmarried women in both groups live with their parents, and half of the Turner and one third of the GH-deficient women have difficulty in getting clothes and shoes to fit them. Otherwise, they have no particular problem in their daily life. In conclusion, Turner women are well educated and work as normal women, but they, as well as GH-deficient women, appear to be anxious about their body and marriage.

  11. COL11A2 mutation associated with autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome: molecular and clinical overlap with otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED).

    PubMed

    Harel, Tamar; Rabinowitz, Ronen; Hendler, Netta; Galil, Aharon; Flusser, Hagit; Chemke, Juan; Gradstein, Libe; Lifshitz, Tova; Ofir, Rivka; Elbedour, Khalil; Birk, Ohad S

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal recessive Weissenbacher-Zweymuller syndrome (WZS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by rhizomelic dwarfism and severe hearing loss. Mutations in the COL11A2 gene have been implicated in causing the autosomal dominant form of this syndrome as well as non-ocular Stickler syndrome and the autosomal recessive syndrome otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED). In a consanguineous Bedouin tribe living in Southern Israel, five individuals affected by autosomal recessive WZS were available for genetic analysis. Homozygosity of a mutation in the COL11A2 gene was found in all affected individuals. This finding lends molecular support to the clinical notion that autosomal recessive WZS and OSMED are a single entity. PMID:15558753

  12. Clinical Syndromes among the Learning Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence J.

    1985-01-01

    Four physiological conditions associated with later learning disabilities are noted: Turner Syndrome (a chromosomal abnormality), preterm children with intracranial hemorrhage, children with incompletely developed connecting fibers between the cerebral hemispheres, and children with acquired brain injury. (CL)

  13. Ullrich-Turner phenotype with unusual manifestation in a patient with mosaicism 45,X/47,XX,+18

    SciTech Connect

    Franceschini, P.; Guala, A.; Camerano, P.; Franceschini, D.; Vardeu, M.P.; Signorile, F.

    1996-03-01

    We report on a girl with Ullrich-Turner phenotype and 45,X/47,XX,+18 chromosomal mosaicism. Only two other patients with similar mosaicism have been reported, both girls with XY sex chromosome constitution. The face of the patient was highly asymmetric, the right side being almost normal, the left showing a typical Ullrich-Turner syndrome appearance. This clinical impression was strengthened by photographic doubling of both hemifaces. The patient had normal intelligence and did not show any stigmata of trisomy 18. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An infant with Turner-Down aneuploidy and massive capillary hemangioma of the orbit: a case report with review.

    PubMed

    Musarella, M A; Verma, R S

    2001-01-01

    We report on a case of double aneuploidy involving Down and Turner cell lines in a female child with a massive capillary hemangioma of the left orbit and mild clinical features of Down syndrome. Cytogenetic findings with G-banding revealed mosaicism in her peripheral blood, i.e. mos45,X[48]/47,XX,+21[28]/46,XX[12/47,XXX[12]. Mosaicism of such nature is rare and to our knowledge the present case is the first reported of Turner-Down double aneuploidy mosaicism associated with an orbital capillary hemangioma. An annotated bibliography of earlier reported cases with documented karyotyping is also included. PMID:11522243

