Science.gov

Sample records for owners group assessment

  1. Safety Evaluation Report related to Hydrogen Control Owners Group assessment of Mark 3 containments

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.Y.; Kudrick, J.A.

    1990-10-01

    Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Section 50.44 Standards for Combustible Gas Control System in Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors,'' requires that systems be provided to control hydrogen concentration in the containment atmosphere following an accident to ensure that containment integrity is maintained. The purpose of this report is to provide regulatory guidance to licensees with Mark III containments with regard to demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 50.44, Section (c)(3)(vi) and (c)(3)(vii). In this report, the staff provides its evaluation of the generic methodology proposed by the Hydrogen Control Owners Group. This generic methodology is documented in Topical Report HGN-112-NP, Generic Hydrogen Control Information for BWR/6 Mark III Containments.'' In addition, the staff has recommended that the vulnerability to interruption of power to the hydrogen igniters be evaluated further on a plant-specific basis as part of the individual plant examination of the plants with Mark III containments. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Assessment of the IMPACTS-BRC code: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, V.C.; Murphy, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated a special program effort for the development of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) rulemaking petition to exempt certain very low activity nuclear power plant waste types as being Below Regulatory Concern (BRC). EPRI is to provide the technical research to support the BRC petition. One of the research tasks in the EPRI program entails a review and verification of the IMPACTS-BRC computer program used by NRC to independently evaluate individual and population radiological impacts from routine treatment and disposal of BRC wastes. A review of the IMPACTS-BRC computer program has been made to evaluate the sensitivity of the code to modeling assumptions and parameter values, assess conservatisms in the code, and verify that the code correctly performs the specified dose calculations. This report describes the results of this review. 6 refs., 3 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group:

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Phillips, L.B.; Williams, W.J.

    1988-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has indicated that Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) exemption of waste streams from the disposal requirements for low level radioactive waste should be based on actual expected nuclide concentration and variability. Because of variations in the importance and relative abundance of nuclides in waste, one or a small number of nuclides may control the detemination of a waste steam as BRC. This study wasconducted to evaluate the relative importance of the major radionucldies in dose assessments for the disposal options and geographic regions under consideration for BRC waste. 6 refs., 25 tabs.

  4. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Nonradiologic characterization and environmental assessment of BRC (Below-Regulatory Concern) waste: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Vogt, D.K.

    1989-02-01

    EPRI is characterizing nonradiologic properties and assessing the environmental impact of candidate BRC waste types in support of a utility rulemaking petition. Recent investigations confirmed that these chemical and physical properties resembled those of conventional wastes and would not preclude disposal by conventional methods. In accordance with the NRC policy statement on below regulatory concern (BRC) waste, petitions to exempt certain wastes from low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal regulations must include an assessment of the waste's nonradiologic properties. Petitions must also assure no significant environmental impact from BRC waste disposal, compatibility of the nonradiologic properties with the intended method of disposal, and negligible potential for recycling. This document characterizes the nonradiologic properties of candidate BRC waste types, as well as the properties of conventional waste and other materials associated with BRC waste disposal, and performs an environmental impact assessment of BRC waste disposal options.

  5. The B & W Owners` Group Generic License Renewal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, R.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Since the late 1970s, the Babcock & Wilcox (B & W) Owners Group (BWOG) has sponsored significant activities that address technical, economic, and licensing issues to ensure that the B & W nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) power plants operate until the end of their current plant licensed life and to preserve the license renewal option. It should be no surprise that the BWOG decided in late 1992 to aggressively pursue a license renewal effort. This effort, the Generic License Renewal Program (GLRP), has over the past 18 months contributed significantly to the industry`s license renewal initiative. The GLRP was established as a project with a full-time management organization within the BWOG structure. Its primary objective was the development and demonstration of an integrated plant assessment (IPA) process that would meet the requirements of the License Renewal Rule, published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December 1991. The BWOG consists of five utilities with plants of very similar design, operation, and age. The owners, along with technical support from B & W Nuclear Technologies, created a highly capable and effective team to address the elements of the license renewal rule. This paper presents the BWOG strategy from the beginning of the program, the accomplishments to date, and the current role of the BWOG GLRP.

  6. A Nordic survey of management practices and owners' attitudes towards keeping horses in groups.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, E; Bøe, K E; Christensen, J W; Hyyppä, S; Jansson, H; Jørgensen, G H M; Ladewig, J; Mejdell, C M; Norling, Y; Rundgren, M; Särkijärvi, S; Søndergaard, E; Keeling, L J

    2015-09-01

    Keeping horses in groups is widely recommended but limited information is available about how this is implemented in practice. The aim of this survey was to describe how horses are kept in the Nordic countries in relation to sex, age, breed, and equestrian discipline and to assess owners' attitudes toward keeping horses in groups. Horse owners in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were approached using a web-based questionnaire, which was translated into 4 languages and distributed online via equestrian forums, organizations, and social media. The number of respondents was 3,229, taking care of 17,248 horses. Only 8% of horses were never kept in groups, 47% were permanently grouped for 24 h/d, and 45% were stabled singly but grouped during turnout. Yearlings were most often permanently kept in groups (75%), mares and geldings more commonly during parts of the day (50 and 51%, respectively), and stallions were often kept alone (38%). Icelandic horses were more likely to be permanently kept in groups (36%) than warmbloods (16%) and ponies (15%). Twice as many competition horses (51%) were never grouped compared with horses used for breeding (20%) or leisure purposes (15%). The majority of respondents (86%) strongly agreed that group housing benefits horse welfare and that it is important for horses to have the company of conspecifics (92%). Nevertheless, not all horses were kept in groups, showing that attitudes toward group housing may not necessarily reflect current management. The risk of injury was a concern of many respondents (45%), as was introducing unfamiliar horses into already established groups (40%) and challenges in relation to feeding in groups (44%). Safety of people (23%) and difficulties handling group-kept horses (19%) were regarded as less problematic. Results suggest that the majority of horses have the possibility to freely interact with other horses, either as fulltime members of a group during 24 h/d or during turnout. Future research should

  7. A Nordic survey of management practices and owners' attitudes towards keeping horses in groups.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, E; Bøe, K E; Christensen, J W; Hyyppä, S; Jansson, H; Jørgensen, G H M; Ladewig, J; Mejdell, C M; Norling, Y; Rundgren, M; Särkijärvi, S; Søndergaard, E; Keeling, L J

    2015-09-01

    Keeping horses in groups is widely recommended but limited information is available about how this is implemented in practice. The aim of this survey was to describe how horses are kept in the Nordic countries in relation to sex, age, breed, and equestrian discipline and to assess owners' attitudes toward keeping horses in groups. Horse owners in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were approached using a web-based questionnaire, which was translated into 4 languages and distributed online via equestrian forums, organizations, and social media. The number of respondents was 3,229, taking care of 17,248 horses. Only 8% of horses were never kept in groups, 47% were permanently grouped for 24 h/d, and 45% were stabled singly but grouped during turnout. Yearlings were most often permanently kept in groups (75%), mares and geldings more commonly during parts of the day (50 and 51%, respectively), and stallions were often kept alone (38%). Icelandic horses were more likely to be permanently kept in groups (36%) than warmbloods (16%) and ponies (15%). Twice as many competition horses (51%) were never grouped compared with horses used for breeding (20%) or leisure purposes (15%). The majority of respondents (86%) strongly agreed that group housing benefits horse welfare and that it is important for horses to have the company of conspecifics (92%). Nevertheless, not all horses were kept in groups, showing that attitudes toward group housing may not necessarily reflect current management. The risk of injury was a concern of many respondents (45%), as was introducing unfamiliar horses into already established groups (40%) and challenges in relation to feeding in groups (44%). Safety of people (23%) and difficulties handling group-kept horses (19%) were regarded as less problematic. Results suggest that the majority of horses have the possibility to freely interact with other horses, either as fulltime members of a group during 24 h/d or during turnout. Future research should

  8. The Joint Owners' Group Program on MOV Periodic Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, Paul S.; Spears, Todd A.

    2002-07-01

    To address long-term motor operated valve (MOV) performance, the Babcock and Wilcox, Boiling Water Reactor, Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse Groups (B and WOG, BWROG, CEOG and WOG) teamed in 1997 to form the Joint Group (JOG) MOV Periodic Verification (PV) Program. This program is nearing completion, with 98 of the 103 operating U.S. reactor units participating. The goal of the program is to provide a justified approach for periodically testing MOVs, that addresses potential degradation. The program defines an interim approach that specifies periodic tests without flow and differential pressure (DP), at a frequency determined by the s risk significance and margin. To justify this approach, each participating plant is also DP testing 2 valves per unit. Each valve is tested three times over five years, with at least one year between tests. The data are evaluated jointly to confirm or adjust the initial guidance. The majority of the tests are complete and conclusions are coming into focus. For gate valves, when the valve factor is initially low, increases can occur between one test and a later test. One common way that the valve factor becomes low is disassembling and reassembling the valve. The data show that, following valve disassembly and re-assembly, the valve factor tends to be reduced, and it tends to increase in subsequent service. Outside of the valves disassembled and reassembled, some gate valves have low valve factors apparently because the valves are not stroked under DP conditions in service. For butterfly valves, there have been no observations of degradation in bearing friction coefficient. A few valves with bronze bearings in raw (untreated) water service have shown significant variations in friction, but they tend to be a mixture of increases and decreases with no pattern of degradation. Globe valves, both unbalanced and balanced, tend to show a constant valve factor with no indication of degradation. (authors)

  9. Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners to canine rabies in Wukari metropolis, Taraba State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Veronica O; Dzikwi, Asabe A; Umoh, Jarlath U

    2014-09-01

    Canine rabies is endemic and occurs throughout the year in all parts of Nigeria. A descriptive cross sectional study was designed to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners towards rabies, to check for the presence of rabies antigens in brain tissue of dogs slaughtered for human consumption and to assess rabies vaccination coverage of dogs in Wukari. Structured questionnaires were prepared and administered to 200 dog owners by face to face interview. The questionnaire sought information on demographic characteristics of the dog owners, their association with dogs, knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners towards rabies. Associations between demographic variables and knowledge, attitude or practice scores were assessed using chi(2) analysis. Also, 188 brain samples from slaughtered dogs were analysed for presence of rabies antigen using direct fluorescent antibody test. Fifteen (7.89%) had rabies antigen. Record files and vaccination certificates of dogs presented to the State Veterinary Hospital Wukari were assessed for anti rabies vaccination coverage. Out of the 200 dog owners, only 26 (13%) knew that rabies virus can be found in nervous tissue, 121 (60.5%) were aware that rabies can be spread through the saliva of a rabid animal, but majority of respondents 172 (86%) did not know the age for first vaccination of dogs against rabies. Dog owners who were civil servants were 4.8 times more likely to have good knowledge (OR=4.84, 95% CI on OR 1.09-21.44) than those of other occupation groups. Positive attitude towards rabies increased with increase in age of dog owners, with respondents within the age group 20-30 years more likely to have negative attitude than those over 40 years. Civil servants were 9.8 times more likely to have good practice than other occupation groups. Rabies antigen was detected in 7.98% of slaughtered dogs. Out of 8370 dogs presented to the hospital between January 2003 and December 2012, only 1128 (13.50%) received anti

  10. Assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners to canine rabies in Wukari metropolis, Taraba State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Veronica O; Dzikwi, Asabe A; Umoh, Jarlath U

    2014-06-12

    Canine rabies is endemic and occurs throughout the year in all parts of Nigeria. A descriptive cross sectional study was designed to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners towards rabies, to check for the presence of rabies antigens in brain tissue of dogs slaughtered for human consumption and to assess rabies vaccination coverage of dogs in Wukari. Structured questionnaires were prepared and administered to 200 dog owners by face to face interview. The questionnaire sought information on demographic characteristics of the dog owners, their association with dogs, knowledge, attitude and practice of dog owners towards rabies. Associations between demographic variables and knowledge, attitude or practice scores were assessed using chi(2) analysis. Also, 188 brain samples from slaughtered dogs were analysed for presence of rabies antigen using direct fluorescent antibody test. Fifteen (7.89%) had rabies antigen. Record files and vaccination certificates of dogs presented to the State Veterinary Hospital Wukari were assessed for anti rabies vaccination coverage. Out of the 200 dog owners, only 26 (13%) knew that rabies virus can be found in nervous tissue, 121 (60.5%) were aware that rabies can be spread through the saliva of a rabid animal, but majority of respondents 172 (86%) did not know the age for first vaccination of dogs against rabies. Dog owners who were civil servants were 4.8 times more likely to have good knowledge (OR=4.84, 95% CI on OR 1.09-21.44) than those of other occupation groups. Positive attitude towards rabies increased with increase in age of dog owners, with respondents within the age group 20-30 years more likely to have negative attitude than those over 40 years. Civil servants were 9.8 times more likely to have good practice than other occupation groups. Rabies antigen was detected in 7.98% of slaughtered dogs. Out of 8370 dogs presented to the hospital between January 2003 and December 2012, only 1128 (13.50%) received anti

  11. Development and validation of a survey for quality of life assessment by owners of healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Lavan, R P

    2013-09-01

    Assessing and maintaining quality of life (QOL) is a growing concern in companion animal practice, as improved nutrition and healthcare have extended canine longevity. The objective of this study was to develop a validated survey for evaluating QOL in healthy dogs for use in clinical and research settings. A total of 174 dog owners completed an initial QOL survey containing 21 items grouped into seven domains (CHQLS-21). After factor analysis of the responses, a final survey was constructed containing 15 items grouped into four domains (happiness, physical functioning, hygiene and mental status), plus two questions on general health and an item asking for a direct QOL assessment (CHQLS-15). Psychometric analysis indicated that the CHQLS-15 had good validity, reliability, and internal consistency and was able to detect QOL changes affecting several domains across age groups in healthy dogs. The CHQLS-15 therefore provides a basis for dialog between clinicians and dog owners regarding the health of their pets, particularly in tracking changes in health status, evaluating response to treatment, and guiding end-of-life decisions. A validated QOL survey could be particularly useful in recognizing and managing functional decline as the healthy canine patient ages. PMID:23639368

  12. Development and validation of a survey for quality of life assessment by owners of healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Lavan, R P

    2013-09-01

    Assessing and maintaining quality of life (QOL) is a growing concern in companion animal practice, as improved nutrition and healthcare have extended canine longevity. The objective of this study was to develop a validated survey for evaluating QOL in healthy dogs for use in clinical and research settings. A total of 174 dog owners completed an initial QOL survey containing 21 items grouped into seven domains (CHQLS-21). After factor analysis of the responses, a final survey was constructed containing 15 items grouped into four domains (happiness, physical functioning, hygiene and mental status), plus two questions on general health and an item asking for a direct QOL assessment (CHQLS-15). Psychometric analysis indicated that the CHQLS-15 had good validity, reliability, and internal consistency and was able to detect QOL changes affecting several domains across age groups in healthy dogs. The CHQLS-15 therefore provides a basis for dialog between clinicians and dog owners regarding the health of their pets, particularly in tracking changes in health status, evaluating response to treatment, and guiding end-of-life decisions. A validated QOL survey could be particularly useful in recognizing and managing functional decline as the healthy canine patient ages.

  13. A new compact for owners and directors. The Working Group on Corporate Governance.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The virtual demise of hostile takeovers and leveraged buyouts has not cooled the tensions over corporate governance. In congressional hearings, at annual meetings, and in proxy contests splashed across the business pages, senior executives and powerful shareholders continue to confront each other. The basic issues remain remarkably consistent. When do investors' legitimate needs for returns translate into destructive pressures on long-term corporate prosperity? What kinds of accountability do top managers owe shareholders in terms of strategic consultation and disclosure? What is the precise role of the board of directors as a management monitor and shareholder representative? More than a year ago, a working group of distinguished lawyers representing large public companies and leading institutional investors began a series of meetings to cut through the rancor. Their goal was to reach common ground on a set of principles that reconciles the tensions between owners and managers. Recently, the group agreed on a statement that all eight members endorsed. The statement, "A New Charter for Owners and Managers," deserves wide readership, scrutiny, and commentary. HBR is pleased the working group chose it as the exclusive forum to release its statement.

  14. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  15. Below regulatory concern owners group: BRC waste variability evaluation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, J.N.; Wanless, J.

    1989-08-01

    Conservative estimates of radionuclide concentrations in BRC waste from commercial nuclear power stations were established in this study. These concentrations are necessary input parameters for dose assessments that will become part of the technical basis for a petition for rulemaking on BRC waste disposal. The NRC policy statement on below regulatory concern (BRC) waste disposal requires that the radiologic properties of the waste proposed to be disposed of as BRC be characterized on a national basis. The characterization is to include the concentrations or contamination levels of the radionuclides expected to be in the waste. The variability in these properties is to be assessed to justify the appropriate parameters used for impact analyses. We evaluated the variability of the radiological properties of BRC wastes generated at nuclear power plants and evaluated average activity concentrations in BRC waste types and waste mass or volume distributions as a function of activity concentration. 24 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Radionuclide prioritization study, Revision 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.F.; Phillips, L.B.; Williams, W.J.

    1989-02-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has indicated that a Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) rulemaking petition to exempt waste streams from the disposal requirements for low level radioactive waste should be based on actual expected nuclide concentration and variability. Because of variations in the importance and relative abundance of nuclides in waste, one or a small number of nuclides may control the determination of a waste stream as BRC. This study was conducted to evaluate the relative importance of the major radionuclides in dose assessments for the disposal options and geographic regions under consideration for BRC waste. 7 refs., 25 tabs.

  17. A Bayesian Belief Network approach to assess the potential of non wood forest products for small scale forest owners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacik, Harald; Huber, Patrick; Hujala, Teppo; Kurtilla, Mikko; Wolfslehner, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    It is an integral element of the European understanding of sustainable forest management to foster the design and marketing of forest products, non-wood forest products (NWFPs) and services that go beyond the production of timber. Despite the relevance of NWFPs in Europe, forest management and planning methods have been traditionally tailored towards wood and wood products, because most forest management models and silviculture techniques were developed to ensure a sustained production of timber. Although several approaches exist which explicitly consider NWFPs as management objectives in forest planning, specific models are needed for the assessment of their production potential in different environmental contexts and for different management regimes. Empirical data supporting a comprehensive assessment of the potential of NWFPs are rare, thus making development of statistical models particularly problematic. However, the complex causal relationships between the sustained production of NWFPs, the available ecological resources, as well as the organizational and the market potential of forest management regimes are well suited for knowledge-based expert models. Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) are a kind of probabilistic graphical model that have become very popular to practitioners and scientists mainly due to the powerful probability theory involved, which makes BBNs suitable to deal with a wide range of environmental problems. In this contribution we present the development of a Bayesian belief network to assess the potential of NWFPs for small scale forest owners. A three stage iterative process with stakeholder and expert participation was used to develop the Bayesian Network within the frame of the StarTree Project. The group of participants varied in the stages of the modelling process. A core team, consisting of one technical expert and two domain experts was responsible for the entire modelling process as well as for the first prototype of the network

  18. The effect of long-term feeding of skin barrier-fortified diets on the owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis symptoms in Labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    van Beeck, Frank Looringh; Watson, Adrian; Bos, Margriet; Biourge, Vincent; Willemse, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of feeding a skin barrier function-augmenting diet early in dogs' lives on the appearance of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Pregnant bitches (starting 5 weeks after mating) and their subsequent litters (up to 1 year of age) were fed either supplemented or unsupplemented diets. Nutrients supplemented were nicotinamide, pantothenate, histidine, inositol and choline. Circulating IgE levels to dust mute allergens Der f and Der p were measured when the puppies were 6 and 12 months old. Two owner questionnaires were used to assess the occurrence of typical signs associated with atopic dermatitis when dogs were between the ages of 22 and 36, and 34 and 48 months. Using linear mixed models we observed higher levels of circulating anti-Der f (P = 0·021) and -Der p IgE (P = 0·01) during the first year in the dogs fed the unsupplemented than in those fed the supplemented diet. The owner-assessed incidence of atopic dermatitis signs amongst the dogs was significantly greater in the unsupplemented group at the time of the second follow-up questionnaire (10/33 dogs v. 2/24 dogs). These outcomes suggest that a nutritionally derived improvement to barrier function early in life may reduce the frequency of signs associated with atopic dermatitis. The effect is possibly the result of making the epidermis, now thought to be a major route of environmental allergen exposure, more resistant to penetration. PMID:26097705

  19. Achieving Success in Small Business: A Self-Instruction Program for Small Business Owner-Managers. Assessing the Health of Your Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This self-instructional module on assessing the health of your business is the eleventh in a set of twelve modules designed for small business owner-managers. The competency for this module is to assess the financial condition of your business. Provided are information sections (key business records, balance sheet and profit and loss statements,…

  20. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or certificates... unpatented mining claim, mill site, or tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 of this chapter... claim, mill site, or tunnel site in lieu of the annual assessment work or notice of intention to...

  1. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or certificates... unpatented mining claim, mill site, or tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 of this chapter... claim, mill site, or tunnel site in lieu of the annual assessment work or notice of intention to...

  2. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or certificates... unpatented mining claim, mill site, or tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 of this chapter... claim, mill site, or tunnel site in lieu of the annual assessment work or notice of intention to...

  3. 43 CFR 3734.1 - Owner of claim to file notice of location and assessment work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 (a) and (b), shall file all notices or certificates... unpatented mining claim, mill site, or tunnel site located on land described in § 3730.0-1 of this chapter... claim, mill site, or tunnel site in lieu of the annual assessment work or notice of intention to...

  4. Group Assessment: Comparing Group and Individual Undergraduate Module Marks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a small study that analysed module marks of one cohort of science undergraduates from one academic year. It explored how group summative assessment marking affected the overall marks in comparison with individual assessment. A tutor allocated students to mixed ability project groups. Individual marks for the group work…

  5. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Radionuclide characterization of potential BRC waste types from nuclear power stations: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Hetzer, D.C.; Wynhoff, N.L.; Raney, P.J.; Forsythe, J.D.; Schmitt, J.S.; Buschbom, R.L.; Hara, K.T.; Strebin, R.S.

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a detailed radiological characterization and statistical assessment of the measured radionuclide distributions for four candidate ''below regulatory concern'' (BRC) waste types from commercial nuclear power stations. These measurements and statistical evaluations will provide the bases for conducting detailed dose assessments associated with various disposal options for BRC wastes. The four waste types selected were dry active waste (DAW), oil, soil, and secondary side ion exchange resin. The measurement included gamma-spectrometric analyses of 558 total samples, including 102 DAW samples, 231 oil samples, 142 soil samples, and 83 resin samples. Radionuclides usually detected during the gamma spectrometry included /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 58/Co. Frequently, /sup 95/Zr, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 106/Ru, and /sup 125/Sb were detected, especially in wastes from plants which had experienced a relatively high rate of fuel cladding failures. Selected aliquots of the gamma-counted samples were radiochemically analyzed for /sup 14/C, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 63/Ni, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 238/Pu, and /sup 239,240/Pu. The gamma-emitting radionuclides in the BRC wastes, which are the primary contributors to the limiting dose to the general population for BRC waste disposal, were dominated by /sup 60/Co and /sup 137/Cs. The variability in the major gamma-emitting nuclides was assessed as a function of reactor type and waste stream. A similar evaluation was conducted for the difficult-to-measure radionuclides. From these assessments, it was concluded that the variability in radionuclide composition from all waste streams and all plants was sufficiently small to justify the development of a single, conservative radionuclide composition that would be representative of the BRC waste generated at commercial US nuclear power stations.

  6. Below regulatory concern owners group: Individual and population impacts from BRC (below regulatory concern) waste treatment and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E.S.; Rogers, V.C.

    1989-08-01

    Using the IMPACTS-BRC and PRESTO-EPA-POP codes, researchers calculated potential individual and population doses for routine and unexpected radiation exposures resulting from the transportation and disposal of BRC nuclear power plant wastes. These calculations provided a basis for establishing annual curie and radionuclide concentration limits for BRC treatment and disposal. EPRI has initiated a program to develop a petition for rulemaking to NRC that would allow management of certain very low activity nuclear power plant waste types as below regulatory concern (BRC), thus exempting these wastes from requirements for burial at licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The technical information required to support the BRC petition includes an assessment of radiologic impacts resulting from the proposed exemption, based on estimated individual and population doses that might result from BRC treatment and disposal of nuclear power plant wastes. 13 figs., 31 tabs.

  7. Researching Group Assessment: Jazz in the Conservatoire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barratt, Elisabeth; Moore, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into methods and scorings for jazz assessment in Trinity College of Music, London, focusing on the possibility of introducing group assessment. It considers the advantages of group assessment methods, contrasting these with the more traditional approach, firmly established in conservatoires, of…

  8. A normative price for energy from an electricity generation system: An Owner-dependent Methodology for Energy Generation (system) Assessment (OMEGA). Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Mcmaster, K. M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility owned solar electric system methodology is generalized and updated. The net present value of the system is determined by consideration of all financial benefits and costs (including a specified return on investment). Life cycle costs, life cycle revenues, and residual system values are obtained. Break even values of system parameters are estimated by setting the net present value to zero. While the model was designed for photovoltaic generators with a possible thermal energy byproduct, it applicability is not limited to such systems. The resulting owner-dependent methodology for energy generation system assessment consists of a few equations that can be evaluated without the aid of a high-speed computer.

  9. Assessment Intelligence in Small Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Wanli; Wu, Yonghe

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of groups in CSCL context is a challenging task fraught with many confounding factors collected and measured. Previous documented studies are by and large summative in nature and some process-oriented methods require time-intensive coding of qualitative data. This study attempts to resolve these problems for teachers to assess groups…

  10. Could it be colic? Horse-owner decision making and practices in response to equine colic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about lay understanding and decision making in response to colic. Horse-owners/carers are key to identifying colic and initiating veterinary intervention. Understanding how owners think and act in relation to colic could assist veterinary surgeons in tailoring information about colic with the aim of improving colic outcomes. Methods A mixed methods approach was employed including qualitative in-depth interviews and a cross-sectional questionnaire. Qualitative data were analysed using Grounded theory to conceptualise processes involved in horse-owner management of colic. Following this, a cross-sectional survey was designed to test these concepts. Cluster analysis explored the role of the human-horse relationship upon colic management strategies. Results Fifteen horse-owners with a range of colic experience participated in the interviews. A theoretical conceptual model was developed and described how horse-owners’ recognised, assessed and responded to colic. Three main management strategies were used including ‘wait and see’, ‘lay treatments’ and ‘seek veterinary assistance’. Actions in response to colic were moderated by owners’ experience of colic and interpretation of the severity of colic signs. A postal questionnaire gathered data from 673 horse-owners from the North-West of the UK. The majority (605, 89.9%) of respondents were female. Cluster analysis revealed 5 meaningful groups of horse-owners based upon assessment of questionnaire items on the human-horse relationship. These groups included 2 professional and 3 amateur owner typologies. There were differences in the responses to some questionnaire items among the identified groups. Conclusions This study describes lay understanding and management of colic among a population of horse-owners from the North-West of the UK. The information may serve as a basis upon which to tailor existing programmes designed to educate owners about colic management strategies, and may

  11. Social referencing in dog-owner dyads?

    PubMed

    Merola, I; Prato-Previde, E; Marshall-Pescini, S

    2012-03-01

    Social referencing is the seeking of information from another individual to form one's own understanding and guide action. In this study, adult dogs were tested in a social referencing paradigm involving their owner and a potentially scary object. Dogs received either a positive or negative message from the owner. The aim was to evaluate the presence of referential looking to the owner, behavioural regulation based on the owner's (vocal and facial) emotional message and observational conditioning following the owner's actions towards the object. Most dogs (83%) looked referentially to the owner after looking at the strange object, thus they appear to seek information about the environment from the human, but little differences were found between dogs in the positive and negative groups as regards behavioural regulation: possible explanations for this are discussed. Finally, a strong effect of observational conditioning was found with dogs in the positive group moving closer to the fan and dogs in the negative group moving away, both mirroring their owner's behaviour. Results are discussed in relation to studies on human-dog communication, attachment and social learning.

  12. Assessment Rocks? The Assessment of Group Composing for Qualification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Ensembles such as rock and pop bands are places of exciting creativity and intense, enjoyable music making for young people. A recent review of New Zealand's secondary school qualification, the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEA), has resulted in a new composition assessment of individuals' achievement in groups. An analysis of…

  13. Assessing Group Dynamics in a Mars Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S. L.

    2007-10-01

    International interest in psychosocial functioning generally and issues of group and inter-group function for space crews has increased as focus has shifted towards longer duration spaceflight and, particularly, the issues involved in sending a human crew to Mars (Kanas, et al., 2001; Dawson, 2002). Planning documents for a human mission to Mars such as the NASA Design Reference Mission (DRM 1.0) emphasize the need for adaptability of crewmembers and autonomy in the crew as a whole (Hoffman and Kaplan, 1997). Similarly a major study by the International Space University (ISU, 1991) emphasized the need for autonomy and initiative for a Mars crew given that many of the scenarios that will be encountered on Mars cannot be rehearsed on earth and given the lack of any realistic possibility for rescue of the crew. This research project was only one subset of data collected during the larger AustroMars Expedition at the Mars Desert Research Facility (MDRS) in 2006. The participating crew comprises part of a multi-year investigation on teams utilizing the MDRS facility. The program of research has included numerous researchers since 2002 with a progressive evolution of key foci addressing stress, personality, coping, adaptation, cognitive functioning, and group identity assessed across the duration period of the individual missions.

  14. How HMOs assess medical groups and IPAs.

    PubMed

    Penner, M

    1997-01-01

    California health maintenance organizations (HMOs) frequently capitate physician organizations--independent practice associations (IPAs) and multispecialty medical groups--to export their risk for professional and outpatient ancillary services. Physician organizations benefit when successful in managing the risk, and from having greater control over medical management decisions. HMOs carefully assess the physician organization's ability to manage capitated risk and provide high-quality care. HMOs gather information on the physician organization's finances, business relationships, physician compensation arrangements, credentialing, hospital relationships, ancillary contracts, procedures for 24-hour care, claims administration, member services, information systems for reporting and tracking utilization, and procedures for utilization/quality management. These data are analyzed to determine whether capitation contract negotiation should proceed. PMID:10166982

  15. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    PubMed

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  16. Assessing Effectiveness of Nurture Groups in Northern Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Isabel; McClatchey, Kirstie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this small-scale study was to assess the effectiveness of nurture groups in Northern Scotland. Data were collected from children (N?=?19) and staff (N?=?5) from three nurture groups. Pre-and post-nurture group Boxall Profile information was also assessed for 33 children across two of the nurture groups. Analysis of the Boxall Profiles…

  17. Psychoeducational Assessment of Minority Group Children: A Casebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Reginald L.

    This volume presents an introduction and 14 case studies by various authors on psychoeducational procedures for assessing minority group children. Included are the following papers: (1) "Psychoeducational Assessment of Minority Group Children: Issues and Perspectives" (R. L. Jones); (2) "Dynamic Assessment: The Learning Potential Assessment…

  18. Self, Peer and Group Assessment in E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Tim S.

    2006-01-01

    Contributions from researchers and practitioners involved in self, peer and group assessment in an online or e-learning environment investigate how assessment practices can be used to assist and improve the learning process. The book describes the principal characteristics of self, peer and group assessment; presents guidelines for effective…

  19. Peer-Assessing Peers' Contribution to EFL Group Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Hidetoshi; Fujita, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is three-fold: (1) to examine the similarities and differences between instructor and peer assessments of EFL group presentations; (2) to understand the utility of peer assessment for discriminating each group member's contribution to group presentations in college EFL classrooms; and (3) to investigate the relationship…

  20. Portfolio Assessment of an Undergraduate Group Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuisma, Raija

    2007-01-01

    Students in the Physiotherapy Programme carried out a group project in their final year of studies. The objectives of the project were that the students learn and appreciate the process and activities involved in research, acquire deeper understanding of a topic in their professional interest, learn to work as a team, manage their own time,…

  1. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, A.C.; Barbosa, A.V.; Arais, L.R.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Carneiro, V.C.; Cerqueira, A.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n = 134), their owners (n = 134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n = 44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains. PMID:26887238

  2. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A C; Barbosa, A V; Arais, L R; Ribeiro, P F; Carneiro, V C; Cerqueira, A M F

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n=134), their owners (n=134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n=44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains.

