Science.gov

Sample records for oversight training results

  1. Alternative considerations for environmental oversight training: Results from a needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.

    1995-11-01

    For staff to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, they must be adequately trained. Well-trained staff are also more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and to remain with a given organization. In addition to hiring staff with relevant backgrounds and skills, critical steps in maintaining adequately trained staff are to analyze skill levels needed for the various tasks that personnel are required to perform and to provide training to improve staff s skill base. This first analysis is commonly referred to as a training needs assessment. Training needs are usually determined by defining the tasks required for a particular job and the associated knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to adequately accomplish these tasks. The Office of Northwestern Area Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) oversees environmental remediation activities in the Chicago, Idaho, Oakland, and Richland Operations Offices. For this organization to effectively carry out its mission, its staff need to be as proficient as possible in the appropriate knowledge and skills. Therefore, a training needs assessment was conducted to determine staff`s level of knowledge and proficiency in various skills. The purpose of the assessment was to: (1) Examine the types of activities or tasks in which staff are involved, (2) Determine the skills needed to perform relevant tasks, and (3) Assess gaps in knowledge and skills for the tasks performed in order to suggest opportunities for skill development.

  2. 10 CFR 440.23 - Oversight, training, and technical assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oversight, training, and technical assistance. 440.23... PERSONS § 440.23 Oversight, training, and technical assistance. (a) The Secretary and the appropriate... evaluations of a program and weatherization projects that are not carried out by a CAA and that are...

  3. 10 CFR 440.23 - Oversight, training, and technical assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Oversight, training, and technical assistance. 440.23... PERSONS § 440.23 Oversight, training, and technical assistance. (a) The Secretary and the appropriate... evaluations of a program and weatherization projects that are not carried out by a CAA and that are...

  4. 44 CFR 209.12 - Oversight and results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oversight and results. 209.12... Oversight and results. (a) FEMA oversight. Our Regional Administrators are responsible for overseeing this... they deem appropriate. (c) Program results. The State will review the effectiveness of...

  5. 44 CFR 209.12 - Oversight and results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oversight and results. 209.12... Oversight and results. (a) FEMA oversight. Our Regional Administrators are responsible for overseeing this... they deem appropriate. (c) Program results. The State will review the effectiveness of...

  6. 44 CFR 209.12 - Oversight and results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Oversight and results. 209.12... Oversight and results. (a) FEMA oversight. Our Regional Administrators are responsible for overseeing this... they deem appropriate. (c) Program results. The State will review the effectiveness of...

  7. 44 CFR 209.12 - Oversight and results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oversight and results. 209.12 Section 209.12 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE SUPPLEMENTAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION AND ELEVATION ASSISTANCE §...

  8. 44 CFR 209.12 - Oversight and results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight and results. 209.12 Section 209.12 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE SUPPLEMENTAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION AND ELEVATION ASSISTANCE §...

  9. Job Corps Oversight Part II: Vocational Training Standards. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session (July 29, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.

    This congressional hearing continues the House's oversight of the Department of Labor's (DOL's) Job Corps program, focusing on the fourth element of successful job training, maintaining a vocational curriculum that reflects current and future job opportunities. It reviews findings of a General Accounting Office (GAO) study that found the program…

  10. State Oversight of Commercial Driver-Training Schools in Virginia. House Document No. 5. Report of the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission to the Governor and the General Assembly of Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State General Assembly, Richmond. Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission.

    In 1998, Virginia's Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC) was directed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicle's (DMV's) oversight of commercial driver training schools (CDTS) in Virginia. The evaluation included the following research activities: mail surveys of DMV CDTS oversight staff and CDTS…

  11. Positive reinforcement training in rhesus macaques-training progress as a result of training frequency.

    PubMed

    Fernström, A-L; Fredlund, H; Spångberg, M; Westlund, K

    2009-05-01

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) efficiency was examined as a function of training frequency in 33 pair- or triple-housed female rhesus macaques. The animals were trained three times a week, once a day or twice a day, using PRT and a clicker as a secondary reinforcer. All animals were trained on 30 sessions, with an average of 5 min per training session per animal. The behaviors, trained in succession, were Targeting (reliably touching and following a Target); Collaborating (dominant animals allowing subordinates to train while stationing); Box-training (accepting being enclosed in a small compartment while responding to Target training) and initial Injection training.Fulfilled criteria for Targeting were obtained in 32/33 animals in a median of nine training sessions. Collaboration was obtained in 27/33 animals in a median of 15 training sessions. However, only four animals completed Box-training during the 30 training sessions and started Injection training. When comparing training success in terms of number of training sessions, training twice a day was less efficient than the other two treatments. In terms of daily progress, our results suggest that from a management perspective, daily training is more conducive to quick training success than thrice weekly training. In addition, in this study no further advantages could be gained from training twice a day.

  12. Civil Military Programs. Stronger Oversight of the Innovative Readiness Training Program Needed for Better Compliance. Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

    A study reviewed the U.S. Department of Defense's (DOD) training projects that support nondefense activity under its Innovative Readiness Training (IRT) Program. The report examines the following: extent, nature, and cost of civil military projects; consistency of DOD's guidance on the IRT Program with statutory requirements; conformity of…

  13. 20 CFR 634.5 - Federal oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal oversight. 634.5 Section 634.5 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR MARKET INFORMATION PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE IV, PART E OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Comprehensive Labor Market...

  14. 20 CFR 634.5 - Federal oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Federal oversight. 634.5 Section 634.5 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR MARKET INFORMATION PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE IV, PART E OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Comprehensive Labor Market...

  15. Computerized Script Training for Aphasia: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Holland, Audrey L.; Cole, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This article describes computer software that was developed specifically for training conversational scripts and illustrates its use with three individuals with aphasia. Methods Three participants with chronic aphasia (Broca’s, Wernicke’s and anomic) were assessed before and after nine weeks of a computer script training program. For each participant, three individualized scripts were developed, recorded on the software, and practiced sequentially at home. Weekly meetings with the speech-language pathologist occurred to monitor practice and assess progress. Baseline and post-treatment scripts were audio-taped, transcribed, and compared to the target scripts for content, grammatical productivity and rate of production of script-related words. Interviews with the person with aphasia and their significant other were conducted at the conclusion of treatment. Results All measures (content, grammatical productivity and rate of production of script-related words) improved for each participant on every script. Two participants gained more than five points on the Aphasia Quotient of the Western Aphasia Battery. Five positive themes were consistently identified from the exit interviews - increased verbal communication, improvements in other modalities and situations, communication changes noticed by others, increased confidence, and satisfaction with the software. Conclusion Computer-based script training potentially may be an effective intervention for persons with chronic aphasia. PMID:18230811

  16. 20 CFR 627.475 - Oversight and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... standards for PIC oversight responsibilities. The required PIC standards shall be included in the Governor's Coordination and Special Services Plan (GCSSP). (e)(1) The PIC, pursuant to standards established by the... described in the job training plan. (2) The PIC shall exercise independent oversight over activities...

  17. How to Measure Results of Sales Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahne, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the development of a training program for salespeople (trainees and managers) called Dimensional Sales Training (DST). It is noted that DST is designed to increase sales, build skills, and improve performance, while providing a systematic process of collecting data for measuring program effectiveness. (EM)

  18. 50 CFR 402.34 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Oversight. (a) Through the periodic program evaluation set forth in the ACA, the Service will determine... the results of the periodic program evaluation described in the ACA to recommend changes to the...

  19. 50 CFR 402.34 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Oversight. (a) Through the periodic program evaluation set forth in the ACA, the Service will determine... the results of the periodic program evaluation described in the ACA to recommend changes to the...

  20. 50 CFR 402.34 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Oversight. (a) Through the periodic program evaluation set forth in the ACA, the Service will determine... the results of the periodic program evaluation described in the ACA to recommend changes to the...

  1. 50 CFR 402.34 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Oversight. (a) Through the periodic program evaluation set forth in the ACA, the Service will determine... the results of the periodic program evaluation described in the ACA to recommend changes to the...

  2. 50 CFR 402.34 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Oversight. (a) Through the periodic program evaluation set forth in the ACA, the Service will determine... the results of the periodic program evaluation described in the ACA to recommend changes to the...

  3. Training Researchers To Commercialize Research Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Sijde, P. C.; Cuyvers, R.

    2003-01-01

    A training course was designed to prepare researchers for research commercialization for researchers. It introduces concepts involved in the publishing of knowledge such as protection of intellectual property, spin-off companies, and working with commercial companies. (JOW)

  4. SAPHIRE 8 Software Quality Assurance Oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt G. Vedros

    2011-09-01

    The software quality assurance oversight consists of updating and maintaining revision control of the SAPHIRE 8 quality assurance program documentation and of monitoring revision control of the SAPHIRE 8 source code. This report summarizes the oversight efforts through description of the revision control system (RCS) setup, operation and contents. Documents maintained under revision control include the Acceptance Test Plan (ATP), Configuration Management Plan, Quality Assurance Plan, Software Project Plan, Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM), System Test Plan, SDP Interface Training Manual, and the SAPHIRE 8, 'New Features and Capabilities Overview'.

  5. Affective Training for Bottom Line Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Miki; Mangin, Christian

    1991-01-01

    Describes the systematic design and implementation of a training program aimed at improving the performance of retail salespeople in the Canadian carpet industry. It was found that, although the program was originally developed to improve the salespeople's knowledge and skills, it was changes in their attitudes that promoted the significant gains…

  6. Leadership Perceptions of Results and Return on Investment Training Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to validate whether the literature on high level training evaluation (level four results and level five return on investment) accurately reflected the expectations of organizational leaders regarding training evaluation reports. The researcher was interested in what high level training evaluation was being conducted at…

  7. Employee Post-Training Behaviour and Performance: Evaluating the Results of the Training Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamantidis, Anastasios D.; Chatzoglou, Prodromos D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that firms invest in training, there is considerable evidence to show that training programmes often fail to achieve the intended result of improving worker and organization performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the medium- to long-term effects of training programmes on firms by means of an integrated research model…

  8. 20 CFR 637.305 - Federal monitoring and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Federal monitoring and oversight. 637.305 Section 637.305 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE V OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Additional Title V Administrative Standards...

  9. 20 CFR 637.305 - Federal monitoring and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Federal monitoring and oversight. 637.305 Section 637.305 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE V OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Additional Title V Administrative Standards...

  10. 20 CFR 637.305 - Federal monitoring and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal monitoring and oversight. 637.305 Section 637.305 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE V OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Additional Title V Administrative Standards...

  11. 5 CFR 330.711 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Interagency Career Transition Assistance Plan for Displaced Employees § 330.711 Oversight. OPM is responsible for oversight of the Interagency Career Transition Assistance Plan...

  12. FDA pharmaceutical quality oversight.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lawrence X; Woodcock, Janet

    2015-08-01

    The launch of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Office of Pharmaceutical Quality (OPQ) is a milestone in FDA's efforts to assure that quality medicines are available to the American public. As a new super-office within CDER, OPQ is strategically organized to streamline regulatory processes, advance regulatory standards, align areas of expertise, and originate surveillance of drug quality. Supporting these objectives will be an innovative and systematic approach to product quality knowledge management and informatics. Concerted strategies will bring parity to the oversight of innovator and generic drugs as well as domestic and international facilities. OPQ will promote and encourage the adoption of emerging pharmaceutical technology to enhance pharmaceutical quality and potentially reinvigorate the pharmaceutical manufacturing sector in the United States. With a motto of "One Quality Voice," OPQ embodies the closer integration of review, inspection, surveillance, policy, and research for the purpose of strengthening pharmaceutical quality on a global scale.

  13. 12 CFR 1273.4 - FHFA oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FHFA oversight. 1273.4 Section 1273.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS OFFICE OF FINANCE § 1273.4 FHFA oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. FHFA shall have such oversight authority over the OF,...

  14. 12 CFR 1273.4 - FHFA oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false FHFA oversight. 1273.4 Section 1273.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS OFFICE OF FINANCE § 1273.4 FHFA oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. FHFA shall have such oversight authority over the OF, the...

  15. Military Education: Improved Oversight and Management Needed for DOD's Fellowship and Training-with-Industry Programs. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-12-367

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD), which includes the military services, selects mid- to upper-career-level military officers to participate in fellowship and training-with-industry programs conducted at non-DOD organizations such as universities, think tanks, private corporations, federal agencies, and Congress. For some fellowships, the military…

  16. Analysis of 10-Year Training Results of Medical Students Using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Satoshi; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Narushi; Tokuyama, Eijiro; Matsumoto, Kumiko; Ota, Tomoyuki; Thuzar, Moe

    2016-06-01

    Background In this article, we reviewed the training results of medical students using the Microvascular Research Center Training Program (MRCP), and proposed an ideal microsurgical training program for all individuals by analyzing the training results of medical students who did not have any surgical experience. Methods As of 2015, a total of 29 medical students completed the MRCP. In the most recent 12 medical students, the number of trials performed for each training stage and the number of rats needed to complete the training were recorded. Additionally, we measured the operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students after it became a current program. Results The average operating time upon finishing stage 5 for the recent six medical students was 120 minutes ± 11 minutes (standard deviation [SD]). The average vascular anastomosis time (for the artery and vein) was 52 minutes ± 2 minutes (SD). For the most recent 12 medical students, there was a negative correlation between the number of trials performed in the non-rat stages (stages 1-3) and the number of rats used in the rat stages (stages 4-5). Conclusion Analysis of the training results of medical students suggests that performing microsurgery first on silicon tubes and chicken wings saves animals' lives later during the training program. We believe that any person can learn the technique of microsurgery by performing 7 to 8 hours of training per day over a period of 15 days within this program setting.

  17. ANALYSIS RESULTS FOR BUILDING 241 702-AZ A TRAIN

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE JM; COOKE CA; LI SW; BROCKMAN FJ

    2006-12-13

    This report presents the analyses results for three samples obtained under RPP-PLAN-28509, Sampling and Analysis Plan for Building 241 702-AZ A Train. The sampling and analysis was done in response to problem evaluation request number PER-2004-6139, 702-AZ Filter Rooms Need Radiological Cleanup Efforts.

  18. Gene therapy oversight: lessons for nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Susan M; Gupta, Rishi; Kohlhepp, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oversight of human gene transfer research ("gene therapy") presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution (by the Institutional Review Board and, for some research, the Institutional Biosafety Committee) and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene transfer research in parallel, including approval of protocols and regulation of products. This article traces the evolution of this dual oversight system; describes how the system is already addressing nanobiotechnology in gene transfer: evaluates gene therapy oversight based on public opinion, the literature, and preliminary expert elicitation; and offers lessons of the gene therapy oversight experience for oversight of nanobiotechnology. PMID:20122108

  19. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  20. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  1. 14 CFR 1203b.108 - Management oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Management oversight. 1203b.108 Section... AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.108 Management oversight. (a) The Administrator shall establish a committee to exercise management oversight over the implementation of...

  2. 14 CFR 1203b.108 - Management oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Management oversight. 1203b.108 Section... AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.108 Management oversight. (a) The Administrator shall establish a committee to exercise management oversight over the implementation of...

  3. 14 CFR 1203b.108 - Management oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management oversight. 1203b.108 Section... AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.108 Management oversight. (a) The Administrator shall establish a committee to exercise management oversight over the implementation of...

  4. Highly realistic, immersive training for navy corpsmen: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Booth-Kewley, Stephanie; McWhorter, Stephanie K

    2014-12-01

    Highly realistic, immersive training has been developed for Navy corpsmen based on the success of the Infantry Immersion Trainer. This new training is built around scenarios that are designed to depict real-life, operational situations. Each scenario used in the training includes sights, sounds, smells, and distractions to simulate realistic and challenging combat situations. The primary objective of this study was to assess corpsmen participants' satisfaction with highly realistic training. The study sample consisted of 434 male Navy service members attending Field Medical Training Battalion-West, Camp Pendleton, California. Corpsmen participants completed surveys after receiving the training. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with the training overall and with several specific elements of the training. The element of the training that the corpsmen rated the highest was the use of live actors. The vast majority of the participants reported that the training had increased their overall confidence about being successful corpsmen and had strengthened their confidence in their ability to provide care under pressure. Additional research should extend highly realistic training to other military medical provider populations. PMID:25469964

  5. Enterprise Training in Taiwan: Results from the Vocational Training Needs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San, Gee

    1990-01-01

    Uses large-scale survey data to analyze status of vocational training among firms in Taiwan. Vocational training in Taiwan, not widely practiced, needs to be strengthened. Factors relevant to training costs, such as labor turnover rates, and factors relevant to training benefits, such as concentration ratios, labor productivity (salary), and…

  6. Results from the Quality Early Childhood Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox-Herzog, Amanda; McLaren, Meridyth; Ward, Sharon; Wong, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    High-quality child care is related to children's positive developmental outcomes. One way to increase quality of care is to provide training to child care providers. This study used assessment-based training to determine if overall quality of care in center-based preschools could be enhanced. Participants were recruited from six center-based…

  7. Outreach Training Activities: Results from a Survey of UAP Outreach Training Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri; And Others

    This survey of 39 University Affiliated Program (UAP) Outreach Training Directors describes UAP outreach training efforts to improve services to people with developmental disabilities. The survey examined the influence of different staffing strategies on the structure of outreach training programs, and the degree of participation by various groups…

  8. Participant Comfort with and Application of Inquiry-Based Learning: Results from 4-H Volunteer Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Heidi; Stevenson, Anne; Meyer, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how a one-time training designed to support learning transfer affected 4-H volunteers' comfort levels with the training content and how comfort levels, in turn, affected the volunteers' application of tools and techniques learned during the training. Results of a follow-up survey suggest that the training participants…

  9. Training for Results; A Systems Approach to the Development of Human Resources in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Malcolm W.

    Using the systems approach, this book explores training in industry as an organizational tool for developing human resources, and stresses training results and return on investment rather than training programs as such. It is intended as a guide for general managers, personnel and industrial relations directors, and training directors on how…

  10. Eight Years of Specialist Training of Dutch Intellectual Disability Physicians: Results of Scientific Research Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Penning, Corine

    2009-01-01

    Training in scientific research methods and skills is a vital part of Dutch specialist training in intellectual disability medicine. The authors evaluated results of such training at one Dutch university medical facility that had an obligatory research program involving projects conducted by the physicians-in-training (topics, teamwork, acquired…

  11. Perceptual Training--Does it Result in Reading Improvement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Patricia H.

    An evaluation of research in the area of perceptual training suggests procedures for teachers to follow until more definitive information is obtained. First, educators should build their programs on broadly-based but accurate classifications of perceptual skills. They should also be aware of the theoretical assumptions which influence perceptual…

  12. Trip Staff Training Practices: Survey and Discussion Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaagstra, Lynn

    A discussion group and survey examined trip-staff training practices among outdoor and adventure recreation/education programs. Of the 40 participants, 80 percent worked with university noncredit programs, with the remaining participants representing university for-credit, military recreation, nonprofit, and for-profit programs. Although the…

  13. Predicting Outcome in Behavioral Parent Training: Expected and Unexpected Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Elizabeth P.; Fite, Paula J.; Bates, John E.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among clinical utility and treatment outcome variables in Behavioral Parent Training (BPT). The sample included 21 mothers with 3-8 year-old children with significant externalizing behavior problems who received treatment for Oppositional Defiant Disorder. The primary aim was to relate two treatment…

  14. Results of Comprehensive Communications Training for Pharmacy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penwarden, Jeffrey R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Undergraduate pharmacy communication skills training's effect on students' acquisition of interpersonal skills was studied in three analyses: (1) empathic listening in simulated pharmacy interviews; (2) self-reported assertiveness; and (3) moral reasoning, ability to discriminate empathic responsiveness, cognitive complexity, and attitudes toward…

  15. 22 CFR 96.32 - Internal structure and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... has authority and responsibility for management and oversight of the staff and any supervised... selection, monitoring, and oversight of supervised providers. (e) The agency or person discloses to...

  16. A blended design in acute care training: similar learning results, less training costs compared with a traditional format.

    PubMed

    Dankbaar, Mary E W; Storm, Diana J; Teeuwen, Irene C; Schuit, Stephanie C E

    2014-09-01

    Introduction There is a demand for more attractive and efficient training programmes in postgraduate health care training. This retrospective study aims to show the effectiveness of a blended versus traditional face-to-face training design. For nurses in postgraduate Acute and Intensive Care training, the effectiveness of a blended course design was compared with a traditional design. Methods In a first pilot study 57 students took a traditional course (2-h lecture and 2-h workshop) and 46 students took a blended course (2-h lecture and 2-h online self-study material). Test results were compared for both groups. After positive results in the pilot study, the design was replicated for the complete programme in Acute and Intensive Care. Now 16 students followed the traditional programme (11 days face-to-face education) and 31 students did the blended programme (7 days face-to-face and 40 h online self-study). An evaluation was done after the pilot and course costs were calculated. Results Results show that the traditional and blended groups were similar regarding the main characteristics and did not differ in learning results for both the pilot and the complete programme. Student evaluations of both designs were positive; however, the blended group were more confident that they had achieved the learning objectives. Training costs were reduced substantially. Conclusion The blended training design offers an effective and attractive training solution, leading to a significant reduction in costs.

  17. Results from a GPS Shuttle Training Aircraft flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Penny E.; Montez, Moises N.; Robel, Michael C.; Feuerstein, David N.; Aerni, Mike E.; Sangchat, S.; Rater, Lon M.; Cryan, Scott P.; Salazar, Lydia R.; Leach, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    A series of Global Positioning System (GPS) flight tests were performed on a National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA). The objective of the tests was to evaluate the performance of GPS-based navigation during simulated Shuttle approach and landings for possible replacement of the current Shuttle landing navigation aid, the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS). In particular, varying levels of sensor data integration would be evaluated to determine the minimum amount of integration required to meet the navigation accuracy requirements for a Shuttle landing. Four flight tests consisting of 8 to 9 simulation runs per flight test were performed at White Sands Space Harbor in April 1991. Three different GPS receivers were tested. The STA inertial navigation, tactical air navigation, and MSBLS sensor data were also recorded during each run. C-band radar aided laser trackers were utilized to provide the STA 'truth' trajectory.

  18. Localization Training Results in Individuals with Unilateral Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Dwyer, Noël Y.; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K.

    2014-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre- to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss. PMID:25457655

  19. Localization training results in individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Dwyer, Noël Y; Burton, Harold; Holden, Laura K

    2015-01-01

    Adults with unilateral hearing loss often demonstrate decreased sound localization ability and report that situations requiring spatial hearing are especially challenging. Few studies have evaluated localization abilities combined with training in this population. The present pilot study examined whether localization of two sound types would improve after training, and explored the relation between localization ability or training benefit and demographic factors. Eleven participants with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss attended five training sessions; localization cues gradually decreased across sessions. Localization ability was assessed pre- and post-training. Assessment stimuli were monosyllabic words and spectral and temporal random spectrogram sounds. Root mean square errors for each participant and stimulus type were used in group and correlation analyses; individual data were examined with ordinary least squares regression. Mean pre-to post-training test results were significantly different for all stimulus types. Among the participants, eight significantly improved following training on at least one localization measure, whereas three did not. Participants with the poorest localization ability improved the most and likewise, those with the best pre-training ability showed the least training benefit. Correlation results suggested that test age, age at onset of severe to profound hearing loss and better ear high frequency audibility may contribute to localization ability. Results support the need for continued investigation of localization training efficacy and consideration of localization training within rehabilitation protocols for individuals with unilateral severe to profound hearing loss.

  20. Scientific Autonomy and Public Oversight

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    When scientific research collides with social values, science’s right to self-governance becomes an issue of paramount concern. In this article, I develop an account of scientific autonomy within a framework of public oversight. I argue that scientific autonomy is justified because it promotes the progress of science, which benefits society, but that restrictions on autonomy can also be justified to prevent harm to people, society, or the environment, and to encourage beneficial research. I also distinguish between different ways of limiting scientific autonomy, and I argue that government involvement in scientific decision-making should usually occur through policies that control the process of science, rather than policies that control the content of science. PMID:19777124

  1. Job Training that Works. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.

    This document reports the oral and written testimony submitted at a Congressional hearing on how job training works--how effective employment training programs succeed and how that success is measured. The hearing was based on a General Accounting Office study that found four hallmarks of effective job training: individual commitment, removal of…

  2. 46 CFR 503.53 - Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PUBLIC INFORMATION Information Security... provisions of Executive Order 12958 and directives of the Information Security Oversight Office. The program... and complaints concerning the Commission's information security program; (d) Recommend...

  3. 46 CFR 503.53 - Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PUBLIC INFORMATION Information Security... provisions of Executive Order 13526 and directives of the Information Security Oversight Office. The program... and complaints concerning the Commission's information security program; (d) Recommend...

  4. 5 CFR 330.611 - Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Agency Career Transition Assistance Plans (CTAP) for Local Surplus and Displaced Employees § 330.611 Oversight. OPM provides advice and assistance to agencies in implementing their Career... of the plans at any time....

  5. The effects of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in airline maintenance: Results following three year's experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. C.; Robertson, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    An airline maintenance department undertook a CRM training program to change its safety and operating culture. In 2 1/2 years this airline trained 2200 management staff and salaried professionals. Participants completed attitude surveys immediately before and after the training, as well as two months, six months, and one year afterward. On-site interviews were conducted to test and confirm the survey results. Comparing managers' attitudes immediately after their training with their pretraining attitudes showed significant improvement for three attitudes. A fourth attitude, assertiveness, improved significantly above the pretraining levels two months after training. The expected effect of the training on all four attitude scales did not change significantly thereafter. Participants' self-reported behaviors and interview comments confirmed their shift from passive to more active behaviors over time. Safety, efficiency, and dependability performance were measured before the onset of the training and for some 30 months afterward. Associations with subsequent performance were strongest with positive attitudes about sharing command (participation), assertiveness, and stress management when those attitudes were measured 2 and 12 months after the training. The two month follow-up survey results were especially strong and indicate that active behaviors learned from the CRM training consolidate and strengthen in the months immediately following training.

  6. The effects of Crew Resource Mangement (CRM) training in airline maintenance: Results following three years' experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. C.; Robertson, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes three years' evaluation of the effects of one airline's Crew Resources Management (CRM) training operation for maintenance. This evaluation focuses on the post-training attitudes of maintenance managers' and technical support professionals, their reported behaviors, and the safety, efficiency and dependable maintenance performance of their units. The results reveal a strong positive effect of the training. The overall program represents the use of CRM training as a long-term commitment to improving performance through effective communication at all levels in airline maintenance operations. The initial findings described in our previous progress reports are reinforced and elaborated here. The current results benefit from the entire pre-post training survey, which now represents total attendance of all managers and staff professionals. Additionally there are now full results from the two-month, six-month, and 12-month follow-up questionnaires, together with as many as 33 months of post-training performance data, using several indicators. In this present report, we examine participants' attitudes, their reported behaviors following the training, the performance of their work units, and the relationships among these variables. Attitudes include those measured immediately before and after the training as well as participants' attitudes months after their training. Performance includes measures, by work units, of on-time flight departures, on-schedule maintenance releases, occupational and aircraft safety, and efficient labor costs. We report changes in these performance measures following training, as well their relationships with the training participants' attitudes. Highlights of results from this training program include increased safety and improved costs associated with positive attitudes about the use of more assertive communication, and the improved management of stress. Improved on-time performance is also related to those improved

  7. Environmental testing results over a tracker drive train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, María; Calvo-Parra, Gustavo; Gil, Eduardo; de la Rubia, Oscar; Hillebrand, Mario; Rubio, Francisca; Aipperspach, Wolfgang; Gombert, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Environmental testing following the draft of the IEC62817 standard has been carried out at ISFOC using a Soitec Solar tracker drive. The objective of this work is twofold; first to assure that the tracker design can perform under varying conditions and survive under extreme conditions and secondly to test the viability and usefulness of the tests described in the standard. After some changes in the device under test (specifically, gear-box oil) the drive system produced satisfactory results, assuring its performance under operational temperatures. Therefore, this work has demonstrated that the tests described in the standard are useful for detecting early failures.

  8. Sea Training at Maritime Academies Oversight. Hearings Before the Ad Hoc Select Subcommittee on Maritime Education and Training of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session on Sea Training of United States Merchant Marine Officers and Different Ways of Satisfying This Requirement at the Various Maritime Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries.

    Recorded are minutes of hearings before the House Ad Hoc Select Subcommittee on Maritime Education and Training regarding the sea training of United States Merchant Marine officers. Examined are various approaches to meeting the sea training requirement, especially the options of maritime academy training vessels, sailing on U.S.-flag merchant…

  9. Preparing Corrections Staff for the Future: Results of a 2-Day Training About Aging Inmates.

    PubMed

    Masters, Julie L; Magnuson, Thomas M; Bayer, Barbara L; Potter, Jane F; Falkowski, Paul P

    2016-04-01

    The aging of the prison population presents corrections staff with unique challenges in knowing how to support inmates while maintaining security. This article describes a 2-day training program to introduce the aging process to select staff at all levels. While the results of a pre-posttest measure, using a modified version of Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz, did not produce a statistically significant difference at the conclusion of the training, attendees did express satisfaction with the training and their newfound insight into the challenges faced by aging inmates. They also offered recommendations for future training to include more practical suggestions for the work environment.

  10. Skills Training to Avoid Inadvertent Plagiarism: Results from a Randomised Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Fiona J.; Wright, Jill D.; Newton, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern within academic institutions. The current study utilised a randomised control trial of 137 new entry tertiary students to assess the efficacy of a scalable short training session on paraphrasing, patch writing and plagiarism. The results indicate that the training significantly enhanced students' overall…

  11. Corporate Takeovers: Assessment of Resulting Training Needs. Training and Development Research Center Project Number Thirty-Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorkquist, David C.

    This document reports on a study of the training needs that result from actual or impending corporate takeovers, based on needs assessments at three corporations conducted by students as part of a university class over a period of 10 weeks. The first section describes the study's background and methodology. The qualitative research methodology…

  12. Survey results of the training, nutrition, and mental preparation of triathletes: practical implications of findings.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Shawn H; Houston, Melinda; Martin, Scott B

    2011-07-01

    Although triathlon is growing in popularity at a remarkable rate, it has not been extensively studied. The aims of this research were to identify preparation strategies used by triathletes and to categorize these strategies according to gender and consultation with triathlon coaches. Survey data collected from 401 triathletes (207 males, 194 females) revealed training, nutritional, and mental preparation habits. Most participants engaged in strength training, consumed food and/or fluids during and after training, set training and competition goals, and applied mental preparation strategies during training and the hour before racing. Water was the most commonly consumed fluid; positive self-talk was the most used mental strategy. Participants were more likely to consult with a triathlon coach than a nutrition or sport psychology professional. Athletes with more years of experience in triathlon and those competing in longer distances were more likely to consult a triathlon coach. Female triathletes were more likely than male triathletes to train with others, use mental preparation strategies, and report feeling anxious before competitions. More male triathletes reported using nutritional supplements during training than their female counterparts. These findings add to the limited research base on triathletes' training habits, and hopefully will help guide practitioners who work with this group. The results provide guidance for collaborative efforts among training, nutrition, and mental health professionals to best support triathletes.

  13. Dietary glutamine supplementation partly reverses impaired macrophage function resulting from overload training in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Dong, Jingmei; Wang, Ru; Luo, Beibei

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of overload training on the function of peritoneal macrophages in rats, and to test the hypothesis that glutamine in vivo supplementation would partly reverse the eventual functional alterations induced by overload training in these cells. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group (C), overload training group (E1), overload training and restore one week group (E2), glutamine-supplementation group (EG1), and glutamine-supplementation and restore 1-week group (EG2). All rats, except those placed on sedentary control were subjected to 11 weeks of overload training protocol. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone, and corticosterone of rats were measured. Moreover, the functions (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, cytokines synthesis, reactive oxygen species generation) of peritoneal macrophages were determined. Data showed that blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone, corticosterone and body weight in the overload training group decreased significantly as compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the chemotaxis capacity (decreased by 31%, p = .003), the phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 27%, p = .005), the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (decreased by 35%, p = .003) and the cytokines response capability of macrophages were inhibited by overload training. However, the hindering of phagocytosis and the cytokines response capability of macrophages induced by overload training could be ameliorated and reversed respectively, by dietary glutamine supplementation. These results suggest that overload training impairs the function of peritoneal macrophages, which is essential for the microbicidal actions of macrophages. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunodepression induced by overload training. Nonetheless, dietary glutamine supplementation could partly reverse the impaired macrophage function resulting from overload training. PMID:25028814

  14. Dietary glutamine supplementation partly reverses impaired macrophage function resulting from overload training in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie; Dong, Jingmei; Wang, Ru; Luo, Beibei

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of overload training on the function of peritoneal macrophages in rats, and to test the hypothesis that glutamine in vivo supplementation would partly reverse the eventual functional alterations induced by overload training in these cells. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group (C), overload training group (E1), overload training and restore one week group (E2), glutamine-supplementation group (EG1), and glutamine-supplementation and restore 1-week group (EG2). All rats, except those placed on sedentary control were subjected to 11 weeks of overload training protocol. Blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone, and corticosterone of rats were measured. Moreover, the functions (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, cytokines synthesis, reactive oxygen species generation) of peritoneal macrophages were determined. Data showed that blood hemoglobin, serum testosterone, corticosterone and body weight in the overload training group decreased significantly as compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the chemotaxis capacity (decreased by 31%, p = .003), the phagocytosis capacity (decreased by 27%, p = .005), the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (decreased by 35%, p = .003) and the cytokines response capability of macrophages were inhibited by overload training. However, the hindering of phagocytosis and the cytokines response capability of macrophages induced by overload training could be ameliorated and reversed respectively, by dietary glutamine supplementation. These results suggest that overload training impairs the function of peritoneal macrophages, which is essential for the microbicidal actions of macrophages. This may represent a novel mechanism of immunodepression induced by overload training. Nonetheless, dietary glutamine supplementation could partly reverse the impaired macrophage function resulting from overload training.