  15. Mixed gonadal dysgenesis with Turner`s phenotype and mosaic karyotype

    SciTech Connect

    Tarim, O.; Lieber, E. |

    1994-09-01

    A 14 8/12-year-old white female patient was evaluated for short stature and amenorrhea. The past and family history were unremarkable. The physical examination revealed a short girl (131.4 cm; height age: 9) with a weight of 39.5kg (weight age: 11-6/12). The blood pressure was in the normal range in all four extremities and the peripheral pulses were positive. She had stigmata of Turner`s syndrome including short neck and slight webbing, cubitus valgus, and shield chest. There was no heart murmur. The only pubertal sign was pubic hair of Tanner stage II. The chromosome study showed a mosaic pattern. A total of 67 cultured lymphocytes from peripheral blood were analyzed which revealed 13 cells with 45,XO; 14 with 46,XY,r(Y); 39 with 46,XY. The patient had a normal vagina and hypoplastic uterus by sonogram. The diagnosis of mixed gonadal dysgenesis was confirmed by exploratory laparotomy and bilateral gonadectomy. The histologic examination of the gonads showed a testicle on the left and a streak ovary on right. The karyotype of the testicular tissue revealed 45,XO in 32 out of 40 and 46,XY in the remaining 8 cells. Pre-operative hormonal evaluation showed elevated gonadotropin levels of FSH 73.5 and LH 12.5 mIU/ml, low estradiol level of 5 pg/ml, normal testosterone level of 18 and DHEA-S of 181 mcg/dl, and normal thyroid function test with T4 of 6 mcg/dl and TSH of 4.2 mIU/ml. Her bone age was 12 years. The patient was also found to have subnormal growth hormone (GH) secretion by overnight GH study (1.55 ng/ml), clonidine stimulation test (7.3ng/ml), and insulin stimulation test (9.2 ng/ml). She responded well to human synthetic GH treatment with a growth velocity of 11.5 cm in two years. Replacement of sex hormones will be initiated after the completion of growth.

  16. The Schmidt-Czerny-Turner spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Jason P.

    2014-09-01

    Since the invention of the CCD detector in 1969 by George Smith and Willard Boyle, incremental innovations to the dispersive imaging spectrograph have slowly materialized in response the abounding advances in CCD detector technology. The modern Czerny-Turner type spectrograph, arguably the most commonly used instrument in optical spectroscopy, fails to uphold the ever increasing needs today's researchers demand, let alone tomorrow's. This paper discusses an innovative solution to the Czerny-Turner imaging spectrograph bridging a more than 20 year gap in development and understanding. A manifold of techniques in optical spectroscopy both advantaged and enabled by this innovation are expounded upon.

  17. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K.; Cho, Megan T.; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Monaghan, Kristin G.; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H.; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G.M.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R.; van Haelst, Mieke M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A. James; Scott, Daryl A.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2016-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions. PMID:27087320

  18. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions.

    PubMed

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K; Cho, Megan T; Schnur, Rhonda E; Monaghan, Kristin G; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G M; de Vries, Bert B A; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R; van Haelst, Mieke M; van Gassen, Koen L I; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A James; Scott, Daryl A; Sherr, Elliott H

    2016-05-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions.

  19. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  20. 1. FRONT FACADE (Photograph of photograph in possession of Turner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FRONT FACADE (Photograph of photograph in possession of Turner Associates and Nicholas Satterlee Associates, Washington, DC, 1973.) - 1 & 2 Logan Circle (House), Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Mathematical Learning Disabilities in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smedt, Bert; Swillen, Ann; Verschaffel, Lieven; Ghesquiere, Pol

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLD) occur frequently in children with specific genetic disorders, like Turner syndrome, fragile X syndrome and neurofibromatosis. This review focuses on MLD in children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS). This syndrome is the most common known microdeletion syndrome with a prevalence of at…

  2. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on.

  3. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on. PMID:24515019

  4. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  5. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype. PMID:26799614

  6. The putative imprinted locus D15S9 within the common deletion region for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes encodes two overlapping mRNAs transcribed from opposite strands