  3. Group Learning Assessment: Developing a Theory-Informed Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Wanli; Wadholm, Robert; Petakovic, Eva; Goggins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Assessment in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) is an implicit issue, and most assessments are summative in nature. Process-oriented methods of assessment can vary significantly in their indicators and typically only partially address the complexity of group learning. Moreover, the majority of these assessment methods require…

  4. Designing and Assessing Productive Group Work in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaca, Javier; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A history teacher examines what is successful and not successful in group work in his high school classroom and gives concrete suggestions for improving group practice. Topics discussed include preparing students for group work, supporting collaboration, inviting critical analysis, and assessing both group and individual performance. (Contains 2…

  5. Customized Assessment Group Initiative: A Complementary Approach to Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akindayomi, Akinloye

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in a US setting, examines the importance of group dynamics that emphasize cooperative team building through the proposed grouping strategy called Customized Assessment Group Initiative (CAGI). CAGI is a student grouping strategy designed to operationalize the mutual accountability concept central to the definition of teams by…

  6. Space Propulsion Synergy Group ETO technology assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, James

    The Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG), which was chartered to support long-range strategic planning, has, using a broad industry/government team, evaluated and achieved consensus on the vehicles, propulsion systems, and propulsion technologies that have the best long-term potential for achieving desired system attributes. The breakthrough that enabled broad consensus was developing criteria that are measurable a priori. The SPSG invented a dual prioritization approach that balances long-term strategic thrusts with current programmatic constraints. This enables individual program managers to make decisions based on both individual project needs and long-term strategic needs. Results indicate that an SSTO using an integrated modular engine has the best long-term potential for a 20 Klb class vehicle, and that health monitoring and control technologies are among the highest dual priority liquid rocket technologies.

  7. Intimate Behavior and Assessment of Benefits in Clinical Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Developed three measures of clinical group benefits and presented empirical evidence (N=27) explicating the logic of the Interpersonal Relations Scale as an assessment device. Conceptualized the benefits of clinical groups as the fostering of intimacy skills by which group members learn about themselves, others, and their interpersonal…

  8. Owners of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.

    2000-01-12

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of November 1999. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  9. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  10. Does the attachment system towards owners change in aged dogs?

    PubMed

    Mongillo, Paolo; Pitteri, Elisa; Carnier, Paolo; Gabai, Gianfranco; Adamelli, Serena; Marinelli, Lieta

    2013-08-15

    Changes during senescence can significantly affect both the emotional and relational needs of old individuals and the characteristics of the attachment system. In order to determine whether the emotional response of dogs is affected by old age, we compared the behavioural parameters of adult (AD <7 years of age, n=25) and aged (AG ≥7 years of age, n=25) dogs in a distressing situation, which gives rise to attachment behaviour patterns (Strange Situation Test, SST). The physiological response of dogs was assessed by measurement of salivary cortisol variations in samples collected both at the dogs' homes and at the study location, before and after the SST. Both groups of dogs expressed clear-cut patterns of attachment to their owners. During the initial part of the procedure, AG dogs sought more physical contact, but behaved more passively and showed less interest in an unknown person during separation from their owners. Compared with AD dogs, AG ones showed a significant increase in salivary cortisol concentrations after the SST. The combination of physiological and behavioural data of the present study supports the hypothesis that, later in life, dogs cope less efficiently with emotional distress caused by mild social challenge. PMID:23911691

  11. 40 CFR 97.615 - Changing designated representative and alternate designated representative; changes in owners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading... new designated representative and the owners and operators of the TR SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2... SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2 Group 1 units at the source. (c) Changes in owners and operators....

  12. 40 CFR 97.615 - Changing designated representative and alternate designated representative; changes in owners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading... new designated representative and the owners and operators of the TR SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2... SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2 Group 1 units at the source. (c) Changes in owners and operators....

  13. Consider the source: the impact of media and authority in outreach to private forest and rangeland owners.

    PubMed

    Ferranto, Shasta; Huntsinger, Lynn; Stewart, William; Getz, Christy; Nakamura, Gary; Kelly, Maggi

    2012-04-30

    Over half of the United States is privately owned. Improving environmental sustainability requires that the scientific and management communities provide effective outreach to the many landowners making decisions about land use and management practices on these lands. We surveyed California forest and rangeland owners in ten counties throughout the state to assess the impact of existing outreach and identify gaps in information distribution and content. Although a number of organizations provide land management advice highly-ranked by landowners, no individual organization currently reaches more than 30% of forest and rangeland owners, and these groups together reach less than 60% of landowners. The lowest ranked advice came from wildlife and land management agencies, whereas the highest ranked advice came from private consultants and advisory organizations. The ecosystem services provided by forests and rangelands are strongly influenced by conservation scale, and this appears to be recognized in current outreach efforts. Owners of large properties (>200 ha) were substantially more likely to have received land management advice than smaller-sized properties, and from a broader group of organizations. As ownerships become increasingly fragmented, outreach focus and methods will need to shift to more effectively target the owners of smaller properties. On the other hand, some major outreach goals, such as conservation of wildlife, ranchland, or agricultural communities, will continue to rely on effective outreach to owners of larger properties.

  14. Implementing Fairness in Racial-Group Assessment Requires Assessment of Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Janet E.

    2007-01-01

    Replies to comments by R. J. Griffore and D. A. Newman et al. on the author's original article on test validity and cultural bias in racial-group assessment. Helms notes that, given that within-group variance exceeds between-groups variance, racial groups are probably simulating a psychological construct that is more strongly related to…

  15. Language Assessment Methods for Three Age Groups of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Ann R.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes results of a survey of licensed Midwestern school-based speech-language pathologists (N=326) regarding methods used to assess the language of children ages 3 to 5 years, 6 to 11 years, and 12 to 18 years. Striking similarities were found in methods used for each age group. The relationship of these methods to recommended…

  16. Continuous Assessment in a Large Group of Psychology Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Merce; Gotzens, Concepcion; Badia, Mar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A continuous classroom assessment method was applied to a higher education course aimed at a large group of educational psychology students at the "Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona". Following the Bologna directions and the constructivist model, both declarative and procedural knowledge was taught in the module, and the students…

  17. Current Assessment Practices: A Report from the Virginia Assessment Study Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Adult Educators Research Network, Dayton.

    The report details the activities of the Virginia Assessment Study Group in documenting the utility of various approaches to assessing adult education programs and instruction within the state. A group of diverse practitioners convened during 1997 to establish project objectives and research questions and to report on their work. The reports of…

  18. Assessing group interaction with social language network analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Pennebaker, James; Scholand, Andrew Joseph; Tausczik, Yla R.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

  19. Assessing Group Interaction with Social Language Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholand, Andrew J.; Tausczik, Yla R.; Pennebaker, James W.

    In this paper we discuss a new methodology, social language network analysis (SLNA), that combines tools from social language processing and network analysis to assess socially situated working relationships within a group. Specifically, SLNA aims to identify and characterize the nature of working relationships by processing artifacts generated with computer-mediated communication systems, such as instant message texts or emails. Because social language processing is able to identify psychological, social, and emotional processes that individuals are not able to fully mask, social language network analysis can clarify and highlight complex interdependencies between group members, even when these relationships are latent or unrecognized.

  20. 25 CFR 700.85 - Owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Owner. 700.85 Section 700.85 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.85 Owner. The term owner means the person who holds any interest in...

  1. 25 CFR 700.85 - Owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Owner. 700.85 Section 700.85 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.85 Owner. The term owner means the person who holds any interest in...

  2. 25 CFR 700.85 - Owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Owner. 700.85 Section 700.85 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.85 Owner. The term owner means the person who holds any interest in...

  3. 25 CFR 700.85 - Owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Owner. 700.85 Section 700.85 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.85 Owner. The term owner means the person who holds any interest in...

  4. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... apply to the business owners described in this section....

  5. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... apply to the business owners described in this section....

  6. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... apply to the business owners described in this section....

  7. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... apply to the business owners described in this section....

  8. 40 CFR 97.615 - Changing designated representative and alternate designated representative; changes in owners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading... new designated representative and the owners and operators of the TR SO2 Group 1 source and the TR SO2... alternate designated representative, the designated representative, and the owners and operators of the...

  9. Surface owner's estate becomes dominant: Wyoming's surface owner consent statute

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, T.

    1981-01-01

    This comment discusses the constitutionality of Wyoming's surface owner consent law in three areas. The first is whether Wyoming's statute is an unconstitutional taking without compensation of the dominant position of the mineral estate holder. The second theory will be that the federal government has preempted the area of mineral lands regulation and therefore Wyoming's statute is void. The third theory is that Wyoming's statute is unconstitutional because it denies equal protection of the law under the fourteenth amendment to the US Constitution. This comment will deal primarily with the reservations of mineral rights under lands the federal government disposed of to private interests. It will not deal with reservations of mineral estates by private parties.

  10. Environmental Impact Assessment in the Visegrad Group countries

    SciTech Connect

    Gałaś, Slávka; Gałaś, Andrzej; Zeleňáková, Martina; Zvijáková, Lenka; Fialová, Jitka; and others

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Comparison and evaluation of EIA systems in the V4 countries are presented. • Strengths and weaknesses of EIA systems based on a questionnaire survey are stated. • The function and efficiency of the EIA application in the V4 countries are analysed. • Irregularities and shortcomings of EIA systems in the V4 should be eliminated. The Environmental Impact Assessment Directive (EIA Directive) has created a reference framework for the implementation of the system of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) into the legal systems of the Member States of the European Union, including the countries belonging to the Visegrad Group (V4): Poland, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and Hungary. The Directive was the basis for the introduction of compulsory stages of the EIA process in the V4. The stages were then adapted to national requirements, including thresholds of the qualifying criteria of projects at the screening and scoping stages. The EIA system in the analysed countries has been growing, changing and being modified together with the political and economic changes of the last 30 years. Although all Visegrad Group countries are members of the EU and should harmonize the provisions of the EIA Directive and its amendments, there still exist singularities in each country's national EIA legislation, in terms of complementarities among the V4 countries, access to information resources, protection of natural resources, mitigation of socio-environmental impacts, or transboundary impact assessment. The article compares and evaluates the EIA systems in the four countries, specifies similarities and differences in the implementation of administrative proceedings and points out opportunities to strengthen the system. It presents selected results of a study conducted in 2013 within the framework of the international project “Assessment of the quality of the environment in the V4 Countries” (AQE V4). This paper indicates examples of good practice in the EIA

  11. Needs assessment for business strategies of anesthesiology groups' practices.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Corey; Dexter, Franklin; Reich, David L; Galati, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Progress has been made in understanding strategic decision making influencing anesthesia groups' operating room business practices. However, there has been little analysis of the remaining gaps in our knowledge. We performed a needs assessment to identify unsolved problems in anesthesia business strategy based on Porter's Five Forces Analysis. The methodology was a narrative literature review. We found little previous investigation for 2 of the 5 forces (threat of new entrants and bargaining power of suppliers), modest understanding for 1 force (threat of substitute products or services), and substantial understanding for 2 forces (bargaining power of customers and jockeying for position among current competitors). Additional research in strategic decisions influencing anesthesia groups should focus on the threat of new entrants, bargaining power of suppliers, and the threat of substitute products or services.

  12. Needs assessment for business strategies of anesthesiology groups' practices.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Corey; Dexter, Franklin; Reich, David L; Galati, Maria

    2011-07-01

    Progress has been made in understanding strategic decision making influencing anesthesia groups' operating room business practices. However, there has been little analysis of the remaining gaps in our knowledge. We performed a needs assessment to identify unsolved problems in anesthesia business strategy based on Porter's Five Forces Analysis. The methodology was a narrative literature review. We found little previous investigation for 2 of the 5 forces (threat of new entrants and bargaining power of suppliers), modest understanding for 1 force (threat of substitute products or services), and substantial understanding for 2 forces (bargaining power of customers and jockeying for position among current competitors). Additional research in strategic decisions influencing anesthesia groups should focus on the threat of new entrants, bargaining power of suppliers, and the threat of substitute products or services. PMID:21490085

  13. Pet dogs as attachment figures for adult owners.

    PubMed

    Kurdek, Lawrence A

    2009-08-01

    This study assessed the extent to which, and under what conditions, owners turn to their pet dogs in times of emotional distress. This feature of an attachment figure-safe haven-is a key characteristic of an attachment bond. Participants (N = 975, mean age = 47.95 years, 789 women and 186 men) were relatively dedicated dog owners who completed an online survey. Relative to other features of an attachment figure, safe haven was the least salient. Nonetheless, participants were more likely to turn to their dogs than they were to turn to their mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, best friends, and children but less likely to turn to their dogs than to their romantic partners. Characteristics of both owners (being male, widowed, highly involved in the care of the dog, and uncomfortable with self-disclosure) and dogs (strongly meeting owner's needs regarding relatedness) heightened the likelihood that dogs were turned to rather than some humans. It is concluded that some owners develop attachment bonds with their pet dogs. PMID:19685978

  14. 24 CFR 30.68 - Section 8 owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... an identity of interest and identity of interest agent. An entity: (1) That has management... thereof; or any other organization or group of people. Ownership interest. Any direct or indirect interest... employed to manage the property that has an identity of interest with the owner or the general partner of...

  15. 24 CFR 30.68 - Section 8 owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... an identity of interest and identity of interest agent. An entity: (1) That has management... thereof; or any other organization or group of people. Ownership interest. Any direct or indirect interest... employed to manage the property that has an identity of interest with the owner or the general partner of...

  16. Ecological assessment plan for Waste Area Grouping 5

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG)5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contains 13 solid waste management units (SWMUs) covering a surface area of {approx}20 ha in Melton Valley south of the main plant area. The largest SWMUs are Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 and SWSA 5 North. These two SWMUs also contain most of the radioactive contamination. WAG 5 contains two surface impoundments and two intermittent streams; runoff from WAG 5 enters White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. Principal contaminants include fission-product radionuclides and transuranic elements, but trace metals and some organics may also be present. This document describes the ecological assessment that will perform to determine the ecological effects of contamination from WAG 5. This document also supports the baseline risk assessment and subsequent alternatives evaluations for WAG 5. Three specific tasks are incorporated in the WAG 5 ecological assessment: (1) threatened and endangered species surveys, (2) ambient toxicity tests of seeps, stream reaches, and soil that are identified as being contaminant sources, and (3) sampling of wildlife (specifically wild turkeys) that could potentially transfer contaminants from WAG 5 to humans.

  17. How the Experience of Assessed Collaborative Writing Impacts on Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Assessed Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotland, James

    2016-01-01

    A time-series analysis was used to investigate Arabic undergraduate students' (n = 50) perceptions of assessed group work in a major government institution of higher education in Qatar. A longitudinal mixed methods approach was employed. Likert scale questionnaires were completed over the duration of a collaborative writing event. Additionally,…

  18. 29 CFR 541.101 - Business owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Business owner. 541.101 Section 541.101 Labor Regulations... Executive Employees § 541.101 Business owner. The term “employee employed in a bona fide executive capacity... equity interest in the enterprise in which the employee is employed, regardless of whether the...

  19. Preliminary Study of Pet Owner Adherence in Behaviour, Cardiology, Urology, and Oncology Fields

    PubMed Central

    Talamonti, Zita; Cassis, Chiara; Brambilla, Paola G.; Scarpa, Paola; Stefanello, Damiano; Cannas, Simona; Minero, Michela; Palestrini, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Successful veterinary treatment of animals requires owner adherence with a prescribed treatment plan. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the level of adherence of the owners of patients presented for behavioural, cardiological, urological, and oncological problems. At the end of the first examination, each owner completed a questionnaire. Then, the owners were called four times to fill out another questionnaire over the phone. With regard to the first questionnaire, statistically significant data concern behavioral medicine and cardiology. In the first area the owner's worry decreases during the follow-up and the number of owners who would give away the animal increases. In cardiology, owners who think that the pathology harms their animal's quality of life decreased significantly over time. With regard to the 9 additional follow-up questions, in behavioural medicine and urology the owner's discomfort resulting from the animal's pathology significantly decreases over time. Assessment of adherence appears to be an optimal instrument in identifying the positive factors and the difficulties encountered by owners during the application of a treatment protocol. PMID:26185708

  20. Using Group Projects to Assess the Learning of Sampling Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidigh, Robert O.; Dunkelberger, Jake

    2012-01-01

    In an introductory business statistics course, student groups used sample data to compare a set of sample means to the theoretical sampling distribution. Each group was given a production measurement with a population mean and standard deviation. The groups were also provided an excel spreadsheet with 40 sample measurements per week for 52 weeks…

  1. The Use of Extreme Groups in Assessing Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alf, Edward F., Jr.; Abrahams, Norman M.

    1975-01-01

    In applied and experimental research, it has been demonstrated that the extreme groups procedure is more powerful than the standard correlational approach for some values of the correlation and extreme group size. Methods are provided for using the covariance information that is usually discarded in the classical extreme groups approach.…

  2. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  3. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  4. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  5. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  6. 24 CFR 982.507 - Rent to owner: Reasonable rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... whether the rent to owner is a reasonable rent in comparison to rent for other comparable unassisted units... rent to owner is not more than rent charged by the owner for comparable unassisted units in...

  7. Horse owners' biosecurity practices following the first equine influenza outbreak in Australia.

    PubMed

    Schemann, K; Taylor, M R; Toribio, J-A L M L; Dhand, N K

    2011-12-15

    A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 759 Australian horse owners to determine their biosecurity practices and perceptions one year after the 2007 equine influenza outbreak and to investigate the factors influencing these perceptions and practices. A web link to an online questionnaire was sent to 1224 horse owners as a follow-up to a previous study to obtain information about biosecurity perceptions and practices, impacts of the 2007 EI outbreak, demographic information and information about horse industry involvement. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with poor biosecurity practices. Biosecurity compliance (low, medium, high), as determined by horse owners' responses to a 16-item question on the frequency of various biosecurity measures, was used as the outcome variable in ordinal logistic regression analyses. Variables with a univariable p-value ≤0.2 were eligible for inclusion in multivariable models built using a manual stepwise approach. Variables with a p-value <0.05 in multivariable models were retained in the final model. Two potential confounders - age and gender of participants - were included in the final model irrespective of their p-values. Thirty percent of the respondents had low biosecurity compliance and were performing biosecurity practices 'not very often' or 'never'. Younger people, people with two or more children, those who were not involved with horses commercially and those who had no long-term business impacts resulting from the 2007 EI outbreak were more likely to have lower biosecurity compliance. People who were not fearful of a future outbreak of equine influenza in Australia and those who thought their current hygiene and access control practices were not very effective in protecting their horses also had poor biosecurity practices. In this observational study we identified factors associated with a group of horse owners with low levels of biosecurity compliance. As this

  8. The Application of Games Theory to Group Project Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Application of game theory to small-group project evaluation in higher education instruction finds that the best strategy for students wishing high grades may not be a strategy that promotes teamwork and cooperation. Suggests that putting students into groups may randomly disadvantage some students relative to others, producing serious unfairness…

  9. Using the Competent Small Group Communicator Instrument to Assess Group Performance in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Lawrence S.

    If being a competent small group problem solver is difficult, it is even more difficult to impart those competencies to others. Unlike athletic coaches who are near their players during the real game, teachers of small group communication are not typically present for on-the-spot coaching when their students are doing their problem solving. That…

  10. Owner reports of attention, activity, and impulsivity in dogs: a replication study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background When developing behaviour measurement tools that use third party assessments, such as parent report, it is important to demonstrate reliability of resulting scales through replication using novel cohorts. The domestic dog has been suggested as a model to investigate normal variation in attention, hyperactivity, and impulsive behaviours impaired in Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). The human ADHD Rating Scale, modified for dogs and using owner-directed surveys, was applied in a European sample. We asked whether findings would be replicated utilizing an Internet survey in a novel sample, where unassisted survey completion, participant attitudes and breeds might affect previous findings. Methods Using a slightly modified version of the prior survey, we collected responses (n = 1030, 118 breeds representing 7 breed groups) primarily in the United States and Canada. This study was conducted using an Internet survey mechanism. Results Reliability analyses confirmed two scales previously identified for dogs (inattention [IA], hyperactivity-impulsivity [HA-IM]). Models including age, training status, and breed group accounted for very little variance in subscales, with no effect of gender. Conclusions The factor invariance demonstrated in these findings confirms that owner report, using this modified human questionnaire, provides dog scores according to "inattention" and "hyperactivity-impulsivity" axes. Further characterization of naturally occurring variability of attention, activity, and impulsivity in domestic dogs may provide insight into genetic backgrounds underlying behaviours impaired in attention and associated disorders. PMID:20047681

  11. Interaction in Group Oral Assessment: A Case Study of Higher- and Lower-Scoring Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the interactional work in which two groups of secondary ESL students engaged to achieve and sustain participation in group oral assessment, which is designed to assess a student's interactive communication skills in a school-based assessment context. The in-depth observation of the ways in which participants co-constructed…

  12. The Use of Group versus Individual Settings for Assessing Student Achievement in Kindergarten and First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins-Burnett, Sally; Rowan, Brian; Correnti, Richard

    This paper reports on an experiment examining the consequences of assessing kindergarten and first-grade students' academic achievement in group versus individualized assessment settings. Students (n=442) blocked by classroom and grade level were randomly assigned to one of two assessment modes: a small group setting with 8 other students from…

  13. Pedagogy, Self-Assessment, and Online Discussion Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayler, Mary; Weller, Karen

    2007-01-01

    One Master's Program, Initiatives in Educational Transformation, has integrated a computer management system (WebCT) into a learner-centered (Weimer, 2002) community of K-12 practicing teachers. Online discussions were an extension of instructional practices that supported dialogue, reflection, and self-assessment for the purpose of continuous…

  14. Improving Group Selection and Assessment in an Asynchronous Collaborative Writing Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandaker, Nobel; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2010-01-01

    Two critical issues of the typical computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) systems are inappropriate selection of student groups and inaccurate assessment of individual contributions of the group members. Inappropriate selection of student groups often leads to ineffective and inefficient collaboration, while inaccurate assessment of…

  15. A Robust Approach for Mapping Group Marks to Individual Marks Using Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spatar, Ciprian; Penna, Nigel; Mills, Henny; Kutija, Vedrana; Cooke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Group work can form a substantial component of degree programme assessments. To satisfy institutional and student expectations, students must often be assigned individual marks for their contributions to the group project, typically by mapping a single holistic group mark to individual marks using peer assessment scores. Since the early 1990s,…

  16. NORTHEAST LOON STUDY WORKING GROUP PARTNERSHIP TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northeast Loon Study Working Group (NELSWG) was formed in 1994 to proactively identify threats to one of the Northeast's most popular waterbirds, the common loon, Gavia immer. Seventeen institutions have come together to identify strategy, coordinate the work load, and share ...

  17. Group and Family Day Care: A Comparative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth

    The point is made that studies of day-care use consistently confirm that the most common form of day care is in-home day care by a relative or another person. Group care as it now functions is most practical for a mother who works regular daytime hours and lives within manageable commuting distance of a center. The yearly costs per child reported…

  18. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  19. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  20. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  1. 46 CFR 160.076-37 - Owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Owner's manual. 160.076-37 Section 160.076-37 Shipping... Owner's manual. (a) General. The manufacturer must provide an owner's manual with each inflatable PFD... accordance with § 160.076-13. (b) Manual contents. Each owner's manual must contain the information...

  2. 46 CFR 160.076-37 - Owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Owner's manual. 160.076-37 Section 160.076-37 Shipping... Owner's manual. (a) General. The manufacturer must provide an owner's manual with each inflatable PFD... accordance with § 160.076-13. (b) Manual contents. Each owner's manual must contain the information...

  3. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  4. 28 CFR 29.8 - Motor vehicle owner participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motor vehicle owner participation. 29.8 Section 29.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION ACT REGULATIONS § 29.8 Motor vehicle owner participation. In order to participate in this program, the owner(s) of...

  5. The Paradox of the Contented Female Business Owner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gary N.; Eddleston, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    According to survey responses from 201 business owners, although the firms of male business owners were more successful than those of female business owners on frequently used measures of business success (business performance compared to competitors and sales), business owner sex did not predict satisfaction with business success, supporting the…

  6. 7 CFR 1780.70 - Owner's procurement regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Owner's procurement regulations. 1780.70 Section 1780..., Contracting, Constructing and Inspections § 1780.70 Owner's procurement regulations. Owner's procurement... other interest in the firm selected for the award. (1) The owner's officers, employees or agents...

  7. Fetching what the owner prefers? Dogs recognize disgust and happiness in human behaviour.

    PubMed

    Turcsán, Borbála; Szánthó, Flóra; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2015-01-01

    Research using the two-object choice paradigm showed that dogs prefer the object associated with the happy human emotion. However, they provided rather ambiguous results regarding the negative emotions. We assumed that differences between the dogs' and owners' interest towards the 'negative' object might be responsible for this. In our experiment, dogs observed their owner expressing different emotions towards two uniform plastic bottles. Five dog groups were tested based on the condition they received: (1) happy versus neutral, (2) happy versus disgust, (3) neutral versus disgust and (4-5) neutral vs neutral, as control groups. Contrary to previous studies using free choice paradigm, we used a task-driven approach. After the demonstration, the dogs had to retrieve one object to the owner. The dogs' performance in the two neutral-neutral groups did not differ from the chance level. In contrast, subjects were able to distinguish between the happy and neutral expression of the owner: they both approached and fetched the 'happy' object. In the happy-disgusted and neutral-disgusted groups, the dogs approached the bottles randomly, suggesting that they found the 'disgusting' and 'neutral' objects equally attractive. Nevertheless, the dogs preferentially retrieved the object marked with the relatively more positive emotion (happy or neutral) to the owner in both conditions. Our results demonstrate that dogs are able to recognize which is the more positive among two emotions, and in a fetching task situation, they override their own interest in the 'disgusting' object and retrieve what the owner prefers.

  8. Small business owners' opinions about written health and safety information.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Lisa M; Fredrickson, Ann L; Casey, Mary Anne

    2007-04-01

    Owners of small manufacturing businesses from twelve industrial sectors (n=40) participated in focus groups. They most frequently read trade and local business publications; few regularly read or receive health and safety materials. They select business-related materials that are specific to their business, give them new ideas, or have information that is easy to use. Insurance companies and business associations are the most frequently mentioned sources of health and safety information. The most important aspects of a prototype newsletter are sponsorship, color and graphics, length and relevance. Most are positive about a university logo, because it indicates a trusted source. The front page should have a table of contents with short descriptions of articles and catchy headlines. A newsletter should take no more than ten minutes to read. Owners did not like articles that were written in first person, used quotes, were too personal or gave no solutions. Owners think a newsletter will be successful if it is targeted to their industry, shows costs, includes case studies about local businesses, isn't too academic, focuses on a different topic with each issue, and gives readers an opportunity to provide feedback.

  9. Small business owners' opinions about written health and safety information.

    PubMed

    Brosseau, Lisa M; Fredrickson, Ann L; Casey, Mary Anne

    2007-04-01

    Owners of small manufacturing businesses from twelve industrial sectors (n=40) participated in focus groups. They most frequently read trade and local business publications; few regularly read or receive health and safety materials. They select business-related materials that are specific to their business, give them new ideas, or have information that is easy to use. Insurance companies and business associations are the most frequently mentioned sources of health and safety information. The most important aspects of a prototype newsletter are sponsorship, color and graphics, length and relevance. Most are positive about a university logo, because it indicates a trusted source. The front page should have a table of contents with short descriptions of articles and catchy headlines. A newsletter should take no more than ten minutes to read. Owners did not like articles that were written in first person, used quotes, were too personal or gave no solutions. Owners think a newsletter will be successful if it is targeted to their industry, shows costs, includes case studies about local businesses, isn't too academic, focuses on a different topic with each issue, and gives readers an opportunity to provide feedback. PMID:17485864

  10. Dietary assessment of a group of elderly Spanish people.

    PubMed

    Ortega, R M; Andrés, P; Redondo, M R; Zamora, M J; López-Sobaler, A M; Encinas-Sotillos, A

    1995-05-01

    The dietary patterns of 60 elderly from Spain (37 women and 23 men) were examined by analysis of the food, energy and nutrient intake during 5 days. The caloric profile was somewhat unbalanced, since the percentage of total energy intake from proteins and lipids was above the recommended limit whereas the proportion of energy derived from carbohydrates was slightly deficient. The degree of underreporting derived by subtracting predicted total daily energy expenditure from self-reported energy intake obtained from a diet control during 5 days is 120 kcal/day in men and 334 kcal/day in women. More than 50% of the population showed intakes of pyridoxine, folates, vitamin A (only in men), vitamin D, vitamin E. zinc, magnesium and iron (only in women) lower than those recommended. Although it is likely that the real intakes of these micronutrients are higher than the levels measured considering the underreporting, the obtained results show the existence of a risk of deficiency of several nutrients. An increase in the energy intake of the group with a parallel increase in physical activity with a view to avoiding weight gain may be of use in improving the nutritional status of the group. This measure, together with increased consumption of vegetables and milk products especially, may lead to a striking reduction in illness, a finding that is of considerable clinical and public health importance.

  11. Energy technology assessments for energy security -- Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, A.D.; Schock, R.N.

    1993-03-01

    In the first phase of the evaluation process the group identified technology areas that are clearly important for reducing US vulnerability to oil supply disruptions. The important technologies were then evaluated against the following specific criteria: Additions to world oil and gas reserves outside the Middle East; increase in efficiency in the oil consuming sectors; displacement of petroleum-based fuels; reduction in demand for oil-fueled transportation; increase in the ability to switch quickly away from petroleum based fuels; increases in domestic and international oil stocks; reduction in world oil demand; and additions to domestic, non-petroleum electrical generating capacity (important in the ultimate term). The technology areas deemed by the members of the working group to be most important are: (1) In the near term, technologies related to improved recovery of natural gas, the conversion of natural gas to liquids, advanced liquefaction of coal, the development of alternatively fueled vehicles, automobiles and light truck improvements to increase efficiency, and vehicles that operate on alternative fuels. (2) In the long term, these technologies, as well as those related to hydrogen production, storage and utilization, biomass derived fuels, electric and hybrid vehicles, building heating and cooling using solar energy, more efficient appliances, improved HVAC, and advanced building materials and envelopes were also judged to be most important. (3) In the ultimate term (>2030) other technologies have the possibility to join with these to increase energy security. These are improved oil and gas exploration and extraction, heavy oil and hydrocarbon conversion, gas recovery from unconventional sources, advanced fission reactors and fuel cycles, solar generation of electricity, and fusion energy. An increase in US electrical generating capacity is also thought to bear directly on energy security in this time-frame.

  12. Distance Education of Pennsylvania Pond Owners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Katherine L.; Swistock, Bryan R.; Sharpe, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations by 175 of 557 Pennsylvania pond owners who attended an Extension program via satellite revealed that most were interested in aesthetic/recreational pond use and pond management. They wanted more in-depth information over a shorter time frame. Only 10% did not favor satellite delivery. Shorter, more focused satellite programs and…

  13. [Cancer risk assessment in a group of traffic officers].

    PubMed

    Fedotova, I V; Chernikova, E F; Kuznetsova, L V; Ippolitova, V P; Petrova, I A

    2011-01-01

    Air-pollution studies in the area where the traffic officers of the road-patrol service of the State Inspectorate for Road Traffic Safety, who patrol road traffic safety, breathe at the stationary militia inspection stations (MIS) and in the areas of the heaviest motor traffic highways of a city ascertained the cancer risk from exposure to carcinogenic agents, such as benzo(a)pyrene, benzene, and formaldehyde. The mean concentrations of these substances do not exceed the hygienic limits. In terms of the hazard index (1.04) and the individual's cancer risk index (4.8 x 10(-5)), the cancer risk for the traffic officers of MIS may be considered acceptable. Both indices (1.28 and 1.3 x 10(-4), respectively) for traffic officers and traffic controllers are suggestive of an increased cancer risk, which constitutes a potential threat to a rise in cancer morbidity in this occupational group and needs preventive measures to be undertaken.