  15. Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight`s (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE`s nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO`s environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO`s GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} models and data interpretation. OFFO`s independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO`s achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO`s two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS.

  16. Photographed Rapid HIV Test Results Pilot Novel Quality Assessment and Training Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yu-Ho C.; Ong, Joanna; Walker, Sandy; Kumalawati, July; Gartinah, Tintin; McPhee, Dale A.; Dax, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are now used widely in non-laboratory settings by non-laboratory-trained operators. Quality assurance programmes are essential in ensuring the quality of HIV RDT outcomes. However, there is no cost-effective means of supplying the many operators of RDTs with suitable quality assurance schemes. Therefore, it was examined whether photograph-based RDT results could be used and correctly interpreted in the non-laboratory setting. Further it was investigated if a single training session improved the interpretation skills of RDT operators. The photographs were interpreted, a 10-minute tutorial given and then a second interpretation session was held. It was established that the results could be read with accuracy. The participants (n = 75) with a range of skills interpreted results (>80% concordance with reference results) from a panel of 10 samples (three negative and seven positive) using four RDTs. Differences in accuracy of interpretation before and after the tutorial were marked in some cases. Training was more effective for improving the accurate interpretation of more complex results, e.g. results with faint test lines or for multiple test lines, and especially for improving interpretation skills of inexperienced participants. It was demonstrated that interpretation of RDTs was improved using photographed results allied to a 10-minute training session. It is anticipated that this method could be used for training but also for quality assessment of RDT operators without access to conventional quality assurance or training schemes requiring wet samples. PMID:21483842

  17. Designing Oversight for Nanomedicine Research in Human Subjects: Systematic Analysis of Exceptional Oversight for Emerging Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney

    2012-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed. PMID:23226969

  18. The SI-Combiner: Making sense of results from multiple trained programs

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, B.K.; Elling, J.W.; Kieckhafer, R.

    1998-12-31

    Many problems, such as Aroclor Interpretation, are ill-conditioned problems in which trained programs, or methods, must operate in scenarios outside their training ranges because it is intractable to train them completely. Consequently, they fail in ways related to the scenarios. Importantly, when multiple trained methods fail divergently, their patterns of failures provide insights into the true results. The SI-Combiner solves this problem of Integrating Multiple learned Models (IMLM) by automatically learning and using these insights to produce a solution more accurate than any single trained program. In application, the Aroclor Interpretation SI-Combiner improved on the accuracy of the most accurate individual trained program in the suite. This paper presents a new fuzzy IMLM method called the SI-Combiner and its application to Aroclor Interpretation. Additionally, this paper shows the improvement in accuracy that the SI-Combiner`s components show against Multicategory Classification (MCC), Dempster-Shafer (DS), and the best individual trained program in the Aroclor Interpretation suite (iMLR).

  19. 12 CFR 985.4 - Finance Board oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board oversight. 985.4 Section 985.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE THE OFFICE OF FINANCE § 985.4 Finance Board oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. The Finance Board shall have the same...

  20. 14 CFR § 1203b.108 - Management oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Management oversight. § 1203b.108 Section...; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.108 Management oversight. (a) The Administrator shall establish a committee to exercise management oversight over the...

  1. 32 CFR 2700.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2700... MICRONESIAN STATUS NEGOTIATIONS SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS Implementation and Review § 2700.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The OMSN Information Security Oversight Committee shall be...

  2. 32 CFR 2700.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2700... MICRONESIAN STATUS NEGOTIATIONS SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS Implementation and Review § 2700.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The OMSN Information Security Oversight Committee shall be...

  3. Oversight Hearings on the National Apprenticeship Training Act. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Employment Opportunities of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (November 15, 17, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document contains two congressional hearings on the present apprenticeship programs to determine whether they are effective in producing the needed skilled craftspersons. The hearings also focus on how the apprenticeship training systems may be improved to meet the ever-changing needs of industry. Testimony includes statements, prepared…

  4. Training and overtraining: an overview and experimental results in endurance sports.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, M J; Lormes, W; Opitz-Gress, A; Steinacker, J M; Netzer, N; Foster, C; Gastmann, U

    1997-03-01

    Overtraining can be defined as "training-competition > > recovery imbalance", that is assumed to result in glycogen deficit, catabolic > anabolic imbalance, neuroendocrine imbalance, amino acid imbalance, and autonomic imbalance. Additional non-training stress factors and monotony of training exacerbate the risk of a resulting overtraining syndrome. Short-term overtraining called overreaching which can be seen as a normal part of athletic training, must be distinguished from long-term overtraining that can lead to a state described as burnout, staleness or overtraining syndrome. Persistent performance incompetence, persistent high fatigue ratings, altered mood state, increased rate of infections, and suppressed reproductive function have been described as key findings in overtraining syndrome. An increased risk of overtraining syndrome may be expected around 3 weeks of intensified/prolonged endurance training at a high training load level. Heavy training loads may apparently be tolerated for extensive periods of time if athletes take a rest day every week and use alternating hard and easy days of training. Persistent performance incompetence and high fatigue ratings may depend on impaired or inhibited transmission of ergotropic (catabolic) signals to target organs, such as: (I) decreased neuromuscular excitability, (II) inhibition of alpha-motoneuron activity (hypothetic), (III) decreased adrenal sensitivity to ACTH (cortisol release) and increased pituitary sensitivity to GHRH (GH release) resulting in a counter-regulatory shift to a more anabolic endocrine responsibility, (IV) decreased beta-adrenoreceptor density (sensitivity to catecholamines), (V) decreased intrinsic sympathetic activity, and (VI) intracellular protective mechanisms such as increased synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSP 70) represent a complex strategy against an overload-dependent cellular damage.

  5. Attempted Training of Alcohol Approach and Drinking Identity Associations in US Undergraduate Drinkers: Null Results from Two Studies.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Kristen P; Wiers, Reinout W; Teachman, Bethany A; Gasser, Melissa L; Westgate, Erin C; Cousijn, Janna; Enkema, Matthew C; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    There is preliminary evidence that approach avoid training can shift implicit alcohol associations and improve treatment outcomes. We sought to replicate and extend those findings in US undergraduate social drinkers (Study 1) and at-risk drinkers (Study 2). Three adaptations of the approach avoid task (AAT) were tested. The first adaptation - the approach avoid training - was a replication and targeted implicit alcohol approach associations. The remaining two adaptations - the general identity and personalized identity trainings - targeted implicit drinking identity associations, which are robust predictors of hazardous drinking in US undergraduates. Study 1 included 300 undergraduate social drinkers. They were randomly assigned to real or sham training conditions for one of the three training adaptations, and completed two training sessions, spaced one week apart. Study 2 included 288 undergraduates at risk for alcohol use disorders. The same training procedures were used, but the two training sessions occurred within a single week. Results were not as expected. Across both studies, the approach avoid training yielded no evidence of training effects on implicit alcohol associations or alcohol outcomes. The general identity training also yielded no evidence of training effects on implicit alcohol associations or alcohol outcomes with one exception; individuals who completed real training demonstrated no changes in drinking refusal self-efficacy whereas individuals who completed sham training had reductions in self-efficacy. Finally, across both studies, the personalized identity training yielded no evidence of training effects on implicit alcohol associations or alcohol outcomes. Despite having relatively large samples and using a well-validated training task, study results indicated all three training adaptations were ineffective at this dose in US undergraduates. These findings are important because training studies are costly and labor-intensive. Future research

  6. Attempted Training of Alcohol Approach and Drinking Identity Associations in US Undergraduate Drinkers: Null Results from Two Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Kristen P.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Teachman, Bethany A.; Gasser, Melissa L.; Westgate, Erin C.; Cousijn, Janna; Enkema, Matthew C.; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    There is preliminary evidence that approach avoid training can shift implicit alcohol associations and improve treatment outcomes. We sought to replicate and extend those findings in US undergraduate social drinkers (Study 1) and at-risk drinkers (Study 2). Three adaptations of the approach avoid task (AAT) were tested. The first adaptation – the approach avoid training – was a replication and targeted implicit alcohol approach associations. The remaining two adaptations – the general identity and personalized identity trainings – targeted implicit drinking identity associations, which are robust predictors of hazardous drinking in US undergraduates. Study 1 included 300 undergraduate social drinkers. They were randomly assigned to real or sham training conditions for one of the three training adaptations, and completed two training sessions, spaced one week apart. Study 2 included 288 undergraduates at risk for alcohol use disorders. The same training procedures were used, but the two training sessions occurred within a single week. Results were not as expected. Across both studies, the approach avoid training yielded no evidence of training effects on implicit alcohol associations or alcohol outcomes. The general identity training also yielded no evidence of training effects on implicit alcohol associations or alcohol outcomes with one exception; individuals who completed real training demonstrated no changes in drinking refusal self-efficacy whereas individuals who completed sham training had reductions in self-efficacy. Finally, across both studies, the personalized identity training yielded no evidence of training effects on implicit alcohol associations or alcohol outcomes. Despite having relatively large samples and using a well-validated training task, study results indicated all three training adaptations were ineffective at this dose in US undergraduates. These findings are important because training studies are costly and labor-intensive. Future

  7. Reid training and sensitivity to developmental maturity in interrogation: results from a national survey of police.

    PubMed

    Kostelnik, Jessica O; Reppucci, N Dickon

    2009-01-01

    Although research has demonstrated that youthfulness is a risk factor for providing false confessions during criminal interrogations, it is unclear whether interrogation training programs address this issue. The goal was to analyze differences between Reid-trained (RT) and non-Reid-trained (non-RT) police in their sensitivity to the developmental maturity of young suspects. 1,828 police officers, 514 of whom were RT, completed surveys about their perceptions and practices during interrogation with children, adolescents, or adults. Results indicate that, compared with non-RT police, RT police demonstrate less sensitivity to the developmental maturity of adolescents in terms of (1) perceptions of their competencies during interrogation and (2) use of psychologically coercive questioning techniques. These findings have implications for the development of juvenile interrogation training programs.

  8. Training and capacity building evaluation: Maximizing resources and results with Success Case Method.

    PubMed

    Medina, L; Acosta-Pérez, E; Velez, C; Martínez, G; Rivera, M; Sardiñas, L; Pattatucci, A

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the use of Success Case Method (Brinkerhoff, 2003) to evaluate health promotion and public health training programs. The goal of the Office Community Research and Engagement (OCRE) of the Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium (PRCTRC) is to establish a stable and sustainable translational research capacity. Early efforts toward achieving this goal included sponsoring two independent research training programs. A description of the implementation of the five step Success Case Method is presented. Results reveal that SCM would deem both trainings as highly successful, based upon the overall impact of a low number of success cases. However, a traditional summative evaluation would consider this disappointing. Strengths of SCM are discussed. It was concluded that the Success Case Method is a useful and valuable evaluative method for measuring the success of health promotion and public health training initiatives and provides sufficient information for decision-making processes.

  9. Transparency and Oversight in Local Wellness Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advocates have called for increased wellness policy transparency and oversight through the use of health advisory councils. This study examines (1) wellness policy transparency, (2) advisory council requirements, (3) factors associated with each, and (4) whether transparency or advisory council requirements are indicative of a stronger…

  10. Toward Better Oversight of NGS Tests.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    The FDA has published two draft guidance documents aimed at streamlining its oversight of tests based on next-generation sequencing (NGS). One contains preliminary recommendations addressing the analytic validity of NGS-based tests for hereditary diseases; the other explains how test developers can obtain official recognition of their genetic variant databases, potentially speeding marketing clearance or approval. PMID:27457361

  11. Security Clearance Oversight and Reform Enhancement Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Tester, Jon [D-MT

    2013-07-10

    10/11/2013 Referred to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.2860, which became Public Law 113-80 on 2/12/2014. Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Toward Better Oversight of NGS Tests.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    The FDA has published two draft guidance documents aimed at streamlining its oversight of tests based on next-generation sequencing (NGS). One contains preliminary recommendations addressing the analytic validity of NGS-based tests for hereditary diseases; the other explains how test developers can obtain official recognition of their genetic variant databases, potentially speeding marketing clearance or approval.

  13. Three Strategies for Effective Data Oversight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses three strategies for building a data center or service. These strategies are: (1) "audit" a way to alliances; (2) "share" oversight but "own" the warehouse; and (3) join new professional "cultures." These strategies have more to do with people and organizations than technology since technology mirrors and amplifies what…

  14. 14 CFR 1203b.108 - Management oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.108 Management oversight. (a) The... authority. (b) The Administrator shall establish a reporting requirement for Headquarters and Field...: (1) Receive instructions on regulations regarding the use of force, including deadly force; and...

  15. 49 CFR 1510.19 - Federal oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FEES § 1510.19 Federal oversight. Direct air carriers and foreign air carriers must allow any... Department of Homeland Security, or the Comptroller General of the United States to audit or review any of... fees were properly collected and remitted consistent with this part....

  16. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field`s quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department`s quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department`s QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department`s QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues.

  17. Pain intensity rating training: results from an exploratory study of the ACTTION PROTECCT system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Amtmann, Dagmar; Askew, Robert L; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Hunsinger, Matthew; Jensen, Mark P; McDermott, Michael P; Patel, Kushang V; Williams, Mark; Bacci, Elizabeth D; Burke, Laurie B; Chambers, Christine T; Cooper, Stephen A; Cowan, Penney; Desjardins, Paul; Etropolski, Mila; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Huang, I-zu; Katz, Mitchell; Kerns, Robert D; Kopecky, Ernest A; Rappaport, Bob A; Resnick, Malca; Strand, Vibeke; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Veasley, Christin; Versavel, Mark; Wasan, Ajay D; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Clinical trial participants often require additional instruction to prevent idiosyncratic interpretations regarding completion of patient-reported outcomes. The Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) public-private partnership developed a training system with specific, standardized guidance regarding daily average pain intensity ratings. A 3-week exploratory study among participants with low-back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, and painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy was conducted, randomly assigning participants to 1 of 3 groups: training with human pain assessment (T+); training with automated pain assessment (T); or no training with automated pain assessment (C). Although most measures of validity and reliability did not reveal significant differences between groups, some benefit was observed in discriminant validity, amount of missing data, and ranking order of least, worst, and average pain intensity ratings for participants in Group T+ compared with the other groups. Prediction of greater reliability in average pain intensity ratings in Group T+ compared with the other groups was not supported, which might indicate that training produces ratings that reflect the reality of temporal pain fluctuations. Results of this novel study suggest the need to test the training system in a prospective analgesic treatment trial. PMID:27058680

  18. Pain intensity rating training: results from an exploratory study of the ACTTION PROTECCT system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Amtmann, Dagmar; Askew, Robert L; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Hunsinger, Matthew; Jensen, Mark P; McDermott, Michael P; Patel, Kushang V; Williams, Mark; Bacci, Elizabeth D; Burke, Laurie B; Chambers, Christine T; Cooper, Stephen A; Cowan, Penney; Desjardins, Paul; Etropolski, Mila; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Huang, I-zu; Katz, Mitchell; Kerns, Robert D; Kopecky, Ernest A; Rappaport, Bob A; Resnick, Malca; Strand, Vibeke; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Veasley, Christin; Versavel, Mark; Wasan, Ajay D; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Clinical trial participants often require additional instruction to prevent idiosyncratic interpretations regarding completion of patient-reported outcomes. The Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) public-private partnership developed a training system with specific, standardized guidance regarding daily average pain intensity ratings. A 3-week exploratory study among participants with low-back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, and painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy was conducted, randomly assigning participants to 1 of 3 groups: training with human pain assessment (T+); training with automated pain assessment (T); or no training with automated pain assessment (C). Although most measures of validity and reliability did not reveal significant differences between groups, some benefit was observed in discriminant validity, amount of missing data, and ranking order of least, worst, and average pain intensity ratings for participants in Group T+ compared with the other groups. Prediction of greater reliability in average pain intensity ratings in Group T+ compared with the other groups was not supported, which might indicate that training produces ratings that reflect the reality of temporal pain fluctuations. Results of this novel study suggest the need to test the training system in a prospective analgesic treatment trial.

  19. Workforce Training Results: An Evaluation of Washington State's Workforce Development System, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    The third biennial outcome evaluation of the state of Washington's workforce development system analyzed the results of nine of the state's largest workforce development programs plus employer-provided training for participants who left programs from July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998. For reporting results, the nine programs were grouped into three…

  20. Emergent Intraverbal Forms may Occur as a Result of Listener Training for Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean P; Eikeseth, Svein; Fletcher, Sarah E; Montebelli, Lisa; Smith, Holly R; Taylor, Jennifer C

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess whether intraverbal behavior, in the form of answers to questions, emerges as a result of listener training for five children diagnosed with autism. Listener responses were targeted and taught using prompting and differential reinforcement. Following successful acquisition of listener responses, the intraverbal form of the response was probed. Data were evaluated via a nonconcurrent multiple-baseline design that included a control series. Results showed listener-to-intraverbal transfer for four of the five participants. One participant required additional teaching that involved tacting the items selected during listener training. PMID:27606219

  1. Training the biomedical informatics workforce in Latin America: results of a needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Blas, Magaly M; Curioso, Walter H; Garcia, Patricia J; Zimic, Mirko; Carcamo, Cesar P; Castagnetto, Jesus M; Lescano, Andres G; Lopez, Diego M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the results of a needs assessment of research and training in Medical Informatics (MI) and Bioinformatics (BI) in Latin America. Methods and results This assessment was conducted by QUIPU: The Andean Global Health Informatics Research and Training Center. After sending email invitations to MI-BI related professionals from Latin America, 142 surveys were received from 11 Latin American countries. The following were the top four ranked MI-related courses that a training programme should include: introduction to biomedical informatics; data representation and databases; mobile health; and courses that address issues of security, confidentiality and privacy. Several new courses and topics for research were suggested by survey participants. The information collected is guiding the development of curricula and a research agenda for the MI and BI QUIPU multidisciplinary programme for the Andean Region and Latin America.

  2. Training the biomedical informatics workforce in Latin America: results of a needs assessment

    PubMed Central

    Blas, Magaly M; Curioso, Walter H; Zimic, Mirko; Carcamo, Cesar P; Castagnetto, Jesus M; Lescano, Andres G; Lopez, Diego M

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the results of a needs assessment of research and training in Medical Informatics (MI) and Bioinformatics (BI) in Latin America. Methods and results This assessment was conducted by QUIPU: The Andean Global Health Informatics Research and Training Center. After sending email invitations to MI–BI related professionals from Latin America, 142 surveys were received from 11 Latin American countries. The following were the top four ranked MI-related courses that a training programme should include: introduction to biomedical informatics; data representation and databases; mobile health; and courses that address issues of security, confidentiality and privacy. Several new courses and topics for research were suggested by survey participants. The information collected is guiding the development of curricula and a research agenda for the MI and BI QUIPU multidisciplinary programme for the Andean Region and Latin America. PMID:22080537

  3. 20 CFR 664.110 - Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area? 664.110 Section 664.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth...

  4. 20 CFR 664.110 - Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area? 664.110 Section 664.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth...

  5. Does training-induced orthostatic hypotension result from reduced carotid baroreflex responsiveness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawelczyk, James A.; Raven, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    As manned space travel has steadily increased in duration and sophistication, the answer to a simple, relevant question remains elusive. Does endurance exercise training - high intensity rhythmic activity, performed regularly for extended periods of time - alter the disposition to, or severity of, postflight orthostatic hypotension? Research results continue to provide different views; however, data are difficult to compare because of the following factors that vary between investigations: the type of orthostatic stress imposed (+Gz, lower body negative pressure (LBNP), head-up tilt); pretest perturbations used (exercise, heat exposure, head-down tilting, bed rest, water immersion, hypohydration, pharmacologically-induced diuresis); the length of the training program used in longitudinal investigations (days versus weeks versus months); the criteria used to define fitness; and the criteria used to define orthostatic tolerance. Generally, research results indicate that individuals engaged in aerobic exercise activities for a period of years have been reported to have reduced orthostatic tolerance compared to untrained control subjects, while the results of shorter term longitudinal studies remain equivocal. Such conclusions suggest that chronic athletic training programs reduce orthostatic tolerance, whereas relatively brief (days to weeks) training programs do not affect orthostatic tolerance to any significant degree (increase or decrease). A primary objective was established to identify the alterations in blood pressure control that contribute to training-induced orthostatic hypotension (TIOH). Although any aspect of blood pressure regulation is suspect, current research has been focused on the baroreceptor system. Reductions in carotid baroreflex responsiveness have been documented in exercise-trained rabbits, reportedly due to an inhibitory influence from cardiac afferent, presumably vagal, nerve fibers that is abolished with intrapericardiac denervation. The

  6. Cognitive Effects of Mindfulness Training: Results of a Pilot Study Based on a Theory Driven Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Lena; Bellingrath, Silja; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reports a pilot study which tested cognitive effects of mindfulness practice in a theory-driven approach. Thirty-four fifth graders received either a mindfulness training which was based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction approach (experimental group), a concentration training (active control group), or no treatment (passive control group). Based on the operational definition of mindfulness by Bishop et al. (2004), effects on sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition, and data-driven as opposed to schema-based information processing were predicted. These abilities were assessed in a pre-post design by means of a vigilance test, a reversible figures test, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, a Stroop test, a visual search task, and a recognition task of prototypical faces. Results suggest that the mindfulness training specifically improved cognitive inhibition and data-driven information processing. PMID:27462287

  7. Cognitive Effects of Mindfulness Training: Results of a Pilot Study Based on a Theory Driven Approach.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Lena; Bellingrath, Silja; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reports a pilot study which tested cognitive effects of mindfulness practice in a theory-driven approach. Thirty-four fifth graders received either a mindfulness training which was based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction approach (experimental group), a concentration training (active control group), or no treatment (passive control group). Based on the operational definition of mindfulness by Bishop et al. (2004), effects on sustained attention, cognitive flexibility, cognitive inhibition, and data-driven as opposed to schema-based information processing were predicted. These abilities were assessed in a pre-post design by means of a vigilance test, a reversible figures test, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, a Stroop test, a visual search task, and a recognition task of prototypical faces. Results suggest that the mindfulness training specifically improved cognitive inhibition and data-driven information processing. PMID:27462287

  8. Barriers to Employer Sponsored Training in Ontario. Results of a Field Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Edward B.

    Results of a field survey of Canadian companies, trade unions, employer associations, educational establishments, and government agencies regarding the extent and possibilities of employer-sponsored training for workers are compiled in this report. Concentrating on the forty-nine companies in the survey sample, with collateral data from the…

  9. Relationship between Past Academic Performance and Results of Specialty In-Training Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronai, Ann K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Records of 63 medical school graduates were examined for predictors of achievement on in-training examinations in anesthesia and orthopedic surgery. The previous academic records were found to contain little to predict examination results, and the correlation between college nonscience subjects and exam performance was negative. (Author/MSE)

  10. Harmonization and streamlining of research oversight for pragmatic clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, P Pearl; Carrithers, Judith; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Rice, Todd W; Corsmo, Jeremy; Hart, Raffaella; Drezner, Marc K; Lantos, John D

    2015-01-01

    The oversight of research involving human participants is a complex process that requires institutional review board (IRB) review as well as multiple non-IRB institutional reviews. This multifaceted process is particularly challenging for multisite research when each site independently completes all required local reviews. The lack of inter-institutional standardization can result in different review outcomes for the same protocol, which can delay study operations from start-up to study completion. Hence, there have been strong calls to harmonize and thus streamline the research oversight process. Although the IRB is only one of the required reviews, it is often identified as the target for harmonization and streamlining. Data regarding variability in decision-making and interpretation of the regulations across IRBs have led to a perception that variability among IRBs is a primary contributor to the problems with review of multisite research. In response, many researchers and policymakers have proposed the use of a single IRB of record, also called a central IRB (CIRB), as an important remedy. While this proposal has merit, the use of a CIRB for multisite research does not address the larger problem of completing non-IRB institutional review in addition to IRB review—and coordinating the interdependence of these reviews. In this paper we describe the overall research oversight process, distinguish between IRB and institutional responsibilities, and identify challenges and opportunities for harmonization and streamlining. We focus on procedural and organizational issues and presume that the protection of human subjects remains the paramount concern. Suggested modifications of IRB processes that focus on time, efficiency, and consistency of review must also address what effect such changes have on the quality of review. We acknowledge that assessment of quality is difficult in that quality metrics for IRB review remain elusive. At best, we may be able to assess the

  11. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior. PMID:21626458

  12. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior.

  13. Results from an Investigation into Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Training Related Shoulder Injuries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Williams, David R.

    2004-01-01

    The number and complexity of extravehicular activities (EVAs) required for the completion and maintenance of the International Space Station (ISS) is unprecedented. The training required to successfully complete this magnitude of space walks presents a real risk of overuse musculoskeletal injuries to the EVA crew population. There was mounting evidence raised by crewmembers, trainers, and physicians at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) between 1999 and 2002 that suggested a link between training in the Neutral - Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and the several reported cases of shoulder injuries. The short- and long-term health consequences of shoulder injury to astronauts in training as well as the potential mission impact associated with surgical intervention to assigned EVA crew point to this as a critical problem that must be mitigated. Thus, a multi-directorate tiger team was formed in December of 2002 led by the EVA Office and Astronaut Office at the JSC. The primary objectives of this Tiger Team were to evaluate the prevalence of these injuries and substantiate the relationship to training in the NBL with the crew person operating in the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU). Between December 2002 and June of 2003 the team collected data, surveyed crewmembers, consulted with a variety of physicians, and performed tests. The results of this effort were combined with the vast knowledge and experience of the Tiger Team members to formulate several findings and over fifty recommendations. This paper summarizes those findings and recommendations as well as the process by which these were determined. The Tiger Team concluded that training in the NBL was directly linked to several major and minor shoulder injuries that had occurred. With the assistance of JSC flight surgeons, outside consultants, and the lead crewmember/physician on the team, the mechanisms of injury were determined. These mechanisms were then linked to specific aspects of the hardware design, operational techniques, and the

  14. Determining Specificity of Motor Imagery Training for Upper Limb Improvement in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Training Protocol and Pilot Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craje, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) refers to the mental rehearsal of a movement without actual motor output. MI training has positive effects on upper limb recovery after stroke. However, until now it is unclear whether this effect is specific to the trained task or a more general motor skill improvement. This study was set up to advance our insights into the…

  15. ENTHUSIASM, INTEREST, AND LEARNING--THE RESULTS OF GAME TRAINING, A STUDY OF SIMULATION TRAINING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PATTEN, RONALD J.; STEINMETZ, LAWRENCE L.

    AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO'S SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, AN EVALUATION WAS MADE OF GAMING AS AN EFFECTIVE TRAINING DEVICE FOR LOWER RANKING MANAGEMENT AND RANK-AND-FILE PERSONNEL. PARTICIPANTS WERE COLLEGE STUDENTS AND PART-TIME STUDENTS, BELIEVED TO BE LIKE PERSONS INVOLVED IN MANAGEMENT TRAINING PROGRAMS AND PROGRAMS FOR RANK-AND-FILE EMPLOYEES. THE…

  16. 12 CFR 4.66 - Oversight and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Management shall appoint an Outreach Program Manager, who shall appoint an Outreach Program Specialist. The Outreach Program Manager is primarily responsible for program advocacy, oversight and monitoring....

  17. Governmental oversight of discharges from concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J

    2006-06-01

    As point sources of pollution in the United States, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are subject to the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permitting system requirements. Changes to federal regulations in 2003 and a 2005 court decision have increased the governmental oversight of CAFOs. Manure application to fields from "large CAFOs" that results in unpermitted discharges can be regulated under the Clean Water Act. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's interpretation of agricultural stormwater discharges was approved so that unpermitted discharges may arise if an owner or operator of a CAFO fails to apply manure correctly. Owners and operators do not, however, have a duty to secure governmental permits in the absence of a discharge. Turning to the federal provisions regarding nutrient management plans, a court found that they were deficient. Moreover, the federal government needs to reconsider requirements that would reduce pathogens from entering surface waters. Although these developments should assist in reducing the impairment of U.S. waters, concern still exists. Greater oversight of nutrient management plans and enhanced enforcement efforts offer opportunities to provide greater assurance that CAFO owners and operators will not allow a discharge of pollutants to enter surface waters. PMID:16456627

  18. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Cockpit Resource Management training - Performance ratings of flightcrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Chidester, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    The first data from the NASA/University of Texas Crew Performance project on the behavior of flightcrews with and without formal training in Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is reported. Expert observers made detailed ratings of 15 components of crew behavior in both line operations and in full mission simulations. The results indicate that such training in crew coordination concepts increases the percentage of crews rated as above average in performance and decreases the percentage rated as below average. The data also show high and unexpected degrees of variations in rated performance among crews flying different aircraft within the same organization. It was also found that the specific behaviors that triggered observer ratings of above or below average performance differed markedly between organizations. Characteristics of experts' ratings and future research needs are also discussed.

  19. [The mentalizing vocational training - first results from a pilot study with adolescents with learning disabilities].

    PubMed

    Curth, Christian; Kotte, Silja; Taubner, Svenja; Unger, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    In this report first results are presented from a pilot study on the Mentalizing Vocational Training that aims to increase the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation programs with adolescents diagnosed with learning disabilities. The prevention program was based on the hypothesis that adolescents' difficulties in motivation and relationships are related to deficits in mentalizing. Thus, we created a prevention program that supports an enduring mentalizing social system following Twemlow's and Fonagy's suggestions for peaceful schools. The program consists of four modules: a psychoeducative training for all professionals within the rehabilitation program, an ongoing supervision for two selected teams, two mentalizing training groups for selected adolescents and a weekly intervision group for the research team analyzing the organizational perspective. During the pilot study, mentalization interest and attachment styles were assessed from all adolescents and professionals. Additionally, adolescents' mentalization capacities were assessed using an objective videobased test as well as general intelligence. Results showed that participants had significantly more attachment anxiety and avoidance as well as less interest to think about themselves and others in a complex way. Furthermore, participants achieved very low scores in the mentalization test (comparable to the autistic spectrum) which were independent from general cognitive deficits. On the organizational level, professionals appeared to be conflicted about the changes in management towards more economic efficiency and overwhelmed by participants with traumatic backgrounds. This led to a regression of the whole organization on the teleological mode. PMID:25478753

  20. Neuromuscular Changes in Female Collegiate Athletes Resulting From a Plyometric Jump-Training Program.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Gary B.; Colston, Marisa A.; Short, Nancy I.; Neal, Kristina L.; Hoewischer, Paul E.; Pixley, Jennifer J.

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess performance changes induced by a 6- week plyometric jump-training program. DESIGN AND SETTING: We used a quasiexperimental design to compare groups formed on the basis of team membership. Testing was conducted in an athletic training research laboratory, both before and after a 6-week period of preseason basketball conditioning. SUBJECTS: Nineteen female collegiate basketball players from a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I program (8 subjects) and a National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Division II program (11 subjects) who had no history of anterior cruciate ligament injury and who had no history of any lower extremity injury during the preceding 6 months. MEASUREMENTS: The variables of primary interest were hamstrings and quadriceps isokinetic peak torque. Of secondary interest were 5 variables derived from step-down and lunging maneuvers performed on a computerized forceplate system and 4 variables derived from tracking the position of the body core during performance of a T-pattern agility drill with a computerized infrared tracking system. RESULTS: A significant group x trial interaction was found for hamstrings peak torque at 60 degrees.s(-1) (F(1,17) = 9.16, P =.008.), and the proportion of total variance attributable to the treatment effect produced by the jump-training program was relatively large (eta(2) =.35, omega(2) =.30). None of the other variables demonstrated statistically significant changes. CONCLUSIONS: Our primary results support plyometric jump training as a strategy for improving neuromuscular attributes that are believed to reduce the risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in female college basketball players. They also provide the basis for reasonable isokinetic strength goals.

  1. The Spider Web of Oversight: An Analysis of External Oversight of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Jason E.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past several decades, state officials and various interest groups and civic organizations have increased their level of direct involvement in the affairs of public higher education. The increase in external attention toward the academy would likely be accompanied by the development of oversight mechanisms to ensure that societal…

  2. Results of a psychosomatic training program in China, Vietnam and Laos: successful cross-cultural transfer of a postgraduate training program for medical doctors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With the “ASIA-LINK” program, the European Community has supported the development and implementation of a curriculum of postgraduate psychosomatic training for medical doctors in China, Vietnam and Laos. Currently, these three countries are undergoing great social, economic and cultural changes. The associated psychosocial stress has led to increases in psychological and psychosomatic problems, as well as disorders for which no adequate medical or psychological care is available, even in cities. Health care in these three countries is characterized by the coexistence of Western medicine and traditional medicine. Psychological and psychosomatic disorders and problems are insufficiently recognized and treated, and there is a need for biopsychosocially orientated medical care. Little is known about the transferability of Western-oriented psychosomatic training programs in the Southeast Asian cultural context. Methods The curriculum was developed and implemented in three steps: 1) an experimental phase to build a future teacher group; 2) a joint training program for future teachers and German teachers; and 3) training by Asian trainers that was supervised by German teachers. The didactic elements included live patient interviews, lectures, communication skills training and Balint groups. The training was evaluated using questionnaires for the participants and interviews of the German teachers and the future teachers. Results Regional training centers were formed in China (Shanghai), Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh City and Hue) and Laos (Vientiane). A total of 200 physicians completed the training, and 30 physicians acquired the status of future teacher. The acceptance of the training was high, and feelings of competence increased during the courses. The interactive training methods were greatly appreciated, with the skills training and self-experience ranked as the most important topics. Adaptations to the cultural background of the participants were necessary

  3. 22 CFR 96.32 - Internal structure and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Internal structure and oversight. 96.32 Section 96.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND... Accreditation and Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.32 Internal structure and oversight. (a)...