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Driscoll, D.J.; Saitoh, S.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is typically caused by a deletion of paternal 15q11-q13, or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15, while Angelman syndrome is caused by a maternal deletion or paternal UPD of the same region. Therefore, these two clinically distinct neurobehavioral syndromes result from differential expression of imprinted genes within 15q11-q13. A 3.1 kb cDNA, DN34, from the D15S9 locus within 15q11-q13 was isolated from a human fetal brain library. We showed previously that DN34 probe detects a DNA methylation imprint and therefore may represent a candidate imprinted gene. Isolation of genomic clones and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the gene segment encoding the partial cDNA DN34 was split by a 2 kb intron, but did not encode a substantial open reading frame (ORF). Preliminary analysis of expression by RT-PCR suggests that this gene is expressed in fetal but not in tested tissue types from the adult, and thus its imprinting status has not been possible to assess at present. Surprisingly, we found an ORF on the antisense strand of the DN34 cDNA. This ORF encodes a putative polypeptide of 505 amino acid residues containing a RING C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc-finger motif and other features of nuclear proteins. Subsequent characterization of this gene, ZNF127, and a mouse homolog, demonstrated expression of 3.2 kb transcript from all tested fetal and adult tissues. Transcripts initiate from within a CpG-island, shown to be differentially methylated on parental alleles in the human. Interestingly, functional imprinting of the mouse homolog was subsequently demonstrated in an F{sub 1} cross by analyzing a VNTR polymorphism in the mRNA. The ZNF127 gene is intronless, has significant overlap with the DN34 gene on the antisense strand, and a 1 kb 3{prime} end within the 2 kb DN34 intron.

  7. Overlap in Patients With Dyspepsia/Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Patients with dyspepsia/functional dyspepsia (FD) show frequent overlapping of other gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, and non-GI diseases, in addition to internal subgroup overlapping. These overlap patients have more frequent or more severe symptoms, poorer health-related quality of life and higher somatization scores, and they are more likely to experience anxiety, depression or insomnia compared to non-overlap patients. The higher prevalence of overlap in patients with dyspepsia/FD is not by chance, indicating common pathogeneses, including visceral hypersensitivity, altered GI motility, infection, and stressful early life events. There are few clinical trials targeting overlap in patients with dyspepsia/FD, and no therapeutic strategy has been established. Further studies in this research area are needed. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of overlap in patients with dyspepsia/FD. PMID:25257470

  8. Overlap among Environmental Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Betty

    1981-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study comparing the overlap of Enviroline, Pollution, and the Environmental Periodicals Bibliography files through searches on acid rain, asbestos and water, diesel, glass recycling, Lake Erie, Concorde, reverse osmosis wastewater treatment cost, and Calspan. Nine tables are provided. (RBF)

  9. HUNTing the Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Costin; Parry, Husbands; Hargrove, Paul

    2005-07-08

    Hiding communication latency is an important optimization for parallel programs. Programmers or compilers achieve this by using non-blocking communication primitives and overlapping communication with computation or other communication operations. Using non-blocking communication raises two issues: performance and programmability. In terms of performance, optimizers need to find a good communication schedule and are sometimes constrained by lack of full application knowledge. In terms of programmability, efficiently managing non-blocking communication can prove cumbersome for complex applications. In this paper we present the design principles of HUNT, a runtime system designed to search and exploit some of the available overlap present at execution time in UPC programs. Using virtual memory support, our runtime implements demand-driven synchronization for data involved in communication operations. It also employs message decomposition and scheduling heuristics to transparently improve the non-blocking behavior of applications. We provide a user level implementation of HUNT on a variety of modern high performance computing systems. Results indicate that our approach is successful in finding some of the overlap available at execution time. While system and application characteristics influence performance, perhaps the determining factor is the time taken by the CPU to execute a signal handler. Demand driven synchronization at execution time eliminates the need for the explicit management of non-blocking communication. Besides increasing programmer productivity, this feature also simplifies compiler analysis for communication optimizations.