  14. Batterers' Intervention: How Group Leaders Assess the Risk Levels of Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.; Lucero, Jessica L.; Kaiser, Angela; Rose, Isabel; Muzzi, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Leaders of intervention groups for batterers must continuously assess how well they are meeting their goal of reducing violence. This article reports on survey and qualitative interview data from group leaders about their risk assessments. The practitioners were aware that their information about the risk levels of members was limited. They…

  15. Students' Attitudes toward a Group Coursework Protocol and Peer Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Caroline; Michaelidou, Nina; Canning, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a knowledge gap by presenting an empirical investigation of a group coursework protocol and peer assessment system (GCP&PAS) used in a UK university to support postgraduate marketing students in their assessed group activities. The aim of the research was to examine students' understanding of the GCP&PAS and their…

  16. Group Assessment at First Year and Final Degree Level: A Comparative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plastow, N.; Spiliotopoulou, G.; Prior, S.

    2010-01-01

    Group projects are an established but debated pedagogical technique in higher education. The purpose of this study was to assess the appropriateness of combining individual and group marks in assessment. A mixed method design involving correlational and comparative elements was used. The sample included one cohort of students who completed a group…

  17. Peer Assessment in Group Projects Accounting for Assessor Reliability by an Iterative Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ko, Sung-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes an advanced method to factor in the contributions of individual group members engaged in an integrated group project using peer assessment procedures. Conway et al. proposed the Individual Weight Factor (IWF) method for peer assessment which has been extensively developed over the years. However, most methods associated with…

  18. A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E. |; Nieves, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents, and thus it is now common for local residents to be compensated for the presence of the facility. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent premia between cities that result from the presence of the facility. However, most of the focus has been on the behavior of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. The authors use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. They find that renters and owners differ in their response to noxious facilities, although the differences are not systematic. Furthermore, the differences between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or socio-demographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations of noxious facilities by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

  19. The Investigation of Peer Assessment in Primary School Cooperative Learning Groups with Respect to Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdabakan, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    There are studies especially at higher education level investigating the subsequent responses of students towards reciprocity, tacit agreement and assessment of peers, but research on the effect of gender on peer assessment is limited. The present study focuses on whether peer assessment used in cooperative learning groups varies with respect to…

  20. Quantitative Approach to Collaborative Learning: Performance Prediction, Individual Assessment, and Group Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cen, Ling; Ruta, Dymitr; Powell, Leigh; Hirsch, Benjamin; Ng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning, although widely reported, lack the quantitative rigor and detailed insight into the dynamics of interactions within the group, while individual contributions and their impacts on group members and their collaborative work remain hidden behind joint group assessment. To bridge this gap we intend to address…

  1. Teaching Medieval Towns: Group Exercises, Individual Presentations and Self-Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Andrew; Gunn, Vicky

    2002-01-01

    Examines the use of innovative collaborative small group activities in a Medieval History undergraduate honors course. Discusses student evaluations and feedback from a focus group to investigate the use of group exercises that involve the construction of three-dimensional models of medieval towns and the use of self-assessment. (Author/LRW)

  2. Using Focus Groups To Supplement the Assessment of Technical Communication Texts, Programs, and Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Philip; Abbott, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Recommends focus groups as a useful research methodology for supplementing other, more commonly used measures of qualitative and quantitative assessment. Explains how focus groups can be used to examine teacher and practitioner perspectives of effective technical writing. Provides suggestions on how focus groups can also be used for evaluating…

  3. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Effects of Group Composition on High-Achieving Students' Science Assessment Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high-ability students completing science assessments. Results for 83 high ability students show the quality of group functioning serves as the strongest predictor of high-ability students' performance and explained much of the…

  4. Psychiatric investigation of 18 bereaved pet owners.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuya; Kawabata, Hidenobu; Maezawa, Masaji

    2011-08-01

    This survey explores the grief associated with the loss of a pet, and was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires were handed out to 50 bereaved pet owners attending a public animal cremation service, and we received 18 responses. Participants responded within 0 to 44 (median 4) days of the death of their pet. Although most mental health problems immediately following mourning are presumed to be normal grief reactions, on the basis of several psychiatric scales, 8 of the 16 valid responses indicated depression and/or neurosis. Statistical analyses showed that the following factors were significantly associated with grief reactions: age of owner, other stressful life events, family size, age of deceased animal, rearing place, and preliminary veterinary consultation. PMID:21483181

  5. Psychosocial needs assessment post kidney transplant: Feasibility of a post-transplant specific support group.

    PubMed

    Brijmohan, Angela; Famure, Olusegun; Sihota, Kiren; Shea, Mary; Marzario, Barbara; Mitchell, Margot

    2015-01-01

    This project assessed unmet psychosocial needs of kidney transplant recipients and the feasibility of a support group located at an urban Canadian hospital to meet those needs. A survey assessed transplant recipient concerns about psychosocial issues related to transplantation, interest in a support group, desired group composition, facilitation, leadership, barriers and alternative forms of support. Most respondents were more than two years since transplant and were more concerned about medical complications, returning to normalcy, and had a greater desire to talk to other transplant recipients. Forty per cent of respondents indicated they would be interested in a support group. However, 60% indicated that a support group hosted in the hospital setting would be a deterrent to attending, citing time and transportation as the greatest barriers. More research is needed to assess the feasibility of post-kidney transplant support groups closer to recipients' homes and the feasibility of alternative forms of support. PMID:26882632

  6. 24 CFR 982.453 - Owner breach of contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) If the owner has committed fraud, bribery or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with any..., bribery or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with the mortgage or loan. (5) If the owner...

  7. Hendra virus and horse owners--risk perception and management.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nina; McLaughlin, Amanda; Taylor, Melanie; Moloney, Barbara; Wright, Therese; Field, Hume

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic novel paramyxovirus causing sporadic fatal infection in horses and humans in Australia. Species of fruit-bats (genus Pteropus), commonly known as flying-foxes, are the natural host of the virus. We undertook a survey of horse owners in the states of Queensland and New South Wales, Australia to assess the level of adoption of recommended risk management strategies and to identify impediments to adoption. Survey questionnaires were completed by 1431 respondents from the target states, and from a spectrum of industry sectors. Hendra virus knowledge varied with sector, but was generally limited, with only 13% of respondents rating their level of knowledge as high or very high. The majority of respondents (63%) had seen their state's Hendra virus information for horse owners, and a similar proportion found the information useful. Fifty-six percent of respondents thought it moderately, very or extremely likely that a Hendra virus case could occur in their area, yet only 37% said they would consider Hendra virus if their horse was sick. Only 13% of respondents stabled their horses overnight, although another 24% said it would be easy or very easy to do so, but hadn't done so. Only 13% and 15% of respondents respectively had horse feed bins and water points under solid cover. Responses varied significantly with state, likely reflecting different Hendra virus history. The survey identified inconsistent awareness and/or adoption of available knowledge, confusion in relation to Hendra virus risk perception, with both over-and under-estimation of true risk, and lag in the uptake of recommended risk minimisation strategies, even when these were readily implementable. However, we also identified frustration and potential alienation by horse owners who found the recommended strategies impractical, onerous and prohibitively expensive. The insights gained from this survey have broader application to other complex risk-management scenarios.

  8. Hendra virus and horse owners--risk perception and management.

    PubMed

    Kung, Nina; McLaughlin, Amanda; Taylor, Melanie; Moloney, Barbara; Wright, Therese; Field, Hume

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic novel paramyxovirus causing sporadic fatal infection in horses and humans in Australia. Species of fruit-bats (genus Pteropus), commonly known as flying-foxes, are the natural host of the virus. We undertook a survey of horse owners in the states of Queensland and New South Wales, Australia to assess the level of adoption of recommended risk management strategies and to identify impediments to adoption. Survey questionnaires were completed by 1431 respondents from the target states, and from a spectrum of industry sectors. Hendra virus knowledge varied with sector, but was generally limited, with only 13% of respondents rating their level of knowledge as high or very high. The majority of respondents (63%) had seen their state's Hendra virus information for horse owners, and a similar proportion found the information useful. Fifty-six percent of respondents thought it moderately, very or extremely likely that a Hendra virus case could occur in their area, yet only 37% said they would consider Hendra virus if their horse was sick. Only 13% of respondents stabled their horses overnight, although another 24% said it would be easy or very easy to do so, but hadn't done so. Only 13% and 15% of respondents respectively had horse feed bins and water points under solid cover. Responses varied significantly with state, likely reflecting different Hendra virus history. The survey identified inconsistent awareness and/or adoption of available knowledge, confusion in relation to Hendra virus risk perception, with both over-and under-estimation of true risk, and lag in the uptake of recommended risk minimisation strategies, even when these were readily implementable. However, we also identified frustration and potential alienation by horse owners who found the recommended strategies impractical, onerous and prohibitively expensive. The insights gained from this survey have broader application to other complex risk-management scenarios. PMID

  9. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  10. 46 CFR 160.076-37 - Owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Owner's manual. 160.076-37 Section 160.076-37 Shipping... Owner's manual. (a) General. The manufacturer must provide an owner's manual with each inflatable PFD sold or offered for sale. A draft of the manual for each model must be submitted for approval...

  11. 46 CFR 28.505 - Vessel owner's responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vessel owner's responsibility. 28.505 Section 28.505... FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Stability § 28.505 Vessel owner's responsibility. (a) Where a test or calculations are necessary to evaluate stability, it is the owner's responsibility to select a...

  12. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  13. 33 CFR 67.40-10 - Communication with owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Communication with owner. 67.40... Communication with owner. Communication with the owners of private aids to navigation by the District Commander shall be addressed to their usual or last known place of business, or to their local representative,...

  14. Using Classroom Assessment and Cognitive Scaffolding to Enhance the Power of Small-Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, James L.; Robinson, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe several types of classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and cognitive scaffolding procedures that they have developed over the years. They then bring the procedures together in a sample lecture/group learning class presentation.

  15. KEY ISSUES FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: BREAKOUT GROUP REPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    On the final afternoon of the Workshop, Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of 1) Use of Human Clinical Data; 2) Animal Models to Assess Food ...

  16. Collaborating or Fighting for the Marks? Students' Experiences of Group Work Assessment in the Creative Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The study explores students' and lecturers' experiences of group work assessment in a performing arts department that includes undergraduate studies in theatre, dance and film. Working from the perspective that assessment is a socially situated practice informed by, and mediated through, the socio-political context within which it occurs, this…

  17. Examining Negotiation in Peer Group Oral Assessment: What Are the Implications?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a case study of negotiation that occurred in peer group oral interactions under assessment conditions. Discourse analysis was used to illustrate how participants negotiated and co-constructed the assessment format itself as well as meaning exchange sequences. Analyses of the data point to the advantage of using peer group…

  18. Student Perceptions and Use of an Assessment Rubric for a Group Concept Map in Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported how the opinions of second-year dentistry students and faculty members can be used to construct an assessment rubric to grade group-based concept maps in physiology (14). This article describes the second phase of this study of the subsequent year's cohort. A case study approach was used to investigate how groups of students…

  19. Human evolutionary history and contemporary evolutionary theory provide insight when assessing cultural group selection.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Agustin; Kissel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Richerson et al. provide a much needed roadmap for assessing cultural group selection (CGS) theory and for applying it to understanding variation between contemporary human groups. However, the current proposal lacks connection to relevant evidence from the human evolutionary record and requires a better integration with contemporary evolutionary theory. The article also misapplies the F st statistic. PMID:27562510

  20. Group In-Course Assessment Promotes Cooperative Learning and Increases Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratten, Margaret K.; Merrick, Deborah; Burr, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe and evaluate a method to motivate medical students to maximize the effectiveness of dissection opportunities by using In-Course-Assessments (ICAs) to encourage teamwork. A student's final mark was derived by combining the group dissection mark, group mark for questions, and their individual question mark. An analysis of…

  1. Exploring Teacher Beliefs and Use of Acceleration, Ability Grouping, and Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missett, Tracy C.; Brunner, Marguerite M.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Moon, Tonya R.; Azano, Amy Price

    2014-01-01

    Few academic interventions for gifted students have generated more empirical support than acceleration and ability grouping, and formative assessment is advocated as a tool that educators can use to appropriately integrate accelerative practices and ability grouping into the classroom. However, the empirical support for accelerative practices,…

  2. International Cultural Immersion: Assessing the Influence of a Group Intervention on Intercultural Sensitivity for Counselor Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Sejal M.; Shannonhouse, Laura; Mobley, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Scholars (e.g., Bemak & Chung, 2004) underscore the need for group workers to be culturally sensitive. One group training strategy, cultural immersion, is often employed to develop cultural sensitivity. However, no studies have utilized quasi-experimental methodologies to assess differences in cultural sensitivity between trainees that immerse…

  3. Multi-Group Invariance of the Conceptions of Assessment Scale among University Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLoreto, Melanie Anne

    2013-01-01

    Conceptions are contextual. In the realm of education, conceptions of various constituent groups are often shaped over a period of a number of years during which time these groups have participated in educational endeavors. Specifically, conceptions of assessment are influenced by beliefs, actions, attitudes, understandings, and past experiences.…

  4. Scope of the Problem and Perception by Owners and Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jennifer A; Villaverde, Cecilia

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a common disease of modern dogs and cats. Dog and cat owners often do not realize their animal is affected. Some pet owners are skeptical of the diagnosis or rationalize the overweight condition of their pets. Animal-related factors associated with obesity in dogs and cats include breed, neuter status, age, and gender, whereas owner-related factors include diet choice, feeding method, and provision of exercise. Owner characteristics, such as age and income, are also potential risk factors for pet obesity. Identifying such risk factors for both animals and owners may help provide targets for prevention or interventional tools.

  5. Scope of the Problem and Perception by Owners and Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jennifer A; Villaverde, Cecilia

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a common disease of modern dogs and cats. Dog and cat owners often do not realize their animal is affected. Some pet owners are skeptical of the diagnosis or rationalize the overweight condition of their pets. Animal-related factors associated with obesity in dogs and cats include breed, neuter status, age, and gender, whereas owner-related factors include diet choice, feeding method, and provision of exercise. Owner characteristics, such as age and income, are also potential risk factors for pet obesity. Identifying such risk factors for both animals and owners may help provide targets for prevention or interventional tools. PMID:27264053

  6. Tobacco Assessment in Actively Accruing National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Program Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Torres, Essie; Toll, Benjamin A.; Cummings, K. Michael; Gritz, Ellen R.; Hyland, Andrew; Herbst, Roy S.; Marshall, James R.; Warren, Graham W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Substantial evidence suggests that tobacco use has adverse effects on cancer treatment outcomes; however, routine assessment of tobacco use has not been fully incorporated into standard clinical oncology practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tobacco use assessment in patients enrolled onto actively accruing cancer clinical trials. Methods Protocols and forms for 155 actively accruing trials in the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program were evaluated for tobacco use assessment at enrollment and follow-up by using a structured coding instrument. Results Of the 155 clinical trials reviewed, 45 (29%) assessed any form of tobacco use at enrollment, but only 34 (21.9%) assessed current cigarette use. Only seven trials (4.5%) assessed any form of tobacco use during follow-up. Secondhand smoke exposure was captured in 2.6% of trials at enrollment and 0.6% during follow-up. None of the trials assessed nicotine dependence or interest in quitting at any point during enrollment or treatment. Tobacco status assessment was higher in lung/head and neck trials as well as phase III trials, but there was no difference according to year of starting accrual or cooperative group. Conclusion Most actively accruing cooperative group clinical trials do not assess tobacco use, and there is no observable trend in improvement over the past 8 years. Failure to incorporate standardized tobacco assessments into NCI-funded Cooperative Group Clinical Trials will limit the ability to provide evidence-based cessation support and will limit the ability to accurately understand the precise effect of tobacco use on cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:22689794

  7. Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional wildlife habitat in Southern New England.

    PubMed

    Buffum, Bill; Modisette, Christopher; McWilliams, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional habitat is a high priority for wildlife conservation agencies in the northeastern USA, where most forest land is privately owned. Many studies have linked regional declines in wildlife populations to the loss of early successional habitat. The government provides financial incentives to create early successional habitat, but the number of family forest owners who actively manage their forests remains low. Several studies have analyzed participation of family forest owners in federal forestry programs, but no study to date has focused specifically on creation of wildlife habitat. The objective of our study was to analyze the experience of a group of wildlife-oriented family forest owners who were trained to create early successional habitat. This type of family forest owners represents a small portion of the total population of family forest owners, but we believe they can play an important role in creating wildlife habitat, so it is important to understand how outreach programs can best reach them. The respondents shared some characteristics but differed in terms of forest holdings, forestry experience and interest in earning forestry income. Despite their strong interest in wildlife, awareness about the importance of early successional habitat was low. Financial support from the federal government appeared to be important in motivating respondents to follow up after the training with activities on their own properties: 84% of respondents who had implemented activities received federal financial support and 47% would not have implemented the activities without financial assistance. In order to mobilize greater numbers of wildlife-oriented family forest owners to create early successional habitat we recommend focusing outreach efforts on increasing awareness about the importance of early successional habitat and the availability of technical and financial assistance.

  8. Do Owners Have a Clever Hans Effect on Dogs? Results of a Pointing Study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidjell, Teresa; Range, Friederike; Huber, Ludwig; Virányi, Zsófia

    2012-01-01

    Dogs are exceptionally successful at interpreting human pointing gestures to locate food hidden in one of two containers. However, it has repeatedly been questioned whether dogs rely on the pointing gesture or their success is increased by subtle cues from their human handler. In two experiments we used a standard two-way object-choice task to focus on this potential Clever Hans effect. We investigated if and how owners’ knowledge and beliefs influenced their dogs’ performance. In two experiments, as is typical in such pointing tasks, the owners sat behind their dogs, in close auditory and tactile contact with them. In Experiment 1, we systematically manipulated the owners’ knowledge of whether or not their dog should follow the pointing gesture, but at the same time instructed the owners to refrain from influencing the choice of their dog. We found no influence of subtle cues from the owners, if indeed they existed: dogs in the different groups followed the pointing uniformly. Furthermore, in the absence of pointing dogs chose randomly, even though the owners had been informed about the location of the reward. In Experiment 2, owners were instructed to actively influence the choice of their dogs, and they, indeed, succeeded in sending their dogs to the container they believed to be baited. However, their influence was significantly weaker if the experimenter had previously pointed to the other location. Overall the pointing gesture seems to have a strong effect on the choice of dogs in an object-choice task. Pointing can lead the dogs to success without help from their owners as well as it can counteract clear directional instructions provided by the owners. PMID:23272000

  9. Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional wildlife habitat in Southern New England.

    PubMed

    Buffum, Bill; Modisette, Christopher; McWilliams, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging family forest owners to create early successional habitat is a high priority for wildlife conservation agencies in the northeastern USA, where most forest land is privately owned. Many studies have linked regional declines in wildlife populations to the loss of early successional habitat. The government provides financial incentives to create early successional habitat, but the number of family forest owners who actively manage their forests remains low. Several studies have analyzed participation of family forest owners in federal forestry programs, but no study to date has focused specifically on creation of wildlife habitat. The objective of our study was to analyze the experience of a group of wildlife-oriented family forest owners who were trained to create early successional habitat. This type of family forest owners represents a small portion of the total population of family forest owners, but we believe they can play an important role in creating wildlife habitat, so it is important to understand how outreach programs can best reach them. The respondents shared some characteristics but differed in terms of forest holdings, forestry experience and interest in earning forestry income. Despite their strong interest in wildlife, awareness about the importance of early successional habitat was low. Financial support from the federal government appeared to be important in motivating respondents to follow up after the training with activities on their own properties: 84% of respondents who had implemented activities received federal financial support and 47% would not have implemented the activities without financial assistance. In order to mobilize greater numbers of wildlife-oriented family forest owners to create early successional habitat we recommend focusing outreach efforts on increasing awareness about the importance of early successional habitat and the availability of technical and financial assistance. PMID:24587160

  10. Making instruction and assessment responsive to diverse students' progress: group-administered dynamic assessment in teaching mathematics.

    PubMed

    Jeltova, Ida; Birney, Damian; Fredine, Nancy; Jarvin, Linda; Sternberg, Robert J; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2011-01-01

    This study entailed a 3 (instructional intervention) × 2 (assessment-type) between-subjects experimental design employing a pretest-intervention-posttest methodology. The instructional interventions were administered between subjects in three conditions: (a) dynamic instruction, (b) triarchic or theory of successful intelligence-control instruction, and (c) standard-control instruction. The assessment-type consisted between subjects of either (a) a group-administered dynamic posttest or (b) the same group-administered posttest interspersed with a control filler activity. Performance in different mathematics content areas taught in fourth grade was investigated. In total, 1,332 students and 63 classroom teachers in 24 schools across six school districts participated in the study. The results indicate the advantages of using dynamic instruction and assessment in regular classrooms while teaching mathematics, especially when the student body is highly ethnically diverse. PMID:21965254

  11. Key issues for the assessment of the allergenic potential of genetically modified foods: breakout group reports.

    PubMed Central

    Germolec, Dori R; Kimber, Ian; Goldman, Lynn; Selgrade, MaryJane

    2003-01-01

    On the final afternoon of the workshop "Assessment of the Allergenic Potential of Genetically Modified Foods," held 10-12 December 2001 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, speakers and participants met in breakout groups to discuss specific questions in the areas of use of human clinical data, animal models to assess food allergy, biomarkers of exposure and effect, sensitive populations, dose-response assessment, and postmarket surveillance. Each group addressed general questions regarding allergenicity of genetically modified foods and specific questions for each subject area. This article is a brief summary of the discussions of each of the six breakout groups regarding our current state of knowledge and what information is needed to advance the field. PMID:12826486

  12. Factors influencing the temporal patterns of dyadic behaviours and interactions between domestic cats and their owners.

    PubMed

    Wedl, Manuela; Bauer, Barbara; Gracey, Dorothy; Grabmayer, Christine; Spielauer, Elisabeth; Day, Jon; Kotrschal, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Human-cat dyads may be similar in interaction structure to human dyads because many humans regard their cats as being social companions. Consequently, we predict that dyadic structure will be contingent on owner and cat personalities, sex, and age as well as duration of cohabitation of the partners. Forty owner-cat dyads were visited in their homes, on four occasions, during which their behaviours and interactions were video-taped. Behaviour was coded from tape and was analysed for temporal (t)-patterns using Theme (Noldus; Magnusson, 1996). Owner personality was assessed using the NEO-FFI. Five cat personality axes were identified by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based on observer-rated items and on coded behaviours. We found that the higher the owner in neuroticism, the fewer t-patterns occurred per minute. The higher the owner in extraversion, the higher was the number of non-overlapping patterns per minute. The more "active" the cat, the fewer non-overlapping patterns occurred per minute, but the higher was the event type complexity. The older the cat, the lower was dyadic event type complexity. We suggest that basic temporal structures similar to those of human-cat dyads may also be found in other long-term and complex dyadic relationships, including those between humans.

  13. Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

    2008-01-01

    The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

  14. Psychosocial Needs Assessment among Earthquake Survivors in Lorestan Province with an Emphasis on the Vulnerable Groups

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, A.; Eftekhari, M. Baradaran; Falahat, K.; Dejman, M.; Heidari, N.; Habibi, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Iran is one of the ten most earthquake prone countries in the world. Earthquakes not only cause new psychological needs among the population but particularly so when one considers vulnerable groups. This in - depth study was conducted with the aim of assessing psychosocial needs six months after an earthquake happened in the west of the county in Lorestan province. Methods: This is a qualitative study using focus group discussion that focuses mainly on the vulnerable groups (women, children, elderly and disabled people) after an earthquake in Boz-azna; a village in Lorestan province in western part of Iran. Findings: Results of the psychosocial assessment indicated feelings of anxiety and worries in four vulnerable groups. Horror, hyper-excitement, avoidance and disturbing thoughts were observed in all groups with the exception of the elderly. Educational failures, loneliness and isolation were highlighted in children. All groups encountered socio-economic needs that included loss of assets and sense of insecurity and also reproductive problems were reported in women's group. Discussion and Conclusion: Modification of a protocol on psychosocial support considering the context of the rural and urban areas with emphasis on the specific needs of the vulnerable groups is an appropriate strategy in crisis management. It seems that appropriate public awareness regarding assistance programs can be effective in reducing stress and needs of disaster survivors. PMID:23777724

  15. Community Resilience: Workshops on Private Sector and Property Owner Requirements for Recovery and Restoration from a Diasaster

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-12-22

    This report summarizes the results of a proejct sponsored by DTRA to 1) Assess the readiness of private-sector businesses, building owners, and service providers to restore property and recover operations in the aftermath of a wide-area dispersal of anthrax; and 2) Understand what private property owners and businesses "want and need" from federal, state, and local government to support recovery and restoration from such an incident.

  16. Green design assessment of electromechanical products based on group weighted-AHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinwei; Zhou, MengChu; Li, Zhiwu; Xie, Huiguang

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing industry is the backbone of a country's economy while environmental pollution is a serious problem that human beings must face today. The green design of electromechanical products based on enterprise information systems is an important method to solve the environmental problem. The question on how to design green products must be answered by excellent designers via both advanced design methods and effective assessment methods of electromechanical products. Making an objective and precise assessment of green design is one of the problems that must be solved when green design is conducted. An assessment method of green design on electromechanical products based on Group Weighted-AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) is proposed in this paper, together with the characteristics of green products. The assessment steps of green design are also established. The results are illustrated via the assessment of a refrigerator design.

  17. A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E. |; Nieves, L.A.

    1996-09-01

    The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents. As a result, one would expect people`s residential and employment choices to reflect a desire to avoid proximity to such facilities. Ibis behavior would in turn affect labor and housing prices. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value impacts of noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent differentials among cities that result from environmental amenities and disamenities. However, most of the research focus has been on the behavioral response of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. We use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. Although the magnitude of the responses of renters and owners to noxious facilities and other environmental characteristics varies, the signs are generally consistent. The differences in values between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or sociodemographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences in characteristics between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

  18. 42 CFR 413.102 - Compensation of owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sound conduct of the institution. (c) Application. (1) Owners of provider organizations often furnish..., if a proprietor furnishes necessary services for the institution, the institution is in...

  19. Implementation and Outcomes of Online Self and Peer Assessment on Group Based Honours Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chengqing; Chanda, Emmanuel; Willison, John

    2014-01-01

    Honours research projects in the School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering at the University of Adelaide are run with small groups of students working with an academic supervisor in a chosen area for one year. The research project is mainly self-directed study, which makes it very difficult to fairly assess the contribution of…

  20. Environmental Assessment. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskirk, E. Drannon, Jr.

    Described is an hour-long learning session on environmental assessment that is designed to help citizen advisory groups improve decision making in water quality planning. The instructor's guide addresses: (1) environmental considerations in water quality planning, and (2) the identification of primary and secondary impacts of wastewater projects.…

  1. Assessing Child Mental Health Services in New York: A Report on Three Focus Groups, Winter 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyanagi, Chris; Semansky, Rafael

    In 2002, the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law investigated the impact of expanding child mental health services in Medicaid on the actual availability of services to children. To assess family satisfaction, focus groups were held in two states: Oregon and New York. Both states have a comprehensive Medicaid mental health benefit for children…

  2. Assessment of Groups Influence on Management Style as Related to University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken with the objective of assessing groups influence on management style as related to University governance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study from academic staff perspective. The management style of the Vice Chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the period September 3, 1996 to…

  3. Making Group Assessment Transparent: What Wikis Can Contribute to Collaborative Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caple, Helen; Bogle, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of new media technologies, in particular wikis, for the compiling and grading of group assessment tasks. Wikis are open web pages that can be viewed and modified by anyone with internet access and are well known for their collaborative nature. Wikis are also transparent, which means that any edit/modification is…

  4. Integrating Teacher- and Peer-Assessments of Group Coursework Assignments in Business Education: Some Innovative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyia, Okey Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to an earlier one that examines "the efficacy of two innovative peer-assessment templates ("PET" and "PACT") introduced to enable students provide evidence of their fairness in evaluating peer contributions to group project work" (Onyia, O. P. and Allen, S., 2012). In the present paper, three…

  5. Chair Report Consultancy Meeting on Nuclear Security Assessment Methodologies (NUSAM) Transport Case Study Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, Doug

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of the consultancy assignment was to (i) apply the NUSAM assessment methods to hypothetical transport security table top exercise (TTX) analyses and (ii) document its results to working materials of NUSAM case study on transport. A number of working group observations, using the results of TTX methodologies, are noted in the report.

  6. Diary-Based Strategy Assessment and Its Relationship to Performance in a Group of Trainee Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilar, Raquel; de los Angeles Martinez Ruiz, Maria; Costa, Juan Luiz Castejon

    2007-01-01

    Our work is based on the study of learning strategies used by a group of trainee teachers in a real learning situation, and how this use of strategies influences the results of the learning process. We use a diary as a tool to assess the learning strategies and compare the results obtained with those using an inventory. Our findings indicate that…

  7. Research and Teaching: Aligning Assessment to Instruction--Collaborative Group Testing in Large- Enrollment Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Marcelle; Roberts, Tina M.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Witzig, Stephen B.; Izci, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a collaborative group-testing strategy implemented and studied in undergraduate science classes. This project investigated how the assessment strategy relates to student performance and perceptions about collaboration and focused on two sections of an undergraduate biotechnology course taught in separate semesters.

  8. The Parenting Questionnaire: An Inventory for Assessing Outcomes of Adlerian Parent Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiffany, Jeanne; Tollefson, Nona

    This study field tests and evaluates the Parenting Questionnaire, an instrument designed to assess parental attitudes and behavior, based on the child-raising theories of Dreikurs and Dinkmeyer and the Adlerian model for parent study groups. Dreikurs and Adler stress the purposive nature of children's behavior or misbehavior, and teach parents to…

  9. Using the Focus Group in Assessing Training Needs: Empowering Child Welfare Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Janice D.; Verschelden, Cia

    1993-01-01

    Describes an assessment process in a public child welfare agency that included workers as a primary source of knowledge about their own needs. Argues that the use of focus groups (a marketing research technique) encourages high levels of direct input and helps engage workers in subsequent phases of the training process. (MM)

  10. Neutering of cats and dogs in Ireland; pet owner self-reported perceptions of enabling and disabling factors in the decision to neuter.