  4. 22 CFR 96.32 - Internal structure and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Internal structure and oversight. 96.32 Section 96.32 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND... Accreditation and Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.32 Internal structure and oversight. (a)...

  5. 41 CFR 105-53.133 - Information Security Oversight Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Information Security... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.133 Information Security Oversight Office. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), headed by the Director of ISOO, who is appointed...

  6. 41 CFR 105-53.133 - Information Security Oversight Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.133 Information Security Oversight Office. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), headed by the Director of ISOO, who is appointed...

  7. 44 CFR 80.19 - Land use and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Land use and oversight. 80.19... RELOCATION FOR OPEN SPACE Post-Award Requirements § 80.19 Land use and oversight. This section applies to... of natural floodplain functions. (1) These uses may include: Parks for outdoor...

  8. 44 CFR 80.19 - Land use and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Land use and oversight. 80.19... RELOCATION FOR OPEN SPACE Post-Award Requirements § 80.19 Land use and oversight. This section applies to... of natural floodplain functions. (1) These uses may include: Parks for outdoor...

  9. 44 CFR 80.19 - Land use and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Land use and oversight. 80.19... RELOCATION FOR OPEN SPACE Post-Award Requirements § 80.19 Land use and oversight. This section applies to... of natural floodplain functions. (1) These uses may include: Parks for outdoor...

  10. 44 CFR 80.19 - Land use and oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Land use and oversight. 80.19... RELOCATION FOR OPEN SPACE Post-Award Requirements § 80.19 Land use and oversight. This section applies to... of natural floodplain functions. (1) These uses may include: Parks for outdoor...

  11. 49 CFR 1560.207 - Oversight of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Oversight of process. The redress process and its implementation are subject to review by the TSA and DHS... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oversight of process. 1560.207 Section 1560.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  12. 49 CFR 1560.207 - Oversight of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Oversight of process. The redress process and its implementation are subject to review by the TSA and DHS... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oversight of process. 1560.207 Section 1560.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  13. 49 CFR 1560.207 - Oversight of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Oversight of process. The redress process and its implementation are subject to review by the TSA and DHS... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oversight of process. 1560.207 Section 1560.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  14. 49 CFR 1560.207 - Oversight of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Oversight of process. The redress process and its implementation are subject to review by the TSA and DHS... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oversight of process. 1560.207 Section 1560.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  15. 49 CFR 1560.207 - Oversight of process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Oversight of process. The redress process and its implementation are subject to review by the TSA and DHS... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight of process. 1560.207 Section 1560.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  16. 13 CFR 120.1000 - Risk-Based Lender Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-Based Lender Oversight. 120.1000 Section 120.1000 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk... Oversight. SBA supervises, examines, and regulates, and enforces laws against, SBA Supervised Lenders...

  17. 13 CFR 130.800 - Oversight of the SBDC program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Oversight of the SBDC program. 130.800 Section 130.800 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.800 Oversight of the SBDC program. SBA shall monitor and oversee the...

  18. 13 CFR 130.800 - Oversight of the SBDC program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight of the SBDC program. 130.800 Section 130.800 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS § 130.800 Oversight of the SBDC program. SBA shall monitor and oversee the...

  19. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a.m., Wednesday, November 30, 2011... participate. The forum is open to all and free to attend (there is no registration). Public aircraft...

  20. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes – Results from Simulated Training Camps

    PubMed Central

    Hecksteden, Anne; Skorski, Sabrina; Schwindling, Sascha; Hammes, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover) have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength) at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1), after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8) and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11). Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue) which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery). With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l), urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl), free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml) and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml). For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l) only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling and by CK

  1. Blood-Borne Markers of Fatigue in Competitive Athletes - Results from Simulated Training Camps.

    PubMed

    Hecksteden, Anne; Skorski, Sabrina; Schwindling, Sascha; Hammes, Daniel; Pfeiffer, Mark; Kellmann, Michael; Ferrauti, Alexander; Meyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Assessing current fatigue of athletes to fine-tune training prescriptions is a critical task in competitive sports. Blood-borne surrogate markers are widely used despite the scarcity of validation trials with representative subjects and interventions. Moreover, differences between training modes and disciplines (e.g. due to differences in eccentric force production or calorie turnover) have rarely been studied within a consistent design. Therefore, we investigated blood-borne fatigue markers during and after discipline-specific simulated training camps. A comprehensive panel of blood-born indicators was measured in 73 competitive athletes (28 cyclists, 22 team sports, 23 strength) at 3 time-points: after a run-in resting phase (d 1), after a 6-day induction of fatigue (d 8) and following a subsequent 2-day recovery period (d 11). Venous blood samples were collected between 8 and 10 a.m. Courses of blood-borne indicators are considered as fatigue dependent if a significant deviation from baseline is present at day 8 (Δfatigue) which significantly regresses towards baseline until day 11 (Δrecovery). With cycling, a fatigue dependent course was observed for creatine kinase (CK; Δfatigue 54±84 U/l; Δrecovery -60±83 U/l), urea (Δfatigue 11±9 mg/dl; Δrecovery -10±10 mg/dl), free testosterone (Δfatigue -1.3±2.1 pg/ml; Δrecovery 0.8±1.5 pg/ml) and insulin linke growth factor 1 (IGF-1; Δfatigue -56±28 ng/ml; Δrecovery 53±29 ng/ml). For urea and IGF-1 95% confidence intervals for days 1 and 11 did not overlap with day 8. With strength and high-intensity interval training, respectively, fatigue-dependent courses and separated 95% confidence intervals were present for CK (strength: Δfatigue 582±649 U/l; Δrecovery -618±419 U/l; HIIT: Δfatigue 863±952 U/l; Δrecovery -741±842 U/l) only. These results indicate that, within a comprehensive panel of blood-borne markers, changes in fatigue are most accurately reflected by urea and IGF-1 for cycling and by CK

  2. Synthetic Biology in the FDA Realm: Toward Productive Oversight Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Leili; Hall, Ralph F

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is expected to create tremendous opportunities in a wide range of areas, including in foods, therapeutics, and diagnostics subject to regulatory oversight by the United States Food and Drug Administration. At the same time, there is substantial basis for concern about the uncertainties of accurately assessing the human health and environmental risks of such SB products. As such, SB is the latest in a string of emerging technologies that is the subject of calls for new approaches to regulation and oversight that involve "thinking ahead" to anticipate governance challenges upstream of technological development and adopting oversight mechanisms that are both adaptive to new information about risks and reflexive to performance data and feedback on policy outcomes over time. These new approaches constitute a marked departure from the status quo, and their development and implementation will require considerable time, resources, and reallocation of responsibilities. Furthermore, in order to develop an appropriate oversight response, adaptive or otherwise, there is first a need to identify the specific types and natures of applications, uncertainties, and regulatory issues that are likely to pose oversight challenges. This article presents our vision for a Productive Oversight Assessment (POA) approach in which the abilities and deficits of an oversight system are evaluated with the aim of enabling productive decisions (i.e., timely, feasible, effective for achieving desired policy outcomes) about oversight while also building capacity to facilitate broader governance efforts. The value ofPOA is two-fold. First, it will advance the development of a generalizable approach for making productive planning and decision-making about the oversight of any given new technology that presents challenges and uncertainties for any given oversight system whose policy goals are implicated by that technology. Second, this effort can enhance the very processes

  3. Impact of Technology. Results of Vocational Training Research and Development in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hermann

    The Federal Institute for Education and Vocational Training Research undertakes research, development, promotion, and counseling work to develop the principles of vocational training provision. Its primary focus has been problems encountered during the transition from vocational training to the labor market. The Institute has been monitoring one…

  4. Using Qualitative Observation To Document Group Processes in Accelerated Schools Training: Techniques and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Katherine; Batten, Constance

    This paper describes the use of qualitative observation techniques for gathering and analyzing data related to group processes during an Accelerated Schools Model training session. The purposes for this research were to observe the training process in order better to facilitate present continuation and future training, to develop questions for…

  5. Harmonization and streamlining of research oversight for pragmatic clinical trials.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, P Pearl; Carrithers, Judith; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Rice, Todd W; Corsmo, Jeremy; Hart, Raffaella; Drezner, Marc K; Lantos, John D

    2015-10-01

    The oversight of research involving human participants is a complex process that requires institutional review board review as well as multiple non-institutional review board institutional reviews. This multifaceted process is particularly challenging for multisite research when each site independently completes all required local reviews. The lack of inter-institutional standardization can result in different review outcomes for the same protocol, which can delay study operations from start-up to study completion. Hence, there have been strong calls to harmonize and thus streamline the research oversight process. Although the institutional review board is only one of the required reviews, it is often identified as the target for harmonization and streamlining. Data regarding variability in decision-making and interpretation of the regulations across institutional review boards have led to a perception that variability among institutional review boards is a primary contributor to the problems with review of multisite research. In response, many researchers and policymakers have proposed the use of a single institutional review board of record, also called a central institutional review board, as an important remedy. While this proposal has merit, the use of a central institutional review board for multisite research does not address the larger problem of completing non-institutional review board institutional review in addition to institutional review board review—and coordinating the interdependence of these reviews. In this article, we describe the overall research oversight process, distinguish between institutional review board and institutional responsibilities, and identify challenges and opportunities for harmonization and streamlining. We focus on procedural and organizational issues and presume that the protection of human subjects remains the paramount concern. Suggested modifications of institutional review board processes that focus on time

  6. Professional Experiences of Online Teachers in Wisconsin: Results from a Survey about Training and Challenges. REL 2016-110

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Jacqueline; Stafford, Erin; Clements, Margaret; Pazzaglia, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    REL Midwest, in partnership with the Midwest Virtual Education Research Alliance, analyzed the results of a survey administered to Wisconsin Virtual School teachers about the training in which they participated related to online instruction, the challenges they encounter while teaching online, and the type of training they thought would help them…

  7. Results of Education Program of “Training of Designers for Town Renovation”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Yasutsugu; Inoi, Hiroto

    The paper introduces the outline and results of the education program of “Training of designers for town renovation”, which has been done for two years in Osaka University, sponsored by the Ministry of education, culture, sports, science and technology. The program has three main aims as follows ; to understand three factors of town planning, “Shape”, “System” and “Mind” and master the design skills for realizing three factors, to master the design skills integrating three factors which are “Environment”, “Social” and “Economic”, and to perceive various people living, improve the ability of communicating and enhance the desire of participating town planning process.

  8. Consultation-liaison psychiatry training and supervision results in fewer recommendations for constant observation.

    PubMed

    Jin, C; Novik, S; Saravay, S

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we tested two hypotheses. First, that consultation-liaison (C-L)-trained psychiatry residents would order constant observation (CO) less frequently than psychiatry residents untrained in C-L. Second, we predicted that CO would be ordered less frequently under circumstances when experienced C-L psychiatry attending and fellows would be available to supervise psychiatry residents training in C-L. We reviewed a total of 138 consultations during a 6-month period. Constant observation was recommended in 31 cases (22.5%). Consultations were done by residents who had received training in C-L psychiatry (n=34) and by residents who were not trained in C-L (n=34). Residents not trained in C-L had a significantly higher percentage of CO orders (44.1%) compared to those trained in C-L (15.4%) (chi(2)=12.1, df=1, P<0.001). Because C-L-trained residents provided regular-hour and after-hour consults while residents without C-L training provided only after-hour consults, we also separately analyzed data from the 102 after-hour cases. We again found that residents with C-L training had a significantly lower rate of ordering CO (22.1%) than those who had not yet received C-L psychiatry training (44.1%) (chi(2)=5.31, df=1, P<0.05). We also found that C-L-trained residents ordered CO less frequently during regular hour consults (2.8%) when experienced staff are available in supervision compared to after hours (22.1%) (chi(2)=6.72, df=1, P<0.01). Our findings suggest that training in C-L psychiatry has a significant impact on the use of constant observation for patients in the general hospital thereby reducing the cost of care. PMID:11020542

  9. FERPA Training Practices: Results of the AACRAO January 2016 60 Second Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2016

    2016-01-01

    The January 2016 American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) "60 Second Survey" focused on institutional Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) training practices and measuring the level of interest in an AACRAO-developed online FERPA training module. The survey received 878 usable responses.…

  10. Generalization of Social Skills: Strategies and Results of a Training Program in Problem Solving Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paraschiv, Irina; Olley, J. Gregory

    This paper describes the "Problem Solving for Life" training program which trains adolescents and adults with mental retardation in skills for solving social problems. The program requires group participants to solve social problems by practicing two prerequisite skills (relaxation and positive self-statements) and four problem solving steps: (1)…

  11. The Training and Retention of Family Child Care Providers: Evaluation Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Charles W.; Orimoto, Lisa N.

    This report describes a 2-year evaluation of a demonstration program designed to train family child care providers to become economically self-sufficient small business operators. The evaluation report reveals that recruitment was stable and successful; that projects provided training to the targeted number of participants and were quite…

  12. Education & Training for CAD/CAM: Results of a National Probability Survey. Krannert Institute Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majchrzak, Ann

    A study was conducted of the training programs used by plants with Computer Automated Design/Computer Automated Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to help their employees adapt to automated manufacturing. The study sought to determine the relative priorities of manufacturing establishments for training certain workers in certain skills; the status of…

  13. Learner Orientation through Professional Development of Teachers? Empirical Results from Cascade Training in Anglophone Cameroon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of a professional development programme on the attitudes towards the teaching and learning of teachers in the Anglophone part of Cameroon. The development programme combines a multiplier system with school-based in-service training. The research compares the effects that the training had on the attitudes of three…

  14. Early Training in Oral Comprehension and Phonological Skills: Results of a Three-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianco, Maryse; Bressoux, Pascal; Doyen, Anne-Lise; Lambert, Eric; Lima, Laurent; Pellenq, Catherine; Zorman, Michel

    2010-01-01

    A sample of 1,273 4-year-old children were followed for 3 years. The children participated in 1 of 2 comprehension training programs, or in a phonological awareness training program. The comprehension programs explored the possibility of improving young children's oral comprehension in an educational setting. The first focused on the component…

  15. 32 CFR 2103.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COUNCIL REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065-INCLUDING PROCEDURES FOR PUBLIC ACCESS TO DOCUMENTS THAT MAY BE DECLASSIFIED Implementation and Review § 2103.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The...

  16. 32 CFR 2103.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COUNCIL REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065-INCLUDING PROCEDURES FOR PUBLIC ACCESS TO DOCUMENTS THAT MAY BE DECLASSIFIED Implementation and Review § 2103.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The...

  17. 42 CFR 460.71 - Oversight of direct participant care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.71 Oversight of direct participant...

  18. 42 CFR 460.71 - Oversight of direct participant care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.71 Oversight of direct participant...

  19. 42 CFR 460.71 - Oversight of direct participant care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.71 Oversight of direct participant...

  20. 5 CFR 831.1611 - Oversight of coverage determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Customs and Border Protection Officers § 831.1611 Oversight of coverage determinations. (a) Upon deciding that a position is a customs and border protection officer position, the...

  1. Specialist training in psychiatry in Europe--results of the UEMS-survey.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Rambaldi, Winfried; Schäfer, Ines; ten Doesschate, Roelof; Hohagen, Fritz

    2008-04-01

    According to the aim of the Treaty of Rome from 1957 which postulated the free movement of workers throughout the European Union, the European Board of Psychiatry in the UEMS (European Union of Medical Specialists) carried out a comprehensive survey of training in psychiatry, including all member countries in order to evaluate the present state of training in psychiatry in each. The survey should indicate whether the training requirements [UEMS Section Psychiatry. Charter on training of medical specialists in the EU: requirements for the speciality psychiatry. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 1997;247(Suppl.):S45-7; UEMS Section Psychiatry. Charter on training of medical specialists in the EU: requirements for the speciality psychiatry. ; 2003 [last revision

  2. Towards a BCI for sensorimotor training: initial results from simultaneous fNIRS and biosignal recordings.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Raphael; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Lambercy, Olivier; Fluet, Marie-Christine; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Martin; Gassert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the concept and initial results of a novel approach for robot assisted sensorimotor training in stroke rehabilitation. It is based on a brain-body-robot interface (B(2)RI), combining both neural and physiological recordings, that detects the intention to perform a motor task. By directly including the injured brain into the therapy, we ultimately aim at providing a new method for severely impaired patients to engage in active movement therapy. In the present study, seven healthy subjects performed an isometric finger pinching task while functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals from motor cortical areas and biosignals were recorded simultaneously. Results showed an insignificant increase in the blood pressure during the preparation period prior to motor execution. During the execution period, significant changes in oxy-and deoxyhemoglobin were found in the primary motor cortex, accompanied by an increase in blood pressure, respiration rate and galvanic skin response (GSR). Cortical measurements of premotor areas and heart rate revealed significant changes at the subject level with large inter-subject variability. The results presented here will serve as priors for the design of further studies to test the efficacy of the concept with stroke patients, and the found effects will provide a basis for the development of a classifier for a future B(2)RI.

  3. Perceptual learning and generalization resulting from training on an auditory amplitude-modulation detection task.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Matthew B; Wright, Beverly A

    2011-02-01

    Fluctuations in sound amplitude provide important cues to the identity of many sounds including speech. Of interest here was whether the ability to detect these fluctuations can be improved with practice, and if so whether this learning generalizes to untrained cases. To address these issues, normal-hearing adults (n = 9) were trained to detect sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM; 80-Hz rate, 3-4 kHz bandpass carrier) 720 trials/day for 6-7 days and were tested before and after training on related SAM-detection and SAM-rate-discrimination conditions. Controls (n = 9) only participated in the pre- and post-tests. The trained listeners improved more than the controls on the trained condition between the pre- and post-tests, but different subgroups of trained listeners required different amounts of practice to reach asymptotic performance, ranging from 1 (n = 6) to 4-6 (n = 3) sessions. This training-induced learning did not generalize to detection with two untrained carrier spectra (5 kHz low-pass and 0.5-1.5 kHz bandpass) or to rate discrimination with the trained rate and carrier spectrum, but there was some indication that it generalized to detection with two untrained rates (30 and 150 Hz). Thus, practice improved the ability to detect amplitude modulation, but the generalization of this learning to untrained cases was somewhat limited.

  4. Evaluating Behaviorally Oriented Aviation Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) Training and Programs: Methods, Results, and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, James C.; Thomas, Robert L., III

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of Aviation Resource Management Programs on aviation culture and performance has compelled a considerable body of research (Taylor & Robertson, 1995; Taylor, 1998; Taylor & Patankar, 2001). In recent years new methods have been applied to the problem of maintenance error precipitated by factors such as the need for self-assessment of communication and trust. The present study - 2002 -- is an extension of that past work. This research project was designed as the conclusion of a larger effort to help understand, evaluate and validate the impact of Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training programs, and other MRM interventions on participant attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and ultimately on enhanced safety performance. It includes research and development of evaluation methodology as well as examination of psychological constructs and correlates of maintainer performance. In particular, during 2002, three issues were addressed. First, the evaluation of two (independent & different) MRM programs for changing behaviors was undertaken. In one case we were able to further apply the approach to measuring written communication developed during 2001 (Taylor, 2002; Taylor & Thomas, 2003). Second, the MRM/TOQ surveys were made available for completion on the internet. The responses from these on-line surveys were automatically linked to a results calculator (like the one developed and described in Taylor, 2002) to aid industry users in analyzing and evaluating their local survey data on the internet. Third, the main trends and themes from our research about MRM programs over the past dozen years were reviewed.

  5. Caregiver-Assisted Coping Skills Training for Lung Cancer: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Laura S.; Keefe, Francis J.; Garst, Jennifer; Baucom, Donald H.; McBride, Colleen; McKee, Daphne C.; Sutton, Linda; Carson, Kimberly; Knowles, Verena; Rumble, Meredith; Scipio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Context Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the U.S. and is associated with high levels of symptoms including pain, fatigue, shortness of breath, and psychological distress. Caregivers as well as patients are adversely affected. However, previous studies of coping skills training (CST) interventions have not been tested in patients with lung cancer nor systematically included caregivers. Objectives This study tested the efficacy of a caregiver-assisted CST protocol in a sample of patients with lung cancer. Methods Two hundred thirty-three lung cancer patients and their caregivers were randomly assigned to receive 14 telephone-based sessions of either caregiver-assisted CST or education/support involving the caregiver. Patients completed measures assessing pain, psychological distress, QOL, and self-efficacy for symptom management; caregivers completed measures assessing psychological distress, caregiver strain, and self-efficacy for helping the patient manage symptoms. Results Patients in both treatment conditions showed improvements in pain, depression, QOL, and self-efficacy and caregivers in both conditions showed improvements in anxiety and self-efficacy from baseline to four-month follow-up. Results of exploratory analyses suggested that the CST intervention was more beneficial to patients/caregivers with Stage II and III cancers, whereas the education/support intervention was more beneficial to patients/caregivers with Stage I cancer. Conclusion Taken together with the broader literature in this area, results from this study suggest that psychosocial interventions can lead to improvements in a range of outcomes for cancer patients. Suggestions for future studies include the utilization of three-group designs (e.g., comparing two active interventions to a standard-care control) and examining mechanisms of change. PMID:20832982

  6. 5 CFR 7501.106 - Additional rules for certain Department employees involved in the regulation or oversight of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... employees involved in the regulation or oversight of Government sponsored enterprises. 7501.106 Section 7501... rules for certain Department employees involved in the regulation or oversight of Government sponsored... or oversight of Government Sponsored Enterprises, specifically the Federal National...

  7. 5 CFR 7501.106 - Additional rules for certain Department employees involved in the regulation or oversight of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... employees involved in the regulation or oversight of Government sponsored enterprises. 7501.106 Section 7501... rules for certain Department employees involved in the regulation or oversight of Government sponsored... or oversight of Government Sponsored Enterprises, specifically the Federal National...

  8. Acceptability and Feasibility Results of a Strength-Based Skills Training Program for Dementia Caregiving Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Katherine S.; Yarry, Sarah J.; Orsulic-Jeras, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The current article provides an in-depth description of a dyadic intervention for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers. Using a strength-based approach, caregiving dyads received skills training across 5 key areas: (a) education regarding dementia and memory loss, (b) effective communication, (c) managing memory loss, (d)…

  9. Results of a Multifaceted Intimate Partner Violence Training Program for Pediatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McColgan, Maria D.; Cruz, Mario; McKee, Jessica; Dempsey, Sandra H.; Davis, Martha B.; Barry, Patricia; Yoder, Ana Lisa; Giardino, Angelo P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) intervention on knowledge, attitudes, and screening practices of pediatric residents. Methods: The intervention included: an on-site IPV counselor, IPV training for attending physicians, residents and social workers, and screening prompts. Evaluation included…

  10. Taking the Pulse of Training Transfer: Instructor Quality and EMT Certification Examination Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene F.; Dickison, Phil; Levine, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS) provides a representative sampling of EMTs throughout the United States. The present study adds to the transfer of training literature by examining the relationship between instructor quality and National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification…

  11. Chat Reference Training after One Decade: The Results of a National Survey of Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Christopher; Paladino, Emily Bounds; Davis, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The first comprehensive national survey of all academic libraries in the United States which were conducting chat reference service was carried out to determine: what practices were being used to prepare personnel for chat reference service, what competencies were being taught, how and why training practices may have changed over time, and what…

  12. Designing the Right Blend: Combining Online and Onsite Training for Optimal Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Kurt; Bunker, Ellen; Cole, David

    2002-01-01

    Describes two decisions in the development of effective blended instruction: selecting the instructional approach and selecting the development approach. Examines a successful training design and development case at a military continuing education college and analyzes it as an application of a blended onsite-online approach to human performance…

  13. Attention Training for School-Aged Children with ADHD: Results of an Open Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamm, Leanne; Hughes, Carroll; Ames, Laure; Pickering, Joyce; Silver, Cheryl H.; Stavinoha, Peter; Castillo, Christine L.; Rintelmann, Jeanne; Moore, Jarrette; Foxwell, Aleksandra; Bolanos, S. Gina; Hines, Tabatha; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Emslie, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The article discusses a feasibility study conducted to examine whether Pay Attention!, an intervention training sustained, selective, alternating, and divided attention, could be utilized in a clinical setting with children diagnosed with ADHD, and whether children who received the intervention made attention and executive functioning…

  14. Audit of Selected Portions of the U.S. Department of Education's Oversight of the Consolidated State Performance Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of an audit by the Office of the Inspector General to determine whether the Department of Education's Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (OESE) provided sufficient oversight of graduation and dropout rates submitted by states in their Consolidated State Performance Reports to ensure the rates were…

  15. How Governing Boards Provide Oversight for Community Colleges: Understanding the Differences between State-Appointed and Elected Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey-Schilling, JoAnna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare how elected and appointed board trustees provide oversight for the community colleges they serve. The rationale for this study was that little examination of board governance processes at community colleges had occurred and, as a result, board members may lack the understanding necessary for effectively…

  16. [The results of self-irrigation in colostomy patients who have undergone a process of systematic training].

    PubMed

    Santos, V L; Koizumi, M S

    1992-12-01

    The present study comprises the results of the use of self-irrigation by 40 colostomized patients, trained by us through a process of systematized training. The effectiveness of the training process can be checked out considering that the most part of the patients have adopted it in its basic features, pointing out a few number of technical difficulties. As to the results of self-irrigation, as a method for controlling the intestinal habit, we can say that 37.50% of the population showed an absence of fecal leakages and 42.50%, sporadic leakages between the irrigations; 27.50% and 35.00%, with absence of gases in the intervals of time and partial use of the collecting pouch, respectively.

  17. Safety study - oversight of rail rapid-transit safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-23

    Annually, about 1.8 billion passengers ride on the rail rapid transit systems operating in the United States. Although this form of transportation is generally safe, the potential exists for a substantial loss of life in the event of a collision, derailment, fire, or other emergency. The safety study examines the adequacy of current oversight of rail rapid transit safety. The safety issues discussed are the effectiveness of current oversight activities exercised by the States in which rail rapid transit systems are operating; the preciseness of rail rapid transit accident/injury data; and the Federal Government's role in the oversight of rail rapid transit safety. Recommendations concerning these issues were made to the Department of Transportation, the Urban Mass Transportation Administration, the District of Columbia, and States in which rail rapid transit systems are currently operating.

  18. Preventive medicine oversight of splash pads on military installations.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Lisa Raysby; Perry, Matthew; Browne, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of military installations have installed splash pads that provide fun, recreational water entertainment for Soldiers and their families. The addition of splash pads brings added responsibilities for medical treatment facility preventive medicine oversight and installation facilities maintenance to ensure a safe and healthy environment. Currently, there are no consistent standards or detailed guidance for military installations to follow when installing and maintaining splash pads. The central issues associated with splash pads on military installations are water quality and risk for waterborne illnesses, responsibility for safety and health oversight, and federal energy and water sustainability mandates. This article examines the importance of implementing a standard for design and oversight to ensure the health and safety of Soldiers and their families.

  19. Preventive medicine oversight of splash pads on military installations.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Lisa Raysby; Perry, Matthew; Browne, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of military installations have installed splash pads that provide fun, recreational water entertainment for Soldiers and their families. The addition of splash pads brings added responsibilities for medical treatment facility preventive medicine oversight and installation facilities maintenance to ensure a safe and healthy environment. Currently, there are no consistent standards or detailed guidance for military installations to follow when installing and maintaining splash pads. The central issues associated with splash pads on military installations are water quality and risk for waterborne illnesses, responsibility for safety and health oversight, and federal energy and water sustainability mandates. This article examines the importance of implementing a standard for design and oversight to ensure the health and safety of Soldiers and their families. PMID:25651143

  20. The effect of training on question formulation among public health practitioners: results from a randomized controlled trial*

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Richard; Broudy, David; Voorhees, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To improve understanding of the information-seeking behaviors of public health professionals, the authors conducted this randomized controlled trial involving sixty participants to determine whether library and informatics training, with an emphasis on PubMed searching skills, increased the frequency and sophistication of participants' practice-related questions. Methods: The intervention group (n = 34) received evidence-based public health library and informatics training first, whereas the control group (n = 26) received identical training two weeks later. The frequency and sophistication of the questions generated by both intervention and control groups during the interim two-week period served as the basis for comparison. Results: The intervention group reported an average of almost 1.8 times more questions than those reported by the control group (1.24 vs. 0.69 questions per participant); however, this difference did not reach statistical significance. The intervention group overall produced more sophisticated (foreground) questions than the control group (18 vs. 9); however, this difference also did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The training provided in the current study seemed to prompt public health practitioners to identify and articulate questions more often. Training appears to create the necessary precondition for increased information-seeking behavior among public health professionals. PMID:18974808

  1. Training and certification of doctors of chiropractic in delivering manual cervical traction forces: Results of a longitudinal observational study.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D; Salsbury, Stacie A; Goertz, Christine M

    2014-10-01

    Objective : Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) use manual cervical distraction to treat patients with neck pain. Previous research demonstrates variability in traction forces generated by different DCs. This article reports on a training protocol and monthly certification process using bioengineering technology to standardize cervical traction force delivery among clinicians. Methods : This longitudinal observational study evaluated a training and certification process for DCs who provided force-based manual cervical distraction during a randomized clinical trial. The DCs completed a 7-week initial training that included instructional lectures, observation, and guided practice by a clinical expert, followed by 3 hours of weekly practice sessions delivering the technique to asymptomatic volunteers who served as simulated patients. An instrument-modified table and computer software provided the DCs with real-time audible and visual feedback on the traction forces they generated and graphical displays of the magnitude of traction forces as a function of time immediately after the delivery of the treatment. The DCs completed monthly certifications on traction force delivery throughout the trial. Descriptive accounts of certification attempts are provided. Results : Two DCs achieved certification in traction force delivery over 10 consecutive months. No certification required more than 3 attempts at C5 and occiput contacts for 3 force ranges (0-20 N, 21-50 N, and 51-100 N). Conclusions : This study demonstrates the feasibility of a training protocol and certification process using bioengineering technology for training DCs to deliver manual cervical distraction within specified traction force ranges over a 10-month period.

  2. Nanosecond-Timescale Intra-Bunch-Train Feedback for the Linear Collider: Results of the FONT2 Run

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.; Dufau, M.; Kalinin, A.; Myatt, G.; Perry, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Hartin, T.; Hussain, S.M.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; Adolphsen, C.; Frisch, J.C.; Hendrickson, L.; Jobe, R.K.; Markiewicz, T.; McCormick, D.J.; Nelson, J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-11

    We report on experimental results from the December 2003/January 2004 data run of the Feedback On Nanosecond Timescales (FONT) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at SLAC. We built a second-generation prototype intra-train beam-based feedback system incorporating beam position monitors, fast analogue signal processors, a feedback circuit, fast-risetime amplifiers and stripline kickers. We applied a novel real-time charge-normalization scheme to account for beam current variations along the train. We used the system to correct the position of the 170-nanosecond-long bunchtrain at NLCTA. We achieved a latency of 53 nanoseconds, representing a significant improvement on FONT1 (2002), and providing a demonstration of intra-train feedback for the Linear Collider.

  3. Summary of Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training with Two Year Post Treatment Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2006-01-01

    This study summarized two treatment research studies and included recidivism data for two years post discharge for group therapy. The study compared Mode deactivation Therapy (MDT), Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), and Social Skills training (SST), results of the MDT series of studies and the two year post-study recidivism data. The data from the…

  4. High-Intensity Interval Training and Isocaloric Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training Result in Similar Improvements in Body Composition and Fitness in Obese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Martins, Catia; Kazakova, Irina; Ludviksen, Marit; Mehus, Ingar; Wisloff, Ulrik; Kulseng, Bard; Morgan, Linda; King, Neil

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of 12 weeks of isocaloric programs of high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) or a short-duration HIIT (1/2HIIT) inducing only half the energy deficit on a cycle ergometer, on body weight and composition, cardiovascular fitness, resting metabolism rate (RMR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), nonexercise physical activity (PA) levels and fasting and postprandial insulin response in sedentary obese individuals. Forty-six sedentary obese individuals (30 women), with a mean BMI of 33.3 ± 2.9 kg/m2 and a mean age of 34.4 ± 8.8 years were randomly assigned to one of the three training groups: HIIT (n = 16), MICT (n = 14) or 1/2HIIT (n = 16) and exercise was performed 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Overall, there was a significant reduction in body weight, waist (p < .001) and hip (p < .01) circumference,, trunk and leg fat mass (FM; p < .01) and an increase in trunk and leg fat free mass (FFM; p < .01) and cardiovascular fitness (VO2max in ml/kg/min; p < .001) with exercise. However, no significant differences were observed between groups. There was no significant change in RMR, RER, nonexercise PA levels, fasting insulin or insulin sensitivity with exercise or between groups. There was a tendency for a reduction in AUC insulin with exercise (p = .069), but no differences between groups. These results indicate that isocaloric training protocols of HIIT or MICT (or 1/2HIIT inducing only half the energy deficit) exert similar metabolic and cardiovascular improvements in sedentary obese individuals.