  10. Plasma Inflammatory Cytokine IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α Levels Correlate with Pulmonary Function in Patients with Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Overlap Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ai-Xia; Lu, Li-Wen; Liu, Wen-Juan; Huang, Mao

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and their correlations with pulmonary function in patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS). MATERIAL AND METHODS Between January 2013 and December 2014, a total of 96 patients with asthma, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), or ACOS were enrolled, and 35 healthy people were included as a control group. Fasting plasma interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/predicted value ratio (FEV1%pred), and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) were analyzed. RESULTS IL-4 and IL-8 levels showed statistically significant differences among the 3 groups of patients (both P<0.001); IL-4 level was significantly lower, while IL-8 level was significantly higher in the AECOPD group and ACOS group than those in the asthma group (all P<0.05). IL-10 level and TNF-α level were significantly different among the 3 patient groups (both P<0.001). IL-10 level was significantly different between each of the 2 groups (all P<0.001). TNF-α level in the asthma group was higher than in the AECOPD group and ACOS group (both P<0.001). IL-4 and IL-10 were positively and IL-8 and TNF-α were negatively related with FEV1, FEV1%pred, and FEV1/FVC. CONCLUSIONS Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α are related with severity of airway diseases and could be potential markers for the evaluation of asthma, COPD, and ACOS.

  11. Plasma Inflammatory Cytokine IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α Levels Correlate with Pulmonary Function in Patients with Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Overlap Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ai-Xia; Lu, Li-Wen; Liu, Wen-Juan; Huang, Mao

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and their correlations with pulmonary function in patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS). Material/Methods Between January 2013 and December 2014, a total of 96 patients with asthma, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), or ACOS were enrolled, and 35 healthy people were included as a control group. Fasting plasma interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/predicted value ratio (FEV1%pred), and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) were analyzed. Results IL-4 and IL-8 levels showed statistically significant differences among the 3 groups of patients (both P<0.001); IL-4 level was significantly lower, while IL-8 level was significantly higher in the AECOPD group and ACOS group than those in the asthma group (all P<0.05). IL-10 level and TNF-α level were significantly different among the 3 patient groups (both P<0.001). IL-10 level was significantly different between each of the 2 groups (all P<0.001). TNF-α level in the asthma group was higher than in the AECOPD group and ACOS group (both P<0.001). IL-4 and IL-10 were positively and IL-8 and TNF-α were negatively related with FEV1, FEV1%pred, and FEV1/FVC. Conclusions Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α are related with severity of airway diseases and could be potential markers for the evaluation of asthma, COPD, and ACOS. PMID:27501772

  12. The epileptology of William Aldren Turner.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    2006-01-01

    William Aldren Turner (1864-1945), in his day Physician to the National Hospital, Queen Square, and to King's College Hospital, London, was one of the major figures in the world of epileptology in the period between Hughlings Jackson in the latter part of the 19th century and the advent of electroencephalography in the 1930s. Although he also made contributions to knowledge in other areas of neurology, and with Grainger Stewart wrote a competent textbook on that subject, Turner's main professional interest throughout his career seems to have been epilepsy. On the basis of a series of earlier, rather heavily statistical, personal publications dealing with various aspects of the disorder, he authored what became a well-accepted monograph entitled Epilepsy - a study of the idiopathic disorder, which appeared in 1907, and he also gave the 1910 Morison lectures in Edinburgh on the topic. His writings on epilepsy over a period of three decades consolidated knowledge rather than led to significant advances, but helped maintain interest in the disorder during a rather long fallow phase in the development of the understanding of its nature.

  13. Overlaps between Frailty and Sarcopenia Definitions.

    PubMed

    Cederholm, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by the catabolism of muscles leading to sarcopenia and frailty. These are two geriatric syndromes with partly overlapping phenotypes. Primary sarcopenia, i.e. loss of muscle mass and function related to aging alone, usually precedes frailty. Thus, robustness passes from sarcopenia over frailty to disability leading eventually to a mortal outcome. Frailty (defined according to the phenotype model) encompasses states as exhaustion, weakness, and slowness, whereas sarcopenia, combining mass and function, is more strictly focused on muscles. Frailty is age related, whereas sarcopenia is also related to disease, starvation, and disuse. In general, the criteria for the two conditions overlap, but frailty requires weight loss, whereas sarcopenia requires muscle loss. Both gait speed and hand grip strength are suggested to be used as diagnostic measures for the two conditions since muscle function is crucial for any of the two syndromes. It is suggested that frailty screening should be part of the geriatric comprehensive assessment starting with measuring walking capacity and complemented by taking a history of fatigue and low activity. For younger adults (i.e. <70 years), sarcopenia screening could first register gait speed or hand grip strength and then body composition measurements. Simple questionnaires are feasible clinical alternatives. Treatment of frailty and sarcopenia overlaps, i.e. provide adequate protein and vitamin D supplementation, and encourage resistance exercise. PMID:26484770