    PubMed

    Downes, Martin J; Devitt, Catherine; Downes, Marie T; More, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Background. Failure among pet owners to neuter their pets results in increased straying and overpopulation problems. Variations in neutering levels can be explained by cultural differences, differences in economic status in rural and urban locations, and owner perceptions about their pet. There are also differences between male and female pet owners. There is no research pertaining to Irish pet owner attitudes towards neutering their pets. This paper identified the perceptions of a sample of Irish cat and dog owners that influenced their decisions on pet neutering. Methods. This study was conducted using social science (qualitative) methods, including an interview-administered survey questionnaire and focus group discussions. Data was coded and managed using Nvivo 8 qualitative data analysis software. Results. Focus groups were conducted with 43 pet (cats and dogs) owners. Two major categories relating to the decision to neuter were identified: (1) enabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: controlling unwanted pet behaviour; positive perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes; perceived owner responsibility; pet function; and the influence of veterinary advice), and (2) disabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: perceived financial cost of neutering; perceived adequacy of existing controls; and negative perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes). Discussion. Pet owner sense of responsibility and control are two central issues to the decision to neuter their pets. Understanding how pet owners feel about topics such as pet neutering, can help improve initiatives aimed at emphasising the responsibility of population control of cats and dogs. PMID:26312187

  11. Neutering of cats and dogs in Ireland; pet owner self-reported perceptions of enabling and disabling factors in the decision to neuter

    PubMed Central

    Devitt, Catherine; Downes, Marie T.; More, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Failure among pet owners to neuter their pets results in increased straying and overpopulation problems. Variations in neutering levels can be explained by cultural differences, differences in economic status in rural and urban locations, and owner perceptions about their pet. There are also differences between male and female pet owners. There is no research pertaining to Irish pet owner attitudes towards neutering their pets. This paper identified the perceptions of a sample of Irish cat and dog owners that influenced their decisions on pet neutering. Methods. This study was conducted using social science (qualitative) methods, including an interview-administered survey questionnaire and focus group discussions. Data was coded and managed using Nvivo 8 qualitative data analysis software. Results. Focus groups were conducted with 43 pet (cats and dogs) owners. Two major categories relating to the decision to neuter were identified: (1) enabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: controlling unwanted pet behaviour; positive perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes; perceived owner responsibility; pet function; and the influence of veterinary advice), and (2) disabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: perceived financial cost of neutering; perceived adequacy of existing controls; and negative perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes). Discussion. Pet owner sense of responsibility and control are two central issues to the decision to neuter their pets. Understanding how pet owners feel about topics such as pet neutering, can help improve initiatives aimed at emphasising the responsibility of population control of cats and dogs. PMID:26312187

  12. Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Cary; LeMay, Nancy; Rodway, Greg; Tracy, Allison; Galer, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA), was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location). The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality. PMID:16223447

  13. Focus Groups and Exit Interviews Are Components of Chemistry Department Program Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreisbach, Joseph H.; Hogan, Thomas P.; Stamford, Anne Marie; Greggo, John W.

    1998-10-01

    The Chemistry Department, in conjunction with the Assessment and Institutional Research Office (AIRO) and the Department of Counseling and Human Services developed an assessment plan which incorporates use of focus groups and exit interviews. As part of the five-year departmental review, a number of student focus groups were facilitated to evaluate (a) the freshman and sophomore organic chemistry programs which also service other departments and (b) the upper division lecture and laboratory program for majors. Use of direct conversation in program assessment yields less ambiguous results compared with other methods because responses can be clarified with careful follow up questions. Success of this project gave rise to use of annual exit interviews with graduating seniors from the chemistry department. The approach described can easily be modified to meet the needs of any academic setting.

  14. 7 CFR 1944.663 - Ownership agreement between HPG grantee and rental property owner or co-op.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... property owner(s) or co-op. (2) The owner(s) agrees to pass on to the tenants any reduction in the debt... Federal, State, or local housing assistance program. (5) The owner(s) agrees that the units repaired or... provided to the owner(s) shall constitute a debt which is payable in the case of any failure of...

  15. Assessment of female sexual function in a group of uncircumcised obese Egyptian women.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, A R M; Ibrahim, N H; Ahmed, H-Eh; Hassanin, A M; Elgawady, M A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess female sexual function in an obese group (250 women) and to compare it with a control group (100 women), among 25-35-year-old uncircumcised Egyptian women, using female sexual function index (FSFI) score. FSFI total score of ⩽ 26.55 was considered diagnostic of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD). The percentage of FSD in the obese group was 73.6% while it was 71% in the control group, which was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The difference between both groups regarding the total (FSFI) score was insignificant (P > 0.05), but arousal and satisfaction domains scores were significantly lower in the obese group. In the obese group, a strong negative correlation between body mass index and arousal, orgasm and the total FSFI score was found. Women with excessive obesity had the lowest total FSFI score. In the obese group, college graduates had the highest total scores and all domain scores of FSFI followed by high school graduates while the least educated women had the lowest scores and when these subgroups were compared, significant differences were found among them. We conclude that in uncircumcised 25-35-year-old Egyptian women, obesity is not a major detrimental factor for FSD, but it may affect some sexual domains such as arousal and satisfaction, although excessive obesity is associated with FSD. Also, educational and cultural factors may have an impact on perception of sex and pleasure. PMID:26155831

  16. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

  17. Assessing Mental Imagery to Evaluate Topographical Disorientation: Group Study and Preliminary Normative Data.

    PubMed

    Descloux, Virginie; Maurer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no specific neuropsychological test assessing spatial orientation abilities, despite the fact that navigational deficits are heavily incapacitating in daily life. This lack of a specific test is probably due to theoretical vagueness of concepts in this field and important interindividual differences in spatial cognition. Here we propose a new standardized test assessing a fundamental component of spatial orientation-namely, mental imagery: Adequate mental visualization of the environment is indeed a necessary step in finding one's way. Two conditions of mental imagery were proposed to a group of 58 patients with a right cerebral lesion and to a control group (N = 117). The 1st condition assessed global, categorical imagery; the 2nd evaluated precise, metric imagery. We evaluated performance of the 2 groups in the 2 conditions and the impact of sociodemographic variables (age, gender, education). Results show that the right-lesioned patients presented difficulties in mental imagery, especially in the metric condition. Moreover, the data indicate a global impact of age and a milder effect of education on mental imagery abilities. Although sample sizes are sometimes small, preliminary normative data are given; already in the present form, they are usable and informative in assessing mental imagery, and more generally, spatial orientation, in a clinical practice.

  18. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual: Volume 1, Administrative and support procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This manual describes procedures currently in use by the Pollutant Assessments Group. The manual is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 includes administrative and support procedures, and Volume 2 includes technical procedures. These procedures are revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures. The purpose of the Pollutant Assessments Groups Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures documenting in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Environmental Measurements and Applications Section (EMAS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of PAG conform properly to protocol outlined by funding organizations. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by PAG and other contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards. The Procedures Manual is sufficiently comprehensive for use by PAG and contractor personnel in the planning, performance, and reporting of project activities and measurements. The Procedures Manual provides procedures for conducting field measurements and includes program planning, equipment operation, and quality assurance elements. Successive revisions of this manual will be archived in the PAG Document Control Department to facilitate tracking of the development of specific procedures.

  19. National Assessment of Educational Progress. 1969-70 Citizenship: Group Results for Sex, Region, and Size of Community. National Assessment Report 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Vincent N.; And Others

    Information on assessment of citizenship achievement is presented in this report which compares 1970 first assessment results for the two sexes, four regions of the country, and four community sizes. Age groups assessed were 9, 13, 17, and 26 through 35 age group; geographical regions were Northeastern, Central, Western, and Southeastern; and…

  20. Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Human health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Purucker, S.T.; Douthat, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow- up information to the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that could cause potential human health risk and ecological risk within WAG2 at ORNL. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the human health risk assessment results based on the data collected for the WAG 2 Phase 1 RI. Estimates of risk are provided based on measured concentrations in the surface water, floodplain soil, and sediment of White Oak Creek, Melton Branch, and their tributaries. The human health risk assessment methodology used in this risk assessment is based on Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). First, the data for the different media are elevated to determine usability for risk assessment. Second, through the process of selecting chemicals of potential concern (COPCs), contaminants to be considered in the risk assessment are identified for each assessment of exposure potential is performed, and exposure pathways are identified. Subsequently, exposure is estimated quantitatively, and the toxicity of each of the COPCs is determined. The results of these analyses are combined and summarized in a risk characterization.

  1. Aircraft Inspection for the General Aviation Aircraft Owner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    Presented is useful information for owners, pilots, student mechanics, and others with aviation interests. Part I of this booklet outlines aircraft inspection requirements, owner responsibilities, inspection time intervals, and sources of basic information. Part II is concerned with the general techniques used to inspect an aircraft. (Author/JN)

  2. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  3. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  4. 24 CFR 983.51 - Owner proposal selection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Owner proposal selection procedures. 983.51 Section 983.51 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROJECT-BASED VOUCHER (PBV) PROGRAM Selection of PBV Owner Proposals § 983.51...

  5. 27 CFR 479.42 - Changes through death of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Changes through death of owner. 479.42 Section 479.42 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... death of owner. Whenever any person who has paid special (occupational) tax dies, the surviving...

  6. 27 CFR 479.42 - Changes through death of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Changes through death of owner. 479.42 Section 479.42 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... death of owner. Whenever any person who has paid special (occupational) tax dies, the surviving...

  7. 27 CFR 479.42 - Changes through death of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Changes through death of owner. 479.42 Section 479.42 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... death of owner. Whenever any person who has paid special (occupational) tax dies, the surviving...

  8. 27 CFR 479.42 - Changes through death of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Changes through death of owner. 479.42 Section 479.42 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... death of owner. Whenever any person who has paid special (occupational) tax dies, the surviving...

  9. 27 CFR 479.42 - Changes through death of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Changes through death of owner. 479.42 Section 479.42 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... death of owner. Whenever any person who has paid special (occupational) tax dies, the surviving...

  10. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... animal owners. Products prepared as provided in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section and...

  11. 37 CFR 381.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 381.9 Section 381.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 381.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and its stations,...

  12. 37 CFR 260.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 260.7 Section 260.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.7 Unknown copyright owners. If...

  13. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  14. 37 CFR 260.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 260.7 Section 260.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.7 Unknown copyright owners. If...

  15. 37 CFR 381.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 381.9 Section 381.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 381.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and its stations,...

  16. 37 CFR 381.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 381.9 Section 381.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 381.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and its stations,...

  17. 37 CFR 381.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 381.9 Section 381.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 381.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and its stations,...

  18. 37 CFR 260.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 260.7 Section 260.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.7 Unknown copyright owners. If...

  19. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  20. 37 CFR 260.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 260.7 Section 260.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND MAKING OF EPHEMERAL PHONORECORDS § 260.7 Unknown copyright owners. If...

  1. 37 CFR 381.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 381.9 Section 381.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 381.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and its stations,...

  2. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  3. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.9 Unknown copyright owners. If PBS and its stations, NPR and...

  4. 25 CFR 700.15 - Waiver of rights by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Waiver of rights by owner. 700.15 Section 700.15 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions § 700.15 Waiver of rights by owner. Nothing in these regulations...

  5. 25 CFR 700.15 - Waiver of rights by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Waiver of rights by owner. 700.15 Section 700.15 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions § 700.15 Waiver of rights by owner. Nothing in these regulations...

  6. 25 CFR 700.15 - Waiver of rights by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Waiver of rights by owner. 700.15 Section 700.15 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions § 700.15 Waiver of rights by owner. Nothing in these regulations...

  7. 25 CFR 700.15 - Waiver of rights by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Waiver of rights by owner. 700.15 Section 700.15 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions § 700.15 Waiver of rights by owner. Nothing in these regulations...

  8. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  9. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... opportunity requirements. (c) Contracting for services. (1) For this part 880 and 24 CFR part 881 projects...) For 24 CFR part 883 projects, with approval of the Agency, the owner may contract with a private or... owner must submit to the contract adminstrator: (1) Financial information in accordance with 24 CFR...

  10. 24 CFR 886.318 - Responsibilities of the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... management functions, including the taking of applications; determining eligibility of applicants in accordance with 24 CFR part 5 of this title; selection of families, including verification of income... of the owner. (a) Management and maintenance. The owner shall be responsible for the management...

  11. 24 CFR 886.119 - Responsibilities of the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the owner. (a) The Owner shall be responsible for management and maintenance of the project in... taxes; (2) Performance of all ordinary and extraordinary maintenance; (3) Performance of all management functions, including the taking of applications; determining eligibility of applicants in accordance...

  12. 37 CFR 41.9 - Action by owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Board proceeding may act in the proceeding to the exclusion of the inventor (see § 3.73(b) of this title... proceeding may petition to act in the proceeding to the exclusion of an inventor or a co-owner. The petition must show the inability or refusal of an inventor or co-owner to prosecute the proceeding or...

  13. 24 CFR 982.453 - Owner breach of contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) If the owner has committed fraud, bribery or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with any... has failed to comply with the regulations for the applicable mortgage insurance or loan program, with the mortgage or mortgage note, or with the regulatory agreement; or if the owner has committed...

  14. 24 CFR 982.453 - Owner breach of contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) If the owner has committed fraud, bribery or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with any... has failed to comply with the regulations for the applicable mortgage insurance or loan program, with the mortgage or mortgage note, or with the regulatory agreement; or if the owner has committed...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 11 - Reports to the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reports to the owner. Sec. 11 Section 11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 11 Reports to the owner. The...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 11 - Reports to the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reports to the owner. Sec. 11 Section 11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 11 Reports to the owner. The...

  17. 46 CFR Sec. 11 - Reports to the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reports to the owner. Sec. 11 Section 11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 11 Reports to the owner. The...

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 11 - Reports to the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reports to the owner. Sec. 11 Section 11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 11 Reports to the owner. The...

  19. 46 CFR Sec. 11 - Reports to the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reports to the owner. Sec. 11 Section 11 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 11 Reports to the owner. The...

  20. 7 CFR 1780.68 - Owner's contractual responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Owner's contractual responsibility. 1780.68 Section 1780.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE..., Contracting, Constructing and Inspections § 1780.68 Owner's contractual responsibility. This part does...

  1. Grouping and Read-Across Approaches for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, Agnes G.; Bleeker, Eric A. J.; Bos, Peter M. J.; van Broekhuizen, Fleur; Gottardo, Stefania; Groenewold, Monique; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Marcomini, Antonio; Peijnenburg, Willie J. G. M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; van Tongeren, Martie; Wiench, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of chemicals affect their exposure, toxicokinetics/fate and hazard, and for nanomaterials, the variation of these properties results in a wide variety of materials with potentially different risks. To limit the amount of testing for risk assessment, the information gathering process for nanomaterials needs to be efficient. At the same time, sufficient information to assess the safety of human health and the environment should be available for each nanomaterial. Grouping and read-across approaches can be utilised to meet these goals. This article presents different possible applications of grouping and read-across for nanomaterials within the broader perspective of the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy (RAS), as developed in the EU FP7 project MARINA. Firstly, nanomaterials can be grouped based on limited variation in physicochemical properties to subsequently design an efficient testing strategy that covers the entire group. Secondly, knowledge about exposure, toxicokinetics/fate or hazard, for example via properties such as dissolution rate, aspect ratio, chemical (non-)activity, can be used to organise similar materials in generic groups to frame issues that need further attention, or potentially to read-across. Thirdly, when data related to specific endpoints is required, read-across can be considered, using data from a source material for the target nanomaterial. Read-across could be based on a scientifically sound justification that exposure, distribution to the target (fate/toxicokinetics) and hazard of the target material are similar to, or less than, the source material. These grouping and read-across approaches pave the way for better use of available information on nanomaterials and are flexible enough to allow future adaptations related to scientific developments. PMID:26516872

  2. Grouping and Read-Across Approaches for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Agnes G; Bleeker, Eric A J; Bos, Peter M J; van Broekhuizen, Fleur; Gottardo, Stefania; Groenewold, Monique; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Marcomini, Antonio; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Jiménez, Araceli Sánchez; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; van Tongeren, Martie; Wiench, Karin; Wohlleben, Wendel; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Physicochemical properties of chemicals affect their exposure, toxicokinetics/fate and hazard, and for nanomaterials, the variation of these properties results in a wide variety of materials with potentially different risks. To limit the amount of testing for risk assessment, the information gathering process for nanomaterials needs to be efficient. At the same time, sufficient information to assess the safety of human health and the environment should be available for each nanomaterial. Grouping and read-across approaches can be utilised to meet these goals. This article presents different possible applications of grouping and read-across for nanomaterials within the broader perspective of the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy (RAS), as developed in the EU FP7 project MARINA. Firstly, nanomaterials can be grouped based on limited variation in physicochemical properties to subsequently design an efficient testing strategy that covers the entire group. Secondly, knowledge about exposure, toxicokinetics/fate or hazard, for example via properties such as dissolution rate, aspect ratio, chemical (non-)activity, can be used to organise similar materials in generic groups to frame issues that need further attention, or potentially to read-across. Thirdly, when data related to specific endpoints is required, read-across can be considered, using data from a source material for the target nanomaterial. Read-across could be based on a scientifically sound justification that exposure, distribution to the target (fate/toxicokinetics) and hazard of the target material are similar to, or less than, the source material. These grouping and read-across approaches pave the way for better use of available information on nanomaterials and are flexible enough to allow future adaptations related to scientific developments. PMID:26516872

  3. Oral health-related cultural beliefs for four racial/ethnic groups: Assessment of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Butani, Yogita; Weintraub, Jane A; Barker, Judith C

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess information available in the dental literature on oral health-related cultural beliefs. In the US, as elsewhere, many racial/ethnic minority groups shoulder a disproportionate burden of oral disease. Cultural beliefs, values and practices are often implicated as causes of oral health disparities, yet little is known about the breadth or adequacy of literature about cultural issues that could support these assertions. Hence, this rigorous assessment was conducted of work published in English on cultural beliefs and values in relation to oral health status and dental practice. Four racial/ethnic groups in the US (African-American, Chinese, Filipino and Hispanic/Latino) were chosen as exemplar populations. Methods The dental literature published in English for the period 1980–2006 noted in the electronic database PUBMED was searched, using keywords and MeSH headings in different combinations for each racial/ethnic group to identify eligible articles. To be eligible the title and abstract when available had to describe the oral health-related cultural knowledge or orientation of the populations studied. Results Overall, the majority of the literature on racial/ethnic groups was epidemiologic in nature, mainly demonstrating disparities in oral health rather than the oral beliefs or practices of these groups. A total of 60 relevant articles were found: 16 for African-American, 30 for Chinese, 2 for Filipino and 12 for Hispanic/Latino populations. Data on beliefs and practices from these studies has been abstracted, compiled and assessed. Few research-based studies were located. Articles lacked adequate identification of groups studied, used limited methods and had poor conceptual base. Conclusion The scant information available from the published dental and medical literature provides at best a rudimentary framework of oral health related ideas and beliefs for specific populations. PMID:18793438

  4. IntelliCages and automated assessment of learning in group-housed mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puścian, Alicja; Knapska, Ewelina

    2014-11-01

    IntelliCage is a fully automated, computer controlled system, which can be used for long-term monitoring of behavior of group-housed mice. Using standardized experimental protocols we can assess cognitive abilities and behavioral flexibility in appetitively and aversively motivated tasks, as well as measure social influences on learning of the subjects. We have also identified groups of neurons specifically activated by appetitively and aversively motivated learning within the amygdala, function of which we are going to investigate optogenetically in the future.

  5. Towards a common framework for assessing the activity and associations of groups who sexually abuse children

    PubMed Central

    Cockbain, Ella; Brayley, Helen; Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Extensive social psychological research emphasises the importance of groups in shaping individuals’ thoughts and actions. Within the child sexual abuse (CSA) literature criminal organisation has been largely overlooked, with some key exceptions. This research was a novel collaboration between academia and the UK's Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP). Starting from the premise that the group is, in itself, a form of social situation affecting abuse, it offers the first systematic situational analysis of CSA groups. In-depth behavioural data from a small sample of convicted CSA group-offenders (n = 3) were analysed qualitatively to identify factors and processes underpinning CSA groups’ activities and associations: group formation, evolution, identity and resources. The results emphasise CSA groups’ variability, fluidity and dynamism. The foundations of a general framework are proposed for researching and assessing CSA groups and designing effective interventions. It is hoped that this work will stimulate discussion and development in this long-neglected area of CSA, helping to build a coherent knowledge-base. PMID:26494978

  6. Assessment of the risks of climate change in the Working Group II contribution to the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, K. J.; Field, C. B.; Mastrandrea, M.; Barros, V.

    2013-12-01

    For the past two decades, IPCC Working Group II has developed comprehensive periodic assessments of climate change impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. In multiple rounds of drafting and review, author teams for each report evaluate the state of knowledge based on extensive scientific and technical information across disciplines. The Working Group II contribution to the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (WGII AR5), to be completed in 2014, explores the ways climate change is shifting patterns of risks and the implications for response. The risks of climate change often emerge from complex interactions typified by inherent uncertainties. Most fundamentally, climate-related risks result from physical hazards interacting with vulnerable and exposed people, assets, and ecosystems. The WGII AR5 assesses observed impacts of climate change, which may in some cases demonstrate risks already influenced by climate change, and it also assesses future risks affected by climate change and societal development. In communicating risks over the coming century, the assessment uses timeframe as a key distinction. Risks over the next few decades will evolve as socioeconomic trends interact with global temperature increase that is similar across emissions scenarios. During this near-term era of committed climate change, societal responses, particularly adaptations, will influence near-term outcomes. Other risks evolve in the longer term, varying across alternative climate change and development futures. Near-term and ongoing mitigation efforts, as well as development, will determine the risks of climate change in the second half of the 21st century, which can be considered an era of climate options. The WGII AR5 evaluates the ways impacts are experienced through extremes, not just through mean changes, and it considers the different types of vulnerability across regions and contexts. Ultimately, managing the risks of climate change can be considered a challenge of decisionmaking under

  7. Aluminium in food and daily dietary intake assessment from 15 food groups in Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hexiang; Tang, Jun; Huang, Lichun; Shen, Xianghong; Zhang, Ronghua; Chen, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Aluminium was measured in 2580 samples of 15 food groups and dietary exposure was estimated. Samples were purchased and analysed during 2010 to 2014. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (mean 4862 mg/kg), laver (mean 455.2 mg/kg) and fried twisted cruller (mean 392.4 mg/kg). Dietary exposure to aluminium was estimated for Zhejiang residents. The average dietary exposure to aluminium via 15 food groups in Zhejiang Province was 1.15 mg/kg bw/week, which is below the provisional tolerable weekly intake of 2 mg/kg bw /week. Jellyfish is the main Al contributor, providing 37.6% of the daily intake via these 15 food groups. This study provided new information on aluminium levels and assessment of aluminium (Al) dietary exposure in Zhejiang Province of China. PMID:26727195

  8. Assessing group-level participation in fluid teams: testing a new metric.

    PubMed

    Paletz, Susannah B F; Schunn, Christian D

    2011-06-01

    Participation is an important factor in team success. We propose a new metric of participation equality that provides an unbiased estimate across groups of different sizes and across those that change size over time. Using 11 h of transcribed utterances from informal, fluid, colocated workgroup meetings, we compared the associations of this metric with coded equality of participation and standard deviation. While coded participation and our metric had similar patterns of findings, standard deviation had a somewhat different pattern, suggesting that it might lead to incorrect assessments with fluid teams. Exploratory analyses suggest that, as compared with mixed-age/status groups, groups of younger faculty had more equal participation and that the presence of negative affect words was associated with more dominated participation. Future research can take advantage of this new metric to further theory on team processes in both face-to-face and distributed settings.

  9. Associations between Stress and Quality of Life: Differences between Owners Keeping a Living Dog or Losing a Dog by Euthanasia

    PubMed Central

    Tzivian, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The loss of a pet may be stressful to the owner. The main objectives of this study were to compare the levels of stress and to explore the correlates of QOL of healthy adults who currently own or who have just lost their dog. Methods The study sample contained 110 current, and 103 bereaved dog owners, all females, who lost their dogs due to euthanasia. QOL was assessed with the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and divided into four major domains–Physical, Psychological, Relationship, and Environmental. Demographic variables, stress, health behaviors, and social support from family, friends, and significant other were included in multivariate analysis. Results Stress levels were significantly higher in bereaved owners. QOL in three of the four domains (Physical, Psychological, and Relationship) of current owners were significantly better than among bereaved owners. Stress was significantly associated with these three domains of QOL. Quality of life was found to be positively associated with social support. Age was related directly only to current owners’ QOL. Conclusions The results suggest that a loss of a dog is associated with stress for the bereaved owner and reduced physical, psychological, and relationship QOL. Lack of social support in the case of death of a companion animal has a strong effect on owners’ grief reactions. PMID:25826295

  10. Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kristina; Persson, Johannes; Persson, Erik; Hanewinkel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Do forest owners' levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climate change? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT) has cast serious doubt on the familiar and often criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concerned about climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintain that citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the most concerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization is greatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are more concerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientific literacy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump the positive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here, using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany, we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelated with, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained without reference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientific literacy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported by the forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found to reduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university education increased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university education was not dependent on the individuals' value profile.

  11. Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile.

    PubMed

    Blennow, Kristina; Persson, Johannes; Persson, Erik; Hanewinkel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Do forest owners' levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climate change? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT) has cast serious doubt on the familiar and often criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concerned about climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintain that citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the most concerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization is greatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are more concerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientific literacy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump the positive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here, using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany, we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelated with, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained without reference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientific literacy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported by the forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found to reduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university education increased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university education was not dependent on the individuals' value profile. PMID:27223473

  12. A veterinarian's role in helping pet owners with decision making.

    PubMed

    Shanan, Amir

    2011-05-01

    End-of-life care frequently requires owners and veterinarians to make decisions of monumental consequences while feeling they sorely lack essential information. This feeling can be distressing to owners and veterinarians and lead to strains in their relationship. This article illustrates an approach to end-of-life decision making that offers the greatest benefit to the animal, the owner, the veterinarian, the veterinary practice, and, ultimately, the veterinary profession. The article introduces issues and concepts that underlie all companion animal end-of-life decision making-the human-animal bond, quality of life, and veterinarians' nonmedical helping roles-and discusses major end-of-life decisions. PMID:21601751

  13. 9 CFR 329.3 - Notification of detention to the owner of the article or livestock detained, or the owner's agent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Notification of detention to the owner of the article or livestock detained, or the owner's agent, and person having custody. 329.3 Section... owner of the article or livestock detained, or the owner's agent, and person having custody. (a)...

  14. 9 CFR 381.212 - Notification of detention to the owner of the poultry or other article, or the owner's agent, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Notification of detention to the owner of the poultry or other article, or the owner's agent, and person having custody. 381.212 Section 381... § 381.212 Notification of detention to the owner of the poultry or other article, or the owner's...

  15. 9 CFR 381.212 - Notification of detention to the owner of the poultry or other article, or the owner's agent, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notification of detention to the owner of the poultry or other article, or the owner's agent, and person having custody. 381.212 Section 381... § 381.212 Notification of detention to the owner of the poultry or other article, or the owner's...

  16. 9 CFR 329.3 - Notification of detention to the owner of the article or livestock detained, or the owner's agent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notification of detention to the owner of the article or livestock detained, or the owner's agent, and person having custody. 329.3 Section... owner of the article or livestock detained, or the owner's agent, and person having custody. (a)...

  17. A Two-Year Participatory Intervention Project with Owners to Reduce Lameness and Limb Abnormalities in Working Horses in Jaipur, India

    PubMed Central

    Reix, Christine E.; Dikshit, Amit K.; Hockenhull, Jo; Parker, Richard M. A.; Banerjee, Anindo; Burn, Charlotte C.; Pritchard, Joy C.; Whay, Helen R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Participatory methods are increasingly used in international human development, but scientific evaluation of their efficacy versus a control group is rare. Working horses support families in impoverished communities. Lameness and limb abnormalities are highly prevalent in these animals and a cause for welfare concern. We aimed to stimulate and evaluate improvements in lameness and limb abnormalities in horses whose owners took part in a 2-year participatory intervention project to reduce lameness (PI) versus a control group (C) in Jaipur, India. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 439 owners of 862 horses participated in the study. PI group owners from 21 communities were encouraged to meet regularly to discuss management and work practices influencing lameness and poor welfare and to track their own progress in improving these. Lameness examinations (41 parameters) were conducted at the start of the study (Baseline), and after 1 year and 2 years. Results were compared with control horses from a further 21 communities outside the intervention. Of the 149 horses assessed on all three occasions, PI horses showed significantly (P<0.05) greater improvement than C horses in 20 parameters, most notably overall lameness score, measures of sole pain and range of movement on limb flexion. Control horses showed slight but significantly greater improvements in four parameters, including frog quality in fore and hindlimbs. Conclusions/Significance This participatory intervention succeeded in improving lameness and some limb abnormalities in working horses, by encouraging changes in management and work practices which were feasible within owners’ socioeconomic and environmental constraints. Demonstration of the potentially sustainable improvements achieved here should encourage further development of participatory intervention approaches to benefit humans and animals in other contexts. PMID:25898014

  18. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess food group intake in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelle Flores; Philippi, Sonia Tucunduva; Estima, Camilla; Leal, Greisse

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess intake of the food groups included in the food guide pyramid for adolescents (FFQ-FP). The final version of the FFQ-FP consisted of 50 food items. The study was carried out with a sample of 109 adolescents over a period of four months. A 24hr recall (24hr) was conducted four times and the FFQ-FP was conducted twice. Validity was determined by comparing the second FFQ-FP and the mean of the four 24hrs, while reproducibility was verified by comparing the results of the two FFQ-FPs. Statistical analysis was carried out using medians, standard deviations, Pearson and intraclass correlations and Kappa statistics to assess concordance. Best results were achieved for the rice (including bread, grains and starches), meats and sugars groups. Weakest correlation was observed for the variable vitamin C. The validity and reproducibility of the FFQ-FP was satisfactory for most variables. PMID:24068225

  19. Validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess food group intake in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marcelle Flores; Philippi, Sonia Tucunduva; Estima, Camilla; Leal, Greisse

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the validity and reproducibility of a food frequency questionnaire to assess intake of the food groups included in the food guide pyramid for adolescents (FFQ-FP). The final version of the FFQ-FP consisted of 50 food items. The study was carried out with a sample of 109 adolescents over a period of four months. A 24hr recall (24hr) was conducted four times and the FFQ-FP was conducted twice. Validity was determined by comparing the second FFQ-FP and the mean of the four 24hrs, while reproducibility was verified by comparing the results of the two FFQ-FPs. Statistical analysis was carried out using medians, standard deviations, Pearson and intraclass correlations and Kappa statistics to assess concordance. Best results were achieved for the rice (including bread, grains and starches), meats and sugars groups. Weakest correlation was observed for the variable vitamin C. The validity and reproducibility of the FFQ-FP was satisfactory for most variables.

  20. Occurrence of fumonisins in Catalonia (Spain) and an exposure assessment of specific population groups.

    PubMed

    Cano-Sancho, G; Ramos, A J; Marín, S; Sanchis, V

    2012-01-01

    Fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) and B₂ (FB₂) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum and common contaminants of cereal crops. The objectives of this study were to (1) study the occurrence of fumonisins in Catalonia (north-eastern region of Spain) and (2) assess the exposure of the Catalonian population to these mycotoxins. Contamination data was provided by a wide survey where 928 individual samples were pooled to analyse 370 composite samples. Fumonisins were extracted and purified using immunoaffinity columns and determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The raw consumption data came from a nutritional study specifically designed to assess the dietary intake of the main foodstuffs related to fumonisin contamination for all population age groups. In addition, two specific groups were selected with respect to maize consumption: immigrants and celiac sufferers. Contamination and consumption data were combined by simulation using an essentially parametric-parametric (P-P) method. The P-P method draws sampling values from distribution functions fitted to consumption and contamination datasets. Moreover, to quantify the accuracy and reliability of the statistical estimates, we built related confidence intervals using a Pseudo-Parametric bootstrap method. The results of this study show that fumonisins are commonly found in some commodities on the Catalonian market, such as beer, corn snacks and ethnic foods; however, the values were well below the permitted maximum EU levels. The most exposed group were infants followed by immigrants but, in all cases, they were below the TDI of 2 µg/kg bw/day.