  5. High-Intensity Interval Training and Isocaloric Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training Result in Similar Improvements in Body Composition and Fitness in Obese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Martins, Catia; Kazakova, Irina; Ludviksen, Marit; Mehus, Ingar; Wisloff, Ulrik; Kulseng, Bard; Morgan, Linda; King, Neil

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of 12 weeks of isocaloric programs of high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) or a short-duration HIIT (1/2HIIT) inducing only half the energy deficit on a cycle ergometer, on body weight and composition, cardiovascular fitness, resting metabolism rate (RMR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), nonexercise physical activity (PA) levels and fasting and postprandial insulin response in sedentary obese individuals. Forty-six sedentary obese individuals (30 women), with a mean BMI of 33.3 ± 2.9 kg/m2 and a mean age of 34.4 ± 8.8 years were randomly assigned to one of the three training groups: HIIT (n = 16), MICT (n = 14) or 1/2HIIT (n = 16) and exercise was performed 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Overall, there was a significant reduction in body weight, waist (p < .001) and hip (p < .01) circumference,, trunk and leg fat mass (FM; p < .01) and an increase in trunk and leg fat free mass (FFM; p < .01) and cardiovascular fitness (VO2max in ml/kg/min; p < .001) with exercise. However, no significant differences were observed between groups. There was no significant change in RMR, RER, nonexercise PA levels, fasting insulin or insulin sensitivity with exercise or between groups. There was a tendency for a reduction in AUC insulin with exercise (p = .069), but no differences between groups. These results indicate that isocaloric training protocols of HIIT or MICT (or 1/2HIIT inducing only half the energy deficit) exert similar metabolic and cardiovascular improvements in sedentary obese individuals. PMID:26479856

  6. 20 CFR 667.410 - What are the oversight roles and responsibilities of recipients and subrecipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the oversight roles and... INVESTMENT ACT Oversight and Monitoring § 667.410 What are the oversight roles and responsibilities of recipients and subrecipients? (a) Roles and responsibilities for all recipients and subrecipients of...

  7. 15 CFR 921.40 - Ongoing oversight and evaluations of designated National Estuarine Research Reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS Ongoing Oversight, Performance Evaluation and Withdrawal of Designation § 921.40 Ongoing oversight and evaluations of designated National Estuarine Research Reserves. (a) The Sanctuaries and Reserve... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ongoing oversight and evaluations...

  8. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal...

  9. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal...

  10. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal...

  11. A child death as a result of physical violence during toilet training.

    PubMed

    Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Coşkun, Kerem Şenol; Yeşil, Arda; Cobanoğlu, Cansu

    2014-11-01

    Enuresis and delayed bladder control are a common source of psychosocial concern for both parents and children. Different cultures have different norms with regard to parenting attitudes. The fact that in Turkey, parents consider enuresis or encopresis as a sign of laziness, misbehavior, or disobedience rather than a medical disorder may cause children to be exposed to physical and emotional violence and maltreatment by the family as a corrective strategy. We present a case in this paper which had a fatal outcome due to physical violence against a child as an educational measure and a toilet training method.

  12. [E-learning in the education and training of physicians. Methods, results, evaluation].

    PubMed

    Boeker, M; Klar, R

    2006-05-01

    E-learning has been established in the education and training of physicians in various types: linear sequential and hyper-textual forms of multimedia presentations and texts, tutorial systems and simulations. Case-based e-learning systems are of special importance in medicine because they allow for mediation of process and practical knowledge by presentation of authentic medical cases in a simulated environment. The integration into the medical education and advanced professional training is crucial for the long-term success of e-learning; in case-based systems this can be accomplished by blended learning approaches which combine elements of traditional teaching with e-learning. Learning management systems (LMS) support integration of traditional teaching and e-learning by serving as an organizational platform for content of teaching. Further, they provide means of communication for trainers and trainees, authoring tools, interactive components, course management and role-based sharing concept. The dissemination of e-learning can be fostered by attention to requirements and user analysis, early adoption to organizational structures, curricular integration and continuous cooperation with students. Summarized, didactic and organizational aspects determine the success of our own e-learning offers as well as they influence the general further development of e-learning more than technical features.

  13. Flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy training for primary care physicians: results of a 5-year experience.

    PubMed

    Schertz, R D; Baskin, W N; Frakes, J T

    1989-01-01

    The first 5 years of a flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy (FFS) training program for primary care physicians was analyzed in an attempt to assess clinical competence and develop a procedure learning curve. A total of 47 primary care physicians (26 third-year family practice residents, 15 family practitioners, and 6 internists) were successfully trained in 60-cm FFS by five gastroenterologists. Didactic teaching methods included 5 hours of videotapes, slides, endoscopic models, and the use of a photo atlas. Following a patient demonstration, each trainee completed 25 examinations supervised with a teaching attachment. Criteria used to assess trainee competence included unassisted length of scope insertion and examination duration. Mean depth of scope insertion was 35.9 cm for the first five examinations, increasing to a mean of 51.7 cm for the final five examinations. Average examination duration decreased from 19.1 min for examinations 1 through 5 to 17.0 min for examinations 21 through 25. Out of 1236 examinations, one or more polyps were found in 222 patients (18.0%). Carcinoma was found in 15 of 1236 examinations (1.4%). In summary, experienced endoscopists can teach primary care physicians to perform 60-cm FFS. Completion of 25 supervised cases appears to be adequate for achieving technical competence in flexible fiberoptic sigmoidoscopy.

  14. 7 CFR 1703.107 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1703.107 Section 1703.107 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan and...

  15. 7 CFR 1703.107 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1703.107 Section 1703.107 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan and...

  16. 7 CFR 1703.107 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1703.107 Section 1703.107 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan and...

  17. 7 CFR 1703.107 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1703.107 Section 1703.107 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan and...

  18. 7 CFR 1703.107 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1703.107 Section 1703.107 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan and...

  19. 40 CFR 70.10 - Federal oversight and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal oversight and sanctions. 70.10 Section 70.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... failure to issue permits; (B) Repeated issuance of permits that do not conform to the requirements of...

  20. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based... Lender” means a Small Business Lending Company or a Non-Federally Regulated Lender. (2) On-site...

  1. 24 CFR 968.419 - Grantee's oversight responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grantee's oversight responsibilities. 968.419 Section 968.419 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING MODERNIZATION Vacancy Reduction Program § 968.419 Grantee's...

  2. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE...

  3. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE...

  4. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE...

  5. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE...

  6. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE...

  7. 46 CFR 160.076-29 - Production oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... production process occurs. Changes in lots of component materials must be treated as changes in materials... used or a production process is revised. (5) The following additional requirements apply as indicated... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Production oversight. 160.076-29 Section...

  8. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Lender” means a Small Business Lending Company or a Non-Federally Regulated Lender. (2) On-site reviews... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS...

  9. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Lender” means a Small Business Lending Company or a Non-Federally Regulated Lender. (2) On-site reviews... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS...

  10. 44 CFR 207.8 - Management cost funding oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Management cost funding oversight. 207.8 Section 207.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT COSTS § 207.8 Management cost...

  11. 44 CFR 207.8 - Management cost funding oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Management cost funding oversight. 207.8 Section 207.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT COSTS § 207.8 Management cost...

  12. 44 CFR 207.8 - Management cost funding oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Management cost funding oversight. 207.8 Section 207.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT COSTS § 207.8 Management cost...

  13. 40 CFR 51.362 - Motorist compliance enforcement program oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... oversight. 51.362 Section 51.362 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... adjustments to improve operation when necessary. (a) Quality assurance and quality control. A quality.... Quality control procedures are required to instruct individuals in the enforcement process regarding...

  14. 5 CFR 831.911 - Oversight of coverage determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....911 Section 831.911 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Law Enforcement Officers and Firefighters § 831.911 Oversight of coverage determinations. (a) Upon deciding that a position is a law enforcement officer or firefighter position,...

  15. 5 CFR 831.911 - Oversight of coverage determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....911 Section 831.911 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Law Enforcement Officers and Firefighters § 831.911 Oversight of coverage determinations. (a) Upon deciding that a position is a law enforcement officer or firefighter position,...

  16. 7 CFR 1739.19 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1739.19 Section 1739.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.19 Reporting...

  17. 7 CFR 1739.19 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1739.19 Section 1739.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.19 Reporting...

  18. 7 CFR 1739.19 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1739.19 Section 1739.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.19 Reporting...

  19. 7 CFR 1739.19 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting and oversight requirements. 1739.19 Section 1739.19 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BROADBAND GRANT PROGRAM Community Connect Grant Program § 1739.19 Reporting...

  20. 44 CFR 207.8 - Management cost funding oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Management cost funding oversight. 207.8 Section 207.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT COSTS § 207.8 Management cost...

  1. 44 CFR 207.8 - Management cost funding oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Management cost funding oversight. 207.8 Section 207.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT COSTS § 207.8 Management cost...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1519t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 404.1519t Section 404.1519t Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Procedures to Monitor the...

  3. 20 CFR 404.1519t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 404.1519t Section 404.1519t Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Procedures to Monitor the...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1519t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 404.1519t Section 404.1519t Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Procedures to Monitor the...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1519t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 404.1519t Section 404.1519t Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Procedures to Monitor the...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1519t - Consultative examination oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Consultative examination oversight. 404.1519t Section 404.1519t Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Procedures to Monitor the...

  7. 49 CFR 240.309 - Railroad oversight responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration of the Certification Programs § 240.309 Railroad oversight responsibilities. (a) No later than... brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 232 or when the procedures are required for compliance with the Class 1, Class 1A, Class II, or running brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 238; (4)...

  8. 49 CFR 240.309 - Railroad oversight responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration of the Certification Programs § 240.309 Railroad oversight responsibilities. (a) No later than... brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 232 or when the procedures are required for compliance with the Class 1, Class 1A, Class II, or running brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 238; (4)...

  9. 49 CFR 240.309 - Railroad oversight responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration of the Certification Programs § 240.309 Railroad oversight responsibilities. (a) No later than... brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 232 or when the procedures are required for compliance with the Class 1, Class 1A, Class II, or running brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 238; (4)...

  10. 49 CFR 240.309 - Railroad oversight responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration of the Certification Programs § 240.309 Railroad oversight responsibilities. (a) No later than... brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 232 or when the procedures are required for compliance with the Class 1, Class 1A, Class II, or running brake test provisions of 49 CFR part 238; (4)...

  11. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized.

  12. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. PMID:27021702

  13. 77 FR 68826 - Notice of Meeting Preservation Technology and Training Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Meeting Preservation Technology and Training Board AGENCY: National Park... Training Board (PTT Board) of the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, National Park... oversight to the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT) in compliance with...

  14. Training and certification of doctors of chiropractic in delivering manual cervical traction forces: Results of a longitudinal observational study.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D; Salsbury, Stacie A; Goertz, Christine M

    2014-10-01

    Objective : Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) use manual cervical distraction to treat patients with neck pain. Previous research demonstrates variability in traction forces generated by different DCs. This article reports on a training protocol and monthly certification process using bioengineering technology to standardize cervical traction force delivery among clinicians. Methods : This longitudinal observational study evaluated a training and certification process for DCs who provided force-based manual cervical distraction during a randomized clinical trial. The DCs completed a 7-week initial training that included instructional lectures, observation, and guided practice by a clinical expert, followed by 3 hours of weekly practice sessions delivering the technique to asymptomatic volunteers who served as simulated patients. An instrument-modified table and computer software provided the DCs with real-time audible and visual feedback on the traction forces they generated and graphical displays of the magnitude of traction forces as a function of time immediately after the delivery of the treatment. The DCs completed monthly certifications on traction force delivery throughout the trial. Descriptive accounts of certification attempts are provided. Results : Two DCs achieved certification in traction force delivery over 10 consecutive months. No certification required more than 3 attempts at C5 and occiput contacts for 3 force ranges (0-20 N, 21-50 N, and 51-100 N). Conclusions : This study demonstrates the feasibility of a training protocol and certification process using bioengineering technology for training DCs to deliver manual cervical distraction within specified traction force ranges over a 10-month period. PMID:25237767

  15. Training and certification of doctors of chiropractic in delivering manual cervical traction forces: Results of a longitudinal observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Vining, Robert D.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Goertz, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Doctors of chiropractic (DCs) use manual cervical distraction to treat patients with neck pain. Previous research demonstrates variability in traction forces generated by different DCs. This article reports on a training protocol and monthly certification process using bioengineering technology to standardize cervical traction force delivery among clinicians. Methods This longitudinal observational study evaluated a training and certification process for DCs who provided force-based manual cervical distraction during a randomized clinical trial. The DCs completed a 7-week initial training that included instructional lectures, observation, and guided practice by a clinical expert, followed by 3 hours of weekly practice sessions delivering the technique to asymptomatic volunteers who served as simulated patients. An instrument-modified table and computer software provided the DCs with real-time audible and visual feedback on the traction forces they generated and graphical displays of the magnitude of traction forces as a function of time immediately after the delivery of the treatment. The DCs completed monthly certifications on traction force delivery throughout the trial. Descriptive accounts of certification attempts are provided. Results Two DCs achieved certification in traction force delivery over 10 consecutive months. No certification required more than 3 attempts at C5 and occiput contacts for 3 force ranges (0–20 N, 21–50 N, and 51–100 N). Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of a training protocol and certification process using bioengineering technology for training DCs to deliver manual cervical distraction within specified traction force ranges over a 10-month period. PMID:25237767

  16. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    PubMed

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described.

  17. Changes in VO2 Max. Resulting from Bicycle Training at Different Intensities Holding Total Mechanical Work Constant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund A., Jr.; Franks, B. Don

    Effects of different training intensities on oxygen intake were determined in this study. Sixteen male subjects aged 16-18 were randomly assigned to one of three training groups or a control group. The training groups trained 3 days per week on bicycle ergometers at different intensities (85 percent, 75 percent, or 65 percent of heart rate…

  18. Compensatory cognitive training for people with first-episode schizophrenia: results from a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mendella, Paul D; Burton, Cynthia Z; Tasca, Giorgio A; Roy, Paul; St Louis, Lea; Twamley, Elizabeth W

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive training or remediation now has multiple studies and meta-analyses supporting its efficacy in improving cognition and functioning in people with schizophrenia. However, relatively little is known about cognitive training outcomes in early psychosis. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial of Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT) compared to Treatment as Usual (TAU) in 27 participants with first-episode psychosis who had received treatment for psychosis for less than six months. Assessments of cognition (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery; MCCB) and functional capacity (UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment-Brief; UPSA-B) were administered at baseline and following the 12-week treatment. The CCT condition, compared to TAU, was associated with significant improvements on the MCCB composite score, as well as MCCB subtests measuring processing speed (Trail Making) and social cognition (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), with large effects on these three outcome measures. There were no significant CCT-associated effects on the UPSA-B or on positive, negative, or depressive symptoms. CCT treatment of cognitive impairments in first-episode schizophrenia is feasible and can result in large effect size improvements in global cognition, processing speed, and social cognition. PMID:25631454

  19. Exercise testing of leg amputees and the result of prosthetic training.

    PubMed

    van Alsté, J A; Cruts, H E; Huisman, K; de Vries, J

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients undergoing rehabilitation following leg amputation were examined to determine cardiac status, which included clinical examination and a graded exercise ECG test, using an arm ergometer. Results were compared to final walking ability. It was found that the cardiac status of these patients was generally poor and that the exercise ECG results did co-relate to walking ability. PMID:4066177

  20. Post-cardiotomy ECMO in pediatric and congenital heart surgery: impact of team training and equipment in the results

    PubMed Central

    Miana, Leonardo Augusto; Canêo, Luiz Fernando; Tanamati, Carla; Penha, Juliano Gomes; Guimarães, Vanessa Alves; Miura, Nana; Galas, Filomena Regina Barbosa Gomes; Jatene, Marcelo Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-cardiotomy myocardial dysfunction requiring mechanical circulatory support occurs in about 0.5% of cases. In our environment, the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been increasing in recent years. Objective To evaluate the impact of investment in professional training and improvement of equipment in the rate of weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and survival. Methods A retrospective study. Fifty-six pediatric and/or congenital heart patients underwent post-cardiotomy extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at our institution between November 1999 and July 2014. We divided this period into two phases: phase I, 36 cases (before the structuring of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program) and phase II, 20 cases (after the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program implementation) with investment in training and equipment). Were considered as primary outcomes: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation weaning and survival to hospital discharge. The results in both phases were compared using Chi-square test. To identify the impact of the different variables we used binary logistic regression analysis. Results Groups were comparable. In phase I, 9 patients (25%) were weaned from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, but only 2 (5.5%) were discharged. In phase II, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was used in 20 patients, weaning was possible in 17 (85%), with 9 (45%) hospital discharges (P<0.01). When the impact of several variables on discharge and weaning of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was analyzed, we observe that phase II was an independent predictor of better results (P<0.001) and need for left cavities drainage was associated with worse survival (P=0.045). Conclusion The investment in professional training and improvement of equipment significantly increased extracorporeal membrane oxygenation results. PMID:27163414

  1. Technical oversight for installation of TNX piezometers, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pidcoe, W.W. Jr.

    1997-06-05

    Science Applications International Corporation was tasked under subcontract C002025P to provide technical oversight for the drilling of one pilot borehole, and the drilling and installation of five piezometers in the TNX Area Swamp. The work was performed in accordance with the Statement of Work in Task Order Proposal No. ER39-129 dated August 6, 1996. This report describes the activities associated with the performance of the task.

  2. Tools, Techniques, and Training: Results of an E-Resources Troubleshooting Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathmel, Angela; Mobley, Liisa; Pennington, Buddy; Chandler, Adam

    2015-01-01

    A primary role of any e-resources librarian or staff is troubleshooting electronic resources (e-resources). While much progress has been made in many areas of e-resources management (ERM) to understand the ERM lifecycle and to manage workflows, troubleshooting access remains a challenge. This collaborative study is the result of the well-received…

  3. False Positive Functional Analysis Results as a Contributor of Treatment Failure during Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Amanda J.; Mueller, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that functional analysis results are beneficial for treatment selection because they identify reinforcers for severe behavior that can then be used to reinforce replacement behaviors either differentially or noncontingently. Theoretically then, if a reinforcer is identified in a functional analysis erroneously, a well researched…

  4. Results from an Experimental Study about Reinforcements Employed in Early Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Maria Teresa Sanz

    2004-01-01

    The Down's syndrome population presents a social quotient higher than its intelligence quotient, the main characteristic of its personality and because of the pronounced hypotony suffered by them, principally in the first years of life. This report shows the results of a study carried out about differential acquisitions of two groups of trisomy-21…

  5. 2011-12 IPEGS Training for School Administrators: Survey Results. Research Brief. Volume 1105

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shneyderman, Aleksandr

    2012-01-01

    The survey results indicate that school administrators are familiar with the Instructional Performance Evaluation and Growth System (IPEGS); most rate themselves as proficient in conducting teacher observations. In addition, a majority of school administrators report a high degree of familiarity with both the IPEGS standards and the four-point…

  6. The Liability Chase Game: Reducing Financial Liability Resulting from JTPA Program Implementation. Employment and Training Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Barbara; Smithson, Craig

    Directed to Service Delivery Area (SDA) administrators but also useful to local elected officials and Private Industry Council members in determining key areas for their review, this document provides suggestions to SDAs on preventive activities that can assist in reducing disallowed costs resulting from the improper operation of JTPA programs. An…

  7. Interobserver reliability of rheumatologists performing musculoskeletal ultrasonography: results from a EULAR "Train the trainers" course

    PubMed Central

    Scheel, A; Schmidt, W; Hermann, K; Bruyn, G; D'Agostino, M; Grassi, W; Iagnocco, A; Koski, J; Machold, K; Naredo, E; Sattler, H; Swen, N; Szkudlarek, M; Wakefield, R; Ziswiler, H; Pasewaldt, D; Werner, C; Backhaus, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the interobserver reliability among 14 experts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) and to determine the overall agreement about the US results compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which served as the imaging "gold standard". Methods: The clinically dominant joint regions (shoulder, knee, ankle/toe, wrist/finger) of four patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases were ultrasonographically examined by 14 experts. US results were compared with MRI. Overall agreements, sensitivities, specificities, and interobserver reliabilities were assessed. Results: Taking an agreement in US examination of 10 out of 14 experts into account, the overall κ for all examined joints was 0.76. Calculations for each joint region showed high κ values for the knee (1), moderate values for the shoulder (0.76) and hand/finger (0.59), and low agreement for ankle/toe joints (0.28). κ Values for bone lesions, bursitis, and tendon tears were high (κ = 1). Relatively good agreement for most US findings, compared with MRI, was found for the shoulder (overall agreement 81%, sensitivity 76%, specificity 89%) and knee joint (overall agreement 88%, sensitivity 91%, specificity 88%). Sensitivities were lower for wrist/finger (overall agreement 73%, sensitivity 66%, specificity 88%) and ankle/toe joints (overall agreement 82%, sensitivity 61%, specificity 92%). Conclusion: Interobserver reliabilities, sensitivities, and specificities in comparison with MRI were moderate to good. Further standardisation of US scanning techniques and definitions of different pathological US lesions are necessary to increase the interobserver agreement in musculoskeletal US. PMID:15640263

  8. Fellowship Training: Need and Contributions.

    PubMed

    Grover, Brandon T; Kothari, Shanu N

    2016-02-01

    Surgical subspecialties are now well established, and many surgery residents pursue fellowship training for various reasons. Fellowships can bridge the gaps found in many residency programs by providing graduating residents with opportunities to master surgical skills, gain confidence and progressive autonomy, and receive further mentorship. The experience also eases the transition to independent practice by allowing surgeons to tailor their training to coincide with personal interests and future practice goals. It is unlikely that the number of surgery residents pursuing fellowship training will decrease, so it is important to provide the infrastructure, oversight, and opportunities to meet their needs.

  9. Online self-administered training of PTSD treatment providers in cognitive-behavioral intervention skills: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ruzek, Josef I; Rosen, Raymond C; Garvert, Donn W; Smith, Lauren D; Sears, Katharine C; Marceau, Lisa; Harty, Brian; Stoddard, Anne M

    2014-12-01

    Despite potential advantages in scalability and efficiency of web-based training for trauma providers, few controlled trials of feasibility and effectiveness of web-based mental health training have been performed. Our study compared web-based training in 3 intervention skills (motivation enhancement [ME], goal setting [GS], behavioral task assignment [BTA]) with web-based training plus telephone consultation, and a no-training control. The primary outcome measures included objective measures of skills acquisition (standardized patient assessments). Results showed significant differences among the training conditions. The overall tests of differences among the groups were statistically significant for ME and BTA skills (p < .001 and p = .005, respectively), but not for GS (p = .245). The web training plus consultation group improved in ME skills by 0.35 units compared to 0.12 units in the web only group (p < .001) and no change in the control group (p = .001). For BTA skills, the web training plus consultation improved by 0.27 units compared to 0.17 units in the web only group (p = .175) and no change in the control group (p = .004). Overall, these findings support the use of web-based dissemination for large-scale training programs for trauma providers in health care delivery systems. Further studies are needed to clarify the specific role of consultation as an adjunct to web-based training. PMID:25522731

  10. Equal Opportunities and Vocational Training--13 Years on. The Results of CEDEFOP's Programme for Women 1977-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeland, Suzanne

    This paper presents an overview of the Equal Opportunities and Vocational Training program of the European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (CEDEFOP) from its inception in 1977 until 1990. In the first section, the report describes the legislation that spurred the equal opportunities and vocational training program and presents…

  11. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original

  12. Evaluating oversight systems for emerging technologies: a case study of genetically engineered organisms.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Najmaie, Pouya; Larson, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. oversight system for genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) was evaluated to develop hypotheses and derive lessons for oversight of other emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology. Evaluation was based upon quantitative expert elicitation, semi-standardized interviews, and historical literature analysis. Through an interdisciplinary policy analysis approach, blending legal, ethical, risk analysis, and policy sciences viewpoints, criteria were used to identify strengths and weaknesses of GEOs oversight and explore correlations among its attributes and outcomes. From the three sources of data, hypotheses and broader conclusions for oversight were developed. Our analysis suggests several lessons for oversight of emerging technologies: the importance of reducing complexity and uncertainty in oversight for minimizing financial burdens on small product developers; consolidating multi-agency jurisdictions to avoid gaps and redundancies in safety reviews; consumer benefits for advancing acceptance of GEO products; rigorous and independent pre- and post-market assessment for environmental safety; early public input and transparency for ensuring public confidence; and the positive role of public input in system development, informed consent, capacity, compliance, incentives, and data requirements and stringency in promoting health and environmental safety outcomes, as well as the equitable distribution of health impacts. Our integrated approach is instructive for more comprehensive analyses of oversight systems, developing hypotheses for how features of oversight systems affect outcomes, and formulating policy options for oversight of future technological products, especially nanotechnology products. PMID:20122100

  13. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

  14. Evaluating oversight systems for emerging technologies: a case study of genetically engineered organisms.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Najmaie, Pouya; Larson, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. oversight system for genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) was evaluated to develop hypotheses and derive lessons for oversight of other emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology. Evaluation was based upon quantitative expert elicitation, semi-standardized interviews, and historical literature analysis. Through an interdisciplinary policy analysis approach, blending legal, ethical, risk analysis, and policy sciences viewpoints, criteria were used to identify strengths and weaknesses of GEOs oversight and explore correlations among its attributes and outcomes. From the three sources of data, hypotheses and broader conclusions for oversight were developed. Our analysis suggests several lessons for oversight of emerging technologies: the importance of reducing complexity and uncertainty in oversight for minimizing financial burdens on small product developers; consolidating multi-agency jurisdictions to avoid gaps and redundancies in safety reviews; consumer benefits for advancing acceptance of GEO products; rigorous and independent pre- and post-market assessment for environmental safety; early public input and transparency for ensuring public confidence; and the positive role of public input in system development, informed consent, capacity, compliance, incentives, and data requirements and stringency in promoting health and environmental safety outcomes, as well as the equitable distribution of health impacts. Our integrated approach is instructive for more comprehensive analyses of oversight systems, developing hypotheses for how features of oversight systems affect outcomes, and formulating policy options for oversight of future technological products, especially nanotechnology products.

  15. Comparison of high and low intensity training in well controlled rheumatoid arthritis. Results of a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed Central

    van den Ende, C H; Hazes, J M; le Cessie, S; Mulder, W J; Belfor, D G; Breedveld, F C; Dijkmans, B A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the benefit of intensive dynamic exercises in comparison to range of motion (ROM) and isometric exercises in rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 100 consecutive rheumatoid arthritis patients on stable medication were randomly assigned to (1) intensive dynamic group exercises which included full weight bearing exercises and conditioning exercises on a stationary bicycle while the heart rate was maintained at 70-85% of the age predicted maximum heart rate, (2) range of motion (ROM) exercises and isometric exercises in a group, (3) individual isometric and ROM exercises, and (4) home instructions for isometric and ROM exercises. Variables of physical condition, muscle strength, joint mobility, daily functioning (HAQ), and disease activity were assessed before and after the 12 week exercise course, and 12 weeks thereafter. An intention to treat analysis was performed. RESULTS: Increases in aerobic capacity (n = 77), muscle strength, and joint mobility in the high intensity exercise programme were respectively 17%, 17% and 16% and differed significantly from the changes in aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and joint mobility in the other exercise groups. No deterioration of disease activity was observed. Twelve weeks after discontinuation of the exercise course the gain in physical capacity had disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive dynamic training is more effective in increasing aerobic capacity, joint mobility, and muscle strength than ROM exercises and isometric training in rheumatoid arthritis patients with well controlled disease. PMID:8976635

  16. Dynamicimagestoaddressconceptualnodes about mechanical waves: Example materials and preliminary results of the experimentation of the teacher training module IMAGONDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, I.; Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Sassi, E.

    2004-09-01

    In the framework of the 2002-03 project “Fisica per la Formazione Culturale - FORMazione Insegnanti" funded by Italy ministry of Education, a set of training materials, focused on mechanical waves, has been developed. The core of the materials is represented by animated images purposely designed in order to: 1) address intrinsically dynamic aspects of one-dimensional impulses/waves propagation on a string; 2) have the trainees reflect upon students' difficulties in reading/interpreting static images (as the ones which are featured in common textbooks) and animations. In this paper we discuss example materials concerning transversal impulses on strings to address conceptual nodes such as: 1) configuration of the string at a given time and its aaabstract representation; 2) displacement vs. time graph of a string element and its aaabstract representation; 3) relationships between the two aaabstract representations; 4) modelization of mechanical wave propagation in one dimension. Moreover the results of the experimentation of the training materials in the framework of the Post Graduate School to Became Physics Teacher in Secondary Schools are presented and commented.

  17. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  18. Employment Training. Successful Projects Share Common Strategy. Statement of Carlotta C. Joyner, Director, Education and Employment Issues, Health, Education, and Human Services Division. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations, Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyner, Carlotta C.

    The General Accounting Office examined six employment training programs that had previously been identified as being successful in helping economically disadvantaged adults. The primary objective of the study was to determine whether the programs shared any common practices/strategies that could be credited for the programs' high performance…

  19. Employer Training of Work-Bound Youth: An Historical Review and New Results. Background Paper No. 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsalam, Nabeel; Stacey, Nevzer

    A study of the training opportunities of high school graduates (about 825,000 in 1988) who work immediately after leaving school identified which members of that group get trained, by whom, and with what earnings consequences, based on the experiences of a sample of graduates from their graduation in 1972 until 1986. The following are among the…

  20. Results of the 1989-90 NETWORK Survey of Two-Year College Involvement in Employment, Training, and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NETWORK: America's Two-Year Coll. Employment, Training, and Literacy Consortium, Cleveland, OH.

    In 1989-90, a survey was conducted of two-year colleges nationwide to determine their level of involvement in the delivery of employment, training, and literacy services to public sector agencies and business and industry. The study focused particularly on those services funded under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), the Job Opportunities…

  1. Multimedia and Training: Practice and Skills of European Producers, Results of the European Project "START-UP" (Part 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Christine Gardiol; Boder, Andre

    1992-01-01

    This second part of a report on European multimedia producers focuses on evaluation criteria and methodologies and the European market for educational and training multimedia materials, including production costs, subcontracting, the production hierarchy, the rationalization of production, and trends in the educational and training multimedia…

  2. Personnel for Parent Development Program. Report Number One: Conceptual Framework and Preliminary Results of Pilot Phase Training Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvy, Kerby T.; Rubin, Howard Stanley

    In the child mental health and child abuse fields, parent training has become a highly valued prevention and treatment service. A conceptual framework and a detailed description of three theoretically-based parent training approaches (Client-Centered, Adlerian, and Social Learning) are presented as background for this report on a two-year pilot…

  3. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAIL FIXED GUIDEWAY SYSTEMS; STATE SAFETY OVERSIGHT... every three (3) years, beginning with the initiation of rail transit agency passenger operations, the oversight agency must conduct an on-site review of the rail transit agency's implementation of its...

  4. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAIL FIXED GUIDEWAY SYSTEMS; STATE SAFETY OVERSIGHT... every three (3) years, beginning with the initiation of rail transit agency passenger operations, the oversight agency must conduct an on-site review of the rail transit agency's implementation of its...

  5. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAIL FIXED GUIDEWAY SYSTEMS; STATE SAFETY OVERSIGHT... every three (3) years, beginning with the initiation of rail transit agency passenger operations, the oversight agency must conduct an on-site review of the rail transit agency's implementation of its...

  6. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAIL FIXED GUIDEWAY SYSTEMS; STATE SAFETY OVERSIGHT... every three (3) years, beginning with the initiation of rail transit agency passenger operations, the oversight agency must conduct an on-site review of the rail transit agency's implementation of its...

  7. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAIL FIXED GUIDEWAY SYSTEMS; STATE SAFETY OVERSIGHT... every three (3) years, beginning with the initiation of rail transit agency passenger operations, the oversight agency must conduct an on-site review of the rail transit agency's implementation of its...

  8. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent...

  9. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent...

  10. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent...

  11. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent...

  12. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent...

  13. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the...

  14. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the...

  15. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... guidance of the same title was announced in the Federal Register on February 27, 2012 (77 FR 11553), and... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and...

  16. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' The... draft guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress... good manufacturing practices (CGMP) for PET drugs. The procedures were finalized and an...

  17. 42 CFR 54a.9 - Oversight of the Charitable Choice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight of the Charitable Choice requirements... GRANTS CHARITABLE CHOICE REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS...., FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT SERVICES § 54a.9 Oversight of the Charitable...

  18. 17 CFR 202.190 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public Company Accounting... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION INFORMAL AND OTHER PROCEDURES Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (Regulation P) § 202.190 Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process. (a) Purpose....

  19. Creating a Learning Organization in Law Enforcement: Maturity Levels for Police Oversight Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filstad, Cathrine; Gottschalk, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a stage model for maturity levels for police oversight agencies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review covering police oversight organizations and stages of growth models. Findings: As a conceptual paper, the main findings are related to the appropriateness of…

  20. 42 CFR 414.39 - Special rules for payment of care plan oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... limited to a single medical condition rather than multi-disciplinary coordination of care; and (iii) The... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for payment of care plan oversight... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.39 Special rules for payment of care plan oversight. (a)...

  1. Psychotropic Medication Management for Youth in State Care: Consent, Oversight, and Policy Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Michael W.; Davidson, Christine V.; Ortega-Piron, D. Jean; Bass, Arin; Gutierrez, Alice; Hall, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The use of psychotropic medications in youth with emotional disturbances in state custody is increasing and presents unique challenges concerning consent and oversight. We examine various means that state child welfare agencies use to provide consent for and oversight of psychotropic medications for children in state custody and describe benefits…

  2. 17 CFR 202.190 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Public Company Accounting... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION INFORMAL AND OTHER PROCEDURES Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (Regulation P) § 202.190 Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process. (a) Purpose....

  3. 17 CFR 202.190 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public Company Accounting... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION INFORMAL AND OTHER PROCEDURES Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (Regulation P) § 202.190 Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process. (a) Purpose....

  4. 42 CFR 493.573 - Continuing Federal oversight of private nonprofit accreditation organizations and approved State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Continuing Federal oversight of private nonprofit accreditation organizations and approved State licensure programs. 493.573 Section 493.573 Public Health CENTERS... Exemption Under an Approved State Laboratory Program § 493.573 Continuing Federal oversight of...

  5. 42 CFR 493.573 - Continuing Federal oversight of private nonprofit accreditation organizations and approved State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Continuing Federal oversight of private nonprofit accreditation organizations and approved State licensure programs. 493.573 Section 493.573 Public Health CENTERS... Exemption Under an Approved State Laboratory Program § 493.573 Continuing Federal oversight of...

  6. Trends in United States Biological Materials Oversight and Institutional Biosafety Committees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Biological materials oversight in life sciences research in the United States is a challenging endeavor for institutions and the scientific, regulatory compliance, and federal communities. In order to assess biological materials oversight at Institutional Biosafety Committees (IBCs) registered with the United States National Institutes of Health,…

  7. 78 FR 35056 - Effectiveness of the Reactor Oversight Process Baseline Inspection Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... COMMISSION Effectiveness of the Reactor Oversight Process Baseline Inspection Program AGENCY: Nuclear... Commission (NRC) plans to hold a public meeting to discuss the effectiveness of the reactor oversight process... these processes and is in the process of reviewing the baseline inspection program and the...

  8. 78 FR 11915 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ..., Release No. 68921/February 13, 2013] Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2013 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (``PCAOB'') to...

  9. 75 FR 3509 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ...); 74 FR 57357 (November 5, 2009). II. Description Section 103 of the Act directs the Board, among other... COMMISSION Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No..., 2009, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB'') filed with...

  10. Barriers to Effective Deliberation in Clinical Research Oversight.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Danielle M

    2016-09-01

    Ethical oversight of clinical research is one of the primary means of ensuring that human subjects are protected from the natural bias of researchers and research institutions in favor of experimentation. At a minimum, effective oversight should ensure that risks are minimized and reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits, protect vulnerable subjects from potential coercion or undue influence, ensure full and informed consent, and promote the equitable distribution of the risks and benefits of research. Because these assessments often involve value judgments for which there are no agreed-upon objective standards, we rely on deliberative procedures thought to have the greatest likelihood of producing the right or best outcomes. Concerns about the potential for improperly functioning IRBs to waste scarce human and institutional resources and impede biomedical progress have motivated a surge in empirical research assessing their procedures and outcomes. Yet within this literature, there has been minimal attention paid to the social scientific evidence regarding how individuals and deliberating groups make decisions, nor how those data might inform IRB practice. This essay seeks to fill that gap, locating recent empirical data on IRB composition and process within the context of data regarding what I call "deliberative pathologies," or instances when deliberation fails to live up to one or more aspect of the deliberative ideal because of systematic biases in the ways participants interact. The paper goes on to make evidence-based recommendations to reduce the vulnerability of IRB deliberations to the kinds of pathologies discussed and indicate directions for future research.

  11. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    PubMed

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained.

  12. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    PubMed

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. PMID:26481207

  13. The intelligence oversight inspection of the Special Technologies Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-13

    Executive Order (EO) 12863, {open_quotes}President`s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board,{close_quotes} dated September 13, 1993, requires Inspectors General of the Intelligence Community to submit reports to the Intelligence Oversight Board, on at least a quarterly basis, on intelligence activities that the Inspectors General have reason to believe may have been unlawful or contrary to Executive order or Presidential directive. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) office of Inspector General, responsibility for oversight of DOE`s intelligence activities, pursuant to EO 12863, has been assigned to the Deputy Inspector General for Inspections. To carry out this responsibility, the Office of Inspections performs reviews to determine if intelligence activities within DOE are in compliance with restrictions set forth in selected intelligence-related laws, Executive orders, and DOE orders, guidelines or implementing procedures. Accordingly, the purpose of this inspection was to determine if intelligence activities conducted by the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) were in compliance with such restrictions. Our primary objectives were to: (1) evaluate STL intelligence personnel`s knowledge of these restrictions, and (2) review procedures implemented by STL to identify, investigate, and report questionable intelligence activities and/or abuses to higher officials.

  14. Barriers to Effective Deliberation in Clinical Research Oversight.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Danielle M

    2016-09-01

    Ethical oversight of clinical research is one of the primary means of ensuring that human subjects are protected from the natural bias of researchers and research institutions in favor of experimentation. At a minimum, effective oversight should ensure that risks are minimized and reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits, protect vulnerable subjects from potential coercion or undue influence, ensure full and informed consent, and promote the equitable distribution of the risks and benefits of research. Because these assessments often involve value judgments for which there are no agreed-upon objective standards, we rely on deliberative procedures thought to have the greatest likelihood of producing the right or best outcomes. Concerns about the potential for improperly functioning IRBs to waste scarce human and institutional resources and impede biomedical progress have motivated a surge in empirical research assessing their procedures and outcomes. Yet within this literature, there has been minimal attention paid to the social scientific evidence regarding how individuals and deliberating groups make decisions, nor how those data might inform IRB practice. This essay seeks to fill that gap, locating recent empirical data on IRB composition and process within the context of data regarding what I call "deliberative pathologies," or instances when deliberation fails to live up to one or more aspect of the deliberative ideal because of systematic biases in the ways participants interact. The paper goes on to make evidence-based recommendations to reduce the vulnerability of IRB deliberations to the kinds of pathologies discussed and indicate directions for future research. PMID:26613717

  15. Establishing procedures for institutional oversight of stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Zettler, Patricia; Wolf, Leslie E; Lo, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs), which are at the forefront of stem cell research, need to establish institutional stem cell research oversight committees (SCROs) to comply with 2005 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommendations and to establish public trust in this sensitive research. Institutional review boards (IRBs) typically lack the expertise and time to adequately review the specific ethical issues raised by stem cell research. To assure careful, timely, and coordinated review of the science and ethics of stem cell protocols, AHCs need to address many practical procedural issues, such as SCRO membership, quorum, conflicts of interest, and procedures for protocol review. The SCRO committee at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), established in 2003, has developed detailed policies and procedures on these issues. The UCSF SCRO has broad scientific expertise and uses ad hoc reviewers to strengthen the review process. Studies receiving full SCRO review have three lead reviewers: a scientist, a reviewer with ethics expertise, and a public representative. Studies introducing human stem cells into nonhuman blastocysts receive full review, even if the stem cells are anonymized. Some protocols are eligible for expedited review. The SCRO neither replaces nor duplicates review by the IRB and institutional animal care and use committees. Other AHCs can draw on the UCSF experience when developing their own policies and procedures for stem cell research oversight.

  16. [The importance of simulation in team training on obstetric emergencies: results of the first phase of the national plan for continuous medical training].

    PubMed

    Maio Matos, Francisco; Sousa Gomes, Andrea; Costa, Fernando Jorge; Santos Silva, Isabel; Carvalhas, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Obstetric emergencies are unexpected and random. The traditional model for medical training of these acute events has included lectures combined with sporadic clinical experiences, but this educational method has inherent limitations. Given the variety of manual skills that must be learned and high-risk environment, Obstetrics is uniquely suited for simulation. New technological educational tools provide an opportunity to learn and master technical skills needed in emergent situations as well as the opportunity to rehearse and learn from mistakes without risks to patients. The goals of this study are to assess which are the factors that trainees associate to human fallibility before and after clinical simulation based training; to compare the confidence level to solve emergent obstetric situations between interns and experts with up to 5 years of experience before and after training, and to determine the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool on emergent events. 31 physicians participated at this course sessions. After the course, we verified changes in the factores that trainees associate to human fallibility, an increase in confidence level to solve emergent obstetric and an increase in the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool.

  17. Competency-Based Training and Worker Turnover in Community Supports for People With IDD: Results From a Group Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Matthew; Nord, Derek; Hewitt, Amy

    2015-06-01

    Turnover among direct support professionals (DSPs) in community support settings for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has been regarded as a challenge since tracking of this workforce began in the 1980s. This study utilized a group randomized controlled design to test the effects of a competency-based training intervention for DSPs on site-level turnover rates over a one year period. Results suggested that, compared with the control group, sites receiving the training intervention experienced a significant decrease in annual turnover, when multiple factors were controlled. Implications, including the importance of considering quality training as a long term organizational investment and intervention to reduce turnover, are discussed.

  18. 17 CFR 170.12 - Delegation of authority to Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight. 170.12 Section 170.12 Commodity and... Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight. The Commission hereby delegates, until the Commission orders otherwise, to the Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight...

  19. Intertwining Psychiatry Residency Training and Ethics in the College Setting.

    PubMed

    Sondheimer, Adrian

    2015-10-01

    An ethical responsibility exists, currently unaddressed, for mandated psychiatry residency training with college student populations. Such training brings numerous potential benefits, including exposure to specific disorders and administrative structures. As well, individual cases pose ethical dilemmas unique to this developmental stage, which segues seamlessly from that of adolescence. Relevant case illustrations are employed. Likewise, psychiatric education oversight bodies are urged to fulfill their ethical obligations to provide pertinent training.

  20. Mindfulness training modifies cognitive, affective, and physiological mechanisms implicated in alcohol dependence: results of a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Gaylord, Susan A; Boettiger, Charlotte A; Howard, Matthew O

    2010-06-01

    Mindfulness training may disrupt the risk chain of stress-precipitated alcohol relapse. In 2008, 53 alcohol-dependent adults (mean age = 40.3) recruited from a therapeutic community located in the urban southeastern U.S. were randomized to mindfulness training or a support group. Most participants were male (79.2%), African American (60.4%), and earned less than $20,000 annually (52.8%). Self-report measures, psychophysiological cue-reactivity, and alcohol attentional bias were analyzed via repeated measures ANOVA. Thirty-seven participants completed the interventions. Mindfulness training significantly reduced stress and thought suppression, increased physiological recovery from alcohol cues, and modulated alcohol attentional bias. Hence, mindfulness training appears to target key mechanisms implicated in alcohol dependence, and therefore may hold promise as an alternative treatment for stress-precipitated relapse among vulnerable members of society.

  1. Training and Certification Program for Certified Energy Auditors (CEA) and Certified Building Commissioning Professionals (CBCP)

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Bill

    2012-08-24

    The Association of Energy Engineers (AEE) has offered energy efficiency training and certification programs for over 30 years. During that time AEE has certified more than 22,000 professionals. All of our certification programs are the result of extensive industry research and program development and oversight by certification boards. For this project award, AEE proposed to work with the Department of Energy to utilize and extend existing industry recognized Certified Energy Auditor (CEA) and Certified Building Commissioning Professional (CBCP) programs under this Training Program Development Announcement. These expanded training programs will have significant impact in training professionals for building commissioning and energy auditing to achieve the goal of bringing existing buildings up to their optimal energy performance potential and ensuring that new buildings maintain their expected optimal level of performance. The goals and objectives of the training development project were achieved with the development of new training programs that are now being offered as self-sustaining commercial training and certification programs. These new programs are training and certifying professionals who are accomplishing the goal of increasing building energy performance in both existing and new buildings.

  2. Playing Super Mario induces structural brain plasticity: gray matter changes resulting from training with a commercial video game.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Gleich, T; Lorenz, R C; Lindenberger, U; Gallinat, J

    2014-02-01

    Video gaming is a highly pervasive activity, providing a multitude of complex cognitive and motor demands. Gaming can be seen as an intense training of several skills. Associated cerebral structural plasticity induced has not been investigated so far. Comparing a control with a video gaming training group that was trained for 2 months for at least 30 min per day with a platformer game, we found significant gray matter (GM) increase in right hippocampal formation (HC), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and bilateral cerebellum in the training group. The HC increase correlated with changes from egocentric to allocentric navigation strategy. GM increases in HC and DLPFC correlated with participants' desire for video gaming, evidence suggesting a predictive role of desire in volume change. Video game training augments GM in brain areas crucial for spatial navigation, strategic planning, working memory and motor performance going along with evidence for behavioral changes of navigation strategy. The presented video game training could therefore be used to counteract known risk factors for mental disease such as smaller hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume in, for example, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Playing Super Mario induces structural brain plasticity: gray matter changes resulting from training with a commercial video game.

    PubMed

    Kühn, S; Gleich, T; Lorenz, R C; Lindenberger, U; Gallinat, J

    2014-02-01

    Video gaming is a highly pervasive activity, providing a multitude of complex cognitive and motor demands. Gaming can be seen as an intense training of several skills. Associated cerebral structural plasticity induced has not been investigated so far. Comparing a control with a video gaming training group that was trained for 2 months for at least 30 min per day with a platformer game, we found significant gray matter (GM) increase in right hippocampal formation (HC), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and bilateral cerebellum in the training group. The HC increase correlated with changes from egocentric to allocentric navigation strategy. GM increases in HC and DLPFC correlated with participants' desire for video gaming, evidence suggesting a predictive role of desire in volume change. Video game training augments GM in brain areas crucial for spatial navigation, strategic planning, working memory and motor performance going along with evidence for behavioral changes of navigation strategy. The presented video game training could therefore be used to counteract known risk factors for mental disease such as smaller hippocampus and prefrontal cortex volume in, for example, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24166407

  4. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  5. The Value of the Internship for Radiation Oncology Training: Results of a Survey of Current and Recent Trainees

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Stephen R. Romero, Michelle J. M.A.; Geannette, Christian M.D.; Patel, Amish

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Although a 12-month clinical internship is the traditional precursor to a radiation oncology residency, the continuance of this mandated training sequence has been questioned. This study was performed to evaluate the perceptions of current radiation oncology residents with respect to the value of their internship experience. Methods and Materials: A survey was sent to all US radiation oncology residents. Each was queried about whether they considered the internship to be a necessary prerequisite for a career as a radiation oncologist and as a physician. Preferences were listed on a Likert scale (1 = not at all necessary to 5 = absolutely necessary). Results: Seventy-one percent considered the internship year mostly (Likert Scale 4) or absolutely necessary (Likert Scale 5) for their development as a radiation oncologist, whereas 19.1% answered hardly or not at all (Likert Scale 2 and 1, respectively). With respect to their collective considerations about the impact of the internship year on their development as a physician, 89% had a positive response, 5.8% had a negative response, and 4.7% had no opinion. Although both deemed the preliminary year favorably, affirmative answers were more frequent among erstwhile internal medicine interns than former transitional program interns. Conclusions: A majority of radiation oncology residents positively acknowledged their internship for their development as a specialist and an even greater majority valued it for their development as a physician. This affirmative opinion was registered more frequently by those completing an internal medicine internship compared with a transitional internship.

  6. Using Video Feedback as a Tool in Training Parent Coaches: Promising Results from a Single-Subject Design

    PubMed Central

    Meade, EB; Dozier, Mary; Bernard, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC) parenting program focuses on three intervention targets: increasing parental nurturance, increasing parental synchrony, and decreasing parental frightening behavior. Parent coaches are expected to comment “in the moment” when behaviors relevant to these three targets are observed in sessions. Making in the moment comments is a challenging aspect of intervention, and parent coaches have struggled with their fidelity to this critical intervention component. Thus, we developed a system for coding the frequency and quality of comments from video-recorded session clips on a statement-by-statement level. To help parent coaches refine and maintain their skills in making such comments, they are taught to code segments of their own video-recorded sessions, with the expectation that gains would be seen in comments after learning to code. In this paper, we describe the fidelity coding system and present initial results from a yearlong, single-subject design examining the effects of video feedback coding for a parent coach who was learning the intervention. We observed an increase in frequency of in the moment comments during the period of video feedback coding, consistent with a training effect. PMID:24972104

  7. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  8. Social and emotional training in Swedish classrooms for the promotion of mental health: results from an effectiveness study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Birgitta; Sandell, Rolf; Bremberg, Sven

    2008-06-01

    Mental ill-health is a major problem worldwide. It includes depression, aggressive behavior, feeling down and alcohol and drug abuse. Since all children go to school, the school is an obvious arena for health interventions. A set of educational techniques named Social and Emotional Learning, based on the use by teachers of cognitive and behavioral methods, which teaches students self-control, social competence, empathy, motivation and self-awareness, has shown promising results in the USA. This paper reports on the application of similar techniques in Sweden (the Social and Emotional Training [SET] program). The study has a quasi-experimental longitudinal design, with two intervention and two control schools. A wide range of instruments, both Swedish and international, are employed. In this paper, results from the school years 1999-2000 (baseline) through to 2001-2002 are reported. Both the intervention and the data collection were performed by ordinary school staff in a routine school setting. Independent bi-annual ratings of teachers' performance were moderate to high, and teachers' perceptions of the program were generally, although by no means universally, high. However, their performance was poorer with regard to the collection of data. In terms of promotion, findings with regard to the impact of the program on mental health are generally favorable-in particular through the promotion of aspects of self-image, including well-being and the hindering of aggressiveness, bullying, attention-seeking and alcohol use. There was, however, no differential effect on social skills. It seems that SET has the potential to operate effectively as a health-promoting intervention during the school period, although its main impact may rather be to act as a brake on the deterioration in some aspects of mental health that is common during adolescence. Positively significant relationships were found on some but not all of the instrument scales, and effect sizes were medium.

  9. Making strides towards better mental health care in Peru: Results from a primary care mental health training

    PubMed Central

    Borba, C. P.C.; Gelaye, B.; Zayas, L.; Ulloa, M.; Lavelle, J.; Mollica, R.F.; Henderson, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    Our program attempted to improve attitudes and confidence of Peruvian primary care physicians (PCPs) providing mental health care. The training program underwent an evaluation to determine impact of sustained confidence in performing medical and psychiatric procedures, and application of learned skills. Fifty-two Peruvian primary care practitioners were trained at the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT) over a two-week period. There was significant improvement in PCPs’ confidence levels of performing psychiatric procedures (counseling, prescribing medications, psychiatric diagnosis, assessing the risk for violence, and treating trauma victims) when comparing baseline and post-two-week to one year follow-up. When comparing post-two-week and one-year follow-up quantitative measures, confidences levels went slightly down. This may be an implication that the frequency of trainings and supervisions are needed more frequently. In contrast, qualitative responses from the one-year follow-up revealed increase in victims of violence clinical care, advocacy, awareness, education, training, policy changes, accessibility of care, and sustainment of diagnostic tools. This study supports the feasibility of training PCP's in a culturally effective manner with sustainability over time. PMID:27054141

  10. MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree) based risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, G.J.

    1990-02-01

    Risk Management is the optimization of safety programs. This requires a formal systems approach to hazards identification, risk quantification, and resource allocation/risk acceptance as opposed to case-by-case decisions. The Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) has gained wide acceptance as a comprehensive formal systems approach covering all aspects of risk management. It (MORT) is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing safety system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1500 specific elements of an ideal ''universal'' management program for optimizing occupational safety.

  11. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs. 

  12. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  PMID:21477056

  13. The measurement of enhancement in mathematical abilities as a result of joint cognitive trainings in numerical and visual- spatial skills: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus, M.; Mascia, M. L.; Fastame, M. C.; Melis, V.; Pilloni, M. C.; Penna, M. P.

    2015-02-01

    A body of literature shows the significant role of visual-spatial skills played in the improvement of mathematical skills in the primary school. The main goal of the current study was to investigate the impact of a combined visuo-spatial and mathematical training on the improvement of mathematical skills in 146 second graders of several schools located in Italy. Participants were presented single pencil-and-paper visuo-spatial or mathematical trainings, computerised version of the above mentioned treatments, as well as a combined version of computer-assisted and pencil-and-paper visuo-spatial and mathematical trainings, respectively. Experimental groups were presented with training for 3 months, once a week. All children were treated collectively both in computer-assisted or pencil-and-paper modalities. At pre and post-test all our participants were presented with a battery of objective tests assessing numerical and visuo-spatial abilities. Our results suggest the positive effect of different types of training for the empowerment of visuo-spatial and numerical abilities. Specifically, the combination of computerised and pencil-and-paper versions of visuo-spatial and mathematical trainings are more effective than the single execution of the software or of the pencil-and-paper treatment.

  14. When do tissues and cells become products? Regulatory oversight of emerging biological therapies.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Although therapeutics derived from biological sources have been subjected to regulatory oversight for some time, the products used in transplantation procedures have historically been exempt from this oversight. These products have been viewed as being part of medical practice rather than as the result of mainstream pharmaceutical manufacture. Furthermore, their unique source makes them difficult to assess in traditional regulatory systems based on the tenets of pharmaceutical quality control. With the increasing use of transplantation therapies to both replace dysfunctional organs and to influence genetic and metabolic processes, public health concerns on these therapies have increased. In addition, it is recognized that therapeutic claims for some of these interventions need to be properly assessed. These considerations have led the established regulatory agencies of the developed world to develop new regulatory paradigms for the products of transplantation practice. While a number of concerns have driven these developments, the minimization of infectious disease risk remains the paramount driver for introducing these regulatory systems. More than the regulation of medicines and medical devices manufactured in traditional pharmaceutical modes, the regulation of cell and tissue products is intimately linked to areas of public health policy and funding. This places regulators in a challenging position as they attempt to reconcile their roles as independent assessors with the needs of the overall public health framework. This is particularly difficult when considering measures which may affect access to life saving therapies. Regulators have recognized the need to assess these therapies through systems which incorporate consideration of risk-benefit ratios and include mechanisms for transparent and accountable release of products when full compliance to traditional concepts of manufacturing practice is not possible.

  15. Adequacy of the regulatory oversight of the Trans-Alaska pipeline and terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Exxon Valdez spill abruptly brought to the nation's attention the risks of transporting crude oil. While oil tanker transportation received many of the headlines, the safety of pipelines carrying oil and the terminals that store it have also been called into question. GAO testified on the adequacy of regulatory oversight of the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline System and the terminal at Valdez, Alaska. This paper reports increased and coordinated regulatory oversight as a major component of an effective operational and emergency response strategy for the pipeline. The current lack of comprehensive and systematic oversight is of particular concern because of recent revelations of significant corrosion problems in the pipeline.

  16. SELF CONCEPT CHANGES AMONG ALCOHOLIC PATIENTS IN MADISON (INDIANA) STATE HOSPITAL RESULTING FROM PARTICIPATION TRAINING IN GROUP DISCUSSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAY, EARL R.

    TO INVESTIGATE THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS ON THE SELF CONCEPT OF PARTICIPATION TRAINING IN GROUP DISCUSSION, 18 INSTITUTIONALIZED MALE ALCOHOLICS (AVERAGE AGE 42.5 YEARS, SCHOOL GRADE ACHIEVEMENT 11.2 YEARS) UNDERWENT THREE HOUR SESSIONS OF GROUP DISCUSSION DURING 12 DAYS IN FEBRUARY 1963, FOLLOWING A CONTROL PERIOD OF 11.8 DAYS. THE BULTER-HAIGH…

  17. Mindfulness Training and Reductions in Teacher Stress and Burnout: Results from Two Randomized, Waitlist-Control Field Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeser, Robert W.; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Jha, Amishi; Cullen, Margaret; Wallace, Linda; Wilensky, Rona; Oberle, Eva; Thomson, Kimberly; Taylor, Cynthia; Harrison, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The effects of randomization to mindfulness training (MT) or to a waitlist-control condition on psychological and physiological indicators of teachers' occupational stress and burnout were examined in 2 field trials. The sample included 113 elementary and secondary school teachers (89% female) from Canada and the United States. Measures were…

  18. Dynamics of Adult Participation in Part-Time Education and Training: Results from the British Household Panel Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macleod, Flora; Lambe, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the dynamics of adult participation in part-time education and training throughout the 90s and into the 2000s using data from 14 waves (1992-2005) of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS). We study the volume (stocks) of participation and non-participation and the gross flows between states. This analysis provides a…

  19. Workforce Results Matter: "The Critical Role of Employment Outcome Data in Improving Transparency of Postsecondary Education and Training"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Tim; Ridley, Neil

    2014-01-01

    At a time of sustained unemployment and sluggish job growth, students and policymakers are increasingly asking tough questions about postsecondary education and training outcomes. Do graduates find jobs? What are they paid? What will they earn in the future? Despite growing national interest in this information, good answers are not widely…

  20. Medication and Parent Training in Children with Pervasive Developmental Disorders and Serious Behavior Problems: Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; McDougle, Christopher J.; Scahill, Lawrence; Handen, Benjamin; Arnold, L. Eugene; Johnson, Cynthia; Stigler, Kimberly A.; Bearss, Karen; Butter, Eric; Swiezy, Naomi B.; Sukhodolsky, Denis D.; Ramadan, Yaser; Pozdol, Stacie L.; Nikolov, Roumen; Lecavalier, Luc; Kohn, Arlene E.; Koenig, Kathleen; Hollway, Jill A.; Korzekwa, Patricia; Gavaletz, Allison; Mulick, James A.; Hall, Kristy L.; Dziura, James; Ritz, Louise; Trollinger, Stacie; Yu, Sunkyung; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wagner, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Many children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) have serious, functionally impairing behavioral problems. We tested whether combined treatment (COMB) with risperidone and parent training (PT) in behavior management is superior to medication alone (MED) in improving severe behavioral problems in children with PDDs. Method:…

  1. Multimedia and Training: Practice and Skills of European Producers, (Part 1) Results of the European Project "START-UP."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Christine Gardiol; Boder, Andre

    1992-01-01

    Describes the START-UP project developed by the European Community to identify educational and training multimedia producers in European countries and to define the methodologies that these producers use in developing their products. Highlights include production stages, multimedia skills, teamwork, decision making, learning processes, learner…

  2. Effectiveness of Strategy Training for Struggling English Language Students: Profiles and Results of a Five-year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Josephine A.; Gomez, Julio Cesar; Quintero, Gloria; Nausa, Ricardo; Rey, Luz Libia

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a group of approximately 1,100 English as a foreign language students who attended a tutoring program dedicated to training learners in study skills and language learning strategies. The study covers a five-year period of time during which the tutoring program remained consistent in its focus and organization. Students…

  3. Access and Equity in Vocational Education and Training: Results from Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. ACER Research Monograph No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Stephen; Long, Michael; Malley, Jeff

    A study examined access and equity in vocational education and training (VET) in Australia for youth from different social and educational backgrounds using data from a program of national longitudinal surveys. Secondary VET participation was low; youth from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were more likely to enroll; and students were more likely…

  4. Human Resource Development and Training Strategies: The Experience and Results of the Eurotecnet Programme. Four Priority Fields of Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education, Training, and Youth.

    The EUROTECNET program has been refocused to concentrate more on continuing vocational education as the area of greatest need across the European Community. Four priority fields or domains of innovative activity have been defined for the final 2 years of EUROTECNET. Priority domain 1 is innovative training needs analysis with a special focus on…

  5. Conflicting results of robot-assisted versus usual gait training during postacute rehabilitation of stroke patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Taveggia, Giovanni; Borboni, Alberto; Mulé, Chiara; Villafañe, Jorge H; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Robot gait training has the potential to increase the effectiveness of walking therapy. Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. We evaluated the effectiveness of a robot training compared with a usual gait training physiotherapy during a standardized rehabilitation protocol in inpatient participants with poststroke hemiparesis. This was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in a postacute physical and rehabilitation medicine hospital. Twenty-eight patients, 39.3% women (72±6 years), with hemiparesis (<6 months after stroke) receiving a conventional treatment according to the Bobath approach were assigned randomly to an experimental or a control intervention of robot gait training to improve walking (five sessions a week for 5 weeks). Outcome measures included the 6-min walk test, the 10 m walk test, Functional Independence Measure, SF-36 physical functioning and the Tinetti scale. Outcomes were collected at baseline, immediately following the intervention period and 3 months following the end of the intervention. The experimental group showed a significant increase in functional independence and gait speed (10 m walk test) at the end of the treatment and follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. The control group showed a significant increase in the gait endurance (6-min walk test) at the follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. Both treatments were effective in the improvement of gait performances, although the statistical analysis of functional independence showed a significant improvement in the experimental group, indicating possible advantages during generic activities of daily living compared with overground treatment.

  6. Conflicting results of robot-assisted versus usual gait training during postacute rehabilitation of stroke patients: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Taveggia, Giovanni; Borboni, Alberto; Mulé, Chiara; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Robot gait training has the potential to increase the effectiveness of walking therapy. Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. We evaluated the effectiveness of a robot training compared with a usual gait training physiotherapy during a standardized rehabilitation protocol in inpatient participants with poststroke hemiparesis. This was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in a postacute physical and rehabilitation medicine hospital. Twenty-eight patients, 39.3% women (72±6 years), with hemiparesis (<6 months after stroke) receiving a conventional treatment according to the Bobath approach were assigned randomly to an experimental or a control intervention of robot gait training to improve walking (five sessions a week for 5 weeks). Outcome measures included the 6-min walk test, the 10 m walk test, Functional Independence Measure, SF-36 physical functioning and the Tinetti scale. Outcomes were collected at baseline, immediately following the intervention period and 3 months following the end of the intervention. The experimental group showed a significant increase in functional independence and gait speed (10 m walk test) at the end of the treatment and follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. The control group showed a significant increase in the gait endurance (6-min walk test) at the follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. Both treatments were effective in the improvement of gait performances, although the statistical analysis of functional independence showed a significant improvement in the experimental group, indicating possible advantages during generic activities of daily living compared with overground treatment. PMID:26512928

  7. Conflicting results of robot-assisted versus usual gait training during postacute rehabilitation of stroke patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Taveggia, Giovanni; Borboni, Alberto; Mulé, Chiara; Villafañe, Jorge H; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Robot gait training has the potential to increase the effectiveness of walking therapy. Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. We evaluated the effectiveness of a robot training compared with a usual gait training physiotherapy during a standardized rehabilitation protocol in inpatient participants with poststroke hemiparesis. This was a randomized double-blind clinical trial in a postacute physical and rehabilitation medicine hospital. Twenty-eight patients, 39.3% women (72±6 years), with hemiparesis (<6 months after stroke) receiving a conventional treatment according to the Bobath approach were assigned randomly to an experimental or a control intervention of robot gait training to improve walking (five sessions a week for 5 weeks). Outcome measures included the 6-min walk test, the 10 m walk test, Functional Independence Measure, SF-36 physical functioning and the Tinetti scale. Outcomes were collected at baseline, immediately following the intervention period and 3 months following the end of the intervention. The experimental group showed a significant increase in functional independence and gait speed (10 m walk test) at the end of the treatment and follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. The control group showed a significant increase in the gait endurance (6-min walk test) at the follow-up, higher than the minimal detectable change. Both treatments were effective in the improvement of gait performances, although the statistical analysis of functional independence showed a significant improvement in the experimental group, indicating possible advantages during generic activities of daily living compared with overground treatment. PMID:26512928

  8. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  9. 45 CFR 155.280 - Oversight and monitoring of privacy and security requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS EXCHANGE ESTABLISHMENT STANDARDS AND OTHER RELATED STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT General Functions of an Exchange § 155.280 Oversight and monitoring of privacy...

  10. Ethics Oversight Mechanisms for Surgical Innovation: A Systematic and Comparative Review of Arguments.

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Lila; Bell, Emily; Racine, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Surgical innovation typically falls under the purview of neither conventional clinical ethics nor research ethics. Due to a lack of oversight for surgical innovation-combined with a potential for significant risk-a wide range of arguments has been advanced in the literature to support or undermine various oversight mechanisms. To scrutinize the argumentation surrounding oversight options, we conducted a systematic review of published arguments. We found that the arguments are typically grounded in common sense and speculation instead of evidence. Presently, the justification or superiority for any single oversight mechanism for surgical innovation cannot be established convincingly. We suggest ways to improve the argument-based literature and discuss the value of systematic reviews of arguments and reasons.

  11. 77 FR 76076 - Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration, Information... committee meeting of the State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee. To discuss...

  12. CCRC statutes: the oversight of long-term care service delivery.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Wilson, C C; Stearns, L R; Branch, L G

    1990-06-01

    A 1987 national survey revealed 27 states with continuing care or life care legislation. State oversight staff in 22 states responded to questions concerning characteristics of the regulated continuing care retirement community (CCRC) industry, the regulation of health and human service delivery within CCRCs, and interdepartmental working relationships between oversight agencies and other state units. Discussion focuses on the regulation of long-term care service provision in the CCRC industry.

  13. Reduction of central venous catheter associated blood stream infections following implementation of a resident oversight and credentialing policy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study assesses the impact that a resident oversight and credentialing policy for central venous catheter (CVC) placement had on institution-wide central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). We therefore investigated the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 line days during the 12 months before and after implementation of the policy. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data at an academic medical center with four adult ICUs and a pediatric ICU. All patients undergoing non-tunneled CVC placement were included in the study. Data was collected on CLABSI, line days, and serious adverse events in the year prior to and following policy implementation on 9/01/08. Results A total of 813 supervised central lines were self-reported by residents in four departments. Statistical analysis was performed using paired Wilcoxon signed rank tests. There were reductions in median CLABSI rate (3.52 vs. 2.26; p = 0.015), number of CLBSI per month (16.0 to 10.0; p = 0.012), and line days (4495 vs. 4193; p = 0.019). No serious adverse events reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. Conclusions Implementation of a new CVC resident oversight and credentialing policy has been significantly associated with an institution-wide reduction in the rate of CLABSI per 1,000 central line days and total central line days. No serious adverse events were reported. Similar resident oversight policies may benefit other teaching institutions, and support concurrent organizational efforts to reduce hospital acquired infections. PMID:21639916

  14. Fostering Distance Training Programme (DTP) Students' Access to Semester Examination Results via SMS at University of Rwanda-College of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nizeyimana, Gerard; Yonah, Zaipuna O.; Nduwingoma, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a situation analysis and implementation of Distance Training Programme (DTP) Semester Examination Results Access (SERA) through Short Message Service (SMS) available anytime and anywhere. "Texting" or SMS mobile phone messaging is rapidly increasing communication in business and community service. The prompting…

  15. Regulation and oversight of independent health facilities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Pries, Charlene R; Vanin, Sharon; Cartagena, Rosario G

    2014-02-01

    Independent health facilities ("IHFs") are an important part of Canada's health care system existing at the interface of public and private care. They offer benefits to individual patients and the public at large, such as improved access to care, reduced wait times, improved choice in the delivery of care, and more efficient use of health care resources. They can also provide physicians greater autonomy, control of resources, and opportunity for profit compared to other practice settings, particularly because IHFs can deliver services outside of publicly-funded health care plans. IHFs also present challenges, particularly around quality of care and patient safety, and the potential to breach the principles of "Medicare" under the Canada Health Act. Various measures are in place to address these challenges, while still enabling the benefits IHFs can offer. IHFs are primarily regulated and overseen at the provincial level through legislation, regulations and provincial medical regulatory College by-laws. Health Canada is responsible for administering the overarching framework for "Medicare". Oversight and regulatory provisions vary across Canada, and are notably absent in the Maritime provinces and the territories. This article provides an overview of specific provisions related to IHFs across the country and how they can co-exist with the Canada Health Act.

  16. Short-Term Unilateral Resistance Training Results in Cross Education of Strength Without Changes in Muscle Size, Activation, or Endocrine Response.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kyle S; Fukuda, David H; Boone, Carleigh H; Wells, Adam J; Townsend, Jeremy R; Jajtner, Adam R; Gonzalez, Adam M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    Short-term unilateral resistance training results in cross education of strength without changes in muscle size, activation, or endocrine response. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1213-1223, 2016-The purpose of this study was to assess the cross education of strength and changes in the underlying mechanisms (muscle size, activation, and hormonal response) after a 4-week unilateral resistance training (URT) program. A group of 9 untrained men completed a 4-week URT program on the dominant leg (DOM), whereas cross education was measured in the nondominant leg (NON); and were compared with a control group (n = 8, CON). Unilateral isometric force (PKF), leg press (LP) and leg extension (LE) strength, muscle size (by ultrasonography) and activation (by electromyography) of the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis, and the hormonal response (testosterone, growth hormone, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1) were tested pretraining and posttraining. Group × time interactions were present for PKF, LP, LE, and muscle size in DOM and for LP in NON. In all interactions, the URT group improved significantly better than CON. There was a significant acute hormonal response to URT, but no chronic adaptation after the 4-week training program. Four weeks of URT resulted in an increase in strength and size of the trained musculature, and cross education of strength in the untrained musculature, which may occur without detectable changes in muscle size, activation, or the acute hormonal response.

  17. Implementation of training programs in self-regulated learning strategies in Moodle format: results of a experience in higher education.

    PubMed

    Núñez, José Carlos; Cerezo, Rebeca; Bernardo, Ana; Rosário, Pedro; Valle, Antonio; Fernández, Estrella; Suárez, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    This paper tests the efficacy of an intervention program in virtual format intended to train studying and self-regulation strategies in university students. The aim of this intervention is to promote a series of strategies which allow students to manage their learning processes in a more proficient and autonomous way. The program has been developed in Moodle format and hosted by the Virtual Campus of the University of Oviedo. The present study had a semi-experimental design, included an experimental group (n=167) and a control one (n=206), and used pretest and posttest measures (self-regulated learning strategies' declarative knowledge, self-regulated learning macro-strategy planning-execution-assessment, self-regulated learning strategies on text, surface and deep learning approaches, and academic achievement). Data suggest that the students enrolled in the training program, comparing with students in the control group, showed a significant improvement in their declarative knowledge, general and on text use of learning strategies, increased their deep approach to learning, decreased their use of a surface approach and, in what concerns to academic achievement, statistically significant differences have been found in favour of the experimental group.

  18. Implementation of training programs in self-regulated learning strategies in Moodle format: results of a experience in higher education.

    PubMed

    Núñez, José Carlos; Cerezo, Rebeca; Bernardo, Ana; Rosário, Pedro; Valle, Antonio; Fernández, Estrella; Suárez, Natalia

    2011-04-01

    This paper tests the efficacy of an intervention program in virtual format intended to train studying and self-regulation strategies in university students. The aim of this intervention is to promote a series of strategies which allow students to manage their learning processes in a more proficient and autonomous way. The program has been developed in Moodle format and hosted by the Virtual Campus of the University of Oviedo. The present study had a semi-experimental design, included an experimental group (n=167) and a control one (n=206), and used pretest and posttest measures (self-regulated learning strategies' declarative knowledge, self-regulated learning macro-strategy planning-execution-assessment, self-regulated learning strategies on text, surface and deep learning approaches, and academic achievement). Data suggest that the students enrolled in the training program, comparing with students in the control group, showed a significant improvement in their declarative knowledge, general and on text use of learning strategies, increased their deep approach to learning, decreased their use of a surface approach and, in what concerns to academic achievement, statistically significant differences have been found in favour of the experimental group. PMID:21504681

  19. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  20. Mindfulness training and stress reactivity in substance abuse: results from a randomized, controlled stage I pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Judson A; Sinha, Rajita; Chen, Justin A; Michalsen, Ravenna N; Babuscio, Theresa A; Nich, Charla; Grier, Aleesha; Bergquist, Keri L; Reis, Deidre L; Potenza, Marc N; Carroll, Kathleen M; Rounsaville, Bruce J

    2009-01-01

    Stress is important in substance use disorders (SUDs). Mindfulness training (MT) has shown promise for stress-related maladies. No studies have compared MT to empirically validated treatments for SUDs. The goals of this study were to assess MT compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in substance use and treatment acceptability, and specificity of MT compared to CBT in targeting stress reactivity. Thirty-six individuals with alcohol and/or cocaine use disorders were randomly assigned to receive group MT or CBT in an outpatient setting. Drug use was assessed weekly. After treatment, responses to personalized stress provocation were measured. Fourteen individuals completed treatment. There were no differences in treatment satisfaction or drug use between groups. The laboratory paradigm suggested reduced psychological and physiological indices of stress during provocation in MT compared to CBT. This pilot study provides evidence of the feasibility of MT in treating SUDs and suggests that MT may be efficacious in targeting stress. PMID:19904666

  1. Mindfulness training and stress reactivity in substance abuse: results from a randomized, controlled stage I pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Judson A; Sinha, Rajita; Chen, Justin A; Michalsen, Ravenna N; Babuscio, Theresa A; Nich, Charla; Grier, Aleesha; Bergquist, Keri L; Reis, Deidre L; Potenza, Marc N; Carroll, Kathleen M; Rounsaville, Bruce J

    2009-01-01

    Stress is important in substance use disorders (SUDs). Mindfulness training (MT) has shown promise for stress-related maladies. No studies have compared MT to empirically validated treatments for SUDs. The goals of this study were to assess MT compared to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in substance use and treatment acceptability, and specificity of MT compared to CBT in targeting stress reactivity. Thirty-six individuals with alcohol and/or cocaine use disorders were randomly assigned to receive group MT or CBT in an outpatient setting. Drug use was assessed weekly. After treatment, responses to personalized stress provocation were measured. Fourteen individuals completed treatment. There were no differences in treatment satisfaction or drug use between groups. The laboratory paradigm suggested reduced psychological and physiological indices of stress during provocation in MT compared to CBT. This pilot study provides evidence of the feasibility of MT in treating SUDs and suggests that MT may be efficacious in targeting stress.

  2. Changes in physiological tremor resulting from sleep deprivation under conditions of increasing fatigue during prolonged military training.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, A; Gajewski, J; Mazur-Różycka, J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to define the changes of the characteristics of physiological postural tremor under conditions of increasing fatigue and lack of sleep during prolonged military training (survival). The subjects of the study were 15 students of the Polish Air Force Academy in Dęblin. The average age was 19.9±1.3 years. During the 36-hour-long continuous military training (survival) the subjects were deprived of sleep. Four tremor measurements were carried out for each of the subjects: Day 1 - morning, after rest (measurement 0); Day 2 - morning, after overnight physical exercise (measurement 1); afternoon, after continuous sleep deprivation (measurement 2); Day 3 - morning, after a full night sleep (measurement 3). The accelerometric method using an acceleration measuring kit was applied to analyse tremor. A significant difference between mean values of the index evaluating tremor power in low frequencies L2-4 in measurement 0 and measurement 3 was observed (p<0.01). No significant differences were found in mean values of index L10-20. Mean frequencies F2-4 differed significantly from each other (F2,42=4.53; p<0.01). Their values were 2.94±0.11, 2.99±0.9, 2.93±0.07 and 2.91±0.07 for successive measurements. A gradual, significant decrease of F8-14 was observed (F2,42=5.143; p<0.01). Prolonged sleep deprivation combined with performing tasks demanding constant physical effort causes long-lasting (over 24 hours) changes of the amplitude of low-frequency tremor changes. This phenomenon may significantly influence psychomotor performance, deteriorating the ability to perform tasks requiring movement precision. PMID:25609888

  3. Combining d-cycloserine with motor training does not result in improved general motor learning in neurologically intact people or in people with stroke.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Kendra M; Lenze, Eric J; Lang, Catherine E

    2014-06-15

    Neurological rehabilitation involving motor training has resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in function but is unable to eliminate many of the impairments associated with neurological injury. Thus there is a growing need for interventions that facilitate motor learning during rehabilitation therapy, to optimize recovery. d-Cycloserine (DCS), a partial N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist that enhances neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system (Ressler KJ, Rothbaum BO, Tannenbaum L, Anderson P, Graap K, Zimand E, Hodges L, Davis M. Arch Gen Psychiatry 61: 1136-1144, 2004), has been shown to facilitate declarative and emotional learning. We therefore tested whether combining DCS with motor training facilitates motor learning after stroke in a series of two experiments. Forty-one healthy adults participated in experiment I, and twenty adults with stroke participated in experiment II of this two-session, double-blind study. Session one consisted of baseline assessment, subject randomization, and oral administration of DCS or placebo (250 mg). Subjects then participated in training on a balancing task, a simulated feeding task, and a cognitive task. Subjects returned 1-3 days later for posttest assessment. We found that all subjects had improved performance from pretest to posttest on the balancing task, the simulated feeding task, and the cognitive task. Subjects who were given DCS before motor training, however, did not show enhanced learning on the balancing task, the simulated feeding task, or the associative recognition task compared with subjects given placebo. Moreover, training on the balancing task did not generalize to a similar, untrained balance task. Our findings suggest that DCS does not enhance motor learning or motor skill generalization in neurologically intact adults or in adults with stroke.

  4. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  5. Combining d-cycloserine with motor training does not result in improved general motor learning in neurologically intact people or in people with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Kendra M.; Lenze, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurological rehabilitation involving motor training has resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in function but is unable to eliminate many of the impairments associated with neurological injury. Thus there is a growing need for interventions that facilitate motor learning during rehabilitation therapy, to optimize recovery. d-Cycloserine (DCS), a partial N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist that enhances neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system (Ressler KJ, Rothbaum BO, Tannenbaum L, Anderson P, Graap K, Zimand E, Hodges L, Davis M. Arch Gen Psychiatry 61: 1136–1144, 2004), has been shown to facilitate declarative and emotional learning. We therefore tested whether combining DCS with motor training facilitates motor learning after stroke in a series of two experiments. Forty-one healthy adults participated in experiment I, and twenty adults with stroke participated in experiment II of this two-session, double-blind study. Session one consisted of baseline assessment, subject randomization, and oral administration of DCS or placebo (250 mg). Subjects then participated in training on a balancing task, a simulated feeding task, and a cognitive task. Subjects returned 1–3 days later for posttest assessment. We found that all subjects had improved performance from pretest to posttest on the balancing task, the simulated feeding task, and the cognitive task. Subjects who were given DCS before motor training, however, did not show enhanced learning on the balancing task, the simulated feeding task, or the associative recognition task compared with subjects given placebo. Moreover, training on the balancing task did not generalize to a similar, untrained balance task. Our findings suggest that DCS does not enhance motor learning or motor skill generalization in neurologically intact adults or in adults with stroke. PMID:24671538

  6. NASA-Navy Telemedicine: Autogenic Feedback Training Exercises for Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acromite, Michael T.; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Davis, Carl; Porter, Henry O.

    2010-01-01

    Airsickness is the most significant medical condition affecting naval aviation training. A 2001 study showed that airsickness was reported in 81% of naval aviation students and was associated with 82% of below average flight scores. The cost to a single training air-wing was over $150,000 annually for fuel and maintenance costs alone. Resistent cases are sent to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) for evaluation and desensitization in the self-paced airsickness desensitization (SPAD) program. This approach is 75% successful, but can take up to 8 weeks at a significant travel cost. NASA Ames Research Center's Autogenic Feedback Training Exercises (AFTE) uses physiological and biofeedback training for motion sickness prevention. It has a remote capability that has been used from Moffett Field, CA to Atlanta, GA . AFTE is administered in twelve (30-minute) training sessions. The success rate for the NASA AFTE program has been over 85%. Methods: Implementation Phases: Phase I: Transfer NASA AFTE to NAMI; NASA will remotely train aviation students at NAMI. Phase II: NAMI-centered AFTE application with NASA oversight. Phase III: NAMI-centered AFTE to remotely train at various Navy sites. Phase IV: NAMI to offer Tri-service application and examine research opportunities. Results: 1. Use available telemedicine connectivity between NAMI and NASA. 2. Save over $2,000 per student trained. 3. Reduce aviation training attrition. 4. Provide standardization of multi-location motion sickness training. 5. Future tri-service initiatives. 6. Data to NASA and Navy for QA and research opportunities.

  7. 77 FR 6411 - Training, Qualification, and Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ...). 75 FR 47906. The Final Crane Rule sets forth requirements that are designed to improve safety for... titled ``Railroad Occupational Safety and Health Standards'' (Policy Statement). 43 FR 10583. The...

  8. Combining Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Training of the DLPFC with N-Back Practice Results in Neuroplastic Effects Confined to the Neurofeedback Target Region

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew S.; Weisend, Michael P.; Kane, Jessica H.; Parker, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    In traditional fMRI, individuals respond to exogenous stimuli and are naïve to the effects of the stimuli on their neural activity patterns. Changes arising in the fMRI signal are analyzed post-hoc to elucidate the spatial and temporal activation of brain regions associated with the tasks performed. The advent of real-time fMRI has enabled a new method to systematically alter brain activity across space and time using neurofeedback training (NFT), providing a new tool to study internally-driven processes such as neuroplasticity. In this work, we combined n-back practice with fMRI-NFT of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to better understand the relationship between open- and closed-loop neuromodulation. FMRI data were acquired during both traditional n-back and NFT across five imaging sessions. Region-of-interest (ROI) and voxel-wise 2 × 2 within subjects ANOVAs were carried out to determine the effects of, and interaction between, training session and neuromodulation type. A main effect of training session was identified for only a single, highly focused cluster that shared spatial properties with the fMRI-NFT target region (left DLPFC). This finding indicates that combined open- and closed-loop neuroplastic enhancement techniques result in focal changes that are confined to the target area of NFT, and do not affect up- or down-stream network components that are normally engaged during working memory. Additionally, we identified a main effect of neuromodulation type for 15 clusters with significantly different activation between open- and closed-loop neuromodulation during training, 12 of which demonstrated higher activity during the open-loop neuromodulation. Our results, taken together with previous reports, indicate that fMRI-NFT combined with n-back practice leads to a highly focal volume exhibiting neuroplasticity without additional network effects. PMID:27445733

  9. Does government oversight improve access to nursing home care? Longitudinal evidence from US counties.

    PubMed

    Howard, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Gains in life expectancy around the world have increasingly placed pressure on governments to ensure that the elderly receive assistance with activities of daily living. This research examines the impact of government oversight of Medicaid payment policies on access to nursing home care services in the United States. Variation in price levels induced by a federal policy shift in 1997 is used to identify the effect of Medicaid reimbursements on the number of nursing homes and beds available. Court rulings prior to the policy change are used to categorically define a range of oversight treatments at the state level. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate a significant decline in access to nursing home care services for individuals living in states in which courts consistently ruled that Medicaid reimbursements did not meet the minimum standard implied by federal law. The findings suggest that nursing home care services were made more accessible through a combination of legislative and judicial oversight of Medicaid payment policies.

  10. Biosafety Oversight and Compliance: What do you Mean, I have to Fill Out Another Form?!

    PubMed

    Petrella, Brenda L

    2015-11-03

    This unit is an overview of biosafety compliance and oversight in the United States. Specific attention is given to the oversight of the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) and how the purview of the IBC may overlap with other local committees, such as the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) for animal research and the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for research on human subjects. Requirements for the Federal Select Agent Program and Dual Use Research of Concern (DURC) are also briefly reviewed for those working with materials and experiments covered under these regulations. This unit serves as a guide for new and established investigators who are navigating the regulatory world and how regulatory oversight applies to their research.

  11. Training and administration of epinephrine auto-injectors for anaphylaxis treatment in US schools: results from the EpiPen4Schools® pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Susan L; Goss, Diana; Hollis, Kelly; Silvia, Suyapa; White, Martha V

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition. Adequate preparation for anaphylaxis management is imperative for school personnel. This descriptive pilot study assessed preparedness of US schools to manage anaphylactic reactions. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional, web-based, pilot survey assessed the occurrence and characteristics of anaphylactic events, as well as training provided to school personnel for the recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Eligible US schools were participants in the EpiPen4Schools® program during the 2013–2014 school year. EpiPen4Schools provides EpiPen® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors and training materials to qualifying US schools. Survey data were parsed by US Census Bureau region and state and were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Results Schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey (N=6,019). Among schools that provided information on anaphylactic events, 11% (607/5,683) reported the occurrence of one or more events, with significant variability in incidence across census regions and among states. A total of 5,613 schools provided information regarding which staff members were trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Thirty-six percent of schools (2,022/5,613) indicated that only the school nurse and select staff were trained in anaphylaxis recognition. The proportion of schools in which most or all school staff received such training differed by region/state (range, 13%–100%). A total of 5,578 schools provided information on which staff were permitted to administer epinephrine. The majority of schools (54%; 3,024/5,578) permitted only the school nurse and select staff to administer epinephrine, although percentages varied by region/state (range, 4%–100%). Conclusion Schools differed substantially in their preparedness to manage anaphylaxis, with significant disparities in staff training and permission to treat. Given

  12. 20 CFR 664.110 - Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Who is responsible for oversight of youth... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Councils § 664.110 Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area? (a)...

  13. 20 CFR 664.110 - Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who is responsible for oversight of youth... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Councils § 664.110 Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area? (a)...

  14. 20 CFR 664.110 - Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who is responsible for oversight of youth... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Youth Councils § 664.110 Who is responsible for oversight of youth programs in the local area? (a)...

  15. 32 CFR 2004.10 - Responsibilities of the Director, Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) [102(b)]. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION... Responsibilities of the Director, Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) . 1 1 Bracketed references pertain... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibilities of the Director,...

  16. 32 CFR 2004.10 - Responsibilities of the Director, Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) [102(b)]. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... National Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION... Responsibilities of the Director, Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) . 1 1 Bracketed references pertain... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities of the Director,...

  17. 76 FR 40961 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... COMMISSION [Release No. 34-64814; File No. PCAOB-2011-01) Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice...''), notice is hereby given that on June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board... compliance of registered public accounting firms and their associated persons with the Act, the Board's...

  18. 17 CFR 140.75 - Delegation of authority to the Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight. 140.75 Section 140.75 Commodity and... COMMISSION Functions § 140.75 Delegation of authority to the Director of the Division of Clearing and... delegates to the Director of the Division of Clearing and Intermediary Oversight and to such members of...

  19. Long-term follow-up for bimanual microincision cataract surgery: comparison of results obtained by surgeons in training and experienced surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Gian Maria; Verdina, Tommaso; Forlini, Matteo; Volante, Veronica; De Maria, Michele; Torlai, Giulio; Benatti, Caterina; Delvecchio, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of bimanual microincision cataract surgery (B-MICS) performed by surgeons in training, evaluating clinical results, posterior capsule opacification (PCO) incidence, and clear corneal incision (CCI) architecture in a long-term follow-up and comparing results with those obtained by experienced surgeons. Patients and methods Eighty eyes of 62 patients operated on by three surgeons in training who used B-MICS technique for the first time were included in the study (Group A). Eighty eyes of 59 patients who underwent B-MICS by three experienced surgeons were included as a control group (Group B). Best corrected visual acuity, astigmatism, corneal pachymetry, and endothelial cell count were evaluated before surgery and at 1 month and 18 months after surgery. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography images were obtained to study the morphology of CCIs. PCO incidence was evaluated using EPCO2000 software. Results Out of 160 surgeries included in the study, mean best-corrected visual acuity improvement at 18 months was 0.343±0.246 logMAR for Group A, and 0.388±0.175 logMAR for Group B, respectively. We found no statistically significant induced astigmatism nor corneal pachymetry changes in either group, while we noticed a statistically significant endothelial cell loss postoperatively in both groups (P<0.05). In Group A, mean PCO score was 0.163±0.196, while for Group B, it was 0.057±0.132 (P=0.0025). Mean length and inclination of the CCIs for Group A and Group B were, respectively, 1,358±175 µm and 1,437±256 µm and 141.8°±6.4° and 148.7°±5.1°. As regards corneal architecture in the 320 CCIs considered, we found posterior wound retractions and endothelial gaps, respectively, 9.8% and 11.6% for Group A and 7.8% and 10.8% for Group B. Conclusion B-MICS performed by surgeons in training is an effective surgical technique even when assessed after a long-term follow-up. PCO incidence resulted in being higher for less

  20. 32 CFR 105.7 - Oversight of the SAPR Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... education, training, and awareness for DoD personnel consistent with this part and 32 CFR part 103. (4... Service Academy, as required by 32 CFR part 103, sections 113 and 4331 of title 10, U.S.C., and in... and 32 CFR part 103. Consult with and rely on the Secretaries of the Military Departments in...

  1. 32 CFR 105.7 - Oversight of the SAPR Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... education, training, and awareness for DoD personnel consistent with this part and 32 CFR part 103. (4... Service Academy, as required by 32 CFR part 103, sections 113 and 4331 of title 10, U.S.C., and in... and 32 CFR part 103. Consult with and rely on the Secretaries of the Military Departments in...

  2. Concomitant Use of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Computer-Assisted Training for the Rehabilitation of Attention in Traumatic Brain Injured Patients: Behavioral and Neuroimaging Results

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Galetto, Valentina; Dimitri, Danilo; Geda, Elisabetta; Perotti, Francesca; Zettin, Marina; Geminiani, Giuliano C.

    2016-01-01

    Divided attention (DA), the ability to distribute cognitive resources among two or more simultaneous tasks, may be severely compromised after traumatic brain injury (TBI), resulting in problems with numerous activities involved with daily living. So far, no research has investigated whether the use of non-invasive brain stimulation associated with neuropsychological rehabilitation might contribute to the recovery of such cognitive function. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 10 transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) sessions combined with computer-assisted training; it also intended to explore the neural modifications induced by the treatment. Thirty-two patients with severe TBI participated in the study: 16 were part of the experimental group, and 16 part of the control group. The treatment included 20’ of tDCS, administered twice a day for 5 days. The electrodes were placed on the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. Their location varied across patients and it depended on each participant’s specific area of damage. The control group received sham tDCS. After each tDCS session, the patient received computer-assisted cognitive training on DA for 40’. The results showed that the experimental group significantly improved in DA performance between pre- and post-treatment, showing faster reaction times (RTs), and fewer omissions. No improvement was detected between the baseline assessment (i.e., 1 month before treatment) and the pre-training assessment, or within the control group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, obtained on the experimental group during a DA task, showed post-treatment lower cerebral activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 42), right and left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), right postcentral gyrus (BA 3) and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9). We interpreted such neural changes as normalization of previously abnormal hyperactivations. PMID:27065823

  3. Concomitant Use of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Computer-Assisted Training for the Rehabilitation of Attention in Traumatic Brain Injured Patients: Behavioral and Neuroimaging Results.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Galetto, Valentina; Dimitri, Danilo; Geda, Elisabetta; Perotti, Francesca; Zettin, Marina; Geminiani, Giuliano C

    2016-01-01

    Divided attention (DA), the ability to distribute cognitive resources among two or more simultaneous tasks, may be severely compromised after traumatic brain injury (TBI), resulting in problems with numerous activities involved with daily living. So far, no research has investigated whether the use of non-invasive brain stimulation associated with neuropsychological rehabilitation might contribute to the recovery of such cognitive function. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 10 transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) sessions combined with computer-assisted training; it also intended to explore the neural modifications induced by the treatment. Thirty-two patients with severe TBI participated in the study: 16 were part of the experimental group, and 16 part of the control group. The treatment included 20' of tDCS, administered twice a day for 5 days. The electrodes were placed on the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. Their location varied across patients and it depended on each participant's specific area of damage. The control group received sham tDCS. After each tDCS session, the patient received computer-assisted cognitive training on DA for 40'. The results showed that the experimental group significantly improved in DA performance between pre- and post-treatment, showing faster reaction times (RTs), and fewer omissions. No improvement was detected between the baseline assessment (i.e., 1 month before treatment) and the pre-training assessment, or within the control group. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, obtained on the experimental group during a DA task, showed post-treatment lower cerebral activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 42), right and left middle frontal gyrus (BA 6), right postcentral gyrus (BA 3) and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9). We interpreted such neural changes as normalization of previously abnormal hyperactivations. PMID:27065823

  4. 14 CFR 117.9 - Fatigue education and awareness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue education and awareness training... FLIGHT AND DUTY LIMITATIONS AND REST REQUIREMENTS: FLIGHTCREW MEMBERS (EFF. 1-4-14) § 117.9 Fatigue... any employee providing direct management oversight of those areas. (b) The fatigue education...

  5. 14 CFR 117.9 - Fatigue education and awareness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue education and awareness training... FLIGHT AND DUTY LIMITATIONS AND REST REQUIREMENTS: FLIGHTCREW MEMBERS § 117.9 Fatigue education and... providing direct management oversight of those areas. (b) The fatigue education and awareness...

  6. The views of quality improvement professionals and comparative effectiveness researchers on ethics, IRBs, and oversight.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Danielle; Kass, Nancy; Saghai, Yashar; Faden, Ruth; Tunis, Sean; Pronovost, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Recently, there have been increasing numbers of activities labeled as either quality improvement (QI) or comparative effectiveness research (CER), both of which are designed to learn what works and what does not in routine clinical care settings. These activities can create confusion for researchers, Institutional Review Board members, and other stakeholders as they try to determine which activities or components of activities constitute clinical practices and which constitute clinical research requiring ethical oversight and informed consent. We conducted a series of semi-structured focus groups with QI and CER professionals to understand their experiences and views of the ethical and regulatory challenges that exist as well as the formal or informal practices and criteria they and their institutions use to address these issues. We found that most participants have experienced challenges related to the ethical oversight of QI and CER activities, and many believe that current regulatory criteria for distinguishing clinical practice from clinical research requiring ethical oversight are confusing. Instead, many participants described other criteria that they believe are more ethically appropriate. Many also described developing formal or informal practices at their institutions to navigate which activities require ethical oversight. However, these local solutions do not completely resolve the issues caused by the blurring of clinical practice and clinical research, raising the question of whether more foundational regulatory changes are needed.

  7. 20 CFR 411.595 - What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EN payment systems? 411.595 Section 411.595 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.595 What oversight... activities to identify areas for improvement. Internal reviews of our systems security controls are...

  8. 20 CFR 411.595 - What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EN payment systems? 411.595 Section 411.595 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.595 What oversight... activities to identify areas for improvement. Internal reviews of our systems security controls are...

  9. California Charter Oversight: Key Elements and Actual Costs. CRB Briefly Stated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    The Legislature mandated the California Research Bureau (CRB) explore known best practices for charter school authorizers and survey California authorizers about their practices and costs. Additionally, the Legislature mandated CRB provide an analysis of current reimbursement for charter school oversight and include suggestions for improving…

  10. Disadvantaged Students: Fiscal Oversight of Title I Could Be Improved. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Two provisions in Title I--maintenance of effort (MOE) and supplement not supplant (SNS)--are designed to limit the extent to which federal funds can be used to replace state and local resources. To assess the quality of oversight of these provisions, the General Accounting Office (GAO) determined how Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana,…

  11. 75 FR 80817 - Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight; Agency Information Collection Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... eligible under a temporary program to receive a tax- free reimbursement for the costs of certain health... for health care benefits, which consists of documentation of actual costs for the items and services... comments. 2. By regular mail. Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, Department of...

  12. 42 CFR 414.39 - Special rules for payment of care plan oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this section a nonphysician practitioner (NPP) is a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist or... the NPP is a nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist, the physician signing the plan of care... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.39 Special rules for payment of care plan oversight....

  13. 42 CFR 414.39 - Special rules for payment of care plan oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... this section a nonphysician practitioner (NPP) is a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist or... the NPP is a nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist, the physician signing the plan of care... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.39 Special rules for payment of care plan oversight....

  14. 42 CFR 414.39 - Special rules for payment of care plan oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this section a nonphysician practitioner (NPP) is a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist or... the NPP is a nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist, the physician signing the plan of care... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.39 Special rules for payment of care plan oversight....

  15. 42 CFR 414.39 - Special rules for payment of care plan oversight.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... this section a nonphysician practitioner (NPP) is a nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist or... the NPP is a nurse practitioner or clinical nurse specialist, the physician signing the plan of care... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.39 Special rules for payment of care plan oversight. (a)...

  16. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  17. 42 CFR 54a.9 - Oversight of the Charitable Choice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oversight of the Charitable Choice requirements. 54a.9 Section 54a.9 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS CHARITABLE CHOICE REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND RELIGIOUS...

  18. California Charter Oversight: Key Elements and Actual Costs. CRB 12-001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Rebecca E.

    2012-01-01

    This study was mandated by SB537 (Simitian, Chapter 650, Stats. of 2007, codified at Ed. Code Section 47613), which requires the California Research Bureau (CRB) to prepare and submit to the Legislature a report on the key elements and actual costs of charter school oversight. Charter schools are public schools that are operated by entities other…

  19. 75 FR 22368 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ...; Management and Oversight of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System AGENCY: National Oceanic and... process, information is collected from states in order to prepare a management plan and environmental... years, per section 312 of the Act, and revise their management plans every five years. This...

  20. 78 FR 49257 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ...; Management and Oversight of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System AGENCY: National Oceanic and.... Abstract This request is for extension of a current information collection. The Coastal Zone Management Act... date and research gaps. Reserves revise their management plans every five years. This information...

  1. [State Oversight in Postsecondary Education and the Office of Education's Eligibility Process. Collected Remarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Steven M.; Proffitt, John

    Perspectives on an American Institutes for Research (AIR) study of state oversight in postsecondary education, conducted for the U.S. Office of Education (USOE), are offered by researcher Steven M. Jung. In addition, a list of recommendations by the General Accounting Office concerning USOE's eligibility process and responses by John Proffitt, on…

  2. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting...

  3. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting...

  4. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting...

  5. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting...

  6. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting...

  7. Transportability of Multisystemic Therapy to Community Settings: Can a Program Sustain Outcomes without MST Services Oversight?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Boydston, Julianne M.; Holtzman, Rochelle J.; Roberts, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multisystemic therapy (MST) has been shown to be effective in treating delinquent behavior in youth. However, some community agencies with MST programs are unable to afford the ongoing costs of licensure and quality assurance oversight provided by MST services. Objective: The present study utilized retrospective archival analyses of…

  8. 9 CFR 332.7 - Federal oversight of a cooperative interstate shipment program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Federal oversight of a cooperative interstate shipment program. 332.7 Section 332.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND...

  9. 9 CFR 332.7 - Federal oversight of a cooperative interstate shipment program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Federal oversight of a cooperative interstate shipment program. 332.7 Section 332.7 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND...

  10. A Voice Crying in the Wilderness: Legislative Oversight Agencies' Efforts to Achieve Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLandingham, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    While legislative oversight offices, like many evaluation and policy analysis units, face substantial challenges in promoting use of their work by policymakers, they often have not taken steps to overcome these challenges by adopting the strategies suggested by the evaluation literature. Although the offices seek utilization, they have not fully…

  11. 76 FR 52997 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ...\\ 15 U.S.C. 7217(b). \\2\\ 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). \\3\\ Release No. 34-64816 (Jul. 6, 2011) [76 FR 40950 (Jul... COMMISSION Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's Accounting Support Fee Among Issuers, Brokers, and Dealers, and Other Amendments...

  12. 75 FR 81684 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... discussions of PCAOB budget matters. \\2\\ 17 CFR 202.190. See Release No. 33-8724 (July 18, 2006) [71 FR 41998...; Release No. 34-63596/December 22, 2010] Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2011 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as...

  13. 75 FR 11210 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Amendment to Board Rules...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    .... \\1\\ See SEC Release No. 34-61032 (November 19, 2009); 74 FR 61722 (November 25, 2009). II... required in those countries. See SEC Release No. 34-61212 (December 22, 2009); 74 FR 68875 (December 29... COMMISSION Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Amendment to Board...

  14. 75 FR 10507 - Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy... Policy Advisory Committee. The meeting will be held to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on March 24, 2010 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m....

  15. 76 FR 10135 - Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... final rule published on September 1, 1998 (63 FR 46596). Prior to 1998, a PHA was evaluated by HUD with..., subpart H. C. Proposed Amendments to PHAS On August 21, 2008, at 73 FR 49544, HUD proposed amendments to... review as critical to its task of effective oversight of the public housing portfolio, as is the case...

  16. 77 FR 57407 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rules on Auditing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ...; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 16, Communications With Audit Committees and... Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 16, Communications With Audit... No. 16, Communications with Audit Committees, related amendments to its interim auditing...

  17. 42 CFR 137.366 - May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.366 May... oversight visits semiannually or on an alternate schedule negotiated in the construction project agreement... under the construction project agreement. At the request of the Self-Governance Tribe, the...

  18. 42 CFR 137.366 - May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.366 May... oversight visits semiannually or on an alternate schedule negotiated in the construction project agreement... under the construction project agreement. At the request of the Self-Governance Tribe, the...

  19. 42 CFR 137.366 - May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.366 May... oversight visits semiannually or on an alternate schedule negotiated in the construction project agreement... under the construction project agreement. At the request of the Self-Governance Tribe, the...

  20. 42 CFR 137.366 - May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.366 May... oversight visits semiannually or on an alternate schedule negotiated in the construction project agreement... under the construction project agreement. At the request of the Self-Governance Tribe, the...

  1. 42 CFR 137.366 - May the Secretary conduct onsite project oversight visits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.366 May... oversight visits semiannually or on an alternate schedule negotiated in the construction project agreement... under the construction project agreement. At the request of the Self-Governance Tribe, the...

  2. Results from a national survey of health communication master's degree recipients: an exploration of training, placement, satisfaction, and success.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Timothy; Gallagher, Susan Scavo; Silk, Kami J; Cruz, Tess Boley; Abroms, Lorien C; Evans, W Douglas; Finley, Anna Marie; Miller, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    The field of health communication has seen substantial growth in recent years, but existing health communication research literature contains little information on individuals who practice health communication in applied settings. This study reports the results of a national survey that targeted the alumni of 5 institutions that offer a master's degree in health communication. Of the 522 total graduates to whom the survey was sent, 398 responded. Survey results provided information in a number of areas including undergraduate education background; criteria used to determine what type of master's degree in health communication to pursue; strategies used to gain employment; employment sector of first job after graduation; salaries received after completion of a master's degree in health communication; satisfaction with career choice after completion of master's degree; satisfaction with type of master's degree in health communication received; satisfaction with career choice after completion of master's degree; and the degree to which respondents felt their master's program in health communication prepared them to meet core competencies in the field. These findings have significant implications for the health communication field and the programs that prepare individuals for a career as a health communication practitioner. PMID:25668684

  3. Training for vigilance: the effect of knowledge of results format and dispositional optimism and pessimism on performance and stress.

    PubMed

    Szalma, James L; Hancock, Peter A; Dember, William N; Warm, Joel S

    2006-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of knowledge of results (KR) format on the performance and stress associated with a vigilance task. Also examined was the effect of the interaction of KR-format (Hit-KR, False Alarm-KR, Miss-KR, and a composite of all three formats) with dispositional optimism and pessimism on performance outcome and reported stress state. Hypotheses based upon a theory of feedback intervention were tested. KR regarding correct detections and the composite-KR (KR regarding correct detections, false alarms, and missed signals) enhanced perceptual sensitivity. However, False Alarm-KR and Miss-KR did not. Contrary to expectations based on the theory, performance was unrelated to the traits across all KR conditions. However, the effects of KR-format on self-reports of stress depended on the individual's level of pessimism and optimism. In addition, KR format and personality affected the multiple dimensions of stress state in different ways.

  4. An educational campaign about epilepsy among Italian primary school teachers. 2. The results of a focused training program.

    PubMed

    Mecarelli, Oriano; Messina, Paolo; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Michelucci, Roberto; Romeo, Antonino; Beghi, Ettore; De Simone, Roberto; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Vecchi, Marilena; Boniver, Clementina; Monti, Fabrizio; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Baldassarri, Chiara; Cesaroni, Elisabetta; Stranci, Giuseppe; Elia, Maurizio; Severi, Sauro; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Ausserer, Harald; Montalenti, Elisa; Pieri, Ilaria; Germano, Michele; Cantisani, Teresa; Casellato, Susanna; Pruna, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A cohort of 582 Italian primary school teachers underwent a questionnaire survey to test their knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy and verify whether an intensive and focused educational program could result in improvement of knowledge and attitudes. The program consisted of a presentation of the clinical manifestations of epilepsy and the distribution of informative brochures and an educational kit on the disease and its management to be used with their students. After several months, 317 teachers were retested using the same questions. Upon retest, the number of "don't know" answers decreased significantly for almost all questions. This was not the case for negative attitudes. The same holds true for teachers believing that epilepsy is a source of learning disability and social disadvantage. These findings support the beliefs that education on epilepsy is more likely to affect ignorance than prejudice and that stronger interventions are needed to counteract stigmatizing behaviors.

  5. An educational campaign about epilepsy among Italian primary school teachers. 2. The results of a focused training program.

    PubMed

    Mecarelli, Oriano; Messina, Paolo; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Michelucci, Roberto; Romeo, Antonino; Beghi, Ettore; De Simone, Roberto; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Vecchi, Marilena; Boniver, Clementina; Monti, Fabrizio; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Baldassarri, Chiara; Cesaroni, Elisabetta; Stranci, Giuseppe; Elia, Maurizio; Severi, Sauro; Pizzanelli, Chiara; Ausserer, Harald; Montalenti, Elisa; Pieri, Ilaria; Germano, Michele; Cantisani, Teresa; Casellato, Susanna; Pruna, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A cohort of 582 Italian primary school teachers underwent a questionnaire survey to test their knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy and verify whether an intensive and focused educational program could result in improvement of knowledge and attitudes. The program consisted of a presentation of the clinical manifestations of epilepsy and the distribution of informative brochures and an educational kit on the disease and its management to be used with their students. After several months, 317 teachers were retested using the same questions. Upon retest, the number of "don't know" answers decreased significantly for almost all questions. This was not the case for negative attitudes. The same holds true for teachers believing that epilepsy is a source of learning disability and social disadvantage. These findings support the beliefs that education on epilepsy is more likely to affect ignorance than prejudice and that stronger interventions are needed to counteract stigmatizing behaviors. PMID:25500360

  6. Training of breast surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Mediget; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-06-01

    Breast surgical oncology is a defined sub-specialty of general surgery with focus on the surgical management of breast disease and malignancy within a multidisciplinary context. Much of the training of breast surgical oncologists in the United States exists within a fellowship training structure with oversight and approval by the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO). Rapid continuous changes in breast oncology practice have further substantiated dedicated expertise in breast surgical oncology. Training programs are structured to develop proficiency in fellows for advanced surgical techniques and clinical decision-making as well as exposure to the multidisciplinary aspects of breast cancer management. Components of a successful program include an intense multidisciplinary curriculum, engagement in clinical research and attention to strong mentorship. National curriculum and training requirements as well as supplemental resources assist in standardizing the fellowship experience. As surgical training and the field of breast oncology continues to evolve, so do fellowship training programs to ensure high quality breast surgical oncologists equipped to deliver high quality evidence based patient care while continuing to drive future research and trainee education. PMID:27197510

  7. Multiple Employment Training Programs. Major Overhaul Needed To Reduce Costs, Streamline the Bureaucracy, and Improve Results. Testimony before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Clarence C.

    Research conducted by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicates that the current system of multiple employment training programs requires major overhaul to reduce costs, streamline the bureaucracy, and improve results. The current system of 163 different federal employment training programs wastes resources and confuses and frustrates clients,…

  8. The Mental Health Impact of Computer and Internet Training on a Multi-ethnic Sample of Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results of a Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Laganá, Luciana; García, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We preliminarily explored the effects of computer and internet training in older age and attempted to address the diversity gap in the ethnogeriatric literature, given that, in our study’s sample, only one-third of the participants self-identified as White. The aim of this investigation was to compare two groups - the control and the experimental conditions - regarding theme 1) computer attitudes and related self-efficacy, and theme 2) self-esteem and depressive symptomatology. Methods: Sixty non-institutionalized residents of Los Angeles County (mean age ± SD: 69.12 ± 10.37 years; age range: 51-92) were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (n=30) or the waitlist/control group (n=30). The experimental group was involved in 6 weeks of one-on-one computer and internet training for one 2-hour session per week. The same training was administered to the control participants after their post-test. Outcome measures included the four variables, organized into the two aforementioned themes. Results: There were no significant between-group differences in either post-test computer attitudes or self-esteem. However, findings revealed that the experimental group reported greater computer self-efficacy, compared to the waitlist/control group, at post-test/follow-up [F(1,56)=28.89, p=0.001, η2=0.01]. Additionally, at the end of the computer and internet training, there was a substantial and statistically significant decrease in depression scores among those in the experimental group when compared to the waitlist/control group [F(1,55)=9.06, p<0.004, η2=0.02]. Conclusions: There were significant improvements in favour of the experimental group in computer self-efficacy and, of noteworthy clinical relevance, in depression, as evidenced by a decreased percentage of significantly depressed experimental subjects from 36.7% at baseline to 16.7% at the end of our intervention. PMID:24151452

  9. A randomized controlled trial of brain training with non-action video games in older adults: results of the 3-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Mayas, Julia; Prieto, Antonio; Toril, Pilar; Pita, Carmen; Laura, Ponce de León; Reales, José M; Waterworth, John A

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616) investigated the maintenance of training effects of 20 1-hr non-action video game training sessions with selected games from a commercial package on several age-declining cognitive functions and subjective wellbeing after a 3-month no-contact period. Two groups of cognitively normal older adults participated in both the post-training (posttest) and the present follow-up study, the experimental group who received training and the control group who attended several meetings with the research team during the study but did not receive training. Groups were similar at baseline on demographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. Significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group had been previously found at posttest, in processing speed, attention and visual recognition memory, as well as in two dimensions of subjective wellbeing. In the current study, improvement from baseline to 3 months follow-up was found only in wellbeing (Affection and Assertivity dimensions) in the trained group whereas there was no change in the control group. Previous significant improvements in processing speed, attention and spatial memory become non-significant after the 3-month interval. Training older adults with non-action video games enhanced aspects of cognition just after training but this effect disappeared after a 3-month no-contact follow-up period. Cognitive plasticity can be induced in older adults by training, but to maintain the benefits periodic boosting sessions would be necessary.

  10. 1996--1997 TEMA/DOE oversight annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) has entered into a five-year agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide emergency response activities associated with the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The Agreement in Principle (AIP) delineates the duties and responsibilities of the parties. The agreement tasked TEMA with the following responsibilities: develop offsite emergency plans; conduct emergency management training; develop offsite emergency organizations; develop emergency communications; develop emergency facilities; conduct exercises and drills; provide detection and protection equipment; and develop an emergency staff. This report describes progress on the 14 deliverables connected with this contract.

  11. Integrating Safety and Lessons-Learned Data with Human Performance for Successful Management and Oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Prevette, S.S.; Bilson, H.E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper documents the improvements Fluor Hanford, Inc. (Fluor Hanford) is making in analyzing and using safety-related and lessons-learned data in cleaning up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) site at Hanford in southeastern Washington state. Results of the application of Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Dashboards to support planning and decision making have been shared at past Waste Management conferences. Recently, Fluor Hanford has implemented and refined a process called the 'Data Analysis Working Group' to integrate data from several sources, including opinions from subject-matter experts. The process also includes a risk-ranking tool used to prioritize potential risks and past problems for management and oversight of the Hanford cleanup. Human Performance and Lessons Learned information also is included in this process. Fluor Hanford has applied SPC in a non-traditional (that is non-manufacturing) manner. Dr. Shewhart's 75-year-old control-chart methodologies have been updated to modern data processing, but are still founded on his sound, tried and true principles. These methods are playing a key role in safety and quality at Hanford. The performance-indicator system used by Fluor Hanford has been featured by several professional societies in their publications, primarily the American Society of Safety Engineers and the American Society for Quality. The system also has been featured in past Waste Management conferences. Eleven years ago, Fluor Hanford's statistician produced 300 data files and accompanying charts a month. Today, those numbers exceed 3,000 a month, almost one chart for every employee. This activity also includes entering data for approximately 500 safety inspections each month. The challenge is in effectively analyzing and prioritizing this information and providing it to senior management to make pro-active decisions and policies. That challenge is being met by Fluor's Data Analysis Working Group process. (authors)

  12. Creating Training Miracles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rylatt, Alastair; Lohan, Kevin

    This book, which is intended as a comprehensive practical reference source for training professionals, consultants, and managers, examines emerging trends in training and explains how to get training results in the workplace by using various educational strategies and advanced training methods. The following are among the topics discussed:…

  13. NASA S and MA at the Crossroads; The Role of NASA Quality Insight/Oversight for Commercial Crewed Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Roy W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation slides examine: The Journey, Current Safety and Mission Assurance (S and MA) Oversight/Insight, The Change, The Issue, Potential NASA relationship with Commercial Partners, and Commercial "X" FRR - Are you Go.

  14. Exercise training in athletes with bicuspid aortic valve does not result in increased dimensions and impaired performance of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Laura; Galanti, Giorgio; Innocenti, Gabriele; Mercuri, Roberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Background. Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart disease (0.9%-2%) and is frequently found in the athletes and in the general population. BAV can lead to aortic valve dysfunction and to a progressive aortic dilatation. Trained BAV athletes exhibit a progressive enlargement of the left ventricle (LV) compared to athletes with normal aortic valve morphology. The present study investigates the possible relationship between different aortic valve morphology and LV dimensions. Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2011, we investigated a total of 292 BAV subjects, divided into three different groups (210 athletes, 59 sedentaries, and 23 ex-athletes). A 2D echocardiogram exam to classify BAV morphology and measure the standard LV systo-diastolic parameters was performed. The study was conducted as a 5-year follow-up echocardiographic longitudinal and as cross-sectional study. Results. Typical BAV was more frequent in all three groups (68% athletes, 67% sedentaries, and 63% ex-athletes) than atypical. In BAV athletes, the typical form was found in 51% (107/210) of soccer players, 10% (21/210) of basketball players, 10% track and field athletics (20/210), 8% (17/210) of cyclists, 6% (13/210) swimmers, and 15% (32/210) of rugby players and others sport. Despite a progressive enlargement of the LV (P < 0.001) observed during the follow-up study, no statistical differences of the LV morphology and function were evident among the diverse BAV patterns either in sedentary subjects or in athletes. Conclusion. In a large population of trained BAV athletes, with different prevalence of typical and atypical BAV type, there is a progressive nonstatistically significant enlargement of the LV. In any case, the dimensions of the LV remained within normal range. The metabolic requirements of the diverse sport examined in the present investigations do not seem to produce any negative impact in BAV athletes.

  15. Training Lymnaea in the presence of a predator scent results in a long-lasting ability to form enhanced long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Forest, Jeremy; Sunada, Hiroshi; Dodd, Shawn; Lukowiak, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Lymnaea exposed to crayfish effluent (CE) gain an enhanced ability to form long-term memory (LTM). We test the hypothesis that a single CE exposure and operant conditioning training leads to long lasting changes in the capability of snails to form LTM when tested in pond water four weeks later. We trained both juvenile and adult snails with a single 0.5 h training session in CE and show that LTM was present 24 h later. Snails trained in a similar manner in just pond water show no LTM. We then asked if such training in CE conferred enhanced memory forming capabilities on these snails four weeks later. That is, would LTM be formed in these snails four weeks later following a single 0.5 h training session in pond water? We found that both adult and juvenile snails previously trained in CE one month previously had enhanced LTM formation abilities. The injection of a DNA methylation blocker, 5-AZA, prior to training in adult snails blocked enhanced LTM formation four weeks later. Finally, this enhanced LTM forming ability was not passed on to the next generation of snails. PMID:27138222

  16. Peer-reviewed forensic consultation in practice: multidisciplinary oversight in common expertise.

    PubMed

    Welner, Michael; Davey, Emily E; Bernstein, Adam

    2014-09-01

    The fallibility of forensic science consultation is an ongoing and major justice concern. Prospective peer-reviewed forensic consultation has over 10 years of application in American criminal and civil courts, adapting from the traditional oversight of teaching hospitals, rules of evidence and discovery, conventions of testimony of expert witnesses, and attorneys' overall trial strategy. In systematizing heightened oversight, this process ensures greater accountability in forensic science consultation. The integration of peer reviewers' complementary expertise and experience enhances the sophistication and overall quality of assessment. Forensic examination frequently involves the interface of different specialties. Multidisciplinary peer review augments expert proficiency with that of professional peers having different vantage points from relevant scientific disciplines. This approach ensures greater sophistication of a case inquiry, built-in accountability, and streamlined processes when multiple experts are necessitated. Here, the authors present examples of several cases and the primary and secondary benefits of this collaborative, rigorous, cross-disciplinary exercise. PMID:24593117

  17. Peer-reviewed forensic consultation in practice: multidisciplinary oversight in common expertise.

    PubMed

    Welner, Michael; Davey, Emily E; Bernstein, Adam

    2014-09-01

    The fallibility of forensic science consultation is an ongoing and major justice concern. Prospective peer-reviewed forensic consultation has over 10 years of application in American criminal and civil courts, adapting from the traditional oversight of teaching hospitals, rules of evidence and discovery, conventions of testimony of expert witnesses, and attorneys' overall trial strategy. In systematizing heightened oversight, this process ensures greater accountability in forensic science consultation. The integration of peer reviewers' complementary expertise and experience enhances the sophistication and overall quality of assessment. Forensic examination frequently involves the interface of different specialties. Multidisciplinary peer review augments expert proficiency with that of professional peers having different vantage points from relevant scientific disciplines. This approach ensures greater sophistication of a case inquiry, built-in accountability, and streamlined processes when multiple experts are necessitated. Here, the authors present examples of several cases and the primary and secondary benefits of this collaborative, rigorous, cross-disciplinary exercise.

  18. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful.

  19. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    PubMed

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. PMID:26242961

  20. A randomized controlled trial of brain training with non-action video games in older adults: results of the 3-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Mayas, Julia; Prieto, Antonio; Toril, Pilar; Pita, Carmen; Laura, Ponce de León; Reales, José M; Waterworth, John A

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616) investigated the maintenance of training effects of 20 1-hr non-action video game training sessions with selected games from a commercial package on several age-declining cognitive functions and subjective wellbeing after a 3-month no-contact period. Two groups of cognitively normal older adults participated in both the post-training (posttest) and the present follow-up study, the experimental group who received training and the control group who attended several meetings with the research team during the study but did not receive training. Groups were similar at baseline on demographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. Significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group had been previously found at posttest, in processing speed, attention and visual recognition memory, as well as in two dimensions of subjective wellbeing. In the current study, improvement from baseline to 3 months follow-up was found only in wellbeing (Affection and Assertivity dimensions) in the trained group whereas there was no change in the control group. Previous significant improvements in processing speed, attention and spatial memory become non-significant after the 3-month interval. Training older adults with non-action video games enhanced aspects of cognition just after training but this effect disappeared after a 3-month no-contact follow-up period. Cognitive plasticity can be induced in older adults by training, but to maintain the benefits periodic boosting sessions would be necessary. PMID:25926790

  1. A randomized controlled trial of brain training with non-action video games in older adults: results of the 3-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Mayas, Julia; Prieto, Antonio; Toril, Pilar; Pita, Carmen; Laura, Ponce de León; Reales, José M.; Waterworth, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007616) investigated the maintenance of training effects of 20 1-hr non-action video game training sessions with selected games from a commercial package on several age-declining cognitive functions and subjective wellbeing after a 3-month no-contact period. Two groups of cognitively normal older adults participated in both the post-training (posttest) and the present follow-up study, the experimental group who received training and the control group who attended several meetings with the research team during the study but did not receive training. Groups were similar at baseline on demographics, vocabulary, global cognition, and depression status. Significant improvements in the trained group, and no variation in the control group had been previously found at posttest, in processing speed, attention and visual recognition memory, as well as in two dimensions of subjective wellbeing. In the current study, improvement from baseline to 3 months follow-up was found only in wellbeing (Affection and Assertivity dimensions) in the trained group whereas there was no change in the control group. Previous significant improvements in processing speed, attention and spatial memory become non-significant after the 3-month interval. Training older adults with non-action video games enhanced aspects of cognition just after training but this effect disappeared after a 3-month no-contact follow-up period. Cognitive plasticity can be induced in older adults by training, but to maintain the benefits periodic boosting sessions would be necessary. PMID:25926790

  2. Regulatory Organizations and Their Requirements. MAS-113. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to enable trainees to identify regulatory organizations and oversight groups and monitor and provide guidance in the implementation of the requirements of…

  3. Does government oversight improve access to nursing home care? Longitudinal evidence from US counties.

    PubMed

    Howard, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Gains in life expectancy around the world have increasingly placed pressure on governments to ensure that the elderly receive assistance with activities of daily living. This research examines the impact of government oversight of Medicaid payment policies on access to nursing home care services in the United States. Variation in price levels induced by a federal policy shift in 1997 is used to identify the effect of Medicaid reimbursements on the number of nursing homes and beds available. Court rulings prior to the policy change are used to categorically define a range of oversight treatments at the state level. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate a significant decline in access to nursing home care services for individuals living in states in which courts consistently ruled that Medicaid reimbursements did not meet the minimum standard implied by federal law. The findings suggest that nursing home care services were made more accessible through a combination of legislative and judicial oversight of Medicaid payment policies. PMID:25526725

  4. Pain medicine: The case for an independent medical specialty and training programs.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Michel Y; Follett, Kenneth A

    2014-06-01

    Over the last 30 years, pain has become one of the most dynamic areas of medicine and a public health issue. According to a recent Institute of Medicine report, pain affects approximately 100 million Americans at an estimated annual economic cost of $560 to $635 billion and is poorly treated overall. The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) recognizes a pain subspecialty, but pain care delivery has struggled with increasing demand and developed in an inconsistent and uncoordinated fashion. Pain education is insufficient and highly variable. Multiple pain professional organizations have led to fragmentation of the field and lack of interdisciplinary agreement, resulting in confusion regarding who speaks for pain medicine. In this Perspective, the authors argue that ABMS recognition of pain medicine as an independent medical specialty would provide much needed structure and oversight for the field and would generate credibility for the specialty and its providers among medical peers, payers, regulatory and legislative agencies, and the public at large. The existing system, managed by three ABMS boards, largely excludes other specialties that contribute to pain care, fails to provide leadership from a single professional organization, provides suboptimal training exposure to pain medicine, and lengthens training, which results in inefficient use of time and educational resources. The creation of a primary ABMS conjoint board in pain medicine with its own residency programs and departments would provide better coordinated training, ensure the highest degree of competence of pain medicine specialists, and improve the quality of pain care and patient safety.

  5. Training evaluation final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Jose A.

    1992-01-01

    In the area of management training, 'evaluation' refers both to the specific evaluation instrument used to determine whether a training effort was considered effective, and to the procedures followed to evaluate specific training requests. This report recommends to evaluate new training requests in the same way new procurement or new projects are evaluated. This includes examining training requests from the perspective of KSC goals and objectives, and determining expected ROI of proposed training program (does training result in improved productivity, through savings of time, improved outputs, and/or personnel reduction?). To determine whether a specific training course is effective, a statement of what constitutes 'good performance' is required. The user (NOT the Training Branch) must define what is 'required level of performance'. This 'model' will be the basis for the design and development of an objective, performance-based, training evaluation instrument.

  6. Effects of strengthening, stretching and functional training on foot function in patients with diabetic neuropathy: results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foot musculoskeletal deficits are seldom addressed by preventive medicine despite their high prevalence in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy. AIM: To investigate the effects of strengthening, stretching, and functional training on foot rollover process during gait. Methods A two-arm parallel-group randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor was designed. Fifty-five patients diagnosed with diabetic polyneuropathy, 45 to 65 years-old were recruited. Exercises for foot-ankle and gait training were administered twice a week, for 12 weeks, to 26 patients assigned to the intervention group, while 29 patients assigned to control group received recommended standard medical care: pharmacological treatment for diabetes and foot care instructions. Both groups were assessed after 12 weeks, and the intervention group at follow-up (24 weeks). Primary outcomes involved foot rollover changes during gait, including peak pressure (PP). Secondary outcomes involved time-to-peak pressure (TPP) and pressure–time integral (PTI) in six foot-areas, mean center of pressure (COP) velocity, ankle kinematics and kinetics in the sagittal plane, intrinsic and extrinsic muscle function, and functional tests of foot and ankle. Results Even though the intervention group primary outcome (PP) showed a not statistically significant change under the six foot areas, intention-to-treat comparisons yielded softening of heel strike (delayed heel TPP, p=.03), better eccentric control of forefoot contact (decrease in ankle extensor moment, p<.01; increase in function of ankle dorsiflexion, p<.05), earlier lateral forefoot contact with respect to medial forefoot (TPP anticipation, p<.01), and increased participation of hallux (increased PP and PTI, p=.03) and toes (increase in PTI, medium effect size). A slower COP mean velocity (p=.05), and an increase in overall foot and ankle function (p<.05) were also observed. In most cases, the values returned to baseline after the follow-up (p

  7. An alumni-based evaluation of graduate training in health communication: results of a survey on careers, salaries, competencies, and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Timothy; Hyde, James N

    2005-01-01

    Published information about career options and the core competencies necessary for health communication professionals (HCPs) is limited. Although the number of graduate programs in health communication continues to grow, no formal assessment of the success of this type of training has been conducted. The current study presents the results of an evaluation of the Master's Program in Health Communication offered collaboratively by Emerson College and the Tufts University School of Medicine. The program was one of the first of its kind and has graduated more health communication students than any other in the United States. To conduct the assessment of the program, the two schools collaborated on the development of an on-line survey for the alumni. Of the 131 graduates eligible to participate, 106 completed the survey. The survey yielded detailed information on the following: (1) career options for individuals with master's degrees in health communication; (2) value of graduate coursework for developing competencies in health communication; (3) salary expectations for individuals with graduate degrees in health communication; and (4) emerging trends in the field. These findings have important implications for the development of new programs and the refinement of existing ones in health communication. PMID:15764441

  8. Medical students' attitude towards rheumatology training at foundation years' level in the UK and rationale behind the students' choice: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Thapper, Muryum; Roussou, Euthalia

    2013-04-01

    The aims are to assess whether medical students are interested in rheumatology as a training post during post-medical-school and prior to specialty training that is covered by foundation years (FY) training in the UK, to determine the time spent in the undergraduate training in rheumatology and whether the desire for musculoskeletal (MsK) medicine training (rheumatology and orthopaedics taken together) is enhanced during FY training and to analyse the rationale behind their choice for rheumatology alone or combined with orthopaedics. An online questionnaire was distributed to all 31 UK medical schools, addressed to fourth-, fifth- and sixth-year medical students. The questionnaire was completed by 256 students from 11 of 31 medical schools existed in the UK in 2009. Most respondents (n = 156; 60.9 %) received 3 weeks (96 h) exposure to rheumatology, whilst one-fifth (n = 53; 20.7 %) had received no exposure in rheumatology. A total of 122 students of the 256 that responded (47.6 %) would like to do rheumatology as part of their training and 116 (45.3 %) would like to have more posts available in rheumatology. However, when asked to choose 6 specialties, out of 21, which would be most useful for post-university training, rheumatology was amongst the bottom three, attracting only 9.4 % of respondent students. A total of 68 of 256 (26.5 %) students, however, expressed a desire for MsK medicine: 44/256 (17.1 %) for orthopaedics and 24/256 (9.4 %) for rheumatology. From a total of 49 of 256 (19.1 %) open-ended responses obtained, 25 (51 %) were from those medical students willing to have exposure in MsK medicine: 15 of 44 (34 %) willing to have orthopaedics and 10 of 24 (41.6 %) willing to have rheumatology. Analysis of the responses revealed that it is mostly the specialty choice that guides towards specialty training. One in five of the medical students responded to had received (actual or perceived) no exposure to rheumatology during their undergraduate years. Career

  9. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  10. The EC and the Labour Market Oriented Vocational Training Policies of the European Regions: Examples and Evaluations. Results of the CEDEFOP Project "Vocational Training and Regional Development." CEDEFOP Flash 3/89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derenbach, Rolf

    1989-01-01

    This summary of the plans for additional research in the project called "Vocational Training and Regional Development" lists the following aspects and criteria of the common evaluation approach: regional framework conditions, program structure, organizational features, pedagogical approach, and procedure in evaluating the success of the program.…

  11. Positive Reinforcement Training for Blood Collection in Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) Results in Undetectable Elevations in Serum Cortisol Levels: A Preliminary Investigation.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Zuniga, Nicole M; Newberry, Ruth C; Robbins, Charles T; Ware, Jasmine V; Jansen, Heiko T; Nelson, O Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Training nonhuman animals in captivity for participation in routine husbandry procedures is believed to produce a lower stress environment compared with undergoing a general anesthetic event for the same procedure. This hypothesis rests largely on anecdotal evidence that the captive subjects appear more relaxed with the trained event. Blood markers of physiological stress responses were evaluated in 4 captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) who were clicker-trained for blood collection versus 4 bears who were chemically immobilized for blood collection. Serum cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) and plasma β-endorphin were measured as indicators of responses to stress. Plasma β-endorphin was not different between the groups. Serum IgA was undetectable in all bears. Serum cortisol was undetectable in all trained bears, whereas chemically immobilized bears had marked cortisol elevations (p < .05). The highest cortisol elevations were found in 2 bears with extensive recent immobilization experience. These findings support the use of positive reinforcement training for routine health procedures to minimize anxiety. PMID:26847149

  12. Positive Reinforcement Training for Blood Collection in Grizzly Bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) Results in Undetectable Elevations in Serum Cortisol Levels: A Preliminary Investigation.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Zuniga, Nicole M; Newberry, Ruth C; Robbins, Charles T; Ware, Jasmine V; Jansen, Heiko T; Nelson, O Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Training nonhuman animals in captivity for participation in routine husbandry procedures is believed to produce a lower stress environment compared with undergoing a general anesthetic event for the same procedure. This hypothesis rests largely on anecdotal evidence that the captive subjects appear more relaxed with the trained event. Blood markers of physiological stress responses were evaluated in 4 captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) who were clicker-trained for blood collection versus 4 bears who were chemically immobilized for blood collection. Serum cortisol and immunoglobulin A (IgA) and plasma β-endorphin were measured as indicators of responses to stress. Plasma β-endorphin was not different between the groups. Serum IgA was undetectable in all bears. Serum cortisol was undetectable in all trained bears, whereas chemically immobilized bears had marked cortisol elevations (p < .05). The highest cortisol elevations were found in 2 bears with extensive recent immobilization experience. These findings support the use of positive reinforcement training for routine health procedures to minimize anxiety.

  13. Utilization of village midwives and other trained delivery attendants for home deliveries in Indonesia: results of Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey 2002/2003 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Titaley, Christiana R; Dibley, Michael J; Roberts, Christine L

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to examine factors associated with utilization of village midwife and other trained delivery attendants for home deliveries. Information from 14,672 cases of the most recent home deliveries of mothers in the 5 year-period prior to the Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey 2002/2003 and 2007 were analysed. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was performed. The association between 26 factors categorised into external environment, predisposing, enabling, need and previous utilization of maternal health services, and utilization of village midwife and other trained delivery attendants, such as nurses, other midwives and doctors, for home deliveries was examined. The population attributable risk of selected significant predictors was calculated. The odds of using village midwives and other trained delivery attendants at childbirth for home deliveries increased with increasing household wealth index and levels of parental education. The odds increased among first birth, mothers who were exposed to mass media, mothers with knowledge of delivery complications, and mothers who had any delivery complications. However, mothers who attended less than four antenatal care visits, who had high parity, or who reported distance and transportation to health facilities was a major problem, had significantly reduced odds for utilizing any trained delivery attendants. Health promotion strategies to raise community awareness about the importance of safe delivery should target low educated parents, mothers from low household economic status, as well as high parity mothers. Efforts to promote antenatal care visits are likely to increase utilization of trained delivery attendants for home deliveries in Indonesia. PMID:20936501

  14. 7 CFR 1290.9 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... issue, problem, interest, or need for each project. (2) How the issue or problem was approached via the project(s). (3) How the goals of each project were achieved. (4) Results, conclusions, and lessons...

  15. 7 CFR 1290.9 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... issue, problem, interest, or need for each project. (2) How the issue or problem was approached via the project(s). (3) How the goals of each project were achieved. (4) Results, conclusions, and lessons...

  16. 7 CFR 1291.10 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... include the following: (1) Project Summary. An outline of the issue, problem, interest, or need for each... Learned. Lessons learned, results, conclusions, for each project. If outcome measures were not achieved, identify and share the lessons learned to help expedite problem-solving. (6) Contact Person. List...

  17. 7 CFR 1291.10 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... include the following: (1) Project Summary. An outline of the issue, problem, interest, or need for each... Learned. Lessons learned, results, conclusions, for each project. If outcome measures were not achieved, identify and share the lessons learned to help expedite problem-solving. (6) Contact Person. List...

  18. 7 CFR 1291.10 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... impediments for each project. (3) Future Project Plans. Outline work to be performed during the next reporting... the project's accomplishments, and/or the potential economic impact of each project. (5) Lessons Learned. Lessons learned, results, conclusions, for each project. If outcome measures were not...

  19. 7 CFR 1290.9 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... project(s). (3) How the goals of each project were achieved. (4) Results, conclusions, and lessons learned... determines necessary, to assure that projects are completed in accordance with the approved State plan. If... substantially with any provision or requirement of the State plan, AMS may disqualify, for one or more...

  20. 7 CFR 1291.10 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... impediments for each project. (3) Future Project Plans. Outline work to be performed during the next reporting... the project's accomplishments, and/or the potential economic impact of each project. (5) Lessons Learned. Lessons learned, results, conclusions, for each project. If outcome measures were not...

  1. 7 CFR 1290.9 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... project(s). (3) How the goals of each project were achieved. (4) Results, conclusions, and lessons learned... determines necessary, to assure that projects are completed in accordance with the approved State plan. If... substantially with any provision or requirement of the State plan, AMS may disqualify, for one or more...

  2. 7 CFR 1291.10 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Learned. Lessons learned, results, conclusions, for each project. If outcome measures were not achieved, identify and share the lessons learned to help expedite problem-solving. (6) Contact Person. List the.... Include other relevant project information available (e.g. publications, Web sites, photographs). (c)...

  3. Moscow Test Well, INEL Oversight Program: Aqueous geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    McCurry, M.; Fromm, J.; Welhan, J.

    1992-09-29

    This report presents a summary and interpretation of data gathered during sampling of the Moscow Test Well at Moscow, Idaho during April and May of 1992. The principal objectives of this chemical survey were to validate sampling procedures with a new straddle packer sampling tool in a previously hydrologically well characterized and simple sampling environment, and to compare analytical results from two independent labs for reproducibility of analytical results. Analytes included a wide range of metals, anions, nutrients, BNA`s, and VOC`s. Secondary objectives included analyzing of waters from a large distilled water tank (utilized for all field laboratory purposes as ``pure`` stock water), of water which passed through a steamer used to clean the packer, and of rinsates from the packer tool itself before it was lowered into the test well. Analyses were also obtained of blanks and spikes for data validation purposes.

  4. EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER KD

    2009-01-08

    The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

  5. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation`s DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) is responsible for assuring the citizens of Tennessee that their health, safety and environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation are protected and that appropriate remedial action is taken to provide this protection. TDEC/DOE-O has five program sections that reflect the organizational structure of the TDEC Bureau of Environment Divisions, as well as DOE`s Environmental Safety and Health, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs.

  6. "Revolting to humanity": oversights, limitations, and complications of the English Legitimacy Act of 1926.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses three areas that limited the effectiveness of the English Legitimacy Act of 1926. First, re-registration was public, expensive, and time-consuming. Second, the Treasury Office used the change in the law of intestacy to refuse more distant relatives' claims on estates. Third, the law separated legitimacy from nationality, thus denying citizenship to legitimated children born abroad of British fathers and foreign mothers. In short, both because of parliamentary oversights and civil servants' narrow interpretations of the law, relatively few children took advantage of the Act, and the minority who did, rather than being 'illegitimate' or 'legitimate', were a third category, the 'legitimated'.

  7. Paradental Training Contract.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This report describes institutional, faculty, and student activities and problems resulting from Lane Community College's acceptance of a federal contract to develop a paradental training program designed specifically to provide training/retraining required to quality military-trained dental corpsmen for examination by the Oregon State Board of…

  8. The Effect of Long-Term Training Program on Balance in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Results of a Pilot Study for Individually Based Functional Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzun, Selda

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of long-term training program on balance and center of pressure (COP) for four male children (13 years of age) with cerebral palsy (CP). These children were classified into one hemiplegic (level II), one diplegic (level II) and two quadriplegic children (levels III and II) using the Gross Motor Function…

  9. Skills-Based Residency Training in Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention: Results from the Georgia-Texas "Improving Brief Intervention" Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, J. Paul; Velasquez, Mary M.; Johnson, J. Aaron; Shellenberger, Sylvia; von Sternberg, Kirk; Dodrill, Carrie; Boltri, John M.; Takei, Roy; Clark, Denice; Grace, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI) is recommended for all primary care patients but is underutilized. This project trained 111 residents and faculty in 8 family medicine residencies to conduct SBI and implement SBI protocols in residency clinics, then assessed changes in self-reported importance and confidence in performing SBI and…

  10. Functional Anatomy of the Cardiovascular System: Professional Development for PreK-3 Teachers Using a "Train and Equip" Method Results in Learning Opportunities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, E. Robert

    2008-01-01

    Preadolescent students are interested in learning the structure and function of the human body. However, their teachers are not trained in this content. The purpose of this project was to expand a successful outreach effort in the health sciences for grade 7-12 teachers to include PreK-3 teachers. A "Healthy Hearts" workshop was offered to train…

  11. Lifelong Learning among Canadians Aged 18 to 64 Years: First Results from the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knighton, Tamara; Hujaleh, Filsan; Iacampo, Joe; Werkneh, Gugsa

    2009-01-01

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: (1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational…

  12. Literacy behind Bars: Results from the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy Prison Survey: Chapter 4--Education and Job Training in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Elizabeth; Dunleavy, Eric; Kutner, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Prisons are intended to rehabilitate criminal offenders, as well as to punish and incapacitate them. The education and training systems operating within most prisons are a key component of the rehabilitation mission of prisons. Previous studies have shown a relationship between participation in educational programs and recidivism rates, with…

  13. 13 CFR 120.1055 - Review and examination results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Review and examination results... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1055 Review and examination results. (a) Written Reports... result of the SBA Lender review or examination (“Report”). The Report may contain findings,...

  14. 13 CFR 120.1055 - Review and examination results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Review and examination results... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1055 Review and examination results. (a) Written Reports... result of the SBA Lender review or examination (“Report”). The Report may contain findings,...

  15. 13 CFR 120.1055 - Review and examination results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Review and examination results... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1055 Review and examination results. (a) Written Reports... result of the SBA Lender review or examination (“Report”). The Report may contain findings,...

  16. Adaptations in upper-body maximal strength and power output resulting from long-term resistance training in experienced strength-power athletes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Daniel G; Newton, Robert U

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to observe changes in maximal upper-body strength and power and shifts in the load-power curve across a multiyear period in experienced resistance trainers. Twelve professional rugby league players who regularly performed combined maximal strength and power training were observed across a 4-year period with test data reported every 2 years (years 1998, 2000, and 2002). Upper-body strength was assessed by the 1 repetition maximum bench press and maximum power during bench press throws (BT Pmax) with various barbell resistances of 40-80 kg. During the initial testing, players also were identified as elite (n = 6) or subelite (n = 6), depending upon whether they participated in the elite first-division national league or second-division league. This subgrouping allowed for a comparison of the scope of changes dependent upon initial strength and training experience. The subelite group was significantly younger, less strong, and less powerful than the elite group, but no other difference existed in height or body mass in 1998. Across the 4-year period, significant increases in strength occurred for the group as a whole and larger increases were observed for the subelite than the elite group, verifying the limited scope that exists for strength gain in more experienced, elite resistance-trained athletes. A similar trend occurred for changes in BT Pmax. This long-term observation confirms that the rate of progress in strength and power development diminishes with increased strength levels and resistance training experience. Furthermore, it also indicates that strength and power can still be increased despite a high volume of concurrent resistance and endurance training. PMID:16937966

  17. Workmanship Standards Personnel Training and Certification Explained

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Jeannette F.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the standards that NASA requires for workmanship and discusses the rationale and the NASA-STD-8739.x standard series. The training and certification of inspectors and operators is to guarantee that workmanship is qualified for NASA applications. The NASA workmanship standard documents review the standards for: Polymeric Applications, Surface Mount Technology, Soldered Electrical Connections, Crimp, Cable and Harnesses, Fiber Optic Terminations, including ANSI and IPC standards for Electrostatic Discharge Safety, Space Applications Electronic Hardware and Requirements for Soldered Electrical and Electronic Assemblies. It also reviews the certification requirements for appropriate personnel. It also reviews the various levels of trainers for the various requirements. There is also a review of calibration requirements for training equipment. Some variations on the curriculum are allowed. NASA requires operators and inspectors to be certified by their employer to ensure that oversight is being performed.

  18. Robotics Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettlie, John E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need for training and education in new skill areas. Points out that the right people often do not get the right training. Too often engineers and skilled workers are trained to the exclusion of supervisors and operators. (JOW)

  19. Role of external oversight in quality activities: accreditation, credentialing, licensure, and deemed status.

    PubMed

    Wish, J B

    1998-12-01

    There currently exist a number of organizations which provide quality oversight to the ESRD program in the United States. The state surveyors confirm that dialysis facilities comply with Medicare's conditions of coverage, but surveyor activities have traditionally followed a quality assurance rather than a continuous quality improvement (CQI) model. State surveyors focus primarily on nursing homes, so their content knowledge of ESRD quality issues may be limited. The ESRD Networks have CQI expertise on their staffs, and their quality agenda is driven by their medical review boards, whose members bring scientific and technical expertise from the provider community. The success of the Networks in achieving quality goals has been hampered by personnel and resource limitations and by inconsistent direction by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA). Texas has developed a dialysis facility licensure program that partners its ESRD Network and its Medicare state surveyors in quality oversight activities. This collaboration has led to improved patient outcomes and may prove to be a model for other states. Non-Medicare payers may contract with dialysis providers based on performance specifications that exceed those of Medicare's conditions of coverage. A private credentialing mechanism for dialysis facilities that satisfies the performance specifications of all payers has been proposed but, in the absence of deemed status for Medicare survey and certification activities, is unlikely to achieve widespread acceptance. PMID:9892388

  20. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  1. Interweaving Curriculum Committees: A New Structure to Facilitate Oversight and Sustain Innovation.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Hugh A; Brownfield, Erica D; Churchward, Gordon; Eley, J William

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate medical education curricula have increased in complexity over the past 25 years; however, the structures for administrative oversight of those curricula remain static. Although expectations for central oversight of medical school curricula have increased, individual academic departments often expect to exert control over the faculty and courses that are supported by the department. The structure of a governance committee in any organization can aid or inhibit that organization's functioning. In 2013, following a major curriculum change in 2007, the Emory University School of Medicine (EUSOM) implemented an "interwoven" configuration for its curriculum committee to better oversee the integrated curriculum. The new curriculum committee structure involves a small executive committee and 10 subcommittees. Each subcommittee performs a specific task or oversees one element of the curriculum. Members, including students, are appointed to two subcommittees in a way that each subcommittee is composed of representatives from multiple other subcommittees. This interweaving facilitates communication between subcommittees and also encourages members to become experts in specific tasks while retaining a comprehensive perspective on student outcomes. EUSOM's previous structure of a single committee with members representing individual departments did not promote cohesive management. The interwoven structure aligns neatly with the goals of the integrated curriculum. Since the restructuring, subcommittee members have been engaged in discussions and decisions on many key issues and expressed satisfaction with the format. The new structure corresponds to EUSOM's educational goals, although the long-term impact on student outcomes still needs to be assessed.

  2. Board oversight of quality: any differences in process of care and mortality?

    PubMed

    Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Bass, Karma; Fraser, Irene

    2009-01-01

    In response to legal and accreditation mandates as well as pressures from purchasers and consumers for quality improvement, hospital governing boards seek to improve their oversight of quality of care by adopting various practices. Based on a previous survey of hospital presidents/chief executive officers, this study examines differences in hospital quality performance associated with the adoption of particular practices in board oversight of quality. Quality was measured by performance in process of care and risk-adjusted mortality, using the Hospital Compare data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project inpatient databases of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Board practices found to be associated with better performance in both process of care and mortality include (1) having a board quality committee; (2) establishing strategic goals for quality improvement; (3) being involved in setting the quality agenda for the hospital; (4) including a specific item on quality in board meetings; (5) using a dashboard with national benchmarks that includes indicators for clinical quality, patient safety, and patient satisfaction; and (6) linking senior executives' performance evaluation to quality and patient safety indicators. Involvement of physician leadership in the board quality committee further enhanced the hospital's quality performance. Taken together, these findings seem to support the will-execution-constancy of purpose framework on improving the effectiveness of hospital boards in overseeing quality. Future study should examine how specific board practices influence the culture and operations of the hospital that lead to better quality of care.

  3. Internet-based treatment of stress urinary incontinence: 1- and 2-year results of a randomized controlled trial with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training

    PubMed Central

    Sjöström, Malin; Umefjord, Göran; Stenlund, Hans; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard; Samuelsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the long-term effects of two non-face-to-face treatment programmes for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) based on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). Subjects and Methods The present study was a randomized controlled trial with online recruitment of 250 community-dwelling women aged 18–70 years with SUI ≥ one time/week. Diagnosis was based on validated self-assessed questionnaires, 2-day bladder diary and telephone interview with a urotherapist. Consecutive computer-generated block randomization was carried out with allocation by an independent administrator to 3 months of treatment with either an internet-based treatment programme (n = 124) or a programme sent by post (n = 126). Both interventions focused mainly on PFMT. The internet group received continuous e-mail support from a urotherapist, whereas the postal group trained on their own. Follow-up was performed after 1 and 2 years via self-assessed postal questionnaires. The primary outcomes were symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]). Secondary outcomes were the Patient Global Impression of Improvement, health-specific quality of life (EQ-visual analogue scale [EQ-VAS]), use of incontinence aids, and satisfaction with treatment. There was no face-to-face contact with the participants at any time. Analysis was based on intention-to-treat. Results We lost 32.4% (81/250) of participants to follow-up after 1 year and 38.0% (95/250) after 2 years. With both interventions, we observed highly significant (P < 0.001) improvements with large effect sizes (>0.8) for symptoms and condition-specific quality of life (QoL) after 1 and 2 years, respectively. No significant differences were found between the groups. The mean (sd) changes in symptom score were 3.7 (3.3) for the internet group and 3.2 (3.4) for the postal group (P = 0

  4. Does previous participation in high-impact training result in residual bone gain in growing girls? One year follow-up of a 9-month jumping intervention.

    PubMed

    Kontulainen, S A; Kannus, P A; Pasanen, M E; Sievänen, H T; Heinonen, A O; Oja, P; Vuori, I

    2002-11-01

    The skeletal response to exercise and training on bone is exceptionally good during the growing years. However, it is not known whether the benefit of training on bone is maintained after the training. This 20-month follow-up study assessed the effect of a 9-month jumping intervention on bone gain and physical performance in 99 girls (mean age 12.5 +/- 1.5 years at the beginning of the study) one year after the end of the intervention. Both bone mineral content (BMC), by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the lumbar spine and proximal femur, and physical performance parameters (standing long jump, leg extension strength, and shuttle run tests) were measured at baseline and at 20 months. A multivariate regression analysis was first used to determine the best predictors of the BMC accrual by time. Analysis showed that age at baseline and square of age, changes in height and weight, and pubertal development into Tanner stages 4 and 5 during the follow-up explained the majority of the BMC gain. Then, the effect of participation in the 9-month exercise intervention on BMC accrual and physical performance was analysed adding this variable (participation: yes/no) into the model. The regression analysis showed that the trainees (N = 50) had 4.9 % (95 % CI, 0.9 % to 8.8 %, p = 0.017) greater BMC increase in the lumbar spine than the controls (N = 49). The mean 20-month BMC increase in the lumbar spine was 28 % (SD 19) in the trainees compared to 22 % (12) increase in the controls. In the proximal femur, the trend was similar but the obtained 2 to 3 % higher BMC accrual in the trainees (compared to that in controls) were statistically insignificant. Among the performance variables, using the same model that best predicted the BMC accrual, the only statistically significant between-groups difference, in favour of the trainees, was the improvement in the standing long jump test (6.4 %, 95 % CI, 2.3 % to 10.4 %, p = 0.002). Improvements in the leg extension strength and

  5. Indian Education Oversight. Hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session on Oversight of Indian Education (May 18-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    The Indian education oversight hearing of May 18 and 19, 1982, focused on federal responsibility for the education of Indians; Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) education services (including BIA elementary and secondary schools and contract schools); proposed transfer of the Indian Education Act, Title IV, program from the Department of Education to…

  6. District of Columbia Public School Census and Enrollment Oversight. Hearing before the Subcommittee on the District of Columbia of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House of Representatives. One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.

    The Subcommittee on the District of Columbia of the House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight held a hearing to discuss an accurate census of the District of Columbia public schools and the system's enrollment. Subcommittee Chairman Thomas M. Davis (Virginia) noted that an accurate and reliable count of student enrollment is directly…

  7. Effects of Correspondence Training in an Abduction Prevention Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen-Woods, Laurie A.; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Foreman, Greg

    1998-01-01

    Examines the effects of adding correspondence training to a behavioral skills training package that taught abduction prevention skills to 31 children, ages 4-5 years. Results indicate that correspondence training did not improve correspondence between saying and doing target behaviors. However, both training approaches were equally effective in…

  8. State Education Department--Oversight of School Districts' Special Education Classification and Placement Processes for School-Age Children. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit and State Financial Services.

    This report presents findings of an audit of the New York State Education Department's Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID). The audit concluded that VESID oversight of school districts may not be adequately targeting formal reviews of special education programs to those districts that pose the…

  9. 75 FR 72816 - Public Input for the Study Regarding the Oversight of Existing and Prospective Carbon Markets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... 145.9 (17 CFR 145.9). The Commission reserves the right, but shall have no obligation, to review, pre... Green Exchange.\\1\\ Under the various bills, different proposals have been set forth with respect to the oversight of a carbon market that would be established in those bills. \\1\\ The CFTC designated the...

  10. 45 CFR 156.480 - Oversight of the administration of the cost-sharing reductions and advance payments of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING STANDARDS RELATED TO EXCHANGES Health Insurance Issuer Responsibilities With Respect to Advance Payments of the Premium Tax Credit and Cost... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oversight of the administration of the...

  11. 12 CFR 361.5 - What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program? 361.5 Section 361.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING §...

  12. 12 CFR 361.5 - What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program? 361.5 Section 361.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING §...

  13. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). ACTION: Notice; request for... Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern. The proposed... sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for such research. These requirements...

  14. 78 FR 39021 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board; System of Records Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... Request Files''. DATES: Written comments should be submitted on or before July 29, 2013. This new system... proposed creation of a system of records for FOIA and Privacy Act case files. SYSTEM OF RECORDS PCLOB--1, Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act Files. SYSTEM NAME: Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight...

  15. 76 FR 40950 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... COMMISSION Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's Accounting Support Fee Among Issuers, Brokers, and Dealers, and Other... 2002 (the ``Act''), notice is hereby given that on June 21, 2011, the Public Company...

  16. 78 FR 48173 - Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations-A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Investigations--A Risk-Based Approach to Monitoring; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Oversight of Clinical Investigations--A Risk-Based Approach to...

  17. Argonne National Laboratory Internal Appraisal Program environment, safety, health/quality assurance oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Winner, G.L.; Siegfried, Y.S.; Forst, S.P.; Meshenberg, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Internal Appraisal Program has developed a quality assurance team member training program. This program has been developed to provide training to non-quality assurance professionals. Upon successful completion of this training and approval of the Internal Appraisal Program Manager, these personnel are considered qualified to assist in the conduct of quality assurance assessments. The training program has been incorporated into a self-paced, computerized, training session.

  18. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  19. A Study of Training Program Characteristics and Training Program Effectiveness among Organizations Receiving Training Services from External Training Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paek, Jeeyon; Hawley, Joshua D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of training program characteristics on training effectiveness among organizations receiving training services from external training providers. Two surveys were sent to HRD managers and senior managers per company. The results showed that the operational margin of the programs where private…

  20. Payload training methodology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The results of the Payload Training Methodology Study (PTMS) are documented. Methods and procedures are defined for the development of payload training programs to be conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Training Complex (PCT) for the Space Station Freedom program. The study outlines the overall training program concept as well as the six methodologies associated with the program implementation. The program concept outlines the entire payload training program from initial identification of training requirements to the development of detailed design specifications for simulators and instructional material. The following six methodologies are defined: (1) The Training and Simulation Needs Assessment Methodology; (2) The Simulation Approach Methodology; (3) The Simulation Definition Analysis Methodology; (4) The Simulator Requirements Standardization Methodology; (5) The Simulator Development Verification Methodology; and (6) The Simulator Validation Methodology.

  1. Unfinished business: ongoing ethical exceptionalism in the oversight of human pluripotent stem cell research in Canada.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Françoise; Downie, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we critically examine the arguments for and against the exceptional status given human pluripotent stem cell research in Canada (through the latest [December 2010] revision of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans), and conclude that this exceptionalism is unwarranted and ethically unsound. In our view, the three federal research granting agencies should honor their longstanding commitment that researchers, research sponsors, and Research Ethics Boards in Canada have access to "a single reference document for all research involving humans conducted under the auspices of institutions eligible for Agency funding." As well, responsibility for the development, interpretation, and implementation of Canada's research ethics guidelines should be under the authority of a single oversight body that is independent of the federal research granting Agencies.

  2. Methods and Management: NIH Administrators, Federal Oversight, and the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sejal S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This article explores the 1965 controversy over the Framingham Heart Study in the midst of growing oversight into the management of science at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It describes how, beginning in the early 1960s, federal overseers demanded that NIH administrators adopt particular management styles in administering programs and how these growing pressures led administrators to favor investigative pursuits that allowed for easy prospective accounting of program payoffs, especially those based on experimental methods designed to examine discrete interventions or outcomes of interest. In light of this changing managerial culture within the NIH, the Framingham study and other population laboratories—with their bases in observation and in open-ended study designs—became harder for NIH administrators to justify and defend. PMID:22643985

  3. Mort User's Manual: For use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  4. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993--May 12, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division`s efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division`s efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE`s compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division`s findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division`s request to be an active participant in DOE`s prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year`s annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division`s office.

  5. Association of Candidate Removals From the Kidney Transplant Waiting List and Center Performance Oversight.

    PubMed

    Schold, J D; Buccini, L D; Poggio, E D; Flechner, S M; Goldfarb, D A

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 59 000 kidney transplant candidates have been removed from the waiting list since 2000 for reasons other than transplantation, death, or transfers. Prior studies indicate that low-performance (LP) center evaluations by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) are associated with reductions in transplant volume. There is limited information to determine whether performance oversight impacts waitlist management. We used national SRTR data to evaluate outcomes of 315 796 candidates on the kidney transplant waiting list (2007-2014). Compared to centers without LP, rates of waitlist removal (WLR) were higher at centers with LP evaluations (44.6/1000 follow-up years, 95% confidence interval [CI] 44.0, 45.1 versus 68.0/1000 follow-up years, 95% CI 66.6, 69.4), respectively, which was consistent after risk adjustment (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.59, 95% CI 1.55, 1.63). Candidate mortality following waitlist removal was lower at LP centers (AHR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.87, 0.94). Analyses limited to LP centers indicated a significant increase in WLR (+28.6 removals/1000 follow-up years, p < 0.001), a decrease in transplant rates (-11.9/1000 follow-up years, p < 0.001) and a decrease in mortality after removal (-67.5 deaths/1000 follow-up years, p < 0.001) following LP evaluation. There is a significant association between LP evaluations and transplant center processes of care for waitlisted candidates. Further understanding is needed to determine the impact of performance oversight on transplant center quality of care and patient outcomes. PMID:26762606

  6. Impact of Short- and Long-term Tai Chi Mind-Body Exercise Training on Cognitive Function in Healthy Adults: Results From a Hybrid Observational Study and Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jacquelyn N.; Manor, Brad; Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Novak, Vera; Lipsitz, Lewis; Gow, Brian; Macklin, Eric A.; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cognitive decline amongst older adults is a significant public health concern. There is growing interest in behavioral interventions, including exercise, for improving cognition. Studies to date suggest tai chi (TC) may be a safe and potentially effective exercise for preserving cognitive function with aging; however, its short-term and potential long-term impact on physically active, healthy adults is unclear. Objective: To compare differences in cognitive function among long-term TC expert practitioners and age-matched and gender-matched TC-naïve adults and to determine the effects of short-term TC training on measures of cognitive function in healthy, nonsedentary adults. Design: A hybrid design including an observational comparison and a 2-arm randomized clinical trial (RCT) Participants: Healthy, nonsedentary, TC-naive adults (50 y-79 y) and age-matched and gender-matched long-term TC experts Methods: A cross-sectional comparison of cognitive function in healthy TC-naïve (n=60) and TC expert (24.5 y ÷ 12 y experience; n=27) adults: TC-naïve adults then completed a 6-month, 2-arm, wait-list randomized clinical trial of TC training. Six measures of cognitive function were assessed for both cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons. Results: TC experts exhibited trends towards better scores on all cognitive measures, significantly so for category fluency (P=.01), as well as a composite z score summarizing all 6 cognitive assessments (P=.03). In contrast, random assignment to 6 months of TC training in TC-naïve adults did not significantly improve any measures of cognitive function. Conclusions: In healthy nonsedentary adults, long-term TC training may help preserve cognitive function; however, the effect of short-term TC training in healthy adults remains unclear. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01340365 PMID:26331103

  7. Hazmat training.

    PubMed

    Borak, J

    1991-04-01

    Federal laws and regulations require hazardous-materials-response training for EMS personnel and other emergency responders. The requirements, however, aren't entirely clear about the amount of time and topics to be covered for EMS training. EMTs and paramedics should either be trained to the highest level at which they are likely to perform, or their performance levels should be restricted to the highest level to which they have been trained.

  8. Toilet training.

    PubMed

    Choby, Beth A; George, Shefaa

    2008-11-01

    Toilet training is a developmental task that impacts families with small children. All healthy children are eventually toilet trained, and most complete the task without medical intervention. Most research on toilet training is descriptive, although some is evidence based. In the United States, the average age at which training begins has increased over the past four decades from earlier than 18 months of age to between 21 and 36 months of age. Newer studies suggest no benefit of intensive training before 27 months of age. Mastery of the developmental skills required for toilet training occurs after 24 months of age. Girls usually complete training earlier than boys. Numerous toilet-training methods are available. The Brazelton child-oriented approach uses physiologic maturity, ability to understand and respond to external feedback, and internal motivation to assess readiness. Dr. Spock's toilet-training approach is another popular method used by parents. The American Academy of Pediatrics incorporates components of the child-oriented approach into its guidelines for toilet training. "Toilet training in a day," a method by Azrin and Foxx, emphasizes operant conditioning and teaches specific toileting components. Because each family and child are unique, recommendations about the ideal time or optimal method must be customized. Family physicians should provide guidance about toilet-training methods and identify children who have difficulty reaching developmental milestones.

  9. Training Visions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, "Training" asks the 2011 winners to give their predictions for what training--either in general or specifically at their companies--will look like in the next five to 10 years. Perhaps their "training visions" will spark some ideas in one's organization--or at least help prepare for what might be coming in the next decade or so.

  10. Results of a National Radiology Attending Physician Survey: The Effects of In-House Late and Overnight Attending Coverage on Radiology Resident Training.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jason C; Singh, Ayushi; Mittal, Sameer; Peterkin, Yuri; Flug, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, there has been increased attending-level image interpretation during what has typically been considered the on-call period. The purpose of this study is to survey radiology attending physicians and assess their perceptions about how the presence of radiology attending physicians during the on-call period affects patient care and resident education. Two hundred eighty-eight radiology attendings completed the online survey. 70% believe that after hours final reads by radiology attendings improves patient care. 56% believe that this additional attending presence has a negative impact on the ability of graduating residents to efficiently interpret studies independently. A majority of radiology attending physicians in this study believe that increased in-house radiology attending coverage is harming resident training across the United States, yet also believe this attending presence is important for patient care. Additional studies are needed to quantify and further evaluate this effect, and develop strategies to address potential negative impacts on radiology resident education. PMID:27020255

  11. Combined Cognitive Training vs. Memory Strategy Training in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Zhu, Xinyi; Hou, Jianhua; Chen, Tingji; Wang, Pengyun; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    As mnemonic utilization deficit in older adults associates with age-related decline in executive function, we hypothesized that memory strategy training combined with executive function training might induce larger training effect in memory and broader training effects in non-memory outcomes than pure memory training. The present study compared the effects of combined cognitive training (executive function training plus memory strategy training) to pure memory strategy training. Forty healthy older adults were randomly assigned to a combined cognitive training group or a memory strategy training group. A control group receiving no training was also included. Combined cognitive training group received 16 sessions of training (eight sessions of executive function training followed by eight sessions of memory strategy training). Memory training group received 16 sessions of memory strategy training. The results partly supported our hypothesis in that indeed improved performance on executive function was only found in combined training group, whereas memory performance increased less in combined training compared to memory strategy group. Results suggest that combined cognitive training may be less efficient than pure memory training in memory outcomes, though the influences from insufficient training time and less closeness between trained executive function and working memory could not be excluded; however it has broader training effects in non-memory outcomes. Clinical Trial Registration: www.chictr.org.cn, identifier ChiCTR-OON-16007793. PMID:27375521

  12. World's simplest electric train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, C.; Alamo, N.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the physics of the "world's simplest electric train." The "train" consists of a AA battery with a strong magnet on each end that moves through a helical coil of copper wire. The motion of the train results from the interaction between the magnetic field created by the current in the wire and the magnetic field of the magnets. We calculate the force of this interaction and the terminal velocity of the train due to eddy currents and friction. Our calculations provide a good illustration of Faraday's and Lenz's laws, as well as of the concepts of the Lorentz force and eddy currents.

  13. Training compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.N. )

    1989-02-01

    Legally mandated training to effect compliance with environmental regulations came into prominence with RCRA. Training and its associated recordkeeping requirements were to be in place by May 18, 1981, but, for the most part, this deadline went unnoticed. Whether the lack of response reflected that fact that the RCRA regulations were extremely confusing or that the training requirements were not taken seriously is hard to determine. Ironically, while RCRA facilities were frequently deficient in meeting the training requirements, it was this specific aspect of the regulations that inexperienced inspectors often targeted and cited. Over the years, through a combination of citations and, more importantly, an increasing appreciation of the benefits of training, the attitude toward regulatory compliance training slowly improved. This paper reflects the attitudes of both management and the workers receiving the training.

  14. 1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico`s DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad.

  15. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    PubMed

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety. PMID:22606923

  16. Can the FDA improve oversight of foreign clinical trials?: Closing the information gap and moving towards a globalized regulatory scheme.

    PubMed

    Ourso, André

    2012-01-01

    Currently, pharmaceutical companies' utilization of foreign clinical trial data is a ubiquitous and indispensable aspect of gaining approval to market drugs in the United States. Cost benefits, a larger pool of ready volunteer subjects, and greater efficiency in clinical testing are some of the reasons for conducting clinical trials overseas. Despite these advantages, lack of proper oversight may have serious public health implications regarding the integrity of clinical research, ethical treatment of human subjects, and drug safety. Due to the expansive global nature of foreign clinical trials, there are concerns with the FDA's ability to monitor and regulate these trials. This article examines the FDA's oversight of foreign clinical trials and the agency's limitations regulating these trials. In addition to looking at steps the FDA is taking to address these limitations, the article examines other potential regulatory and cooperative actions that can be taken to effectively monitor foreign clinical trials and to ensure data integrity and patient safety.

  17. Outdoor Adventure Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Howard L.

    1978-01-01

    Outdoor adventure training resulted in increased sensitivity, self-confidence, carry-over into intellectual activities, and pro-social change in a variety of university, juvenile, and penal institutional settings. Modifications for urban adventure training opportunities have also been developed but not yet evaluated. (MJB)

  18. Experimenting with Electric Trains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, D. P.; Ramsdell, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A simple experiment can be performed to characterize the relationship between applied voltage and velocity (steady state and transient) for an electric toy train. The results can be used by teams of students to solve a series of challenges in which they attempt to predict the performance of a particular train. Some sample challenges might include…

  19. Hospital Board Oversight of Quality and Patient Safety: A Narrative Review and Synthesis of Recent Empirical Research

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Ross; Mannion, Russell; Freeman, Tim; Davies, Huw TO

    2013-01-01

    Context Recurring problems with patient safety have led to a growing interest in helping hospitals’ governing bodies provide more effective oversight of the quality and safety of their services. National directives and initiatives emphasize the importance of action by boards, but the empirical basis for informing effective hospital board oversight has yet to receive full and careful review. Methods This article presents a narrative review of empirical research to inform the debate about hospital boards’ oversight of quality and patient safety. A systematic and comprehensive search identified 122 papers for detailed review. Much of the empirical work appeared in the last ten years, is from the United States, and employs cross-sectional survey methods. Findings Recent empirical studies linking board composition and processes with patient outcomes have found clear differences between high- and low-performing hospitals, highlighting the importance of strong and committed leadership that prioritizes quality and safety and sets clear and measurable goals for improvement. Effective oversight is also associated with well-informed and skilled board members. External factors (such as regulatory regimes and the publication of performance data) might also have a role in influencing boards, but detailed empirical work on these is scant. Conclusions Health policy debates recognize the important role of hospital boards in overseeing patient quality and safety, and a growing body of empirical research has sought to elucidate that role. This review finds a number of areas of guidance that have some empirical support, but it also exposes the relatively inchoate nature of the field. Greater theoretical and methodological development is required if we are to secure more evidence-informed governance systems and practices that can contribute to safer care. PMID:24320168

  20. Emergency Medical Care Training and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topham, Charles S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 11-week emergency medical care training program for adolescents focusing on: pretest results; factual emergency instruction and first aid; practical experience training; and assessment. (RC)