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Philip Turner, Photographer Summer 1967 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Philip Turner, Photographer Summer 1967 CARRIAGE HOUSE, SOUTH (FRONT) AND EAST ELEVATIONS - Albert F. Madlener House, 4 West Burton Place, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Philip Turner, Photographer Summer 1967 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Philip Turner, Photographer Summer 1967 SOUTH (FRONT) FACADE OF HOUSE AND CARRIAGE HOUSE FROM SOUTHWEST - Albert F. Madlener House, 4 West Burton Place, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. The sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Sir William Turner.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marious; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S

    2010-08-20

    Sir William Turner (1832-1916) was Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh. His classic paper of 1863 on the anastomoses between the parietal and visceral branches of the abdominal aorta, later known as the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Turner, has mostly been forgotten. Located in the retroperitoneum and surrounding the kidneys and other adjacent structures, this plexus is an important route of collateral circulation. In the current paper, we discuss the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus as described by Turner in 1863 and review the literature concerning its potential clinical significance in the kidney, emphasizing its probable role in the metastatic spread of various tumors of abdominal organs and in the continuing viability of the kidney after renal artery occlusion. A biographical sketch of Sir William Turner is also presented.

  17. Peter J Turner: an inventive optometrist.

    PubMed

    Frederikson, Lesley G; Jacobs, Robert J

    2007-11-01

    Machines are Peter Turner's life. They always have been, are now and probably always will be. He can blame his parents for this because despite urging Peter to become an optometrist they gave him inventive genes, a love of technology and holiday work in a factory fitting and turning, and welding. In the 30 years since completing his State Diploma in Optics in New Zealand (SDONZ), Peter has designed and developed three key pieces of optical equipment: a Sun-Following Radio Telescope, a CCTV read/write system and the Berkeley Glare & Acuity Test (BEGAT). He has also completed myriad technological innovations for friends and family ranging from a motorised chair and stand unit for optometric rooms to components for venetian blind manufacturing. PMID:17958574

  18. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  19. Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome in the urban Chinese population: prevalence and disease burden using the 2010, 2012, and 2013 China National Health and Wellness Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bo; DiBonaventura, Marco; Karlsson, Niklas; Ling, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background Research has suggested a significant burden for patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, few studies have studied this population in the People’s Republic of China, a region in the midst of rapid epidemiological change with respect to respiratory disease. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of ACOS and its association with patient outcomes in urban China. Methods Data from the 2010, 2012, and 2013 China National Health and Wellness Survey, an Internet-based survey of adults in urban China, were used (N=59,935). Respondents were categorized into one of four groups based on self-reported physician diagnoses: ACOS, asthma only, COPD only, or control (ie, no asthma or COPD). A propensity score matching procedure was conducted to cull the control group into a subgroup (ie, matched controls) who resembled patients with ACOS, asthma only, and COPD only. These four groups (ACOS, asthma only, COPD only, matched controls) were then compared with respect to health status (Short Form-12 version 2/Short Form-36 version 2), work productivity, and health care resource use using generalized linear models. Results Patients with ACOS (N=366) comprised 0.61% of the adult population, 30.73% of the asthma population, and 18.60% of the COPD population in the People’s Republic of China. Patients with ACOS reported significantly worse health status (eg, health utilities =0.63, 0.66, 0.63, and 0.69 for ACOS, COPD only, asthma only, and matched controls, respectively) and significantly greater work impairment (eg, overall work impairment =43.65%, 35.19%, 48.55%, and 29.80%, respectively) and health care resource use (eg, physician visits in the past 6 months =5.13, 3.84, 4.65, and 2.39, respectively) compared with matched controls and patients with COPD only. Few significant differences were observed between patients with ACOS and asthma only. Conclusion Patients with ACOS have a greater comorbidity