  1. Assessing Fidelity of Treatment Delivery in Group and Individual 12-Step Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Barbara K.; Manuel, Jennifer K.; Manser, Sarah Turcotte; Peavy, K. Michelle; Stelmokas, Julija; McCarty, Dennis; Guydish, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Twelve Step Facilitation (TSF) is an emerging, empirically supported treatment, the study of which will be strengthened by rigorous fidelity assessment. This report describes the development, reliability and concurrent validity of the Twelve Step Facilitation Adherence Competence Empathy Scale (TSF ACES), a comprehensive fidelity rating scale for group and individual TSF treatment developed for the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network study, Stimulant Abuser Groups to Engage in 12-Step. Independent raters used TSF ACES to rate treatment delivery fidelity of 966 (97% of total) TSF group and individual sessions. TSF ACES summary measures assessed therapist treatment adherence, competence, proscribed behaviors, empathy and overall session performance. TSF ACES showed fair to good overall reliability; weighted kappa coefficients for 59 co-rated sessions ranged from .31–1.00, with a mean of .69. Reliability ratings for session summary measures were good to excellent (.69–.91). Internal consistency for the instrument was variable (.47–.71). Relationships of the TSF ACES summary measures with each other, as well as relationships of the summary measures with a measure of therapeutic alliance provided support for concurrent and convergent validity. Implications and future directions for use of TSF ACES in clinical trials and community treatment implementation are discussed. PMID:22944595

  2. Vulnerability as a Function of Individual and Group Resources in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    deFur, Peter L.; Evans, Gary W.; Hubal, Elaine A. Cohen; Kyle, Amy D.; Morello-Frosch, Rachel A.; Williams, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Background The field of risk assessment has focused on protecting the health of individual people or populations of wildlife from single risks, mostly from chemical exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently began to address multiple risks to communities in the “Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment” [EPA/630/P02/001F. Washington DC:Risk Assessment Forum, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2003)]. Simultaneously, several reports concluded that some individuals and groups are more vulnerable to environmental risks than the general population. However, vulnerability has received little specific attention in the risk assessment literature. Objective Our objective is to examine the issue of vulnerability in cumulative risk assessment and present a conceptual framework rather than a comprehensive review of the literature. In this article we consider similarities between ecologic and human communities and the factors that make communities vulnerable to environmental risks. Discussion The literature provides substantial evidence on single environmental factors and simple conditions that increase vulnerability or reduce resilience for humans and ecologic systems. This observation is especially true for individual people and populations of wildlife. Little research directly addresses the topic of vulnerability in cumulative risk situations, especially at the community level. The community level of organization has not been adequately considered as an end point in either human or ecologic risk assessment. Furthermore, current information on human risk does not completely explain the level of response in cumulative risk conditions. Ecologic risk situations are similarly more complex and unpredictable for cases of cumulative risk. Conclusions Psychosocial conditions and responses are the principal missing element for humans. We propose a model for including psychologic and social factors as an integral component of cumulative risk assessment. PMID

  3. Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, WorkingGroup III

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Terry; Bashmakov, Igor; Bernstein, Lenny; Bogner,Jean; Bosch, Peter; Dave, Rutu; Davidson, Ogunlade; Fisher, Brian; Grubb,Michael; Gupta, Sujata; Halsnaes, Kirsten; Heij, Bertjan; Kahn Ribeiro,Suzana; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Levine, Mark; Martino, Daniel; MaseraCerutti, Omar; Metz, Bert; Meyer, Leo; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Najam, Adil; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Rogner, Hans Holger; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye,Jayant; Schock, Robert; Shukla, Priyaradshi; Sims, Ralph; Smith, Pete; Swart, Rob; Tirpak, Dennis; Urge-Vorsatz, Diana; Zhou, Dadi

    2007-04-30

    A. Introduction 1. The Working Group III contribution to theIPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on thescientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects ofmitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third AssessmentReport (TAR) and the Special Reports on COB2B Capture and Storage (SRCCS)and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The following summary is organised into six sections after thisintroduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends, - Mitigation in theshort and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030), -Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030), - Policies, measures andinstruments to mitigate climate change, - Sustainable development andclimate change mitigation, - Gaps in knowledge. References to thecorresponding chapter sections are indicated at each paragraph in squarebrackets. An explanation of terms, acronyms and chemical symbols used inthis SPM can be found in the glossary to the main report.

  4. International Myeloma Working Group consensus criteria for response and minimal residual disease assessment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Paiva, Bruno; Anderson, Kenneth C; Durie, Brian; Landgren, Ola; Moreau, Philippe; Munshi, Nikhil; Lonial, Sagar; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Kastritis, Efstathios; Boccadoro, Mario; Orlowski, Robert; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Spencer, Andrew; Hou, Jian; Chng, Wee Joo; Usmani, Saad Z; Zamagni, Elena; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Jagannath, Sundar; Johnsen, Hans E; Terpos, Evangelos; Reiman, Anthony; Kyle, Robert A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Richardson, Paul G; McCarthy, Philip; Ludwig, Heinz; Chen, Wenming; Cavo, Michele; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Hillengass, Jens; Palumbo, Antonio; Orfao, Alberto; Rajkumar, S Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma has substantially changed over the past decade with the introduction of several classes of new effective drugs that have greatly improved the rates and depth of response. Response criteria in multiple myeloma were developed to use serum and urine assessment of monoclonal proteins and bone marrow assessment (which is relatively insensitive). Given the high rates of complete response seen in patients with multiple myeloma with new treatment approaches, new response categories need to be defined that can identify responses that are deeper than those conventionally defined as complete response. Recent attempts have focused on the identification of residual tumour cells in the bone marrow using flow cytometry or gene sequencing. Furthermore, sensitive imaging techniques can be used to detect the presence of residual disease outside of the bone marrow. Combining these new methods, the International Myeloma Working Group has defined new response categories of minimal residual disease negativity, with or without imaging-based absence of extramedullary disease, to allow uniform reporting within and outside clinical trials. In this Review, we clarify several aspects of disease response assessment, along with endpoints for clinical trials, and highlight future directions for disease response assessments. PMID:27511158

  5. International Myeloma Working Group consensus criteria for response and minimal residual disease assessment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Paiva, Bruno; Anderson, Kenneth C; Durie, Brian; Landgren, Ola; Moreau, Philippe; Munshi, Nikhil; Lonial, Sagar; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Kastritis, Efstathios; Boccadoro, Mario; Orlowski, Robert; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Spencer, Andrew; Hou, Jian; Chng, Wee Joo; Usmani, Saad Z; Zamagni, Elena; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Jagannath, Sundar; Johnsen, Hans E; Terpos, Evangelos; Reiman, Anthony; Kyle, Robert A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Richardson, Paul G; McCarthy, Philip; Ludwig, Heinz; Chen, Wenming; Cavo, Michele; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Hillengass, Jens; Palumbo, Antonio; Orfao, Alberto; Rajkumar, S Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma has substantially changed over the past decade with the introduction of several classes of new effective drugs that have greatly improved the rates and depth of response. Response criteria in multiple myeloma were developed to use serum and urine assessment of monoclonal proteins and bone marrow assessment (which is relatively insensitive). Given the high rates of complete response seen in patients with multiple myeloma with new treatment approaches, new response categories need to be defined that can identify responses that are deeper than those conventionally defined as complete response. Recent attempts have focused on the identification of residual tumour cells in the bone marrow using flow cytometry or gene sequencing. Furthermore, sensitive imaging techniques can be used to detect the presence of residual disease outside of the bone marrow. Combining these new methods, the International Myeloma Working Group has defined new response categories of minimal residual disease negativity, with or without imaging-based absence of extramedullary disease, to allow uniform reporting within and outside clinical trials. In this Review, we clarify several aspects of disease response assessment, along with endpoints for clinical trials, and highlight future directions for disease response assessments.

  6. 7 CFR 1780.70 - Owner's procurement regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE LOANS AND GRANTS Planning, Designing, Bidding... practices between firms; organizational conflicts of interest; and unnecessary experience and bonding... shall consider fully any recommendation made by the owner concerning the technical design and choice...

  7. 24 CFR 886.109 - Housing assistance payments to owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... occupied by an Owner; cooperatives are considered rental housing. (c) If an Eligible Family vacates its... not be entitled to any payment under this paragraph unless he: (1) Immediately upon learning of...

  8. 24 CFR 884.106 - Housing assistance payments to owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... assistance may be provided for any unit occupied by an Owner; however, cooperatives are considered rental... learning of the vacancy, has notified HUD or the PHA, as the case may be, of the vacancy or...

  9. 24 CFR 886.309 - Housing assistance payment to owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provided for any unit occupied by an owner. However, cooperatives are considered rental housing rather than... under this paragraph unless he or she: (1) Immediately upon learning of the vacancy, has notified HUD...

  10. 33 CFR 106.200 - Owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., the OCS facility owner or operator must: (1) Define the security organizational structure for each OCS facility and provide each person exercising security duties or responsibilities within that structure...

  11. Photocopy o a measured drawing (location and owner of original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy o a measured drawing (location and owner of original are unknown) Root and Siemens, Architect, 1906. Terra cotta details - Scarritt Building & Arcade, Ninth Street & Grand Avenue, & 819 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Jackson County, MO

  12. 31. RUSSELL DIZE, CAPTAIN AND OWNER, AT HELM OF KATHRYN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. RUSSELL DIZE, CAPTAIN AND OWNER, AT HELM OF KATHRYN (Photocopy of 35mm color slide taken by Todd Croteau, 1997) - KATHRYN-Two-sail Bateau "Skipjack", Dogwood Harbor, Chesapeake Bay, Tilghman, Talbot County, MD

  13. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  14. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  15. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  16. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  17. 33 CFR 203.51 - Levee owner's manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Maintenance Manual specified by 33 CFR 208.10(a)(10) will fulfill the requirement of providing a levee owner's... Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm: The Corps Rehabilitation and...

  18. Domestic Cats (Felis silvestris catus) Do Not Show Signs of Secure Attachment to Their Owners

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Alice; Mills, Daniel Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Ainsworth Strange Situation Test (SST) has been widely used to demonstrate that the bond between both children and dogs to their primary carer typically meets the requirements of a secure attachment (i.e. the carer being perceived as a focus of safety and security in otherwise threatening environments), and has been adapted for cats with a similar claim made. However methodological problems in this latter research make the claim that the cat-owner bond is typically a secure attachment, operationally definable by its behaviour in the SST, questionable. We therefore developed an adapted version of the SST with the necessary methodological controls which include a full counterbalance of the procedure. A cross-over design experiment with 20 cat-owner pairs (10 each undertaking one of the two versions of the SST first) and continuous focal sampling was used to record the duration of a range of behavioural states expressed by the cats that might be useful for assessing secure attachment. Since data were not normally distributed, non-parametric analyses were used on those behaviours shown to be reliable across the two versions of the test (which excluded much cat behaviour). Although cats vocalised more when the owner rather the stranger left the cat with the other individual, there was no other evidence consistent with the interpretation of the bond between a cat and its owner meeting the requirements of a secure attachment. These results are consistent with the view that adult cats are typically quite autonomous, even in their social relationships, and not necessarily dependent on others to provide a sense of security and safety. It is concluded that alternative methods need to be developed to characterise the normal psychological features of the cat-owner bond. PMID:26332470

  19. Part-Based and Configural Processing of Owner's Face in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pitteri, Elisa; Mongillo, Paolo; Carnier, Paolo; Marinelli, Lieta; Huber, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Dogs exhibit characteristic looking patterns when looking at human faces but little is known about what the underlying cognitive mechanisms are and how much these are influenced by individual experience. In Experiment 1, seven dogs were trained in a simultaneous discrimination procedure to assess whether they could discriminate a) the owner's face parts (eyes, nose or mouth) presented in isolation and b) whole faces where the same parts were covered. Dogs discriminated all the three parts of the owner's face presented in isolation, but needed fewer sessions to reach the learning criterion for the eyes than for both nose and mouth. Moreover, covering the eyes region significantly disrupted face discriminability compared to the whole face condition while such difference was not found when the nose or mouth was hidden. In Experiment 2, dogs were presented with manipulated images of the owner's face (inverted, blurred, scrambled, grey-scale) to test the relative contribution of part-based and configural processing in the discrimination of human faces. Furthermore, by comparing the dogs enrolled in the previous experiment and seven ‘naïve’ dogs we examined if the relative contribution of part-based and configural processing was affected by dogs' experience with the face stimuli. Naïve dogs discriminated the owner only when configural information was provided, whereas expert dogs could discriminate the owner also when part-based processing was necessary. The present study provides the first evidence that dogs can discriminate isolated internal features of a human face and corroborate previous reports of salience of the eyes region for human face processing. Although the reliance on part-perception may be increased by specific experience, our findings suggest that human face discrimination by dogs relies mainly on configural rather than on part-based elaboration. PMID:25251285

  20. A Video Recording and Viewing Protocol for Student Group Presentations: Assisting Self-Assessment through a Wiki Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to firstly develop a protocol for video recording student group oral presentations, for later viewing and self-assessment by student group members. Secondly, evaluations of students' experiences of this process were undertaken to determine if this self-assessment method was a positive experience for them in gaining…

  1. Response assessment after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastasis: a report from the SPIne response assessment in Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Isabelle; Chang, Eric L; Sheehan, Jason; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Ryu, Samuel; Foote, Matthew; Lo, Simon S; Muacevic, Alexander; Soltys, Scott G; Chao, Samuel; Gerszten, Peter; Lis, Eric; Yu, Eugene; Bilsky, Mark; Fisher, Charles; Schiff, David; Fehlings, Michael G; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Susan; Chow, Edward; Parelukar, Wendy R; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-12-01

    The SPine response assessment In Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group is a committee of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and comprises a panel of international experts in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Here, we present the group's first report on the challenges in standardising imaging-based assessment of local control and pain for spinal metastases. We review current imaging modalities used in SBRT treatment planning and tumour assessment and review the criteria for pain and local control in registered clinical trials specific to spine SBRT. We summarise the results of an international survey of the panel to establish the range of current practices in assessing tumour response to spine SBRT. The ultimate goal of the SPINO group is to report consensus criteria for tumour imaging, clinical assessment, and symptom-based response criteria to help standardise future clinical trials. PMID:26678212

  2. Mobile phones carry the personal microbiome of their owners.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Altrichter, Adam E; Green, Jessica L

    2014-01-01

    Most people on the planet own mobile phones, and these devices are increasingly being utilized to gather data relevant to our personal health, behavior, and environment. During an educational workshop, we investigated the utility of mobile phones to gather data about the personal microbiome - the collection of microorganisms associated with the personal effects of an individual. We characterized microbial communities on smartphone touchscreens to determine whether there was significant overlap with the skin microbiome sampled directly from their owners. We found that about 22% of the bacterial taxa on participants' fingers were also present on their own phones, as compared to 17% they shared on average with other people's phones. When considered as a group, bacterial communities on men's phones were significantly different from those on their fingers, while women's were not. Yet when considered on an individual level, men and women both shared significantly more of their bacterial communities with their own phones than with anyone else's. In fact, 82% of the OTUs were shared between a person's index and phone when considering the dominant taxa (OTUs with more than 0.1% of the sequences in an individual's dataset). Our results suggest that mobile phones hold untapped potential as personal microbiome sensors.

  3. Mobile phones carry the personal microbiome of their owners

    PubMed Central

    Altrichter, Adam E.; Green, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Most people on the planet own mobile phones, and these devices are increasingly being utilized to gather data relevant to our personal health, behavior, and environment. During an educational workshop, we investigated the utility of mobile phones to gather data about the personal microbiome — the collection of microorganisms associated with the personal effects of an individual. We characterized microbial communities on smartphone touchscreens to determine whether there was significant overlap with the skin microbiome sampled directly from their owners. We found that about 22% of the bacterial taxa on participants’ fingers were also present on their own phones, as compared to 17% they shared on average with other people’s phones. When considered as a group, bacterial communities on men’s phones were significantly different from those on their fingers, while women’s were not. Yet when considered on an individual level, men and women both shared significantly more of their bacterial communities with their own phones than with anyone else’s. In fact, 82% of the OTUs were shared between a person’s index and phone when considering the dominant taxa (OTUs with more than 0.1% of the sequences in an individual’s dataset). Our results suggest that mobile phones hold untapped potential as personal microbiome sensors. PMID:25024916

  4. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  5. Assessing the children's views on foods and consumption of selected food groups: outcome from focus group approach

    PubMed Central

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2013-01-01

    The food choices in childhood have high a probability of being carried through into their adulthood life, which then contributes to the risk of many non-communicable diseases. Therefore, there is a need to gather some information about children's views on foods which may influence their food choices for planning a related dietary intervention or programme. This paper aimed to explore the views of children on foods and the types of foods which are usually consumed by children under four food groups (snacks, fast foods, cereals and cereal products; and milk and dairy products) by using focus group discussions. A total of 33 school children aged 7-9 years old from Selangor and Kuala Lumpur participated in the focus groups. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the listed themes. The outcomes show that the children usually consumed snacks such as white bread with spread or as a sandwich, local cakes, fruits such as papaya, mango and watermelon, biscuits or cookies, tea, chocolate drink and instant noodles. Their choices of fast foods included pizza, burgers, French fries and fried chicken. For cereal products, they usually consumed rice, bread and ready-to-eat cereals. Finally, their choices of dairy products included milk, cheese and yogurt. The reasons for the food liking were taste, nutritional value and the characteristics of food. The outcome of this study may provide additional information on the food choices among Malaysian children, especially in urban areas with regard to the food groups which have shown to have a relationship with the risk of childhood obesity. PMID:23610606

  6. Assessing the children's views on foods and consumption of selected food groups: outcome from focus group approach.

    PubMed

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2013-04-01

    The food choices in childhood have high a probability of being carried through into their adulthood life, which then contributes to the risk of many non-communicable diseases. Therefore, there is a need to gather some information about children's views on foods which may influence their food choices for planning a related dietary intervention or programme. This paper aimed to explore the views of children on foods and the types of foods which are usually consumed by children under four food groups (snacks, fast foods, cereals and cereal products; and milk and dairy products) by using focus group discussions. A total of 33 school children aged 7-9 years old from Selangor and Kuala Lumpur participated in the focus groups. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the listed themes. The outcomes show that the children usually consumed snacks such as white bread with spread or as a sandwich, local cakes, fruits such as papaya, mango and watermelon, biscuits or cookies, tea, chocolate drink and instant noodles. Their choices of fast foods included pizza, burgers, French fries and fried chicken. For cereal products, they usually consumed rice, bread and ready-to-eat cereals. Finally, their choices of dairy products included milk, cheese and yogurt. The reasons for the food liking were taste, nutritional value and the characteristics of food. The outcome of this study may provide additional information on the food choices among Malaysian children, especially in urban areas with regard to the food groups which have shown to have a relationship with the risk of childhood obesity. PMID:23610606

  7. Assessing the children's views on foods and consumption of selected food groups: outcome from focus group approach.

    PubMed

    Sharif Ishak, Sharifah Intan Zainun; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2013-04-01

    The food choices in childhood have high a probability of being carried through into their adulthood life, which then contributes to the risk of many non-communicable diseases. Therefore, there is a need to gather some information about children's views on foods which may influence their food choices for planning a related dietary intervention or programme. This paper aimed to explore the views of children on foods and the types of foods which are usually consumed by children under four food groups (snacks, fast foods, cereals and cereal products; and milk and dairy products) by using focus group discussions. A total of 33 school children aged 7-9 years old from Selangor and Kuala Lumpur participated in the focus groups. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed according to the listed themes. The outcomes show that the children usually consumed snacks such as white bread with spread or as a sandwich, local cakes, fruits such as papaya, mango and watermelon, biscuits or cookies, tea, chocolate drink and instant noodles. Their choices of fast foods included pizza, burgers, French fries and fried chicken. For cereal products, they usually consumed rice, bread and ready-to-eat cereals. Finally, their choices of dairy products included milk, cheese and yogurt. The reasons for the food liking were taste, nutritional value and the characteristics of food. The outcome of this study may provide additional information on the food choices among Malaysian children, especially in urban areas with regard to the food groups which have shown to have a relationship with the risk of childhood obesity.

  8. Factors associated with crashes involving taxi owners and non-owners: A case of moral hazard and adverse selection?

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard; Choi, Jaisung

    2016-02-01

    Taxis experience a higher risk of a motor vehicle crash partly because of their much higher levels of exposure on the roads. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the factors associated with the frequency and severity of taxi collisions, little research has been conducted to examine the differences in the factors associated with owner taxis and non-owner taxis. This study finds that collisions involving non-owners are more likely to be associated with poor or risky driving behaviors than collisions involving taxi vehicle owners. This result is consistent with the economic principles of moral hazard and adverse selection. Hence, policy makers responsible for traffic safety, taxi regulation or taxi operations should consider measures to reduce these market inefficiencies and improve the safety of not only taxi drivers but all road users.

  9. Factors associated with crashes involving taxi owners and non-owners: A case of moral hazard and adverse selection?

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard; Choi, Jaisung

    2016-02-01

    Taxis experience a higher risk of a motor vehicle crash partly because of their much higher levels of exposure on the roads. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the factors associated with the frequency and severity of taxi collisions, little research has been conducted to examine the differences in the factors associated with owner taxis and non-owner taxis. This study finds that collisions involving non-owners are more likely to be associated with poor or risky driving behaviors than collisions involving taxi vehicle owners. This result is consistent with the economic principles of moral hazard and adverse selection. Hence, policy makers responsible for traffic safety, taxi regulation or taxi operations should consider measures to reduce these market inefficiencies and improve the safety of not only taxi drivers but all road users. PMID:26655521

  10. Weighted Association Rule Mining for Item Groups with Different Properties and Risk Assessment for Networked Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungja; Ceong, Heetaek; Won, Yonggwan

    In market-basket analysis, weighted association rule (WAR) discovery can mine the rules that include more beneficial information by reflecting item importance for special products. In the point-of-sale database, each transaction is composed of items with similar properties, and item weights are pre-defined and fixed by a factor such as the profit. However, when items are divided into more than one group and the item importance must be measured independently for each group, traditional weighted association rule discovery cannot be used. To solve this problem, we propose a new weighted association rule mining methodology. The items should be first divided into subgroups according to their properties, and the item importance, i.e. item weight, is defined or calculated only with the items included in the subgroup. Then, transaction weight is measured by appropriately summing the item weights from each subgroup, and the weighted support is computed as the fraction of the transaction weights that contains the candidate items relative to the weight of all transactions. As an example, our proposed methodology is applied to assess the vulnerability to threats of computer systems that provide networked services. Our algorithm provides both quantitative risk-level values and qualitative risk rules for the security assessment of networked computer systems using WAR discovery. Also, it can be widely used for new applications with many data sets in which the data items are distinctly separated.

  11. Clinical Assessment of Nifedipine-Induced Gingival Overgrowth in a Group of Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Cliciane Portela; Navarro, Claudia Maria; Sposto, Maria Regina

    2011-01-01

    Although it has been established that nifedipine is associated with gingival overgrowth (GO), there is little information on the prevalence and severity of this condition in the Brazilian population. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of nifedipine-induced GO in Brazilian patients and the risk factors associated using a Clinical Index for Drug Induced Gingival Overgrowth (Clinical Index DIGO). The study was carried out on 35 patients under treatment with nifedipine (test group) and 35 patients without treatment (control group). Variables such as demographic (age, gender), pharmacological (dose, time of use), periodontal (plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, clinical insertion level, and bleeding on probing), and GO were assessed. Statistical analysis showed no association between GO and demographic or pharmacological variables. However, there was an association between GO and periodontal variables, except for plaque index. According to our study, the Clinical Index DIGO can be used as a parameter to evaluate GO. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of gingival inflammation was the main risk factor for the occurrence of nifedipine-induced GO. PMID:21991453

  12. 40 CFR 264.148 - Incapacity of owners or operators, guarantors, or financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Financial Requirements § 264.148 Incapacity of owners...

  13. [Focus on risk assessment in health environments: results and perspectives of a multicenter working group].

    PubMed

    Polato, R; Bacis, M; Belotti, L; Biggi, N; Campagna, M; Carrer, P; Cologni, L; Gattini, V; Lodi, V; Magnavita, N; Micheloni, G; Negro, C; Placidi, D; Puro, V; Tonelli, F; Porru, S

    2010-01-01

    The hospital risk assessment (VdR) is certainly a relevant issue concerning the activities of prevention for the health of healthcare workers in relation to biological risk. The aim of this paper is to provide an up-date of the issue, based on the suggestions of recent literature about the rules ratified by the new legislative decree and data supplied by the Group of 10 Hospitals participated in this multicenter study. From the analysis of data on healthcare settings (HCS) participating in the project the following considerations can be formulated: i) All HCS considered VdR from biological agents. The method recommended in the Guidelines SIMLII 2005 is the most followed ii) To grading the risk, the use of invasive procedures for carrying out the analysis results is a necessary element iii) the operators classified as exposed to biological risk, and therefore subject to health surveillance, represent almost all of workforce in 7 out of 10 HCS. The subgroup believes that VdR must be conducted in close collaboration with the occupational physician and should represent a worthwhile investment with spin-off character on prevention, decision making, empowering. The presence of environmental requirements and organizational procedures should be considered, so that HCS is enabled for an effective risk management, without which risk assessments cannot be performed. The method of VdR mentioned in the guidelines MLIS 2005, besides being the most widely used by the company participating in the study, still has practical reasons and opportunities to justify its use. The HCS group felt the need to propose an implementation of the definition of invasive procedures and EPP, together with individual assessment. Flexibility was suggested in identifying different levels of risk with the involvement of occupational physicians, especially in the presence of EPP, also in order to plan content and frequency of health surveillance.

  14. [Focus on risk assessment in health environments: results and perspectives of a multicenter working group].

    PubMed

    Polato, R; Bacis, M; Belotti, L; Biggi, N; Campagna, M; Carrer, P; Cologni, L; Gattini, V; Lodi, V; Magnavita, N; Micheloni, G; Negro, C; Placidi, D; Puro, V; Tonelli, F; Porru, S

    2010-01-01

    The hospital risk assessment (VdR) is certainly a relevant issue concerning the activities of prevention for the health of healthcare workers in relation to biological risk. The aim of this paper is to provide an up-date of the issue, based on the suggestions of recent literature about the rules ratified by the new legislative decree and data supplied by the Group of 10 Hospitals participated in this multicenter study. From the analysis of data on healthcare settings (HCS) participating in the project the following considerations can be formulated: i) All HCS considered VdR from biological agents. The method recommended in the Guidelines SIMLII 2005 is the most followed ii) To grading the risk, the use of invasive procedures for carrying out the analysis results is a necessary element iii) the operators classified as exposed to biological risk, and therefore subject to health surveillance, represent almost all of workforce in 7 out of 10 HCS. The subgroup believes that VdR must be conducted in close collaboration with the occupational physician and should represent a worthwhile investment with spin-off character on prevention, decision making, empowering. The presence of environmental requirements and organizational procedures should be considered, so that HCS is enabled for an effective risk management, without which risk assessments cannot be performed. The method of VdR mentioned in the guidelines MLIS 2005, besides being the most widely used by the company participating in the study, still has practical reasons and opportunities to justify its use. The HCS group felt the need to propose an implementation of the definition of invasive procedures and EPP, together with individual assessment. Flexibility was suggested in identifying different levels of risk with the involvement of occupational physicians, especially in the presence of EPP, also in order to plan content and frequency of health surveillance. PMID:21061702

  15. Puppy Temperament Assessments Predict Breed and American Kennel Club Group but Not Adult Temperament.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lauren M; Skiver Thompson, Rebekah; Ha, James C

    2016-01-01

    Puppy assessments for companion dogs have shown mixed long-term reliability. Temperament is cited among the reasons for surrendering dogs to shelters. A puppy temperament test that reliably predicts adult behavior is one potential way to lower the number of dogs given to shelters. This study used a longitudinal design to assess temperament in puppies from 8 different breeds at 7 weeks old (n = 52) and 6 years old (n = 34) using modified temperament tests, physiological measures, and a follow-up questionnaire. For 7-week-old puppies, results revealed (a) puppy breed was predictable using 3 variables, (b) 4 American Kennel Club breed groups had some validity based on temperament, (c) temperament was variable within litters of puppies, and (d) certain measures of temperament were related to physiological measures (heart rate). Finally, puppy temperament assessments were reliable in predicting the scores of 2 of the 8 adult dog temperament measures. However, overall, the puppy temperament scores were unreliable in predicting adult temperament.

  16. Immunotherapy response assessment in neuro-oncology: a report of the RANO working group.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F; Brandes, Alba A; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising area of therapy in patients with neuro-oncological malignancies. However, early-phase studies show unique challenges associated with the assessment of radiological changes in response to immunotherapy reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumour regression, can still occur after initial disease progression or after the appearance of new lesions. Refinement of the response assessment criteria for patients with neuro-oncological malignancies undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. Herein, a multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describe immunotherapy Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology (iRANO) criteria based on guidance for the determination of tumour progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria and the RANO working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease within 6 months of initiating immunotherapy, including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for the use of corticosteroids. We review the role of advanced imaging techniques and the role of measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurological and immunological functions. The iRANO guidelines put forth in this Review will evolve successively to improve their usefulness as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate.

  17. Puppy Temperament Assessments Predict Breed and American Kennel Club Group but Not Adult Temperament.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lauren M; Skiver Thompson, Rebekah; Ha, James C

    2016-01-01

    Puppy assessments for companion dogs have shown mixed long-term reliability. Temperament is cited among the reasons for surrendering dogs to shelters. A puppy temperament test that reliably predicts adult behavior is one potential way to lower the number of dogs given to shelters. This study used a longitudinal design to assess temperament in puppies from 8 different breeds at 7 weeks old (n = 52) and 6 years old (n = 34) using modified temperament tests, physiological measures, and a follow-up questionnaire. For 7-week-old puppies, results revealed (a) puppy breed was predictable using 3 variables, (b) 4 American Kennel Club breed groups had some validity based on temperament, (c) temperament was variable within litters of puppies, and (d) certain measures of temperament were related to physiological measures (heart rate). Finally, puppy temperament assessments were reliable in predicting the scores of 2 of the 8 adult dog temperament measures. However, overall, the puppy temperament scores were unreliable in predicting adult temperament. PMID:26882034

  18. Novel Prognostic Groups in Thymic Epithelial Tumors: Assessment of Risk and Therapeutic Strategy Selection

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelillo, Rolando M. Trodella, Lucio; Ramella, Sara; Cellini, Numa; Balducci, Mario; Mantini, Giovanna; Cellini, Francesco; Ciresa, Marzia; Fiore, Michele; Evoli, Amelia; Sterzi, Silvia; Russo, Patrizia; Grozio, Alessia; Cesario, Alfredo; Granone, Pierluigi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of multimodality treatment on patients with thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) (i.e., thymomas and thymic squamous cell carcinoma) and to define the prognostic classes according to the Masaoka and World Health Organization histologic classification systems. Methods and Materials: Primary surgery was the mainstay of therapy. Extended thymectomy was performed in all cases. The cases were primarily staged according to the Masaoka system. Adjuvant radiotherapy was given to patients diagnosed with Masaoka Stage II, III, and IVA TET. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered in selected cases. Results: We reviewed the records of 120 patients with TETs, with a mean follow-up of 13.8 years. Of the 120 patients, 98 (81.6%) received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these 98 patients, Grade 1-2 pulmonary or esophageal toxicity was acute in 12 (12.2%) and late in 8 (8.2%). The median overall survival was 21.6 years. Of the 120 patients, 106 were rediagnosed and reclassified according to the World Health Organization system, and the survival rate was correlated with it. Three different prognostic classes were defined: favorable, Masaoka Stage I and histologic grade A, AB, B1, B2 or Masaoka Stage II and histologic grade A, AB, B1; unfavorable, Stage IV disease or histologic grade C or Stage III and histologic grade B3; intermediate, all other combinations. The 10- and 20-year survival rate was 95% and 81% for the favorable group, 90% and 65% for the intermediate group, and 50% and 0% for the unfavorable group, respectively. Local recurrence, distant recurrence, and tumor-related deaths were also evaluated. Conclusion: The analysis of our experience singled out three novel prognostic classes and the assessment of risk identified treatment selection criteria.

  19. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-05-08

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  20. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  1. Dose assessment of population groups exposed to elevated radon levels in radioactive Italian spas

    SciTech Connect

    Sciocchetti, G.; Tosti, S.; Baldassini, P.G.; Sarao, R.; Soldano, E.