  20. Overlapping left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshiro

    2009-06-01

    Cardiac transplantation, a final option of treatment for refractory heart failure, has not been a standard procedure in Japan especially, mainly because of the shortage of donors. However, surgical methods to restore native heart function, such as surgical ventricular restoration (SVR), are often effective for these cases. The Dor procedure has been used for ischemic cardiomyopathy cases presenting with broad akinetic segments. This is a fine method to exclude the scarred septum and to reduce the intraventricular cavity by encircling purse-string suture, but it may produce a postoperative spherical ventricular shape as a result of endoventricular patch repair. Also, partial left ventriculectomy is not recommended for non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy cases for now. A modification of these SVR and surgical approaches to functional mitral regurgitation has been named "overlapping ventriculoplasty" without endoventricular patch and resection of viable cardiac muscle, and "mitral complex reconstruction", which consists of mitral annuloplasty, papillary muscle approximation, and suspension. Although the long-term prognosis of these procedures is undetermined, they could be an important option, at least as an alternative bridge to transplantation. This review will describe the concepts and some technical aspects of these procedures for the end-stage heart. PMID:19474505

  1. Turner syndrome and 45,X/47,XXX mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Akbas, E; Mutluhan, H; Savasoglu, K; Soylemez, F; Ozturk, I; Yazici, G

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of double aneuploidy is a relatively rare phenomenon. We report on a 17-year-old woman with short stature, minimal pubic and axillar hair and short hands. In cultured lymphocyte a double aneuploidy mosaicism was detected, consisting of a cell line with trisomy for X chromosome and a cell line with monosomy for the X-chromosome and no cell line with a normal karyotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of mosaic 45,X/47,XXX in Turkey.

  2. [Dental abnormalities and orthodontic disorders in Turner's syndrome patients].

    PubMed

    Borkowska, Marzena; Gawlik, Aneta; Hankus, Magdalena; Małecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    Wśród licznych zaburzeń składających się na obraz zespołu Turnera występują również nieprawidłowości stomatologiczne. Szczególną uwagę należy zwrócić na nieprawidłową budowę zębów i zaburzenia ortodontyczne. Wśród nich występują wady zgryzu, takie jak tyłozgryz czy zgryz krzyżowy, a także zwężenie górnego łuku zębowego i wysokie wysklepienie podniebienia. Istotnym elementem są również zaburzenia kostne w obrębie twarzoczaszki, stwierdzane u niemal wszystkich pacjentek. Okazuje się, że terapia rekombinowanym hormonem wzrostu (rGH) mogłaby mieć wpływ na zapobieganie występowaniu ortodontycznych wad szkieletowych. Konieczne są jednak dalsze badania w tym zakresie. Występujące wady mają bezpośredni wpływ na wygląd twarzy pacjentek i ich samoocenę. Niewątpliwie profesjonalna opieka stomatologiczna powinna być włączona w całość wielodyscyplinarnej terapii, którą objęte są pacjentki z ZT.

  3. Astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer for broadband spectral simultaneity

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Qingsheng

    2011-04-01

    A low-cost, broadband, astigmatism-corrected Czerny-Turner arrangement with a fixed plane grating is proposed. A wedge cylindrical lens is used to correct astigmatism over a broadband spectral range. The principle and method of astigmatism correction are described in detail. We compare the performance of this modified Czerny-Turner arrangement with that of the traditional Czerny-Turner arrangement by using a practical Czerny-Turner imaging spectrometer example.

  4. Familial deletion of 18p associated with Turner like clinical features

    SciTech Connect

    Say, B.; Gopal Rao, V.V.N.; Harris, S.

    1994-09-01

    The authors report the first occurrence to our knowledge of a familial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18 in a mother and daughter. The proband is an 18-year-old female referred for chromosomal analysis because of mental retardation and short stature. She is the only offspring. Her birth weight was 3 pounds 10 ounces (below 5th percentile). As a child, she had delayed milestones. Her IQ is 69 and she is in classes for the educable mentally handicapped. Her height is 145.6 cm and weight 38.7 kg (both below 5th percentile). Physical examination revealed a low nuchal hairline. She has myopia. Chromosome analysis from peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed a 46,XX,del(18)(p11.21) karyotype. Since some of the same clinical features are also seen in the mother including short stature (157 cm), mental retardation, ocular problems like cataracts, exotropia and refractive error, chromosome analysis was performed which showed the same 46,XX,del(18)(p11.21) karyotype. A familial case like this has great implications in genetic counseling. Since the syndrome is not associated with sterility, the recurrence risk for the offspring is 50%. Patients with deletion (18p) syndrome are reported to have findings suggestive of Turner syndrome with varying degrees of mental retardation. We recommend that in patients with such clinical features associated with mental retardation, normal menstrual history and/or fertility, the possibility of deletion (18p) syndrome be considered.

  5. Clinical management of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Clara, Joseph A.; Sallman, David A.; Padron, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPNs) are a unique group of hematologic malignancies characterized by concomitant myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative features. According to the 2008 WHO classification, the category includes atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U), and the provisional entity refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis (RARS-T). Although diagnosis currently remains based on clinicopathologic features, the incorporation of next-generation platforms has allowed for the recent molecular characterization of these diseases which has revealed unique and complex mutational profiles that support their distinct biology and is anticipated to soon play an integral role in diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment. Future goals of research should include the development of disease-modifying therapies, and further genetic understanding of the category will likely form the foundation of these efforts. PMID:27807503

  6. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  7. Sir William Turner and his studies on the mammalian placenta.

    PubMed

    Magee, Reginald

    2003-06-01

    William Turner was appointed Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh in 1867, and from 1903 until his death in 1916, he was Principal and Vice-Chancellor. He was an outstanding teacher and many of those he taught went on to occupy chairs of anatomy. He published widely on anatomical subjects and one of his interests was comparative anatomy and physiology of the placenta. This paper takes a brief look at Turner's studies on the anatomical structure of the placenta, its comparative anatomy, his thoughts about its physiology and its place in the evolutionary process. At the time, these lectures constituted an anatomical and physiological classic. At the time Turner prepared his lectures, which were delivered in 1875 and 1876, little was known about the gestatory process in marsupials or monotremes. These mammals have a very brief period of intrauterine gestation and placentation and mention is made of studies that have been done in recent times on this subject.

  8. On the Neuberger overlap operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriçi, Artan

    1999-04-01

    We compute Neuberger's overlap operator by the Lanczos algorithm applied to the Wilson-Dirac operator. Locality of the operator for quenched QCD data and its eigenvalue spectrum in an instanton background are studied.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Cowden syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions can be caused by mutations in the PTEN gene. Some people with Cowden syndrome have had ... represent a spectrum of overlapping features known as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome instead of two distinct conditions. ...

  10. Linkage mapping of a severe X-linked mental retardation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Malmgren, H.; Sundvall, M.; Steen-Bondeson, M.L.; Pettersson, U. ); Dahl, N. University Hospital, Uppsala ); Gustavson, K.H.; Anneren, G.; Wadelius, C. )