    1992-12-31

    The natural spring waters on the Isle of Ischia are among the most radioactive in the world. Therapeutic application of these waters, which contain very high radon concentrations, increases the radon exposure of people treated with them. People who live and work at radioactive spas may be good subjects for testing to evaluate detectable biological effects, especially because their exposures will be less influenced by synergistic factors than those of underground miners. The aim of our investigation was to characterize radon exposure for population groups exposed to high radon levels. Our approach takes into account some peculiar requirements of our epidemiological investigations. To obtain representative dose values, workers were classified into groups to obtain significant results suitable for epidemiological pilot studies. Investigations were carried out on the geological aspects of radon sources, environmental parameters, physical and dosimetric factors which influence radon levels, and related exposures in therapeutic facilities in order to model patterns of radon exposures for the various population groups. We inventoried hyper-radioactive springs on the island. We identified workers in radon spas who were exposed to radiation from inhaled radon daughters and retrospectively assessed their radon exposures. Results showed that, under some conditions, spa employees may have been exposed to much higher than usual levels of radon, which produced up to about 60 mSv y{sup -1} effective dose equivalent.

  2. A graphical method to assess distribution assumption in group-based trajectory models.

    PubMed

    Elsensohn, Mad-Hélénie; Klich, Amna; Ecochard, René; Bastard, Mathieu; Genolini, Christophe; Etard, Jean-François; Gustin, Marie-Paule

    2016-04-01

    Group-based trajectory models had a rapid development in the analysis of longitudinal data in clinical research. In these models, the assumption of homoscedasticity of the residuals is frequently made but this assumption is not always met. We developed here an easy-to-perform graphical method to assess the assumption of homoscedasticity of the residuals to apply especially in group-based trajectory models. The method is based on drawing an envelope to visualize the local dispersion of the residuals around each typical trajectory. Its efficiency is demonstrated using data on CD4 lymphocyte counts in patients with human immunodeficiency virus put on antiretroviral therapy. Four distinct distributions that take into account increasing parts of the variability of the observed data are presented. Significant differences in group structures and trajectory patterns were found according to the chosen distribution. These differences might have large impacts on the final trajectories and their characteristics; thus on potential medical decisions. With a single glance, the graphical criteria allow the choice of the distribution that best capture data variability and help dealing with a potential heteroscedasticity problem.

  3. Fetal alcohol syndrome related knowledge assessment and comparison in New Jersey health professional groups.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, M; Nayeem, A; Adubato, S; Dejoseph, M; Zimmerman-Bier, B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is a need to educate health professionals in regard to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders across many health and allied health fields. OBJECTIVE Conduct evaluations of educational programs designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs in relation to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) among health and allied health professionals in the northeastern United States. METHODS FASD related educational efforts were carried out and evaluated in New Jersey for various health-related professional groups over a four-month period using a common set of materials. Pre and post-test evaluation comprised 20 questions on FASD recognition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Groups surveyed included nurses, social workers, counselors, therapists, clinicians and allied health professionals comprising physician assistants, dieticians, physical therapists, occupational therapists. RESULTS Results showed that a majority of health care professionals in New Jersey possess basic knowledge related to FASD and the effects of alcohol on a child in utero. They also had significant awareness of the importance of early diagnosis and the importance of reducing secondary disabilities. The study did however reveal areas for improvement in some professional groups. CONCLUSIONS FASD is the most important preventable cause of mental retardation. Health professionals attending workshops typically had a good basic understanding of FASD, though with some weaknesses specific to their discipline. Educational efforts in regard to FASD should be sensitive to the various health professionals engaged in preventing, diagnosing and treating FASD.

  4. Measuring Small-Group Environments: A Validity Study of Scores from the Salter Environmental Type Assessment and the Group Environment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol

    2007-01-01

    This concurrent validity study of Salter Environmental Type Assessment scores was conducted with the Group Environment Scale. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation of 191 college students' responses suggested two factors that accounted for 51% of the variance. The factor-analytic results and concurrent validity coefficients…

  5. Swimming Training Assessment: The Critical Velocity and the 400-m Test for Age-Group Swimmers.

    PubMed

    Zacca, Rodrigo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge P; Pyne, David B; Castro, Flávio Antônio de S

    2016-05-01

    To verify the metabolic responses of oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentrations [La], and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) when swimming at an intensity corresponding to the critical velocity (CV) assessed by a 4-parameter model (CV4par), and to check the reliability when using only a single 400-m maximal front crawl bout (T400) for CV4par assessment in age-group swimmers. Ten age-group swimmers (14-16 years old) performed 50-, 100-, 200-, 400- (T400), 800-, and 1,500-m maximal front crawl bouts to calculate CV4par. V[Combining Dot Above]O2, HR, [La], and RPE were measured immediately after bouts. Swimmers then performed 3 × 10-minute front crawl (45 seconds rest) at CV4par. V[Combining Dot Above]O2, HR, [La], and RPE were measured after 10 minutes of rest (Rest), warm-up (Pre), each 10-minute repetition, and at the end of the test (Post). CV4par was 1.33 ± 0.08 m·s. V[Combining Dot Above]O2, HR, [La], and RPE were similar between first 10-minute and Post time points in the 3 × 10-minute protocol. CV4par was equivalent to 92 ± 2% of the mean swimming speed of T400 (v400) for these swimmers. CV4par calculated through a single T400 (92%v400) showed excellent agreement (r = 0.30; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.05 m·s, p = 0.39), low coefficient of variation (2%), and root mean square error of 0.02 ± 0.01 m·s when plotted against CV4par assessed through a 4-parameter model. These results generated the equation CV4par = 0.92 × v400. A single T400 can be used reliably to estimate the CV4par typically derived with 6 efforts in age-group swimmers.

  6. Methods of conducting effective outreach to private well owners - a literature review and model approach.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lucinda; Wilson, Steve; Kelly, Walton

    2016-04-01

    Educational outreach programs have the potential to increase the occurrence of private well testing and maintenance behaviors, but are not always able to successfully engage the intended audience and overcome their barriers to change. We conducted a review of literature regarding behavior change and risk communication to identify common barriers to private well stewardship and motivational strategies to encourage change, as well as best practices for communicating with well owners. Results indicated that no specific strategy will be appropriate for all audiences, as different groups of well owners will have different barriers to change. For this reason, educators must develop an understanding of their audience so they are able to identify the most significant barriers to change and select motivational strategies that will directly reduce barriers. Implications for private well outreach programs are discussed. PMID:27105402

  7. Methods of conducting effective outreach to private well owners - a literature review and model approach.

    PubMed

    Morris, Lucinda; Wilson, Steve; Kelly, Walton

    2016-04-01

    Educational outreach programs have the potential to increase the occurrence of private well testing and maintenance behaviors, but are not always able to successfully engage the intended audience and overcome their barriers to change. We conducted a review of literature regarding behavior change and risk communication to identify common barriers to private well stewardship and motivational strategies to encourage change, as well as best practices for communicating with well owners. Results indicated that no specific strategy will be appropriate for all audiences, as different groups of well owners will have different barriers to change. For this reason, educators must develop an understanding of their audience so they are able to identify the most significant barriers to change and select motivational strategies that will directly reduce barriers. Implications for private well outreach programs are discussed.

  8. Consumer health information for pet owners

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sarah Anne

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The author studied health information available for veterinary consumers both in print and online. Methods: WorldCat was searched using a list of fifty-three Library of Congress subject headings relevant to veterinary consumer health to identify print resources for review. Identified items were then collected and assessed for authority, comprehensiveness of coverage, validity, and other criteria outlined by Rees. An in-depth assessment of the information available for feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) and canine congestive heart failure (CHF) was then conducted to examine the availability and quality of information available for specific diseases and disorders. A reading grade level was assigned for each passage using the Flesch-Kincaid formula in the Readability Statistics feature in Microsoft Word. Results/Discussion: A total of 187 books and 7 Websites were identified and evaluated. More than half of the passages relating to FLUTD and CHF were written above an 11th-grade reading level. A limited quantity of quality, in-depth resources that address specific diseases and disorders and are written at an appropriate reading level for consumers is available. Conclusion: The library's role is to facilitate access to the limited number of quality consumer health resources that are available to veterinary consumers. PMID:16636707

  9. Geriatric assessment predicts survival and toxicities in elderly myeloma patients: an International Myeloma Working Group report

    PubMed Central

    Bringhen, Sara; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Larocca, Alessandra; Facon, Thierry; Kumar, Shaji K.; Offidani, Massimo; McCarthy, Philip; Evangelista, Andrea; Lonial, Sagar; Zweegman, Sonja; Musto, Pellegrino; Terpos, Evangelos; Belch, Andrew; Hajek, Roman; Ludwig, Heinz; Stewart, A. Keith; Moreau, Philippe; Anderson, Kenneth; Einsele, Hermann; Durie, Brian G. M.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Landgren, Ola; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Richardson, Paul; Sonneveld, Pieter; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a pooled analysis of 869 individual newly diagnosed elderly patient data from 3 prospective trials. At diagnosis, a geriatric assessment had been performed. An additive scoring system (range 0-5), based on age, comorbidities, and cognitive and physical conditions, was developed to identify 3 groups: fit (score = 0, 39%), intermediate fitness (score = 1, 31%), and frail (score ≥2, 30%). The 3-year overall survival was 84% in fit, 76% in intermediate-fitness (hazard ratio [HR], 1.61; P = .042), and 57% in frail (HR, 3.57; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 nonhematologic adverse events at 12 months was 22.2% in fit, 26.4% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.23; P = .217), and 34.0% in frail (HR, 1.74; P < .001) patients. The cumulative incidence of treatment discontinuation at 12 months was 16.5% in fit, 20.8% in intermediate-fitness (HR, 1.41; P = .052), and 31.2% in frail (HR, 2.21; P < .001) patients. Our frailty score predicts mortality and the risk of toxicity in elderly myeloma patients. The International Myeloma Working group proposes this score for the measurement of frailty in designing future clinical trials. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01093136 (EMN01), #NCT01190787 (26866138MMY2069), and #NCT01346787 (IST-CAR-506). PMID:25628469

  10. A focus group assessment of patient perspectives on irritable bowel syndrome and illness severity.

    PubMed

    Drossman, Douglas A; Chang, Lin; Schneck, Susan; Blackman, Carlar; Norton, William F; Norton, Nancy J

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing need to understand from the patient's perspective the experience of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and the factors contributing to its severity; this has been endorsed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Accordingly, we conducted focus groups to address this issue. A total of 32 patients with mostly moderate to severe IBS were recruited through advertising and were allocated into three focus groups based on predominant stool pattern. The focus groups were held using standard methodology to obtain a general assessment of the symptoms experienced with IBS, its impact, and of factors associated with self-perceived severity. Patients described IBS not only as symptoms (predominantly abdominal pain) but mainly as it affects daily function, thoughts, feelings and behaviors. Common responses included uncertainty and unpredictability with loss of freedom, spontaneity and social contacts, as well as feelings of fearfulness, shame, and embarrassment. This could lead to behavioral responses including avoidance of activities and many adaptations in routine in an effort for patients to gain control. A predominant theme was a sense of stigma experienced because of a lack of understanding by family, friends and physicians of the effects of IBS on the individual, or the legitimacy of the individual's emotions and adaptation behaviors experienced. This was a barrier to normal functioning that could be ameliorated through identifying with others who could understand this situation. Severity was linked to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and was influenced by the intensity of abdominal pain and other symptoms, interference with and restrictions relating to eating, work, and social activities, and of the unpredictability of the condition. This study confirms the heterogeneous and multi-component nature of IBS. These qualitative data can be used in developing health status and severity instruments for larger-scale studies. PMID:19337833

  11. Preliminary petroleum source rock assessment of upper Proterozoic Chuar group, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Palacas, J.G.; Reynolds, M.W.

    1989-03-01

    Strata in the Chuar Group, Grand Canyon, Arizona, are potential petroleum source rocks. This group, divided into the Galeros Formation below and the Kwagunt Formaton above, consists predominantly of very fine-grained siliciclastic rocks and thin sequences of sandstones and stromatolites and cryptalgal carbonate rocks. Over half the succession consists of organic-rich, gray to black mudstone and siltstone. Geochemical analyses indicate that the 281-m thick Walcott Member, the uppermost unit of the Kwagunt, has good to excellent petroleum source rock potential. The lower half of the Walcott is characterized by total organic carbon (TOC) contents as much as 7.0% (average /approximately/ 3.0%), hydrogen indices as much as 204 mg HC/g TOC (average 135 mg HC/g TOC), genetic potentials (S/sub 1/ + S/sub 2/) of nearly 16,000 ppm (average /approximately/ 6000 ppm), and extractable organic matter (EOM) as much as 4000 ppm. Data for the upper Walcott are incomplete but suggest that these rocks are as rich or richer than the lower Walcott. Maturity assessment indicates that source rocks of the Walcott are within the oil generation window. Strata of the thermally mature underlying Awatubi Member of the Kwagunt and the thermally mature to overmature Galeros Formation are, in general, rated as poor oil sources with genetic potentials generally less than 1000 ppm, but they are possible gas sources. Several thin sequences in these units, however, display good oil source characteristics, with EOM nearly 2000 ppm and genetic potentials nearly 7000 ppm. Chuar Group strata may be potential sources for economical accumulations of petroleum in upper Proterozoic or lower Paleozoic reservoir rocks in northwest Arizona and southwest Utah.

  12. Climate Change Education: Engaging Family Private Forest Owners on Issues Related to Climate Change: A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Alexandra S.; Feder, Michael; Storksdieck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The forested land in the United States is an asset that is owned and managed not only by federal, state, and local governments, but also by families and other private groups, including timber investment management organizations and real estate investment trusts. The more than 10 million family forestland owners manage the largest percentage of…

  13. Risk Behaviors among Asian Women Who Work at Massage Parlors in San Francisco: Perspectives from Masseuses and Owners/Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Oh, Hyun Joo; Wong, Serena; Nguyen, Hongmai

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive, cultural, and contextual factors that influence HIV-related risk behaviors among Asian women who engage in sex work at massage parlors in San Francisco. Focus groups and qualitative interviews were conducted for Vietnamese and Thai masseuses and massage parlor owners/managers. Economic pressure as well as…

  14. 46 CFR 67.113 - Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Managing owner designation; address; requirement to... Required for Vessel Documentation § 67.113 Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address. The owner of each vessel must designate a managing owner on the Application...

  15. 46 CFR 67.113 - Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Managing owner designation; address; requirement to... Required for Vessel Documentation § 67.113 Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address. The owner of each vessel must designate a managing owner on the Application...

  16. 25 CFR 215.6 - Applications for leases; consent of Indian owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applications for leases; consent of Indian owners. 215.6... owners. (a) Applications or requests by the Indian owners of restricted or trust land, or by others, that... Indian owner thereof, if an adult who has not been specifically found by the Secretary of the Interior...

  17. 46 CFR 67.113 - Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Managing owner designation; address; requirement to... Required for Vessel Documentation § 67.113 Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address. The owner of each vessel must designate a managing owner on the Application...

  18. 46 CFR 67.113 - Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Managing owner designation; address; requirement to... Required for Vessel Documentation § 67.113 Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address. The owner of each vessel must designate a managing owner on the Application...

  19. 46 CFR 67.113 - Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Managing owner designation; address; requirement to... Required for Vessel Documentation § 67.113 Managing owner designation; address; requirement to report change of address. The owner of each vessel must designate a managing owner on the Application...

  20. The use of electronic collars for training domestic dogs: estimated prevalence, reasons and risk factors for use, and owner perceived success as compared to other training methods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of electronic training devices for dog training is controversial. The aims of this study were to give an indication of the extent to which dog owners use these devices in England, identify factors associated with their use, and compare owner report of outcomes. A convenience sample of dog owners in England was used to identify numbers using electronic training devices and identify reasons for use. Factors associated with use of remote e-collars only were determined by comparing dogs trained using these devices with two control populations matched for reason of use (recall / chasing problems). Comparison groups were: those using other ‘negative reinforcement / positive punishment’ training techniques, and those using ‘positive reinforcement / negative punishment’ based methods. A multinominal logistic regression model was used to compare factors between categories of training method. Owner reported success for use was compared using chi-squared analysis. Results For England only, 3.3% (n = 133) owners reported using remote activated e-collars, 1.4% (n = 54) reported use of bark activated e-collars, and 0.9% (n = 36) reported using electronic boundary fences. In comparison with the e-collar group, owners using reward based training methods for recall / chasing were 2.8 times more likely to be female and 2.7 times less likely to have attended agility training. Owners using other aversive methods for recall / chasing were 2.8 times more likely to have attended puppy classes than those using e-collars. However, the model only explained 10% variance between groups. A significantly higher proportion of owners in the reward group reported training success than those in the e-collar group. Conclusions In conclusion, a fairly low proportion of owners select to use electronic training devices. For a population matched by reason for training method use, characteristics of dogs, including occurrence of undesired behaviours do not appear to

  1. Toxocara canis in household dogs: prevalence, risk factors and owners' attitude towards deworming.

    PubMed

    Nijsse, R; Ploeger, H W; Wagenaar, J A; Mughini-Gras, L

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites and risk factors for shedding of Toxocara eggs were determined for 916 Dutch household dogs older than 6 months. Additionally, the owners answered a questionnaire about their dogs and their attitude towards routine deworming was assessed. Faecal samples were examined using the centrifugal sedimentation flotation method. The overall prevalence of dogs shedding Toxocara eggs was 4.6 %. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk for 1-7-year-old dogs to shed Toxocara eggs was significantly lower (OR 0.38) than that of 6-12-month-old dogs. Compared to dogs walking ≤20 % of the time off-leash, those ranging freely 50-80 % and 80-100 % of the time had a significantly higher risk (OR 10.49 and 13.52, respectively) of shedding Toxocara eggs. Other risk factors were coprophagy (OR 2.44) and recently being kenneled (OR 2.76). Although the applied deworming frequency was not significantly associated with shedding Toxocara eggs, there was a trend towards no shedding in dogs under strict supervision that were dewormed 3-4 times a year. Most dog owners (68 %) recognized 'dog's health' as the main reason for deworming. Only 16 % of dogs were dewormed four times a year. It was concluded that the prevalence of Toxocara egg-shedding household dogs is almost unchanged over recent years and that the knowledge of owners is insufficient to expect sound decisions on routine deworming.

  2. The Observing Working Group for the Asteroid Impact & Delfection Assessment (AIDA) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osip, David J.; Rivkin, Andrew S.; Pravec, Petr; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Thirouin, Audrey; Scheirich, Peter; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna; Richardson, Derek C.; Polishook, David; Ryan, William; Thomas, Cristina; Busch, Michael W.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Michel, Patrick; AIDA Observing Working Group

    2016-10-01

    The Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is a joint ESA-NASA mission concept currently under study. AIDA has two components: the Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) is the US component designed to demonstrate a kinetic impactor, while the Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) spacecraft is on station to do a thorough pre- and post-impact survey of the Didymos system.Members of the DART and AIM Investigation teams have been organized into several joint and independent working groups. While there is overlap in subject matter and membership between the groups, we focus here on the activities of the Observing Working Group.The first work by the group was undertaken during the spring of 2015, before DART entered Phase A. During this period Didymos made an apparition reaching roughly V ~ 20.5 in brightness, and our top priority was constraining which of two very different pole positions for the Didymos system was correct. Several telescopes in the 2–4-m aperture range around the world attempted observations. An observed mutual event allowed the one pole position to be ruled out. Didymos is now thought to be a low-obliquity, retrograde rotator, similar to many other asteroid binary systems and consistent with expectations from a YORP-driven origin for the satellite.We have begun planning for the 2017 apparition, occurring in the first half of the year. Didymos will be ~20% brighter at opposition than the 2015 apparition. Scaling from the successful observations with the 4.3-m Lowell Discovery Channel Telescope indicates that we will need telescopes at least 4 m (or larger, for some of the tasks, or at times longer before or after the opposition) in primary diameter for the advanced characterization in 2017.Currently, we have four goals for this apparition: 1) confirming the preferred retrograde pole position; 2) gathering data to allow BYORP-driven changes in the mutual orbit to potentially be determined by later observations; 3) establishing whether or not

  3. Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Erik; Hanewinkel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Do forest owners’ levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climate change? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT) has cast serious doubt on the familiar and often criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concerned about climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintain that citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the most concerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization is greatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are more concerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientific literacy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump the positive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here, using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany, we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelated with, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained without reference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientific literacy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported by the forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found to reduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university education increased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university education was not dependent on the individuals' value profile. PMID:27223473

  4. Examining the Reliability of Scores from the Consensual Assessment Technique in the Measurement of Individual and Small Group Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanic, Nicholas; Randles, Clint

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the reliability of measures of both individual and group creative work using the consensual assessment technique (CAT). CAT was used to measure individual and group creativity among a population of pre-service music teachers enrolled in a secondary general music class (n = 23) and was evaluated from…

  5. "It's a Bit of a Generalisation, but …": Participant Perspectives on Intercultural Group Assessment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Paul; Hampton, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on domestic and international students' perceptions of the influence of group diversity on communication, learning, task performance and assessment grades. The study's methodology involved quantitative and qualitative analysis of surveys (N?=?312), focus group interviews of students (n?=?26) and individual staff interviews…

  6. Real-time seismic monitoring needs of a building owner - And the solution: A cooperative effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Sanli, A.; Sinclair, M.; Gallant, S.; Radulescu, D.

    2004-01-01

    A recently implemented advanced seismic monitoring system for a 24-story building facilitates recording of accelerations and computing displacements and drift ratios in near-real time to measure the earthquake performance of the building. The drift ratio is related to the damage condition of the specific building. This system meets the owner's needs for rapid quantitative input to assessments and decisions on post-earthquake occupancy. The system is now successfully working and, in absence of strong shaking to date, is producing low-amplitude data in real time for routine analyses and assessment. Studies of such data to date indicate that the configured monitoring system with its building specific software can be a useful tool in rapid assessment of buildings and other structures following an earthquake. Such systems can be used for health monitoring of a building, for assessing performance-based design and analyses procedures, for long-term assessment of structural characteristics, and for long-term damage detection.

  7. Assessing physiological responses of dune forest functional groups to changing water availability: from Tropics to Mediterranean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Cristina; Lo Cascio, Mauro; Correia, Otília; Vieira, Simone; Cruz Diaz Barradas, Maria; Zunzunegui, Maria; Ramos, Margarida; João Pereira, Maria; Máguas, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    Spain, provide an excellent experimental network to study the water dynamics and community functioning in natural ecosystems of high ecological value. To fulfill the main objective, a stable isotope approach (leaf δ13C and xylem+water sources δ18O) was used as a tool to assess physiological performance and water strategies integrated in spatio-temporal water dynamics. Plant functional groups' water use was characterized in a water changing situation (at different seasons) in a climatic gradient. We evaluated stress sensitivity of the functional groups to seasonal changes in water availability in different communities and tried to understand their water use strategy.

  8. DNA barcoding for effective biodiversity assessment of a hyperdiverse arthropod group: the ants of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Alex; Fisher, Brian L; Hebert, Paul D.N

    2005-01-01

    The role of DNA barcoding as a tool to accelerate the inventory and analysis of diversity for hyperdiverse arthropods is tested using ants in Madagascar. We demonstrate how DNA barcoding helps address the failure of current inventory methods to rapidly respond to pressing biodiversity needs, specifically in the assessment of richness and turnover across landscapes with hyperdiverse taxa. In a comparison of inventories at four localities in northern Madagascar, patterns of richness were not significantly different when richness was determined using morphological taxonomy (morphospecies) or sequence divergence thresholds (Molecular Operational Taxonomic Unit(s); MOTU). However, sequence-based methods tended to yield greater richness and significantly lower indices of similarity than morphological taxonomy. MOTU determined using our molecular technique were a remarkably local phenomenon—indicative of highly restricted dispersal and/or long-term isolation. In cases where molecular and morphological methods differed in their assignment of individuals to categories, the morphological estimate was always more conservative than the molecular estimate. In those cases where morphospecies descriptions collapsed distinct molecular groups, sequence divergences of 16% (on average) were contained within the same morphospecies. Such high divergences highlight taxa for further detailed genetic, morphological, life history, and behavioral studies. PMID:16214741

  9. Radiotherapy in pediatric medulloblastoma: Quality assessment of Pediatric Oncology Group Trial 9031

    SciTech Connect

    Miralbell, Raymond . E-mail: Raymond.Miralbell@hcuge.ch; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Laurie, Fran; Kessel, Sandy; Glicksman, Arvin; Friedman, Henry S.; Urie, Marcia; Kepner, James L.; Zhou Tianni; Chen Zhengjia; Barnes, Pat; Kun, Larry; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential influence of radiotherapy quality on survival in high-risk pediatric medulloblastoma patients. Methods and Materials: Trial 9031 of the Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) aimed to study the relative benefit of cisplatin and etoposide randomization of high-risk patients with medulloblastoma to preradiotherapy vs. postradiotherapy treatment. Two-hundred and ten patients were treated according to protocol guidelines and were eligible for the present analysis. Treatment volume (whole brain, spine, posterior fossa, and primary tumor bed) and dose prescription deviations were assessed for each patient. An analysis of first site of failure was undertaken. Event-free and overall survival rates were calculated. A log-rank test was used to determine the significance of potential survival differences between patients with and without major deviations in the radiotherapy procedure. Results: Of 160 patients who were fully evaluable for all treatment quality parameters, 91 (57%) had 1 or more major deviations in their treatment schedule. Major deviations by treatment site were brain (26%), spinal (7%), posterior fossa (40%), and primary tumor bed (17%). Major treatment volume or total dose deviations did not significantly influence overall and event-free survival. Conclusions: Despite major treatment deviations in more than half of fully evaluable patients, underdosage or treatment volume misses were not associated with a worse event-free or overall survival.

  10. Assessment of exposure to platinum-group metals in urban children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, S.; Alimonti, A.; Petrucci, F.; Bocca, B.; Krachler, M.; Forastiere, F.; Sacerdote, M. T.; Mallone, S.

    2001-07-01

    Catalytic converters for automotive traction raise some concern for human health and the environment, due to the release of Pd, Pt and Rh (Pt-Group Metals, PGMs). In fact, the thermal and mechanical conditions under which such devices work (including abrasion effects and hot-temperature chemical reactions with oil fumes) can cause significant release of the PGMs to the environment and eventually affect human health. A pilot investigation was performed to assess the exposure to these metals of 310 schoolchildren aged between 6 and 10 years from the urban and suburban area of Rome. All determinations were performed by high-resolution magnetic-sector inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after UV irradiation of the samples. The mean concentration values of these metals in urine were found to be (in ng/g creatinine) 7.5±5.4 for Pd, 0.9±1.1 for Pt and 8.5±8.0 for Rh. Urine concentrations of Pd and Rh (but not Pt) were found to be strongly associated with traffic density in the area of residence.

  11. Exposure Assessment for Italian Population Groups to Deoxynivalenol Deriving from Pasta Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Brera, Carlo; Bertazzoni, Valentina; Debegnach, Francesca; Gregori, Emanuela; Prantera, Elisabetta; De Santis, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Four hundred and seventy-two pasta samples were collected from long retail distribution chain sales points located in North, Central and South Italy. Representative criteria in the sample collection were followed in terms of number of samples collected, market share, and types of pasta. Samples were analysed by an accredited HPLC-UV method of analysis. The mean contamination level (64.8 μg/kg) of deoxynivalenol (DON) was in the 95th percentile (239 μg/kg) and 99th percentile (337 μg/kg), far below the legal limit (750 μg/kg) set by Regulation EC/1126/2007, accounting for about one tenth, one third and half the legal limit, respectively. Ninety-nine percent of samples fell below half the legal limit. On the basis of the obtained occurrence levels and considering the consumption rates reported by the Italian official database, no health concern was assessed for all consumer groups, being that exposure was far below the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 1000 ng/kg b.w/day. Nevertheless, despite this, particular attention should be devoted to the exposure to DON by high consumers, such as children aged 3–5 years, who could reach the TDI even with very low levels of DON contamination. PMID:24287568

  12. Exposure assessment for Italian population groups to deoxynivalenol deriving from pasta consumption.

    PubMed

    Brera, Carlo; Bertazzoni, Valentina; Debegnach, Francesca; Gregori, Emanuela; Prantera, Elisabetta; De Santis, Barbara

    2013-11-26

    Four hundred and seventy-two pasta samples were collected from long retail distribution chain sales points located in North, Central and South Italy. Representative criteria in the sample collection were followed in terms of number of samples collected, market share, and types of pasta. Samples were analysed by an accredited HPLC-UV method of analysis. The mean contamination level (64.8 μg/kg) of deoxynivalenol (DON) was  in the 95th percentile (239 μg/kg) and 99th percentile (337 μg/kg), far below the legal limit (750 μg/kg) set by Regulation EC/1126/2007, accounting for about one tenth, one third and half the legal limit, respectively. Ninety-nine percent of samples fell below half the legal limit. On the basis of the obtained occurrence levels and considering the consumption rates reported by the Italian official database, no health concern was assessed for all consumer groups, being that exposure was far below the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 1000 ng/kg b.w/day. Nevertheless, despite this, particular attention should be devoted to the exposure to DON by high consumers, such as children aged 3-5 years, who could reach the TDI even with very low levels of DON contamination.

  13. 33 CFR 106.200 - Owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Owner or operator. 106.200 Section 106.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)...

  14. 33 CFR 106.200 - Owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Owner or operator. 106.200 Section 106.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)...

  15. 33 CFR 106.200 - Owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Owner or operator. 106.200 Section 106.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)...

  16. 33 CFR 106.200 - Owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Owner or operator. 106.200 Section 106.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARINE SECURITY: OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF (OCS) FACILITIES Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)...

  17. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Notice to account owners. 210.13 Section 210.13 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN...

  18. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice to account owners. 210.13 Section 210.13 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN...

  19. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notice to account owners. 210.13 Section 210.13 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN...

  20. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Notice to account owners. 210.13 Section 210.13 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN...

  1. 31 CFR 210.13 - Notice to account owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notice to account owners. 210.13 Section 210.13 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN...

  2. 29 CFR 4043.27 - Distribution to a substantial owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.27 Distribution to a substantial owner. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs for... does not exceed the limitation (as of the date the reportable event occurs) under section...

  3. 7 CFR 4280.109 - Ineligible applicants, borrowers, and owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....109 Section 4280.109 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Rural... paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section. (a) If an applicant, borrower, or owner has an outstanding...

  4. 7 CFR 4280.109 - Ineligible applicants, borrowers, and owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....109 Section 4280.109 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS Rural... paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section. (a) If an applicant, borrower, or owner has an outstanding...

  5. 24 CFR 886.309 - Housing assistance payment to owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (SECTION 8 HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS, SECTION 202 DIRECT LOAN... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Housing assistance payment to owners. 886.309 Section 886.309 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND...

  6. 24 CFR 886.309 - Housing assistance payment to owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (SECTION 8 HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS, SECTION 202 DIRECT LOAN... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Housing assistance payment to owners. 886.309 Section 886.309 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND...

  7. 2. WEST FRONT ENTRANCE, WITH OWNERS MR. & MRS. ISACC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST FRONT ENTRANCE, WITH OWNERS MR. & MRS. ISACC N. HAGAN (WHO CONTRACTED WITH FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT FOR THE DESIGN OF THIS HOUSE) - Isaac N. Hagan House, Kentuck Knob, U.S. Route 40 vicinity (Stewart Township), Chalkhill, Fayette County, PA

  8. 9 CFR 54.5 - Certification by owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Certification by owners. 54.5 Section 54.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES CONTROL OF SCRAPIE...

  9. 9 CFR 54.5 - Certification by owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certification by owners. 54.5 Section 54.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES CONTROL OF SCRAPIE...

  10. 24 CFR 982.310 - Owner termination of tenancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the provisions for protection of victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in 24 CFR... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8 TENANT-BASED ASSISTANCE: HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER PROGRAM Leasing a Unit § 982..., the owner may not terminate the tenancy for “other good cause” based on any of the following...

  11. Seminar On Sanitation for Restaurant Owners and Managers. Unit I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlkeld, Joyce C.

    Intended for use in conducting short seminars on sanitation for restaurant owners and managers, the conceptual outline is organized to provide four hours of classroom instruction. Two major concepts are emphasized. The first concept, the effect of sanitary practices on the financial profits of food service, focuses on: (1) service and quality to…

  12. 46 CFR 356.17 - Annual requirements for vessel owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Annual requirements for vessel owners. 356.17 Section 356.17 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS REQUIREMENTS FOR VESSELS OF 100 FEET OR GREATER IN REGISTERED LENGTH TO OBTAIN A FISHERY ENDORSEMENT TO THE...

  13. 46 CFR 356.17 - Annual requirements for vessel owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual requirements for vessel owners. 356.17 Section 356.17 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS REQUIREMENTS FOR VESSELS OF 100 FEET OR GREATER IN REGISTERED LENGTH TO OBTAIN A FISHERY ENDORSEMENT TO THE...

  14. 46 CFR 356.17 - Annual requirements for vessel owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual requirements for vessel owners. 356.17 Section 356.17 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS REQUIREMENTS FOR VESSELS OF 100 FEET OR GREATER IN REGISTERED LENGTH TO OBTAIN A FISHERY ENDORSEMENT TO THE...

  15. 46 CFR 356.17 - Annual requirements for vessel owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Annual requirements for vessel owners. 356.17 Section 356.17 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS REQUIREMENTS FOR VESSELS OF 100 FEET OR GREATER IN REGISTERED LENGTH TO OBTAIN A FISHERY ENDORSEMENT TO THE...

  16. 46 CFR 356.17 - Annual requirements for vessel owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Annual requirements for vessel owners. 356.17 Section 356.17 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION MISCELLANEOUS REQUIREMENTS FOR VESSELS OF 100 FEET OR GREATER IN REGISTERED LENGTH TO OBTAIN A FISHERY ENDORSEMENT TO THE...

  17. 46 CFR 67.30 - Requirement for citizen owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirement for citizen owner. 67.30 Section 67.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.30 Requirement for citizen...

  18. 46 CFR 67.30 - Requirement for citizen owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirement for citizen owner. 67.30 Section 67.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.30 Requirement for citizen...

  19. 46 CFR 67.30 - Requirement for citizen owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirement for citizen owner. 67.30 Section 67.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.30 Requirement for citizen...

  20. 46 CFR 67.30 - Requirement for citizen owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirement for citizen owner. 67.30 Section 67.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.30 Requirement for citizen...

  1. 46 CFR 67.30 - Requirement for citizen owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for citizen owner. 67.30 Section 67.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.30 Requirement for citizen...

  2. 37 CFR 382.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 382.7 Section 382.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Subscription Services § 382.7 Unknown copyright...

  3. 37 CFR 382.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 382.7 Section 382.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Subscription Services § 382.7 Unknown copyright...

  4. 37 CFR 253.9 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 253.9 Section 253.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights U.S. COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES USE OF CERTAIN COPYRIGHTED WORKS IN CONNECTION...

  5. 37 CFR 260.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 260.7 Section 260.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights U.S. COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES RATES AND TERMS FOR PREEXISTING...

  6. 37 CFR 382.7 - Unknown copyright owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Unknown copyright owners. 382.7 Section 382.7 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... SATELLITE DIGITAL AUDIO RADIO SERVICES Preexisting Subscription Services § 382.7 Unknown copyright...

  7. 37 CFR 42.9 - Action by patent owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Action by patent owner. 42.9 Section 42.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Trial Practice and Procedure General §...

  8. 37 CFR 42.120 - Patent owner response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Patent owner response. 42.120 Section 42.120 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Inter Partes Review...

  9. 37 CFR 42.220 - Patent owner response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Patent owner response. 42.220 Section 42.220 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Post-Grant Review...

  10. 37 CFR 42.120 - Patent owner response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Patent owner response. 42.120 Section 42.120 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Inter Partes Review...

  11. 37 CFR 42.9 - Action by patent owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Action by patent owner. 42.9 Section 42.9 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Trial Practice and Procedure General §...

  12. 37 CFR 42.220 - Patent owner response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Patent owner response. 42.220 Section 42.220 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Post-Grant Review...

  13. 24 CFR 850.155 - Securing owner's responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Securing owner's responsibilities. 850.155 Section 850.155 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN...'s responsibilities. Assistance provided under this part shall constitute a debt of the...

  14. 9 CFR 107.1 - Veterinary practitioners and animal owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Veterinary practitioners and animal owners. 107.1 Section 107.1 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS...

  15. 46 CFR 289.4 - Insurance by owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insurance by owners. 289.4 Section 289.4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING SUBSIDIZED VESSELS AND... to require, whenever the contracts so provide, that this be done at some future date, should it...

  16. 33 CFR 105.200 - Owner or operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this part. (b) For each facility, the facility owner or operator must: (1) Define the security organizational structure and provide each person exercising security duties and responsibilities within that structure the support needed to fulfill those obligations; (2) Designate, in writing, by name or by title,...

  17. 27 CFR 479.43 - Changes through bankruptcy of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Changes through bankruptcy of owner. 479.43 Section 479.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  18. 27 CFR 479.43 - Changes through bankruptcy of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Changes through bankruptcy of owner. 479.43 Section 479.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  19. 27 CFR 479.43 - Changes through bankruptcy of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Changes through bankruptcy of owner. 479.43 Section 479.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  20. 27 CFR 479.43 - Changes through bankruptcy of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Changes through bankruptcy of owner. 479.43 Section 479.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  1. 27 CFR 479.43 - Changes through bankruptcy of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Changes through bankruptcy of owner. 479.43 Section 479.43 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  2. 24 CFR 882.412 - Subcontracting of owner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for which it provides the management functions under this section. ... or obligations. (b) PHA management. If the Owner and a PHA wish to enter into a management contract... administer the Housing Assistance Payments Contract and no other management alternative exists, the HUD...

  3. 24 CFR 880.601 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... units. (b) Management and maintenance. The owner is responsible for all management functions, including... DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SECTION 8 HOUSING ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS PROGRAM FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION Management § 880.601... maintenance functions (including ordinary and extraordinary maintenance), and replacement of capital...

  4. Private Woodland Owners' Perspectives on Multifunctionality in English Woodlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Julie; Courtney, Paul; Slee, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed in forest policies to deliver public goods such as biodiversity, recreation, landscape and carbon sequestration, alongside timber production. In light of this, it is important to understand how woodland owners themselves perceive their role in delivering these multiple benefits. With up to 80% of woodland in…

  5. 24 CFR 982.310 - Owner termination of tenancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity—(1) Evicting drug criminals due to drug crime on or near the premises. The lease must provide that... failure to pay rent or other amounts due under the lease) or repeated violation of the terms and... portion of the rent to owner covered by the housing assistance payment under the HAP contract between...

  6. 24 CFR 982.310 - Owner termination of tenancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... activity—(1) Evicting drug criminals due to drug crime on or near the premises. The lease must provide that... failure to pay rent or other amounts due under the lease) or repeated violation of the terms and... portion of the rent to owner covered by the housing assistance payment under the HAP contract between...

  7. 24 CFR 982.310 - Owner termination of tenancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activity—(1) Evicting drug criminals due to drug crime on or near the premises. The lease must provide that... failure to pay rent or other amounts due under the lease) or repeated violation of the terms and... portion of the rent to owner covered by the housing assistance payment under the HAP contract between...

  8. 24 CFR 982.310 - Owner termination of tenancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... activity—(1) Evicting drug criminals due to drug crime on or near the premises. The lease must provide that... failure to pay rent or other amounts due under the lease) or repeated violation of the terms and... portion of the rent to owner covered by the housing assistance payment under the HAP contract between...

  9. Does Class Matter? Mentoring Small Businesses' Owner-Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbank, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper examines the way social class influences the relationship between business mentors and small business owner-managers. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on the author's experience of mentoring businesses with The Prince's Trust. Three businesses were selected as cases. The methodological approach involved…

  10. 16 CFR 701.4 - Owner registration cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Owner registration cards. 701.4 Section 701.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT DISCLOSURE OF WRITTEN CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTY TERMS...

  11. 16 CFR 701.4 - Owner registration cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Owner registration cards. 701.4 Section 701.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT DISCLOSURE OF WRITTEN CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTY TERMS...

  12. 16 CFR 701.4 - Owner registration cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Owner registration cards. 701.4 Section 701.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT DISCLOSURE OF WRITTEN CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTY TERMS...

  13. 16 CFR 701.4 - Owner registration cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Owner registration cards. 701.4 Section 701.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT DISCLOSURE OF WRITTEN CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTY TERMS...

  14. 16 CFR 701.4 - Owner registration cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Owner registration cards. 701.4 Section 701.4 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT DISCLOSURE OF WRITTEN CONSUMER PRODUCT WARRANTY TERMS...

  15. Pet Dogs Benefit Owners' Health: A "Natural Experiment" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headey, Bruce; Na, Fu; Zheng, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports results from a "natural experiment" taking place in China on the impact of dogs on owners' health. Previous Western research has reported modest health benefits, but results have remained controversial. In China pets were banned in urban areas until 1992. Since then dog ownership has grown quite rapidly in the major cities,…

  16. Women Business Owners: Selling to the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small Business Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide is designed to help women business owners become more successful by providing them with information about marketing their goods and services to the federal government. Part 1 focuses on how the government buys. It covers briefly general procedures, consolidated purchasing programs, and individual federal agencies. Three government tools…

  17. 24 CFR 891.400 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Project Management § 891... unleased units or residential spaces. (b) Management and maintenance. The Owner is responsible for all management functions. These functions include selection and admission of tenants, required reexaminations...

  18. 24 CFR 891.400 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Project Management § 891... unleased units or residential spaces. (b) Management and maintenance. The Owner is responsible for all management functions. These functions include selection and admission of tenants, required reexaminations...

  19. 24 CFR 891.400 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Project Management § 891... unleased units or residential spaces. (b) Management and maintenance. The Owner is responsible for all management functions. These functions include selection and admission of tenants, required reexaminations...

  20. 24 CFR 891.400 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Project Management § 891... unleased units or residential spaces. (b) Management and maintenance. The Owner is responsible for all management functions. These functions include selection and admission of tenants, required reexaminations...

  1. 24 CFR 891.400 - Responsibilities of owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Project Management § 891... unleased units or residential spaces. (b) Management and maintenance. The Owner is responsible for all management functions. These functions include selection and admission of tenants, required reexaminations...

  2. 33 CFR 67.40-20 - Charges invoiced to owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charges invoiced to owner. 67.40-20 Section 67.40-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Notification §...

  3. 33 CFR 67.40-15 - Marking at owner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marking at owner's expense. 67.40-15 Section 67.40-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION AIDS TO NAVIGATION ON ARTIFICIAL ISLANDS AND FIXED STRUCTURES Notification §...

  4. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus carriage among dogs and their owners

    PubMed Central

    BOOST, M. V.; O'DONOGHUE, M. M.; JAMES, A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Case reports have indicated transmission of Staphylococcus aureus between humans and pets. We investigated associations between level of contact between dog and owner, and S. aureus colonization. In a cross-sectional study, nasal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of S. aureus was determined for 830 dogs and 736 owners. Relatedness of isolates was investigated using antibiograms and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Associations between carriage and demographics or amount of contact between owners and dogs were documented. S. aureus was isolated in 24% of humans and 8·8% of dogs. Antibiotic resistance was significantly more common in canine isolates. Of 17 owner/dog colonized pairs, six were indistinguishable by PFGE. Colonization of dogs was not associated with close human contact, but was strongly associated with health-care occupations (OR 3·29, 95% CI 1·49–7·26, P=0·002). In outbreak situations health-care workers' pets should be considered as a source of S. aureus. High rates of resistance indicate increased monitoring of antibiotic use in veterinary practice is needed. PMID:17678561

  5. Planning and Management Guidelines for Inland Lake Property Owners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dusen, Peter; Marsh, William M.

    This booklet is designed to assist prospective and established property owners in the selection, planning, and management of lake lands. It is organized into three parts: (1) selection and preparation of a building site; (2) property management; and (3) community development. These sections outline some basic guidelines for land development and…

  6. Explaining Antagonism to the Owners of Foxwoods Casino Resort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Hauteserre, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Conflictual relations between the owners of Foxwoods Casino and Resort, who are American Indians, and the white residents of Ledyard and nearby Preston and North Stonington townships in southeastern Connecticut are long-standing. They have flared up on numerous occasions and especially since 1982 when the Mashantucket Pequots considered building a…

  7. Seminar on Sanitation for Restaurant Owners and Managers. Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlkeld, Joyce C.

    Intended for use in conducting short seminars on sanitation for restaurant owners and managers, unit two of the curriculum guide is organized to provide four hours of classroom instruction. Four major concepts are emphasized. The first concept, providing sanitary conditions in food service establishments, discusses safe use and storage of cleaning…

  8. 71. Historic American Buildings Survey COURT BETWEEN OWNER'S SUITE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. Historic American Buildings Survey COURT BETWEEN OWNER'S SUITE AND BABY HOUSE PHOTOCOPY OF PLATE FROM IRVIN L. SCOTT, 'MARALAGO', THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT (JUNE 20, 1928), P. 807 - Mar-a-Lago, 1100 South Ocean Boulevard, Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  9. 9 CFR 54.5 - Certification by owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the animal may be removed to a U.S. Department of Agriculture facility or a quarantined research... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Certification by owners. 54.5 Section 54.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  10. 9 CFR 54.5 - Certification by owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the animal may be removed to a U.S. Department of Agriculture facility or a quarantined research... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Certification by owners. 54.5 Section 54.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  11. 7 CFR 760.905 - Eligible owners and contract growers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible owners and contract growers. 760.905 Section 760.905 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS 2005-2007 Livestock Indemnity...

  12. 7 CFR 760.905 - Eligible owners and contract growers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible owners and contract growers. 760.905 Section 760.905 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS INDEMNITY PAYMENT PROGRAMS 2005-2007 Livestock Indemnity...

  13. Seismic monitoring instrumentation needs of a building owner and the solution - A cooperative effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Sanli, A.; Sinclair, M.; Gallant, S.; Radulescu, D.; ,

    2003-01-01

    A specific case whereby the owner of a building, in collaboration with another federal agency with expertise in seismic monitoring of buildings, private consulting engineers, and a supplier, facilitated development of a seismic monitoring system for a 24-story building in San Francisco, California. The unique aspects of this monitoring systems include: the monitoring system must relate to rapid assessment of the building following an earthquake and the monitoring system must deliver the data in relatively short time, if not in real-time. The system has the standard recording capability at the site server PC. It has the capability to calculate select number of drift ratios, specific to the building.

  14. Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation Phase 1 Seep Task data report: Contaminant source area assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2, Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Seep Task efforts during 1993 and 1994 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented here follow results form the first year of sampling, 1992, which are contained in the Phase 1 RI report for WAG 2 (DOE 1995a). The WAG 2 Seep Task efforts focused on contaminants in seeps, tributaries, and main streams within the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. This report is designed primarily as a reference for contaminants and a resource for guiding remedial decisions. Additional in-depth assessments of the Seep Task data may provide clearer understandings of contaminant transport from the different source areas in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 consists of WOC and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, and the associated flood plains and subsurface environment. The WOC watershed encompasses ORNL and associated WAGs. WAG 2 acts as an integrator for contaminant releases from the contaminated sites at ORNL and as the conduit transporting contaminants to the Clinch River. The main objectives of the Seep Task were to identify and characterize seeps, tributaries and source areas that are responsible for the contaminant releases to the main streams in WAG 2 and to quantify their input to the total contaminant release from the watershed at White Oak Dam (WOD). Efforts focused on {sup 90}Sr, {sup 3}H, and {sup 137}Cs because these contaminants pose the greatest potential human health risk from water ingestion at WOD. Bimonthly sampling was conducted throughout the WOC watershed beginning in March 1993 and ending in August 1994. Samples were also collected for metals, anions, alkalinity, organics, and other radionuclides.

  15. Assessment of the Etiologic Factors of Gingival Recession in a Group of Patients in Northwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Abolfazli, Nader; Eskandari, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Gingival recession (GR), a common problem in periodontium, is associated with various etiologic factors. There is controversy over the role and importance of these factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the etiologic factors of GR in a group of subjects in Northwest Iran. Materials and methods In this case-control study, patients referring to a university clinic (123 patients with GR and 123 patients without GR) were evaluated. Patients were examined by an experienced periodontist. A checklist assessing the history of systemic disease, smoking, radiotherapy, orthodontic treatment, chemical and mechanical trauma, tooth-brushing method, type of occlusion, axial inclination of tooth, width and thickness of keratinized gingiva, presence of calculus, prosthesis, faulty restorations and food impaction, and frenum pull was completed for each patient. Chi-square test was used for data analysis. Results Presence of calculus was significantly associated with GR in the evaluated patients (P = 0.000). Low width and thickness of keratinized gingiva, smoking and traumatic tooth brushing were other significant factors (P < 0.05). The type of occlusion, axial inclination of teeth, existence of prosthesis, high frenal attachment, radiotherapy, systemic diseases and chemical trauma were not significantly associated with GR in the evaluated patients (P > 0.05). Conclusion Supra- and sub-gingival calculus, inadequate width and thickness of keratinized tissue, and incorrect tooth brushing techniques are most important etiologic factors of GR. Oral hygiene instructions including correct tooth brushing techniques as well as scaling and root planing with periodic recalls can play a significant role in prevention of GR. PMID:23230492

  16. Self-Help Group Leaders as Community Helpers: An Impact Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissen, Greg; Warren, Mary; Nansel, Tonja; Goodman, Samantha

    2002-01-01

    A study examined costs and benefits perceived by 26 self-help group leaders who helped rural Kansas communities in extending the use, awareness, and effectiveness of self-help groups. Findings that satisfaction in helping was the major benefit and time constraints the major cost were used to tailor leadership roles. Self-help group activity…

  17. Building-owners energy-education program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The objectives of the program are to develop and test market a cogent education program aimed specifically at building owners to help them be more decisive and knowledgeable, and to motivate them to direct their managers and professionals to implement a rational plan for achieving energy conservation in their commercial office buildings and to establish a plan, sponsored by the Building Owners and Managers Association International (BOMA) to implement this educational program on a nation-wide basis. San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta were chosen for test marketing a model program. The procedure used in making the energy survey is described. Energy survey results of participating buildings in San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta are summarized. (MCW)

  18. Assessing effects of prenatal alcohol exposure using group-wise sparse representation of fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Zhu, Dajiang; Zhao, Shijie; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Guo, Lei; Li, Zhihao; Coles, Claire; Hu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianming

    2015-08-30

    Task-based fMRI activation mapping has been widely used in clinical neuroscience in order to assess different functional activity patterns in conditions such as prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) affected brains and healthy controls. In this paper, we propose a novel, alternative approach of group-wise sparse representation of the fMRI data of multiple groups of subjects (healthy control, exposed non-dysmorphic PAE and exposed dysmorphic PAE) and assess the systematic functional activity differences among these three populations. Specifically, a common time series signal dictionary is learned from the aggregated fMRI signals of all three groups of subjects, and then the weight coefficient matrices (named statistical coefficient map (SCM)) associated with each common dictionary were statistically assessed for each group separately. Through inter-group comparisons based on the correspondence established by the common dictionary, our experimental results have demonstrated that the group-wise sparse coding strategy and the SCM can effectively reveal a collection of brain networks/regions that were affected by different levels of severity of PAE. PMID:26195294

  19. Making Instruction and Assessment Responsive to Diverse Students' Progress: Group-Administered Dynamic Assessment in Teaching Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeltova, Ida; Birney, Damian; Fredine, Nancy; Jarvin, Linda; Sternberg, Robert J.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2011-01-01

    This study entailed a 3 (instructional intervention) x 2 (assessment-type) between-subjects experimental design employing a pretest-intervention-posttest methodology. The instructional interventions were administered between subjects in three conditions: (a) dynamic instruction, (b) triarchic or theory of successful intelligence-control…

  20. Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Recommended Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Steering Committee, Opag; Planets Community, Outer

    2010-05-01

    The Outer Solar System provides critical clues to how solar systems form and evolve, how planetary systems become habitable, and how life has evolved in our solar system. NASA's Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) was established to identify scientific priorities and pathways for Outer Solar System exploration. Fundamental new discoveries are best made with a mixture of mission sizes that includes large (flagship) missions, and medium-sized and smaller-sized (as practical) missions, along with vigorous support for basic research, data analysis, and technology development — a balanced strategy most efficiently implemented as an Outer Planets Exploration Program. Missions to the Outer Solar System are major undertakings, requiring large and expensive launch vehicles, long mission durations, highly reliable (frequently radiation hard) and autonomous spacecraft, and radioisotope power sources in most cases. OPAG has recommended to the US National Research Council Planetary Science Decadal Survey to explore the possibilities for ‘small flagship' class missions to be considered, providing a greater range of choice and capabilities in the mix to balance program size and science return. With the Galileo mission concluded, the Cassini equinox mission in progress, and Juno in development, OPAG has strongly endorsed the competitive selection by NASA of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) as the next Outer Planets Flagship and as part of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) with ESA, a collaboration that includes a Ganymede orbiter and an increased focus on Jupiter science; OPAG has strongly recommended support of JEO and EJSM in the Decadal Survey. In addition, OPAG has strongly endorsed approval by NASA of the Cassini Solstice Mission, including the Juno-like end-of-mission scenario, given the likely phenomenal return on investment. OPAG also advocates the need for a focused technology program for the next Outer Planet Flagship Mission after EJSM, in order to be ready

  1. River resort owners find LPG a power behind their success

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a restaurant and resort which runs entirely on LPG. It has two generators converted to LPG that supply the power for the complex. Energy supplied from the propane is used in the kitchens, to drive the water pump and provide electricity for lighting and other power needs, and to heat the swimming pool. Far more importantly for the owners has been the fuel cost savings of at least 60%.

  2. Business owners' optimism and business performance after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Bronson, James W; Faircloth, James B; Valentine, Sean R

    2006-12-01

    Previous work indicates that individuals' optimism is related to superior performance in adverse situations. This study examined correlations after flooding for measures of business recovery but found only weak support (very small common variance) for business owners' optimism scores and sales recovery. Using traditional measures of recovery, in this study was little empirical evidence that optimism would be of value in identifying businesses at risk after a natural disaster.

  3. How life insurance can benefit the business owner

    SciTech Connect

    Byles, B.

    1993-02-01

    There are many situations when life insurance can fill the financial needs of business owners. Three of the most common needs are business continuation/value conservation (buy-sell agreement), asset conservation upon death or disability of a key employee (replace the value of a key employee upon death or disability), and the reward and retention of selected employees (bonus or deferred compensation). Let's take a closer look to see why life insurance makes sense in these three areas.

  4. American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment Spring 2007 Reference Group Data Report (Abridged)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Assessing and understanding the health needs and capacities of college students is paramount to creating healthy campus communities. The American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) is a survey that ACHA developed in 1998 to assist institutions of higher education in achieving this goal. The…

  5. 77 FR 25999 - Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC; Oregon; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ..., 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC's application for... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC; Oregon; Notice of Availability of...

  6. Too Long to Read: Assessing the Motivation behind Graduate Student Attendance in Reading Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, John J.; Steppan, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Graduate-level reading groups serve as a primary forum for students to learn current and complex concepts in their field. Because graduate students lament that reading "abnormally long" articles discourage them from attending particular reading group sessions, we tested the hypothesis that attendance will decrease proportionally with…

  7. 77 FR 67359 - Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC, Oregon; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ..., 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC's application for... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC, Oregon; Notice of Availability of...

  8. Assessment Results and Student Achievement; a Correlation Study Regarding Ability Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonaker, Richard V.

    2013-01-01

    School leaders face increased pressure to identify instructional and administrative practices that increase student achievement. However, achievement gaps persist between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged student groups. This study highlighted relationships between ability grouping and academic achievement in a suburban school district.…

  9. Inter-dog aggression in a UK owner survey: prevalence, co-occurrence in different contexts and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Casey, R A; Loftus, B; Bolster, C; Richards, G J; Blackwell, E J

    2013-02-01

    Aggression between dogs is common and can result in injury. The aims of this study were to estimate prevalence, evaluate co-occurrence with human-directed aggression, and investigate potential risk factors, using a cross-sectional convenience sample of dog owners. Aggression (barking, lunging, growling or biting) towards unfamiliar dogs was reported to currently occur, by 22 per cent of owners, and towards other dogs in the household, by 8 per cent. A low level of concordance between dog and human-directed aggression suggested most dogs were not showing aggression in multiple contexts. Aggression towards other dogs in the household was associated with increasing dog age, use of positive punishment/negative reinforcement training techniques, and attending ring-craft classes. Aggression towards other dogs on walks was associated with location of questionnaire distribution, owner age, age of dog, origin of dog, dog breed type, use of positive punishment/negative reinforcement training techniques and attending obedience classes for more than four weeks. In both, the amount of variance explained by models was low (<15 per cent), suggesting that unmeasured factors mostly accounted for differences between groups. These results suggest general characteristics of dogs and owners which contribute to intraspecific aggression, but also highlight that these are relatively minor predictors.

  10. Proficiency Assessment of Male Volleyball Teams of the 13-15-Year Age Group at Estonian Championships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamm, Meelis; Stamm, Raini; Koskel, Sade

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: Assessment of feasibility of using own computer software "Game" at competitions. Material and methods: The data were collected during Estonian championships in 2006 for male volleyball teams of the 13-15-years age group (n = 8). In all games, the performance of both teams was recorded in parallel with two computers. A total of 19 games…

  11. Group Dynamic Assessment in an Early Foreign Language Learning Program: Tracking Movement through the Zone of Proximal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davin, Kristin Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Although researchers have begun to explore the implementation of dynamic assessment (DA) with foreign language learners, few of these studies have occurred in the language classroom. Whereas DA is typically implemented in dyads, promising research in the field of foreign language learning suggests that DA may promote development with groups of…

  12. Assessing Child Mental Health Services in the Oregon Health Plan: A Report on Three Focus Groups, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyanagi, Chirs; Semansky, Rafael

    In 2002, the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law investigated the impact of expanding child mental health services in Medicaid on the actual availability of services to children. To assess family satisfaction, focus groups were held in two states: Oregon and New York. Both states have a comprehensive Medicaid mental health benefit for children…

  13. Student-Chosen Criteria for Peer Assessment of Tertiary Rock Groups in Rehearsal and Performance: What's Important?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blom, Diana; Encarnacao, John

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates criteria chosen by music students for peer and self assessment of both the rehearsal process and performance outcome of their rock groups. The student-chosen criteria and their explanations of these criteria were analysed in relation to Birkett's skills taxonomy of "soft" and "hard" skills. In the rehearsal process, students…

  14. Assessing Student Perceptions of the Community of Inquiry Model through Group Collaboration via Online and Face-to-Face Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Hui-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method study was to assess student perceptions of teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence, measured by the Community of Inquiry Scale (Arbaugh et al., 2008), through group collaboration via online and face-to-face instruction. Thirty-seven teacher education students participated in this…

  15. Dealing with Free-Riders in Assessed Group Work: Results from a Study at a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Barbara; Perry, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Potential employers require graduates to be able to demonstrate competent teamwork skills in initiating ideas and solving problems cooperatively. Teamwork is prevalent in educational institutions and often included as a way of enriching learning and assessment. Whilst group working can provide a rich opportunity for cooperative learning, its…

  16. An Application of Score Equity Assessment: Invariance of Linkage of New SAT[R] to Old SAT across Gender Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Cahn, Miriam F.; Dorans, Neil J.

    2006-01-01

    The College Board's SAT[R] data are used to illustrate how the score equity assessment (SEA) can help inform the program about equatability. SEA is used to examine whether the content change(s) to the revised new SAT result in differential linking functions across gender groups. Results of population sensitivity analyses are reported on the…

  17. A Known Group Analysis Validity Study of the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education in US Elementary and Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covay Minor, Elizabeth; Porter, Andrew C.; Murphy, Joseph; Goldring, Ellen B.; Cravens, Xiu; Elloitt, Stephen N.

    2014-01-01

    The Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education (VAL-ED) provides educators with a tool for principal evaluation based on principal, teacher, and supervisor reports of principals' learning-centered leadership. In this study, we conduct a known group analysis as part of a larger argument for the validity of the VAL-ED in US elementary and…

  18. 77 FR 34455 - In the Matter of Aegis Assessments, Inc., APC Group, Inc., Aurelio Resource Corp., BioAuthorize...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of Aegis Assessments, Inc., APC Group, Inc., Aurelio Resource Corp., BioAuthorize... securities of BioAuthorize Holdings, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the...

  19. Reading and Written Expression Performance of Ten Asian/Pacific-Islander Ethnic Groups on the Eighth Grade California Assessment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Morris K.; And Others

    For the first time, Asian and Pacific-Islander (API) eighth-grade students taking part in the California Assessment Program (CAP) were identified as belonging to one of the following 10 API ethnic groups: Asian-Indian, Cambodian, Chinese, Filipino, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Pacific-Islander, and Vietnamese. In school districts associated…

  20. Grouping chemicals for health risk assessment: A text mining-based case study of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Guo, Yufan; Silins, Ilona; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla; Korhonen, Anna

    2016-01-22

    As many chemicals act as carcinogens, chemical health risk assessment is critically important. A notoriously time consuming process, risk assessment could be greatly supported by classifying chemicals with similar toxicological profiles so that they can be assessed in groups rather than individually. We have previously developed a text mining (TM)-based tool that can automatically identify the mode of action (MOA) of a carcinogen based on the scientific evidence in literature, and it can measure the MOA similarity between chemicals on the basis of their literature profiles (Korhonen et al., 2009, 2012). A new version of the tool (2.0) was recently released and here we apply this tool for the first time to investigate and identify meaningful groups of chemicals for risk assessment. We used published literature on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-persistent, widely spread toxic organic compounds comprising of 209 different congeners. Although chemically similar, these compounds are heterogeneous in terms of MOA. We show that our TM tool, when applied to 1648 PubMed abstracts, produces a MOA profile for a subgroup of dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) which differs clearly from that for the rest of PCBs. This suggests that the tool could be used to effectively identify homogenous groups of chemicals and, when integrated in real-life risk assessment, could help and significantly improve the efficiency of the process. PMID:26562772

  1. Grouping chemicals for health risk assessment: A text mining-based case study of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Guo, Yufan; Silins, Ilona; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla; Korhonen, Anna

    2016-01-22

    As many chemicals act as carcinogens, chemical health risk assessment is critically important. A notoriously time consuming process, risk assessment could be greatly supported by classifying chemicals with similar toxicological profiles so that they can be assessed in groups rather than individually. We have previously developed a text mining (TM)-based tool that can automatically identify the mode of action (MOA) of a carcinogen based on the scientific evidence in literature, and it can measure the MOA similarity between chemicals on the basis of their literature profiles (Korhonen et al., 2009, 2012). A new version of the tool (2.0) was recently released and here we apply this tool for the first time to investigate and identify meaningful groups of chemicals for risk assessment. We used published literature on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-persistent, widely spread toxic organic compounds comprising of 209 different congeners. Although chemically similar, these compounds are heterogeneous in terms of MOA. We show that our TM tool, when applied to 1648 PubMed abstracts, produces a MOA profile for a subgroup of dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) which differs clearly from that for the rest of PCBs. This suggests that the tool could be used to effectively identify homogenous groups of chemicals and, when integrated in real-life risk assessment, could help and significantly improve the efficiency of the process.

  2. Using Secondary Data to Evaluate Diverse Groups of Chemical and Nonchemical Stressors in Cumulative Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    A main impediment of performing cumulative risk assessments (CRAs) is having data for multiple chemical and nonchemical stressors in the same individuals or populations. Therefore, secondary data analysis can be utilized as a screening approach to integrate population characteri...

  3. Health impact assessment in multinationals: A case study of the Royal Dutch/Shell Group

    SciTech Connect

    Birley, Martin . E-mail: martin@birleyhia.co.uk

    2005-10-15

    Health impact assessment is part of the risk management process of multinational corporations/companies. Sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS, and the 'paradox of plenty' are used as examples of the challenges they face. The 'business case' for impact assessment is explained. The policies, procedures, standards, and activities used by Shell to manage such risks are described. An approach to capacity building and competency development is presented that applies to both company staff and external contractors.

  4. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Jocelyne C; Gambino, Sara A; Richter, Jeffrey D; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools. Methods Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed. Results Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition. Conclusion The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training. PMID:26109860

  5. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Suttora, Linda C.; Phifer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  6. 26 CFR 1.679-1 - U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.679-1 U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust. (a) In general. A U.S. transferor...

  7. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-1 - Foreign persons not treated as owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Foreign persons not treated as owners. 1.672(f... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(f)-1 Foreign persons not treated as owners. (a) General rule—(1) Application of the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-1 - Foreign persons not treated as owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Foreign persons not treated as owners. 1.672(f... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(f)-1 Foreign persons not treated as owners. (a) General rule—(1) Application of the...

  9. 26 CFR 1.679-1 - U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.679-1 U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust. (a) In general. A U.S. transferor...

  10. 26 CFR 1.679-1 - U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.679-1 U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust. (a) In general. A U.S. transferor...

  11. 26 CFR 1.679-1 - U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.679-1 U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust. (a) In general. A U.S. transferor who...

  12. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-1 - Foreign persons not treated as owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign persons not treated as owners. 1.672(f... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(f)-1 Foreign persons not treated as owners. (a) General rule—(1) Application of the...

  13. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  14. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  15. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  16. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-1 - Foreign persons not treated as owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Foreign persons not treated as owners. 1.672(f... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(f)-1 Foreign persons not treated as owners. (a) General rule—(1) Application of the general...

  17. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power over income,...

  18. 26 CFR 1.679-1 - U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.679-1 U.S. transferor treated as owner of foreign trust. (a) In general. A U.S. transferor...

  19. 26 CFR 1.678(b)-1 - If grantor is treated as the owner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false If grantor is treated as the owner. 1.678(b)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.678(b)-1 If grantor is treated as the owner. Section 678(a) does not apply with respect to a power...

  20. 26 CFR 1.672(f)-1 - Foreign persons not treated as owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Foreign persons not treated as owners. 1.672(f... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.672(f)-1 Foreign persons not treated as owners. (a) General rule—(1) Application of the...

  1. 33 CFR 187.101 - What information must be collected to identify a vessel owner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this section. (4) Owner identifier, which must be the owner's tax identification number, date of birth together with driver's license number, or date of birth together with other unique number. (b) A... the owner's tax identification number, date of birth together with driver's license number, or date...

  2. 33 CFR 187.101 - What information must be collected to identify a vessel owner?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this section. (4) Owner identifier, which must be the owner's tax identification number, date of birth together with driver's license number, or date of birth together with other unique number. (b) A... the owner's tax identification number, date of birth together with driver's license number, or date...

  3. 19 CFR 133.36 - Change in name of owner of recorded copyright.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Change in name of owner of recorded copyright. 133...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TRADEMARKS, TRADE NAMES, AND COPYRIGHTS Recordation of Copyrights § 133.36 Change in name of owner of recorded copyright. If there is a change in the name of the owner of a...

  4. 19 CFR 133.36 - Change in name of owner of recorded copyright.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Change in name of owner of recorded copyright. 133...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TRADEMARKS, TRADE NAMES, AND COPYRIGHTS Recordation of Copyrights § 133.36 Change in name of owner of recorded copyright. If there is a change in the name of the owner of a...

  5. 19 CFR 133.36 - Change in name of owner of recorded copyright.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Change in name of owner of recorded copyright. 133...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TRADEMARKS, TRADE NAMES, AND COPYRIGHTS Recordation of Copyrights § 133.36 Change in name of owner of recorded copyright. If there is a change in the name of the owner of a...

  6. 39 CFR 946.2 - Disposition of property of apparent owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISPOSITION OF STOLEN MAIL MATTER AND PROPERTY ACQUIRED BY THE POSTAL INSPECTION SERVICE FOR USE AS EVIDENCE § 946.2 Disposition of property of apparent owners. Where an apparent owner of property subject to this... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposition of property of apparent owners....

  7. 39 CFR 946.2 - Disposition of property of apparent owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISPOSITION OF STOLEN MAIL MATTER AND PROPERTY ACQUIRED BY THE POSTAL INSPECTION SERVICE FOR USE AS EVIDENCE § 946.2 Disposition of property of apparent owners. Where an apparent owner of property subject to this... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disposition of property of apparent owners....

  8. 39 CFR 946.2 - Disposition of property of apparent owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISPOSITION OF STOLEN MAIL MATTER AND PROPERTY ACQUIRED BY THE POSTAL INSPECTION SERVICE FOR USE AS EVIDENCE § 946.2 Disposition of property of apparent owners. Where an apparent owner of property subject to this... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposition of property of apparent owners....

  9. 9 CFR 54.4 - Application by owners for indemnity payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., or that is already under a State movement restriction. In such cases, the flock owner will confirm...) Name, address, and social security number of the flock owner; (2) Number and breed(s) of animals in the... for animals in the flock; any signs of scrapie observed in the flock by the owner; and any movement...

  10. 9 CFR 54.4 - Application by owners for indemnity payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., or that is already under a State movement restriction. In such cases, the flock owner will confirm...) Name, address, and social security number of the flock owner; (2) Number and breed(s) of animals in the... for animals in the flock; any signs of scrapie observed in the flock by the owner; and any movement...

  11. 39 CFR 946.4 - Disposition of property of unknown owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposition of property of unknown owners. 946.4 Section 946.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE RELATING TO THE... § 946.4 Disposition of property of unknown owners. (a) Where no apparent owner of property subject...

  12. 39 CFR 946.4 - Disposition of property of unknown owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disposition of property of unknown owners. 946.4 Section 946.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE RELATING TO THE... § 946.4 Disposition of property of unknown owners. (a) Where no apparent owner of property subject...

  13. 39 CFR 946.4 - Disposition of property of unknown owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposition of property of unknown owners. 946.4 Section 946.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE RELATING TO THE... § 946.4 Disposition of property of unknown owners. (a) Where no apparent owner of property subject...

  14. Secondhand Tobacco Smoke and Municipal Smokefree Ordinances: Attitudes of Restaurant and Bar Owners and Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Scott P.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the attitudes of restaurant and bar owners and managers toward a smokefree city ordinance can contribute greatly to the success of a smokefree policy campaign. While local opposition to a smokefree policy always arises from restaurant and bar owners, this study of restaurant and bar owners and managers in two Midwestern cities…

  15. 40 CFR 1068.520 - How do I notify affected owners?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I notify affected owners? 1068.../Equipment § 1068.520 How do I notify affected owners? (a) Notify owners by first class mail or e-mail unless... you using one of the following methods if they have sold the engine/equipment: (i) Send a...

  16. 40 CFR 144.64 - Incapacity of owners or operators, guarantors, or financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Code, naming the owner or operator as debtor, within 10 business days after the commencement of the... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Incapacity of owners or operators... Responsibility: Class I Hazardous Waste Injection Wells § 144.64 Incapacity of owners or operators,...

  17. 25 CFR 141.58 - Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Remedies § 141.58 Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners. (a) The Commissioner... use in reservation businesses. Until such model bookkeeping system is promulgated, each business owner... business owner shall file with the Area Director an annual report on or before April 15 in a form...

  18. 25 CFR 141.58 - Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Remedies § 141.58 Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners. (a) The Commissioner... use in reservation businesses. Until such model bookkeeping system is promulgated, each business owner... business owner shall file with the Area Director an annual report on or before April 15 in a form...

  19. 26 CFR 1.401-13 - Excess contributions on behalf of owner-employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... owner-employee derived from the trade or business with respect to which the plan is established bears to... business with respect to which the plan is established. However, if such owner-employee has not derived... was not an owner-employee with respect to such trade or business. Furthermore, taxable years of...

  20. 25 CFR 141.58 - Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Remedies § 141.58 Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners. (a) The Commissioner... use in reservation businesses. Until such model bookkeeping system is promulgated, each business owner... business owner shall file with the Area Director an annual report on or before April 15 in a form...

  1. 77 FR 31566 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2012 Survey of Business Owners and Self...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    .... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2012 Survey of Business Owners and Self... Survey of Business Owners and Self-Employed Persons (SBO). In the SBO, businesses are asked several... forms. The Survey of Business Owners was last conducted in 2007 as part of the 2007 Economic Census....

  2. 17 CFR 229.403 - (Item 403) Security ownership of certain beneficial owners and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of certain beneficial owners and management. 229.403 Section 229.403 Commodity and Securities... Management and Certain Security Holders § 229.403 (Item 403) Security ownership of certain beneficial owners and management. (a) Security ownership of certain beneficial owners. Furnish the following...

  3. 25 CFR 141.58 - Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Remedies § 141.58 Records, reports, and obligations of reservation business owners. (a) The Commissioner... use in reservation businesses. Until such model bookkeeping system is promulgated, each business owner... business owner shall file with the Area Director an annual report on or before April 15 in a form...

  4. 40 CFR 85.2104 - Owners' compliance with instructions for proper maintenance and use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Owners' compliance with instructions....2104 Owners' compliance with instructions for proper maintenance and use. (a) An emission performance warranty claim may be denied on the basis of noncompliance by a vehicle owner with the written...

  5. A Process Model of Small Business Owner-Managers' Learning in Peer Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jing; Hamilton, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore how owner-managers of small businesses can learn in peer networks to improve their management skills. It aims to offer a new way of understanding owner-managers' learning as part of a social process, by highlighting the complex, interactive relationship that exists between the owner-manager, his or…

  6. Being an Effective, Engaged Owner during a Design and Construction Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalina, David

    2007-01-01

    This article explains how a project owner can be an active participant during the design and construction of his/her facility. The author discusses the two levels of participation the project owner needs to actively work with the design and construction team. And he further states that a project owner can enrich his/her personal experience and…

  7. GOAL: A software tool for assessing biological significance of genes groups

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modern high throughput experimental techniques such as DNA microarrays often result in large lists of genes. Computational biology tools such as clustering are then used to group together genes based on their similarity in expression profiles. Genes in each group are probably functionally related. The functional relevance among the genes in each group is usually characterized by utilizing available biological knowledge in public databases such as Gene Ontology (GO), KEGG pathways, association between a transcription factor (TF) and its target genes, and/or gene networks. Results We developed GOAL: Gene Ontology AnaLyzer, a software tool specifically designed for the functional evaluation of gene groups. GOAL implements and supports efficient and statistically rigorous functional interpretations of gene groups through its integration with available GO, TF-gene association data, and association with KEGG pathways. In order to facilitate more specific functional characterization of a gene group, we implement three GO-tree search strategies rather than one as in most existing GO analysis tools. Furthermore, GOAL offers flexibility in deployment. It can be used as a standalone tool, a plug-in to other computational biology tools, or a web server application. Conclusion We developed a functional evaluation software tool, GOAL, to perform functional characterization of a gene group. GOAL offers three GO-tree search strategies and combines its strength in function integration, portability and visualization, and its flexibility in deployment. Furthermore, GOAL can be used to evaluate and compare gene groups as the output from computational biology tools such as clustering algorithms. PMID:20459620

  8. The development of stereotype content: The use of warmth and competence in assessing social groups.

    PubMed

    Roussos, Gina; Dunham, Yarrow

    2016-01-01

    Past research suggests that warmth and competence are primary dimensions of social perception used by adults to understand social groups. The current study investigated whether children use these two dimensions to structure their representations of familiar groups. Results indicated that adult warmth and competence judgments were independent from one another and placed groups in warmth by competence space in ways consistent with past work. However, children showed some sensitivity to both dimensions but did not treat them as independent. Children's judgments of competence were closely aligned with adult judgments, but their judgments of warmth were influenced by factors that solely influenced adult judgments of competence. These data suggest that children develop an understanding of competence as an independent dimension prior to developing an understanding of warmth as an independent dimension and that their judgments of warmth may reflect a more general summing of all available evaluative information. Implications for children's developing understanding of the broader intergroup landscape are discussed. PMID:26407824

  9. The development of stereotype content: The use of warmth and competence in assessing social groups.

    PubMed

    Roussos, Gina; Dunham, Yarrow

    2016-01-01

    Past research suggests that warmth and competence are primary dimensions of social perception used by adults to understand social groups. The current study investigated whether children use these two dimensions to structure their representations of familiar groups. Results indicated that adult warmth and competence judgments were independent from one another and placed groups in warmth by competence space in ways consistent with past work. However, children showed some sensitivity to both dimensions but did not treat them as independent. Children's judgments of competence were closely aligned with adult judgments, but their judgments of warmth were influenced by factors that solely influenced adult judgments of competence. These data suggest that children develop an understanding of competence as an independent dimension prior to developing an understanding of warmth as an independent dimension and that their judgments of warmth may reflect a more general summing of all available evaluative information. Implications for children's developing understanding of the broader intergroup landscape are discussed.

  10. Nearest-neighbour clusters as a novel technique for assessing group associations

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    When all the individuals in a social group can be easily identified, one of the simplest measures of social interaction that can be recorded is nearest-neighbour identity. Many field studies use sequential scan samples of groups to build up association metrics using these nearest-neighbour identities. Here, I describe a simple technique for identifying clusters of associated individuals within groups that uses nearest-neighbour identity data. Using computer-generated datasets with known associations, I demonstrate that this clustering technique can be used to build data suitable for association metrics, and that it can generate comparable metrics to raw nearest-neighbour data, but with much less initial data. This technique could therefore be of use where it is difficult to generate large datasets. Other situations where the technique would be useful are discussed. PMID:26064580

  11. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    PubMed Central

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  12. Tutor versus Peer Group Assessment of Student Performance in a Simulation Training Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Kam-por; Leung, Roberta

    1996-01-01

    Performance in a simulation exercise of 96 third-year college students studying the hotel and tourism industries was assessed separately by teacher and peers using an identical checklist. Although results showed some agreement between teacher and peers, when averaged marks were converted into grades, agreement occurred in under half the cases.…

  13. VULNERABILITY AS A FUNCTION OF INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP RESOURCES IN CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The field of risk assessment has focused on protecting the health of individual people or populations of wildlife from single risks, mostly from chemical exposure. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently began to address multiple risks to communities in the ...

  14. Topic Negotiation in Peer Group Oral Assessment Situations: A Conversation Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, Zhengdong; Davison, Chris; Hamp-Lyons, Liz

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the production of topical talk in peer collaborative negotiation in an interactive assessment innovation context. The ability to stay on topic, to move from topic to topic and to introduce new topics appropriately is at the core of communicative competence. Applying conversation analysis (CA), we describe and analyze how one…

  15. Community Partners' Assessment of Service Learning in an Interpersonal and Small Group Communication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steimel, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    This assessment explored community partners' perceptions of service learning in a required communication course. Semi-structured interviews revealed that community partners believed that students were providing needed and valuable service, students were learning about the community, and students were learning through their application of…

  16. Dominie: Teaching and Assessment Strategies. CAL Research Group Technical Report No. 74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spensley, Fiona; Elsom-Cook, Mark

    This document outlines the strategies that are used for teaching and assessment in Dominie, an intelligent tutoring system designed to enable the user to operate a computer interface independently. Eight interaction modes are described in detail: four teaching strategies (cognitive apprenticeship, successive refinement, discovery learning, and…

  17. Modeling Booklet Effects for Nonequivalent Group Designs in Large-Scale Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Martin; Weirich, Sebastian; Siegle, Thilo; Frey, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Multiple matrix designs are commonly used in large-scale assessments to distribute test items to students. These designs comprise several booklets, each containing a subset of the complete item pool. Besides reducing the test burden of individual students, using various booklets allows aligning the difficulty of the presented items to the assumed…

  18. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of Group Exercise and Animal-Assisted Therapy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, Brandon; Artese, Ashley; Schmitt, Karla; Cormier, Eileen; Panton, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility of incorporating animal-assisted therapy teams (ATT) into a 6-week group exercise program for older adults (77 ± 6 years). Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to an exercise with ATT (E+ATT; n = 8) or exercise only (E; n = 7) group. Groups exercised 3x/week for 45 min. Feasibility was assessed by three objectives: (1) ATT will not need extensive preparation beyond their original therapy training; (2) the study will require minimal cost; and (3) ATT must not impair the effectiveness of the exercise program. By the study conclusion, all objectives were met. Time and cost were minimal for ATT, and adherence was 93% and 90% for E+ATT and E, respectively. There were significant improvements in both groups (p ≤ .05) for arm curls, get-up and go, and 6-min walk. The results of this pilot study suggest that it is feasible to incorporate ATT into group exercise programming for older adults.

  19. Unleashing their potential: a critical realist scoping review of the influence of dogs on physical activity for dog-owners and non-owners

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dog-owners tend to be more physically active than non-owners; however, dogs have also been shown to inhibit physical activity for non-owners, under some circumstances. Methods We conducted a scoping review to identify studies pertaining to the influence of dogs on physical activity for both dog-owners and non-owners, and adopted a critical realist orientation to draw inferences about the positive and negative impact of dogs via their affect on physical and social environments. Results We identified 35 studies from disparate literatures for review. These studies confirm that dog and owner behaviors affect shared physical and social environments in ways that may influence physical activity patterns, not only among dog-owners but also among non-owners. The direction of influence appears to be most positive in neighborhoods exhibiting high levels of social cohesion, socioeconomic status, perceived safety, dominant culture, or all of these. In disadvantaged neighborhoods, the health of women as well as older adults may be disproportionately affected by dog and owner behavior. Conclusions While dogs have the potential to increase physical activity for both dog-owners and non-owners, the presence or absence of dogs will not have a standard effect across the physical and social environments of all neighborhoods. Dogs' contributions to shared environments in ways that support physical activity for all must be leveraged. Thus, specific contextual factors must be considered in relation to dogs when planning neighborhood-level interventions designed to support physical activity. We suggest this population health topic merits further investigation. PMID:21600036

  20. The Counterfactual Self-Estimation of Program Participants: Impact Assessment without Control Groups or Pretests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Christoph Emanuel; Gaus, Hansjoerg; Rech, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes an innovative approach to estimating the counterfactual without the necessity of generating information from either a control group or a before-measure. Building on the idea that program participants are capable of estimating the hypothetical state they would be in had they not participated, the basics of the Roy-Rubin model…

  1. Focus Group Assessment of Culturally Specific Cholesterol-Lowering Menus for Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, M.; Coyle, Y.; Kavanaugh, A.; Adams-Huet, B.; Lipsky, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    This study focus tested the acceptability of a set of six 1400 kcal and six 1800 kcal culturally appropriate cholesterol-lowering menus developed for low-income Mexican-Americans with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The focus group, made up of 11 low-income Mexican-American women without SLE, found the menus to be generally culturally valid,…

  2. Assessing Students' Perceptions of Campus Community: A Focus Group Approach. Professional File. Number 95, Spring 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, David X.

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a focus group approach to the understanding of student perceptions of campus community. Using the Strange and Banning (2001) framework of community, the author argues that students' sense of campus community should be studied as it exists within the institutional environment. The results of the study include: 1) There is a strong…

  3. Theory Presentation and Assessment in a Problem-Based Learning Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Phillip J.; Koschmann, Timothy; Conlee, Melinda

    A study used conversational analysis to examine the reasoning students use in a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) environment as they formulate a theory (in medical contexts, a diagnosis) which accounts for evidence (medical history and symptoms). A videotaped group interaction was analyzed and transcribed. In the segment of interaction examined, the…

  4. Sameness: The regulatory crux with nanomaterial identity and grouping schemes for hazard assessment.

    PubMed

    Walser, Tobias; Studer, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Regulators and industry need clear rules for identification and grouping of nanomaterials for a streamlined quantitative hazard evaluation. Therefore, we provide convincing reasons for (i) why to introduce pragmatic definition of identities for nanomaterials, (ii) how to combine them into entities, and ultimately (iii) how the entities might be evaluated with testing strategies based on clouds of similar nanomaterials.

  5. A Retention Assessment Process: Utilizing Total Quality Management Principles and Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codjoe, Henry M.; Helms, Marilyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Retaining students is a critical topic in higher education. Methodologies abound to gather attrition data as well as key variables important to retention. Using the theories of total quality management and focus groups, this case study gathers and reports data from current college students. Key results, suggestions for replication, and areas for…

  6. "Chemistry Is in the News": Assessing Intra-Group Peer Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Kathleen M.; Glaser, Rainer E.

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is rapidly becoming a norm within both the professional and academic worlds, and the ability to collaborate is becoming an essential skill for all graduates. "Chemistry Is in the News" ("CIITN") is a curriculum that aims to teach students this skill by engaging student collaborative groups in a project that ties real world…

  7. Using Anchoring Vignettes to Assess Group Differences in General Self-Rated Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grol-Prokopczyk, Hanna; Freese, Jeremy; Hauser, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses a potentially serious problem with the widely used self-rated health (SRH) survey item: that different groups have systematically different ways of using the item's response categories. Analyses based on unadjusted SRH may thus yield misleading results. The authors evaluate anchoring vignettes as a possible solution to this…

  8. Adolescent Girls' Assessment and Management of Sexual Risks: Insights from Focus Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay-Cheng, Laina Y.; Livingston, Jennifer A.; Fava, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted focus groups with girls ages 14 to 17 (N = 43) to study how the dominant discourse of sexual risk shapes young women's understanding of the sexual domain and their management of these presumably pervasive threats. Through inductive analysis, we developed a coding scheme focused on three themes: (a) "types of sexual risk," (b) "factors…

  9. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-02-02

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  10. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of the University of Hartford First-Year Interest Group Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Robert L.; Colarulli, Guy C.; Barrett, Karen A.; Stevenson, Catherine B.

    2005-01-01

    A first-year interest group (FIG) is a learning community using course clusters. An effective model of FIGs and an innovative faculty development process are briefly described. Evaluation results found that University of Hartford FIGs improved student learning, improved curricular integration, fostered student community, and promoted faculty…

  11. Designing Project-Based Courses with a Focus on Group Formation and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    The value and the pitfalls of project and group work are well recognized. The principles and elements which apply to projects in general, apply to project-based courses. Thoughtful and detailed planning, understanding of the stakeholders and their needs, a good design, appropriate testing, monitoring and quality control and continual management…

  12. Group Simulation for "Authentic" Assessment in a Maternal-Child Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Desiree; Stanley, Leah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore student perceptions and outcomes surrounding the use of a labor and delivery simulation as a midterm exam in a maternal-newborn lecture course. An exploratory case study design was used to gain a holistic view of the simulation experience. Data from focus groups, written debriefings, simulation…

  13. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds. PMID:26848693

  14. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to reconstruct paleomonsoon from Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manasa, M.; Saraswat, Rajeev; Nigam, Rajiv

    2016-04-01

    Temporal changes in benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups were suggested as an effective proxy to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Arabian Sea. Here, in order to test the applicability of temporal variation in morpho-groups to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal, we have documented recent benthic foraminiferal distribution from the continental shelf region of the northwestern Bay of Bengal. Based on the external morphology, benthic foraminifera were categorized into rounded symmetrical (RSBF) and angular asymmetrical benthic foraminifera (AABF). Additionally, a few other dominant groups were also identified based on test composition (agglutinated, calcareous) and abundance (Asterorotalids and Nonions). The relative abundance of each group was compared with the ambient physico-chemical conditions, including dissolved oxygen, organic matter, salinity and temperature. We report that the RSBF are abundant in comparatively warm and well oxygenated waters of low salinity, suggesting a preference for high energy environment, whereas AABF dominate relatively cold, hypersaline deeper waters with low dissolved oxygen, indicating a low energy environment. The agglutinated foraminifera, Asterorotalids and Nonions dominate shallow water, low salinity regions, whereas the calcareous benthic foraminiferal abundance increases away from the riverine influx regions. Food availability, as estimated from organic carbon abundance in sediments, has comparatively less influence on faunal distribution in the northwestern Bay of Bengal, as compared to dissolved oxygen, temperature and salinity. We conclude that the factors associated with freshwater influx affect the distribution of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups in the northwestern Bay of Bengal and thus it can be used to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal.

  15. Contrasting group analysis of Brazilian students with dyslexia and good readers using the computerized reading and writing assessment battery "BALE".

    PubMed

    Toledo Piza, Carolina M J; de Macedo, Elizeu C; Miranda, Monica C; Bueno, Orlando F A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of cognitive processes underpinning reading and writing skills may help to distinguish different reading ability profiles. The present study used a Brazilian reading and writing battery to compare performance of students with dyslexia with two individually matched control groups: one contrasting on reading competence but not age and the other group contrasting on age but not reading competence. Participants were 28 individuals with dyslexia (19 boys) with a mean age of 9.82 (SD ± 1.44) drawn from public and private schools. These were matched to: (1) an age control group (AC) of 26 good readers with a mean age of 9.77 (SD ± 1.44) matched by age, sex, years of schooling, and type of school; (2) reading control group (RC) of 28 younger controls with a mean age of 7.82 (SD ± 1.06) matched by sex, type of school, and reading level. All groups were tested on four tasks from the Brazilian Reading and Writing Assessment battery ("BALE"): Written Sentence Comprehension Test (WSCT); Spoken Sentence Comprehension Test (OSCT); Picture-Print Writing Test (PPWT 1.1-Writing); and the Reading Competence Test (RCT). These tasks evaluate reading and listening comprehension for sentences, spelling, and reading isolated words and pseudowords (non-words). The dyslexia group scored lower and took longer to complete tasks than the AC group. Compared with the RC group, there were no differences in total scores on reading or oral comprehension tasks. However, dyslexics presented slower reading speeds, longer completion times, and lower scores on spelling tasks, even compared with younger controls. Analysis of types of errors on word and pseudoword reading items showed students with dyslexia scoring lower for pseudoword reading than the other two groups. These findings suggest that the dyslexics overall scores were similar to those of younger readers. However, specific phonological and visual decoding deficits showed that the two groups differ in terms of underpinning

  16. Ecological diversity of Bartonella species infection among dogs and their owner in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Natalie A; Maggi, Ricardo G; Rossmeisl, John H; Hegarty, Barbara C; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2011-11-01

    Bartonella species comprise a genus of gram-negative, fastidious, intracellular bacteria that have been implicated in association with an increasing spectrum of disease manifestations in dogs and human patients. In this study, chronic canine and human disease, for which causation was not diagnostically defined, were reported by the breeder of a kennel of Doberman pinschers. In addition to other diagnostic tests, serology, polymerase chain reaction, and enrichment blood culture were used to assess the prevalence of Bartonella sp. infection in the dogs and their owner. From five dogs, Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype I, multiple Bartonella henselae strains, and a species most similar to Candidatus B. volans, a rodent-associated Bartonella sp., were amplified and sequenced from biopsy tissues, cerebrospinal fluid, or blood enrichment cultures. The owner was bacteremic with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype I, the same subsp. and genotype detected in one of her dogs. These results further emphasize the ecological complexity of Bartonella sp. transmission in nature. PMID:21736485

  17. Diagnostic validity across racial and ethnic groups in the assessment of adolescent DSM-IV disorders.

    PubMed

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Gruber, Michael J; Kessler, Ronald C; Lin, Julia Y; McLaughlin, Katie A; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Alegria, Margarita

    2012-12-01

    We examine differential validity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) diagnoses assessed by the fully-structured Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI) among Latino, non-Latino Black, and non-Latino White adolescents in comparison to gold standard diagnoses derived from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-age Children (K-SADS). Results are based on the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement, a national US survey of adolescent mental health. Clinicians re-interviewed 347 adolescent/parent dyads with the K-SADS. Sensitivity and/or specificity of CIDI diagnoses varied significantly by ethnicity/race for four of ten disorders. Modifications to algorithms sometimes reduced bias in prevalence estimates, but at the cost of reducing individual-level concordance. These findings document the importance of assessing fully-structured diagnostic instruments for differential accuracy in ethnic/racial subgroups.

  18. Diagnostic validity across racial and ethnic groups in the assessment of adolescent DSM-IV disorders

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Gruber, Michael J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lin, Julia Y.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Alegria, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    We examine differential validity of DSM-IV diagnoses assessed by the fully-structured Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI) among Latino, Non-Latino Black, and Non-Latino White adolescents in comparison to gold standard diagnoses derived from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (K-SADS). Results are based on the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent Supplement, a national US survey of adolescent mental health. Clinicians re-interviewed 347 adolescent/parent dyads with the K-SADS. Sensitivity and/or specificity of CIDI diagnoses varied significantly by ethnicity/race for four of ten disorders. Modifications to algorithms sometimes reduced bias in prevalence estimates, but at the cost of reducing individual-level concordance. These findings document the importance of assessing fully-structured diagnostic instruments for differential accuracy in ethnic/racial subgroups. PMID:23148026

  19. Survey to investigate pet ownership and attitudes to pet care in metropolitan Chicago dog and/or cat owners.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Amber; Litster, Annette; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this descriptive cross-sectional study were to investigate dog and cat acquisition and attitudes toward pet care among residents of the Chicago area (zip codes 60600-60660); to compare data obtained from owners of shelter-acquired pets with those of residents who acquired their pets from other sources; to compare data from dog owners with cat owners; and to compare pet health practices among the respondents of different zip code income groups. In-person surveys administered at five pet store locations collected data from 529 respondents, representing 582 dogs and 402 cats owned or continuously cared for in the past 3 years. Median household income data for represented zip codes was also obtained. Shelters were the most common source of cats (p<0.01) and were the second most common source of dogs. Cats were more likely to have been acquired as strays, while dogs were more likely to have been acquired from friends/family/neighbors, pet stores, breeders or rescue organizations and to be kept as outdoor-only pets (p<0.01). More cats were kept per household than dogs (dogs mean=1.32/household; cats mean=1.78/household; p<0.01). Pet owners were most commonly 'very likely' (5 on a 1-5/5 Likert scale) to administer all hypothetical treatments discussed, although cat owners were less likely to spend time training their pet (p=0.05). Cat owners were less likely to have taken their pet to a veterinarian for vaccinations or annual physical exams (p<0.01). Shelter-acquired cats were significantly more likely to have been taken by their owners to the veterinarian for annual exams (p=0.05) than cats obtained as strays. Owners of shelter-acquired pets were at least as willing as other respondents to administer hypothetical treatments and pay ≥$1000 for veterinary treatment. Respondents from site #3 lived in zip codes that had relatively lower median household incomes (p<0.01) and were less likely to spend ≥$1000 on their pets than those at the four other sites (p<0

  20. Using and Applying Focus Groups in Climate Change Impact Assessment Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLorme, D.; Hagen, S.

    2011-12-01

    The focus group social science research method is an efficient and flexible data collection tool with broad applicability across disciplines and contexts. Through group dynamics, this interviewing approach offers strengths in gathering candid, spontaneous comments and detailed firsthand descriptions from stakeholders' perspectives. The method, which can stand alone or be integrated with other research frameworks, has much potential for helping to manage complex issues of global change. For optimal outcomes, however, careful planning and procedures are paramount. This presentation offers guidance in this regard via examples, tips, and lessons learned from a multidisciplinary NOAA-funded project: Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (EESLR-NGOM). Focus groups are a key component of the EESLR-NGOM project as they are being used to better understand coastal resource managers' operational and information behaviors and needs regarding sea level rise (SLR), erosion, and hurricane storm surge impact; to learn how to best develop and translate the project's expected scientific results into straightforward, useful, and readily-disseminated products; and to gather outreach recommendations. As part of an EESLR-NGOM project kickoff workshop, 12 coastal resource managers participated voluntarily in a focus group. A summary of findings and illustrative participant quotations will be included in the presentation. The initial focus group was productive in gaining insights into challenges and opportunities associated with a climate change project such as the EESLR-NGOM. It highlighted the importance of considering the interrelationships of natural and built environments and new avenues for resilience and sustainability. The coastal resource managers are not only end-users but also opinion leaders in their local communities who will diffuse this information widely through their networks of other potential end-users. Engaging coastal resource managers in