    1993-06-01

    A four-generation Swedish family with a new type of X-linked mental retardation syndrome was recently reported by Gustavson et al. The complex syndrome includes microcephaly, severe mental retardation, optical atrophy with decreased vision or blindness, severe hearing defect, characteristic facial features, spasticity, seizures, and restricted joint motility. The patients die during infancy or early in childhood. Twenty-one family members, including two affected males, were available for study. Linkage analysis was conducted in the family by using 11 RFLP markers and 10 VNTR markers spread along the X chromosome. A hypervariable short tandem repeat of DXS294 at Xq26 showed a peak two-point lod score of 3.35 at zero recombination fraction. Calculations using the same markers revealed a multipoint peak lod score of 3.65 at DXS294. Crossover events with the centromeric marker DXS424 and the telomeric marker DXS297 delimit a probable region for the gene localization. It is noteworthy that the disease loci of two other syndromes with overlapping clinical manifestations recently were shown by Turner et al. and Pettigrew et al. to be linked to markers at Xq26. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Joseph Mallord William Turner: Burning of the Houses of Parliament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solender, Katherine; Buchanan, Penelope D.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan that introduces students in grades seven-nine to artistic depiction of a specific time and place. Explores Joseph Mallord William Turner's "Burning of the Houses of Parliament" as both visual record and emotional interpretation. Lists instructional strategies for description, analysis, interpretation, and judgment. Suggests…

  12. Seeding for pervasively overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Conrad; Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2011-06-01

    In some social and biological networks, the majority of nodes belong to multiple communities. It has recently been shown that a number of the algorithms specifically designed to detect overlapping communities do not perform well in such highly overlapping settings. Here, we consider one class of these algorithms, those which optimize a local fitness measure, typically by using a greedy heuristic to expand a seed into a community. We perform synthetic benchmarks which indicate that an appropriate seeding strategy becomes more important as the extent of community overlap increases. We find that distinct cliques provide the best seeds. We find further support for this seeding strategy with benchmarks on a Facebook network and the yeast interactome.

  13. General study of asymmetrical crossed Czerny-Turner spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Fan, Xianguang; Wang, Xin; Xu, Yingjie; Que, Jing; He, Jian

    2015-11-20

    A study of the spectrum resolution, wavelength range, and primary aberration of the asymmetrical crossed Czerny-Turner spectrometer is presented by deducing the relationship between them and structural parameters of the spectrometer in a new way of thinking based on simple but effective geometric models. The analysis was verified in an experiment and simulation performed on the optical design program ZEMAX, and the obtained results agree with the analysis. Owing to the analysis, initial designed parameters of the spectrometer were given and then optimized by ZEMAX; with the instruction of the study, a small adjustment was made in the actual alignment to obtain the desired final spectrometer. The spectrometer successfully measured the last four characteristic peaks of the Raman spectrum of CCL4, which demonstrates that the research provides important guidance to the design and alignment of an asymmetrical crossed Czerny-Turner spectrometer.

  14. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  15. 75 FR 38809 - Southern Turner Cimarron I, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Southern Turner Cimarron I, LLC; Notice of Filing June 25, 2010. Take notice that on June 24, 2010, Southern Turner Cimarron I, LLC filed a supplement confirming passive...

  16. The Rhetoric of Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, Renowned Speaker and Journalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Melbourne S.

    Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, a journalist and speaker, headed a back-to-Africa movement in the second half of the nineteenth century that was one of the first black rhetorical movements to meet the challenges of institutionalized racism in the United States. Turner was a preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, becoming first an elder…

  17. A Study Guide for Stephen B. Oates' "The Fires of Jubilee: Nat Turner's Fierce Rebellion"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briley, Ron

    2006-01-01

    This document is a study guide for Stephen B. Oates biography of Nat Turner, "The Fires of Jubilee." The book is a practical reading vehicle for introducing Nat Turner to secondary students in grades 11 and 12. Oates divides his work into four parts, which could provide the basis for four reading assignments, although the sections are not of equal…

  18. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  19. Item Overlap Correlations: Definitions, Interpretations, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Louis M.

    1994-01-01

    Item overlap coefficient (IOC) formulas are discussed, providing six warnings about their calculation and interpretation and some explanations of why item overlap influences the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory factor structures. (SLD)

  20. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness.