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Sample records for oxalate monohydrate stone

  1. Prediction of calcium oxalate monohydrate stone composition during ureteroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidizedah, Reza; Melnyk, Megan; Teichman, Joel M. H.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Prior research shows that Ho:YAG lithotripsy produces tiny dust fragments at low pulse energy (0.2J). However, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones may not fragment at this low pulse energy setting. Stone composition is rarely known until after surgery and historically, attempts to predict stone composition on the basis of endoscopic stone appearance were unsuccessful. Current endoscopic technology permits visual details that previously were not evident. As COM appears black under ambient light, we attempt to predict COM stone composition at the time of ureteroscopy based on its endoscopic appearance. Methods: Consecutive subjects undergoing ureteroscopy for stone disease were studied. Any portion of the stone that appeared black under endoscopic vision was considered clinical evidence of COM. Predicted stone composition was correlated with post-operative calculus analysis. Results: 46 consecutive ureteroscopic stone cases were analyzed prospectively. 25 of 28 subjects (89%) with black stones had stones later proven to be COM by composition analysis, versus one of 18 patients (6%) with non-black stones that were COM (p<0.0001). A black endoscopic stone appearance had a positive predictive value for COM of 89% and a non-black endoscopic stone appearance had a negative predictive value for COM of 94% (sensitivity 96%, specificity 83%). Conclusions: COM may reasonably be predicted intra-operatively by its black endoscopic appearance. The clinical utility would be to use higher laser pulse energy settings than for non-COM compositions. This data raises the possibility that more sophisticated optical characterization of endoscopic stone appearance may prove to be a useful tool to predict stone composition.

  2. Face-specific molecular adhesion and binding to calcium oxalate monohydrate: Implication for kidney stone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Xiaoxia

    This thesis focuses on the face-specific molecular adhesion to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, the principal crystalline in kidney stones. The primary technique used is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows visualizing the structure and growth of crystals, measuring the adhesion force between functional groups and crystal faces, and examining adhesion and binding of the molecules to crystals. The microscopic events associated with crystal growth on the {100}, {12-1}, and {010} faces have been investigated. Each face exhibits hillocks with step sites that can be assigned to specific crystal planes, enabling direct determination of growth rates along specific crystallographic directions. The growth rates are found to depend on the degree of supersaturation. The addition of macromolecules with anionic side chains results in inhibition of hillock growth. The magnitude of this effect depends on the macromolecule structure & concentration, and the identity of the step site. The different profiles observed for three synthetic macromolecules, which have similar backbones but different side chains, argues that local binding of anionic side chains to crystal surface sites governs growth inhibition rather than any secondary polymer structure. The dependence of adhesion force on the functional group-COM crystal face combinations has been identified. Tip-immobilized carboxylate and amidinium groups display the largest adhesion forces among all the functional groups examined, and the adhesive strength decreases as (100) > (12-1) > (010). The more adherent surface of COM, compared with its dihydrate form COD, corroborates the critical role of COM in stone formation. The influence of small molecules, synthetic polymers and native proteins on adhesion was examined. The introduction of these molecular additives, except osteopontin, result in a reduction in the adhesion force measured for all three faces. The extent of suppression, however, varies for molecule

  3. The concentration of Zn, Mg and Mn in calcium oxalate monohydrate stones appears to interfere with their fragility in ESWL therapy.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Unal, Ibrahim; Berber, Asiye; Demir, Temir Ali; Mutlu, Fezan; Aydar, Yüksel

    2008-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has remained the preferred method of treatment of urinary stones since its introduction in 1980. Although SWL is classified as a potential first-line treatment for renal stones smaller than 2 cm and its overall success rate is higher than 85% for stone clearance, not all renal calculi are successfully fragmented after SWL. Among the urinary stones, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stone is one of the hardest stones to fragment. Several factors interfering with stone fragility are known to exist. In addition to technical properties for SWL to increase the quality and rate of stone disintegration, the composition of stones such as trace element levels may also interfere with the efficacy of SWL. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to elucidate the correlation, if it exists, between fragmentation of renal stones and their trace element (Cu, Zn, Mg, Fe, Pb, Mn, Cr) concentrations. For this purpose, the patients admitted to our department who were identified with urinary stones (740 patients) and underwent SWL sessions were evaluated prospectively. Patients having 5-20 mm of solitary COM stone in the renal pelvis were included in this study. The trace element concentrations of renal stones that were successfully fragmented with SWL (SWL-S) were compared with those that were unsuccessfully fragmented after three SWL sessions (SWL-US) and removed surgically. Our measurements showed that the concentrations of Cu, Fe, Pb, and Cr were similar in both groups; by contrast, the concentration of Zn, Mg and Mn was significantly lower in SWL-US renal stones. The present results suggest that low concentrations of Zn, Mg and Mn in COM stones appear to make them resistant to SWL fragmentation and may offer a critical distinction for the choice of a treatment program.

  4. Crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Gaur, S. S.; Sheehan, M. E.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1988-02-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate has been investigated up to very large extents of growth over a range of supersaturations maintained using the Constant Composition technique. It is suggested that the initial rapid growth of aged seed crystals resulting in marked lattice perfection, reduces the density of growth sites on the crystal surfaces. A method for the preparation of perfected crystallites of calcium oxalate monohydrate through pregrowth of aged crystals has been developed. At large extents of growth with respect to initial seed crystals ( > 200% for aged crystals and 30-60% for pregrown crystals), the rates of crystallization at constant supersaturation undergo marked increases accompanying the formulation of secondary nuclei. These nucleation thresholds depend both upon supersaturation and upon the initial specific surface area of the crystallites and may be important factors in the formation of calcium oxalate stones in vivo. Experiments in whole urine suggest that the kinetics of growth, secondary nucleation, aggregation and cementation of particles may be important factors in kidney stone formation.

  5. Analysis of Altered MicroRNA Expression Profiles in Proximal Renal Tubular Cells in Response to Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystal Adhesion: Implications for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bohan; Wu, Bolin; Liu, Jun; Yao, Weimin; Xia, Ding; Li, Lu; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Zhangqun; Yu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) is the major crystalline component in kidney stones and its adhesion to renal tubular cells leads to tubular injury. However, COM-induced toxic effects in renal tubular cells remain ambiguous. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in gene regulation at the posttranscriptional levels. Objective The present study aimed to assess the potential changes in microRNAs of proximal renal tubular cells in response to the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Methodology Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and DAPI staining were used to measure the toxic effects of HK-2 cells exposed to COM crystals. MicroRNA microarray and mRNA microarray were applied to evaluate the expression of HK-2 cells exposed to COM crystals. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technology was used to validate the microarray results. Target prediction, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and pathway analysis were applied to predict the potential roles of microRNAs in biological processes. Principal Findings Our study showed that COM crystals significantly altered the global expression profile of miRNAs in vitro. After 24 h treatment with a dose (1 mmol/L), 25 miRNAs were differentially expressed with a more than 1.5-fold change, of these miRNAs, 16 were up-regulated and 9 were down-regulated. A majority of these differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with cell death, mitochondrion and metabolic process. Target prediction and GO analysis suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs potentially targeted many genes which were related to apoptosis, regulation of metabolic process, intracellular signaling cascade, insulin signaling pathway and type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Our study provides new insights into the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis associated with nephrolithiasis. PMID:24983625

  6. The osteopontin-controlled switching of calcium oxalate monohydrate morphologies in artificial urine provides insights into the formation of papillary kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Aaron; Grohe, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The protein osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in preventing the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stones. To gain insight into these mechanisms, crystallization was induced by addition of human kidney OPN to artificial urine (ionic strength comparable to urine; without citrate), and the OPN-COM interaction studied using a combination of scanning electron (SEM) and confocal microscopy. By SEM, we found that increasing OPN concentrations formed large monoclinic penetration twins (no protein added) and, at higher concentrations (1-, 2μg/ml OPN), super and hyper twins with crystal habits not found in previous studies. For instance, the hyper twins indicate well-facetted gearwheel-like habits with "teeth" developed in all crystallographic directions. At OPN concentrations ≥2μg/ml, a switching to small dumbbell-shaped COM habits with fine-textured surfaces occurred. Confocal microscopy of these dumbbells indicates protein incorporation in almost the entire crystal structure (in contrast to facetted COM), proposing a threshold concentration of ∼2μg/ml OPN for the facetted to the non-facetted habit transformation. Both the gearwheel-like and the dumbbell-shaped habit are again found side-by-side (presumably triggered by OPN concentration gradients within the sample) in in-vitro formed conglomerates, which resemble cross-sections of papillary kidney stones. The abrupt transformation from facetted to non-facetted habits and the unique compliance of the two in-vitro formed habits with the two main morphologies found in papillary kidney stones propose that OPN is a main effector in direct stone-forming processes. Moreover, stone structures which exhibit these two morphologies side-by-side might serve as a novel indicator for OPN concentrations surrounding those structures.

  7. The osteopontin-controlled switching of calcium oxalate monohydrate morphologies in artificial urine provides insights into the formation of papillary kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Aaron; Grohe, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The protein osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in preventing the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stones. To gain insight into these mechanisms, crystallization was induced by addition of human kidney OPN to artificial urine (ionic strength comparable to urine; without citrate), and the OPN-COM interaction studied using a combination of scanning electron (SEM) and confocal microscopy. By SEM, we found that increasing OPN concentrations formed large monoclinic penetration twins (no protein added) and, at higher concentrations (1-, 2μg/ml OPN), super and hyper twins with crystal habits not found in previous studies. For instance, the hyper twins indicate well-facetted gearwheel-like habits with "teeth" developed in all crystallographic directions. At OPN concentrations ≥2μg/ml, a switching to small dumbbell-shaped COM habits with fine-textured surfaces occurred. Confocal microscopy of these dumbbells indicates protein incorporation in almost the entire crystal structure (in contrast to facetted COM), proposing a threshold concentration of ∼2μg/ml OPN for the facetted to the non-facetted habit transformation. Both the gearwheel-like and the dumbbell-shaped habit are again found side-by-side (presumably triggered by OPN concentration gradients within the sample) in in-vitro formed conglomerates, which resemble cross-sections of papillary kidney stones. The abrupt transformation from facetted to non-facetted habits and the unique compliance of the two in-vitro formed habits with the two main morphologies found in papillary kidney stones propose that OPN is a main effector in direct stone-forming processes. Moreover, stone structures which exhibit these two morphologies side-by-side might serve as a novel indicator for OPN concentrations surrounding those structures. PMID:27362921

  8. Catechin prevents the calcium oxalate monohydrate induced renal calcium crystallization in NRK-52E cells and the ethylene glycol induced renal stone formation in rat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species play important roles in renal calcium crystallization. In this study, we examined the effects of catechin, which have been shown to have antioxidant properties on the renal calcium crystallization. Methods In the vitro experiment, the changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential, expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase 3 were measured to show the effects of catechin treatment on the NRK-52E cells induced by calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). In the vivo study, Sprague–Dawley rats were administered 1% ethylene glycol (EG) to generate a rat kidney stone model and then treated with catechin (2.5 and 10 mg/kg/day) for 14 days. The urine and serum variables were dected on 7 and 14 days after EG administration. The expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase 3, SOD, osteopontin (OPN), malondialdehyde (MDA), 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in kidney were measured. Furthermore, the mitochondrial microstructure in the kidney was also examined by transmission electron microscopy. Results Catechin treatment could prevent the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and expression of SOD, 4-HNE, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase 3 in NRK-52E cells induced by the COM. For the in vivo experiments, the EG administration induced renal calcium crystallization was also prevented by the catechin. The expression of SOD, OPN, MDA, OPN and 8-OHdG, were increased after EG administration and this increase was diminished by catechin. Moreover, catechin also prevented EG induced mitochondrial collapse in rat. Conclusions Catechin has preventive effects on renal calcium crystallization both in vivo and in vitro, and provide a potential therapeutic treatment for this disease. PMID:24044655

  9. The dissolution of calcium oxalate kidney stones. A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Tomazic, B B; Nancollas, G H

    1982-07-01

    The rates of dissolution of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) and of kidney stones containing these phases has been studied in 0.15 M sodium chloride solution at 37C. In contrast to the diffusion controlled dissolution of the pure synthetic phases, the kidney stones appear to dissolve considerably more slowly by a predominantly surface controlled process, independent of fluid dynamics. The differences between the dissolution rates of the synthetic and stone minerals become greater as the reactions approach equilibrium. As was found for the COD mineral, the dihydrate stone material transforms into the thermodynamically more stable monohydrate phase. The COD stone phase is significantly stabilized in the presence of inhibitors such as polyphosphate and magnesium ions. This may be an important factor in explaining the observed presence of dihydrate as a surface phase in many reported cases of calcium oxalate lithiasis.

  10. Protein adsorption at calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Sheng, X.; Rimer, J.; Jung, T.; Ward, M.

    2008-03-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals are the dominant inorganic phase in most kidney stones, and kidney stones form as aggregates of COM crystals and organic material, principally proteins, but little is known about the molecular level events at COM surfaces that regulate COM aggregation. We have examined the influence of polyelectrolytes on the force of adhesion between chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and selected COM crystal faces in saturated solution. In general, we found that polyanions bind to COM surfaces and block adhesion of a carboxylate functionalized AFM tip, while polycations had no measureable effect on adhesion force under the same conditions. We did observe a unique absence of interaction between poly(glutamic acid) and the COM (100) face compared to other synthetic polyanions, and some native urinary protein structures also exhibited unique face selective interactions, suggesting that simple electrostatic models will not completely explain the data.

  11. The nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate on self- assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Graff, G.L.; Fryxell, G.E.; Rieke, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    A physical chemical approach was used to study calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleation and growth on various organic interfaces. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs), containing derivatized organic functional groups, were designed to mimic various amino acid residues present in both urine and stone matrix macromolecules. Derivatized surfaces include SAMs with terminal methyl, bromo, imidazole, and thiazolidine-carboxylic acid functional groups. Pronounced differences in COM deposition were observed for the various interfaces with the imidazole and thiazolidine surfaces having the greatest effect and the methyl and bromo groups having little or no nucleating potential.

  12. Microelectrophoretic study of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopolysaccharides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  13. Oxalate: from the environment to kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Brzica, Hrvoje; Breljak, Davorka; Burckhardt, Birgitta C; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Sabolić, Ivan

    2013-12-01

    Oxalate urolithiasis (nephrolithiasis) is the most frequent type of kidney stone disease. Epidemiological research has shown that urolithiasis is approximately twice as common in men as in women, but the underlying mechanism of this sex-related prevalence is unclear. Oxalate in the organism partially originate from food (exogenous oxalate) and largely as a metabolic end-product from numerous precursors generated mainly in the liver (endogenous oxalate). Oxalate concentrations in plasma and urine can be modified by various foodstuffs, which can interact in positively or negatively by affecting oxalate absorption, excretion, and/or its metabolic pathways. Oxalate is mostly removed from blood by kidneys and partially via bile and intestinal excretion. In the kidneys, after reaching certain conditions, such as high tubular concentration and damaged integrity of the tubule epithelium, oxalate can precipitate and initiate the formation of stones. Recent studies have indicated the importance of the SoLute Carrier 26 (SLC26) family of membrane transporters for handling oxalate. Two members of this family [Sulfate Anion Transporter 1 (SAT-1; SLC26A1) and Chloride/Formate EXchanger (CFEX; SLC26A6)] may contribute to oxalate transport in the intestine, liver, and kidneys. Malfunction or absence of SAT-1 or CFEX has been associated with hyperoxaluria and urolithiasis. However, numerous questions regarding their roles in oxalate transport in the respective organs and male-prevalent urolithiasis, as well as the role of sex hormones in the expression of these transporters at the level of mRNA and protein, still remain to be answered. PMID:24384768

  14. Inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by the combination of citrate and osteopontin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, S. Roger; Zachowicz, William J.; Guan, Xiangying; Tang, Ruikang; Hoyer, John R.; De Yoreo, James J.; Nancollas, George H.

    2006-05-01

    The design of effective crystallization inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), the primary constituent of kidney stones, is a significant goal. Inhibitory molecules identified in urine include a small organic anion, citrate, and osteopontin (OPN), an aspartic acid-rich protein. The results of molecular-scale analyses combining force microscopy with molecular modeling raised the possibility that inhibition of COM crystallization might be increased by the additive effects of citrate and OPN because they act on different crystal faces. Constant composition (CC) kinetics studies of COM crystal growth now confirm that additive effects are, indeed, achieved in vitro when both citrate and OPN are present. These results suggest that a strategy employing combinations of inhibitors may provide a useful therapeutic approach to urinary stone disease.

  15. Factors affecting crystallization, dispersion, and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate in various urinary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmas, Kimberly Gail

    The mechanisms for the formation of kidney stones are not well understood. One possible mechanism is the formation of aggregates in the nephron tubules of the kidneys. However, altering the urinary environment may be a method to help prevent the recurrence of the formation of kidney stones. The primary inorganic constituent found in kidney stones of North American patients is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). In this research, studies on the effect of mixing rate on COM precipitation showed that rapid mixing compared to slow mixing produced smaller particle sizes and a narrower particle size distribution due to the more uniform supersaturation level. The findings are consistent with the general contention that mixing directly influences nucleation rate while mixing rate has relatively little influence over rate of growth in precipitation processes. Screening and central composite experimental designs are used to determine the effect of various factors on the aggregation and dispersion characteristics of previously grown calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals in artificial urinary environments of controlled variables. The variables examined are pH, calcium, oxalate, pyrophosphate, citrate, and protein concentrations in ultrapure water and artificial urine. Optical density measurements, zeta potential analysis, particle size analyzer, optical microscopy, AFM force measurements, protein adsorption, and ions and small molecule adsorption have been used to assess the state of aggregation and dispersion of the COM crystals and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such a complex system. The data indicate that our model protein, mucin, acts as a dispersant. This is attributed to steric hindrance resulting from the adsorbed mucoprotein. Oxalate, however, promotes aggregation. Interesting interactions between protein and oxalate along with protein and citrate are observed. Such interactions (synergistic or antagonistic) are found to depend on the concentrations of

  16. Aggregation and dispersion characteristics of calcium oxalate monohydrate: effect of urinary species.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Kimberly G; Gower, Laurie B; Khan, Saeed R; El-Shall, Hassan

    2002-12-01

    In this research, screening and central composite experimental designs are used to determine the effect of various factors on the aggregation and dispersion characteristics of previously grown calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals in artificial urinary environments of controlled variables. The variables examined are pH and calcium, oxalate, pyrophosphate, citrate, and protein concentrations in ultrapure water and artificial urine. Optical density measurements, particle size analysis, optical microscopy, AFM force measurements, and protein adsorption have been used to assess the state of aggregation and dispersion of the COM crystals and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such a complex system. The data indicate that our model protein, mucin, acts as a dispersant. This is attributed to steric hindrance resulting from the adsorbed mucoprotein. Oxalate, however, promotes aggregation. Interesting interactions between protein and oxalate along with protein and citrate are observed. Such interactions (synergistic or antagonistic) are found to depend on the concentrations of these species. Surface responses for these interactions are presented and discussed in this paper. In summary, solution, surface, and interface chemistries interact in a complex manner in the physiological environment to either inhibit or promote aggregation, and an understanding of such interactions may help determine and control the factors affecting kidney stone formation.

  17. The electrokinetic behavior of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chrondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for chemical adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopopolysacchrides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. The amount of proteins that can chemically adsorb appears to be limited to approximately one monomolecular layer. When the surface charge is high, an insufficient number of proteins can chemically adsorb to neutralize or reverse the surface charge. The remaining surface charge is balanced by proteins held near the surface by longer range electrostatic forces only. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  18. Nephrocalcin isoforms coat crystal surfaces and differentially affect calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal morphology, growth, and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurutz, Josh W.; Carvalho, Mauricio; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2003-08-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals were grown in the presence of each of the four isoforms of nephrocalcin (NC), a urinary protein proposed to inhibit kidney stone growth. Crystal size, morphology, and surface topography were assessed using optical microscopy, Coulter counter measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). All crystals grown in the presence of NC isoforms were calcium oxalate monohydrates (COMs). Crystals formed in the presence of NC-A were smaller than control crystals, which were grown without NC, according to optical and SEM results, suggesting that NC-A restricts crystal growth. In contrast, samples grown with NC-C and NC-D exhibit more large crystals and several crystal aggregates, suggesting that NC-C and -D promote crystal growth and aggregation. Crystals grown with NC-B are not significantly larger or smaller than controls. AFM images of the crystals reveal significantly different surface textures on the control crystals relative to those grown with NC isoforms, indicating that NC acts by coating nascent calcium oxalate crystals. These are the first reported AFM images that show topography of NC-coated crystals. These findings suggest that NC isoforms have distinct interactions with different COM crystal faces, which may be responsible for their different effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  19. Morphological conversion of calcium oxalate crystals into stones is regulated by osteopontin in mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsushi; Nomura, Shintaro; Saeki, Yukihiko; Higashibata, Yuji; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Hirose, Masahito; Itoh, Yasunori; Yasui, Takahiro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2008-10-01

    An important process in kidney stone formation is the conversion of retentive crystals in renal tubules to concrete stones. Osteopontin (OPN) is the major component of the kidney calcium-containing stone matrix. In this study, we estimated OPN function in early morphological changes of calcium oxalate crystals using OPN knockout mice: 100 mg/kg glyoxylate was intra-abdominally injected into wildtype mice (WT) and OPN knockout mice (KO) for a week, and 24-h urine oxalate excretion showed no significant difference between WT and KO. Kidney crystal depositions were clearly detected by Pizzolato staining but not by von Kossa staining in both genotypes, and the number of crystals in KO was significantly fewer than in WT. Morphological observation by polarized light optical microphotography and scanning electron microphotography (SEM) showed large flower-shaped crystals growing in renal tubules in WT and small and uniform crystals in KO. X-ray diffraction detected the crystal components as calcium oxalate monohydrate in both genotypes. Immunohistochemical staining of OPN showed that the WT crystals contained OPN protein but not KO crystals. We concluded that OPN plays a crucial role in the morphological conversion of calcium oxalate crystals to stones in mouse kidneys.

  20. Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals internalized into renal tubular cells are degraded and dissolved by endolysosomes.

    PubMed

    Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-02-25

    Interaction between calcium oxalate crystals and renal tubular cells has been recognized as one of the key mechanisms for kidney stone formation. While crystal adhesion and internalization have been extensively investigated, subsequent phenomena (i.e. crystal degradation and dissolution) remained poorly understood. To explore these mechanisms, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals (1000 μg/ml of crystals/culture medium) to confirm crystal internalization into MDCK (Type II) renal tubular cells after exposure to the crystals for 1 h and to trace the internalized crystals. Crystal size, intracellular and extracellular fluorescence levels were measured using a spectrofluorometer for up to 48 h after crystal internalization. Moreover, markers for early endosome (Rab5), late endosome (Rab7) and lysosome (LAMP-2) were examined by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry confirmed that FITC-labelled COM crystals were internalized into MDCK cells (14.83 ± 0.85%). The data also revealed a reduction of crystal size in a time-dependent manner. In concordance, intracellular and extracellular fluorescence levels were decreased and increased, respectively, indicating crystal degradation/dissolution inside the cells and the degraded products were eliminated extracellularly. Moreover, Rab5 and Rab7 were both up-regulated and were also associated with the up-regulated LAMP-2 to form large endolysosomes in the COM-treated cells at 16-h after crystal internalization. We demonstrate herein, for the first time, that COM crystals could be degraded/dissolved by endolysosomes inside renal tubular cells. These findings will be helpful to better understand the crystal fate and protective mechanism against kidney stone formation.

  1. Negative Linear Compressibility in Organic Mineral Ammonium Oxalate Monohydrate with Hydrogen Bonding Wine-Rack Motifs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuancun; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Hongsheng; Yang, Ke; Zou, Bo

    2015-07-16

    Negative linear compressibility (NLC) is a relatively uncommon phenomenon and rarely studied in organic systems. Here we provide the direct evidence of the persistent NLC in organic mineral ammonium oxalate monohydrate under high pressure using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculation. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurement reveals that ammonium oxalate monohydrate shows both positive and negative linear compressibility along b-axis before 11.5 GPa. The red shift of the external Raman modes and abnormal changes of several selected internal modes in high-pressure Raman spectra further confirmed the NLC. DFT calculations demonstrate that the N-H···O hydrogen bonding "wine-rack" motifs result in the NLC along b-axis in ammonium oxalate monohydrate. We anticipate the high-pressure study of ammonium oxalate monohydrate may represent a promising strategy for accelerating the pace of exploitation and improvement of NLC materials especially in organic systems. PMID:26266859

  2. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  3. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  4. Growth kinetics of calcium oxalate monohydrate. III. Variation of solution composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijvoet, Olav L. M.; Blomen, Leo J. M. J.; Will, Eric J.; van der Linden, Hanneke

    1983-11-01

    The influence of the variations of initial supersaturation, ionic strength and calcium-to-oxalate ratio on the growth kinetics of calcium oxalate monohydrate from suspension at 37°C have been investigated in an isotopic system. All experiments can be described with a single growth formula, containing three constants: kA (growth rate constant), La (thermodynamic solubility product) and [ tm] (a parameter describing the agglomeration of any seed suspension). This formula is able to predict any growth curve when the initial concentrations of seed, oxalate and indifferent electrolyte are known. Comparisons with datak from the literature are discussed.

  5. Efficiency of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy on calcium-oxalate stones: role of copper, iron, magnesium and zinc concentrations on disintegration of the stones.

    PubMed

    Küpeli, S; Arikan, N; Durak, I; Sarica, K; Akpoyraz, M; Karalezli, G

    1993-01-01

    Clinical use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the noninvasive management of urinary calculi is highly effective and practical. But its results vary in relation to several factors including localization, size and the chemical composition of the stones. Moreover, the anatomy of the kidneys treated is another contributing factor to the success rate of ESWL in upper urinary tract stones. Currently, except cystine and struvite stones, the efficiency of ESWL has been proved and has become the most outstanding therapy for calculi in a great number of stone centers. In this study, the efficiency of ESWL treatment in respect to the concentrations of 4 different trace elements (Cu, Fe, Mg and Zn) in the chemical composition of Ca-oxalate monohydrate stones have been evaluated in 20 patients.

  6. [Components of Urinary Nanocrystals and Their Influence on Formation of Calcium Oxalate Stones].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-bao; Wen, Xiao-ling; Xue, Jun-fa; Ouyang, Jian-ming

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were accurately performed to analyze the components of nanocrystals in the urine of patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones. XRD, SAED and FFT detected the presence of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), uric acid (UA), and calcium phosphate (CaP). EDS detected the elements of C, O, Ca, with a small amount of N and P. These results showed that the main components of urinary nanocrystals were COM, with a small amount UA and phosphate. HRTEM observation showed that the particle size of urinary nanocrystals was dozens of nanometers. The result was consistent with the calculation by Debye-Scherrer equation. When the urine was filtered through a microporous membrane of 0.45, 1.2, and 3 μm, respectively, the number of diffraction peaks of the obtained urine crystallites increased with the increased pore size, indicating the increase of urinary crystallite species. Crystal nucleation, growth, aggregation, and adhesion of crystals to the renal epithelial cells are important processes for CaOx stone formation. The presence of a large amount of COM crystals in patients' urine is a critical factor for CaOx stones formation. Nano UA and CaP crystallite can induce the CaOx stone formation as central nidus.

  7. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. Methods African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin–eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Results The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Conclusion Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone

  8. Inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate growth by citrate and the effect of the background electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Matthew L.; Qiu, S. Roger; Hoyer, John R.; Casey, William H.; Nancollas, George H.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2007-08-01

    Pathological mineralization is a common phenomenon in broad range of plants and animals. In humans, kidney stone formation is a well-known example that afflicts approximately 10% of the population. Of the various calcium salt phases that comprise human kidney stones, the primary component is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). Citrate, a naturally occurring molecule in the urinary system and a common therapeutic agent for treating stone disease, is a known inhibitor of COM. Understanding the physical mechanisms of citrate inhibition requires quantification of the effects of both background electrolytes and citrate on COM step kinetics. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of these effects, in which we measure the effect of the electrolytes LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl, and the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration for a range of COM supersaturations. We find that varying the background electrolyte results in significant differences in the measured step speeds and in step morphology, with KCl clearly producing the smallest impact and NaCl the largest. The kinetic coefficient for the former is nearly three times larger than for the latter, while the steps change from smooth to highly serrated when KCl is changed to NaCl. The results on the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration show that citrate produces a dead zone whose width increases with citrate concentration as well as a continual reduction in kinetic coefficient with increasing citrate level. We relate these results to a molecular-scale view of inhibition that invokes a combination of kink blocking and step pinning. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the classic step-pinning model of Cabrera and Vermilyea (C-V model) does an excellent job of predicting the effect of citrate on COM step kinetics provided the model is reformulated to more realistically account for impurity adsorption, include an expression for the Gibbs-Thomson effect that is correct for all supersaturations

  9. Alterations in circadian rhythmicity in calcium oxalate renal stone formers.

    PubMed

    Touitou, Y; Touitou, C; Charransol, G; Reinberg, A; Thomas, J; Bogdan, A; Barthelemy, C; Desgrez, P

    1983-01-01

    The circadian (circannual for oxalic acid) variations of 13 urinary variables (volume, creatinine, calcium, oxalic acid, glycolic acid, 17-ketosteroids, 17-hydroxycorticosteroids, phosphates, urea, uric acid, chloride, sodium, and potassium) have been documented in 7 calcium oxalate renal stone formers and 7 healthy men (control group). Urine was collected every 4 h over a period of 24 h. All subjects had the same synchronization: diurnal activity from 07(00) to 23(00) +/- 1 h and nocturnal rest; meals were given at fixed clock hours (08(00), 12(30) and 20(00) +/- 1 h). A statistically-significant rhythm (p less than 0.05) was validated for all variables except urea and calcium in healthy men. In renal stone formers, 6 variables (calcium, oxalic acid, and glycolic acid in particular) had no detectable circadian rhythm. However, a periodicity of c. 8 h (ultradian rhythm) was demonstrated for calcium and oxalic acid with peaks being located around 02(00), 10(00), and 18(00). No circannual variations in oxalic acid output could be observed. The present study shows an alteration of the periodicity of calcium and oxalic metabolisms, i.e. the loss of a circadian (24-h) rhythm and the occurrence of an ultradian rhythm of 8 h. The risk of calcium-oxalate crystallisation appears thus greater at 02(00), 10(00), and 18(00). Furthermore, any study dealing with oxalic acid excretion should state the season of urine collection when comparing renal stone formers and healthy subjects, as significant differences in oxaluria may appear during the summer months and not during the rest of the year. PMID:6862698

  10. Mimicking the biomolecular control of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth: effect of contiguous glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Grohe, Bernd; Hug, Susanna; Langdon, Aaron; Jalkanen, Jari; Rogers, Kem A; Goldberg, Harvey A; Karttunen, Mikko; Hunter, Graeme K

    2012-08-21

    Scanning confocal interference microscopy (SCIM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate the adsorption of the synthetic polypeptide poly(l-glutamic acid) (poly-glu) to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals and its effect on COM formation. At low concentrations (1 μg/mL), poly-glu inhibits growth most effectively in ⟨001⟩ directions, indicating strong interactions of the polypeptide with {121} crystal faces. Growth in <010> directions was inhibited only marginally by 1 μg/mL poly-glu, while growth in <100> directions did not appear to be affected. This suggests that, at low concentrations, poly-glu inhibits lattice-ion addition to the faces of COM in the order {121} > {010} ≥ {100}. At high concentrations (6 μg/mL), poly-glu resulted in the formation of dumbbell-shaped crystals featuring concave troughs on the {100} faces. The effects on crystal growth indicate that, at high concentrations, poly-glu interacts with the faces of COM in the order {100} > {121} > {010}. This mirrors MD simulations, which predicted that poly-glu will adsorb to a {100} terrace plane (most calcium-rich) in preference to a {121} (oblique) riser plane but will adsorb to {121} riser plane in preference to an {010} terrace plane (least calcium-rich). The effects of different poly-glu concentration on COM growth (1-6 μg/mL) may be due to variations between the faces in terms of growth mechanism and/or (nano)roughness, which can affect surface energy. In addition, 1 μg/mL might not be adequate to reach the critical concentration for poly-glu to significantly pin step movement on {100} and {010} faces. Understanding the mechanisms involved in these processes is essential for the development of agents to reduce recurrence of kidney stone disease.

  11. Increased calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal binding to injured renal tubular epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Verkoelen, C F; van der Boom, B G; Houtsmuller, A B; Schröder, F H; Romijn, J C

    1998-05-01

    The retention of crystals in the kidney is considered to be a crucial step in the development of a renal stone. This study demonstrates the time-dependent alterations in the extent of calcium oxalate (CaOx) monohydrate (COM) crystal binding to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells during their growth to confluence and during the healing of wounds made in confluent monolayers. As determined by radiolabeled COM crystal binding studies and confirmed by confocal-scanning laser microscopy, relatively large amounts of crystals (10.4 +/- 0.4 micrograms/cm2) bound to subconfluent cultures that still exhibited a low transepithelial electrical resistance (TER < 400 omega.cm2). The development of junctional integrity, indicated by a high resistance (TER > 1,500 omega.cm2), was followed by a decrease of the crystal binding capacity to almost undetectable low levels (0.13 +/- 0.03 microgram/cm2). Epithelial injury resulted in increased crystal adherence. The highest level of crystal binding was observed 2 days postinjury when the wounds were already morphologically closed but TER was still low. Confocal images showed that during the repair process, crystals selectively adhered to migrating cells at the wound border and to stacked cells at sites were the wounds were closed. After the barrier integrity was restored, crystal binding decreased again to the same low levels as in undamaged controls. These results indicate that, whereas functional MDCK monolayers are largely protected against COM crystal adherence, epithelial injury and the subsequent process of wound healing lead to increased crystal binding.

  12. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killilea, David W.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  13. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheeswari, S.; Sriram, R.; Brindha, P.; Kurian, Gino A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model. Materials and Methods: The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH), sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques. Results: The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4. Conclusion: Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O3 2-and SO4 2- moiety produced by the test compounds. PMID:26200543

  14. Development of an instrument to measure adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate to surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeger, Craig Fredrick

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) is the primary constituent in kidney stones. COM crystals were synthesized in the laboratory and characterized. Computer calculations of particle shape have been reconciled to observed shapes of COM crystals experimentally synthesized under various conditions. Comparison between the theoretical atomic structures generated by computer calculations are consistent with previously reported atomic layering sequences. Composite mixing rules were used to deconvolute the dielectric constant of COM from a COM/silicone composite. Utilizing the Lichtenecker dielectric mixing model, the value of the static dielectric constant of COM was determined to be 28.9. Optical and dielectric data were then used in the Tabor-Winterton relationship to calculate the Hamaker constant, Asb{131}, of COM particles interacting in water. The Asb{131} for COM as a function of crystallographic habit also was examined. The mean value of Asb{131} for COM was calculated to be 13.7 × 10sp{-21} J at 37sp°C in an aqueous environment. A hydrodynamic method for measuring the adhesion of particles to a surface has been designed for use in the study of kidney stone disease and other pathological biomineralization phenomena. The hydrodynamic force required to displace a particle adhering to a fused quartz substrate was calculated via the Poiseuille equation. The strength necessary to remove 50% of the COM particles adhering to the substrate on the (010) and (101) crystallographic surfaces are 81 and 170 Pa, respectively. The previously determined Hamaker constant and measured values of zeta potential were used to calculate the energy of interaction between a COM particle and the fused quartz substrate which was found to be comparable to experimentally measured values, provided the separation distance was on the order of 20 nm. Using the instrument and technique developed, the adhesion of COM to biologically and non-biologically relevant materials was measured in COM

  15. Stabilization of Submicron Calcium Oxalate Suspension by Chondroitin Sulfate C May Be an Efficient Protection from Stone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Jun; Xue, Jun-Fa; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The influences of chondroitin sulfate C (C6S) on size, aggregation, sedimentation, and Zeta potential of sub-micron calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystallites with mean sizes of about 330 nm were investigated using an X-ray diffractometer, nanoparticle size Zeta potential analyzer, ultraviolet spectrophotometer, and scanning electron microscope, after which the results were compared with those of micron-grade crystals. C6S inhibited the conversion of COD to COM and the aggregation of COM and COD crystallitesis; it also decreased their sedimentation rate, thus increasing their stability in aqueous solution. The smaller the size of the COD crystallites, the easier they can be converted to COM. The stability of sub-micron COD was worse than that of micron-grade crystals. C6S can inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate stones. PMID:24382950

  16. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Matlaga, Brian R.

    2007-04-05

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  17. Calcium oxalate crystal growth in human urinary stones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.M.; Johnson, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Calcium oxalate stones are very common and increasing. Crystal growth is no less important than the crystal nucleation in the pathogenesis of stone formation. The crystal growth was studied in human calcium oxalate stones by a combined electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The main mode of weddellite growth was interpenetration twinning of tetrahedral bipyramids. Bipyramids may form as initial crystal seeds, develop from anhedral crystals (crystals which lack flat symmetric faces) of spherular or mulberry shape, develop on the surface of preformed bipyramids by spiral dislocation mechanisms, or develop on whewellite crystal by heterogeneous nucleation and epitaxy. Heterogeneous nucleations of whewellite on weddellite, and calcium apatite on whewellite were also observed. Whewellite grew mainly by parallel twinning. Interpenetration twinning was exceptional. Transformation of anhedral to euhedral (completely bounded by flat faces that are set ar fixed angles to one another) whewellite occurred by parallel fissurations followed by brick wall like stacking of the crystals, while euhedral transformation of weddellite occurred by protrusion of bipyramids frm anhedral crystal surface. Occasionally, an evidence of crystal dissolution was noted. Although an aggregation of crystals is believed to play a pivotal role in stone nidus formation, growth in size of the formed crystals, and twinning and epitactic crystal intergrowth apparently play a significant role in the obstructive urinary stone formation.

  18. Selective inclusion of proteins into urinary calcium oxalate crystals: comparison between stone-prone and stone-free population groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, D.; Rodgers, A. L.; Sturrock, E. D.

    2003-11-01

    This study investigated whether incorporation of proteins into calcium oxalate urinary crystals is different in the black and white populations in South Africa and whether such differences could provide insight into the former group's remarkably low stone incidence. CaOx monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals were precipitated from each group's urine after adjustment of the calcium concentrations to 0.5 and 12 mmol/l, respectively. Crystals were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Intracrystalline proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE and immunodetected for urinary prothrombin fragment 1 (UPTF1) and osteopontin. Crystals precipitated from the black and white groups' control urines comprised mainly COM and COD, respectively. In both race groups UPTF1 was the major protein included in pure COM crystals while in pure COD it was osteopontin, but in the black group osteopontin was also included in COM. The black group's urine crystals incorporated significantly more intracrystalline protein. Selective inclusion of UPTF1 and osteopontin may be due to the unique crystal structure of COM and COD and the proteins' conformation at the different calcium concentrations at which these hydrates precipitate. The greater amount of intracrystalline inhibitory protein in the black group may be a factor in their low stone incidence.

  19. High-throughput platform for design and screening of peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Chung, Jihae; Chandra, Divya; Sosa, Ricardo D.; Karande, Pankaj; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Crystal growth modifiers present a versatile tool for controlling crystal shape and size. Our work described here focuses on the design and screening of short peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals using high-throughput approaches. We designed a small library of 13 peptides containing Ala and Asp amino acids arranged in varying sequences that mimic ubiquitous motifs in natural calcium-binding proteins. Peptides were screened using a quick assay to measure their efficacy for inhibiting COM crystallization. Our results show that subtle variations in the placement of Ala and Asp residues in the peptide sequence can have a profound effect on their inhibition potential. We were able to discover peptide sequences that inhibit COM crystallization more effectively than some of the well-known COM inhibitors, such as citrate. Our results also demonstrate that peptides can be engineered to bind to specific faces of COM crystals. Peptide sequences identified in this work are promising candidates for further development as therapies for biomineral-related diseases, such as kidney stone disease. Collectively, our work establishes new paradigms for the design, synthesis, and screening of peptides for controlling crystal habit with the potential to impact a variety of fields, including drug discovery, advanced materials, catalysis and separations.

  20. Oxalate-degrading microorganisms or oxalate-degrading enzymes: which is the future therapy for enzymatic dissolution of calcium-oxalate uroliths in recurrent stone disease?

    PubMed

    Peck, Ammon B; Canales, Benjamin K; Nguyen, Cuong Q

    2016-02-01

    Renal urolithiasis is a pathological condition common to a multitude of genetic, physiological and nutritional disorders, ranging from general hyperoxaluria to obesity. The concept of quickly dissolving renal uroliths via chemolysis, especially calcium-oxalate kidney stones, has long been a clinical goal, but yet to be achieved. Over the past 25 years, there has been a serious effort to examine the prospects of using plant and microbial oxalate-degrading enzymes known to catabolize oxalic acid and oxalate salts. While evidence is emerging that bacterial probiotics can reduce recurrent calcium-oxalate kidney stone disease by lowering systemic hyperoxaluria, the possible use of free oxalate-degrading enzyme therapy remains a challenge with several hurdles to overcome before reaching clinical practice. PMID:26645869

  1. Renal histopathology and crystal deposits in patients with small bowel resection and calcium oxalate stone disease.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E; Worcester, Elaine M; Bledsoe, Sharon B; Sommer, Andre J; Williams, James C; Krambeck, Amy E; Philips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2010-08-01

    We present here the anatomy and histopathology of kidneys from 11 patients with renal stones following small bowel resection, including 10 with Crohn's disease and 1 resection in infancy for unknown cause. They presented predominantly with calcium oxalate stones. Risks of formation included hyperoxaluria (urine oxalate excretion greater than 45 mg per day) in half of the cases, and acidic urine of reduced volume. As was found with ileostomy and obesity bypass, inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs) contained crystal deposits associated with cell injury, interstitial inflammation, and papillary deformity. Cortical changes included modest glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Randall's plaque (interstitial papillary apatite) was abundant, with calcium oxalate stone overgrowth similar to that seen in ileostomy, idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, and primary hyperparathyroidism. Abundant plaque was compatible with the low urine volume and pH. The IMCD deposits all contained apatite, with calcium oxalate present in three cases, similar to findings in patients with obesity bypass but not an ileostomy. The mechanisms for calcium oxalate stone formation in IMCDs include elevated urine and presumably tubule fluid calcium oxalate supersaturation, but a low calcium to oxalate ratio. However, the mechanisms for the presence of IMCD apatite remain unknown.

  2. Crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate at dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers in the presence of chondroitin sulfate A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Deng, Sui-Ping; Zhong, Jiu-Ping; Tieke, Bernd; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2004-10-01

    The growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals beneath dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers in the presence of chondroitin sulfate A (C4S) was systematically examined under different surface pressure. The results indicated that the addition of C4S can inhibit the crystal growth and prevent the aggregation of COM crystals. Under a DPPC monolayer, well-defined three-dimensional hexagonal prisms and three-dimensional rhombus prisms with sharply angled tips were obtained. The DPPC monolayer at a surface pressure of 10 mN/m can match the Ca2+ distance of the (1 bar 0 1) face of COM better than at 20 mN/m. The addition of C4S could cooperatively modulate the interaction strength between the monolayer (or itself) with the specific morphology determining faces such as (1 bar 0 1) and (0 2 0), and thus results in remarkable stabilization of the (1 bar 0 1) faces. The dramatic changes in morphological details were due to the strong electrostatic interactions between the Ca2+-rich (1 bar 0 1) crystal faces of COM and the polyanionic polysaccharide C4S together with the negatively charged sites of the zwitterionic DPPC monolayers. The increase of the concentration of C4S can further enhance the stabilization of the (1 bar 0 1) face.

  3. Growth and characterization of new semiorganic nonlinear optical and piezoelectric lithium sulfate monohydrate oxalate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Harsh; Sinha, Nidhi; Kumar, Binay

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A new semiorganic single crystal of LSO grown by slow evaporation technique. • Morphological studies of the LSO crystal deduced by BFDH law. • In the UV–vis spectrum wide transparent region and large band gap were found. • SHG is equal to KDP crystal and d{sub 33} was found to be equal to 6pC/N. • Grown crystal belongs to softer category. - Abstract: New semiorganic crystal of lithium sulfate monohydrate oxalate (LSO) for nonlinear application was synthesized by controlled slow evaporation method. The growth rate of various planes of the grown crystal was estimated by morphological study. Single crystal XRD analysis confirmed that the crystal belongs to triclinic lattice with space group P1. High transparency (∼95%) with large band gap (4.57 eV) was analyzed by UV–vis studies. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to identify various functional groups present in the LSO crystal. SHG efficiency was found to be equal to the KDP crystal. Thermal stability (up to 117.54 °C) and melting point (242 °C) of the crystal were studied by TG-DTA. In dielectric measurements, the value of dielectric constant decreases with increase in frequency. Hardness studies confirmed soft nature of crystals. The piezoelectric coefficient was found to be 6pC/N along [0 0 1].

  4. The influence of magnesium chloride on blood and urine parameters in calcium oxalate stone patients.

    PubMed

    Brundig, P; Berg, W; Schneider, H J

    1981-01-01

    The influence of magnesium chloride on various blood and urine parameters in calcium oxalate stone patients is studied. High dose magnesium therapy was found to increase urinary magnesium concentrations, whereas the oxalic acid concentration is reduced. The experiments support the statements on the role of magnesium in endogenous oxalic acid depression and the inhibition of the intestinal resorption. For urolith prevention it will be necessary to apply high magnesium doses of easily absorbable and well-tolerated medicaments.

  5. Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate-monohydrate: Effects of relative humidity and new spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudia; Casati, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Brambilla, Luigi; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    New data on vibrational properties of calcium oxalates and their controversial transformation mechanism are presented. We have focused on whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O) and weddellite [CaC2O4·(2 + x) H2O], the most common phases of calcium oxalate; these compounds occur in many organisms, in kidney stones and in particular kinds of films found on the surface of many works of art. Low temperature experiments carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have highlighted both the high structural order in the crystalline state of whewellite and the disordered distribution of the zeolitic water molecules in weddellite. The synthesised nanocrystals of weddellite have been kept under different hygrometric conditions in order to study, by X-ray powder diffraction, the role of “external” water molecules on their stability. Moreover, in order to identify the different kinds of water molecules, a re-investigation, supported by quantum chemical calculations, of the observed vibrational spectra (IR and Raman) of whewellite has been conducted.

  6. Is there a role for pentosan polysulfate in the prevention of calcium oxalate stones?

    PubMed

    Jones, Marklyn; Monga, Manoj

    2003-12-01

    The clinical role for pentosan polysulfate (PPS) in the prevention of calcium oxalate urolithiasis is not known. Crystallization and aggregation are important steps in calcium oxalate stone formation, and PPS has been shown to inhibit these steps, both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, PPS has a role in repairing injured urothelium and inhibiting adhesion to epithelial defects. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study appears warranted to assess the utility of PPS in the prevention of recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

  7. A comparative study on several models of experimental renal calcium oxalate stones formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jihong; Cao, Zhengguo; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhou, Siwei; Ye, Zhangqun

    2007-02-01

    In order to compare the effects of several experimental renal calcium oxalate stones formation models in rats and to find a simple and convenient model with significant effect of calcium oxalate crystals deposition in the kidney, several rat models of renal calcium oxalate stones formation were induced by some crystal-inducing drugs (CID) including ethylene glycol (EG), ammonium chloride (AC), vitamin D(3)[1alpha(OH)VitD(3), alfacalcidol], calcium gluconate, ammonium oxalate, gentamicin sulfate, L-hydroxyproline. The rats were fed with drugs given singly or unitedly. At the end of experiment, 24-h urines were collected and the serum creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), the extents of calcium oxalate crystal deposition in the renal tissue, urinary calcium and oxalate excretion were measured. The serum Cr levels in the stone-forming groups were significantly higher than those in the control group except for the group EG+L-hydroxyproline, group calcium gluconate and group oxalate. Blood BUN concentration was significantly higher in rats fed with CID than that in control group except for group EG+L-hydroxyproline and group ammonium oxalate plus calcium gluconate. In the group of rats administered with EG plus Vitamin D(3), the deposition of calcium oxalate crystal in the renal tissue and urinary calcium excretion were significantly greater than other model groups. The effect of the model induced by EG plus AC was similar to that in the group induced by EG plus Vitamin D(3). EG plus Vitamin D(3) or EG plus AC could stably and significantly induced the rat model of renal calcium oxalate stones formation. PMID:17393118

  8. Contrasting histopathology and crystal deposits in kidneys of idiopathic stone formers who produce hydroxy apatite, brushite, or calcium oxalate stones.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E; Worcester, Elaine M; Sommer, Andre J; Phillips, Carrie L; Williams, James C; Coe, Fredric L

    2014-04-01

    Our previous work has shown that stone formers who form calcium phosphate (CaP) stones that contain any brushite (BRSF) have a distinctive renal histopathology and surgical anatomy when compared with idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF). Here we report on another group of idiopathic CaP stone formers, those forming stone containing primarily hydroxyapatite, in order to clarify in what ways their pathology differs from BRSF and ICSF. Eleven hydroxyapatite stone formers (HASF) (2 males, 9 females) were studied using intra-operative digital photography and biopsy of papillary and cortical regions to measure tissue changes associated with stone formation. Our main finding is that HASF and BRSF differ significantly from each other and that both differ greatly from ICSF. Both BRSF and ICSF patients have significant levels of Randall's plaque compared with HASF. Intra-tubular deposit number is greater in HASF than BRSF and nonexistent in ICSF while deposit size is smaller in HASF than BRSF. Cortical pathology is distinctly greater in BRSF than HASF. Four attached stones were observed in HASF, three in 25 BRSF and 5-10 per ICSF patient. HASF and BRSF differ clinically in that both have higher average urine pH, supersaturation of CaP, and calcium excretion than ICSF. Our work suggests that HASF and BRSF are two distinct and separate diseases and both differ greatly from ICSF.

  9. RENAL HISTOPATHOLOGY AND CRYSTAL DEPOSITS IN PATIENTS WITH SMALL BOWEL RESECTION AND CALCIUM OXALATE STONE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.; Sommer, Andre J.; Williams, James C.; Krambeck, Amy E.; Philips, Carrie L.; Coe, Fredric L

    2013-01-01

    To date, the surgical anatomy and histopathology of kidneys from patients with stones and small bowel resection have not been studied. We present here materials from 11 cases, 10 Crohn’s disease and one with resection in infancy for unknown cause. Stones are predominantly calcium oxalate (CaOx). Urine stone risks included hyperoxaluria (urine oxalate excretion > 45 mg/day) in half of the cases, and reduced urine volume and pH. As in ileostomy and obesity bypass, inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) contain crystal deposits with associated cell injury, interstitial inflammation and papillary deformity. Cortical changes include modest glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Interstitial papillary apatite (Randall’s) plaque is abundant, and CaOx stones grow over deposits as in ileostomy, idiopathic CaOx stone formers, and primary hyperparathyroidism. Abundant plaque is compatible with the low urine volume and pH. IMCD deposits all contain apatite; in 3 cases CaOx is also present. This is similar to findings in obesity bypass but not ileostomy. Mechanisms for CaOx in IMCD appear to include elevated urine, and presumably tubule fluid CaOx SS with a low calcium to oxalate ratio; mechanisms for the universal presence of IMCD apatite are unknown. PMID:20428098

  10. Hyperoxaluria leads to dysbiosis and drives selective enrichment of oxalate metabolizing bacterial species in recurrent kidney stone endures

    PubMed Central

    Suryavanshi, Mangesh V.; Bhute, Shrikant S.; Jadhav, Swapnil D.; Bhatia, Manish S.; Gune, Rahul P.; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria due to endogenously synthesized and exogenously ingested oxalates is a leading cause of recurrent oxalate stone formations. Even though, humans largely rely on gut microbiota for oxalate homeostasis, hyperoxaluria associated gut microbiota features remain largely unknown. Based on 16S rRNA gene amplicons, targeted metagenomic sequencing of formyl-CoA transferase (frc) gene and qPCR assay, we demonstrate a selective enrichment of Oxalate Metabolizing Bacterial Species (OMBS) in hyperoxaluria condition. Interestingly, higher than usual concentration of oxalate was found inhibitory to many gut microbes, including Oxalobacter formigenes, a well-characterized OMBS. In addition a concomitant enrichment of acid tolerant pathobionts in recurrent stone sufferers is observed. Further, specific enzymes participating in oxalate metabolism are found augmented in stone endures. Additionally, hyperoxaluria driven dysbiosis was found to be associated with oxalate content, stone episodes and colonization pattern of Oxalobacter formigenes. Thus, we rationalize the first in-depth surveillance of OMBS in the human gut and their association with hyperoxaluria. Our findings can be utilized in the treatment of hyperoxaluria associated recurrent stone episodes. PMID:27708409

  11. Prophylactic effects of quercetin and hyperoside in a calcium oxalate stone forming rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Yun-fei; Feng, Yuan; Peng, Bo; Che, Jian-ping; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-hua

    2014-12-01

    Quercetin and hyperoside (QH) are the two main constituents of the total flavone glycosides of Flos Abelmoschus manihot, which has been prescribed for treating chronic kidney disease for decades. This study aimed to investigate the effect of QH on calcium oxalate (CaOx) formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-fed rats. Rats were divided into three groups: an untreated stone-forming group, a QH-treated stone-forming group (20 mg/kg/day) and a potassium citrate-treated stone-forming group (potassium citrate was a worldwide-recognized calculi-prophylactic medicine). Ethylene glycol (0.5 %) was administered to the rats during the last week, and vitamin D3 was force-fed to induce hyperoxaluria and kidney calcium oxalate crystal deposition. 24 h urine samples were collected before and after inducing crystal deposits. Rats were killed and both kidneys were harvested after 3 weeks. Bisected kidneys were examined under a polarized light microscope for semi-quantification of the crystal-formation. The renal tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase levels were measured by Western blot. QH and potassium citrate have the ability to alkalinize urine. The number of crystal deposits decreased significantly in the QH-treated stone-forming group as compared to the other groups. Superoxide dismutase and catalase levels also increased significantly in the QH-treated stone-forming group, as compared with the untreated stone-forming group. QH administration has an inhibitory effect on the deposition of CaOx crystal in EG-fed rats and may be effective for preventing stone-forming disease. PMID:25085199

  12. Electron spin echo and spin relaxation of low-symmetry Mn(2+)-complexes in ammonium oxalate monohydrate single crystal.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Stanisław K; Lijewski, Stefan; Goslar, Janina; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa

    2014-09-01

    Pulse EPR experiments were performed on low concentration Mn(2+) ions in ammonium oxalate monohydrate single crystals at X-band, in the temperature range 4.2-60K at crystal orientation close to the D-tensor z-axis. Hyperfine lines of the resolved spin transitions were selectively excited by short nanosecond pulses. Electron spin echo signal was not observed for the low spin transition (+5/2↔+3/2) suggesting a magnetic field threshold for the echo excitation. Echo appears for higher spin transitions with amplitude, which grows with magnetic field. Opposite behavior displays amplitude of echo decay modulations, which is maximal at low field and negligible for high field spin transitions. Electron spin-lattice relaxation was measured by the pulse saturation method. After the critical analysis of possible relaxation processes it was concluded that the relaxation is governed by Raman T(7)-process. The relaxation is the same for all spin transitions except the lowest temperatures (below 20K) where the high field transitions (-3/2↔-1/2) and (-5/2↔-3/2) have a slower relaxation rate. Electron spin echo dephasing is produced by electron spectral diffusion mainly, with a small contribution from instantaneous diffusion for all spin transitions. For the highest field transition (-5/2↔-3/2) an additional contribution from nuclear spectral diffusion appears with resonance type enhancement at low temperatures.

  13. Effects of dietary interventions on 24-hour urine parameters in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

    PubMed

    Kıraç, Mustafa; Küpeli, Bora; Irkilata, Lokman; Gülbahar, Ozlem; Aksakal, Nur; Karaoğlan, Ustünol; Bozkırlı, Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dietary factors on 24-hour urine parameters in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones. A total of 108 of idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones were included in the study. A 24-hour urinalysis was performed and metabolic abnormalities were measured for all of the patients. All of the patients were given specialized diets for their 24-hour urine abnormalities. At the end of first month, the same parameters were examined in another 24-hour urinalysis. Hyperoxaluria, hypernatruria, and hypercalciuria were found in 84 (77%), 43 (39.8%), and 38 (35.5%) of the patients, respectively. The differences between the oxalate, sodium, volume, uric acid, and citrate parameters before and after the dietary intervention were significant (p < 0.05). The calcium parameters were not significantly different before and after the intervention. We found that oxalate, sodium, volume, uric acid, and citrate-but not calcium-abnormalities in patients with recurrent calcium oxalate stones can be corrected by diet. The metabolic profiles of idiopathic calcium oxalate stone patients should be evaluated and the appropriate dietary interventions should be implemented to decrease stone recurrence.

  14. Analysis of urinary stone based on a spectrum absorption FTIR-ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asyana, V.; Haryanto, F.; Fitri, L. A.; Ridwan, T.; Anwary, F.; Soekersi, H.

    2016-03-01

    This research analysed the urinary stone by measuring samples using Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and black box analysis. The main objective of this study is to find kinds of urinary stone and determine a total spectrum, which is a simple model of the chemical and mineral composition urinary stone through black box analysis using convolution method. The measurements result showed that kinds of urinary stone were pure calcium oxalate monohydrate, ion amino acid calcium oxalate monohydrate, a mixture of calcium oxalate monohydrate with calcium phosphate, a mixture of ion amino acid calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium phosphate,pure uric acid, ion amino acid uric acid, and a mixture of calcium oxalate monohydrate with ion amino acid uric acid. The results of analysis of black box showed characteristics as the most accurate and precise to confirm the type of urinary stones based on theregion absorption peak on a graph, the results of the convolution, and the shape of the total spectrum on each urinary stones.

  15. Chronic stress and calcium oxalate stone disease: is it a potential recurrence risk factor?

    PubMed

    Arzoz-Fabregas, Montserrat; Ibarz-Servio, Luis; Edo-Izquierdo, Sílvia; Doladé-Botías, María; Fernandez-Castro, Jordi; Roca-Antonio, Josep

    2013-04-01

    Chronic emotional stress is associated with increased cortisol release and metabolism disorders. However, few studies have evaluated the influence of chronic stress on calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone disease and its recurrence. A total of 128 patients were enrolled in this case-control study over a period of 20 months. All patients were CaOx stone formers with a recent stone episode (<3 months); 31 were first-time stone formers (FS) and 33 recurrent stone formers (RS). Dimensions of chronic stress were evaluated with self-reported validated questionnaires measuring stressful life events, perceived stress, anxiety, depression, burnout and satisfaction with life. An ad hoc self-reporting questionnaire was designed to evaluate stress-related specifically to stone episodes. Blood and urine samples were collected to determine cortisol levels and urinary composition. In addition, epidemiological data, socioeconomic information, diet and incidences of metabolic syndrome (MS) were reported. Overall, no significant differences were observed in the scores of cases and controls on any of the questionnaires dealing with stress. The number (p < 0.001) and the intensity (p < 0.001) of perceived stressful life events were higher in RS than in FS, but there were no differences between the two groups in other dimensions of stress. RS had higher glucose (p = 0.08), uric acid (p = 0.02), blood cortisol (p = 0.01), and urine calcium levels (p = 0.01) than FS. RS also had lower economic levels (p = 0.02) and more frequent incidences of MS (p = 0.07) than FS. Although no differences were observed in cases and controls among any dimension of chronic stress, the number and intensity of stressful life events were higher in RS than in FS. These differences correlate with variations in blood and urinary levels and with metabolic disorders, indicating an association between chronic stress and risk of recurrent CaOx stone formation.

  16. Effects of calcium supplements on the risk of renal stone formation in a population with low oxalate intake.

    PubMed

    Stitchantrakul, Wasana; Sopassathit, Wichai; Prapaipanich, Surasing; Domrongkitchaiporn, Somnuek

    2004-12-01

    It has been speculated that calcium supplement in subjects with low oxalate intake might increase the risk of calcium stone formation due to an increase in calcium absorption without a significant reduction in oxalate absorption. There have been no human studies addressing specifically the effects of taking calcium supplements in populations whose dietary oxalate is low. This study was conducted to determine the effects of calcium supplements on the risk of calcium stone formation in a population with low oxalate intake. Thirty-two healthy male navy privates, 22.7 +/- 1.9 (mean +/- SD) years old, who had oxalate intake of less than 1 mmol/day, a serum creatinine of less than 150 micromol/l, and no history of renal stones, participated in the study. Dietary oxalate was controlled to be under 1 mmol/day throughout the study. Twenty-four hour urine collections for the determination of urinary constituents were obtained at baseline and after taking calcium supplements. Detection of calcium oxalate was performed to assess the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation. The urinary excretion of calcium was significantly elevated above baseline values while taking the calcium supplements (3.48 +/- 2.13 vs 5.17 +/- 2.61 mmol/d, p < 0.05) and urinary oxalate was significantly decreased when the subjects took calcium supplements compared to the corresponding baseline value (0.13 +/- 0.05 vs 0.17 +/- 0.07 mmol/d, p = 0.01). Urinary citrate was significantly elevated when the subjects took calcium supplements compared to the baseline (0.83 +/- 0.57 vs 0.64 +/- 0.39 mmol/d, p = 0.03). There was no significant alteration in the activity products of calcium oxalate while taking the calcium supplements (0.54 +/- 0.25 vs 0.57 +/- 0.22, p = 0.54). The effect of calcium supplements with meals, for the reduction of the risk of calcium stone formation, was unchanged, even in a population whose oxalate intake is rather low. Taking calcium supplements resulted in a reduction in urinary

  17. Proteomic analysis of a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Matsuta, Yosuke; Moriyama, Manabu; Yasuda, Makoto; Chishima, Noriharu; Yamaoka, Noriko; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the matrix protein of a rare urinary stone that contained calcium carbonate. A urinary stone was extracted from a 34-year-old male patient with metabolic alkalosis. After X-ray diffractometry and infrared analysis of the stone, proteomic analysis was carried out. The resulting mass spectra were evaluated with protein search software, and matrix proteins were identified. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis confirmed that the stone contained calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Of the identified 53 proteins, 24 have not been previously reported from calcium oxalate- or calcium phosphate-containing stones. The protease inhibitors and several proteins related to cell adhesion or the cytoskeleton were identified for the first time. We analyzed in detail a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Considering the formation of a calcium carbonate stone, the new identified proteins should play an important role on the urolithiasis process in alkaline condition.

  18. The Interaction between Enterobacteriaceae and Calcium Oxalate Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Beare, Evan; Saxena, Vijay; Hilt, Evann E.; Thomas-White, Krystal; Schober, Megan; Li, Birong; Becknell, Brian; Hains, David S.; Wolfe, Alan J.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of calcium oxalate crystals and deposits in UTI pathogenesis has not been established. The objectives of this study were to identify bacteria present in pediatric urolithiasis and, using in vitro and in vivo models, to determine the relevance of calcium oxalate deposits during experimental pyelonephritis. Methods Pediatric kidney stones and urine were collected and both cultured and sequenced for bacteria. Bacterial adhesion to calcium oxalate was compared. Murine kidney calcium oxalate deposits were induced by intraperitoneal glyoxalate injection and kidneys were transurethrally inoculated with uropathogenic Escherichia coli to induce pyelonephritis Results E. coli of the family Enterobacteriaceae was identified in patients by calcium oxalate stone culture. Additionally Enterobacteriaceae DNA was sequenced from multiple calcium oxalate kidney stones. E. coli selectively aggregated on and around calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals. Mice inoculated with glyoxalate and uropathogenic E. coli had higher bacterial burdens, increased kidney calcium oxalate deposits and an increased kidney innate immune response compared to mice with only calcium oxalate deposits or only pyelonephritis. Conclusions In a murine model, the presence of calcium oxalate deposits increases pyelonephritis risk, likely due to preferential aggregation of bacteria on and around calcium oxalate crystals. When both calcium oxalate deposits and uropathogenic bacteria were present, calcium oxalate deposit number increased along with renal gene transcription of inner stone core matrix proteins increased. Therefore renal calcium oxalate deposits may be a modifiable risk factor for infections of the kidney and urinary tract. Furthermore, bacteria may be present in calcium oxalate deposits and potentially contribute to calcium oxalate renal disease. PMID:26448465

  19. Aggregation of freshly precipitated calcium oxalate crystals in urine of calcium stone patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Baumann, J M; Affolter, B; Casella, R

    2011-12-01

    Aggregation (AGN) of freshly precipitated calcium oxalate crystals was photometrically studied in urine of 30 calcium stone patients and 30 controls, in solutions containing urinary macromolecules (UMS) and in an inhibitor free control solution (CS). Crystals were produced by oxalate titration and crystallization was monitored measuring optical density (OD). Tests were repeated adding hydroxyapatite (HAP) to urine and UMS and adding citrate and pyrophosphate (PPi) to UMS of the controls. AGN was recognized as a rapid OD decrease being at least three times faster than sedimentation of single crystals (p < 0.001) and used to calculate an extent of AGN (EA%). The time between the end of titration and the beginning of AGN was determined as suspension stability (SS). The main effect of urinary inhibitors was retardation of AGN without changing EA, SS being higher in urine than UMS (p < 0.001) and in UMS than CS (p < 0.001). In urine of 63% of controls but only in 33% of patients, no AGN was recorded (p < 0.05). The high inhibitory activity of urine could not be reproduced in UMS even in combination with 3.5 mM citrate or 0.05 mM PPi. 0.05 mg/mL HAP reduced SS in all urine samples to low values and increased the rate of rapid OD decrease, being a measure for the size of aggregates. Retarding AGN of crystals during their passage through the kidney seems to be an important mechanism to prevent stone formation during crystalluria. The promotion of AGN by HAP reveals a new role of Randall's plaques in nephrolithiasis.

  20. Serum Estradiol and Testosterone Levels in Kidney Stones Disease with and without Calcium Oxalate Components in Naturally Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Lili; Duan, Xiaolu; Zeng, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Epidemiological data reveal that the overall risk for kidney stones disease is lower for women compared to age-matched men. However, the beneficial effect for the female sex is lost upon menopause, a time corresponding to the onset of fall in estrogen levels. The aim of this study was to describe the serum estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) characteristics of naturally postmenopausal women with kidney stones. Methods 113 naturally postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed kidney stones (aged 57.4±4.98 years) and 84 age frequency matched stone-free controls (56.9±4.56 years) were validly recruited in the case-control study. The odds ratios (ORs) for the associations between sex hormones and kidney stones were estimated with logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic data and medical history. Patients were also stratified analyzed according to stone components (calcium oxalate stones [COS]; non-calcium oxalate stones [NCOS]). Results Serum E2 (21.1 vs. 31.1 pg/ml) was significantly lower in kidney stones patients compared to controls. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that this effect was driven by COS patients (p<0.001). According to tertiles of the E2 levels, a significant higher frequency of COS was seen in the lowest E2 group (p <0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis identified E2 level as a strong factor that was independently associated with the risk for COS (per 1 SD increase, OR=0.951, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.919-0.985; highest: lowest tertile, OR=0.214, 95%CI = 0.069-0.665). However, serum T levels did not significantly differ among the groups. Conclusions Naturally postmenopausal women with higher remaining estradiol levels appear less likely to suffer from kidney calcium oxalate stones. However, no correlation was found between serum T level and kidney stones. These findings support the hypothesis that higher postmenopausal endogenous estrogens may protect against kidney stones with ageing. PMID:24086550

  1. Urate and calcium oxalate stones: from repute to rhetoric to reality.

    PubMed

    Grover, P K; Ryall, R L

    1994-01-01

    A critical appraisal of the evidence commonly cited to support a link between high urate excretion and calcium oxalate (CaOx) urinary calculi is presented. Two theories have been invoked to provide a scientific explanation for urate's apparent promotory effect. The first proposes that urinary urate crystals promote CaOx precipitation by the phenomenon of epitaxy; the second hypothesis is that colloidal particles of urate reduce the inhibitory activity of urinary glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) which normally prevent the crystallization of CaOx. However, to the present, neither has been verified experimentally. More recent research from our group has revealed that at normal physiological pH values dissolved urate directly promotes CaOx precipitation by the classic 'salting-out' effect by enhancing nucleation, growth and aggregation of CaOx crystals. It is therefore suggested that the beneficial effect of allopurinol in reducing CaOx stone recurrences may be attributed to its lowering the urinary output of urate and thereby reducing the probability that CaOx will be salted out of urine, rather than to epitaxy or inactivation of urinary GAGs.

  2. Experimental determination of multiple thermodynamic and kinetic risk factors for nephrolithiasis in the urine of healthy controls and calcium oxalate stone formers: does a universal discriminator exist?

    PubMed

    Rodgers, A L; Webber, D; Hibberd, B

    2015-11-01

    Nephrolithiasis is thought to be governed by urinary thermodynamic and kinetic risk factors. However, identification of one or more of these factors which consistently and unambiguously differentiates between healthy subjects (N) and calcium oxalate (CaOx) renal stone patients (SF) remains elusive. The present study addresses this challenge. 24 h urines were collected from 15 N and 10 SF. Urine compositions were used to compute thermodynamic risk indices including urinary ratios, quotients and supersaturation (SS) values, while CaOx metastable limits (MSL) were determined experimentally. Crystallisation kinetics was determined by measuring rates of particle formation (number, volume, size) using a Coulter counter multisizer (CC) and a Coulter flow cytometer (FC). Particle shapes were qualitatively differentiated by FC and were viewed directly by scanning electron microscopy. Several urinary composition ratios and risk quotients were significantly different between the groups. However, there were no significant differences between CaOx MSL or SS values. Using transformed FC data, the rate of CaOx crystallisation in SF was significantly greater than in N. This was not supported by CC measurements. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to particle size or CaOx crystal growth rates. Single and aggregated CaOx dihydrate crystals were observed in both groups with equal frequency and there were no differences in the kinetic properties of these deposits. A few CaOx monohydrate crystals were observed in SF. Although several risk factors were found to be significantly different between the groups, none of them were consistently robust when compared to other cognate factors. Arguments were readily invoked which demonstrated inter-factor inconsistencies and conflicts. We suspect that a unique discriminatory factor, such as any of those which we investigated in the present study, may not exist.

  3. Experimental determination of multiple thermodynamic and kinetic risk factors for nephrolithiasis in the urine of healthy controls and calcium oxalate stone formers: does a universal discriminator exist?

    PubMed

    Rodgers, A L; Webber, D; Hibberd, B

    2015-11-01

    Nephrolithiasis is thought to be governed by urinary thermodynamic and kinetic risk factors. However, identification of one or more of these factors which consistently and unambiguously differentiates between healthy subjects (N) and calcium oxalate (CaOx) renal stone patients (SF) remains elusive. The present study addresses this challenge. 24 h urines were collected from 15 N and 10 SF. Urine compositions were used to compute thermodynamic risk indices including urinary ratios, quotients and supersaturation (SS) values, while CaOx metastable limits (MSL) were determined experimentally. Crystallisation kinetics was determined by measuring rates of particle formation (number, volume, size) using a Coulter counter multisizer (CC) and a Coulter flow cytometer (FC). Particle shapes were qualitatively differentiated by FC and were viewed directly by scanning electron microscopy. Several urinary composition ratios and risk quotients were significantly different between the groups. However, there were no significant differences between CaOx MSL or SS values. Using transformed FC data, the rate of CaOx crystallisation in SF was significantly greater than in N. This was not supported by CC measurements. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to particle size or CaOx crystal growth rates. Single and aggregated CaOx dihydrate crystals were observed in both groups with equal frequency and there were no differences in the kinetic properties of these deposits. A few CaOx monohydrate crystals were observed in SF. Although several risk factors were found to be significantly different between the groups, none of them were consistently robust when compared to other cognate factors. Arguments were readily invoked which demonstrated inter-factor inconsistencies and conflicts. We suspect that a unique discriminatory factor, such as any of those which we investigated in the present study, may not exist. PMID:26198547

  4. [Multiple calcium oxalate stone formation in a patient with glycogen storage disease type I (von Gierke's disease) and renal tubular acidosis type I: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, A; Segawa, T; Kakehi, Y; Takeuchi, H

    1993-07-01

    A case of multiple urinary stones in a patient with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) is reported. In spite of the presence of hyperuricemia, these stones did not consist of uric acid, but mainly of calcium oxalate. Laboratory studies revealed distal renal tubular acidosis and hypocitraturia, but no significant abnormality in calcium metabolism. We discussed the mechanism of calcium stone formation in our case, and its prophylactic treatment by oral administration of citrate compound. PMID:8362684

  5. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  6. The use of non-contrast computed tomography and color Doppler ultrasound in the characterization of urinary stones - preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Bulakçı, Mesut; Tefik, Tzevat; Akbulut, Fatih; Örmeci, Mehmet Tolgahan; Beşe, Caner; Şanlı, Öner; Oktar, Tayfun; Salmaslıoğlu, Artür

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of density value in computed tomography (CT) and twinkling artifact observed in color Doppler analysis for the prediction of the mineral composition of urinary stones. Material and methods A total of 42 patients who were operated via percutaneous or endoscopic means and had undergone abdominal non-contrast CT and color Doppler ultrasonography examinations were included in the study. X-ray diffraction method was utilized to analyze a total of 86 stones, and the correlations between calculated density values and twinkling intensities with stone types were investigated for each stone. Results Analyses of extracted stones revealed the presence of 40 calcium oxalate monohydrate, 12 calcium oxalate dihydrate, 9 uric acid, 11 calcium phosphate, and 14 cystine stones. The density values were calculated as 1499±269 Hounsfield Units (HU) for calcium oxalate monohydrate, 1505±221 HU for calcium oxalate dihydrate, 348±67 HU for uric acid, 1106±219 HU for calcium phosphate, and 563±115 HU for cystine stones. The artifact intensities were determined as grade 0 in 15, grade 1 in 32, grade 2 in 24, and grade 3 in 15 stones. Conclusion In case the density value of the stone is measured below 780 HU and grade 3 artifact intensity is determined, it can be inferred that the mineral composition of the stone tends to be cystine. PMID:26623143

  7. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2011-02-01

    An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa), has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the theoretical acidic conditions of these soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. Regarding the carbonate flux, another direct consequence of wood feeding is a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues, which is not consumed by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter. Therefore, an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting gents (mainly termites, fungi, and bacteria) release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition some of these gents are themselves producers of oxalate (fungi). Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The solution is pumped through the

  8. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2011-07-01

    An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa), has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the acidic conditions in these types of soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. In addition, a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues contributes to the carbonate flux and is identified as a direct consequence of wood feeding by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter, and an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting agents (mainly termites, saprophytic fungi, and bacteria) release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition, some of these agents are themselves producers of oxalate (e.g. fungi). Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can then start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The solution is

  9. Nutrient intake and urine composition in calcium oxalate stone-forming dogs: comparison with healthy dogs and impact of dietary modification.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Abigail E; Blackburn, Judith M; Markwell, Peter J; Robertson, William G

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient intake and urine composition were analyzed in calcium oxalate (CaOx)stone-forming and healthy control dogs to identify factors that contribute to CaOx urolithiasis. Stone-forming dogs had significantly lower intake of sodium, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus and significantly higher urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations, calcium excretion, and CaOx relative supersaturation (RSS). Feeding a diet used in the treatment of canine lower urinary tract disease for 1 month was associated with increased intake of moisture, sodium, and fat; reduced intake of potassium and calcium; and decreased urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations, calcium excretion, and CaOx RSS. No clinical signs of disease recurrence were observed in the stone-forming dogs when the diet was fed for an additional 11 months. The results suggest that hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria contribute to the formation of CaOx uroliths in dogs and show that dietary modifications can alter this process. PMID:15578454

  10. Bulk crystal growth, optical, mechanical and ferroelectric properties of new semiorganic nonlinear optical and piezoelectric Lithium nitrate monohydrate oxalate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Jyoti; Kumar, Binay

    2016-01-01

    New semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystals of Lithium nitrate oxalate monohydrate (LNO) were grown by slow evaporation solution technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study indicated that LNO crystal belongs to the triclinic system with space group P1. Various functional groups present in the material were identified by FTIR and Raman analysis. UV-vis study showed the high transparency of crystals with a wide band gap 5.01 eV. Various Optical constants i.e. Urbach energy (Eu), extinction coefficient (K), refractive index, optical conductivity, electric susceptibility with real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant were calculated using the transmittance data which have applications in optoelectronic devices. A sharp emission peak was found at 438 nm in photoluminescence measurement, which revealed suitability of crystal for fabricating violet lasers. In dielectric studies, a peak has been observed at 33 °C which is due to ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition. Piezoelectric charge coefficients (d33 = 9.2 pC/N and g33) have been calculated, which make it a suitable for piezoelectric devices applications. In ferroelectric studies, a saturated loop was found in which the values of coercive field and remnant polarization were found to be 2.18 kV/cm and 0.39 μC/cm2, respectively. Thermal behavior was studied by TGA and DSC studies. The relative SHG efficiency of LNO was found to be 1.2 times that of KDP crystal. In microhardness study, Meyer's index value was found to be 1.78 which revealed its soft nature. These optical, dielectric, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, mechanical and non-linear optical properties of grown crystal establish the usefulness of this material for optoelectronics, non-volatile memory and piezoelectric devices applications.

  11. EDAX versus FTIR in mixed stones.

    PubMed

    Fazil Marickar, Y M; Lekshmi, P R; Varma, Luxmi; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Mixed stones form a significant number of all urinary stones. Accurate analysis of individual areas of stones is fraught with uncertainties. Scanning electron microscopy with elemental distribution analysis (SEM-EDAX) is a very important tool in assessing stone composition. The objective of this paper is to project the role of the combination of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and SEM-EDAX combination in achieving a total understanding of mixed stone morphology. Ten mixed urinary stones were washed and dried and the composition recognized by analysis of FTIR spectra by comparing with the spectra of pure components. Spectra for different layers were obtained. Then the stone samples were further studied by SEM-EDAX analysis. The findings of FTIR were correlated with SEM-EDAX and detailed data generated. Using SEM-EDAX, the spatial distribution of major and trace elements were studied to understand their initiation and formation. As much as 80% of the stones studied were mixtures of calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) and calcium phosphate (hydroxyapatite) in various proportions. Quantitative evaluation of components was achieved through FTIR and SEM-EDAX analysis. It was possible to get an idea about the spatial distribution of molecules using SEM analysis. The composition of different areas was identified using EDAX. Analyzing with EDAX, it was possible to obtain the percentage of different elements present in a single sample. The study concludes that the most common mixed stone encountered in the study is a mixture of calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium phosphate in a definite proportion. The combination identified not only the molecular species present in the calculus, but also the crystalline forms within chemical constituents. Using EDAX, the amount of calcium, phosphorus, oxygen and carbon present in the stone sample could be well understood.

  12. Macromolecules Relevant to Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryall, Rosemary L.; Cook, Alison F.; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Grover, Phulwinder K.

    2007-04-01

    Despite years of research, no single macromolecule in kidney calculi or in urine has yet been shown to fulfill a specific function in stone pathogenesis. In this paper we briefly review papers investigating the urinary excretion of individual macromolecules, their effects on calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization and attachment of crystals to renal epithelial cells, and the influence of lithogenic conditions on their renal expression in cultured cells and animal models. Using prothrombin fragment 1 (PTF1) and human serum albumin as examples, we show the types of patterns resulting from the binding of a fluorescently tagged protein to a specific CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystal face and its incorporation into the crystal structure. Molecular modeling is also used to illustrate how PTF1 can align with the atomic array on a COM crystal surface. We conclude that although many macromolecules are, by strict definition, relevant to stone formation, very few are probably truly influential.

  13. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  14. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  15. Mechanisms of differing stone fragility in extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Preminger, G M

    1994-08-01

    Clinical experience with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has demonstrated significant variations in stone fragility. To understand the physical mechanisms of the differences, we quantitatively determined shockwave-stone interaction under clinically relevant SWL conditions for six stone compositions: calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), struvite (MAPH), calcium apatite (CA), uric acid (UA), brushite, and cystine. We also characterized the acoustic and mechanical properties of the stones using ultrasound and microindentation techniques. Our results show that renal calculi have distinctly different acoustic and mechanical properties. Higher wave speed, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were measured from COM and cystine stones, whereas lower values of the corresponding properties were found in CA and MAPH, and the values for brushite and UA stones were in between. Computer modeling of shockwave propagation revealed that under the same shockwave intensity, larger deformation was induced in CA and MAPH stones than in COM and cystine stones. In addition, multiple reflected tensile waves were predicted for stones with concentric layer structure, indicating their susceptibility to shockwave fragmentation. These findings elucidate the mechanisms of the differences in stone fragility observed clinically. Their implications to SWL are discussed.

  16. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate trihydrate in artificial urine by constant composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalko, F. J.; Adair, J. H.; Khan, S. R.

    1997-11-01

    Calcium oxalate is a major component of most human kidney stones. To improve our understanding of kidney stone formation, crystallization of calcium oxalate in a urine-like solution was investigated using constant composition technique. Artificial urine with a calcium oxalate relative supersaturation of 10 was incubated at 37°C in the reaction vessel of a constant composition system with or without seed crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). Reaction was allowed to proceed until its rate reached an equilibrium. Crystals were isolated and identified. A mixture of COM and calcium oxalate trihydrate (COT) crystals was produced in the absence of COM seeds. Addition of COM seeds resulted in their growth, formation of more COM crystals and unexpectedly, the nucleation of COT crystals. Seeded systems are generally considered to produce crystal growth only. Our results, however, indicate the occurrence of both nucleation and growth under these circumstances. It is proposed that low supersaturation in concert with high ionic strength as present in the artificial urine and exists in mammalian urine may lead to the coexistence of stable COM and unstable COT.

  17. The paradoxical role of urinary macromolecules in the aggregation of calcium oxalate: a further plea to increase diuresis in stone metaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, J M; Affolter, B

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to get information on aggregation (AGN) of urinary calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx) which seems to occur in stone formation despite a protecting coat of urinary macromolecules (UMs). CaOx crystallization was directly produced in urine, control and albumin solution by Ox titration and was spectrophotometrically followed. A rapid decrease of optical density indicating AGN was absent in 14 of 15 freshly voided urines of 5 healthy controls. However, in the presence of UM-coated hydroxyapatite all urines with relative high sodium concentration, being an indicator of concentrated urine, showed a pronounced AGN which was abolished when these urines were diluted. Albumin relatively found to be an inhibitor of AGN showed after temporary adsorption on Ca Phosphate (CaP) massive self-AGN and changed to a promoter of CaOx AGN. Self-AGN after adsorption on surfaces especially of CaP, being an important compound of Randall's plaques, can thus explain this paradoxical behavior of UMs. Aggregated UMs probably bridge zones of electrostatic repulsion between UM-coated crystals with identical electrical surface charge. These zones extend by urine dilution which decreases ionic strength. Diminution of urinary concentration by increasing diuresis seems, therefore, to be important in stone metaphylaxis.

  18. The paradoxical role of urinary macromolecules in the aggregation of calcium oxalate: a further plea to increase diuresis in stone metaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, J M; Affolter, B

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to get information on aggregation (AGN) of urinary calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx) which seems to occur in stone formation despite a protecting coat of urinary macromolecules (UMs). CaOx crystallization was directly produced in urine, control and albumin solution by Ox titration and was spectrophotometrically followed. A rapid decrease of optical density indicating AGN was absent in 14 of 15 freshly voided urines of 5 healthy controls. However, in the presence of UM-coated hydroxyapatite all urines with relative high sodium concentration, being an indicator of concentrated urine, showed a pronounced AGN which was abolished when these urines were diluted. Albumin relatively found to be an inhibitor of AGN showed after temporary adsorption on Ca Phosphate (CaP) massive self-AGN and changed to a promoter of CaOx AGN. Self-AGN after adsorption on surfaces especially of CaP, being an important compound of Randall's plaques, can thus explain this paradoxical behavior of UMs. Aggregated UMs probably bridge zones of electrostatic repulsion between UM-coated crystals with identical electrical surface charge. These zones extend by urine dilution which decreases ionic strength. Diminution of urinary concentration by increasing diuresis seems, therefore, to be important in stone metaphylaxis. PMID:26920852

  19. Natural Abundance 43Ca NMR as a Tool for Exploring Calcium Biomineralization: Renal Stone Formation and Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Kirkpatrick, Robert J.

    2011-12-07

    Renal stone diseases are a global health issue with little effective therapeutic recourse aside from surgery and shock-wave lithotripsy, primarily because the fundamental chemical mechanisms behind calcium biomineralization are poorly understood. In this work, we show that natural abundance 43Ca NMR at 21.1 T is an effective means to probe the molecular-level Ca2+ structure in oxalate-based kidney stones. We find that the 43Ca NMR resonance of an authentic oxalate-based kidney stone cannot be explained by a single pure phase of any common Ca2+-bearing stone mineral. Combined with XRD results, our findings suggest an altered calcium oxalate monohydrate-like Ca2+ coordination environment for some fraction of Ca2+ in our sample. The evidence is consistent with existing literature hypothesizing that nonoxalate organic material interacts directly with Ca2+ at stone surfaces and is the primary driver of renal stone aggregation and growth. Our findings show that 43Ca NMR spectroscopy may provide unique and crucial insight into the fundamental chemistry of kidney stone formation, growth, and the role organic molecules play in these processes.

  20. Calcium oxalate calculi-induced clusterin expression in kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Yi; Liu, Junjiang; Jiang, Junyi; Pumill, Chris; Elaiho, Cordelia; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Shoubin; Zhou, Tie

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clusterin expression in the kidney and evaluate the urine clusterin level in the kidney stone formers. (1) In vitro, we treated the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line with different concentrations of calcium oxalate (CaOx), and then the clusterin protein expression in the cells was evaluated by Western blotting. (2) Kidney stone patients who received percutaneous nephrolithotomy were enrolled in our study. Urine samples were collected before surgery, the kidney punctured to obtain kidney tissue guided by ultrasound intraoperatively. Clusterin expression in the human kidney tissue was evaluated by immunochemistry. The urine clusterin level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Non-kidney disease subjects were chosen as controls. In vitro, the clusterin expression was up-regulated in the MDCK cells induced by CaOx. The study included 49 patients and 41 non-kidney disease subjects. All calculi were composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate or calcium oxalate dihydrate and a few also contained protein or uric acid. Mean ± SD urine clusterin level was 17.47 ± 18.61 μg/ml in patients, and 3.31 ± 5.42 μg/ml in non-kidney disease subjects, respectively (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed the clusterin was located in the cytoplasm of the renal distal and collecting tubular epithelial cells. Also the tissue clusterin expression increased significantly in the kidney stone formers compared to the control groups (p = 0.001). CaOx could induce clusterin expression in renal tubular cells, and increase clusterin levels in the kidney and urine from the kidney stone formers.

  1. Using Helical CT to Predict Stone Fragility in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, James C. Jr.; Zarse, Chad A.; Jackson, Molly E.; McAteer, James A.; Lingeman, James E.

    2007-04-05

    Great variability exists in the response of urinary stones to SWL, and this is true even for stones composed of the same mineral. Efforts have been made to predict stone fragility to shock waves using computed tomography (CT) patient images, but most work to date has focused on the use of stone CT number (i.e., Hounsfield units). This is an easy number to measure on a patient stone, but its value depends on a number of factors, including the relationship of the size of the stone to me resolution (i.e., the slicewidth) of the CT scan. Studies that have shown a relationship between stone CT number and failure in SWL are reviewed, and all are shown to suffer from error due to stone size, which was not accounted for in the use of Hounsfield unit values. Preliminary data are then presented for a study of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, in which stone structure-rather than simple CT number values-is shown to correlate with fragility to shock waves. COM stones that were observed to have structure by micro CT (e.g., voids, apatite regions, unusual shapes) broke to completion in about half the number of shock waves required for COM stones that were observed to be homogeneous in structure by CT. This result suggests another direction for the use of CT in predicting success of SWL: the use of CT to view stone structure, rather than simply measuring stone CT number. Viewing stone structure by CT requires the use of different viewing windows than those typically used for examining patient scans, but much research to date indicates that stone structure can be observed in the clinical setting. Future clinical studies will need to be done to verify the relationship between stone structure observed by CT and stone fragility in SWL.

  2. Hyaluronan and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselman, Marino

    2008-09-01

    Kidney stones cannot be formed as long as crystals are passed in the urine. However, when crystals are retained it becomes possible for them to aggregate and form a stone. Crystals are expected to be formed not earlier than the distal tubules and collecting ducts. Studies both in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals do not adhere to intact distal epithelium, but only when the epithelium is proliferating or regenerating, so that it possesses dedifferentiated cells expressing hyaluronan, osteopontin (OPN) and their mutual receptor CD44 at the apical cell membrane. The polysaccharide hyaluronan is an excellent crystal binding molecule because of its negative ionic charge. We hypothesized that the risk for crystal retention in the human kidney would be increased when tubular cells express hyaluronan at their apical cell membrane. Two different patient categories in which nephrocalcinosis frequently occurs were studied to test this hypothesis (preterm neonates and kidney transplant patients). Hyaluronan (and OPN) expression at the luminal membrane of tubular cells indeed was observed, which preceded subsequent retention of crystals in the distal tubules. Tubular nephrocalcinosis has been reported to be associated with decline of renal function and thus further studies to extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of retention and accumulation of crystals in the kidney are warranted. Ultimately, this may allow the design of new strategies for the prevention and treatment of both nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis in patients.

  3. Physicochemical analysis of urinary stones from Dharmapuri district.

    PubMed

    Aslin Shamema, A; Thanigai Arul, K; Senthil Kumar, R; Narayana Kalkura, S

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease caused by the multifactorial components such as geographical location, bacterial infection, low urine volume, and low intake of water. This disease induces severe metabolic abnormalities in the human body. As the prevalence of this disease was high in Dharmapuri district located in Tamil Nadu, urinary stones removed from the patients pertaining to this district were collected and to identify the toxic elements present in the stones. The presence of functional groups and phases of the stones were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The majority of stones were found to be calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and mixed stones having minor existence of struvite and uric acid. Hexagonal shaped COM crystals, needle shaped uric acid crystals and layered arrangement of struvite crystals in the core region were revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to determine the thermal stability and the hardness of the stone which was measured using Vickers hardness (HV). The presence of toxic elements in stones such as zirconium and mercury was identified using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The EDS analysis showed higher concentration of zirconium in the core region compared to the periphery. The percentage of zirconium was relatively high compared to other toxic elements in the stones. The Vickers hardness results indicated that high HV values in the core region than the periphery and this might be due to the presence of zirconium.

  4. Physicochemical analysis of urinary stones from Dharmapuri district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslin Shamema, A.; Thanigai Arul, K.; Senthil Kumar, R.; Narayana Kalkura, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disease caused by the multifactorial components such as geographical location, bacterial infection, low urine volume, and low intake of water. This disease induces severe metabolic abnormalities in the human body. As the prevalence of this disease was high in Dharmapuri district located in Tamil Nadu, urinary stones removed from the patients pertaining to this district were collected and to identify the toxic elements present in the stones. The presence of functional groups and phases of the stones were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The majority of stones were found to be calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and mixed stones having minor existence of struvite and uric acid. Hexagonal shaped COM crystals, needle shaped uric acid crystals and layered arrangement of struvite crystals in the core region were revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to determine the thermal stability and the hardness of the stone which was measured using Vickers hardness (HV). The presence of toxic elements in stones such as zirconium and mercury was identified using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The EDS analysis showed higher concentration of zirconium in the core region compared to the periphery. The percentage of zirconium was relatively high compared to other toxic elements in the stones. The Vickers hardness results indicated that high HV values in the core region than the periphery and this might be due to the presence of zirconium.

  5. Rapid vaporization of kidney stones, ex vivo, using a Thulium fiber laser at pulse rates up to 500 Hz with a stone basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser (λ = 2120 nm) is currently the preferred laser for fragmenting kidney stones in the clinic. However, this laser has some limitations, including operation at low pulse rates and a multimode spatial beam profile which prohibits its use with smaller, more flexible optical fibers. Our laboratory is studying the Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1908 nm) as an alternative lithotripter. The TFL has several advantages, including lower stone ablation thresholds, use with smaller and more flexible fibers, and operation at arbitrary pulse lengths and pulse rates. Previous studies have reported increased stone ablation rates with TFL operation at higher pulse rates, however, stone retropulsion remains an obstacle to even more efficient stone ablation. This study explores TFL operation at high pulse rates in combination with a stone stabilization device (e.g. stone basket) for improved efficiency. A TFL beam with pulse energy of 35 mJ, pulse duration of 500-μs, and pulse rates of 10-500 Hz was coupled into 100-μm-core, low-OH, silica fibers, in contact mode with uric acid and calcium oxalate monohydrate stones, ex vivo. TFL operation at 500 Hz produced UA and COM stone ablation rates up to 5.0 mg/s and 1.3 mg/s, respectively. High TFL pulse rates produced increased stone ablation rates sufficient for use in the clinic.

  6. Percutaneous debulking of staghorn stones combined with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: results and complications.

    PubMed

    Puppo, P; Bottino, P; Germinale, F; Caviglia, C; Ricciotti, G; Giuliani, L

    1988-01-01

    The results and complications of 122 percutaneous debulking of staghorn stones are carefully reviewed, discriminating between dilated and not dilated kidneys. Percutaneous debulking can be defined as satisfactory in about 70% of the cases. In the remaining 30% of the cases (mostly not dilated kidneys) it has got little or no results. The overall complication rate is quite low and most of the common complications can be prevented. Percutaneous procedures in nondilated kidneys have an overall complication rate highly superior to that in dilated kidneys. It should be preferable to treat as many staghorn stones as possible in nondilated kidneys with staged extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) monotherapy, stenting the ureter and monitoring the urinary infection. Struvite stones are best suitable for stented ESWL because of their fragility. In case of cystine or oxalate monohydrate staghorn stone open surgery might be preferable in virgin patients, but it is often refused by the patients.

  7. Relevance of dietary protein concentration and quality as risk factors for the formation of calcium oxalate stones in cats.

    PubMed

    Paßlack, Nadine; Burmeier, Hannes; Brenten, Thomas; Neumann, Konrad; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary protein for the development of feline calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths has not been conclusively clarified. The present study evaluated the effects of a varying dietary protein concentration and quality on critical indices for the formation of CaOx uroliths. Three diets with a high protein quality (10-11 % greaves meal/diet) and a varying crude protein (CP) concentration (35, 44 and 57 % in DM) were compared. Additionally, the 57 % CP diet was compared with a fourth diet that had a similar CP concentration (55 % in DM), but a lower protein quality (34 % greaves meal/diet). The Ca and oxalate (Ox) concentrations were similar in all diets. A group of eight cats received the same diet at the same time. Each feeding period was divided into a 21 d adaptation period and a 7 d sampling period to collect urine. There were increases in urinary volume, urinary Ca concentrations, renal Ca and Ox excretion and urinary relative supersaturation (RSS) with CaOx with increasing dietary protein concentrations. Urinary pH ranged between 6·34 and 6·66 among all groups, with no unidirectional effect of dietary protein. Lower renal Ca excretion was observed when feeding the diet with the lower protein quality, however, the underlying mechanism needs further evaluation. In conclusion, although the observed higher urinary volume is beneficial, the increase in urinary Ca concentrations, renal Ca and Ox excretion and urinary RSS CaOx associated with a high-protein diet may be critical for the development of CaOx uroliths in cats.

  8. Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, Charles R.; Coburn, Jack W.; Brickman, Arnold S.; Lee, David B. N.; Narins, Robert G.; Ehrlich, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones has steadily risen during this century; passage of a calculus and a positive family history increase the probability of recurrence. Findings from recent studies on the cause of renal calculi have stressed crystallization and crystal aggregation of stone minerals from supersaturated urine, rather than excessive organic matrix. Absence of normal urine inhibitors of calcium salts is also stressed. Formation of calcium oxalate stones is the major problem. Therapy with decreased calcium and oxalate intake, thiazides, phosphate salts and allopurinol in various combinations has substantially decreased the prevalence of recurrent stones. The rationale for the use of allopurinol is that uric acid salts enhance the tendency for calcium oxalate to crystallize from supersaturated urine. The hypercalciuria seen in 30 percent to 40 percent of patients with oxalate stones is usually caused by intestinal hyperabsorption of calcium. Although patients with uric acid calculi constitute only a small fraction of those in whom stones form, they represent a group in whom good medical therapy, based on sound physiologic principles, has proved extremely successful. Renal tubular syndromes lead to nephrocalcinosis and lithiasis through hypercalciuria, alkaline urine and hypocitraturia, the latter an inhibitor of calcium salt precipitation. Recent advances in surgical techniques are discussed, including the rationale for removing staghorn calculi. The ileal ureter and coagulum pyelolithotomy deserve special emphasis. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 7. PMID:7385835

  9. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  10. Lysergol monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Stefan; Köppen, Robert; Koch, Matthias; Emmerling, Franziska; Nehls, Irene

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound [systematic name: (7-methyl-4,6,6a,7,8,9-hexa­hydro­indolo[4,3,2-fg]quinoline-9-yl)methanol monohydrate], C16H18N2O·H2O, the non-aromatic ring (ring C of the ergoline skeleton) directly fused to the aromatic rings is nearly planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.659 (3) Å, and shows an envelope conformation. In the crystal, hydrogen bonds between the lysergol and water mol­ecules contribute to the formation of layers parallel to (10). PMID:22347120

  11. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined.

  12. Solubility of the Sodium and Ammonium Salts of Oxalic Acid in Water with Ammonium Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Buttke, Lukas G; Schueller, Justin R; Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2016-08-18

    The solubility of the sodium and ammonium salts of oxalic acid in water with ammonium sulfate present has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray crystallography, and infrared spectroscopy. The crystals that form from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium hydrogen oxalate were determined to be sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate under low ammonium sulfate conditions and ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate under high ammonium sulfate conditions. Crystals from aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate/sodium oxalate were determined to be ammonium oxalate monohydrate under moderate to high ammonium sulfate concentrations and sodium oxalate under low ammonium sulfate concentrations. It was also found that ammonium sulfate enhances the solubility of the sodium oxalate salts (salting in effect) and decreases the solubility of the ammonium oxalate salts (salting out effect). In addition, a partial phase diagram for the ammonium hydrogen oxalate/water system was determined. PMID:27482644

  13. Exploring Calcium Oxalate Crystallization: A Constant Composition Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M.; Kleinman, Jack G.; Wesson, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Crystal growth rates have been extensively studied in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization, because COM crystals are the principal component in most kidney stones. Constant composition methods are useful for studying growth rates, but fail to differentiate concurrent nucleation and aggregation events. A constant composition method coupled with particle size determinations that addresses this deficiency was previously published for a calcium phosphate system, and this method was extended to COM crystallization in this report. A seeded constant composition experiment was combined with particle size determination and a separate near-equilibrium aggregation experiment to separate effects of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation in COM crystal formation and to test the effects of various inhibitors relevant to stone formation. With no inhibitors present, apparent COM growth rates were heavily influenced by secondary nucleation at low seed crystal additions, but growth-related aggregation increased at higher seed crystal densities. Among small molecule inhibitors, citrate demonstrated growth rate inhibition but enhanced growth-related aggregation, while magnesium did not affect COM crystallization. Polyanions (polyaspartate, polyglutamate, or osteopontin) showed strong growth rate inhibition, but large differences in nucleation and aggregation were observed. Polycations (polyarginine) did not affect COM crystal growth or aggregation. Mixtures of polyanions and polycations produced a complicated set of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation behaviors. These experiments demonstrated the power of combining particle size determinations with constant composition experiments to fully characterize COM crystallization and to obtain detailed knowledge of inhibitor properties that will be critical to understanding kidney stone formation. PMID:26016572

  14. Exploring calcium oxalate crystallization: a constant composition approach.

    PubMed

    Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M; Kleinman, Jack G; Wesson, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Crystal growth rates have been extensively studied in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization, because COM crystals are the principal component in most kidney stones. Constant composition methods are useful for studying growth rates, but fail to differentiate concurrent nucleation and aggregation events. A constant composition method coupled with particle size determinations that addresses this deficiency was previously published for a calcium phosphate system, and this method was extended to COM crystallization in this report. A seeded constant composition experiment was combined with particle size determination and a separate near-equilibrium aggregation experiment to separate effects of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation in COM crystal formation and to test the effects of various inhibitors relevant to stone formation. With no inhibitors present, apparent COM growth rates were heavily influenced by secondary nucleation at low seed crystal additions, but growth-related aggregation increased at higher seed crystal densities. Among small molecule inhibitors, citrate demonstrated growth rate inhibition but enhanced growth-related aggregation, while magnesium did not affect COM crystallization. Polyanions (polyaspartate, polyglutamate, or osteopontin) showed strong growth rate inhibition, but large differences in nucleation and aggregation were observed. Polycations (polyarginine) did not affect COM crystal growth or aggregation. Mixtures of polyanions and polycations produced a complicated set of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation behaviors. These experiments demonstrated the power of combining particle size determinations with constant composition experiments to fully characterize COM crystallization and to obtain detailed knowledge of inhibitor properties that will be critical to understanding kidney stone formation.

  15. Isovaline monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Ray J; Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P

    2013-11-27

    The title compound, C5H11NO2·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid valine that crystallizes from water in its zwitterion form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has no α-H atom. The compound exhibits hydrogen bonding between the water mol-ecule and the carboxyl-ate O atoms and an amine H atom. In addition, there are inter-molecular hydrogen-bonding inter-actions between the carboxyl-ate O atoms and amine H atoms. In the crystal, these extensive N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds lead to the formation of a three-dimensional network. PMID:24454253

  16. Effect of different cooking methods on vegetable oxalate content.

    PubMed

    Chai, Weiwen; Liebman, Michael

    2005-04-20

    Approximately 75% of all kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate, and hyperoxaluria is a primary risk factor for this disorder. Nine types of raw and cooked vegetables were analyzed for oxalate using an enzymatic method. There was a high proportion of water-soluble oxalate in most of the tested raw vegetables. Boiling markedly reduced soluble oxalate content by 30-87% and was more effective than steaming (5-53%) and baking (used only for potatoes, no oxalate loss). An assessment of the oxalate content of cooking water used for boiling and steaming revealed an approximately 100% recovery of oxalate losses. The losses of insoluble oxalate during cooking varied greatly, ranging from 0 to 74%. Because soluble sources of oxalate appear to be better absorbed than insoluble sources, employing cooking methods that significantly reduce soluble oxalate may be an effective strategy for decreasing oxaluria in individuals predisposed to the development of kidney stones.

  17. Effect of supersaturation ratio and Khella extract on nucleation and morphology of kidney stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, E. A.; Daosukho, S.; El-Shall, H.

    2009-04-01

    Induction times in supersaturated calcium oxalate (CaOx)-the major component of most kidney stones-solutions were determined at 37 °C using UV-vis spectrometry with and without Khella extract. The slope of the light absorbance measurement curve indicated the inhibition of calcium oxalate nucleation with Khella extract. The induction time was estimated from the time vs. absorbance curve. Khella seeds were obtained from two sources, one in Turkey and one in Egypt. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) results showed that only Turkish Khella extract contained khellin and visnagin that are believed to be the active components of the herb. Both extracts contained calcium, magnesium, and oxalate. It was found that both Khella extracts reduced the induction time at every supersaturation ratio. Using an equation that relates induction times and supersaturation ratios, free energy barrier, and critical nuclei radius were calculated. The results revealed that decrease of free energy barrier and critical nuclei radius as supersaturation ratio increased. In addition, the calculated surface energy of calcium oxalate crystals was decreased from 9.01 to 6.79 and 6.40 mJ/m2 with Egyptian Khella extract and Turkish Khella extract, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs showed that the control supersaturated CaOx solutions produced CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystals. With the addition of Khella extract, the resulting crystals were modified to calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) form.

  18. Acute oxalate nephropathy caused by ethylene glycol poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jung Woong; Lee, Jong-Ho; Son, In Sung; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Do Young; Hwang, Yong; Chung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Hong Seok; Lim, So Dug

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is a sweet-tasting, odorless organic solvent found in many agents, such as anti-freeze. EG is composed of four organic acids: glycoaldehyde, glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid and oxalic acid in vivo. These metabolites are cellular toxins that can cause cardio-pulmonary failure, life-threatening metabolic acidosis, central nervous system depression, and kidney injury. Oxalic acid is the end product of EG, which can precipitate to crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the tubular lumen and has been linked to acute kidney injury. We report a case of EG-induced oxalate nephropathy, with the diagnosis confirmed by kidney biopsy, which showed acute tubular injury of the kidneys with extensive intracellular and intraluminal calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal depositions. PMID:26889430

  19. [Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in patients with the long-term presence of stones in the ureter].

    PubMed

    Stepanov, V N; Perel'man, V M; Kadyrov, Z A

    1996-01-01

    28 patients with long-standing ureteroliths (present in the ureter for 2 months and longer, size 0.8-1.5 cm) were exposed to extracorporeal impulse lithotripsy (EIL). 26 of them were found to have inflammation in the kidneys and upper urinary tracts. Comparative data on EIL effect show that patients with long-standing ureteroliths need more intensive and long EIL treatment, that fragmentation is more troublesome in oxalate monohydrates and phosphate stones with hydroxylapatite. 4 cases eventuated in operative intervention, in 3 cases ureterolith extraction was performed. EIL results in long-standing ureteroliths depend on the presence of renal and urinary tract inflammation, severity of periureteritis, chemical composition, density and structure of the stones.

  20. Crystal structure and spectroscopic analysis of a new oxalate-bridged Mn(II) compound: catena-poly[guanidinium [[aqua-chlorido-manganese(II)]-μ2-oxalato-κ(4) O (1),O (2):O (1'),O (2')] monohydrate].

    PubMed

    Sehimi, Hiba; Chérif, Ichraf; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi

    2016-05-01

    As part of our studies on the synthesis and the characterization of oxalate-bridged compounds M-ox-M (ox = oxalate dianion and M = transition metal ion), we report the crystal structure of a new oxalate-bridged Mn(II) phase, {(CH6N3)[Mn(C2O4)Cl(H2O)]·H2O} n . In the compound, a succession of Mn(II) ions (situated on inversion centers) adopting a distorted octa-hedral coordination and bridged by oxalate ligands forms parallel zigzag chains running along the c axis. These chains are inter-connected through O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions to form anionic layers parallel to (010). Individual layers are held together via strong hydrogen bonds involving the guanidinium cations (N-H⋯O and N-H⋯Cl) and the disordered non-coordinating water mol-ecule (O-H⋯O and O-H⋯Cl), as well as by guanidinium π-π stacking. The structural data were confirmed by IR and UV-Visible spectroscopic analysis. PMID:27308028

  1. Estimation of the oxalate content of foods and daily oxalate intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Kennedy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate ingested may be an important risk factor in the development of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Reliable food tables listing the oxalate content of foods are currently not available. The aim of this research was to develop an accurate and reliable method to measure the food content of oxalate. METHODS: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) were compared as direct techniques for the estimation of the oxalate content of foods. Foods were thoroughly homogenized in acid, heat extracted, and clarified by centrifugation and filtration before dilution in water for analysis. Five individuals consuming self-selected diets maintained food records for three days to determine their mean daily oxalate intakes. RESULTS: Both techniques were capable of adequately measuring the oxalate in foods with a significant oxalate content. With foods of very low oxalate content (<1.8 mg/100 g), IC was more reliable than CE. The mean daily intake of oxalate by the five individuals tested was 152 +/- 83 mg, ranging from 44 to 352 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: CE appears to be the method of choice over IC for estimating the oxalate content of foods with a medium (>10 mg/100 g) to high oxalate content due to a faster analysis time and lower running costs, whereas IC may be better suited for the analysis of foods with a low oxalate content. Accurate estimates of the oxalate content of foods should permit the role of dietary oxalate in urinary oxalate excretion and stone formation to be clarified. Other factors, apart from the amount of oxalate ingested, appear to exert a major influence over the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.

  2. Modulation of calcium oxalate crystallization by proteins and small molecules investigated by In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, S. R.; Orme, C. A.; Zepeda, S.; Cody, A. M.; Wierzbicki, A.; Hoyer, J. R.; Nancollas, G. H.; de Yoreo, J. J.

    2003-03-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) is known to be a source of pathogenesis in humans where it causes kidney stone disease. The basic modulation of COM by proteins and small molecules mechanism is not well understood. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor the COM surface morphology and growth dynamics under controlled growth conditions from pure solutions and those doped with citrate and osteopontin (OPN). AFM results show that OPN, like citrate, inhibits growth on the (-101) face through a step pinning mechanism, especially in the [-10-1] direction. We propose a model that reconciles the step-specific interactions implied by the AFM results with the face-specific predictions of the calculations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  3. Crystal aggregation in kidney stones; a polymer aggregation problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Beshensky, A.; Viswanathan, P.; Zachowicz, W.; Kleinman, J.

    2008-03-01

    Kidney stones most frequently form as aggregates of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with organic layers between them, and the organic layers contain principally proteins. The pathway leading to the formation of these crystal aggregates in affected people has not been identified, but stone forming patients are thought to have a defect in the structure or distribution of urinary proteins, which normally protect against stone formation. We have developed two polyelectrolyte models that will induce COM crystal aggregation in vitro, and both are consistent with possible urinary protein compositions. The first model was based on mixing polyanionic and polycationic proteins, in portions such that the combined protein charge is near zero. The second model was based on reducing the charge density on partially charged polyanionic proteins, specifically Tamm-Horsfall protein, the second most abundant protein in urine. Both models demonstrated polymer phase separation at solution conditions where COM crystal aggregation was observed. Correlation with data from other bulk crystallization measurements suggest that the anionic side chains form critical binding interactions with COM surfaces that are necessary along with the phase separation process to induce COM crystal aggregation.

  4. Crystallization kinetics of calcium oxalate hydrates studied by scanning confocal interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohe, Bernd; Rogers, Kem A.; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Hunter, Graeme K.

    2006-10-01

    Scanning confocal interference microscopy (SCIM) is an optical technique that allows the visualization of structures below the limits of classical optical microscopy (≪250 nm). This study represents the first use of SCIM to analyze the formation of calcium oxalate crystals, the major constituent of kidney stones. Crystals were nucleated and grown on the glass bottom of Petri dishes in the presence and absence of the polyelectrolyte inhibitor poly- L-aspartic acid (poly-asp). In the absence of poly-asp, monoclinic calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleated from {1 0 0} or {0 1 0} faces. The first observed particles were 70-120 nm in diameter and grew by a step-like progression in the [0 0 1] and [0 1 0] directions. Addition of poly-asp had several effects on calcium oxalate formation. First, the number of particles was increased, but their sizes were decreased. Second, the rate of COM growth in the [0 0 1] direction was decreased to a greater extent than the rate along [0 1 0]. Third, the formation of tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals was favored. Fourth, the rates of COD growth along <1 1 0> and allied directions were decreased, whereas that parallel to <0 0 1> is increased. Sequences of highly resolved growth fronts show step displacement for COM and moving crystal edges for COD. Analysis of image sequences suggested that growth is strongly affected by competing and alternating processes, in which diffusion processes are rate-limiting and induce nonlinear growth. This study shows that SCIM is a powerful technique for the quantitative analysis of crystallization processes and for determining the mode of action of inhibitors.

  5. Effects of vitamin E ingestion on plasma and urinary risk factors for calcium oxalate urolithiasis in two population groups having different stone-risk profiles: evidence of different physiological handling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Theka, Takalani; Rodgers, Allen; Lewandowski, Sonja; Webber, Dawn; Allie-Hamdulay, Shameez

    2012-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that vitamin E supplementation reduces calciuria and oxaluria and that it may also prevent oxalate-mediated peroxidative injury, all of which reduce the risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In view of the significant difference in stone occurrence in black (B) and white (W) South Africans, we undertook to investigate the effects of vitamin E supplementation in subjects from these two groups. Five healthy males from each group ingested one capsule (400 IU) of vitamin E daily for 60 days. Blood and 24 h urine samples were collected at baseline and on day 60; 24 h dietary questionnaires were simultaneously completed. Urine composition was determined by routine analyses. Urinary and plasma TBARS were determined using a commercially available assay kit while plasma vitamin E was determined by reverse phase HPLC. Plasma vitamin E increased significantly in W but not in B. Urinary and plasma TBARS did not increase in either group. Urinary citrate increased significantly in both groups but the percentage increase in W (169%) was greater than that in B (82%). No other urinary parameter changed significantly. The increase in plasma vitamin E in W but not in B suggests either that the mechanism by which it is packaged into chylomicrons, which are secreted into the systemic circulation, is suppressed in the latter group or that it is differentially absorbed in the two groups. Similarly, to explain the greater increase in citraturia in W compared to B, we speculate that inhibition of lipogenesis of arachidonic acid by vitamin E, ultimately leading to an increase in citraturia, occurs to a lesser extent in B than in W.

  6. Biomimetic growth of calcium oxalate crystals: synchrotron X-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Ahmet; Stripe, Benjamin; Dutta, Pulak

    2010-03-01

    Oriented crystals of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) form one of the major constituents of kidney stones in humans, and these crystals are also found in many plants. It is widely accepted that an organic matrix of lipids and proteins is involved in the crystallization of COM, though their role is not well-understood [1]. Langmuir monolayers of lipids on supersaturated aqueous solutions can be used to mimic the lipid-crystal interface during mineralization. We have studied nucleation and growth of COM crystals under heneicosanoic acid monolayers at the air-water interface. We used synchrotron x-rays in the grazing incidence geometry to determine the structure of the organic monolayer and the orientation of COM crystals in-situ during crystallization. We see that the (-101) faces of COM crystals are parallel to the organic matrix. There is a commensurate relationship between the heneicosanoic acid monolayer and the (-101) crystal face that may be responsible from the oriented growth. Evolution of the monolayer structure with time will be described. [1]S. R. Khan, Calcium Oxalate in Biological Systems, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1995

  7. Stone Composition as a Function of Age and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Andrew D.; Krambeck, Amy E.; Williams, James C.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Mehta, Ramila A.; Moyer, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Kidney stones are heterogeneous but often grouped together. The potential effects of patient demographics and calendar month (season) on stone composition are not widely appreciated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The first stone submitted by patients for analysis to the Mayo Clinic Metals Laboratory during 2010 was studied (n=43,545). Stones were classified in the following order: any struvite, any cystine, any uric acid, any brushite, majority (≥50%) calcium oxalate, or majority (≥50%) hydroxyapatite. Results Calcium oxalate (67%) was the most common followed by hydroxyapatite (16%), uric acid (8%), struvite (3%), brushite (0.9%), and cystine (0.35%). Men accounted for more stone submissions (58%) than women. However, women submitted more stones than men between the ages of 10–19 (63%) and 20–29 (62%) years. Women submitted the majority of hydroxyapatite (65%) and struvite (65%) stones, whereas men submitted the majority of calcium oxalate (64%) and uric acid (72%) stones (P<0.001). Although calcium oxalate stones were the most common type of stone overall, hydroxyapatite stones were the second most common before age 55 years, whereas uric acid stones were the second most common after age 55 years. More calcium oxalate and uric acid stones were submitted in the summer months (July and August; P<0.001), whereas the season did not influence other stone types. Conclusions It is well known that calcium oxalate stones are the most common stone type. However, age and sex have a marked influence on the type of stone formed. The higher number of stones submitted by women compared with men between the ages of 10 and 29 years old and the change in composition among the elderly favoring uric acid have not been widely appreciated. These data also suggest increases in stone risk during the summer, although this is restricted to calcium oxalate and uric acid stones. PMID:25278549

  8. Oxalobacter sp. reduces urinary oxalate excretion by promoting enteric oxalate secretion.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M; Cornelius, J; Allison, M; Sidhu, H; Peck, A; Freel, R W

    2006-02-01

    The primary goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that Oxalobacter colonization alters colonic oxalate transport thereby reducing urinary oxalate excretion. In addition, we examined the effects of intraluminal calcium on Oxalobacter colonization and tested the hypothesis that endogenously derived colonic oxalate could be degraded by lyophilized Oxalobacter enzymes targeted to this segment of the alimentary tract. Oxalate fluxes were measured across short-circuited, in vitro preparations of proximal and distal colon removed from Sprague-Dawley rats and placed in Ussing chambers. For these studies, rats were colonized with Oxalobacter either artificially or naturally, and urinary oxalate, creatinine and calcium excretions were determined. Colonized rats placed on various dietary treatment regimens were used to evaluate the impact of calcium on Oxalobacter colonization and whether exogenous or endogenous oxalate influenced colonization. Hyperoxaluric rats with some degree of renal insufficiency were also used to determine the effects of administering encapsulated Oxalobacter lysate on colonic oxalate transport and urinary oxalate excretion. We conclude that in addition to its intraluminal oxalate-degrading capacity, Oxalobacter interacts physiologically with colonic mucosa by inducing enteric oxalate secretion/excretion leading to reduced urinary excretion. Whether Oxalobacter, or products of Oxalobacter, can therapeutically reduce urinary oxalate excretion and influence stone disease warrants further investigation in long-term studies in various patient populations. PMID:16518326

  9. Alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells serves as a calcium oxalate crystal receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fong-ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    To search for a strategy to prevent kidney stone formation/recurrence, this study addressed the role of α-enolase on apical membrane of renal tubular cells in mediating calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal adhesion. Its presence on apical membrane and in COM crystal-bound fraction was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Pretreating MDCK cells with anti-α-enolase antibody, not isotype-controlled IgG, dramatically reduced cell-crystal adhesion. Immunofluorescence staining also confirmed the direct binding of purified α-enolase to COM crystals at {121} > {100} > {010} crystal faces. Coating COM crystals with urinary proteins diminished the crystal binding capacity to cells and purified α-enolase. Moreover, α-enolase selectively bound to COM, not other crystals. Chemico-protein interactions analysis revealed that α-enolase interacted directly with Ca2+ and Mg2+. Incubating the cells with Mg2+ prior to cell-crystal adhesion assay significantly reduced crystal binding on the cell surface, whereas preincubation with EDTA, a divalent cation chelator, completely abolished Mg2+ effect, indicating that COM and Mg2+ competitively bind to α-enolase. Taken together, we successfully confirmed the role of α-enolase as a COM crystal receptor to mediate COM crystal adhesion at apical membrane of renal tubular cells. It may also serve as a target for stone prevention by blocking cell-crystal adhesion and stone nidus formation. PMID:27796334

  10. Flow-driven pattern formation in the calcium-oxalate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohner, Bíborka; Endrődi, Balázs; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2016-04-01

    The precipitation reaction of calcium oxalate is studied experimentally in the presence of spatial gradients by controlled flow of calcium into oxalate solution. The density difference between the reactants leads to strong convection in the form of a gravity current that drives the spatiotemporal pattern formation. The phase diagram of the system is constructed, the evolving precipitate patterns are analyzed and quantitatively characterized by their diameters and the average height of the gravity flow. The compact structures of calcium oxalate monohydrate produced at low flow rates are replaced by the thermodynamically unstable calcium oxalate dihydrate favored in the presence of a strong gravity current.

  11. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  12. Evidence that serum calcium oxalate supersaturation is a consequence of oxalate retention in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Worcester, E M; Nakagawa, Y; Bushinsky, D A; Coe, F L

    1986-01-01

    Serum oxalate rises in uremia because of decreased renal clearance, and crystals of calcium oxalate occur in the tissues of uremic patients. Crystal formation suggests that either uremic serum is supersaturated with calcium oxalate, or local oxalate production or accumulation causes regional supersaturation. To test the first alternative, we ultrafiltered uremic serum and measured supersaturation with two different methods previously used to study supersaturation in urine. First, the relative saturation ratio (RSR), the ratio of the dissolved calcium oxalate complex to the thermodynamic calcium oxalate solubility product, was estimated for 11 uremic (before and after dialysis) and 4 normal serum samples using a computer program. Mean ultrafiltrate oxalate predialysis was 89 +/- 8 microM/liter (+/- SEM), 31 +/- 4 postdialysis, and 10 +/- 3 in normals. Mean RSR was 1.7 +/- 0.1 (predialysis), 0.7 +/- 0.1 (postdialysis), and 0.2 +/- 0.1 (normal), where values greater than 1 denote supersaturation, less than 1, undersaturation. Second, the concentration product ratio (CPR), the ratio of the measured calcium oxalate concentration product before to that after incubation of the sample with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal, was measured in seven uremic and seven normal serum ultrafiltrates. Mean oxalate was 91 +/- 11 (uremic) and 8 +/- 3 (normal). Mean CPR was 1.4 +/- 0.2 (uremic) and 0.2 +/- 0.1 (normal). Predialysis, 17 of 18 uremic ultrafiltrates were supersaturated with respect to calcium oxalate. The degree of supersaturation was correlated with ultrafiltrate oxalate (RSR, r = 0.99, r = 29, P less than 0.001; CPR, r = 0.75, n = 11, P less than 0.001). A value of ultrafiltrate oxalate of 50 microM/liter separated undersaturated from supersaturated samples and occurred at a creatinine of approximately 9.0 mg/dl. PMID:3711339

  13. In vivo oxalate degradation by liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in rat model of hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Tulika; Pundir, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: High level of urinary oxalate substantially increases the risk of hyperoxaluria, a significant risk factor for urolithiasis. The primary goal of this study was to reduce urinary oxalate excretion employing liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in animal model. Methods: A membrane bound oxalate oxidase was purified from Bougainvillea leaves. The enzyme in its native form was less effective at the physiological pH of the recipient animal. To increase its functional viability, the enzyme was immobilized on to ethylene maleic anhydride (EMA). Rats were injected with liposome encapsulated EMA- oxalate oxidase and the effect was observed on degradation of oxalic acid. Results: The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity with 60-fold purification and 31 per cent yield. The optimum pH of EMA-derivative enzyme was 6.0 and it showed 70 per cent of its optimal activity at pH 7.0. The EMA-bound enzyme encapsulated into liposome showed greater oxalate degradation in 15 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats as compared with 30 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats and control rats. Interpretation & conclusions: EMA-oxalate oxidase encapsulated liposome caused oxalate degradation in experimental hyperoxaluria indicating that the enzyme could be used as a therapeutic agent in hyperoxaluria leading to urinary stones. PMID:23481063

  14. Urinary stones as a novel matrix for human biomonitoring of toxic and essential elements.

    PubMed

    Kuta, J; Smetanová, S; Benová, D; Kořistková, T; Machát, J

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring of body burden of toxic elements is usually based on analysis of concentration of particular elements in blood, urine and/or hair. Analysis of these matrices, however, predominantly reflects short- or medium-term exposure to trace elements or pollutants. In this work, urinary stones were investigated as a matrix for monitoring long-term exposure to toxic and essential elements. A total of 431 samples of urinary calculi were subjected to mineralogical and elemental analysis by infrared spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The effect of mineralogical composition of the stones and other parameters such as sex, age and geographical location on contents of trace and minor elements is presented. Our results demonstrate the applicability of such approach and confirm that the analysis of urinary calculi can be helpful in providing complementary information on human exposure to trace metals and their excretion. Analysis of whewellite stones (calcium oxalate monohydrate) with content of phosphorus <0.6 % has been proved to be a promising tool for biomonitoring of trace and minor elements.

  15. Histopathology Predicts the Mechanism of Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life and these numbers appear to be on the rise. Despite years of scientific research into the mechanisms of stone formation and growth, limited advances have been made until recently. Randall's original observations and thoughts on the mechanisms for kidney stone formation have been validated for idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) but not for most other stone forming groups. Our current studies on selected groups of human stone formers using intraoperative papillary biopsies has shown overwhelming evidence for the presence of Randall's plaque in ICSF and that stone formation and growth are exclusively linked to its availability to urinary ions and proteins. Intense investigation of the plaque-stone junction is needed if we are to understand the factors leading to the overgrowth process on exposed regions of plaque. Such information should allow the development of treatment strategies to block stone formation in ICSF patients. Patients who form brushite stones, or who form apatite stones because of distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), or patients with calcium oxalate stones due to obesity bypass procedures, or patients with cystinuria, get plugged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) which leads to total destruction of the lining cells and focal sites of interstitial fibrosis. These stone formers have plaque but at levels equal to or below non-stone formers, which would suggest that they form stones by a different mechanism than do ICSF patients.

  16. Kidney Stones: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney stones are caused by high levels of calcium, oxalate, and phosphorus in the urine. Some foods may ... consume of the following: • liquids • sodium • animal protein • calcium • oxalate Drinking enough liquids each day is the best ...

  17. Nutritional aspects of stone disease.

    PubMed

    Hess, Bernhard

    2002-12-01

    Kidney stones can form during a state of urinary supersaturation. Because urine often is supersaturated with respect to various salts, crystal formation is very common in nonstone formers and stone formers alike, and it may even be absent in kidney stone formers. Thus, uncomplicated crystalluria does not distinguish between stone formers and healthy people. Landmark clinical studies, however, have shown that under identical conditions of dietary and fluid intake, healthy controls almost exclusively excrete single calcium oxalate crystals 3 to 4 microns in diameter, whereas recurrent calcium stone formers pass larger crystals, 10 to 12 microns in diameter, often fused into polycrystalline aggregates 20 to 300 microns in diameter. Thus, those who form stones appear to be more "sensitive" to a given diet than nonstone formers. It is in these subjects that "bad dietary habits" induce nephrolithiasis, making nutritional aspects important. This article reviews the current evidence-based knowledge of the impact of nutrition on the recurrence of a kidney stone.

  18. Role of nanobacteria in the pathogenesis of kidney stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Tian; Yu, Chengfan; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the nanobacteria (NB) induced damage to human tubular epithelial HK-2 cells and the potential role of NB in the kidney stone formation. Methods: Serum sample from 15 patients with kidney stone was collected. Four groups were included: control, NB group, nanograde hydroxyapatite (nHAP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) group. Catalase (CAT), malonaldehyde (MDA) and Na+/K+ ATPase activity was detected in the supernatant at 12 and 24 h. At 12 and 24 h, COM was added. Results: At 12 h and 24 h, the CAT in NB group was significantly higher than in control group and nHAP group (P<0.01). CAT at 24 h was significantly higher than in COM group (P<0.01). At 12 h and 24 h, the MDA in NB group was significantly higher than in control group and nHAP group (P<0.01) and significantly lower than in COM group (P<0.01). At 12 h, the Na+/K+ ATPase activity in NB group and nHAP group was significantly lower than in control group, but dramatically increased as compared to COM group (P<0.01). At 24 h, the Na+/K+ ATPase activity in NB group and nHAP group was significantly lower than in control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: NB may induce lipid peroxidation in HK-2 cells and cause adhesion of HK-2 cells to COM in a time-dependent manner, resulting in damage to HK-2 cells. This injury-causing capability of NB is more potent than nHAP and might be involved in the pathogenesis of kidney stone formation. PMID:27508044

  19. Oxalobacter formigenes Colonization and Oxalate Dynamics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingsheng; Ellis, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Animal and human studies have provided compelling evidence that colonization of the intestine with Oxalobacter formigenes reduces urinary oxalate excretion and lowers the risk of forming calcium oxalate kidney stones. The mechanism providing protection appears to be related to the unique ability of O. formigenes to rely on oxalate as a major source of carbon and energy for growth. However, much is not known about the factors that influence colonization and host-bacterium interactions. We have colonized mice with O. formigenes OxCC13 and systematically investigated the impacts of diets with different levels of calcium and oxalate on O. formigenes intestinal densities and urinary and intestinal oxalate levels. Measurement of intestinal oxalate levels in mice colonized or not colonized with O. formigenes demonstrated the highly efficient degradation of soluble oxalate by O. formigenes relative to other microbiota. The ratio of calcium to oxalate in diets was important in determining colonization densities and conditions where urinary oxalate and fecal oxalate excretion were modified, and the results were consistent with those from studies we have performed with colonized and noncolonized humans. The use of low-oxalate purified diets showed that 80% of animals retained O. formigenes colonization after a 1-week dietary oxalate deprivation. Animals not colonized with O. formigenes excreted two times more oxalate in feces than they had ingested. This nondietary source of oxalate may play an important role in the survival of O. formigenes during periods of dietary oxalate deprivation. These studies suggest that the mouse will be a useful model to further characterize interactions between O. formigenes and the host and factors that impact colonization. PMID:25979889

  20. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallisation in vitro by an extract of Bergenia ciliata

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sarmistha; Verma, Ramtej J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an extract obtained from the rhizomes of Bergenia ciliata (Saxifragaceae) on the inhibition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallisation in vitro. Materials and methods A hydro-alcoholic extract (30:70, v/v) of rhizomes of B. ciliata was prepared at different concentrations (1–10 mg/mL). The crystallisation of CaOx monohydrate (COM) was induced in a synthetic urine system. The nucleation and aggregation of COM crystals were measured using spectrophotometric methods. The rates of nucleation and aggregation were evaluated by comparing the slope of the turbidity of a control system with that of one exposed to the extract. The results were compared with a parallel study conducted with a marketed poly-herbal combination, Cystone, under identical concentrations. Crystals generated in the urine were also analysed by light microscopy. Statistical differences and percentage inhibitions were calculated and assessed. Results The extract of B. ciliata was significantly more effective in inhibiting the nucleation and aggregation of COM crystals in a dose-dependent manner than was Cystone. Moreover, the extract induced more CaOx dihydrate crystals, with a significant reduction in the number and size of COM crystals. Conclusion An extract of the traditional herb B. ciliata has an excellent inhibitory activity on crystalluria and therefore might be beneficial in dissolving urinary stones. However, further study in animal models of urolithiasis is needed to evaluate its potential anti-urolithiatic activity. PMID:26558080

  1. A simple method for quantitating the propensity for calcium oxalate crystallization in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wabner, C. L.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the propensity for spontaneous crystallization of calcium oxalate in urine, the permissible increment in oxalate is calculated. The previous method required visual observation of crystallization with the addition of oxalate, this warranted the need for a large volume of urine and a sacrifice in accuracy in defining differences between small incremental changes of added oxalate. Therefore, this method has been miniaturized and spontaneous crystallization is detected from the depletion of radioactive oxalate. The new "micro" method demonstrated a marked decrease (p < 0.001) in the permissible increment in oxalate in urine of stone formers versus normal subjects. Moreover, crystallization inhibitors added to urine, in vitro (heparin or diphosphonate) or in vivo (potassium citrate administration), substantially increased the permissible increment in oxalate. Thus, the "micro" method has proven reliable and accurate in discriminating stone forming from control urine and in distinguishing changes of inhibitory activity.

  2. Determination of Oxalate Content in Herbal Remedies and Dietary Supplements Based on Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel; Blanco, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Lifestyle, especially diet, is a prominent risk factor that affects the formation of calcium oxalate stones. Urinary oxalate excretion is directly related to the amount of oral intake and intestinal absorption rate of oxalate. This work evaluated the possibility of increasing oxalate ingestion, which could lead to secondary hyperoxaluria, associated with the intake of herbal remedies and dietary supplements containing plant extracts. A wide variety of 17 commercially available drugs and dietary supplements were analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed remarkable differences in oxalate contents of the extracts. Total oxalate concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 2.2 mg/g in solid samples and from 0.005 to 0.073 mg/mL in liquid samples. The selected herbal remedies and dietary supplements containing plant extracts represent only a low risk for calcium oxalate stone formers, if the recommended daily dose is not exceeded.

  3. Oxalate content of soybean seeds (Glycine max: Leguminosae), soyfoods, and other edible legumes.

    PubMed

    Massey, L K; Palmer, R G; Horner, H T

    2001-09-01

    Consumption of soybeans and food products made from them is increasing because of their desirable nutritional value. However, the oxalate content of seeds from 11 cultivars of soybean showed relatively high levels of total oxalate from 0.67 to 3.5 g/100 g of dry weight. Oxalate primarily was found as calcium oxalate crystals. Thirteen tested commercial soyfoods contained between 16 and 638 mg of total oxalate per serving. These values compare to those of three other legume foods, peanut butter, refried beans, and lentils, which contained 197, 193, and 100 mg of total oxalate per serving, respectively. After oxalate has been absorbed from the diet, it cannot be metabolized and is excreted by the kidney into urine, where it binds to calcium forming an insoluble salt that may precipitate to form kidney stones. The amounts of total oxalate in soybean seeds, soy foods, and other common legume foods exceed current recommendations for oxalate consumption by individuals who have a history of calcium oxalate kidney/urinary stones. This study serves as the basis to find soybean cultivars lower in oxalate, which will have lower risk for kidney stone formation after human consumption. PMID:11559120

  4. Intracrystalline Proteins Promote Dissolution of Urinary Calcium Oxalate Crystals in Cultured Renal Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Phulwinder K.; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Fleming, David E.; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2007-04-01

    We have proposed that internalized calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals containing intracrystalline proteins would be vulnerable to intracellular dissolution. The aims of this study were (1) to measure non-uniform strain and crystallite size in CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystals containing increasing amounts of intracrystalline crystal matrix extract (CME) and (2) to compare the rates of crystal dissolution in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCKII) cells. CME was isolated by demineralization of COM crystals generated from human urine. Cold and 14C-oxalate-labelled COM crystals were precipitated from ultrafiltered urine containing CME at final concentrations of 0-5mg/L. Non-uniform strain and crystallite size were determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction with Rietveld whole-pattern peak fitting and profile analysis, and the protein content of the crystals was analyzed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting for prothrombin fragment 1. Radiolabeled crystals were added to MDCKII cells and dissolution was expressed as radioactive label released into the medium relative to that in the crystals at zero time. Non-uniform strain increased and crystallite size decreased proportionally with rising CME concentration, reaching saturation between approximately 1 and 5 mg/L, and demonstrating unequivocally the inclusion of increasing quantities of proteins in the crystals. This was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. Crystal dissolution also followed saturation kinetics. These findings were confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), which showed that the degree of crystal degradation increased relative to CME concentration. We conclude that intracrystalline proteins enhance intracellular dissolution of CaOx crystals and thus may provide a natural defense against stone pathogenesis.

  5. Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and expression of matrix GLA protein in the kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Aslam; Wang, Wei; Khan, Saeed R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Polymorphism of the gene for matrix GLA protein (MGP), a calcification inhibitor, is associated with nephrolithiasis. However, experimental investigations of MGP role in stone pathogenesis are limited. We determined the effect of renal epithelial exposure to oxalate (Ox), calcium oxalate (CaOx) monohydrate (COM) or hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal on the expression of MGP. Methods MDCK cells in culture were exposed to 0.3, 0.5 or 1 mM Ox and 33, 66 or 133–150 μg/cm2 of COM/HA for 3–72 h. MGP expression and production were determined by Western blotting and densitometric analysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to determine MGP release into the medium. Hyperoxaluria was induced in male Sprague–Dawley rats by feeding hydroxyl-L-proline. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect renal MGP expression. Results Exposure to Ox and crystals led to time- and concentration-dependent increase in expression of MGP in MDCK cells. Cellular response was quicker to crystal exposure than to the Ox, expression being significantly higher after 3-h exposure to COM or HA crystals and more than 6 h of exposure to Ox. MGP expression was increased in kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats particularly in renal peritubular vessels. Conclusion We demonstrate increased expression of MGP in renal tubular epithelial cells exposed to Ox or CaOx crystals as well as the HA crystals. The most significant finding of this study is the increased staining seen in renal peritubular vessels of the hyperoxaluric rats, indicating involvement of renal endothelial cells in the synthesis of MGP. PMID:23475213

  6. Urinary stone composition in Oman: with high incidence of cystinuria.

    PubMed

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Bayoumi, Riad; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Hinai, Abdullhakeem; Al-Maskary, Sultan; Venkiteswaran, Krishna; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Rhman, Khalid; Sharif, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar

    2015-06-01

    Urinary stones are a common problem in Oman and their composition is unknown. The aim of this study is to analyze the components of urinary stones of Omani patients and use the obtained data for future studies of etiology, treatment, and prevention. Urinary stones of 255 consecutive patients were collected at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stones were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. The biochemical, metabolic, and radiological data relating to the patients and stones were collected. The mean age was 41 years, with M:F ratio of 3.7:1. The common comorbidities associated with stone formation were hypertension; diabetes, benign prostate hyperplasia; urinary tract infection; obesity; and atrophic kidney. The common presentation was renal colic and flank pain (96%). Stones were surgically retrieved in 70% of patients. Mean stone size was 9 ± 0.5 mm (range 1.3-80). Stone formers had a BMI ≥ 25 in 56% (P = 0.006) and positive family history of stones in 3.8%. The most common stones in Oman were as follows: Calcium Oxalates 45% (114/255); Mixed calcium phosphates & calcium oxalates 22% (55/255); Uric Acid 16% (40/255); and Cystine 4% (10/255). The most common urinary stones in Oman are Calcium Oxalates. Overweight is an important risk factor associated with stone formation. The hereditary Cystine stones are three times more common in Oman than what is reported in the literature that needs further genetic studies. PMID:25805105

  7. Urinary stone composition in Oman: with high incidence of cystinuria.

    PubMed

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S; Bayoumi, Riad; Al-Farsi, Yahya; Al-Hinai, Abdullhakeem; Al-Maskary, Sultan; Venkiteswaran, Krishna; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Rhman, Khalid; Sharif, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar

    2015-06-01

    Urinary stones are a common problem in Oman and their composition is unknown. The aim of this study is to analyze the components of urinary stones of Omani patients and use the obtained data for future studies of etiology, treatment, and prevention. Urinary stones of 255 consecutive patients were collected at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Stones were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. The biochemical, metabolic, and radiological data relating to the patients and stones were collected. The mean age was 41 years, with M:F ratio of 3.7:1. The common comorbidities associated with stone formation were hypertension; diabetes, benign prostate hyperplasia; urinary tract infection; obesity; and atrophic kidney. The common presentation was renal colic and flank pain (96%). Stones were surgically retrieved in 70% of patients. Mean stone size was 9 ± 0.5 mm (range 1.3-80). Stone formers had a BMI ≥ 25 in 56% (P = 0.006) and positive family history of stones in 3.8%. The most common stones in Oman were as follows: Calcium Oxalates 45% (114/255); Mixed calcium phosphates & calcium oxalates 22% (55/255); Uric Acid 16% (40/255); and Cystine 4% (10/255). The most common urinary stones in Oman are Calcium Oxalates. Overweight is an important risk factor associated with stone formation. The hereditary Cystine stones are three times more common in Oman than what is reported in the literature that needs further genetic studies.

  8. Oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxalic acid is found in most plant species and can serve beneficial roles that protect the plant from a variety of environmental stresses. Excessive amounts of oxalate, however, can be detrimental to plant health. Thus, careful coordination of oxalate metabolism is needed. Despite the important impa...

  9. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  10. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  11. Isolation and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Roop-ngam, Piyachat; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-01

    Oxalate-binding proteins are thought to serve as potential modulators of kidney stone formation. However, only few oxalate-binding proteins have been identified from previous studies. Our present study, therefore, aimed for large-scale identification of oxalate-binding proteins in porcine kidney using an oxalate-affinity column containing oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads for purification followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to resolve the recovered proteins. Comparing with those obtained from the controlled column containing uncoupled EAH-Sepharose 4B (to subtract the background of non-specific bindings), a total of 38 protein spots were defined as oxalate-binding proteins. These protein spots were successfully identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and/or tandem MS (MS/MS) as 26 unique proteins, including several nuclear proteins, mitochondrial proteins, oxidative stress regulatory proteins, metabolic enzymes and others. Identification of oxalate-binding domain using the PRATT tool revealed "L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]" as a functional domain responsible for oxalate-binding in 25 of 26 (96%) unique identified proteins. We report herein, for the first time, large-scale identification and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney. The presence of positively charged arginine residue in the middle of this functional domain suggested its significance for binding to the negatively charged oxalate. These data will enhance future stone research, particularly on stone modulators. PMID:22796524

  12. Enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate and effects on soluble oxalate concentration in foods.

    PubMed

    Israr, Beenish; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    Soluble oxalate in foods is major concern for kidney stone formers due to its tendency to increase urinary oxalate concentration. Phytate forms complexes with cations, which increases soluble oxalate by making cations unavailable to precipitate oxalate. Thus, in order to reduce soluble oxalate, bran samples (wheat, oat and barley) and bean samples (red kidney bean and white bean) were treated with phytase. Release of phosphate after phytate degradation and its association with calcium was determined. Phosphate concentration increased after application of phytase in all samples, but effect on soluble oxalate concentration varied. Wheat and oat bran showed significant reduction (P<0.05) in soluble oxalate compared to bean samples. Wheat bran, oat bran and white bean had a lower calcium:phosphate ratio than barley bran and red kidney beans. Correlation of the calcium:phosphate molar ratio with release of phosphate depends on concentration of calcium ions and this influences soluble oxalate concentration. PMID:27507467

  13. Enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate and effects on soluble oxalate concentration in foods.

    PubMed

    Israr, Beenish; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    Soluble oxalate in foods is major concern for kidney stone formers due to its tendency to increase urinary oxalate concentration. Phytate forms complexes with cations, which increases soluble oxalate by making cations unavailable to precipitate oxalate. Thus, in order to reduce soluble oxalate, bran samples (wheat, oat and barley) and bean samples (red kidney bean and white bean) were treated with phytase. Release of phosphate after phytate degradation and its association with calcium was determined. Phosphate concentration increased after application of phytase in all samples, but effect on soluble oxalate concentration varied. Wheat and oat bran showed significant reduction (P<0.05) in soluble oxalate compared to bean samples. Wheat bran, oat bran and white bean had a lower calcium:phosphate ratio than barley bran and red kidney beans. Correlation of the calcium:phosphate molar ratio with release of phosphate depends on concentration of calcium ions and this influences soluble oxalate concentration.

  14. A nidus, crystalluria and aggregation: key ingredients for stone enlargement.

    PubMed

    Saw, N K; Rao, P N; Kavanagh, J P

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro study of calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formation is usually based on crystallisation models but it is recognised that both healthy individuals and stone formers have crystalluria. We have established a robust in vitro stone growth model based on the principle of mixed suspension, mixed product removal system (MSMPR). Utilising this technique we studied the influence of CaOx crystallisation kinetics and the variation of calcium and oxalate concentrations on CaOx stone growth in vitro. Six stones received standard concentration of Ca (6 mM) and Ox (1.2 mM) in the medium while another six received variable concentrations of both Ca and Ox at various intervals. Stone mass was plotted against the experiment duration (typically 5-7 weeks). The stone growth was dependent on sufficient input calcium and oxalate concentrations and once triggered, stone growth could not be maintained at reduced calcium and oxalate inputs. The stone growth rate was positively correlated to the number of crystals in suspension around the stone and to the crystal nucleation rate and negatively correlated to the crystal growth rates. This leads to the conclusion that aggregation of crystals from the surrounding suspension was the dominant mechanism for stone enlargement.

  15. Calcium oxalate crystals increased enolase-1 secretion from renal tubular cells that subsequently enhanced crystal and monocyte invasion through renal interstitium

    PubMed Central

    Chiangjong, Wararat; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals cause kidney stone disease by still unclear mechanisms. The present study aimed to characterize changes in secretion of proteins from basolateral compartment of renal tubular epithelial cells after exposure to COM crystals and then correlated them with the stone pathogenesis. Polarized MDCK cells were cultivated in serum-free medium with or without 100 μg/ml COM crystals for 20 h. Secreted proteins collected from the lower chamber (basolateral compartment) were then resolved in 2-D gels and visualized by Deep Purple stain (n = 5 gels/group). Spot matching and intensity analysis revealed six protein spots with significantly altered levels in COM-treated samples. These proteins were then identified by tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS), including enolase-1, phosphoglycerate mutase-1, actinin, 14-3-3 protein epsilon, alpha-tubulin 2, and ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. The increased enolase-1 level was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Functional analysis revealed that enolase-1 dramatically induced COM crystal invasion through ECM migrating chamber in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, enolase-1 bound onto U937 monocytic cell surface markedly enhanced cell migration through the ECM migrating chamber. In summary, our data indicated that the increased secretory enolase-1 induced by COM crystals played an important role in crystal invasion and inflammatory process in renal interstitium. PMID:27045290

  16. Desvenlafaxine succinate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Venu, Nalivela; Sreekanth, Bukkapattanam R; Ram, Thaimattam; Devarakonda, Surya

    2008-05-01

    The title compound {systematic name: [2-(1-hydroxycyclohexyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]dimethylammonium 3-carboxypropanoate monohydrate}, C(16)H(26)NO(2)(+) x C(4)H(5)O(4)(-) x H(2)O, is a succinate salt of O-desmethylvenlafaxine (desvenlafaxine). The present structure is one of four reported polymorphs of this salt, which is a new antidepressant drug. The carboxyl group of the succinate anion adopts a rare anti conformation and is engaged in a very short O-H...O(-) hydrogen-bond contact. Both cations and anions are involved separately in the formation of distinct O-H...O hydrogen-bonded networks. Desvenlafaxine cations and water molecules self-assemble to generate a honeycomb layer, while the succinate anions form a linear tape structure. These hydrogen-bonded networks are interlinked via N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds. The hydrogen-bonding network is so strong that desolvation and melting occur together at approximately 402 K. Thus, the crystal structure may be used to understand the thermal stability and solubility of the compound at the molecular level.

  17. Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Vahlensieck, E W; Bach, D; Hesse, A; Strenge, A

    1982-01-01

    In the German Federal Republic, the incidence of urolithiasis is 0.54% and the prevalence is 4%. Calcium oxalate stones are to be expected in over 60% of the cases. Pathogenetic factors are discussed. It is demonstrated that the overconsumption of chocolate, rhubarb and spinach brings about risk situations for stone formation, while asparagus and tomatoes present no risk. The increased animal protein and alcohol intake may be the most important reasons for the accumulations of calcium oxalate stones. Beside the minimum investigation programme it is demonstrated by examples that recurrent stone formers need an extended investigation to find out more about the pathogenesis, in order to determine an effective treatment or to prevent recurrences. PMID:7182367

  18. Holmium:YAG (λ=2120nm) vs. Thulium fiber laser (λ=1908nm) ablation of kidney stones: thresholds, rates, and retropulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    The Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser lithotriptor is capable of operating at high pulse energies, but its efficient operation is limited to relatively low pulse rates (~10 Hz) during lithotripsy. On the contrary, the Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is limited to low pulse energies, but can operate at very high pulse rates (up to 1000 Hz). This study compares stone ablation threshold, ablation rate, and retropulsion effects for different Ho:YAG and TFL operation modes. The TFL (λ=1908 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 5-35 mJ, 500-μs pulse duration, and pulse rates of 10-400 Hz. The Ho:YAG laser (λ=2120 nm) was operated with pulse energies of 30-550 mJ, 350-μs pulse duration, and pulse rate of 10 Hz. Laser energy was delivered through small-core (200-270-μm) optical fibers in contact mode with human calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones for ablation studies and plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms for retropulsion studies. The COM stone ablation threshold for Ho:YAG and TFL measured 82.6 J/cm2and 20.8 J/cm2, respectively. Stone retropulsion with Ho:YAG laser increased linearly with pulse energy. Retropulsion with TFL was minimal at pulse rates < 150 Hz, then rapidly increased at higher pulse rates. For minimal stone retropulsion, Ho:YAG operation at pulse energies < 175 mJ at 10 Hz, and TFL operation at 35 mJ at 100 Hz is recommended, with both lasers producing comparable ablation rates. Further development of a TFL operating with both high pulse energies (e.g. 100-200 mJ) and high pulse rates (100-150 Hz) may also provide higher ablation rates, when retropulsion is not the primary concern.

  19. Urinary stone analysis on 12,846 patients: a report from a single center in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenqi; Yang, Bicheng; Ou, Lili; Liang, Yeping; Wan, Shawpong; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    We reported a retrospective review of the urinary stone compositions in 12,846 patients. Data on urinary stone compositions analyzed between January 2003 and December 2012 in our center were collected. Infrared spectroscopy was used for stone analysis. Predominant stone component was recorded. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-18, 19-40, 41-60, and 61-92, and five categories by components. In order to determine the change of stone characteristics with respect to time, data were also divided into two periods, 2003-2007 and 2008-2012. A total of 12,846 stones were included in this study. The age of the patients ranged from 1 to 92 years with 7,736 males and 5,110 females. Stone made of single component was rare, 2.61%. Calcium oxalate stone was the most common component at 82.56%. Calcium oxalate and uric acid stones were more common in male than in female. The incidence of calcium phosphate stones and uric acid stones had increased during the past 5 years, while calcium oxalate stones decreased. We found the highest incidence of stone disease in the 41-60 years old group and the lowest in the 1-18 years old for both genders. Calcium oxalate was the dominant component in every group but was more prevalent in 19-40 years group. The percentage of magnesium ammonium phosphate stone and uric acid stone increased with age.

  20. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  1. Isolation and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Roop-ngam, Piyachat; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first large-scale characterizations of oxalate-binding kidney proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recently developed oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads were applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 38 forms of 26 unique oxalate-binding kidney proteins were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 25/26 (96%) of identified proteins had 'L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]' domain. -- Abstract: Oxalate-binding proteins are thought to serve as potential modulators of kidney stone formation. However, only few oxalate-binding proteins have been identified from previous studies. Our present study, therefore, aimed for large-scale identification of oxalate-binding proteins in porcine kidney using an oxalate-affinity column containing oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads for purification followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to resolve the recovered proteins. Comparing with those obtained from the controlled column containing uncoupled EAH-Sepharose 4B (to subtract the background of non-specific bindings), a total of 38 protein spots were defined as oxalate-binding proteins. These protein spots were successfully identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and/or tandem MS (MS/MS) as 26 unique proteins, including several nuclear proteins, mitochondrial proteins, oxidative stress regulatory proteins, metabolic enzymes and others. Identification of oxalate-binding domain using the PRATT tool revealed 'L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]' as a functional domain responsible for oxalate-binding in 25 of 26 (96%) unique identified proteins. We report herein, for the first time, large-scale identification and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney. The presence of positively charged arginine residue in the middle of this functional domain suggested its significance for binding to the negatively charged oxalate. These data will enhance future stone research, particularly on stone

  2. Trace element relations to renal stones phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluszkiewicz, C.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Gazilka, M.

    1990-04-01

    The renal stones formation is still not well known and seems to be a very complex phenomenon. Therefore, the renal stones were analyzed by the Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy as well as by the Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) method. Using FTIR the samples were grouped into 5 types: phosphates, mixture of phosphates and oxalates, oxalates, mixture of oxalates and uric acid, and uric acid. PIXE was used to determine Trace Element (TE) contents. The combination of the two analysis methods enables us to find some TE relations to different renal stones phases. In general it appeared that TE contents in mixed structures are always between values of the respective pure phases. It was also found that some of the toxic elements are related to the structures but not necessarily to environmental influences as in the case of lead. All data were statistically analyzed and the correalations of the elements are presented.

  3. Mineralogy and chemistry of urinary stones: patients from North Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Iyad Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Urinary stone diseases are increasing in the Middle East. The majority of urinary stone cases are found in the northern part of the country. Stone samples taken from patients living in the Irbid area were collected from Princess Basma Hospital. The present study concentrates on the mineralogical and chemical composition of the urinary stones and on the effective environmental factors that assist in developing the different types of urinary stones. Using X-ray diffraction techniques, the mineralogical composition of the urinary stones was found to be as follows: oxalate, cholesten, and uric acid, with cystine stones occuring more frequently than the others. Cholesten and calcium oxalate stones are the most dominant types of stones. Calcium oxalate is the most common type of oxalate stone. Calcium oxalate is represented in: whewellite, wheddellite, and calcium carbonate oxalate hydrate minerals, in addition to other minerals such as brushite, ammonium phosphate, vaterite, valleriite, and bobierrite from other types of stones. Bobierrite (phosphate group) is a new mineral reported in urinary stones, and this has not been determined in any previous study worldwide. Apatite (calcium phosphate) is deduced using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The SEM technique determined crystal forms and systems, shapes, morphological features, and the names of the minerals forming urine stones, while optical properties are studied by polarizing microscope. X-ray fluorescence technique determined the concentrations of major and some trace elements. It revealed that Ca is the main constituent of the urinary stones, especially those composed of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. The concentration of trace elements was Ba = 1.57, P = 3.61, Fe = 1.78, S = 2.08, Zr = 4.63, Mo = 3.92, Cu = 1.89, Co = 1.56, and F = 4.2% and was higher in the urinary stones of Jordanian patients than in foreigners in the country. Questionnaires completed by patients suggest that the most

  4. Total and soluble oxalate content of some Indian spices.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Das, Sumana; Savage, G P

    2012-06-01

    Spices, such as cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, garlic, ginger, cumin, coriander and turmeric are used all over the world as flavouring and colouring ingredients in Indian foods. Previous studies have shown that spices contain variable amounts of total oxalates but there are few reports of soluble oxalate contents. In this study, the total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of ten different spices commonly used in Indian cuisine were measured. Total oxalate content ranged from 194 (nutmeg) to 4,014 (green cardamom) mg/100 g DM, while the soluble oxalate contents ranged from 41 (nutmeg) to 3,977 (green cardamom) mg/100 g DM. Overall, the percentage of soluble oxalate content of the spices ranged from 4.7 to 99.1% of the total oxalate content which suggests that some spices present no risk to people liable to kidney stone formation, while other spices can supply significant amounts of soluble oxalates and therefore should be used in moderation. PMID:22492273

  5. Total and soluble oxalate content of some Indian spices.

    PubMed

    Ghosh Das, Sumana; Savage, G P

    2012-06-01

    Spices, such as cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, garlic, ginger, cumin, coriander and turmeric are used all over the world as flavouring and colouring ingredients in Indian foods. Previous studies have shown that spices contain variable amounts of total oxalates but there are few reports of soluble oxalate contents. In this study, the total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of ten different spices commonly used in Indian cuisine were measured. Total oxalate content ranged from 194 (nutmeg) to 4,014 (green cardamom) mg/100 g DM, while the soluble oxalate contents ranged from 41 (nutmeg) to 3,977 (green cardamom) mg/100 g DM. Overall, the percentage of soluble oxalate content of the spices ranged from 4.7 to 99.1% of the total oxalate content which suggests that some spices present no risk to people liable to kidney stone formation, while other spices can supply significant amounts of soluble oxalates and therefore should be used in moderation.

  6. Crystal structure and spectroscopic analysis of a new oxalate-bridged MnII compound: catena-poly[guanidinium [[aqua­chlorido­manganese(II)]-μ2-oxalato-κ4 O 1,O 2:O 1′,O 2′] monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Sehimi, Hiba; Chérif, Ichraf; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi

    2016-01-01

    As part of our studies on the synthesis and the characterization of oxalate-bridged compounds M–ox–M (ox = oxalate dianion and M = transition metal ion), we report the crystal structure of a new oxalate-bridged MnII phase, {(CH6N3)[Mn(C2O4)Cl(H2O)]·H2O}n. In the compound, a succession of MnII ions (situated on inversion centers) adopting a distorted octa­hedral coordination and bridged by oxalate ligands forms parallel zigzag chains running along the c axis. These chains are inter­connected through O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions to form anionic layers parallel to (010). Individual layers are held together via strong hydrogen bonds involving the guanidinium cations (N—H⋯O and N—H⋯Cl) and the disordered non-coordinating water mol­ecule (O—H⋯O and O—H⋯Cl), as well as by guanidinium π–π stacking. The structural data were confirmed by IR and UV–Visible spectroscopic analysis. PMID:27308028

  7. Stone Morphology: Implication for Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudon, Michel; Jungers, Paul; Bazin, Dominique

    2008-09-01

    Urinary stones of similar crystalline composition as identified by X-ray diffraction or Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) may exhibit distinct structures, which are reflected in distinctive stone morphology. Among factors involved in stone morphology—some reflecting lithogenic activity, others depending on the crystal shape, or on the propensity of crystalline phases to form large aggregates, finally the environment where the stone is growing—all of these factors influence the inner structure of the stone and its superficial characteristics. We present here examples of the clinical interest of refined morphologic examination of stones, in addition to X-ray diffraction or FT-IR identification of its components. Such combination of methods allows the identification of specific etiologies among calcium oxalate stones, especially a morphological type pathognomonic of primary hyperoxaluria and other types related to distinct conditions of stone formation. Among phosphatic stones—in addition to stone composition, which must be considered not only on the basis of the main component, but also taking into account the minor crystalline phases, which often are clinically relevant—morphological types also contribute to diagnosis of the underlying etiology, especially for stones related to distal tubular acidosis. Finally, common purine stones also exhibit different morphologies related to stone composition and etiology: two main structures for uric acid and two for ammonium urate help to distinguish risk factors and lithogenic conditions involved in the formation of these calculi. Morphologic examination is a simple, rapid and cheap method that points to specific diseases or lithogenic factors. Better awareness of its clinical relevance should lead to wider utilization.

  8. A Case of Recurrent Renal Aluminum Hydroxide Stone

    PubMed Central

    Cakıroglu, Basri; Dogan, Akif Nuri; Tas, Tuncay; Gozukucuk, Ramazan; Uyanik, Bekir Sami

    2014-01-01

    Renal stone disease is characterized by the differences depending on the age, gender, and the geographic location of the patients. Seventy-five percent of the renal stone components is the calcium (Ca). The most common type of the stones is the Ca oxalate stones, while Ca phosphate, uric acid, struvite, and sistine stones are more rarely reported. Other than these types, triamterene, adenosine, silica, indinavir, and ephedrine stones are also reported in the literature as case reports. However, to the best of our knowledge, aluminum hydroxide stones was not reported reported before. Herein we will report a 38-years-old woman with the history of recurrent renal colic disease whose renal stone was determined as aluminum hydroxide stone in type. Aluminum mineral may be considered in the formation of kidney stones as it is widely used in the field of healthcare and cosmetics. PMID:25013740

  9. Interactions in Calcium Oxalate Hydrate/Surfactant Systems.

    PubMed

    Sikiric; Filipovic-Vincekovic; Babic-Ivancić Vdović Füredi-Milhofer

    1999-04-15

    Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) into the thermodynamically stable monohydrate (COM) in anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) and cationic (dodecylammonium chloride) surfactant solutions has been studied. Both surfactants inhibit, but do not stop transformation from COD to COM due to their preferential adsorption at different crystal faces. SDS acts as a stronger transformation inhibitor. The general shape of adsorption isotherms of both surfactants at the solid/liquid interface is of two-plateau-type, but differences in the adsorption behavior exist. They originate from different ionic and molecular structures of crystal surfaces and interactions between surfactant headgroups and solid surface. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Thulium fiber laser ablation of kidney stones using a 50-μm-core silica optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory is currently studying the experimental thulium fiber laser (TFL) as a potential alternative laser lithotripter to the gold standard, clinical Holmium:YAG laser. We have previously demonstrated the efficient coupling of TFL energy into fibers as small as 100-μm-core-diameter without damage to the proximal end. Although smaller fibers have a greater tendency to degrade at the distal tip during lithotripsy, fiber diameters (≤200 μm) have been shown to increase the saline irrigation rates through the working channel of a flexible ureteroscope, to maximize the ureteroscope deflection, and to reduce the stone retropulsion during laser lithotripsy. In this study, a 50-μm-core-diameter, 85-μm-outer-diameter, low-OH silica fiber is characterized for TFL ablation of human calcium oxalate monohydrate urinary stones, ex vivo. The 50-μm-core fiber consumes approximately 30 times less cross-sectional area inside the single working channel of a ureteroscope than the standard 270-μm-core fiber currently used in the clinic. The ureteroscope working channel flow rate, including the 50-μm fiber, decreased by only 10% with no impairment of ureteroscope deflection. The fiber delivered up to 15.4±5.9 W under extreme bending (5-mm-radius) conditions. The stone ablation rate measured 70±22 μg/s for 35-mJ-pulse-energy, 500-μs-pulse-duration, and 50-Hz-pulse-rate. Stone retropulsion and fiber burnback averaged 201±336 and 3000±2600 μm, respectively, after 2 min. With further development, thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using ultra-small, 50-μm-core fibers may introduce new integration and miniaturization possibilities and potentially provide an alternative to conventional Holmium:YAG laser lithotripsy using larger fibers.

  11. Characterization of calcium oxalate biominerals in some (non-Cactaceae) succulent plant species.

    PubMed

    Monje, Paula V; Baran, Enrique J

    2010-01-01

    The water-accumulating leaves of crassulacean acid metabolism plants belonging to five different families were investigated for the presence of biominerals by infrared spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. Spectroscopic results revealed that the mineral present in succulent species of Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, and Asphodelaceae was calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite, CaC2O4 x H2O). Crystals were predominantly found as raphides or solitary crystals of various morphologies. However, representative Crassulaceae members and a succulent species of Asteraceae did not show the presence of biominerals. Overall, these results suggest no correlation between calcium oxalate generation and crassulacean acid metabolism in succulent plants.

  12. Effect of indigenous plant extracts on calcium oxalate crystallization having a role in urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Fauzia; Waqar, Muhammad A

    2011-10-01

    Crystallization process has a major role in urolithiasis. In the present study, effect of two indigenous plants extracts namely Boerhavia diffusa and Bryophyllum pinnatum extract was determined on the crystallization of calcium oxalate crystals. Effect on the number, size and type of calcium oxalate crystals was observed. Results showed significant activity of both extracts against calcium oxalate crystallization at different concentrations (P < 0.05). Size of the crystals gradually reduced with the increasing concentration of both extracts. The number of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals which are injurious to epithelial cells gradually reduced and at the highest concentration of extracts (100 mg/ml) completely disappeared (P < 0.05). These results confirm that B. diffusa and B. pinnatum extracts have antiurolithic activity and have the ability to reduce crystal size as well as to promote the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals rather than monohydrate (COM) crystals. Control of crystal size and formation of COD rather than COM crystals, in combination with the diuretic action of extracts is an important way to control urolithiasis. PMID:21643743

  13. Laser lithotripsy for ureteric stones.

    PubMed

    Foo, K T; Wujanto, R; Wong, M Y

    1994-01-01

    The use of laser is a relatively new modality of treatment in urology. With the advent of the pulse-dye laser lithotripter and a finer 7.2 ureteroscope (miniscope), we found that it was more effective for treating ureteric stones than the conventional ultrasound lithotripsy. Between May 1989 and December 1991, 239 patients (162 males, 77 females) with 259 ureteric stones were treated endoscopically by this modality. Their ages ranged from 19 to 81 years (mean 46.3). The stones were mostly of 5 to 10 mm in their transverse diameters. They were situated in the upper ureter in 59, middle ureter in 39, and lower ureter in 161 cases. The miniscope was inserted into the ureter without prior dilatation and under direct vision. Stone fragmentation was performed using the 504-nm pulse-dye laser of 30 to 60 mJ energy. Complete fragmentation of the stone using the Candela laser lithotripter was achieved in 202 patients (85%). The average hospital stay was two days. Of the 37 unsuccessful cases, 11 were due to failed ureteroscopy, ten due to poor visibility from bleeding, 14 due to stone migrating up to the kidneys and two were monohydrate calculi which did not fragment with laser lithotripsy. Open ureterolithotomies were necessary in 14 patients (5.9%). Significant morbidity was perforation of the ureters which occurred in three patients (1.3%). This was due to ureteroscopy rather than the laser lithotripsy itself. With the availability of the new shockwave lithotripter (ESWL) which can treat ureteric stones in even less invasive ways, without anaesthesia and as outpatient, we are now reserving laser lithotripsy for those who failed ESWL. Generally they are the stones which cause severe obstruction to the ureter.

  14. [Calyceal stones].

    PubMed

    Netsch, C; Gross, A J

    2013-08-01

    The natural course of untreated, asymptomatic calyceal calculi has not yet been clearly defined regarding disease progression and risk of surgical interventions. The decision for an active treatment of calyceal calculi is based on stone composition, stone size and symptoms. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has a low complication rate and is recommended by the current guidelines of the German (DGU) and European (EAU) Associations of Urology as a first-line therapy for the treatment of calyceal stones <2 cm in diameter. However, immediate removal of stones is not achieved with ESWL. The primary stone-free rates (SFR) after ESWL depend on stone location and stone composition and can show remarkable differences. Minimally invasive procedures, such as percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy and ureteroscopy are alternatives for the treatment of calyceal stones which have low morbidity and high primary SFR when performed in centres of excellence.

  15. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  16. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... for uric acid stones) Antibiotics (for struvite stones) Diuretics (water pills) Phosphate solutions Sodium bicarbonate or sodium citrate Water pills (thiazide diuretics) Tamsulosin to relax the ureter and help the ...

  17. [Calcium kidney stones. Diagnostic and preventive prospects].

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, T; Terranegra, A; Biasion, R; Soldati, L; Vezzoli, G

    2007-01-01

    Kidney stone disease is one of the main causes of hospitalization in Italy. Its prevalence increased in the last century and is probably still increasing. The pathogenesis of the disease is not known, although two main theories have been elaborated. The first hypothesizes that hydroxyapatite deposition in the interstitium of the renal papillae (Randall's plaque) precedes urinary calcium oxalate precipitation on the ulcered surface of the papilla to form a stone. The second presumes the tubular lumen of Bellini's duct to be the site where calcium-oxalate salts precipitate to form the nucleus for stone formation within the urinary tract. These pathogenetic processes may be favored by different dietary and genetic factors. The genes involved are not known, although many studies have been performed. Polymorphisms of genes coding for the vitamin D receptor, calcium-sensing receptor, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, and urokinase were found to be associated with kidney stones, but these results have not been replicated. Different nutrients are suspected to predispose patients to calcium kidney stone disease. A high intake of animal proteins, sodium, vitamin C and oxalate has been implicated in stone formation, whereas calcium, alkalis and phytate may have a protective effect. The prevention of calcium stone formation is based on the recognition of risk factors like those already mentioned here. Furthermore, a family history of kidney stones may be useful in identifying subjects predisposed to become calcium stone formers. However, the expectations of the scientific community are turned to the advances in genetics and to the findings of genetic studies, which may provide diagnostic tools and criteria to define the risk profile of the single individual.

  18. Kidney stone ablation times and peak saline temperatures during Holmium:YAG and Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy, in vitro, in a ureteral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Using a validated in vitro ureter model for laser lithotripsy, the performance of an experimental Thulium fiber laser (TFL) was studied and compared to clinical gold standard Holmium:YAG laser. The Holmium laser (λ = 2120 nm) was operated with standard parameters of 600 mJ, 350 μs, 6 Hz, and 270-μm-core optical fiber. TFL (λ = 1908 nm) was operated with 35 mJ, 500 μs, 150-500 Hz, and 100-μm-core fiber. Urinary stones (60% calcium oxalate monohydrate / 40% calcium phosphate), of uniform mass and diameter (4-5 mm) were laser ablated with fibers through a flexible video-ureteroscope under saline irrigation with flow rates of 22.7 ml/min and 13.7 ml/min for the TFL and Holmium laser, respectively. The temperature 3 mm from tube's center and 1 mm above mesh sieve was measured by a thermocouple and recorded during experiments. Total laser and operation times were recorded once all stone fragments passed through a 1.5-mm sieve. Holmium laser time measured 167 +/- 41 s (n = 12). TFL times measured 111 +/- 49 s, 39 +/- 11 s, and 23 +/- 4 s, for pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz (n = 12 each). Mean peak saline irrigation temperatures reached 24 +/- 1 °C for Holmium, and 33 +/- 3 °C, 33 +/- 7 °C, and 39 +/- 6 °C, for TFL at pulse rates of 150, 300, and 500 Hz. To avoid thermal buildup and provide a sufficient safety margin, TFL lithotripsy should be performed with pulse rates below 500 Hz and/or increased saline irrigation rates. The TFL rapidly fragmented kidney stones due in part to its high pulse rate, high power density, high average power, and reduced stone retropulsion, and may provide a clinical alternative to the conventional Holmium laser for lithotripsy.

  19. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  20. Nephrolithiasis: Molecular Mechanism of Renal Stone Formation and the Critical Role Played by Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kanu Priya; Narula, Shifa; Kakkar, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Urinary stone disease is an ailment that has afflicted human kind for many centuries. Nephrolithiasis is a significant clinical problem in everyday practice with a subsequent burden for the health system. Nephrolithiasis remains a chronic disease and our fundamental understanding of the pathogenesis of stones as well as their prevention and cure still remains rudimentary. Regardless of the fact that supersaturation of stone-forming salts in urine is essential, abundance of these salts by itself will not always result in stone formation. The pathogenesis of calcium oxalate stone formation is a multistep process and essentially includes nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation, and crystal retention. Various substances in the body have an effect on one or more of the above stone-forming processes, thereby influencing a person's ability to promote or prevent stone formation. Promoters facilitate the stone formation while inhibitors prevent it. Besides low urine volume and low urine pH, high calcium, sodium, oxalate and urate are also known to promote calcium oxalate stone formation. Many inorganic (citrate, magnesium) and organic substances (nephrocalcin, urinary prothrombin fragment-1, osteopontin) are known to inhibit stone formation. This review presents a comprehensive account of the mechanism of renal stone formation and the role of inhibitors/promoters in calcium oxalate crystallisation. PMID:24151593

  1. Analysis of commercial kidney stone probiotic supplements

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Melissa L.; Shaw, Karen J.; Jackson, Shelby B.; Daniel, Steven L.; Knight, John

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the levels of Oxalobacter formigenes in probiotic supplements marketed by ™PRO Lab, Ltd, Toronto, Canada, and capsules of Oxalo™ purchased from Sanzyme Ltd, Hyderabad, India, and to measure the ability of these preparations to degrade oxalate in vitro. METHODS Probiotic supplements and pure cultures of O. formigenes were cultured in a number of media containing oxalate. OD595 was used to measure bacterial growth and ion chromatography was used to measure loss of oxalate in culture media. O. formigenes specific and degenerate Lactobacillus primers to the oxalate decarboxylase gene (oxc) were used in PCR. RESULTS Incubating probiotic supplements in different media did not result in growth of oxalate-degrading organisms. PCR indicated the absence of organisms harboring the oxc gene. Culture and 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated the ™PRO Lab supplement contained viable Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis (GenBank accession no. KJ095656.1), while Oxalo™ contained several Bacillus species and Lactobacillus plantarum. CONCLUSION The probiotic supplement sold over the internet by ™PRO Lab, Ltd and Sanzyme Ltd did not contain identifiable O. formigenes or viable oxalate-degrading organisms, and they are unlikely to be of benefit to calcium oxalate kidney stone patients. PMID:25733259

  2. Dimension stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    Dimension stone can be defined as natural rock material quarried to obtain blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length and thickness) and shape for architectural or engineering purposes. Color, grain texture and pattern, and surface finish of the stone are also normal requirements. Other important selection criteria are durability (based on mineral composition, hardness and past performance), strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish.

  3. Optimum nutrition for kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, Ita P; Goldfarb, David S

    2013-03-01

    We summarize the data regarding the associations of individual dietary components with kidney stones and the effects on 24-hour urinary profiles. The therapeutic recommendations for stone prevention that result from these studies are applied where possible to stones of specific composition. Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone-formers are advised to reduce ingestion of animal protein, oxalate, and sodium while maintaining intake of 800 to 1200 mg of calcium and increasing consumption of citrate and potassium. There are few data regarding dietary therapy of calcium phosphate stones. Whether the inhibitory effect of citrate sufficiently counteracts increasing urine pH to justify more intake of potassium and citrate is not clear. Reduction of sodium intake to decrease urinary calcium excretion would also be expected to decrease calcium phosphate stone recurrence. Conversely, the most important urine variable in the causation of uric acid stones is low urine pH, linked to insulin resistance as a component of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The mainstay of therapy is weight loss and urinary alkalinization provided by a more vegetarian diet. Reduction in animal protein intake will reduce purine ingestion and uric acid excretion. For cystine stones, restriction of animal protein is associated with reduction in intake of the cystine precursor methionine as well as cystine. Reduction of urine sodium results in less urine cystine. Ingestion of vegetables high in organic anion content, such as citrate and malate, should be associated with higher urine pH and fewer stones because the amino acid cystine is soluble in more alkaline urine. Because of their infectious origin, diet has no definitive role for struvite stones except for avoiding urinary alkalinization, which may worsen their development.

  4. Determinants of Brushite Stone Formation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Siener, Roswitha; Netzer, Linda; Hesse, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. Methods Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. Results Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while calcium oxalate was the major secondary stone component. Urinary pH and oxalate excretion were significantly higher, whereas urinary citrate was lower in patients as compared to healthy controls. Despite lower dietary intake, urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher in brushite stone patients. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed pH>6.50 (OR 7.296; p = 0.035), calcium>6.40 mmol/24 h (OR 25.213; p = 0.001) and citrate excretion <2.600 mmol/24 h (OR 15.352; p = 0.005) as urinary risk factors for brushite stone formation. A total of 56% of patients exhibited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Urinary pH, calcium and citrate excretion did not significantly differ between patients with or without dRTA. Conclusions Hypercalciuria, a diminished citrate excretion and an elevated pH turned out to be the major urinary determinants of brushite stone formation. Interestingly, urinary phosphate was not associated with urolithiasis. The increased urinary oxalate excretion, possibly due to decreased calcium intake, promotes the risk of mixed stone formation with calcium oxalate. Neither dietary factors nor dRTA can account as cause for hypercalciuria, higher urinary pH and diminished citrate excretion. Further research is needed to define the role of dRTA in brushite stone formation and to evaluate the hypothesis of an acquired acidification defect. PMID:24265740

  5. High calcium enhances calcium oxalate crystal binding capacity of renal tubular cells via increased surface annexin A1 but impairs their proliferation and healing.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Fong-ngern, Kedsarin; Peerapen, Paleerath; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-07-01

    Hypercalciuria is associated with kidney stone formation and impaired renal function. However, responses of renal tubular cells upon exposure to high-calcium environment remain largely unknown. We thus performed a proteomic analysis of altered proteins in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium and evaluated functional significance of these changes. MDCK cells were maintained with or without 20 mM CaCl(2) for 72 h. Cellular proteins were then analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) (n = 5 gels derived from 5 independent culture flasks per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed 20 protein spots (from a total of 700) that were differentially expressed between the two groups. These altered proteins were then identified by Q-TOF-MS and MS/MS analyses, including those involved in calcium binding, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, mitosis regulation, apoptosis, cell migration, oxidative stress, and ion transport. Protein network analysis and functional validation revealed that high-calcium-exposed cells had 36.5% increase in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal-binding capacity. This functional change was consistent to the expression data in which annexin A1 (ANXA1), a membrane-associated calcium-binding protein, was markedly increased on the apical surface of high-calcium-exposed cells. Pretreatment with anti-ANXA1 antibody could neutralize this increasing crystal-binding capacity. Moreover, high-calcium exposure caused defects in cell proliferation and wound healing. These expression and functional data demonstrate the enhanced crystal-binding capacity but impaired cell proliferation and wound healing in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium. Taken together, these phenomena may contribute, at least in part, to the pathogenic mechanisms of hypercalciuria-induced nephrolithiasis and impaired renal function. Our in vitro study offers several candidates for further

  6. Stone Mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the part of the rock outcrop dubbed Stone Mountain at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A Patch of Stone (Figure credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS)

    The colorless square in this color image of the martian rock formation called Stone Mountain is one portion of the rock being analyzed with tools on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The square area is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. Stone Mountain is located within the rock outcrop on Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  7. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  8. Nutrition and renal stone disease in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.

    2002-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Russian space program showing that humans exposed to the microgravity environment of space have a greater risk for developing renal stones. Increased bone resorption and the attendant hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia contribute significantly to raising the urinary state of saturation with respect to the calcium salts, namely calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. In addition, other environmental and dietary factors may adversely affect urine composition and increase stone formation risk during space flight. For example, reductions in urinary volume, pH, and citrate contribute to raising stone formation risk. In addition to raising the risk for calcium stone formation, this metabolic profile is conducive to the formation of uric acid stones. Although observations to date have suggested that there may actually be a reduced food intake during the early phase of flight, crew members on longer-duration flights may increase food intake and be at increased risk for stone formation. Taken together, these findings support the use of nutritional recommendations for crew members that would serve to reduce the stone-forming propensity of the urinary environment. Pharmacologic intervention should be directed at raising urinary volumes, diminishing bone losses, and preventing reductions in urinary pH and citrate. Success in reducing the risk for stone formation in astronauts would also be of potential major benefit to the estimated 20 million Americans with nephrolithiasis.

  9. Effect of different brewing times on soluble oxalate content of loose-packed black teas and tea bags.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Reza; Lotfi Yagin, Neda; Liebman, Michael; Nikniaz, Zeinab

    2013-02-01

    Because of the postulated role of increased dietary oxalate intake in calcium oxalate stone formation, the effect of different brewing times on soluble oxalate contents of loose-packed black tea and tea bags was studied. The oxalate content of 25 different samples of loose-packed black teas after brewing at 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 min and of ten brands of tea bags after infusion for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min was measured by enzymatic assay. The oxalate concentration resulting from different brewing times ranged from 4.3 to 6.2 mg/240 ml for loose-packed black teas and from 2.7 to 4.8 mg/240 ml for tea bags. There was a stepwise increase in oxalate concentration associated with increased brewing times.

  10. Kidney stones

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... urine exits the kidney and enters the ureter. As urine can become very concentrated as it passes through the kidneys. When the urine ... chemicals dissolved in the urine can crystallize, forming a kidney stone (renal calculus). Usually the calculus is ...

  11. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  12. The preventive effect of sodium pentosan polysulfate against renal stone formation in hyperoxaluric rats.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Tatsuya; Ishii, Keiichi; Yoneda, Yukio; Kamikawa, Sadanori; Kanazawa, Toshinao; Sugimoto, Toshikado; Osswald, Hartmut

    2002-10-01

    Sodium pentosan polysulfate (SPP), a semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan, was administered to rats with hyperoxaluria, induced by a vitamin B6 deficient diet, as a model of calcium oxalate stone formation. We studied the preventive effects of SPP on stone formation as well as its inhibitory effects on stone growth by autoradiography and radioluminography after intravenous injection of (14)C-oxalate. The rats were divided into non-treated and SPP-treated groups. The non-treated rats were divided into three groups: one group was fed a regular diet, while the other two groups were fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. The SPP-treated rats were divided into two groups: one group was intravenously injected with SPP from the start of the vitamin B6 deficient diet for a total of 4 weeks and the other group was injected with the same amount of SPP after 2 weeks of the diet for 2 weeks. (14)C-oxalate renal macroautoradiograms were prepared, and calcium oxalate deposits in the renal tissues were compared between the non-treated and SPP-treated groups. The preventive effects on calcium oxalate stone formation were clearly observed in the group injected with SPP for 4 weeks. Even in the other SPP-treated group, in which the administration of SPP was started at 2 weeks after the start of the diet when calcium oxalate stone formation was already observed, the size of the calcium oxalate deposits observed after 4 weeks was smaller than that in the non-treated group fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet for 4 weeks. In conclusion, our results show that SPP has not only preventive effects on calcium oxalate stone formation but also growth inhibitory effects on stones in hyperoxaluric rats.

  13. Selective Rac1 inhibition protects renal tubular epithelial cells from oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani; Thamilselvan, Sivagnanam

    2012-08-01

    Oxalate-induced oxidative cell injury is one of the major mechanisms implicated in calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth of kidney stones. We previously demonstrated that oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-derived free radicals play a significant role in renal injury. Since NADPH oxidase activation requires several regulatory proteins, the primary goal of this study was to characterize the role of Rac GTPase in oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative injury in renal epithelial cells. Our results show that oxalate significantly increased membrane translocation of Rac1 and NADPH oxidase activity of renal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. We found that NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac1, blocked oxalate-induced membrane translocation of Rac1 and NADPH oxidase activity. In the absence of Rac1 inhibitor, oxalate exposure significantly increased hydrogen peroxide formation and LDH release in renal epithelial cells. In contrast, Rac1 inhibitor pretreatment, significantly decreased oxalate-induced hydrogen peroxide production and LDH release. Furthermore, PKC α and δ inhibitor, oxalate exposure did not increase Rac1 protein translocation, suggesting that PKC resides upstream from Rac1 in the pathway that regulates NADPH oxidase. In conclusion, our data demonstrate for the first time that Rac1-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase might be a crucial mechanism responsible for oxalate-induced oxidative renal cell injury. These findings suggest that Rac1 signaling plays a key role in oxalate-induced renal injury, and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to prevent calcium oxalate crystal deposition in stone formers and reduce recurrence.

  14. Continuous-wave and quasi-continuous wave thulium-doped all-fiber laser: implementation on kidney stone fragmentations.

    PubMed

    Pal, Debasis; Ghosh, Aditi; Sen, Ranjan; Pal, Atasi

    2016-08-10

    A continuous-wave (CW) as well as quasi-continuous wave (QCW) thulium-doped all-fiber laser at 1.94 μm has been designed for targeting applications in urology. The thulium-doped active fiber with an octagonal-shaped inner cladding is pumped at 793 nm to achieve stable CW laser power of 10 W with 32% lasing efficiency (against launched pump power). The linear variation of laser power with pump offers a scope of further power scaling. A QCW operation with variation of duty cycle from 0.5% to 90%, repetition rate from 0.1 Hz to 1 kHz, and pulse width from 40 μs to 2 s has been presented. Laser power of 9.5 W in CW mode of operation and average power of 5.2 W with energy range of 10.4-104 mJ in QCW mode of operation has been employed to fragment calcium oxalate monohydrate kidney stones (size of 1.5-4 cm) having different colors and composition. Dependence of ablation threshold, ablation rate, and average fragmented particle size on the average power and energy has been studied. One minute of laser exposure results in fragmentation of a stone surface with ablation rate of 8  mg/min having minimum particle size of 6.54 μm with an average size of 20-100 μm ensuring the natural removal of fragmented parts through the urethra. PMID:27534454

  15. Continuous-wave and quasi-continuous wave thulium-doped all-fiber laser: implementation on kidney stone fragmentations.

    PubMed

    Pal, Debasis; Ghosh, Aditi; Sen, Ranjan; Pal, Atasi

    2016-08-10

    A continuous-wave (CW) as well as quasi-continuous wave (QCW) thulium-doped all-fiber laser at 1.94 μm has been designed for targeting applications in urology. The thulium-doped active fiber with an octagonal-shaped inner cladding is pumped at 793 nm to achieve stable CW laser power of 10 W with 32% lasing efficiency (against launched pump power). The linear variation of laser power with pump offers a scope of further power scaling. A QCW operation with variation of duty cycle from 0.5% to 90%, repetition rate from 0.1 Hz to 1 kHz, and pulse width from 40 μs to 2 s has been presented. Laser power of 9.5 W in CW mode of operation and average power of 5.2 W with energy range of 10.4-104 mJ in QCW mode of operation has been employed to fragment calcium oxalate monohydrate kidney stones (size of 1.5-4 cm) having different colors and composition. Dependence of ablation threshold, ablation rate, and average fragmented particle size on the average power and energy has been studied. One minute of laser exposure results in fragmentation of a stone surface with ablation rate of 8  mg/min having minimum particle size of 6.54 μm with an average size of 20-100 μm ensuring the natural removal of fragmented parts through the urethra.

  16. Reactive oxygen species, inflammation and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones are formed attached to Randall’s plaques (RPs) or Randall’s plugs. Mechanisms involved in the formation and growth are poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that stone formation is a form of pathological biomineralization or ectopic calcification. Pathological calcification and plaque formation in the body is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the development of oxidative stress (OS). This review explores clinical and experimental data in support of ROS involvement in the formation of CaOx kidney stones. Under normal conditions the production of ROS is tightly controlled, increasing when and where needed. Results of clinical and experimental studies show that renal epithelial exposure to high oxalate and crystals of CaOx/calcium phosphate (CaP) generates excess ROS, causing injury and inflammation. Major markers of OS and inflammation are detectable in urine of stone patients as well as rats with experimentally induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Antioxidant treatments reduce crystal and oxalate induced injury in tissue culture and animal models. Significantly lower serum levels of antioxidants, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthine have been found in individuals with a history of kidney stones. A diet rich in antioxidants has been shown to reduce stone episodes. ROS regulate crystal formation, growth and retention through the timely production of crystallization modulators. In the presence of abnormal calcium, citrate, oxalate, and/or phosphate, however, there is an overproduction of ROS and a decrease in the antioxidant capacity resulting in OS, renal injury and inflammation. Cellular degradation products in the urine promote crystallization in the tubular lumen at a faster rate thus blocking the tubule and plugging the tubular openings at the papillary tips forming Randall’s plugs. Renal epithelial cells lining the loops of Henle/collecting ducts may become osteogenic, producing membrane vesicles

  17. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  18. Urinary oxalate and glycolate excretion and plasma oxalate concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, T M; Kasidas, G P; Murdoch, I; Rose, G A

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria in young children is hampered by the lack of a reliable reference range for urinary oxalate excretion, especially in infants. We present data on urinary oxalate and glycolate excretion in 137 normal children, on the plasma oxalate concentration in 33 normal children and 53 with chronic renal failure, and on amniotic fluid oxalate concentration in 63 uncomplicated pregnancies. The urinary oxalate:creatinine molar ratios were log normally distributed: mean (range) values were less than 1 year 0.061 (0.015-0.26), 1-5 years 0.036 (0.011-0.12), 5-12 years 0.030 (0.0059-0.15), and greater than 12 years 0.013 (0.0021-0.083). Geometric mean (range) plasma oxalate concentration in the normal children was 1.53 (0.78-3.02) mumols/l and was independent of age. The mean (SD) plasma oxalate: creatinine molar ratio in these normal children and 50 with chronic renal failure was 0.033 (0.013), and was independent of age and renal function. Mean (SD) amniotic fluid oxalate concentration was 19.0 (4.3) mumols/l. PMID:2031609

  19. Urine glycoprotein crystal growth inhibitors. Evidence for a molecular abnormality in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Y; Abram, V; Parks, J H; Lau, H S; Kawooya, J K; Coe, F L

    1985-01-01

    One reason that some people are prone to calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis is that they produce urine that is subnormal in its ability to inhibit the growth of calcium oxalate crystals. We have identified in human urine a glycoprotein (GCI) that inhibits calcium oxalate crystal growth strongly, and at low concentrations (10(-7) M); in this study, we have isolated GCI molecules from the urine of normal people and patients with calcium oxalate stones. GCI from stone formers is abnormal in three ways: it contains no detectable gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), whereas normal GCI contains 2-3 residues of Gla per mole; about half of the GCI in urine of patients inhibits crystal growth 4-20 times less than normal GCI as judged by its performance in a kinetic growth assay, in vitro; at the air-water interface, patient GCI has a film collapse pressure approximately half of normal. GCI molecules from the urine of patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis are intrinsically abnormal, and these abnormalities could play a role in the genesis of stones. PMID:4056037

  20. Introduction: Kidney Stone Research, Lessons From Human Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Fredric L.

    2007-04-01

    About 5% of American women and 12% of men will develop a kidney stone at some time in their life, the prevalence has been rising in both sexes. Approximately 80% of stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and calcium phosphate; 10% of struvite; 9% of uric acid; and the remaining 1% are composed of cystine or ammonium acid urate or are diagnosed as drug-related stone. Stones ultimately arise because of an unwanted phase change of these substances from liquid to solid state. In this introduction, I have outlined our current thinking of the possible mechanisms involved in stone formation based on our biopsy data collected from a series of human kidney stone formers. In addition, I have presented a set of questions as a means of focusing future research in this field.

  1. Idiopathic hypercalciuria and formation of calcium renal stones.

    PubMed

    Coe, Fredric L; Worcester, Elaine M; Evan, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    The most common presentation of nephrolithiasis is idiopathic calcium stones in patients without systemic disease. Most stones are primarily composed of calcium oxalate and form on a base of interstitial apatite deposits, known as Randall's plaque. By contrast some stones are composed largely of calcium phosphate, as either hydroxyapatite or brushite (calcium monohydrogen phosphate), and are usually accompanied by deposits of calcium phosphate in the Bellini ducts. These deposits result in local tissue damage and might serve as a site of mineral overgrowth. Stone formation is driven by supersaturation of urine with calcium oxalate and brushite. The level of supersaturation is related to fluid intake as well as to the levels of urinary citrate and calcium. Risk of stone formation is increased when urine citrate excretion is <400 mg per day, and treatment with potassium citrate has been used to prevent stones. Urine calcium levels >200 mg per day also increase stone risk and often result in negative calcium balance. Reduced renal calcium reabsorption has a role in idiopathic hypercalciuria. Low sodium diets and thiazide-type diuretics lower urine calcium levels and potentially reduce the risk of stone recurrence and bone disease. PMID:27452364

  2. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  3. Kidney Stones (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Kidney Stones KidsHealth > For Parents > Kidney Stones Print A ... remove the stones from their urinary tracts. How Kidney Stones Form It's the kidneys' job to remove ...

  4. INACCURATE REPORTING OF MINERAL COMPOSITION BY COMMERCIAL STONE ANALYSIS LABORATORIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR INFECTION AND METABOLIC STONES

    PubMed Central

    Krambeck, Amy E.; Khan, Naseem F.; Jackson, Molly E.; Lingeman, James E.; McAteer, James A; Williams, James C.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of stone composition analysis by commercial laboratories. METHODS 25 human renal stones with infrared spectroscopy (IR) determined compositions were fragmented into aliquots and studied with micro-computed tomography (CT) to ensure fragment similarity. Representative fragments of each stone were submitted to 5 commercial stone laboratories for blinded analysis. RESULTS All laboratories agreed on composition for 6 pure stones. Of 4 stones known to contain struvite, only 2(50%) were identified as struvite by all laboratories. Struvite was reported as a component by some laboratories for 4 stones previously determined not to contain struvite. Overall, there was disagreement regarding struvite in 6(24%) stones. For 9 calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones, all laboratories reported some mixture of CaOx, but the quantities of subtypes differed significantly among laboratories. In 6 apatite containing stones, apatite was missed by the laboratories in 20% of the samples. None of the laboratories identified atazanavir in a stone containing that antiviral drug. One laboratory reported protein in every sample, while all others reported it in only 1 sample. Nomenclature for apatite differed among laboratories, with one reporting apatite as carbonate apatite (CA) and never hydroxyapatite (HA), another never reporting CA and always reporting HA, and a third reporting CA as apatite with calcium carbonate. CONCLUSIONS Commercial laboratories reliably recognize pure calculi; however, variability in reporting of mixed calculi suggests a problem with accuracy of stone analysis results. Furthermore, there is a lack of standard nomenclature used by laboratories. PMID:20728108

  5. Atypical findings in a patient with a renal milky stone including a cake of stone.

    PubMed

    Uesugi, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Takaharu

    2006-08-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted to our department with the diagnosis of a renal calculus. She exhibited dull left flank pain. A plain film revealed a round opaque calcific density in the left kidney in the supine and the upright position. There was no connection between the calcification and the renal collecting system by retrograde pyelography. Computed tomography in the supine position showed a rounded calcification in the left renal parenchyma without a semilunar configuration. She was diagnosed with left renal calyceal diverticula calculi. She underwent a surgical intervention which found a renal milky stone including a 10-mm. diameter stone. The examination of the fluid and the stone material disclosed three components: calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. The present case is interesting because its characteristics differ from the common features of renal milky stone.

  6. Trace elements in urinary stones: a preliminary investigation in Fars province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Behnam; Yavarashayeri, Nasrin; Irani, Dariush; Moore, Farid; Zarasvandi, Alireza; Salari, Mehrdad

    2015-04-01

    In view of the high incidence rate of urinary stones in the south and southwest of Iran, this paper investigates trace elements content including heavy metals in 39 urinary stones, collected from patients in Fars province, Iran. The mineralogy of the stones is investigated using X-ray diffractometry. The samples are classified into five mineral groups (calcium oxalate, uric acid, cystine, calcium phosphate and mixed stone). Major and trace elements in each group were determined using ICP-MS method. P and Ca constitute the main elements in urinary stones with Ca being more affine to oxalates while other alkali and alkaline earths precipitate with phosphate. Significant amounts of trace elements, especially Zn and Sr, were found in urinary calculi (calcium oxalate and phosphates) relative to biominerals (uric acid and cystine). Among urinary calculi, calcium phosphate contains greater amounts of trace metal than calcium oxalate. Phosphates seem to be the most important metal-bearing phases in urinary stones. Results indicate that concentrations of elements in urinary stones depend on the type of mineral phases. Significant differences in elements content across various mineralogical groups were found by applying statistical methods. Kruskal-Wallis test reveals significant difference between Ca, P, K, Na, Mg, S, Zn, Sr, Se, Cd, and Co content in different investigated mineral groups. Moreover, Mann-Whitney test differentiates Ca, Na, Zn, Sr, Co, and Ni between minerals in oxalate and uric acid stones. This study shows that urinary stone can provide complementary information on human exposure to elements and estimate the environmental risks involved in urinary stones formation. PMID:25433503

  7. Trace elements in urinary stones: a preliminary investigation in Fars province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Behnam; Yavarashayeri, Nasrin; Irani, Dariush; Moore, Farid; Zarasvandi, Alireza; Salari, Mehrdad

    2015-04-01

    In view of the high incidence rate of urinary stones in the south and southwest of Iran, this paper investigates trace elements content including heavy metals in 39 urinary stones, collected from patients in Fars province, Iran. The mineralogy of the stones is investigated using X-ray diffractometry. The samples are classified into five mineral groups (calcium oxalate, uric acid, cystine, calcium phosphate and mixed stone). Major and trace elements in each group were determined using ICP-MS method. P and Ca constitute the main elements in urinary stones with Ca being more affine to oxalates while other alkali and alkaline earths precipitate with phosphate. Significant amounts of trace elements, especially Zn and Sr, were found in urinary calculi (calcium oxalate and phosphates) relative to biominerals (uric acid and cystine). Among urinary calculi, calcium phosphate contains greater amounts of trace metal than calcium oxalate. Phosphates seem to be the most important metal-bearing phases in urinary stones. Results indicate that concentrations of elements in urinary stones depend on the type of mineral phases. Significant differences in elements content across various mineralogical groups were found by applying statistical methods. Kruskal-Wallis test reveals significant difference between Ca, P, K, Na, Mg, S, Zn, Sr, Se, Cd, and Co content in different investigated mineral groups. Moreover, Mann-Whitney test differentiates Ca, Na, Zn, Sr, Co, and Ni between minerals in oxalate and uric acid stones. This study shows that urinary stone can provide complementary information on human exposure to elements and estimate the environmental risks involved in urinary stones formation.

  8. Raman spectroscopy study of calcium oxalate extracted from cacti stems.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Loza-Cornejo, Sofia; Terrazas, Teresa; Terrazas, Tania; Miranda-Beltrán, María de la Luz; Aparicio-Fernández, Xóchitl; López-Macías, Brenda M; Morales-Martínez, Sandra E; Ortiz-Morales, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To find markers that distinguish the different Cactaceae species, by using near infrared Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we studied the occurrence, in the stem, of solid deposits in five Cactaceae species (Coryphantha clavata, Ferocactus latispinus, Opuntia ficus-indica, O. robusta, and O. strepthacantha) collected from their natural habitats from a region of México. The deposits in the tissues usually occurred as spheroidal aggregates, druses, or prismatic crystals. From the Raman spectra, the crystals were identified either as calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC2O4·H2O) or calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC2O4·2H2O). Opuntia species (subfamily Opuntioideae) showed the presence of CaC2O4·H2O, and the deposition of CaC2O4·2H2O was present in C. clavata and F. latispinus (subfamily Cactoideae, Cacteae tribe). As a punctual technique, Raman spectroscopy seems to be a useful tool to identify crystal composition. In addition to allowing the analysis of crystal morphology, this spectroscopic technique can be used to identify Cactaceae species and their chemotaxonomy.

  9. Mechanisms for the atmospheric corrosion of carbonate stone

    SciTech Connect

    Graedel, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    The physical and chemical phenomena responsible for the atmospheric corrosion of carbonate stone are presented. Corrosion product formation, morphology, and chemical makeup are discussed in the context of calcium-containing minerals and other crystalline structures that thermodynamics and kinetics suggest are likely to be present. Formation pathways for the minerals most often reported to occur in carbonate corrosion layers are shown in schematic diagrams. The dominant corrosion products are sulfates and oxalates, the former resulting from interactions with atmospheric sulfur dioxide or sulfate ions, the latter from oxalate secretions from the biological organisms. present (and perhaps to some extent from oxalate deposited from the atmosphere). The degradation processes are enhanced by the catalytic action of transition metal ions present in the stone and of soot deposited from the atmosphere.

  10. Crystal structure of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Titaeva, E. K. Somov, N. V.; Portnov, V. N.; Titaev, D. N.

    2015-01-15

    Crystals of a new polymorphic modification of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate NaHC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} · H{sub 2}O have been grown in a metasilicate gel. Their atomic structure is solved by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Do teas rich in antioxidants reduce the physicochemical and peroxidative risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in humans? Pilot studies with Rooibos herbal tea and Japanese green tea.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, A; Mokoena, M; Durbach, I; Lazarus, J; de Jager, S; Ackermann, H; Breytenbach, I; Okada, A; Usami, M; Hirose, Y; Ando, R; Yasui, T; Kohri, K

    2016-08-01

    Several experimental and animal studies have demonstrated that substances rich in antioxidants can reduce the physicochemical and peroxidative risk factors for calcium oxalate (CaOx) renal stone formation in urine and blood. However, there are very few such investigations in humans. In the present pilot study, two varieties of tea, a green one from Japan (JGT) and a herbal one from South Africa (Rooibos) (RT), both rich in antioxidants, were administered to a group of CaOx stone formers (SF) (n = 8) for 30 days. Both teas were analysed for polyphenols by high-performance liquid chromatography and for minerals by plasma atomic and optical emission spectroscopy. 24 h urines (baseline and day 30) were analysed for lithogenic factors. CaOx metastable limits and crystal nucleation and growth kinetics were also determined in each urine sample. Deposited crystals were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Blood samples were collected (baseline and day 30). Biomarkers of oxidative stress including plasma and urinary thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) were also determined. Urinary physicochemical risk factors were also investigated after ingestion of RT for 30 days in two control groups (CG1 and CG2), the latter one of which consisted of habitual JGT drinkers. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon signed rank tests and Mann-Whitney tests for paired and independent measurements, respectively. Several flavonoids and catechins were quantified in RT and JGT, respectively, confirming that both teas are rich sources of antioxidants. Mineral content was found to be far below dietary reference intakes. There were no significant changes in any of the urinary physicochemical or peroxidative risk factors in the control groups or in SF, except for the supersaturation (SS) of brushite (Bru) which decreased in the latter group after ingestion of JGT. Crystal morphology showed a tendency to change from

  12. Update on Oxalate Crystal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Elizabeth C.; Michet, Claude J.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Lieske, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate arthropathy is a rare cause of arthritis characterized by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals within synovial fluid. This condition typically occurs in patients with underlying primary or secondary hyperoxaluria. Primary hyperoxaluria constitutes a group of genetic disorders resulting in endogenous overproduction of oxalate, whereas secondary hyperoxaluria results from gastrointestinal disorders associated with fat malabsorption and increased absorption of dietary oxalate. In both conditions oxalate crystals can deposit in the kidney leading to renal failure. Since oxalate is primarily renally eliminated, it accumulates throughout the body in renal failure, a state termed oxalosis. Affected organs can include bones, joints, heart, eyes and skin. Since patients can present with renal failure and oxalosis before the underlying diagnosis of hyperoxaluria has been made, it is important to consider hyperoxaluria in patients who present with unexplained soft tissue crystal deposition. The best treatment of oxalosis is prevention. If patients present with advanced disease, treatment of oxalate arthritis consists of symptom management and control of the underlying disease process. PMID:23666469

  13. Oxalate films and red stains on Carrara marble.

    PubMed

    Realini, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Sansonetti, Antonio; Rampazzi, Laura; Colombini, Maria Perla; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Zanardini, Elisabetta; Abbruscato, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The analytical studies carried out during two different diagnostic surveys, respectively in 1983 and 2003, offered the opportunity to control decay phenomena development on stones facing Certosa of Pavia (Italy). Calcium oxalate films and red stains, present on Carrara marble surface, have been particularly focused; these are the only decay phenomena which apparently have remained unchanged during a period of twenty years. More sensitive and in-depth analytical studies (FTIR equipped with diamond cell, GC-MS, SEM-EDS and optical microscopy) achieved a better knowledge about their composition. Results allowed a critical evaluation of the role of oxalate films on the external marble surface and to suggest new hypotheses about the formation of red stains. PMID:16485663

  14. Urinary oxalate excretion by very low birth weight infants receiving parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Campfield, T; Braden, G

    1989-11-01

    Renal calcifications have been described in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and diuretic drug-associated hypercalciuria is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of this lesion. Hyperoxaluria is an important cause of renal stone formation in children and adults. Because parenteral nutrition solutions contain the oxalate precursors ascorbate and glycine, the relationship between total parenteral nutrition administration and oxalate excretion in VLBW infants was examined. Administration of approximately 0.5 g of total parenteral nutrition protein per kilogram per day to VLBW infants was associated with an increased urinary oxalate concentration and an increased urinary oxalate to creatinine ratio, when compared with VLBW infants receiving a glucose and electrolyte solution. A further increase in urinary oxalate concentration and oxalate to creatinine ratio was noted when total parenteral nutrition protein was increased to approximately 1.5 g of protein per kilogram per day. In VLBW infants who receive total parenteral nutrition, elevated urinary oxalate concentrations may develop and may be a factor in the pathogenesis of nephrocalcinosis in these infants.

  15. Tamm-Horsfall protein in recurrent calcium kidney stone formers with positive family history: abnormalities in urinary excretion, molecular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Markus; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Zipperle, Ljerka; Hess, Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) powerfully inhibits calcium oxalate crystal aggregation, but structurally abnormal THPs from recurrent calcium stone formers may promote crystal aggregation. Therefore, increased urinary excretion of abnormal THP might be of relevance in nephrolithiasis. We studied 44 recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers with a positive family history of stone disease (RCSF(fam)) and 34 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (C). Twenty-four-hour urinary THP excretion was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Structural properties of individually purified THPs were obtained from analysis of elution patterns from a Sepharose 4B column. Sialic acid (SA) contents of native whole 24-h urines, crude salt precipitates of native urines and individually purified THPs were measured. THP function was studied by measuring inhibition of CaOx crystal aggregation in vitro (pH 5.7, 200 mM sodium chloride). Twenty-four-hour urine excretion of THP was higher in RCSF(fam) (44.0 +/- 4.0 mg/day) than in C (30.9 +/- 2.2 mg/day, P = 0.015). Upon salt precipitation and lyophilization, elution from a Sepharose 4B column revealed one major peak (peak A, cross-reacting with polyclonal anti-THP antibody) and a second minor peak (peak B, not cross-reacting). THPs from RCSF(fam) eluted later than those from C (P = 0.021), and maximum width of THP peaks was higher in RCSF(fam )than in C (P = 0.024). SA content was higher in specimens from RCSF(fam) than from C, in native 24-h urines (207.5 +/- 20.4 mg vs. 135.2 +/- 16.1 mg, P = 0.013) as well as in crude salt precipitates of 24-h urines (10.4 +/- 0.5 mg vs. 7.4 +/- 0.9 mg, P = 0.002) and in purified THPs (75.3 +/- 9.3 microg/mg vs. 48.8 +/- 9.8 microg/mg THP, P = 0.043). Finally, inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal aggregation by 40 mg/L of THP was lower in RCSF(fam) (6.1 +/- 5.5%, range -62.0 to +84.2%) than in C (24.9 +/- 6.0%, range -39.8 to +82.7%), P = 0.022, and only 25 out of 44 (57%) THPs from RCSF

  16. FKBP-12 exhibits an inhibitory activity on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Han, In Sook; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Park, Jong Wook; Suh, Min Ho; Suh, Sung Il; Shin, Song Woo; Ahn, Su Yul; Choe, Byung Kil

    2002-01-01

    Urolithiasis and calcium oxalate crystal deposition diseases are still significant medical problems. In the course of nephrocalcin cDNA cloning, we have identified FKBP-12 as an inhibitory molecule of calcium oxalate crystal growth. lambdagt 11 cDNA libraries were constructed from renal carcinoma tissues and screened for nephrocalcin cDNA clones using anti-nephrocalcin antibody as a probe. Clones expressing recombinant proteins, which appeared to be antigenically cross-reactive to nephrocalcin, were isolated and their DNA sequences and inhibitory activities on the calcium oxalate crystal growth were determined. One of the clone lambda gt 11 #31-1 had a partial fragment (80 bp) of FKBP-12 cDNA as an insert. Therefore, a full-length FKBP-12 cDNA was PCR-cloned from the lambda gt 11 renal carcinoma cDNA library and was subcloned into an expression vector. The resultant recombinant FKBP-12 exhibited an inhibitory activity on the calcium oxalate crystal growth (Kd=10(-7) M). Physiological effect of the extracellular FKBP-12 was investigated in terms of macrophage activation and proinflammatory cytokine gene induction. Extracellular FKBP-12 failed to activate macrophages even at high concentrations. FKBP-12 seems an anti-stone molecule for the oxalate crystal deposition disease and recurrent stone diseases. PMID:11850587

  17. Spectroscopic study of the inhibition of calcium oxalate calculi by Larrea tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinales, Luis Alonso

    The causes of urolithiasis include such influences as diet, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors which have been documented as sources that aggravate urinary calculi depositions and aggregations, and, implicitly, as causes of urolithiasis. This study endeavors to detail the scientific mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate calculi formation, and, more importantly, their inhibition under growth conditions imposed by the traditional medicinal approach using the herbal extract, Larrea tridentata. The calculi were synthesized without and with Larrea tridentata infusion by employing the single diffusion gel technique. A visible decrease in calcium oxalate crystal growth with increasing amounts of Larrea tridentata herbal infusion was observed in photomicrographs, as well as a color change from white-transparent for pure crystals to light orange-brown for crystals with inhibitor. Analysis of the samples, which includes Raman, infrared absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques, demonstrate an overall transition in morphology of the crystals from monohydrate without herbal extract to dihydrate with inhibitor. Furthermore, the resulting data from Raman and infrared absorption support the possibilities of the influences, in this complex process, of NDGA and its derivative compounds from Larrea tridentata, and of the bonding of the magnesium of the inhibitor with the oxalate ion on the surface of the calculi crystals. This assumption corroborates well with the micrographs obtained under higher magnification, which show that the separated small crystallites consist of darker brownish cores, which we attribute to the dominance of growth inhibition by NDGA, surrounded by light transparent thin shells, which possibly correspond to passivation of the crystals by magnesium oxalate. The SEM results reveal the transformation from the dominant monoclinic structure of the calcium oxalate crystals grown alone to the tetragonal

  18. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Calcium Phosphate Stones in a Model of Hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy S; Asplin, John R; Frick, Kevin K; Granja, Ignacio; Culbertson, Christopher D; Ng, Adeline; Grynpas, Marc D; Bushinsky, David A

    2015-12-01

    Potassium citrate is prescribed to decrease stone recurrence in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate binds intestinal and urine calcium and increases urine pH. Citrate, metabolized to bicarbonate, should decrease calcium excretion by reducing bone resorption and increasing renal calcium reabsorption. However, citrate binding to intestinal calcium may increase absorption and renal excretion of both phosphate and oxalate. Thus, the effect of potassium citrate on urine calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation and stone formation is complex and difficult to predict. To study the effects of potassium citrate on urine supersaturation and stone formation, we utilized 95th-generation inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats. Rats were fed a fixed amount of a normal calcium (1.2%) diet supplemented with potassium citrate or potassium chloride (each 4 mmol/d) for 18 weeks. Urine was collected at 6, 12, and 18 weeks. At 18 weeks, stone formation was visualized by radiography. Urine citrate, phosphate, oxalate, and pH levels were higher and urine calcium level was lower in rats fed potassium citrate. Furthermore, calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation were higher with potassium citrate; however, uric acid supersaturation was lower. Both groups had similar numbers of exclusively calcium phosphate stones. Thus, potassium citrate effectively raises urine citrate levels and lowers urine calcium levels; however, the increases in urine pH, oxalate, and phosphate levels lead to increased calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation. Potassium citrate induces complex changes in urine chemistries and resultant supersaturation, which may not be beneficial in preventing calcium phosphate stone formation.

  19. Fungal production of citric and oxalic acid: importance in metal speciation, physiology and biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Gadd, G M

    1999-01-01

    The production of organic acids by fungi has profound implications for metal speciation, physiology and biogeochemical cycles. Biosynthesis of oxalic acid from glucose occurs by hydrolysis of oxaloacetate to oxalate and acetate catalysed by cytosolic oxaloacetase, whereas on citric acid, oxalate production occurs by means of glyoxylate oxidation. Citric acid is an intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with metals greatly influencing biosynthesis: growth limiting concentrations of Mn, Fe and Zn are important for high yields. The metal-complexing properties of these organic acids assist both essential metal and anionic (e.g. phosphate) nutrition of fungi, other microbes and plants, and determine metal speciation and mobility in the environment, including transfer between terrestrial and aquatic habitats, biocorrosion and weathering. Metal solubilization processes are also of potential for metal recovery and reclamation from contaminated solid wastes, soils and low-grade ores. Such 'heterotrophic leaching' can occur by several mechanisms but organic acids occupy a central position in the overall process, supplying both protons and a metal-complexing organic acid anion. Most simple metal oxalates [except those of alkali metals, Fe(III) and Al] are sparingly soluble and precipitate as crystalline or amorphous solids. Calcium oxalate is the most important manifestation of this in the environment and, in a variety of crystalline structures, is ubiquitously associated with free-living, plant symbiotic and pathogenic fungi. The main forms are the monohydrate (whewellite) and the dihydrate (weddelite) and their formation is of significance in biomineralization, since they affect nutritional heterogeneity in soil, especially Ca, P, K and Al cycling. The formation of insoluble toxic metal oxalates, e.g. of Cu, may confer tolerance and ensure survival in contaminated environments. In semi-arid environments, calcium oxalate formation is important in the formation and

  20. Renal stone risk assessment during Space Shuttle flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The metabolic and environmental factors influencing renal stone formation before, during, and after Space Shuttle flights were assessed. We established the contributing roles of dietary factors in relationship to the urinary risk factors associated with renal stone formation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 24-hr. urine samples were collected prior to, during space flight, and following landing. Urinary and dietary factors associated with renal stone formation were analyzed and the relative urinary supersaturation of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate (brushite), sodium urate, struvite and uric acid were calculated. RESULTS: Urinary composition changed during flight to favor the crystallization of calcium-forming salts. Factors that contributed to increased potential for stone formation during space flight were significant reductions in urinary pH and increases in urinary calcium. Urinary output and citrate, a potent inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, were slightly reduced during space flight. Dietary intakes were significantly reduced for a number of variables, including fluid, energy, protein, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first in-flight characterization of the renal stone forming potential in astronauts. With the examination of urinary components and nutritional factors, it was possible to determine the factors that contributed to increased risk or protected from risk. In spite of the protective components, the negative contributions to renal stone risk predominated and resulted in a urinary environment that favored the supersaturation of stone-forming salts. Dietary and pharmacologic therapies need to be assessed to minimize the potential for renal stone formation in astronauts during/after space flight.

  1. [Oxalobacter formigenes--characteristics and role in development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are one of the important factors for urinary calculi formation. While urease-positive bacteria and nanobacteria contribute to stone formation, Oxalobacter formigenes rods play a protective role against the development of urolithiasis. Proteus mirabilis alkaline environment of the urinary tract and cause crystallization mainly of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate). However, nanobacteria, due to the possibility of apatite deposition on the surface of their cells, have long been considered as an etiological factor of urinary calculi consisting of calcium phosphates. O. formigenes is an anaerobe using oxalate as the main source of carbon and energy and occurs as natural gastrointestinal microflora of humans and animals. These bacteria control the amount of oxalate excretion degrading oxalates and regulating their transport by intestinal epithelium. Lower colonization of the human colon by O. formigenes can cause increased oxalate excretion and lead to the development of oxalate urolithiasis. Due to the positive influence of O. formigenes, there is ongoing research into the use of this microorganism as a probiotic in the prophylaxis or treatment of hyperoxaluria, both secondary and primary. The results of these studies are very promising, but they still require continuation. Future studies focus on the exact characteristics of O. formigenes including their metabolism and the development of methods for applying as a therapeutic agent the bacteria or their enzymes degrading the oxalate. PMID:24379255

  2. 21 CFR 520.608 - Dicloxacillin sodium monohydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dicloxacillin sodium monohydrate capsules. 520.608 Section 520.608 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Dicloxacillin sodium monohydrate capsules. (a) Specifications. Each capsule contains dicloxacillin...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2184 - Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate. 520.2184... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2184 Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate. (a) Chemical name. 2-Sulfamido-6-chloroxyrazine, sodium. (b) Sponsor. See Nos....

  4. 21 CFR 520.2184 - Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate. 520.2184... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2184 Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate. (a) Chemical name. 2-Sulfamido-6-chloroxyrazine, sodium. (b) Sponsor. See Nos....

  5. [Two cases of uric acid stones unsuccessfully dissociated by oral chemolysis].

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Makoto; Yamada, Tetsuo; Murayama, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    We report two patients with renal uric acid (UA) stones in whom chemolysis by oral administration of alkaline citrate and allopurinol was unsuccessful. The stone in a 58-year old female did not dissolve because her urinary pH remained low throughout the day after alkaline citrate administration. The stone in a 50-year old man did not dissolve because his urinary pH was 5.5-6.0 after alkaline citrate administration. Alkalization of the urine helps reduce the stone size and the calcification of the stone. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy was performed and the stone composition showed mixed calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. The indication of oral chemolysis of uric acid stones is discussed.

  6. Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Pak, Charles Y. C.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    1999-01-01

    Space flight produces a number of metabolic and physiological changes in the crewmembers exposed to microgravity. Following launch, body fluid volumes, electrolyte levels, and bone and muscle undergo changes as the human body adapts to the weightless environment. Changes in the urinary chemical composition may lead to the potentially serious consequences of renal stone formation. Previous data collected immediately after space flight indicate changes in the urine chemistry favoring an increased risk of calcium oxalate and uric acid stone formation (n = 323). During short term Shuttle space flights, the changes observed include increased urinary calcium and decreased urine volume, pH and citrate resulting in a greater risk for calcium oxalate and brushite stone formation (n = 6). Results from long duration Shuttle/Mir missions (n = 9) followed a similar trend and demonstrated decreased fluid intake and urine volume and increased urinary calcium resulting in a urinary environment saturated with the calcium stone-forming salts. The increased risk occurs rapidly upon exposure to microgravity, continues throughout the space flight and following landing. Dietary factors, especially fluid intake, or pharmacologic intervention can significantly influence the urinary chemical composition. Increasing fluid intake to produce a daily urine output of 2 liters/day may allow the excess salts in the urine to remain in solution, crystals formation will not occur and a renal stone will not develop. Results from long duration crewmembers (n = 2) who had urine volumes greater than 2.5 L/day minimized their risk of renal stone formation. Also, comparisons of stone-forming risk in short duration crewmembers clearly identified greater risk in those who produced less than 2 liters of urine/day. However, hydration and increased urine output does not correct the underlying calcium excretion due to bone loss and only treats the symptoms and not the cause of the increased urinary salts

  7. Modulation of Calcium Oxalate Crystallization by Proteins and Small Molecules Investigated by In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, R.; Orme, C.; Cody, A. M.; Wierzbicki, A.; Hoyer, J.; Nancollas, G.; de Yoreo, J.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which biological inhibitors control nucleation and growth of inorganic crystals is a major focus of biomineral research. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), which plays a functional role in plant physiology, is also a source of pathogenesis in humans where it causes kidney stone disease. Although a great deal of research has been carried out on the modulation COM by proteins and small molecules, the basic mechanism has not yet been understood. However, because the proteins that play a role in COM growth have been identified and sequenced, COM provides an excellent model system for research into biomineral growth. In this study, in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor the COM surface under controlled growth conditions both from pure solutions and those doped with citrate and osteopontin (OPN) in order to determine their effects on surface morphology and growth dynamics at the molecular level. As with other solution-grown crystals such as calcite, COM grows on complex dislocation hillocks. In pure solution, while growth on the (010) face is isotropic, hillocks on the (-101) face exhibit anisotropic step kinetics. Steps of [-10-1] and <120> orientation are clearly delineated with the [-10-1] being the fast growing direction. When citrate is added to the solution, both growth rate and morphology are drastically changed on (-101) face, especially along the [-10-1] direction. This results in isotropic disc-shaped hillocks a shape that is then reflected in the macroscopic growth habit. In contrast, no large growth changes were observed on the (010) facet. At the same time, molecular modeling predicts an excellent fit of the citrate ion into the (-101) plane and a poor fit to the (010) face. Here we propose a model that reconciles the step-specific interactions implied by the AFM results with the face-specific predictions of the calculations. Finally, we present the results of doping with aspartic acid as well as

  8. [Composition analyses of urinary microcrystalline in urine of magnesium ammonium phosphate stones formers and its relationship with the stones formation].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Huang, Zhi-Jie; Hou, Shan-Hua; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    By means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nano-particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the composition, morphology, particle size and zeta potential of urinary microcrystalline in urine of magnesium ammonium phosphate stone formers were investigated. The components of stones were also analyzed. The results showed that there was a close relationship among stone components, urinary microcrystalline composition and urine pH. A high pH value of 6.5 or more usually appeared in the urine of magnesium ammonium phosphate stone formers. The main component of urine microcrystalline was magnesium ammonium phosphate crystals with different crystal water such as monohydrate or hexahydrate. Magnesium ammonium phosphate crystals are mainly petal-shaped, crosswise shape. These microcrystalline have an uneven particle size distribution, a wider distribution range, and apparent aggregation. There is no significant difference in the zeta potential between the magnesium ammonium phosphate stone formers (mean (-9.83 +/- 0.66) mV) and healthy control subjects (mean (-10.74 +/- 0.25) mV). This study can help predict the occurrence of urolithiasis, and provide inspiration to the prediction of the type of urinary stones.

  9. [EXPERIENCE OF USE OF BLEMAREN® IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS IN URIC ACID AND CALCIUM OXALATE UROLITHIASIS].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, O V; Yanenko, E K

    2015-01-01

    154 patients with urolithiasis were under outpatient observation for 2-8 years. Among them there were 76 women and 78 men aged 21-66 years, of which 46 patients with uric acid urolithiasis, and 88--with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Treatment of patients was carried out systematically, depending on their condition. Indications for the application of Blemaren® included the presence of uric acid stones, uric acid and/or oxalate crystalluria. The duration of treatment was 6.1 months. The dosage of the drug varied from 6 to 18 g per day and was selected individually, depending on the purpose of the appointment of Blemaren®. Reduction of the urine pH to 6.2- 6.8-7.2 was the criterion for properly selected dose. To dissolve uric acid stones in the presence of hyperuricemia and/or hyperuricuria, Blemaren® was administered in combination with allopurinol at a dose of 0.1 g 3-4 times a day. Besides pharmacotherapy, treatment included diet therapy. It was found that the morning urine pH in urate urolithiasis is sustainable and has a range of 5.0-6.0, in 80.4% of cases--range of 5.0-5.5. In calcium oxalate urolithiasis this parameter is also stable and has a range of 5.0-6.7, in 82.9% of cases--range of 5.5-6.0. Optimal urine pH to eliminate uric acid and oxalate crystalluria in patients with uric acid and calcium oxalate urolithiasis is the interval of 6.2-6.4. It was shown that Blemaren® is a highly effective agent for treatment and prevention of uric acid and calcium oxalate crystalluria in calcium oxalate and uric acid urolithiasis. Further, its effectiveness in dissolving of uric acid stones in the absence of an infectious inflammatory process is 82.3%. PMID:26859932

  10. Phenotypic characterization of kidney stone formers by endoscopic and histological quantification of intrarenal calcification.

    PubMed

    Linnes, Michael P; Krambeck, Amy E; Cornell, Lynn; Williams, James C; Korinek, Mark; Bergstralh, Eric J; Li, Xujian; Rule, Andrew D; McCollough, Cynthia M; Vrtiska, Terri J; Lieske, John C

    2013-10-01

    Interstitial Randall's plaques and collecting duct plugs are distinct forms of renal calcification thought to provide sites for stone retention within the kidney. Here we assessed kidney stone precursor lesions in a random cohort of stone formers undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Each accessible papilla was endoscopically mapped following stone removal. The percent papillary surface area covered by plaque and plug were digitally measured using image analysis software. Stone composition was determined by micro-computed tomography and infrared analysis. A representative papillary tip was biopsied. The 24-h urine collections were used to measure supersaturation and crystal growth inhibition. The vast majority (99%) of stone formers had Randall's plaque on at least 1 papilla, while significant tubular plugging (over 1% of surface area) was present in about one-fifth of patients. Among calcium oxalate stone formers the amount of Randall's plaque correlated with higher urinary citrate levels. Tubular plugging correlated positively with pH and brushite supersaturation but negatively with citrate excretion. Lower urinary crystal growth inhibition predicted the presence of tubular plugging but not plaque. Thus, tubular plugging may be more common than previously recognized among patients with all types of stones, including some with idiopathic calcium oxalate stones.

  11. Analysis of renal stones by capillary isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jarolímová, Zdeňka; Lubal, Přemysl; Kanický, Viktor

    2012-08-30

    An analytical method for the determination of the composition of renal stones by capillary isotachophoresis with conductometric detection was developed. Using different leading/terminating electrolyte systems, the qualitative and quantitative analysis of organic compounds (urate, xanthate, oxalate) and inorganic ions (phosphate, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), NH(4)(+)) species commonly present in mixed renal stones in three separate steps can be carried out with limits of detection about 10 μmol/L. The developed method was validated by the analysis of real samples and can be used for urinary calculi classification. In addition, it was verified that this method can also be employed for the determination of the above mentioned analytes in some other samples (bones, teeth) concerning apatite biominerals (fluoro-, carbonate-, chloro-apatite). PMID:22939127

  12. Calcium oxalates grown in human urine under different batch conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, R. C.; Kavanagh, J. P.; Heywood, B. R.; Rao, P. N.

    2005-11-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallisation in solution is often studied as it is the major crystalline phase in kidney stones, and as such contributes to a large proportion of pathological mineralisation. A variety of different methods are used to produce CaOx in urine, particularly with the goal of investigating mineral/organic interactions. Interpretation of growth phenomena in these studies often neglects the methodological differences, which are not always trivial. CaOx was grown simultaneously from a single pool of urine using six different protocols comparable to those found in the literature. The variations between the CaOx populations generated was great, with CaOx trihydrate detected as the most common hydromorph in two of the methods used, even though it is usually discounted in stone research. Crystal morphologies, density, particle size and surface area varied in all the methods tested, and a common technique used to remove organic matter from the crystal surface resulted in total phase transformation in one of the crystal populations. In conclusion, inter-assay comparisons of CaOx product are likely to be meaningless unless strict protocols are adhered to. Results indicate that certain crystalline properties considered relevant to stone formation may actually be a symptom of the experimental conditions.

  13. [Management of renal stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    The management of renal stones needs a recent and good quality imaging. Contrast medium injection is optional. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the most common treatment of renal stones. ESWL is indicated as first line treatment for less than 1.5cm stones. The stone-free (SF) rate at 3 months of ESWL is 70-80%. Results of ESWL for stones with more than 1000UH density or located in the lower calyx are poor. Flexible ureteroscopy (URS) is indicated in case of ESWL failure or for hyperdense, 1-2cm stones. The SF rate of flexible is 80%. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is indicated for complex or more than 2cm stones. Asymptomatic and non infected stones, especially if located in the lower calyx, do not need urological treatment but must be followed up. In all cases, renal stones needs a metabolic evaluation and treatment, and annual follow-up.

  14. Renal Stone Risk During Space Flight: Assessment and Countermeasure Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Sams, C. F.; Jones, J. A.; Pietrzke, R. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M. A.; Hudson, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has focused its future on exploration class missions including the goal of returning to the moon and landing on Mars. With these objectives, humans will experience an extended exposure to the harsh environment of microgravity and the associated negative effects on all the physiological systems of the body. Exposure to microgravity affects human physiology and results in changes to the urinary chemical composition during and after space flight. These changes are associated with an increased risk of renal stone formation. The development of a renal stone would have health consequences for the crewmember and negatively impact the success of the mission. As of January 2007, 15 known symptomatic medical events consistent with urinary calculi have been experienced by 13 U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts. Previous results from both MIR and Shuttle missions have demonstrated an increased risk for renal stone formation. These data have shown decreased urine volume, urinary pH and citrate levels and increased urinary calcium. Citrate, an important urinary inhibitor of calcium-containing renal stones binds with calcium in the urine, thereby reducing the amount of calcium available to form calcium oxalate stones. Urinary citrate also prevents calcium oxalate crystals from aggregating into larger crystals and into renal stones. In addition, citrate makes the urine less acidic which inhibits the development of uric acid stones. Potassium citrate supplementation has been successfully used to treat patients who have formed renal stones. The evaluation of potassium citrate as a countermeasure has been performed during the ISS Expeditions 3-6, 8, 11-13 and is currently in progress during the ISS Expedition 14 mission. Together with the assessment of stone risk and the evaluation of a countermeasure, this investigation provides an educational opportunity to all crewmembers. Individual urinary biochemical profiles are generated and the risk of stone formation is estimated

  15. Kidney stone risk following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Canales, Benjamin K; Gonzalez, Ricardo D

    2014-09-01

    Since the first report in 2005, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has been linked to a variety of metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. The studies with the highest level of evidence, performed in non-stone forming patients before and after RYGB, cite a number of kidney stone risk factors, including a 25% increase in urinary oxalate, a 30% decrease in urinary citrate, and reduction in urine volume by half a liter. In addition to these, recent clinical and experimental studies have contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this unique population. This review summarizes the current RYGB urinary chemistry profiles and epidemiological studies, outlines known and theoretical mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and hypocitrituria, and provides some standard recommendations for reducing stone risk in RYGB stone formers as well as some novel ones, including correction of metabolic acidosis and use of probiotics.

  16. Changes in Renal Function and Blood Pressure in Patients with Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worcester, Elaine M.

    2007-04-01

    Stone disease is a rare cause of renal failure, but a history of kidney stones is associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, particularly in overweight patients. Loss of renal function seems especially notable for patients with stones associated with cystinuria, hyperoxaluria, and renal tubular acidosis, in whom the renal pathology shows deposits of mineral obstructing inner medullary collecting ducts, often diffusely. However, even idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers have a mild but significant decrease in renal function, compared to age, sex and weight-matched normals, and appear to lose renal function with age at a slightly faster rate than non-stone formers. There is also an increased incidence of hypertension among stone formers, although women are more likely to be affected than men.

  17. [Kidney stone formation during space flight and long-term bed rest].

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Jun; Tozawa, Keiichi

    2011-10-01

    Microgravity environment like space flight or a condition requiring long-term bed-rest increase bone resorption and decrease bone formation, inducing the rapid decrease of bone minerals to osteoporosis. Bone mineral loss increases urinary calcium excretion and the risk of urinary stone formation. To clarify the influence of the conditions on renal stone formation, a 90-day bed rest test was performed to analyze the mechanism of microgravity or bed rest-induced stone formation and prevention by bisphosphonate medication and bed-rest exercise. As the results, renal stone formation was observed in control and exercise groups and no stone was seen in the medication group. In the medication group, urinary calcium excretion and relative supersaturation of calcium oxalate were lower than in the control group throughout the bed-rest and recovery period. Bisphosphonate is useful for the prevention of renal stone formation during space flight and long-term bed-rest. PMID:21960236

  18. 21 CFR 556.625 - Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.625 Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate. A... edible tissues of chickens....

  19. 21 CFR 556.625 - Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.625 Sodium sulfachloropyrazine monohydrate. A... edible tissues of chickens....

  20. 21 CFR 520.608 - Dicloxacillin sodium monohydrate capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... monohydrate equivalent to 50, 100, 200, or 500 milligrams of dicloxacillin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in... body weight, three times daily. In severe cases, up to 25 milligrams per pound of body weight...

  1. 2-Methyl-aspartic acid monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S; Dworkin, Jason P; Butcher, Ray J

    2013-11-30

    The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water mol-ecules while extensive N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array. PMID:24454270

  2. Bifunctional hydrogen bonds in monohydrated cycloether complexes.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Margarita M; Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the cooperative effects implicated in bifunctional hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) were studied (in monohydrated six-membered cycloether) within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and of the natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. The study was carried out in complexes formed by six-membered cycloether compounds (tetrahydropyrane, 1,4-dioxane, and 1,3-dioxane) and a water molecule. These compounds were used as model systems instead of more complicated molecules of biological importance. All the results were obtained at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) level theory using a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Attention was focused on the indicators of the cooperative effects that arise when a water molecule interacts simultaneously with a polar and a nonpolar portion of a six-membered cycloether (via bifunctional hydrogen bonds) and compared with conventional H-bonds where the water molecule only interacts with the polar portion of the cycloether. Different indicators of H-bonds strength, such as structural and spectroscopic data, electron charge density, population analysis, hyperconjugation energy and charge transference, consistently showed significant cooperative effects in bifunctional H-bonds. From the AIM, as well as from the NBO analysis, the obtained results allowed us to state that in the monohydrated six-membered cycloether, where the water molecule plays a dual role, as proton acceptor and proton donor, a mutual reinforcement of the two interactions occurs. Because of this feature, the complexes engaged by bifunctional hydrogen bonds are more stabilized than the complexes linked by conventional hydrogen bonds. PMID:20136161

  3. Bifunctional hydrogen bonds in monohydrated cycloether complexes.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Margarita M; Angelina, Emilio L; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the cooperative effects implicated in bifunctional hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) were studied (in monohydrated six-membered cycloether) within the framework of the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and of the natural bond orbitals (NBO) analysis. The study was carried out in complexes formed by six-membered cycloether compounds (tetrahydropyrane, 1,4-dioxane, and 1,3-dioxane) and a water molecule. These compounds were used as model systems instead of more complicated molecules of biological importance. All the results were obtained at the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) level theory using a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Attention was focused on the indicators of the cooperative effects that arise when a water molecule interacts simultaneously with a polar and a nonpolar portion of a six-membered cycloether (via bifunctional hydrogen bonds) and compared with conventional H-bonds where the water molecule only interacts with the polar portion of the cycloether. Different indicators of H-bonds strength, such as structural and spectroscopic data, electron charge density, population analysis, hyperconjugation energy and charge transference, consistently showed significant cooperative effects in bifunctional H-bonds. From the AIM, as well as from the NBO analysis, the obtained results allowed us to state that in the monohydrated six-membered cycloether, where the water molecule plays a dual role, as proton acceptor and proton donor, a mutual reinforcement of the two interactions occurs. Because of this feature, the complexes engaged by bifunctional hydrogen bonds are more stabilized than the complexes linked by conventional hydrogen bonds.

  4. Rejoinder to Lynda Stone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    Responds to Lynda Stone's comments on the author's essay on the interpretation of history. Demonstrates the linkages between his argument and those of Stone. Concludes by contesting some of her interpretations of his philosophical forebear, Edmund Husserl, and by pointing to the common objectives of both his and Stone's research. (DSK)

  5. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with /sup 45/Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO/sub 3/ and CaCl/sub 2/ than from CaC/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  6. The effect of glycosaminoglycans on the crystallisation of calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Kohri, K; Garside, J; Blacklock, N J

    1989-06-01

    The effect of glycosaminoglycans on urinary stone formation was evaluated using a mixed suspension, mixed product removal (MSMPR) crystallisation system together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the resulting crystals. Chondroitin sulphate was found to decrease the nucleation rate and to promote both the growth rate and suspension density. Results obtained with hyaluronic acid, although inconclusive, are similar to those given by chondroitin sulphate. Heparin sodium salt had a powerful inhibitory effect on both the nucleation rate and the suspension density, the effect increasing in proportion to the heparin concentration. SEM examination showed that the octahedral habit of calcium oxalate dihydrate was modified by the addition of heparin sodium salt and confirmed that the average crystal size in the presence of chondroitin sulphate and hyaluronic acid was significantly greater than the control or that found in the presence of heparin sodium salt. PMID:2502299

  7. [Formation of organic acids by fungi isolated from the surface of stone monuments].

    PubMed

    Sazanova, K V; Shchiparev, S M; Vlasov, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Capacity of the fungi isolated from the surface of stone monuments for acid formation was studied in cultures under various carbon sources and cultivation conditions. The composition of organic nutrients was adjusted according to the results of investigation of the surface layers from the monuments in urban environment. The primary soil formed at the surface of the stone monuments under urban conditions was shown to contain a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources and is a rich substrate for fungal growth. Oxalic acid was produced by fungi grown on media with various concentrations of sugars, sugar alcohols, and organic acids. Malic, citric, fumaric, and succinic acids were identified only at elevated carbohydrate concentrations, mostly in liquid cultures. Oxalic acid was the dominant among the acids produced by Aspergillus niger at all experimental setups. Unlike A. niger, the relative content of oxalic acid produced by Penicillium citrinum decreased at high carbohydrate concentrations. PMID:25844464

  8. [Formation of organic acids by fungi isolated from the surface of stone monuments].

    PubMed

    Sazanova, K V; Shchiparev, S M; Vlasov, D Iu

    2014-01-01

    Capacity of the fungi isolated from the surface of stone monuments for acid formation was studied in cultures under various carbon sources and cultivation conditions. The composition of organic nutrients was adjusted according to the results of investigation of the surface layers from the monuments in urban environment. The primary soil formed at the surface of the stone monuments under urban conditions was shown to contain a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources and is a rich substrate for fungal growth. Oxalic acid was produced by fungi grown on media with various concentrations of sugars, sugar alcohols, and organic acids. Malic, citric, fumaric, and succinic acids were identified only at elevated carbohydrate concentrations, mostly in liquid cultures. Oxalic acid was the dominant among the acids produced by Aspergillus niger at all experimental setups. Unlike A. niger, the relative content of oxalic acid produced by Penicillium citrinum decreased at high carbohydrate concentrations.

  9. Evaluation of sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyopteris justii as antioxidant agents and as inhibitors of the formation of calcium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Melo, Karoline Rachel Teodosio; Camara, Rafael Barros Gomes; Queiroz, Moacir Fernandes; Vidal, Arthur Anthunes Jacome; Lima, Camila Renata Machado; Melo-Silveira, Raniere Fagundes; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate crystals and other types of crystals are the cause of urolithiasis, and these are related to oxidative stress. The search for new compounds with antioxidant qualities and inhibitors of these crystal formations is therefore necessary. In this study, we extracted four sulfated polysaccharides, a fucoglucoxyloglucuronan (DJ-0.3v), a heterofucan (DJ-0.4v), and two glucans (DJ-0.5v and DJ-1.2v), from the marine alga Dictyopteris justii. The presence of sulfated polysaccharides was confirmed by chemical analysis and FT-IR. All the sulfated polysaccharides presented antioxidant activity under different conditions in some of the in vitro tests and inhibited the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. Fucan DJ-0.4v was the polysaccharide that showed the best antioxidant activity and was one of the best inhibitors of the crystallization of calcium oxalate. Glucan DJ-0.5v was the second most potent inhibitor of the formation of oxalate crystals, as it stabilized dehydrated oxalate crystals (less aggressive form), preventing them from transforming into monohydrate crystals (more aggressive form). The obtained data lead us to propose that these sulfated polysaccharides are promising agents for use in the treatment of urolithiasis. PMID:24287990

  10. [Relationship between metabolic syndrome and urinary stone disease].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-10-01

    Epidemiologically, there are many same characteristics among patients with urolithiasis, life-style related diseases and metabolic syndrome. In a comparison with the major urological diseases, the patients with stone disease have the largest amount of visceral fat on computerized tomography. The patients who finally had a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in urolithiasis were 43% of men and female 31%. The clinical features of the patients include increased urinary oxalate excretion, abnormal uric acid metabolism, and acidic urine. The basic studies by the animal experiments suggest that there is a close relationship between urolithiasis and metabolic syndrome. After the treatment of the urinary stone, it is very important to make a long-term follow-up by not only the prevention of recurrent stone episode but also life style management and medical treatment for metabolic syndrome. PMID:21960234

  11. Alterations in renal stone risk factors after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Pak, C. Y.; Cintron, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Exposure to the microgravity environment of space produces a number of physiological changes of metabolic and environmental origin that could increase the potential for renal stone formation. Metabolic, environmental and physicochemical factors that influence renal stone risk potential were examined in 24-hour urine samples from astronauts 10 days before launch and on landing day to provide an immediate postflight assessment of these factors. In addition, comparisons were made between male and female crewmembers, and between crewmembers on missions of less than 6 days and those on 6 to 10-day missions. Results suggest that immediately after space flight the risk of calcium oxalate and uric acid stone formation is increased as a result of metabolic (hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, pH) and environmental (lower urine volume) derangements, some of which could reflect residual effects of having been exposed to microgravity.

  12. [TRANSURETHRAL URETEROLITHOTRIPSY FOR UPPER URINARY TRACT STONE IN SMALL CHILDREN WEIGHNING AROUND 10KG].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yoko; Moriya, Kimihiko; Mitsui, Takahiko; Kitta, Takeya; Kanno, Yukiko; Kon, Masafumi; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2015-10-01

    Management strategy for upper urinary tract calculi in small children is still a matter controversial. We report successful management of ureteral stone with transurethral ureterolithotripsy (TUL) in 2 boys weighing around 10 kg. Case 1: A 2-year-old boy (78 cm in height, 9.6 kg in weight), who received hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone for the treatment of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, was referred to our hospital with a right 9-mm lower ureteral stone. For TUL, a 7.5 Fr rigid cystoscope was introduced into the ureter directly after dilation of the ureteral orifice. By using Holmium:YAG laser for lithotripsy, complete stone evacuation was achieved. Stone analysis showed the composition of calcium phosphate and calcium oxalate. Case 2: A 1-year-old boy (80 cm in height, 10.5 kg in weight) with neurofibromatosis type 1 was referred to our hospital with a left 7.5-mm ureteral stone at the ureteropelvic junction. TUL was performed using a 4.5 F rigid ureteroscope and Holmium:YAG laser. No residual stone was identified. Stone analysis showed the composition of calcium oxalate. TUL is a safe and feasible option for small children, even in boys weighing approximately 10 kg. PMID:26717789

  13. Renal Stone Risk during Spaceflight: Assessment and Countermeasure Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Jones, Jeffery A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Hudson, Ed K.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Vision for Space Exploration centers on exploration class missions including the goals of returning to the moon and landing on Mars. One of NASA's objectives is to focus research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect crewmembers during long duration voyages. Exposure to microgravity affects human physiology and results in changes in the urinary chemical composition favoring urinary supersaturation and an increased risk of stone formation. Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and development of a renal stone is significantly influenced by both dietary and environmental factors. Previous results from long duration Mir and short duration Shuttle missions have shown decreased urine volume, pH, and citrate levels and increased calcium. Citrate, an important inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, binds with urinary calcium reducing the amount of calcium available to form stones. Citrate inhibits renal stone recurrence by preventing crystal growth, aggregation, and nucleation and is one of the most common therapeutic agents used to prevent stone formation. Methods: Thirty long duration crewmembers (29 male, 1 female) participated in this study. 24-hour urines were collected and dietary monitoring was performed pre-, in-, and postflight. Crewmembers in the treatment group received two potassium citrate (KCIT) pills, 10 mEq/pill, ingested daily beginning 3 days before launch, all in-flight days and through 14 days postflight. Urinary biochemical and dietary analyses were completed. Results: KCIT treated subjects exhibited decreased urinary calcium excretion and maintained the levels of calcium oxalate supersaturation risk at their preflight levels. The increased urinary pH levels in these subjects reduced the risk of uric acid stones. Discussion: The current study investigated the use of potassium citrate as a countermeasure to minimize the risk of stone formation during ISS missions. Results suggest that supplementation

  14. Renal-Stone Risk Assessment During Space Shuttle Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1996-01-01

    The metabolic and environmental factors influencing renal stone formation before, during, and after Space Shuttle flights were assessed. We established the contributing roles of dietary factors in relationship to the urinary risk factors associated with renal stone formation. 24-hr urine samples were collected prior to, during space flight, and following landing. Urinary factors associated with renal stone formation were analyzed and the relative urinary supersaturation ratios of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate (brushite), sodium urate, struvite and uric acid were calculated. Food and fluid consumption was recorded for a 48-hr period ending with the urine collection. Urinary composition changed during flight to favor the crystallization of stone-forming salts. Factors that contributed to increased potential for stone formation during space flight were significant reductions in urinary pH and increases in urinary calcium. Urinary output and citrate, a potent inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, were slightly reduced during space flight. Dietary intakes were significantly reduced for a number of variables, including fluid, energy, protein, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium. This is the first in-flight characterization of the renal stone forming potential in astronauts. With the examination of urinary components and nutritional factors, it was possible to determine the factors that contributed to increased risk or protected from risk. In spite of the protective components, the negative contributions to renal stone risk predominated and resulted in a urinary environment that favored the supersaturation of stone-forming salts. The importance of the hypercalciuria was noted since renal excretion was high relative to the intake.

  15. Solubility, inhibition of crystallization and microscopic analysis of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of fractions from Humulus lupulus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckowiak, Anna; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Skibiński, PrzemysŁaw; GaweŁ, WiesŁaw; Zaczyńska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-11-01

    Procedures for obtaining noncytotoxic and nonmutagenic extracts from Humulus lupulus L. of high potency for inhibition and dissolving of model (calcium oxalate crystals) and real kidney stones, obtained from patients after surgery, are presented. Multistep extraction procedures were performed in order to obtain the preparations with the highest calcium complexing properties. The composition of obtained active fractions was analyzed by GC/MS and NMR methods. The influence of preparations on inhibition of formation and dissolution of model and real kidney stones were evaluated based on conductrometric titration, flame photometry and microscopic analysis. The "fraction soluble in methanol" obtained from water-alkaline extracts contains sugar alcohols and organic acids, and is effective in dissolving the kidney stones. The "fraction insoluble in methanol" contains only sugar derivatives and it changes the morphology of the crystals, making them "jelly-like". Both fractions are potentially effective in kidney stone therapy.

  16. Association analysis for oxalate concentration in spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening and breeding low-oxalate germplasm is a major objective in spinach breeding. This research aims to conduct association analysis and identify SNP markers associated with oxalate concentration in spinach germplasm. A total of 310 spinach genotypes including 300 USDA germplasm accessions and ...

  17. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  18. Antilithiatic Activity of phlorotannin rich extract of Sarghassum Wightii on Calcium Oxalate Urolithiais – In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sujatha, D.; Singh, Kiranpal; Vohra, Mursalin; Kumar, K. Vijay; Sunitha, S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Urolithiasis is a common urological disorder responsible for serious human affliction and cost to the society with a high recurrence rate. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluate the phlorotannin rich extract of Sargassum wightii using suitable in vitro and in vivo models to provide scientific evidence for its antilithiatic activity. Materials and Methods: To explore the effect of Sargassum wightii on calcium oxalate crystallization, in vitro assays like crystal nucleation, aggregation and crystal growth were performed. Calcium oxalate urolithiasis was induced in male Sprague dawley rats using a combination of gentamicin and calculi producing diet (5% ammonium oxalate and rat pellet feed). The biochemical parameters like calcium, oxalate, magnesium, phosphate, sodium and potassium were evaluated in urine, serum and kidney homogenates. Histopathological studies were also done to confirm the biochemical findings. Results: The yield of Sargassum wightii extract was found to be 74.5 gm/kg and confirmed by quantitative analysis. In vitro experiments with Sargassum wightii showed concentration dependent inhibition of calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth supported by SEM analysis. In the in vivo model, Sargassum wightii reduced both calcium and oxalate supersaturation in urine, serum and deposition in the kidney. The biochemical results were supported by histopathological studies. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that Sargassum wightii has the ability to prevent nucleation, aggregation and growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Sargassum wightii has better preventive effect on calcium oxalate stone formation indicating its strong potential to develop as a therapeutic option to prevent recurrence of urolithiasis. PMID:26200544

  19. Citrate, oxalate, sodium, and magnesium levels in fresh juices of three different types of tomatoes: evaluation in the light of the results of studies on orange and lemon juices.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erdal; Batislam, Ertan; Kacmaz, Murat; Erguder, Imge

    2010-06-01

    Fruit and vegetable juices containing citrate may be recommended as an alternative in mild to moderate level hypocitraturic calcium stone formers who cannot tolerate pharmacological treatment. Tomato has been proved a citrate-rich vegetable. Tomato juice usage as citrate sources in hypocitraturic recurrent stone formers were evaluated in the light of the results of studies on orange and lemon juices. Ten 100 ml samples were prepared from three different tomato types processed through a blender. These samples were examined in terms of citrate, oxalate, calcium, magnesium, and sodium contents. No difference was detected between the parameters tested in three different tomato juices. Fresh tomato juice may be useful in hypocitraturic recurrent stone formers due to its high content of citrate and magnesium, and low content of sodium and oxalate. As the three different types of tomatoes did not differ in terms of citrate, magnesium, sodium, and oxalate content, they may be useful for clinical use if also supported by clinical studies.

  20. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the calcium oxalate producing extremotolerant lichen Circinaria gyrosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, U.; Meessen, J.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Hübers, H.-W.; Rull, F.; Sánchez, F. J.; de la Torre, R.; de Vera, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of astrobiological exposure and simulation experiments in the BIOMEX project, the lichen Circinaria gyrosa was investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. Owing to the symbiotic nature of lichens and their remarkable extremotolerance, C. gyrosa represents a valid model organism in recent and current astrobiological research. Biogenic compounds of C. gyrosa were studied that may serve as biomarkers in Raman assisted remote sensing missions, e.g. ExoMars. The surface as well as different internal layers of C. gyrosa have been characterized and data on the detectability and distribution of β-carotene, chitin and calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) are presented in this study. Raman microspectroscopy was applied on natural samples and thin sections. Although calcium oxalates can also be formed by rare geological processes it may serve as a suitable biomarker for astrobiological investigations. In the model organism C. gyrosa, it forms extracellular crystalline deposits embedded in the intra-medullary space and its function is assumed to balance water uptake and gas exchange during the rare, moist to wet environmental periods that are physiologically favourable. This is a factor that was repeatedly demonstrated to be essential for extremotolerant lichens and other organisms. Depending on the decomposition processes of whewellite under extraterrestrial environmental conditions, it may not only serve as a biomarker of recent life, but also of past and fossilized organisms.

  1. Anhydrous Amorphous Calcium Oxalate Nanoparticles from Ionic Liquids: Stable Crystallization Intermediates in the Formation of Whewellite.

    PubMed

    Gehl, Aaron; Dietzsch, Michael; Mondeshki, Mihail; Bach, Sven; Häger, Tobias; Panthöfer, Martin; Barton, Bastian; Kolb, Ute; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are not well understood. To test the viability and the limits of the classical crystallization, new model systems for crystallization are needed. With a view to elucidating the formation of an amorphous precursor and its subsequent crystallization, the crystallization of calcium oxalate, a biomineral widely occurring in plants, is investigated. Amorphous calcium oxalate (ACO) precipitated from an aqueous solution is described as a hydrated metastable phase, as often observed during low-temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. In the presence of water, ACO rapidly transforms into hydrated whewellite (monohydrate, CaC2 O4 ⋅H2 O, COM). The problem of fast crystallization kinetics is circumvented by synthesizing anhydrous ACO from a pure ionic liquid (IL-ACO) for the first time. IL-ACO is stable in the absence of water at ambient temperature. It is obtained as well-defined, non-agglomerated particles with diameters of 15-20 nm. When exposed to water, it crystallizes to give (hydrated) COM through a dissolution/recrystallization mechanism. PMID:26549793

  2. A new compound in kidney stones? Powder X-ray diffraction study of calcium glycinate trihydrate.

    PubMed

    Le Bail, Armel; Daudon, Michel; Bazin, Dominique

    2013-07-01

    The present identification of a new compound in kidney stones is relevant in clinical practice. Here, poly[[di-μ-aqua-bis(glycinato-κ(2)N,O)calcium(II)] monohydrate], {[Ca(C2H4NO2)2(H2O)2]·H2O}n, has been identified in a possible kidney concretion, although it could be a 'false calculus' associated with Munchausen syndrome. The crystal packing is characterized by an infinite zigzag chain of Ca atoms in [Ca(OW)4O2N2] (OW is a water O atom) square antiprisms, sharing edges formed by water molecules. An uncoordinated water molecule interconnects the parallel chains in a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding scheme. Similarities between the trihydrate and the monohydrate are described. PMID:23832032

  3. Oxalates in some Indian green leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Radek, M; Savage, G P

    2008-05-01

    The soluble and total oxalate contents of 11 leafy vegetables grown in India were determined. Spinach, purple and green amaranth and colocasia contained high levels of total oxalates, which ranged from 5,138.0 +/- 37.6 mg/100 g dry matter up to 12,576.1 +/- 107.9 mg/100 g dry matter. Seven other leafy vegetables (curry, drumstick, shepu, fenugreek, coriander, radish and onion stalks) contained only insoluble oxalate, which ranged from 209.0 +/- 5.0 mg/100 g dry matter to 2,774.9 +/-18.4 mg/100 g dry matter. In vitro digestion of the samples showed that the gastric available oxalate was 10% lower than the values obtained from acid extraction and that intestinal available oxalate was 20% lower than the values obtained following hot water extraction. The percentage calcium bound in the insoluble oxalate fraction of the dried leafy vegetables ranged from 3.3% to 86.7% of the total calcium. Addition of four different sources of calcium (low fat milk, whole milk, calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate) resulted in a range of 32-100% reductions of intestinal available oxalate in the mixture. PMID:18335334

  4. The scientific basis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Predilection and precipitation, promotion and proscription.

    PubMed

    Ryall, R L

    1993-01-01

    The documentation of no other human disease threads as far into antiquity as that of urinary stones. However, despite this arcane history and the development of novel means of treating the condition, the basic mechanisms of stone formation and the identity of indicators of recurrence remain largely shrouded in uncertainty. This review is concerned with what scientific information is known about the cause and formation of calcium oxalate stones--the most common component of human uroliths. Stone pathogenesis can be broadly divided into two main processes: (1) nucleation of insoluble crystals in urine and (2) retention of those crystals within the urinary tract. The first section of the article presents the various factors that are known or surmised to influence the likelihood that crystals will nucleate within the renal collecting system, and these are considered from the perspective of both their relation to metabolic disorders and their usefulness as diagnostic and therapeutic indicators. A discussion of factors that may influence the probability that newly formed crystals will be retained within the nephron forms the second part of the review. In developing this more mechanistic aspect of the disease the epitaxy, matrix and inhibitor theories of stone formation are presented, with particular emphasis being placed on their relation to crystal nucleation, growth or aggregation, and experimental evidence both for and against the hypotheses are discussed.

  5. Influence of impurities on the crystallization of dextrose monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markande, Abhay; Nezzal, Amale; Fitzpatrick, John; Aerts, Luc; Redl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The effects of impurities on dextrose monohydrate crystallization were investigated. Crystal nucleation and growth kinetics in the presence of impurities were studied using an in-line focused beam reflectance monitoring (FBRM) technique and an in-line process refractometer. Experimental data were obtained from runs carried out at different impurity levels between 4 and 11 wt% in the high dextrose equivalent (DE) syrup. It was found that impurities have no significant influence on the solubility of dextrose in water. However, impurities have a clear influence on the nucleation and growth kinetics of dextrose monohydrate crystallization. Nucleation and growth rate were favored by low levels of impurities in the syrup.

  6. The tetrapeptide Z-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-OBg monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Schiemann, Norbert; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2003-08-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern of Z-Leu-Aib-Pro-Val-OBg monohydrate [(N-benzhydrylamino)carbonylmethyl N-benzyloxycarbonyl-alpha-aminoisobutyrylprolylvalinate monohydrate], C(43)H(55)N(5)O(8).H(2)O, is unusual for a tetrapeptide because, in addition to a 1-->4 hydrogen bond, a second hydrogen bond of the type 1-->5 is formed. This folding reflects the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern that this amino acid sequence adopts in the naturally occurring peptaibol alamethicin.

  7. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING OXALATE TYPE CARRIER

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

    1960-04-19

    A method is given for dissolving and reprecipitating an oxalate carrier precipitate in a carrier precipitation process for separating and recovering plutonium from an aqueous solution. Uranous oxalate, together with plutonium being carried thereby, is dissolved in an aqueous alkaline solution. Suitable alkaline reagents are the carbonates and oxulates of the alkali metals and ammonium. An oxidizing agent selected from hydroxylamine and hydrogen peroxide is then added to the alkaline solution, thereby oxidizing uranium to the hexavalent state. The resulting solution is then acidified and a source of uranous ions provided in the acidified solution, thereby forming a second plutoniumcarrying uranous oxalate precipitate.

  8. Urine risk factors in children with calcium kidney stones and their siblings.

    PubMed

    Bergsland, Kristin J; Coe, Fredric L; White, Mark D; Erhard, Michael J; DeFoor, William R; Mahan, John D; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Asplin, John R

    2012-06-01

    Calcium nephrolithiasis in children is increasing in prevalence and tends to be recurrent. Although children have a lower incidence of nephrolithiasis than adults, its etiology in children is less well understood; hence, treatments targeted for adults may not be optimal in children. To better understand metabolic abnormalities in stone-forming children, we compared chemical measurements and the crystallization properties of 24-h urine collections from 129 stone formers matched to 105 non-stone-forming siblings and 183 normal, healthy children with no family history of stones, all aged 6 to 17 years. The principal risk factor for calcium stone formation was hypercalciuria. Stone formers have strikingly higher calcium excretion along with high supersaturation for calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate, and a reduced distance between the upper limit of metastability and supersaturation for calcium phosphate, indicating increased risk of calcium phosphate crystallization. Other differences in urine chemistry that exist between adult stone formers and normal individuals such as hyperoxaluria, hypocitraturia, abnormal urine pH, and low urine volume were not found in these children. Hence, hypercalciuria and a reduction in the gap between calcium phosphate upper limit of metastability and supersaturation are crucial determinants of stone risk. This highlights the importance of managing hypercalciuria in children with calcium stones.

  9. Calcium oxalate toxicity in renal epithelial cells: the mediation of crystal size on cell death mode.

    PubMed

    Sun, X-Y; Gan, Q-Z; Ouyang, J-M

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in renal epithelial cells has been studied extensively, but the cell death mode induced by CaOx with different physical properties, such as crystal size and crystal phase, has not been studied in detail. In this study, we comparatively investigated the differences of cell death mode induced by nano-sized (50 nm) and micron-sized (10 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) to explore the cell death mechanism. The effect of the exposure of nano-/micron-sized COM and COD crystals toward the African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were investigated by detecting cell cytoskeleton changes, lysosomal integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), apoptosis and/or necrosis, osteopontin (OPN) expression, and malondialdehyde (MDA) release. Nano-/micron-sized COM and COD crystals could cause apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Nano-sized crystals primarily caused apoptotic cell death, leading to cell shrinkage, phosphatidylserine ectropion, and nuclear shrinkage, whereas micron-sized crystals primarily caused necrotic cell death, leading to cell swelling and cell membrane and lysosome rupture. Nano-sized COM and COD crystals induced much greater cell death (sum of apoptosis and necrosis) than micron-sized crystals, and COM crystals showed higher cytotoxicity than the same-sized COD crystals. Both apoptosis and necrosis could lead to mitochondria depolarization and elevate the expression of OPN and the generation of lipid peroxidation product MDA. The amount of expressed OPN and generated MDA was positively related to cell injury degree. The physicochemical properties of crystals could affect the cell death mode. The results of this study may provide a basis for future studies on cell death mechanisms.

  10. Calcium oxalate toxicity in renal epithelial cells: the mediation of crystal size on cell death mode

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X-Y; Gan, Q-Z; Ouyang, J-M

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in renal epithelial cells has been studied extensively, but the cell death mode induced by CaOx with different physical properties, such as crystal size and crystal phase, has not been studied in detail. In this study, we comparatively investigated the differences of cell death mode induced by nano-sized (50 nm) and micron-sized (10 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) to explore the cell death mechanism. The effect of the exposure of nano-/micron-sized COM and COD crystals toward the African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were investigated by detecting cell cytoskeleton changes, lysosomal integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), apoptosis and/or necrosis, osteopontin (OPN) expression, and malondialdehyde (MDA) release. Nano-/micron-sized COM and COD crystals could cause apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Nano-sized crystals primarily caused apoptotic cell death, leading to cell shrinkage, phosphatidylserine ectropion, and nuclear shrinkage, whereas micron-sized crystals primarily caused necrotic cell death, leading to cell swelling and cell membrane and lysosome rupture. Nano-sized COM and COD crystals induced much greater cell death (sum of apoptosis and necrosis) than micron-sized crystals, and COM crystals showed higher cytotoxicity than the same-sized COD crystals. Both apoptosis and necrosis could lead to mitochondria depolarization and elevate the expression of OPN and the generation of lipid peroxidation product MDA. The amount of expressed OPN and generated MDA was positively related to cell injury degree. The physicochemical properties of crystals could affect the cell death mode. The results of this study may provide a basis for future studies on cell death mechanisms. PMID:27551481

  11. Sulphite quantification on damaged stones and mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, G.; Zappia, G.; Sabbioni, C.

    An analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous identification and quantification of the sulphite and main anions found in degradation patinas on historic buildings and monuments, as well as on stones and mortars exposed in simulation chamber and field tests. The quantification of anions was performed by means of ion chromatography (IC), after the stabilisation of sulphite with a D(-) fructose solution. The utilisation of two different chromatographic columns, connected in series, allowed the simultaneous determination of fluoride, acetate, formate, chloride, nitrite, bromide, iodide, oxyhalides, nitrate, phosphate, sulphite, sulphate and oxalate, in a time of approximately 25 min, without interference and with high reproducibility. Finally, the results show how in the majority of cases the formation of sulphite is an intermediate stage in the sulphation process affecting building materials exposed to the environment and needs to be measured together with sulphate, in order to obtain a correct interpretation of degradation mechanisms on such materials.

  12. Renal stone disease and obesity: what is important for urologists and nephrologists?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed H; Ahmed, Hassan T; Khalil, Atif A

    2012-01-01

    Currently, obesity has reached an epidemic stage and represents a challenge for health authorities across the globe. Certainly, with emergence of obesity epidemic, we started to see an increase in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and nephrolithiasis. Interestingly, epidemiologic studies have shown that the incident stone risk increases with body mass index (BMI), and no further increase in risk is noticed when the BMI > 30 kg/m(2). Furthermore, metabolic syndrome and diabetes are also associated with an increase in the incidence of renal stones disease. The shared links between these metabolic disorders are insulin resistance. Furthermore, insulin resistance is thought to alter renal acid-base metabolism, resulting in a lower urine pH and increased risk of uric acid stone disease. Obesity is also associated with excess nutritional intake of lithogenic substances such as refined sugars, low fluid intake, calcium, oxalate, and purine-rich foods. Obesity is also associated with an increase in incidence of urinary tract infection. Recent reports suggested that renal stone disease carries risk of myocardial infarction, progression of CKD, and diabetes. Alarmingly, orlistat (obesity medication) and bariatric surgery are associated with hyperoxaluria and associated stone formation and even oxalate nephropathy. Certainly, the many health risks of obesity, including nephrolithiasis, will add more burden on urologists and nephrologists. Shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, and ureteroscopy are all safe procedures in obese individuals. Further research is urgently needed to address the pathophysiology and management of obesity-induced renal stones disease.

  13. Automated homogeneous oxalate precipitation of Pu(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, S.L.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Mills, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Homogeneous oxalate precipitation using diethyl oxalate was compared to precipitating Pu(III) oxalate with solid oxalic acid. The diethyl oxalate technique at 75{degree}C is better because it gives 50% less plutonium in the filtrate with a reasonable filtering time. Also, the procedure for the homogeneous precipitation is easier to automate because the liquid diethyl oxalate is simpler to introduce into the precipitator than solid oxalic acid. It also provides flexibility because the hydrolysis rate and therefore the precipitation rate can be controlled by varying the temperature. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-01

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process. PMID:24389750

  15. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  16. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  17. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  18. Magnetic Compensation in the Bimetallic Oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Peter L; Fishman, Randy Scott; Reboredo, Fernando A; Moreno, Juana

    2008-01-01

    Bimetallic oxalates are layered molecule-based magnets with either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic interactions between transition metals M(II) and M'(III) on an open honeycomb lattice. Some Fe(II)Fe(III) bimetallic oxalates exhibit magnetic compensation (MC) at a compensation temperature Tcomp ≈ 30 K below the ferrimagnetic transition temperature Tc ≈ 45 K. To see if MC is possible in other bimetallic oxalates, we construct a theoretical model for bimetallic oxalates that exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions. By varying the M(II) and M'(III) average orbital angular momentum, which can be controlled by the choice of interlayer cations, we have found regions of MC in the families M(II)Mn(III) with M = Fe, Co, or Ni and V(II)M'(III) with M' = Cr or V but not in the family M(II)Ru(III) with M = Fe or Cu.

  19. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms.

  20. Modeling the Adsorption of Oxalate onto Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Elena; Emiroglu, Caglayan; García, David; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Huertas, F Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a multiscale modeling of the interaction of oxalate with clay mineral surfaces from macroscale thermodynamic equilibria simulations to atomistic calculations is presented. Previous results from macroscopic adsorption data of oxalate on montmorillonite in 0.01 M KNO3 media at 25 °C within the pH range from 2.5 to 9 have been used to develop a surface complexation model. The experimental adsorption edge data were fitted using the triple-layer model (TLM) with the aid of the FITEQL 4.0 computer program. Surface complexation of oxalate is described by two reactions: >AlOH + Ox(2-) + 2H(+) = >AlOxH + H2O (log K = 14.39) and >AlOH + Ox(2-) + H(+) = >AlOx(-) + H2O (log K = 10.39). The monodentate complex >AlOxH dominated adsorption below pH 4, and the bidentate complex >AlOx(-) was predominant at higher pH values. Both of the proposed inner-sphere oxalate species are qualitatively consistent with previously published diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic results for oxalate on montmorillonite edge surface (Chem. Geol. 2014, 363, 283-292). Atomistic computational studies have been performed to understand the interactions at the molecular level between adsorbates and mineral surface, showing the atomic structures and IR frequency shifts of the adsorption complexes of oxalate with the edge surface of a periodic montmorillonite model. PMID:26444928

  1. Effect of Lagenaria siceraria fruit powder on sodium oxalate induced urolithiasis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Takawale, Rahul V.; Mali, Vishal R.; Kapase, Chinmay U.; Bodhankar, Subhash L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In spite of advances in the present practice of medicine, the formation and growth of calculi continues to trouble mankind, as there is no satisfactory drug to treat kidney stones. In India, many indigenous drugs are in use for the treatment of urinary calculus disease. Objective: The present study was intended to determine anti-urolithiatic effect of Lagenaria siceraria fruit powder (LSFP) against sodium oxalate (NaOx) induced urolithiasis in rats. Materials and Methods: Animals were grouped as Vehicle Group (received vehicle gum acacia 2% w/v 1 mL/kg/p.o.), NaOx Group(Sodium oxalate 70 mg/kg,i.p.), LSFP Group (500 mg/kg, p.o. LSFP suspended in gum acacia 2% + Sodium oxalate 70 mg/kg), Cystone Group (500 mg/kg, p.o. Cystone suspended in gum acacia 2% + Sodium oxalate 70 mg/kg). Result: The increased severity of microscopic calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals deposition along with increased concentration in the kidney was seen after 7 days of NaOx (70 mg/kg, i.p.) pre-treatment. LSFP (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and standard marketed formulation Cystone (500 mg/kg, p.o.) caused a significant reversal of NaOx-induced changes in ion excretion and urinary CaOx concentration in 7 days treatment. Conclusion: From the results, it was concluded that LSFP showed beneficial effect against urolithiasis by decreasing CaOx excretion and preventing crystal deposition in the kidney tubules. PMID:22707863

  2. 12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FLOOR 2; STONE CRANE IN PLACE FOR ROCK STONES; STONE CRANE HAS OAK SPAR, JIB AND BRACE, METAL SCREW, IRON YOKE AND DOGS; IRON PINS FIT THROUGH HOLES IN DOGS INTO HOLES DRILLED IN RUNNER STONE - Hook Windmill, North Main Street at Pantigo Road, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  3. Oxygen nano-bubble water reduces calcium oxalate deposits and tubular cell injury in ethylene glycol-treated rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yasuhiko; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Okada, Atsushi; Kubota, Yasue; Kawai, Noriyasu; Itoh, Yasunori; Tozawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2013-08-01

    Renal tubular cell injury induced by oxalate plays an important role in kidney stone formation. Water containing oxygen nano-bubbles (nanometer-sized bubbles generated from oxygen micro-bubbles; ONB) has anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ONB water on kidney stone formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-treated rats. We divided 60 rats, aged 4 weeks, into 5 groups: control, the water-fed group; 100 % ONB, the 100 % ONB water-fed group; EG, the EG treated water-fed group; EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB, water containing EG and 50 % or 100 % ONB, respectively. Renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and renal expression of inflammation-related proteins, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the crystal-binding molecule hyaluronic acid were compared among the 5 groups. In the control and 100 % ONB groups, no renal CaOx deposits were detected. In the EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB groups, ONB water significantly decreased renal CaOx deposits, urinary NAG excretion, and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, osteopontin, and hyaluronic acid expression and increased renal superoxide dismutase-1 expression compared with the EG group. ONB water substantially affected kidney stone formation in the rat kidney by reducing renal tubular cell injury. ONB water is a potential prophylactic agent for kidney stones.

  4. The Relationship between Serum Oxalic Acid, Central Hemodynamic Parameters and Colonization by Oxalobacter formigenes in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gulhan, Baris; Turkmen, Kultigin; Aydin, Merve; Gunay, Murat; Cıkman, Aytekin; Kara, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Elevated pulse wave velocity (PWV) and central aortic blood pressures are independent predictors of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Oxalic acid is a uremic retention molecule that is extensively studied in the pathogenesis of calcium oxalate stones. Oxalobacter formigenes, a member of the colon microbiota, has important roles in oxalate homeostasis. Data regarding the colonization by and the exact role of O. formigenes in the pathogenesis of oxalic acid metabolism in HD patients are scant. Hence, we aimed to determine the relationship between fecal O. formigenes colonization, serum oxalic acid and hemodynamic parameters in HD patients with regard to the colo-reno-cardiac axis. Methods Fifty HD patients were enrolled in this study. PWV and central aortic systolic (cASBP) and diastolic blood pressures (cADBP) were measured with a Mobil-O-Graph (I.E.M. GmbH, Stolberg, Germany). Serum oxalic acid levels were assessed by ELISA, and fecal O. formigenes DNA levels were isolated and measured by real-time PCR. Results Isolation of fecal O. formigenes was found in only 2 HD patients. One of them had 113,609 copies/ml, the other one had 1,056 copies/ml. Serum oxalic acid levels were found to be positively correlated with PWV (r = 0.29, p = 0.03), cASBP (r = 0.33, p = 0.001) and cADBP (r = 0.42, p = 0.002) and negatively correlated with LDL (r = −0.30, p = 0.03). In multivariate linear regression analysis, PWV was independently predicted by oxalic acid, glucose and triglyceride. Conclusions This is the first study that demonstrates the absence of O. formigenes as well as a relation between serum oxalic acid and cASBP, cADBP and PWV in HD patients. Replacement of O. formigenes with pre- and probiotics might decrease serum oxalic acid levels and improve cardiovascular outcomes in HD patients. PMID:26195968

  5. High precision mapping of kidney stones using μ-IR spectroscopy to determine urinary lithogenesis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Francisco; Ortiz-Alías, Pilar; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Evolution of urinary lithiasis is determined by the metabolism and life-style of the related patient. The appropriate classification of the stone is mandatory for the identification of the lithogenic process. In this study, cros-sections from a single stone of each of the most frequent urolithiasis types (calcium oxalate mono and dihydrate and carbonate apatite) have been selected and imaged using IR microspectroscopy. Moreover, the use of high definition sFTIR (synchrotron source) has revealed hidden information to the conventional FTIR. This work has demonstrated that minor components become key factors on the description of the stages of stone formation. Intensity map for COM (1630 cm(-1) peak). The high spatial definition achieved is key for the precise description of the kidney stone history.

  6. Kidney Stones in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nephrology American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Stones in Children Page Content On this page: ...

  7. Renal stones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Norma; DasGupta, Ranan

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of renal stones during pregnancy is a complex problem. Risks to the fetus from ionising radiation and interventional procedures need to be balanced with optimising clinical care for the mother. Management of such patients requires a clear understanding of available options, with a multidisciplinary team approach. In this review, we discuss the role of different diagnostic tests including ultrasound, magnetic resonance urography, and computerized tomography. We also provide an update on recent developments in the treatment of renal stones during pregnancy. Expectant management remains first-line treatment. Where definitive treatment of the stone is required, new evidence suggests that ureteroscopic stone removal may be equally safe, and possibly better than traditional temporising procedures. PMID:27512433

  8. Gallbladder stones: shockwave therapy.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, M

    1992-11-01

    Within the past 7 years, gallbladder lithotripsy by shockwaves has been proven to be a safe and effective non-invasive therapy for selected patients with gallstone disease. While regulatory decisions prevent shockwave therapy from being used more frequently in the USA, the number of patients treated in Europe and Asia is increasing constantly. At our institution, a relatively constant number of about 250 new patients per year have been treated since 1988 (Figure 4). About 20% of patients with gallstones are suitable for shockwave therapy according to present criteria. The rate of evacuation of all fragments is determined by the initial stone number and stone size, the success at stone fragmentation, adjuvant bile acid dissolution therapy, and gallbladder contractility. In contrast to laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Dubois et al, 1989; Perissat et al, 1989; Southern Surgeons Club, 1991), shockwave therapy does not require general anaesthesia. And in contrast to direct contact dissolution therapy of gallbladder stones using MTBE (Thistle et al, 1989), lithotripsy is non-invasive. In the majority of patients, complete fragment disappearance takes several months. Preliminary analyses of the cost-effectiveness of lithotripsy have revealed that lithotripsy, including retreatments and bile acid medication for recurrent stones, costs about as much as open cholecystectomy (Rothschild et al, 1990; Bass et al, 1991). The ideal patient for gallbladder lithotripsy has a single radiolucent stone < or = 20-25 mm in diameter in a functioning gallbladder (Figure 1). In patients with such stones, nearly all studies have confirmed a favourable outcome with rapid clearance of all fragments and a relatively low rate of stone recurrence. For carefully selected patients, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy is therefore an attractive non-invasive therapy.

  9. Evidence for a distinct gut microbiome in kidney stone formers compared to non-stone formers.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua M; Moazami, Saman; Qiu, Yunping; Kurland, Irwin; Chen, Zigui; Agalliu, Ilir; Burk, Robert; Davies, Kelvin P

    2016-10-01

    with oxalate levels (r = -0.60, p < 0.06) and Escherichia trended to an inverse correlation with citrate (r = -0.56, p < 0.08). We also compared bacterial abundance between uric acid (UA) stone formers (n = 5) and non UA stone formers (n = 18) and found no significant difference between them. We identified two genus of bacteria in the GMB that had significant association with KSD. Interestingly, components of the 24-h urine appear to be correlated to bacterial abundance. These preliminary studies for the first time associate differences in the GMB with kidney stone formation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the potential causative role of preexisting dysbiosis in kidney stone disease. PMID:27115405

  10. Evidence for a distinct gut microbiome in kidney stone formers compared to non-stone formers.

    PubMed

    Stern, Joshua M; Moazami, Saman; Qiu, Yunping; Kurland, Irwin; Chen, Zigui; Agalliu, Ilir; Burk, Robert; Davies, Kelvin P

    2016-10-01

    with oxalate levels (r = -0.60, p < 0.06) and Escherichia trended to an inverse correlation with citrate (r = -0.56, p < 0.08). We also compared bacterial abundance between uric acid (UA) stone formers (n = 5) and non UA stone formers (n = 18) and found no significant difference between them. We identified two genus of bacteria in the GMB that had significant association with KSD. Interestingly, components of the 24-h urine appear to be correlated to bacterial abundance. These preliminary studies for the first time associate differences in the GMB with kidney stone formation. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the potential causative role of preexisting dysbiosis in kidney stone disease.

  11. Dynamic mapping analysis of recurrent calcium-rich kidney stones sequentially excreted from a single patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, C. A.; Rodgers, A. L.; Prozesky, V. M.; Przybylowicz, W. J.

    1997-02-01

    The technique of Dynamic Analysis (DA) has been applied to obtain information on the distribution of minor components and trace elements (TE) in a series of calcium oxalate (CaOx) human kidney stones by nuclear microprobe (NMP) determination. In the present study microanalysis was further expanded to include information on Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S and Cl. Interest was also focused on determining levels of directional variability in elemental concentrations of Ca, minor components and TE throughout selected micro-regions of single stones by DA.

  12. The Structure of an Oxalate Oxidoreductase Provides Insight into Microbial 2-Oxoacid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a versatile and ubiquitous cofactor. When coupled with [4Fe-4S] clusters in microbial 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (OFORs), TPP is involved in catalyzing low-potential redox reactions that are important for the synthesis of key metabolites and the reduction of N2, H+, and CO2. We have determined the high-resolution (2.27 Å) crystal structure of the TPP-dependent oxalate oxidoreductase (OOR), an enzyme that allows microbes to grow on oxalate, a widely occurring dicarboxylic acid that is found in soil and freshwater and is responsible for kidney stone disease in humans. OOR catalyzes the anaerobic oxidation of oxalate, harvesting the low-potential electrons for use in anaerobic reduction and fixation of CO2. We compare the OOR structure to that of the only other structurally characterized OFOR family member, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. This side-by-side structural analysis highlights the key similarities and differences that are relevant for the chemistry of this entire class of TPP-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26061898

  13. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  14. Diagnosis of rare inherited glyoxalate metabolic disorders through in-situ analysis of renal stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Grohe, B.; Hoppe, B.; Beck, B. B.; Tessadri, R.

    2012-04-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias type I - III constitute rare autosomal-recessive inherited disorders of the human glyoxylate metabolism. By mechanisms that are ill understood progressive nephrocalcinosis and recurrent urolithiasis (kidney stone formation) often starting in early childhood, along with their secondary complications results in loss of nephron mass which progresses to end-stage renal failure over time. In the most frequent form, end-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the rule and combined liver/kidney transplantation respectively pre-emptive liver transplantation are the only causative treatment today. Hence, this contributes significantly to healthcare costs and early diagnosis is extremely important for a positive outcome for the patient. We are developing a stone-based diagnostic method by in-detail multi-methods investigation of the crystalline moiety in concert with urine and stone proteomics. Stone analysis will allow faster analysis at low-impact for the patients in the early stages of the disease. First results from combined spectroscopic (Raman, FTIR)and geochemical micro-analyses (Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation ICP-MS) are presented here that show significant differences between stones from hyperoxaluria patients and those formed by patients without this disorder (idiopathic stones). Major differences exist in chemistry as well as in morphology and phase composition of the stones. Ca/P ratios and Mg contents differentiate between oxalate-stones from hyperoxaluria patients and idiopathic stones. Results show that also within the different subtypes of primary hyperoxaluria significant differences can be found in stone composition. These imply differences in stone formation which could be exploited for new therapeutic pathways. Furthermore, the results provide important feedback for suspected but yet unconfirmed cases of primary hyperoxaluria when used in concert with the genetic methods routinely applied.

  15. Thirty-eight years of stone meetings in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bichler, K H

    2006-04-01

    Of decisive importance for the many research groups all over Europe were the scientific symposia dealing with the theoretical foundations and clinical aspects of urinary stone disease. There were several sources from which today's European Urinary Stone meetings and the "Eurolithiasis Society" itself arose. It was a long way from Leeds in 1968 to Jena 1970, Bonn-Vienna in 1972 and to 11 European meetings from 1989 to 2005. Which developments in urinary stone disease research have been presented at our congresses during the past 40 years? The 1970s and 1980s are the years marked by efforts to measure the important lithogenic substances such as calcium, ionized calcium, uric acid, phosphate, oxalate with reliable methods. Hypercalciuria and specifically mild hyperoxaluria were the topics of numerous investigations in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. The calcium-loading test described by Pak has been discussed frequently since its application. It became apparent that oxalic acid is more important in urinary stone formation than hypercalciuria. Of importance were investigations done by Robertson and his colleagues on the influence of diet (in particular, an animal protein-rich diet) on urinary stone formation. Another emphasis of research was investigation of the crystallization process: supersaturation, crystal growth and aggregation are important steps in urinary stone formation. Of great importance in the formation of urinary stones are inhibitors (inhibitory activity): citrate, magnesium, pyrophosphate, macromolecules: GAGs, THP etc. and it became possible in the early 1970s to determine substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) and GAGs. Much attention in the 1970s and 1980s was focused on urinary stone analysis (X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, polarization microscopy) and standardization of these methods. In the mid-1980s, a whole series of epidemiological studies were carried out, with data for the Federal Republic of Germany, East Germany

  16. Bone Genes in the Kidney of Stone Formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.

    2008-09-01

    Intraoperative papillary biopsies from kidneys of idiopathic-calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF) have revealed a distinct pattern of mineral deposition in the interstitium of the renal papilla. The earliest sites of these deposits, termed Randall's plaque, are found in the basement membrane of thin loops of Henle and appear to spread into the surrounding interstitium down to the papillary epithelium. Recent studies show kidney stones of ICSF patients grow attached to the renal papilla and at sites of Randall's plaque. Together these observations suggest that plaque formation may be the critical step in stone formation. In order to control plaque formation and thereby reduce future kidney stone development, the mechanism of plaque deposition must be understood. Because the renal papilla has unique anatomical features similar to bone and the fact that the interstitial deposits of ICSF patients are formed of biological apatite, this paper tests the hypothesis that sites of interstitial plaque form as a result of cell-mediated osteoblast-like activity.

  17. Biochemical diagnosis in 3040 kidney stone formers in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Spivacow, Francisco Rodolfo; del Valle, Elisa Elena; Negri, Armando Luis; Fradinger, Erich; Abib, Anabella; Rey, Paula

    2015-08-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a frequent condition in urology that has an important recurrence and high impact in health economy. Knowing the biochemical abnormalities implicated in its pathogenesis is mandatory to establish therapeutic aims. Our objectives are to present the results in 3040 kidney stone formers in Argentina. All patients were selected after completing an ambulatory metabolic protocol with diagnostic purposes. There were 1717 men, (56.48%), with a mean age of 45±12 years, and 1323 women, (43.52%), mean age 44±12 years. 2781 patients had biochemical abnormalities, (91.49%), and were arbitrarily divided in two groups: those who had only one (single) biochemical abnormality (n=2156) and those who had associated abnormalities (n=625). No biochemical abnormalities were found in 259 patients (8.51%). The abnormalities present, single and associated, in order of frequency, were idiopathic hypercalciuria, (56.88%), hyperuricosuria (21.08%), unduly acidic urine (10.95%), hypocitraturia (10.55%), hypomagnesuria (7.9%), primary hyperparathyroidism (3.01%), hyperoxaluria (2.6%), and cystinuria (0.32%). We performed in 484 patient's stone composition and found calcium oxalate stones related to idiopathic hypercalciuria predominantly while uric acid stones to unduly acidic urine. In conclusion, the biochemical abnormalities described are similar to those found in a previous series of our own and to those reported in the literature. Its diagnosis is important to therapeutic purposes to avoid eventual recurrence.

  18. An isotopic study of oxalate excretion in sheep.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, G H; Belling, G B

    1975-12-01

    Intravenously injected 14C labelled oxalate was rapidly removed from the blood stream via the kidney in 2 sheep, 75% being cleared within 8 h. Mean daily urinary oxalate excretions over 5 days were 21-2 and 27-5 mg and the derived plasma oxalate concentrations were 52-6 and 74-4 mug/100 ml, respectively. Oxalate was both filtered and secreted by the renal tubule with oxalate/inulin ratios varying from 1-11 to 1-57 in 6 normal sheep. A large increase in calcium excretion induced by calcium borogluconate infusion over 5 days was accompanied by a small but consistent increase in urinary oxalate excretion relative to calcium. Oxalate in blood was to be found mainly in the plasma, there being a small (8%) proporation within erythrocytes. This is lower than that reported for man, and yet in its excretion of oxalate via the kidney the sheep appears to closely resemble man and dog.

  19. Laser-probe-based investigation of the evolution of particle size distributions of calcium oxalate particles formed in artificial urines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Norbert; Mohr, Bernhard; Hesse, Albrecht

    2001-11-01

    The mechanisms for the formation of calcium oxalate kidney stones are not well understood. In our urological basic research study, ammonium oxalate was added to sample solutions of CaCl 2 and to artificial urines to induce the formation of calcium oxalate crystals, the most common crystals in the urinary tract. Using an in-line laser-probe we took real-time readings (4 min intervals) of the PSD evolution of particles ranging in size between 0.5 and 250 μm over a period of 1 h. Most particles were between 0.5 and 14 μm in size. The particle-size mode is approximately 2 μm. The time-dependent PSD development depends on the composition of the solution. The in-line laser-probe permits individual analysis of minute particles which fall below the lower coulter counter detection limit. As these particles form the basis of all further processes which alter the particle size, they are of paramount interest in urinary stone research.

  20. Vibrational spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Maria C; Torres, María M; Palacios, Daniel; González-Baró, Ana C; Baran, Enrique J

    2015-02-25

    The infrared and Raman spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate, SrC2O4⋅H2O and SrC2O4⋅2H2O, were recorded and discussed on the basis of their structural peculiarities and in comparison with the spectra of the related calcium oxalates and other previously investigated metallic oxalates.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10628 - Mixed metal oxalate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixed metal oxalate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10628 Mixed metal oxalate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxalate (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10628 - Mixed metal oxalate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed metal oxalate (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10628 Mixed metal oxalate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as mixed metal oxalate (PMN...

  3. Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Bucay, Abraham; Garimella, Pranav; Ezeokonkwo, Chukwudi; Bijol, Vanesa; Strom, James A; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with acute kidney injury in the setting of community-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea and biopsy-proven acute oxalate nephropathy. We discuss potential mechanisms, including increased colonic permeability to oxalate. We conclude that C difficile-associated diarrhea is a potential cause of acute oxalate nephropathy. PMID:24183111

  4. Role of Transport and Kinetics in Growth of Renal Stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Iskovitz, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    Renal stone disease is not only a concern on earth but could conceivably pose as a serious risk to the astronauts health and safety in Space. In this paper, a combined transport-kinetics model for growth of calcium oxalate crystals is presented. The model is used to parametrically investigate the growth of renal calculi in urine with a focus on the coupled effects of transport and surface reaction on the ionic concentrations at the surface of the crystal and their impact on the resulting growth rates. It is shown that under nominal conditions of low solution supersaturation and low Damkohler number that typically exist on Earth, the surface concentrations of calcium and oxalate approach their bulk solution values in the urine and the growth rate is most likely limited by the surface reaction kinetics. But for higher solution supersaturations and larger Damkohler numbers that may be prevalent in the microgravity environment of Space, the calcium and oxalate surface concentrations tend to shift more towards their equilibrium or saturation values and thus the growth process may be limited by the transport through the medium. Furthermore, parametric numerical studies suggest that changes to the renal biochemistry of astronauts due in space may promote development of renal calculi during long duration space expeditions.

  5. Biopsy proven medullary sponge kidney: clinical findings, histopathology, and role of osteogenesis in stone and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Worcester, Elaine M; Williams, James C; Sommer, Andre J; Lingeman, James E; Phillips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2015-05-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is associated with recurrent stone formation, but the clinical phenotype is unclear because patients with other disorders may be incorrectly labeled MSK. We studied 12 patients with histologic findings pathognomonic of MSK. All patients had an endoscopically recognizable pattern of papillary malformation, which may be segmental or diffuse. Affected papillae are enlarged and billowy, due to markedly enlarged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD), which contain small, mobile ductal stones. Patients had frequent dilation of Bellini ducts, with occasional mineral plugs. Stones may form over white (Randall's) plaque, but most renal pelvic stones are not attached, and have a similar morphology as ductal stones, which are a mixture of calcium oxalate and apatite. Patients had no abnormalities of urinary acidification or acid excretion; the most frequent metabolic abnormality was idiopathic hypercalciuria. Although both Runx2 and Osterix are expressed in papillae of MSK patients, no mineral deposition was seen at the sites of gene expression, arguing against a role of these genes in this process. Similar studies in idiopathic calcium stone formers showed no expression of these genes at sites of Randall's plaque. The most likely mechanism for stone formation in MSK appears to be crystallization due to urinary stasis in dilated IMCD with subsequent passage of ductal stones into the renal pelvis where they may serve as nuclei for stone formation. PMID:25615853

  6. Biopsy proven medullary sponge kidney: clinical findings, histopathology, and role of osteogenesis in stone and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Worcester, Elaine M; Williams, James C; Sommer, Andre J; Lingeman, James E; Phillips, Carrie L; Coe, Fredric L

    2015-05-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is associated with recurrent stone formation, but the clinical phenotype is unclear because patients with other disorders may be incorrectly labeled MSK. We studied 12 patients with histologic findings pathognomonic of MSK. All patients had an endoscopically recognizable pattern of papillary malformation, which may be segmental or diffuse. Affected papillae are enlarged and billowy, due to markedly enlarged inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD), which contain small, mobile ductal stones. Patients had frequent dilation of Bellini ducts, with occasional mineral plugs. Stones may form over white (Randall's) plaque, but most renal pelvic stones are not attached, and have a similar morphology as ductal stones, which are a mixture of calcium oxalate and apatite. Patients had no abnormalities of urinary acidification or acid excretion; the most frequent metabolic abnormality was idiopathic hypercalciuria. Although both Runx2 and Osterix are expressed in papillae of MSK patients, no mineral deposition was seen at the sites of gene expression, arguing against a role of these genes in this process. Similar studies in idiopathic calcium stone formers showed no expression of these genes at sites of Randall's plaque. The most likely mechanism for stone formation in MSK appears to be crystallization due to urinary stasis in dilated IMCD with subsequent passage of ductal stones into the renal pelvis where they may serve as nuclei for stone formation.

  7. Oxalic acid degradation by a novel fungal oxalate oxidase from Abortiporus biennis.

    PubMed

    Grąz, Marcin; Rachwał, Kamila; Zan, Radosław; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase was identified in mycelial extracts of a basidiomycete Abortiporus biennis strain. Intracellular enzyme activity was detected only after prior lowering of the pH value of the fungal cultures by using oxalic or hydrochloric acids. This enzyme was purified using size exclusion chromatography (Sephadex G-25) and ion-exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose). This enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 2 when incubated at 40°C, and the optimum temperature was established at 60°C. Among the tested organic acids, this enzyme exhibited specificity only towards oxalic acid. Molecular mass was calculated as 58 kDa. The values of Km for oxalate and Vmax for the enzyme reaction were 0.015 M and 30 mmol min(-1), respectively. PMID:27337220

  8. Screening of indigenous oxalate degrading lactic acid bacteria from human faeces and South Indian fermented foods: assessment of probiotic potential.

    PubMed

    Gomathi, Sivasamy; Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Kavitha, Murugan; Selvi, M S; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have the potential to degrade intestinal oxalate and this is increasingly being studied as a promising probiotic solution to manage kidney stone disease. In this study, oxalate degrading LAB were isolated from human faeces and south Indian fermented foods, subsequently assessed for potential probiotic property in vitro and in vivo. Based on preliminary characteristics, 251 out of 673 bacterial isolates were identified as LAB. A total of 17 strains were found to degrade oxalate significantly between 40.38% and 62.90% and were subjected to acid and bile tolerance test. Among them, nine strains exhibited considerable tolerance up to pH 3.0 and at 0.3% bile. These were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius using 16S rDNA sequencing. Three strains, Lactobacillus fermentum TY5, Lactobacillus fermentum AB1, and Lactobacillus salivarius AB11, exhibited good adhesion to HT-29 cells and strong antimicrobial activity. They also conferred resistance to kanamycin, rifampicin, and ampicillin, but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The faecal recovery rate of these strains was observed as 15.16% (TY5), 6.71% (AB1), and 9.3% (AB11) which indicates the colonization ability. In conclusion, three efficient oxalate degrading LAB were identified and their safety assessments suggest that they may serve as good probiotic candidates for preventing hyperoxaluria.

  9. Screening of Indigenous Oxalate Degrading Lactic Acid Bacteria from Human Faeces and South Indian Fermented Foods: Assessment of Probiotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Murugan; Selvi, M. S.; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have the potential to degrade intestinal oxalate and this is increasingly being studied as a promising probiotic solution to manage kidney stone disease. In this study, oxalate degrading LAB were isolated from human faeces and south Indian fermented foods, subsequently assessed for potential probiotic property in vitro and in vivo. Based on preliminary characteristics, 251 out of 673 bacterial isolates were identified as LAB. A total of 17 strains were found to degrade oxalate significantly between 40.38% and 62.90% and were subjected to acid and bile tolerance test. Among them, nine strains exhibited considerable tolerance up to pH 3.0 and at 0.3% bile. These were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius using 16S rDNA sequencing. Three strains, Lactobacillus fermentum TY5, Lactobacillus fermentum AB1, and Lactobacillus salivarius AB11, exhibited good adhesion to HT-29 cells and strong antimicrobial activity. They also conferred resistance to kanamycin, rifampicin, and ampicillin, but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The faecal recovery rate of these strains was observed as 15.16% (TY5), 6.71% (AB1), and 9.3% (AB11) which indicates the colonization ability. In conclusion, three efficient oxalate degrading LAB were identified and their safety assessments suggest that they may serve as good probiotic candidates for preventing hyperoxaluria. PMID:24723820

  10. Kidney stones - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Renal calculi - self-care; Nephrolithiasis - self-care; Stones - kidney - self-care ... You visited your health care provider or the hospital because you have a kidney stone. You will need to take self-care steps. Which steps ...

  11. Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also help prevent kidney stones, such as citrus drinks. Recommendations based on the specific type of ... do to prevent kidney stones. Some studies suggest citrus drinks like lemonade and orange juice protect against ...

  12. Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with orlistat

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, Youshay; Ball, Kenneth C.; Lewin, Jack R.; Lerant, Anna A.; Fülöp, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major world-wide epidemic which has led to a surge of various weight loss-inducing medical or surgical treatments. Orlistat is a gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor used as an adjunct treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus to induce clinically significant weight loss via fat malabsorption. Case Presentation: We describe a case of a 76-year-old female with past medical history of chronic kidney disease (baseline serum creatinine was 1.5-2.5 mg/dL), hypertension, gout and psoriatic arthritis, who was admitted for evaluation of elevated creatinine, peaking at 5.40 mg/dL. She was started on orlistat 120 mg three times a day six weeks earlier. Initial serologic work-up remained unremarkable. Percutaneous kidney biopsy revealed massive calcium oxalate crystal depositions with acute tubular necrosis and interstitial inflammation. Serum oxalate level returned elevated at 45 mm/l (normal <27). Timed 24-hour urine collection documented increased oxalate excretion repeatedly (54-96 mg/24 hour). After five renal dialysis sessions in eighth days she gradually regained her former baseline kidney function with creatinine around 2 mg/dL. Given coexisting proton-pump inhibitor therapy, only per os calcium-citrate provided effective intestinal oxalate chelation to control hyperoxaluria. Conclusions: Our case underscores the potential of medically induced fat malabsorption to lead to an excessive oxalate absorption and acute kidney injury (AKI), especially in subjects with pre-existing renal impairment. Further, it emphasizes the importance of kidney biopsy to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27152294

  13. Synthesis of Oxalic Acid by Enzymes from Lettuce Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Davies, David D.; Asker, Hassan

    1983-01-01

    A rapid purification of lactate dehydrogenase and glycolate oxidase from lettuce (Lactuca sativa) leaves is described. The kinetics of both enzymes are reported in relation to their possible roles in the production of oxalate. Lettuce lactate dehydrogenase behaves like mammalian dehydrogenase, catalyzing the dismutation of glyoxylate to glycolate and oxalate. A model is proposed in which glycolate oxidase in the peroxisomes and lactate dehydrogenase in the cytosol are involved in the production of oxalate. The effect of pH on the balance between oxalate and glycolate produced from glyoxylate suggests that in leaves lactate dehydrogenase may function as part of an oxalate-based biochemical, pH-stat. PMID:16662946

  14. Photolytic destruction of oxalate in aqueous mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.T.; Lum, B.Y.

    1995-03-01

    In aqueous plutonium processing, residual oxalic acid can be destroyed (oxalate kill) by UV light with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in 1 M HCl solutions. By controlling the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the oxalate kill process will not affect the chloride concentration. In nitric acid solutions, UV light alone can destroy the oxalic acid. However, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the rate of destruction is faster. After the destruction of oxalic acid, the acidic solutions may be reusable without further purification process.

  15. 21 CFR 520.1263 - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1263 Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms....

  16. 21 CFR 520.1263 - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1263 Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms....

  17. 21 CFR 520.1263 - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1263 Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate oral dosage forms....

  18. 21 CFR 520.1263a - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate tablets and sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate tablets and sirup. 520.1263a Section 520.1263a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1263a Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate tablets and sirup. (a) Specifications. The...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1263a - Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate tablets and sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate tablets and sirup. 520.1263a Section 520.1263a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 520.1263a Lincomycin hydrochloride monohydrate tablets and sirup. (a) Specifications. The...

  20. Challenging Case: Stones.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S; Ziemba, Justin B; Matlaga, Brian R; Monga, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman presents to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident, and a CT scan revealed no injuries but incidentally notes three non-obstructing stones in the left kidney of 3, 4, and 5 mm in size. She is completely asymptomatic and has no history of urolithiasis.

  1. Kidney stones during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Semins, Michelle J; Matlaga, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Kidney stones affect 10% of people at some point in their lives and, for some unfortunate women, this happens during pregnancy. Pregnancy is a complex state and both physiological and mechanical changes alter risk factors for kidney stone formation. When a pregnant woman develops acute nephrolithiasis, the situation is more complicated than in nonpregnant women. Imaging limitations and treatment restrictions mean that special diagnostic and management algorithms are needed upon presentation. Ultrasonography remains the gold-standard first-line diagnostic imaging modality for kidney stones during pregnancy but several second-line alternatives exist. Acute renal colic during pregnancy is associated with risks to both mother and fetus. As such, these patients need to be handled with special attention. First-line management is generally conservative (trial of passage and pain management) and is associated with a high rate of stone passage. Presentation of obstructive nephrolithiasis with associated infection represents a unique and serious clinical situation requiring immediate drainage. If infection is not present and conservative management fails, ureteroscopy can be offered if clinically appropriate, but, in some circumstances, temporary drainage with ureteral stent or nephrostomy tube might be indicated. Shockwave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are contraindicated during pregnancy.

  2. Challenging Case: Stones.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S; Ziemba, Justin B; Matlaga, Brian R; Monga, Manoj

    2016-10-01

    A 40-year-old woman presents to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident, and a CT scan revealed no injuries but incidentally notes three non-obstructing stones in the left kidney of 3, 4, and 5 mm in size. She is completely asymptomatic and has no history of urolithiasis. PMID:27566646

  3. When Stones Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucier, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Creating towers of balanced stones is a versatile outdoor learning activity that can be experienced in the classroom, school yard, forest, or parking lot. Students discover hidden talents, learn to work and communicate clearly with others, and reconnect with the natural world. Several variations on the exercise are given, along with principles of…

  4. Assessment of stone composition in the management of urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Kijvikai, Kittinut; de la Rosette, J J M

    2011-02-01

    Several explanations have been suggested to account for the failure of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment in patients with urinary stones, including large stone volume, unfavorable stone location or composition and the type of lithotriptor used. Unfavorable stone composition is considered a major cause of failure of ESWL treatment, and consequently knowledge of the stone composition before treatment is initiated is desirable. Plain abdominal radiographs cannot accurately determine either stone composition or fragility, and although the CT attenuation value in Hounsfield units (HU) (that is, normalized to the attenuation characteristics of water) is useful, this parameter has limited value as a predictor of stone composition or the response to ESWL treatment. By contrast, stone morphology as visualized by CT correlates well with both fragility and susceptibility to fragmentation by ESWL. For patients prone to recurrent calculi, analyses of stone composition are especially important, as they may reveal an underlying metabolic abnormality. The development of advanced imaging technologies that can predict stone fragility is essential, as they could provide extra information for physicians, enabling them to select the most appropriate treatment option for patients with urinary stones.

  5. Ultrasonic degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dükkanci, M; Gündüz, G

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the ultrasonic degradation of oxalic acid. The effects of ultrasonic power, H(2)O(2), NaCl, external gases on the degradation of oxalic acid were investigated. Reactor flask containing oxalic acid was immersed in the ultrasonic bath with water as the coupling fluid. Representative samples withdrawn were analysed by volumetric titration. Degradation degree of oxalic acid increased with increasing ultrasonic power. It was observed that H(2)O(2) has negative contribution on the degradation of oxalic acid and there was an optimum concentration of NaCl for enhancing the degradation degree of oxalic acid. Although bubbling nitrogen gave higher degradation than that for bubbling air, both gases (for 20 min before sonication and during sonication together) could not help to enhance the degradation of oxalic acid when compared with the degradation without gas passage. PMID:16352455

  6. Oxalate transport by anion exchange across rabbit ileal brush border.

    PubMed Central

    Knickelbein, R G; Aronson, P S; Dobbins, J W

    1986-01-01

    This study demonstrates the presence of oxalate transporters on the brush border membrane of rabbit ileum. We found that an inside alkaline (pH = 8.5 inside, 6.5 outside) pH gradient stimulated [14C]oxalate uptake 10-fold at 1 min with a fourfold accumulation above equilibrated uptake at 5 min. 1 mM 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (disodium salt; DIDS) profoundly inhibited the pH-gradient stimulated oxalate uptake. Using an inwardly directed K+ gradient and valinomycin, we found no evidence for potential sensitive oxalate uptake. In contrast to Cl:HCO3 exchange, HCO3 did not stimulate oxalate uptake more than was seen with a pH gradient in the absence of HCO3. An outwardly directed Cl gradient (50 mM inside, 5 mM outside) stimulated oxalate uptake 10-fold at 1 min with a fivefold accumulation above equilibrated uptake. Cl-stimulated oxalate uptake was largely inhibited by DIDS. Addition of K+ and nigericin only slightly decreased the Cl gradient-stimulated oxalate uptake, which indicates that this stimulation was not primarily due to the Cl gradient generating an inside alkaline pH gradient via Cl:OH exchange. Further, an outwardly directed oxalate gradient stimulated 36Cl uptake. These results suggested that both oxalate:OH and oxalate:Cl exchange occur on the brush border membrane. To determine if one or both of these exchanges were on contaminating basolateral membrane, the vesicle preparation was further fractionated into a brush border and basolateral component using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Both exchangers localized to the brush border component. A number of organic anions were examined (outwardly directed gradient) to determine if they could stimulate oxalate and Cl uptake. Only formate and oxaloacetate were found to stimulate oxalate and Cl uptake. An inwardly directed Na gradient only slightly stimulated oxalate uptake, which was inhibited by DIDS. PMID:3003149

  7. Crystals, Randall's plaques and renal stones: do bone and atherosclerosis teach us something?

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Giovanni; D'Angelo, Angela; Fabris, Antionia; Tosetto, Enrica; Anglani, Franca; Lupo, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of calcium-oxalate (CaOx) renal stones is still debated and a number of issues needs to be clarified. In particular, it is difficult to combine the intraluminal physical-chemical imbalance and fixed particle theory with the evidence that CaOx stones actually form and grow on Randall's plaque in the renal pelvis. On the basis of recent findings in renal stone research, and data from the biology of ectopic calcification, the hypothesis is advanced that abnormal pre-urine CaOx supersaturation triggers inflammation in the long Henle's loop cells at tip forceps level. This in turn induces differentiation of these cells toward the osteogenic lineage, determining the synthesis of typical bone osteoid proteins (osteopontin, osteocalcin, BMP-2, etc) and hydroxyapatite mineralization of the Henle's basement membrane (beneath the differentiating cells) which precedes Randal's plaque formation. This may constitute a further, still unexplored example of epithelial-mesenchymal-differentiation in the kidney. PMID:15593050

  8. Mode of Action: Oxalate Crystal-Induced Renal Tubule Degeneration and Glycolic Acid-Induced Dysmorphogenesis—Renal and Developmental Effects of Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Meek, M E.; Carney, E W.

    2005-10-01

    Ethylene glycol can cause both renal and developmental toxicity, with metabolism playing a key role in the mode of action (MOA) for each form of toxicity. Renal toxicity is ascribed to the terminal metabolite oxalic acid, which precipitates in the kidney in the form of calcium oxalate crystals and is believed to cause physical damage to the renal tubules. The human relevance of the renal toxicity of ethylene glycol is indicated by the similarity between animals and humans of metabolic pathways, the observation of renal oxalate crystals in toxicity studies in experimental animals and human poisonings, and cases of human kidney and bladder stones related to dietary oxalates and oxalate precursors. High-dose gavage exposures to ethylene glycol also cause axial skeletal defects in rodents (but not rabbits), with the intermediary metabolite, glycolic acid, identified as the causative agent. However, the mechanism by which glycolic acid perturbs development has not been investigated sufficiently to develop a plausible hypothesis of mode of action, nor have any cases of ethylene glycol-induced developmental effects been reported in humans. Given this, and the variations in sensitivity between animal species in response, the relevance to humans of ethylene glycol-induced developmental toxicity in animals is unknown at this time.

  9. Polymeric structure of (ethylenediamine)silver(I) 3-nitrobenzoate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Usman, Anwar; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chantrapromma, Suchada; Zhu, Hai-Liang; Wang, Xian-Jiang

    2003-03-01

    In the ternary title compound, catena-poly[[silver(I)-mu-ethylenediamine-kappa(2)N:N'] 3-nitrobenzoate monohydrate], [[Ag(C(2)H(8)N(2))](C(7)H(4)NO(4)) x H(2)O](n), the Ag atom is bicoordinated in a linear configuration by two different N atoms from two symmetry-related ethylenediamine ligands, thus giving linear polymeric chains with an [-Ag-N-C-C-N-](n) backbone running parallel to the a axis. In the crystal packing, these linear chains are interconnected by N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonds to form layers parallel to the ab plane. PMID:12711770

  10. Red facts: Oxalic acid. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    All pesticides sold or used in the United States must be registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing that they can be used without posing unreasonable risks to people or the environment. Because of advances in scientific knowledge, the law requires that pesticides which were first registered years ago be reregistered to ensure that they meet today's more stringent standards. Oxalic acid is registered for use as a disinfectant to control bacteria and germs, and as a sanitizer, in toilet bowls, urinals and bathroom premises. Oxalic acid also has many diverse, non-pesticidal, manufacturing and industrial uses including use in fabric printing and dyeing; bleaching straw hats; removing paint, varnish, rust or ink stains; and cleaning wood.

  11. Oxalate nephropathy due to gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Canos, H J; Hogg, G A; Jeffery, J R

    1981-01-01

    Renal failure secondary to oxalate interstitial nephritis developed in three patients with malabsorption and steatorrhea following a jejunoileal bypass, extensive small intestine resection and a partial gastrectomy. Hyperoxaluria was documented in two of the cases. The possibility that this complication can occur in patients after a jejunoileal bypass operation is now recognized. This report shows that it can also occur in patients with other bowel disorders that cause malabsorption and steatorrhea. Since the prognosis for patients with oxalate nephropathy is poor, renal function should be closely monitored in patients who are at risk because of these disorders. Therapy should be directed at correcting malabsorption, steatorrhea and hyperoxaluria. When the renal function of patients with a jejunoileal bypass continues to decline despite intensive medical therapy, restoration of bowel continuity is strongly recommended. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:7471017

  12. Use of Potassium Citrate to Reduce the Risk of Renal Stone Formation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Sams, C. F.; Jones, J. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hudson, E. K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: NASA s Vision for Space Exploration centers on exploration class missions including the goals of returning to the moon and landing on Mars. One of NASA s objectives is to focus research on astronaut health and the development of countermeasures that will protect crewmembers during long duration voyages. Exposure to microgravity affects human physiology and results in changes in the urinary chemical composition favoring urinary supersaturation and an increased risk of stone formation. Nephrolithiasis is a multifactorial disease and development of a renal stone is significantly influenced by both dietary and environmental factors. Previous results from long duration Mir and short duration Shuttle missions have shown decreased urine volume, pH, and citrate levels and increased calcium. Citrate, an important inhibitor of calcium-containing stones, binds with urinary calcium reducing the amount of calcium available to form stones. Citrate inhibits renal stone recurrence by preventing crystal growth, aggregation, and nucleation and is one of the most common therapeutic agents used to prevent stone formation. Methods: Thirty long duration crewmembers (29 male, 1 female) participated in this study. 24-hour urines were collected and dietary monitoring was performed pre, in, and postflight. Crewmembers in the treatment group received two potassium citrate (KCIT) pills, 10 mEq/pill, ingested daily beginning 3 days before launch, all inflight days and through 14 days postflight. Urinary biochemical and dietary analyses were completed. Results: KCIT treated subjects exhibited decreased urinary calcium excretion and maintained the levels of calcium oxalate supersaturation risk at their preflight levels. The increased urinary pH levels in these subjects reduced the risk of uric acid stones. Discussion: The current study investigated the use of potassium citrate as a countermeasure to minimize the risk of stone formation during ISS missions. Results suggest that

  13. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  14. Wanted: suitable replacement stones for the Lede stone (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Kock, T.; Dewanckele, J.; Boone, M. A.; De Boever, W.; De Schutter, G.; Jacobs, P.; Cnudde, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Lede stone is an arenaceous limestone with a Lutetian age, occurring as discrete (most of the times three) stone banks in the marine sandy sediments of the Lede Formation (Belgium). It has a quartz content of approximate 40%. This increases abrasion strength and together with the cementation results in an average compressive strength of about 80-85 MPa. The cement is a microsparitic calcite cement. Other carbonate particles are both microfossils (mainly foraminifers) and macrofossils (bivalves, serpulids, echinoderms, …). This great diversity gives the stone a heterogeneous, animated appearance. The intra- and interparticle porosity is in total 5-10 % in average and the apparent density is 2400-2550 kg/m3. Another important constituent is glauconite, present in a few percent. In fresh state, the stone has a greenish-grey colour, but when it is exposed to atmospheric conditions for a couple of years, the stone acquires a yellowish to rust-coloured patina due to the weathering of glauconite. Sulphatation causes severe damage to the stone, and black gypsum crusts are common in urban environments on stones protected from runoff. This stone was excavated in both open air and underground quarries in the areas of Brussels and Ghent. The proximity of main rivers such as the Scheldt and Zenne provided transport routes for export towards the north (e.g. Antwerp and The Netherlands). Its first known use dates back to Roman times but the stone flourished in Gothic architecture due to its easy workability and its 'divine' light coloured patina. This results nowadays in a dominant occurrence in the cultural heritage of northwestern Belgium and the south of The Netherlands. Socio-economical reasons caused several declines and revivals of Lede stone in use. In the beginning of the 20th century, only a few excavation sites remained, with as main quarry the one located at Bambrugge (Belgium). By the end of the first half of the 20th century, however, no quarry sites remained

  15. Effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence in patients with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Phil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to assess the relationship between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary stone-forming constituents, and to assess the effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence risk in first stone formers (SF). Baseline serum creatinine levels were obtained, and renal insufficiency was defined as creatinine clearance ≤60 mL/min (Cockroft-Gault). This retrospective case-control study consists of 342 first SF; 171 SF with normal renal function were selected with 1:1 propensity scores matched to 171 SF with renal insufficiency. Urinary metabolic evaluation was compared to renal function. GFR was positively correlated with urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion. Subjects with renal insufficiency had significantly lower urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion than those with normal renal function, but not urine volume. With regard to urinary metabolic abnormalities, similar results were obtained. SF with renal insufficiency had lower calcium oxalate supersaturation indexes and stone recurrence rates than SF with normal renal function. Kaplan-Meier curves showed similar results. In conclusion, GFR correlates positively with urinary excretion of stone-forming constituents in SF. This finding implies that renal insufficiency is not a risk factor for stone recurrence. PMID:25120325

  16. Effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence in patients with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Seo, Sung Phil; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to assess the relationship between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary stone-forming constituents, and to assess the effect of renal insufficiency on stone recurrence risk in first stone formers (SF). Baseline serum creatinine levels were obtained, and renal insufficiency was defined as creatinine clearance ≤60 mL/min (Cockroft-Gault). This retrospective case-control study consists of 342 first SF; 171 SF with normal renal function were selected with 1:1 propensity scores matched to 171 SF with renal insufficiency. Urinary metabolic evaluation was compared to renal function. GFR was positively correlated with urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion. Subjects with renal insufficiency had significantly lower urinary calcium, uric acid, and citrate excretion than those with normal renal function, but not urine volume. With regard to urinary metabolic abnormalities, similar results were obtained. SF with renal insufficiency had lower calcium oxalate supersaturation indexes and stone recurrence rates than SF with normal renal function. Kaplan-Meier curves showed similar results. In conclusion, GFR correlates positively with urinary excretion of stone-forming constituents in SF. This finding implies that renal insufficiency is not a risk factor for stone recurrence.

  17. Pathophysiology of the Hypercalciuria in the Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-Forming Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushinsky, David A.

    2007-04-01

    Given evidence for a genetic cause of hypercalciuria, we screened adult male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for hypercalciuria and used those with the highest urinary calcium excretion to breed the next generation, followed by subsequent selection and inbreeding of their most hypercalciuric progeny. By the 30th generation, and continuing to the present, the GHS rats (for Genetic Hypercalciuric Stone-forming rats) excrete 8-10 times as much calcium as simultaneously studied control rats The GHS rats were found to have defects in calcium transport in the intestine, kidneys and bone, similar to abnormalities found in many patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. The GHS rats also form kidney stones. By the conclusion of an 18 wk study, all of the GHS rats formed stones, while there was no stone formation in similarly treated SD controls. The GHS rats, when fed a standard 1.2% calcium diet, form only poorly crystalline apatite stones. However, when 5% hydroxyproline is added to the diet of the GHS rats, they form only calcium oxalate stones.

  18. Necromancing the stones.

    PubMed

    Goel, V

    1995-12-15

    Since its introduction 15 years ago extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has become a standard treatment for urinary stones. The author comments on the results of Adrian R. Levy and Maurice McGregor's study of the use of ESWL for urinary stones in Quebec (see pages 1729 to 1736 of this issue). The rapid increase in the use of ESWL that occurred in the first 2 years of the study points to the fact that the application of a new technology is often quickly expanded before thorough assessments of effectiveness and safety have been carried out. New technologies also lead to shifts in cost distribution that must be considered in cost analyses. The author argues that continuing research is needed to document the dissemination of new technologies and points to methodologic concerns that should be addressed to make such research as fruitful as possible.

  19. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  20. Pyrophosphate Transport and Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, John A.; Carr, Georgina; Moochhala, Shabbir H.; Simmons, Nicholas L.

    2008-09-01

    Since the 1960's, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) has been known to inhibit apatite precipitation. Recent findings suggest that PPi plays a central role in the control of normal bone mineralization. Knockout mice have established the functional importance of PPi transmembrane transport, via the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. The molecular nature and transport function of ANKH are reviewed. PPi is present in urine and ANKH is expressed in the cortical collecting duct where PPi transport to both the tubular lumen and renal interstitium may occur. Arginine vasopressin stimulation of cortical collecting duct cells grown on semi-permeable supports appears to upregulate apical ANKH expression, which we postulate may be a mechanism of stone inhibition during urinary concentration and supersaturation of calcium salts. Hypopyrophosphaturia may be a forgotten metabolic risk factor for stone formation and polymorphisms of the ANKH gene may underlie this defect. The physiological importance and clinical significance of PPi generation and transport in preventing idiopathic renal stone disease and nephrocalcinosis now needs to be established.

  1. Initial presentation in psychiatry emergency room led to diagnosis of many urinary bladder stones in a male patient.

    PubMed

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Nagaraja, Aarathi; Mahmood, Aza K

    2013-01-01

    The first case of man who presented to psychiatry emergency room for evaluation of abnormal behavior because of urinary stones was reported. Careful evaluation of patient led to a diagnosis of 37 urinary bladder stones in an Egyptian man with obstructive uropathy and metabolic defects in the form of hyperoxaluria and hypocitraturia. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of metabolic defects can lead to successful outcome in preventing reformation of urinary tract stones after surgery. A 61-year-old Egyptian man presented to psychiatry emergency room because he was found lying on floor in bathroom to urinate by his wife who thought her husband needed psychiatric evaluation. Patient gave history of frequent urination and dysuria on and off for 3 years. In the last 3 months before his presentation to emergency room, he got into a habit of lying down on his left side when he went to bathroom to urinate because it was easier for him to pass urine. Renal consultation requested because of presence of red blood cells in urinalysis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed bilateral hydronephrosis and multiple bladder stones. Twenty-four-hour urine collection showed low urinary citrate and high oxalate. Patient underwent open vesicolithotomy and removal of 36 stones. Stone analysis showed 75% uric acid and 25% calcium oxalate. Patient did very well after surgery, and 1 month later, he underwent transuretheral resection of prostate without any complications. Now patient has no difficulty passing urine and he has no recent attack of urinary tract infection. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of metabolic defects in men with urinary bladder stones would hopefully provide clinicians with the proper diagnostic tools to more specifically treat such patients with improved success in preventing reformation of urinary tract stones after surgery.

  2. BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS IN NORMAL AND STONE FORMING RATS TREATED WITH THE RIPE KERNEL JUICE OF PLANTAIN (MUSA PARADISIACA)

    PubMed Central

    Devi, V. Kalpana; Baskar, R.; Varalakshmi, P.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Musa paradisiaca stem kernel juice was investigated in experimental urolithiatic rats. Stone forming rats exhibited a significant elevation in the activities of two oxalate synthesizing enzymes - Glycollic acid oxidase and Lactate dehydrogenase. Deposition and excretion of stone forming constituents in kidney and urine were also increased in these rats. The enzyme activities and the level of crystalline components were lowered with the extract treatment. The extract also reduced the activities of urinary alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, r-glutamyl transferase, inorganic pyrophosphatase and β-glucuronidase in calculogenic rats. No appreciable changes were noticed with leucine amino peptidase activity in treated rats. PMID:22556626

  3. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  4. Medical management of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Monica S C; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing in industrialized nations, resulting in a corresponding rise in economic burden. Nephrolithiasis is now recognized as both a chronic and systemic condition, which further underscores the impact of the disease. Diet and environment play an important role in stone disease, presumably by modulating urine composition. Dietary modification as a preventive treatment to decrease lithogenic risk factors and prevent stone recurrence has gained interest because of its potential to be safer and more economical than drug treatment. However, not all abnormalities are likely to be amenable to dietary therapy, and in some cases drugs are necessary to reduce the risk of stone formation. Unfortunately, no new drugs have been developed for stone prevention since the 1980s when potassium citrate was introduced, perhaps because the long observation period needed to demonstrate efficacy discourages investigators from embarking on clinical trials. Nonetheless, effective established treatment regimens are currently available for stone prevention. PMID:26977089

  5. Medical management of renal stones.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Monica S C; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing in industrialized nations, resulting in a corresponding rise in economic burden. Nephrolithiasis is now recognized as both a chronic and systemic condition, which further underscores the impact of the disease. Diet and environment play an important role in stone disease, presumably by modulating urine composition. Dietary modification as a preventive treatment to decrease lithogenic risk factors and prevent stone recurrence has gained interest because of its potential to be safer and more economical than drug treatment. However, not all abnormalities are likely to be amenable to dietary therapy, and in some cases drugs are necessary to reduce the risk of stone formation. Unfortunately, no new drugs have been developed for stone prevention since the 1980s when potassium citrate was introduced, perhaps because the long observation period needed to demonstrate efficacy discourages investigators from embarking on clinical trials. Nonetheless, effective established treatment regimens are currently available for stone prevention.

  6. Canine calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Case-based applications of therapeutic principles.

    PubMed

    Lulich, J P; Osborne, C A; Lekcharoensuk, C; Allen, T A; Nakagawa, Y

    1999-01-01

    The case study presented here illustrates the diagnosis and management of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in a Bichon Frise, a breed at increased risk for this type of stone. If the Bichon Frise had persistent hypercalcemia, we would have evaluated serum concentrations of ionized calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D to identify an underlying cause. Because his urine was alkaline, additional potassium citrate was not provided. Likewise, as a fortified diet was fed to him, vitamin B6 therapy was not considered. This case study illustrates the benefits of radiographic evaluation immediately following surgery and during follow-up examinations. If we had postponed radiographs until the patient developed clinical signs, additional surgical procedures may have been required.

  7. Electrochemical synthesis and characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Roushani, Mahmoud; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles via electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate solutions. ► Design of a Taguchi orthogonal array to identify the optimal experimental conditions. ► Controlling the size and shape of particles via applied voltage and oxalate concentration. ► Characterization of zinc oxalate nanoparticles by SEM, UV–vis, FT-IR and TG–DTA. - Abstract: A rapid, clean and simple electrodeposition method was designed for the synthesis of zinc oxalate nanoparticles. Zinc oxalate nanoparticles in different size and shapes were electrodeposited by electrolysis of a zinc plate anode in sodium oxalate aqueous solutions. It was found that the size and shape of the product could be tuned by electrolysis voltage, oxalate ion concentration, and stirring rate of electrolyte solution. A Taguchi orthogonal array design was designed to identify the optimal experimental conditions. The morphological characterization of the product was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. UV–vis and FT-IR spectroscopies were also used to characterize the electrodeposited nanoparticles. The TG–DTA studies of the nanoparticles indicated that the main thermal degradation occurs in two steps over a temperature range of 350–430 °C. In contrast to the existing methods, the present study describes a process which can be easily scaled up for the production of nano-sized zinc oxalate powder.

  8. The oxalic acid: 2-chloroacetamide crystallization: A new revelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, R.; Choudhury, R. R.; Capet, Frederic; Roussel, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    The OH of COOH can acts as both donor and acceptor of hydrogen bond. OH of COOH as an acceptor was primarily observed in Oxalic acid Amide complexes. In order to further understand the packing in these complexes, oxalic acid was complexed with 2-tricholoroacetamide. This crystallization resulted in the formation of ammonium tetraoxalate dehydrate. A result similar to what was observed in complexation of oxalic acid with amide containing amino acids (asparagine and glutamine). Interestingly in all these cases, the amide bond is broken, to form the ammonium ion when trying to complex with oxalic acid.

  9. Kinetic study of oxalic acid inhibition on enzymatic browning.

    PubMed

    Son, S M; Moon, K D; Lee, C Y

    2000-06-01

    Oxalic acid has a strong antibrowning activity. The inhibitory pattern on catechol-PPO model system appeared to be competitive, with a K(i) value of 2.0 mM. When the PPO was incubated with oxalic acid, the activity was not recovered via dialysis, but the inactivated enzyme partially recovered its activity when cupric ion was added. Comparing the relative antibrowning effectiveness of oxalic acid with other common antibrowning agents, oxalic acid with I(50) value of 1.1 mM is as effective as kojic acid and more potent than cysteine and glutathione.

  10. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Recent findings Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the UPJ with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Summary Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing UPJ stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic. PMID:26845428

  11. [Infection-induced urinary stones].

    PubMed

    Bichler, K-H; Eipper, E; Naber, K

    2003-01-01

    Infection stones make up approximately 15% of urinary stone diseases and are thus an important group. These stones are composed of struvite and/or carbonate apatite. The basic precondition for the formation of infection stones is a urease-positive urinary tract infection. Urease is necessary to split urea into ammonia and CO(2). As a result, ammonia ions can form and at the same time alkaline urine develops, both being preconditions for the formation of struvite and carbonate apatite crystals. When these crystals are deposited infection stones form. Pathogenetically, various risk factors play a role: urinary obstruction, neurogenic bladder, dRTA, and MSK. If these infections are not treated and the stones are not removed, the kidney will be damaged. Modern methods are available for stone removal, e.g., ESWL and/or instrumental urinary stone removal. Here, especially less invasive methods are preferable. Any treatment must be adjusted to the patient individually. Patients should be examined frequently for recurrent urinary tract infections and stone recurrences, and new infections must be resolutely treated. Good therapy and prophylaxis are possible with present-day treatment modalities. PMID:12574884

  12. Simultaneous formation of calcium oxalate (mono-, di-, and trihydrate) induced by potassium tartrate in gelatinous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Zheng, Hui; Deng, Sui-Ping

    2006-07-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) is the major crystalline component of kidney stone. Calcium oxalate mono-(COM), di-(COD), and trihydrate (COT) crystals were simultaneously induced by potassium tartrate (K 2tart) in a gelatinous system by a double diffusion technique. The phase composition and morphology of the crystals were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In the presence of low concentration of K 2tart (0.01 mol/l), the COM crystals with sharp tips are the dominant crystal phase. The percentage of COD is less than 5% and no COT crystals are observed. When the concentration of K 2tart is increased to 0.10 and 0.50 mol/l, the percentage of COT increases to 56% and 82%, respectively. The morphology of COM crystals becomes blunter. The crystallization temperature affects the phase composition and morphology of CaOx crystals. In the presence of 0.01 mol/l K 2tart, COM and COT are the main phases at 37 °C. However, COD is dominant at 7 °C. The result that K 2tart can increase the content of COT and inhibit the aggregation and decrease the surface area of COM crystals indicates K 2tart can inhibit the formation of CaOx stones. This result also supports the clinical use of K 2tart and may be helpful in elucidating the mechanisms by which the formation of CaOx calculi can be inhibited.

  13. Villamayor stone (Golden Stone) as a Global Heritage Stone Resource from Salamanca (NW of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Talegon, Jacinta; Iñigo, Adolfo; Vicente-Tavera, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    Villamayor stone is an arkosic stone of Middle Eocene age and belongs to the Cabrerizos Sandstone Formation that comprising braided fluvial systems and paleosoils at the top of each stratigraphic sequence. The sandstone is known by several names: i) the Villamayor Stone because the quarries are located in Villamayor de Armuña village that are situated at 7 km to the North from Salamanca city; ii) the Golden Stone due to its patina that produced a ochreous/golden color on the façades of monuments of Salamanca (World Heritage City,1988) built in this Natural stone (one of the silicated rocks utilised). We present in this work, the Villamayor Stone to be candidate as Global Heritage Stone Resource. The Villamayor Stone were quarrying for the construction and ornamentation of Romanesque religious monuments as the Old Cathedral and San Julian church; Gothic (Spanish plateresc style) as the New Cathedral, San Esteban church and the sculpted façade of the Salamanca University, one of the oldest University in Europe (it had established in 1250); and this stone was one of the type of one of the most sumptuous Baroque monuments is the Main Square of the its galleries and arcades (1729). Also, this stone was used in building palaces, walls and reconstruction of Roman bridge. Currently, Villamayor Stone is being quarried by small and family companies, without a modernized processing, for cladding of the façades of the new buildings until that the construction sector was burst (in 2008 the international economic crisis). However, Villamayor Stone is the main stone material used in the city of Salamanca for the restoration of monuments and, even in small quantities when compared with just before the economic crisis, it would be of great importance for future generations protect their quarries and the craft of masonry. Villamayor Stone has several varieties from channels facies to floodplains facies, in this work the selected varieties are: i) the fine-grained stone

  14. The Systematic Classification of Gallbladder Stones

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Tie; Ma, Rui-hong; Luo, Xiao-bing; Yang, Liu-qing; Luo, Zhen-liang; Zheng, Pei-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background To develop a method for systematic classification of gallbladder stones, analyze the clinical characteristics of each type of stone and provide a theoretical basis for the study of the formation mechanism of different types of gallbladder stones. Methodology A total of 807 consecutive patients with gallbladder stones were enrolled and their gallstones were studied. The material composition of gallbladder stones was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and the distribution and microstructure of material components was observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy. The composition and distribution of elements were analyzed by an X-ray energy spectrometer. Gallbladder stones were classified accordingly, and then, gender, age, medical history and BMI of patients with each type of stone were analyzed. Principal Findings Gallbladder stones were classified into 8 types and more than ten subtypes, including cholesterol stones (297), pigment stones (217), calcium carbonate stones (139), phosphate stones (12), calcium stearate stones (9), protein stones (3), cystine stones (1) and mixed stones (129). Mixed stones were those stones with two or more than two kinds of material components and the content of each component was similar. A total of 11 subtypes of mixed stones were found in this study. Patients with cholesterol stones were mainly female between the ages of 30 and 50, with higher BMI and shorter medical history than patients with pigment stones (P<0.05), however, patients with pigment, calcium carbonate, phosphate stones were mainly male between the ages of 40 and 60. Conclusion The systematic classification of gallbladder stones indicates that different types of stones have different characteristics in terms of the microstructure, elemental composition and distribution, providing an important basis for the mechanistic study of gallbladder stones. PMID:24124459

  15. Nephrolithiasis, stone composition, meteorology, and seasons in Malta: Is there any connection?

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Jesmar; Attard, Stephanie; Carachi, Alexander; Galea, Ruth; Fava, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Context: The effect of seasons and meteorology on the incidence of nephrolithiasis has been studied in various regions around the globe, but seldom in the Mediterranean. Aims: This retrospective analysis aims at investigating these putative effects in the Maltese Islands, whose climate is typically Mediterranean, followed by a systematic review of the literature. Materials and Methods: Submission rate and chemical composition of all kidney stones after spontaneous passage or surgical removal between January 2009 and December 2011 were analyzed according to seasons and corresponding meteorology. Results: A total of 389 stones were analyzed. A higher stone submission rate was observed in summer compared to winter (31.6% vs. 20.8%, P = 0.0008) and in the warm period compared to the cold period (57.1% vs. 42.9%, P = 0.0001). Significant correlation was established between the monthly number of stones and mean monthly maximum temperature (r = 0.50, P = 0.002), mean monthly temperature (r = 0.49, P = 0.003) and mean monthly Humidex (r = 0.49, P = 0.007). Humidex was found to be an independent predictor for stone submission (β = 0.49, P = 0.007). The majority of stones contained calcium (83.3%), combined with oxalate (77.6%), phosphate (14.7%), and carbonate (2.8%). Some stones (11.8%) contained a mixture of >1 negatively charged molecules. Urate (11.6%), cysteine (4.6%), and ammonium-magnesium-phosphate (0.5%) constituted the rest. There was no association between chemical composition and seasons. Literature review included 25 articles. Higher ambient temperature and warm seasons were the most commonly encountered risk factors for both presentation and etiology of nephrolithiasis. Conclusions: A significant positive correlation was noted between ambient temperature and stone submission rate, which was significantly higher during the warm months in Malta. PMID:27453655

  16. Reregistration eligibility document (RED): Oxalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. This pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED) for oxalic acid discusses the scientific data and other information supporting EPA's regulatory conclusion that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  17. X-ray diffraction and SEM study of kidney stones in Israel: quantitative analysis, crystallite size determination, and statistical characterization.

    PubMed

    Uvarov, Vladimir; Popov, Inna; Shapur, Nandakishore; Abdin, Tamer; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Duvdevani, Mordechai

    2011-12-01

    Urinary calculi have been recognized as one of the most painful medical disorders. Tenable knowledge of the phase composition of the stones is very important to elucidate an underlying etiology of the stone disease. We report here the results of quantitative X-ray diffraction phase analysis performed on 278 kidney stones from the 275 patients treated at the Department of Urology of Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital (Jerusalem, Israel). Quantification of biominerals in multicomponent samples was performed using the normalized reference intensity ratio method. According to the observed phase compositions, all the tested stones were classified into five chemical groups: oxalates (43.2%), phosphates (7.7%), urates (10.3%), cystines (2.9%), and stones composed of a mixture of different minerals (35.9%). A detailed analysis of each allocated chemical group is presented along with the crystallite size calculations for all the observed crystalline phases. The obtained results have been compared with the published data originated from different geographical regions. Morphology and spatial distribution of the phases identified in the kidney stones were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). This type of detailed study of phase composition and structural characteristics of the kidney stones was performed in Israel for the first time. PMID:21308400

  18. Preclinical Evaluation of Antiurolithiatic Activity of Viburnum opulus L. on Sodium Oxalate-Induced Urolithiasis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Mert; Ergene, Burçin; Süntar, Ipek; Özbilgin, Serkan; Saltan Çitoğlu, Gülçin; Demirel, M. Ayşe; Keleş, Hikmet; Altun, Levent; Küpeli Akkol, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to evaluate the antiurolithiatic effect of the various extracts prepared from the fruits of Viburnum opulus L., in regard to its ethnobotanical record. To induce urolithiasis, 70 mg/kg sodium oxalate was injected to the rats which were housed individually in metabolic cages. The test materials were applied during 7 days. Biochemical (urine and serum parameters), histopathological and antioxidant (TBARs, TSH and GSH) assays were conducted. The urine samples were examined by light microscope for the determination of the calcium oxalate crystals. Lyophilized juice of V. opulus (LJVO) and lyophilized commercial juice of V. opulus (LCJVO) exerted potential antiurolithiatic activity which was attributed to its diuretic effect along with the inhibitory action on the oxalate levels and free radical production. We also determined the chlorogenic acid content of the LJVO by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Chlorogenic acid was determined by using Supelcosil LC-18 (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column and acetonitrile: water: 0.2% o-phosphoric acid as a mobile phase. The chlorogenic acid content of V. opulus was found to be 0.3227 mg/mL in fruit juice. The results obtained in this study have provided a scientific evidence for the traditional usage of V. opulus on passing kidney stones in Turkish folk medicine. PMID:25165481

  19. Metformin Prevents Renal Stone Formation through an Antioxidant Mechanism In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Qin, Zhenbang; Zhang, Changwen; Qi, Shiyong; Yang, Tong; He, Zhen; Yang, Kuo; Liu, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a causal factor and key promoter of urolithiasis associated with renal tubular epithelium cell injury. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of metformin on renal tubular cell injury induced by oxalate and stone formation in a hyperoxaluric rat model. MTT assays were carried out to determine the protection of metformin from oxalate-induced cytotoxicity. The intracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in vitro. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into control group, ethylene glycol (EG) treated group, and EG + metformin treated group. Oxidative stress and crystal formations were evaluated in renal tissues after 8-week treatment. Metformin significantly inhibited the decrease of the viability in MDCK cells and HK-2 cells induced by oxalate. Besides, metformin markedly prevented the increased concentration of MDA and the decreased tendency of SOD in oxalate-induced MDCK cells and HK-2 cells. In vivo, the increased MDA levels and the reduction of SOD activity were detected in the EG treated group compared with controls, while these parameters reversed in the EG + metformin treated group. Kidney crystal formation in the EG + metformin treated group was decreased significantly compared with the EG treated group. Metformin suppressed urinary crystal deposit formation through renal tubular cell protection and antioxidative effects. PMID:27781075

  20. Recumbent Stone Circles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    During the 1970s and early 1980s, British archaeoastronomers were striving to bridge the interpretative gulf between the "megalithic observatories" of Alexander Thom and an archaeological mainstream that, generally speaking, was hostile to any mention of astronomy in relation to the megalithic monuments of Neolithic and Early Bronze Age Britain. The Scottish recumbent stone circles (RSCs) came to represent an example where sounder methodology could overcome many of the data selection issues that had beset earlier studies and, with due restraint, produce credible interpretations. Systematic studies of their orientations consistently concluded that the RSCs had a strong lunar connection, and it was widely envisaged that they were the setting for ceremonies associated with the appearance of the moon over the recumbent stone. Other evidence such as the presence of white quartz and the spatial distribution of cupmarks appeared to back up this conclusion. New archaeological investigations since 1999 have challenged and modified these conclusions, confirming in particular that the circles were built to enclose cairns rather than to demarcate open spaces. Yet the restricted pattern of orientations of these structures could only have been achieved by reference to the basic diurnal motions of the skies, and orientation in relation to simple observations of the midsummer moon remains the most likely reading of the alignment evidence taken as a whole. On the other hand, a consideration of the broader context, which includes the nearby Clava cairns, highlights instead the symbolic importance of the sun.

  1. Scottish Short Stone Rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Short stone rows received a good deal of attention during the 1980s and 1990s, at a time when archaeoastronomy in prehistoric Britain and Ireland was moving beyond reassessments of Alexander Thom's "megalithic observatories" by identifying coherent groups of similar monuments with clear orientation trends. Many such rows are found in western Scotland, with the main concentration in Argyll and the island of Mull. Systematic analyses of their orientations produced credible evidence of an awareness of the 18.6-year lunar node cycle, within a "primary-secondary" pattern whereby isolated rows were oriented close to moonrise or moonset at the southern major standstill limit, while others oriented in this way were accompanied by a second row oriented in a declination range that could be interpreted either as lunar or solar. A detailed investigation of the landscape situation of the sites in northern Mull, accompanied by excavations at two of the sites, suggested that they were deliberately placed in locations where critical moonsets would be seen against prominent distant landscape features, but where the distant horizon in most or all other directions was hidden from view. A lack of independent archaeological evidence may help to explain why archaeoastronomical investigations at short stone rows have never progressed beyond "data-driven" studies of orientations and landscape situation. Nonetheless, the work that was done at these sites raised important general methodological issues, and pioneered techniques, that remain relevant across archaeoastronomy today.

  2. Treatment of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Wickham, J E

    1993-11-27

    Replacement of open surgery with minimally invasive techniques for treating stones in the renal tract has greatly reduced patients' morbidity and mortality and the period of hospitalisation and convalescence. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy does not require anaesthesia and requires little analgesia so that treatment can be given on an outpatient basis, and there is no wound to heal. Only a small puncture site is needed for percutaneous endoscopic lithotomy, and with the advent of prophylactic antibiotics there are few complications. Of renal stones, about 85% can now be successfully treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy alone, and almost all of the stones too large or hard for lithotripsy can be treated endoscopically, with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes being used to fragment the stone. Stones in the upper and lower thirds of the ureter can be treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy, but stones in the middle third, which cannot normally be visualised to allow focusing of the shockwaves, usually require ureteroscopy. Nearly all bladder stones can be treated by transurethral endoscopy with an electrohydraulic probe. Only the largest renal tract stones still require open surgery.

  3. Transformation of zinc hydroxide chloride monohydrate to crystalline zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Moezzi, Amir; Cortie, Michael; McDonagh, Andrew

    2016-04-25

    Thermal decomposition of layered zinc hydroxide double salts provides an interesting alternative synthesis for particles of zinc oxide. Here, we examine the sequence of changes occurring as zinc hydroxide chloride monohydrate (Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O) is converted to crystalline ZnO by thermal decomposition. The specific surface area of the resultant ZnO measured by BET was 1.3 m(2) g(-1). A complicating and important factor in this process is that the thermal decomposition of zinc hydroxide chloride is also accompanied by the formation of volatile zinc-containing species under certain conditions. We show that this volatile compound is anhydrous ZnCl2 and its formation is moisture dependent. Therefore, control of atmospheric moisture is an important consideration that affects the overall efficiency of ZnO production by this process. PMID:27030646

  4. Reaction of Molecular Hydrogen with Tetraaminecopper(II) Sulfate Monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Seiichi; Kori, Toshinari; Kida, Sigeo

    1994-02-01

    The reaction of tetraammincopper(II) sulfate monohydrate in a solid state with H 2 (10 MPa) was studied. The Cu(II) ion in the complex was reduced to Cu(0). The final product was a mixture of (NH 4) 2SO 4 and colloidal black Cu(0) which showed a remarkable reactivity as follows. In thermogravimetric analysis up to 440°C under nitrogen atmosphere, the above product reacted between the components very much differently from a control sample with the same composition. The six intermediate samples, taken at successive reaction times, were examined by powder diffraction method. As one of the intermediates, the copper double salt, (NH 4) 2Cu(SO 4) 2, was identified.

  5. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Wood, Ian G.; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R.; Gutmann, Matthias J.; Sparkes, Hazel A.

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047 (3), b = 4.453 (1), c = 11.023 (3) Å and V = 591.3 (3) Å3 [ρcalc = 1281.8 (7) kg m−3] at 10 K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100 K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273 K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263 K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273 K; above 273 K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (E HB ≃ 30–40 kJ mol−1), on the basis of H⋯O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ∼ 36 kJ mol−1. The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  6. Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate: Formation and Heterogeneous Chemistry in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated some thermodynamic properties (i.e., freezing/melting points) and heterogeneous chemistry of sulfuric acid monohydrate (SAM, H2SO4.H2O), using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The freezing point observations of thin liquid sulfuric acid films show that for acid contents between 75 and 85 wt % the monohydrate crystallizes readily at temperatures between 220 and 240 K on a glass substrate. Once formed, SAM can be thermodynamically stable in the H2O partial pressure range of (1-4) x 10(exp -4) torr and in the temperature range of 220-240 K. For a constant H2O partial pressure, lowering the temperature causes SAM to melt when the temperature and water partial pressure conditions are out of its stability regime. The reaction probability measurements indicate that the hydrolysis of N2O5 is significantly suppressed owing to the formation of crystalline SAM: The reaction probability on water-rich SAM (with higher relative humidity, or RH) is of the order of 10(exp -3) at 210 K and decreases by more than an order of magnitude for the acid-rich form (with lower RH). The hydrolysis rate of ClONO2 on water-rich SAM is even smaller, of the order of 10(exp -4) at 195 K. These reported values on crystalline SAM are much smaller than those on liquid solutions. No enhancement of these reactions is observed in the presence of HCl vapor at the stratospheric concentrations. In addition, Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller analysis of gas adsorption isotherms and photomicrography have been performed to characterize the surface roughness and porosities of the SAM substrate. The results suggest the possible formation of SAM in some regions of the middle- or low-latitude stratosphere and, consequently, much slower heterogeneous reactions on the frozen aerosols.

  7. Oxalate Synthesis and Pyrolysis: A Colorful Introduction to Stoichiometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannatta, Michael W.; Richards-Babb, Michelle; Sweeney, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Metal oxalate synthesis and pyrolysis provides an opportunity for students to (i) learn stoichiometry, (ii) experience the consequences of proper stoichiometric calculations and experimental techniques, and (iii) be introduced to the relevance of chemistry by highlighting oxalates in context, for example, usages and health effects. At our…

  8. Histopathological occurrence and characterisation of calcium oxalate: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, A J

    1977-01-01

    Oxalosis is the histological manifestation of a number of diverse clinicopathological states involving abnormalities of both endogenous and exogenous oxalate. Crystalline deposits of calcium oxalate, usually first detected by their birefringence, may be characterised by a combination of their physical and tinctorial properties. Images PMID:72077

  9. [Formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin injection diluted with infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Eto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kie; Shimazu, Kounosuke; Sugiura, Toshimune; Baba, Kaori; Sato, Ayaka; Goromaru, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Hara, Keiko; Shinohara, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin use can cause acute peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory paresthesias, which are markedly exacerbated by exposure to cold temperatures, and is a dose-limiting factor in the treatment of colorectal cancer.Oxalate is eliminated in a series of nonenzymatic conversions of oxaliplatin in infusion solutions or biological fluids.Elimination of oxalate from oxaliplatin has been suggested as one of the reasons for the development of acute neuropathy.In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)-based method to detect oxalate formation, and investigated the time dependent formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin diluted with infusion solutions.The results obtained showed that the amount of oxalate in the solution corresponded to 1.6% of oxaliplatin 8 h after oxaliplatin dilution with a 5% glucose solution. On the other hand, oxalate formation from oxaliplatin diluted with a saline solution was ten-fold higher than that from oxaliplatin diluted with the 5% glucose solution.Most patients who were intravenously injected with oxaliplatin experienced venous pain.As a preventive measure against venous pain, dexamethasone was added to the oxaliplatin injection.We measured the amount of oxalate formed in the dexamethasone-containing oxaliplatin injection diluted with a 5% glucose solution.The amount of oxalate formed when dexamethasone was added did not differ significantly from that formed when dexamethasone was not added.Thus, there are no clinical problems associated with the stability of oxaliplatin solutions.

  10. Calcium Oxalate Accumulation in Malpighian Tubules of Silkworm (Bombyx mori)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Aaron J.; Webb, Mary Alice

    2007-04-01

    Silkworm provides an ideal model system for study of calcium oxalate crystallization in kidney-like organs, called Malpighian tubules. During their growth and development, silkworm larvae accumulate massive amounts of calcium oxalate crystals in their Malpighian tubules with no apparent harm to the organism. This manuscript reports studies of crystal structure in the tubules along with analyses identifying molecular constituents of tubule exudate.

  11. Production of oxalic acid by some fungi infected tubers.

    PubMed

    Faboya, O; Ikotun, T; Fatoki, O S

    1983-01-01

    Oxalic acid (as oxalate) was detected in four tubers commonly used for food in Nigeria-Dioscorea rotundata (White yam), Solanum tuberosum (Irish potato), Ipomoea batatas (Sweet potato), and Manihot esculenta (cassava). Whereas healthy I. batata had the highest oxalic acid content, healthy M. esculenta contained the lowest. When all tubers were artifically inoculated with four fungi-Penicillium oxalicum CURIE and THOM, Aspergillus niger VAN TIEGH, A. flavus and A. tamarii KITA, there was an increase in oxalate content/g of tuber tissue. The greatest amount of oxalate was produced by P. oxalicum in D. rotundata tuber. Consistently higher amounts of oxalate were produced by the four fungi in infected sweet potato tuber than in any other tuber and consistently lower amounts of oxalate were produced by the four fungi in Irish potato tuber. Differences in the carbohydrate type present in the tubers and in the biosynthesis pathway are thought to be responsible for variation in the production of oxalate in the different tubers by the four fungi used.

  12. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  13. The exposome for kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David S

    2016-02-01

    The exposome is the assembly and measure of all the exposures of an individual in a lifetime. An individual's exposures begin before birth and include insults from environmental and occupational sources. The associated field is called exposomics, which relies on the application of internal and external exposure assessment methods. Exposomics has not yet been thoroughly applied to the study of kidney stones although much is known about how diet and fluid intake affect nephrolithiasis. Some other novel exposures that may contribute to kidney stones are discussed including use of antibiotics, urbanization and migration to urban heat islands, and occupation. People whose school and jobs limit their access to fluids and adequate bathroom facilities may have higher prevalence of stones. Examples include athletes, teachers, heathcare workers, and cab drivers. Occupational kidney stones have received scant attention and may represent a neglected, and preventable, type of stone. An exposomic-oriented history would include a careful delineation of occupation and activities. PMID:26615595

  14. Potential Pharmacologic Treatments for Cystinuria and for Calcium Stones Associated with Hyperuricosuria

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, David S.

    2012-03-14

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to 'salt out' (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantages over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of L-cystine methyl ester and L-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, L-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.

  15. Intra-tubular deposits, urine and stone composition are divergent in patients with ileostomy.

    PubMed

    Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E; Coe, Fredric L; Bledsoe, Sharon B; Sommer, Andre J; Williams, James C; Krambeck, Amy E; Worcester, Elaine M

    2009-11-01

    Patients with ileostomy typically have recurrent renal stones and produce scanty, acidic, sodium-poor urine because of abnormally large enteric losses of water and sodium bicarbonate. Here we used a combination of intra-operative digital photography and biopsy of the renal papilla and cortex to measure changes associated with stone formation in seven patients with ileostomy. Papillary deformity was present in four patients and was associated with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rates. All patients had interstitial apatite plaque, as predicted from their generally acid, low-volume urine. Two patients had stones attached to plaque; however, all patients had crystal deposits that plugged the ducts of Bellini and inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs). Despite acid urine, all crystal deposits contained apatite, and five patients had deposits of sodium and ammonium acid urates. Stones were either uric acid or calcium oxalate as predicted by supersaturation, however, there was a general lack of supersaturation for calcium phosphate as brushite, sodium, or ammonium acid urate because of the overall low urine pH. This suggests that local tubular pH exceeds that of bulk urine. Despite low urine pH, patients with an ileostomy resemble those with obesity bypass, in whom IMCD apatite crystal plugs are found. They are, however, unlike these bypass patients in having interstitial apatite plaque. IMCD plugging with sodium and ammonium acid urate has not been found previously and appears to correlate with formation of uric acid stones. PMID:19710630

  16. Potential pharmacologic treatments for cystinuria and for calcium stones associated with hyperuricosuria.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, David S

    2011-08-01

    Two new potential pharmacologic therapies for recurrent stone disease are described. The role of hyperuricosuria in promoting calcium stones is controversial with only some but not all epidemiologic studies demonstrating associations between increasing urinary uric acid excretion and calcium stone disease. The relationship is supported by the ability of uric acid to "salt out" (or reduce the solubility of) calcium oxalate in vitro. A randomized, controlled trial of allopurinol in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria was also effective in preventing recurrent stones. Febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (also known as xanthine dehydrogenase or xanthine oxidoreductase) may have advantages over allopurinol and is being tested in a similar protocol, with the eventual goal of determining whether urate-lowering therapy prevents recurrent calcium stones. Treatments for cystinuria have advanced little in the past 30 years. Atomic force microscopy has been used recently to demonstrate that effective inhibition of cystine crystal growth is accomplished at low concentrations of l-cystine methyl ester and l-cystine dimethyl ester, structural analogs of cystine that provide steric inhibition of crystal growth. In vitro, l-cystine dimethyl ester had a significant inhibitory effect on crystal growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness will be tested in an Slc3a1 knockout mouse that serves as an animal model of cystinuria.

  17. Mathematical model to estimate risk of calcium-containing renal stones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietrzyk, R. A.; Feiveson, A. H.; Whitson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Astronauts exposed to microgravity during the course of spaceflight undergo physiologic changes that alter the urinary environment so as to increase the risk of renal stone formation. This study was undertaken to identify a simple method with which to evaluate the potential risk of renal stone development during spaceflight. METHOD: We used a large database of urinary risk factors obtained from 323 astronauts before and after spaceflight to generate a mathematical model with which to predict the urinary supersaturation of calcium stone forming salts. RESULT: This model, which involves the fewest possible analytical variables (urinary calcium, citrate, oxalate, phosphorus, and total volume), reliably and accurately predicted the urinary supersaturation of the calcium stone forming salts when compared to results obtained from a group of 6 astronauts who collected urine during flight. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this model will simplify both routine medical monitoring during spaceflight as well as the evaluation of countermeasures designed to minimize renal stone development. This model also can be used for Earth-based applications in which access to analytical resources is limited.

  18. Fad diets and their effect on urinary stone formation.

    PubMed

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2014-09-01

    The influence of unhealthy dietary habits on urinary stone formation has been widely recognized in literature. Dietary advice is indeed the cornerstone prescription for prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. However, only a small amount of medical literature has addressed the influence of popular or fad diets, often self-prescribed for the management of obesity and overweight or for cultural beliefs, on the risk of kidney stones. Thereby in this paper we analyze the current knowledge on the effects of some popular diets on overall lithogenic risk. High-protein diets, like Dukan diet, raise some concerns, since animal proteins are able to increase urinary calcium and to decrease urinary citrate excretion, thus leading to a high overall lithogenic risk. Low-carbohydrate diets, like Atkins diet or zone diet, may have a protective role against kidney stone formation, but there are also evidences stating that this dietary approach may rise calciuria and decrease citraturia, since it is generally associated to a relatively high intake of animal proteins. Vegan diet can be harmful for urinary stone disease, especially for the risk of hyperuricemia and micronutrient deficiencies, even if only few studies have addressed this specific matter. On the other side, the benefits of a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet on kidney stone prevention have been largely emphasized, provided that the intake of calcium and oxalate is balanced. Traditional Mediterranean diet should exert a protective effect on nephrolithiasis as well, even if specific studies have not been carried out yet. High phytate and antioxidant content of this diet have however demonstrated to be beneficial in preventing the formation of new or recurrent calculi. Anyway, at the current state of knowledge, the most effective dietary approach to prevent kidney stone disease is a mild animal protein restriction, a balanced intake of carbohydrates and fats and a high intake of fruit and vegetables. Other fundamental aspects

  19. Fad diets and their effect on urinary stone formation

    PubMed Central

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Meschi, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    The influence of unhealthy dietary habits on urinary stone formation has been widely recognized in literature. Dietary advice is indeed the cornerstone prescription for prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. However, only a small amount of medical literature has addressed the influence of popular or fad diets, often self-prescribed for the management of obesity and overweight or for cultural beliefs, on the risk of kidney stones. Thereby in this paper we analyze the current knowledge on the effects of some popular diets on overall lithogenic risk. High-protein diets, like Dukan diet, raise some concerns, since animal proteins are able to increase urinary calcium and to decrease urinary citrate excretion, thus leading to a high overall lithogenic risk. Low-carbohydrate diets, like Atkins diet or zone diet, may have a protective role against kidney stone formation, but there are also evidences stating that this dietary approach may rise calciuria and decrease citraturia, since it is generally associated to a relatively high intake of animal proteins. Vegan diet can be harmful for urinary stone disease, especially for the risk of hyperuricemia and micronutrient deficiencies, even if only few studies have addressed this specific matter. On the other side, the benefits of a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet on kidney stone prevention have been largely emphasized, provided that the intake of calcium and oxalate is balanced. Traditional Mediterranean diet should exert a protective effect on nephrolithiasis as well, even if specific studies have not been carried out yet. High phytate and antioxidant content of this diet have however demonstrated to be beneficial in preventing the formation of new or recurrent calculi. Anyway, at the current state of knowledge, the most effective dietary approach to prevent kidney stone disease is a mild animal protein restriction, a balanced intake of carbohydrates and fats and a high intake of fruit and vegetables. Other fundamental aspects

  20. Fad diets and their effect on urinary stone formation.

    PubMed

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2014-09-01

    The influence of unhealthy dietary habits on urinary stone formation has been widely recognized in literature. Dietary advice is indeed the cornerstone prescription for prevention of nephrolithiasis as well. However, only a small amount of medical literature has addressed the influence of popular or fad diets, often self-prescribed for the management of obesity and overweight or for cultural beliefs, on the risk of kidney stones. Thereby in this paper we analyze the current knowledge on the effects of some popular diets on overall lithogenic risk. High-protein diets, like Dukan diet, raise some concerns, since animal proteins are able to increase urinary calcium and to decrease urinary citrate excretion, thus leading to a high overall lithogenic risk. Low-carbohydrate diets, like Atkins diet or zone diet, may have a protective role against kidney stone formation, but there are also evidences stating that this dietary approach may rise calciuria and decrease citraturia, since it is generally associated to a relatively high intake of animal proteins. Vegan diet can be harmful for urinary stone disease, especially for the risk of hyperuricemia and micronutrient deficiencies, even if only few studies have addressed this specific matter. On the other side, the benefits of a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet on kidney stone prevention have been largely emphasized, provided that the intake of calcium and oxalate is balanced. Traditional Mediterranean diet should exert a protective effect on nephrolithiasis as well, even if specific studies have not been carried out yet. High phytate and antioxidant content of this diet have however demonstrated to be beneficial in preventing the formation of new or recurrent calculi. Anyway, at the current state of knowledge, the most effective dietary approach to prevent kidney stone disease is a mild animal protein restriction, a balanced intake of carbohydrates and fats and a high intake of fruit and vegetables. Other fundamental aspects

  1. Probabilistic Modeling of the Renal Stone Formation Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Lauren M.; Myers, Jerry G.; Goodenow, Debra A.; McRae, Michael P.; Jackson, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    randomly sampling the probability distributions of the electrolyte concentrations and system parameters that are inputs into the deterministic model. The total urine chemistry concentrations are used to determine the urine chemistry activity using the Joint Expert Speciation System (JESS), a biochemistry model. Information used from JESS is then fed into the deterministic growth model. Outputs from JESS and the deterministic model are passed back to the probabilistic model where a multivariate regression is used to assess the likelihood of a stone forming and the likelihood of a stone requiring clinical intervention. The parameters used to determine to quantify these risks include: relative supersaturation (RS) of calcium oxalate, citrate/calcium ratio, crystal number density, total urine volume, pH, magnesium excretion, maximum stone width, and ureteral location. Methods and Validation: The RSFM is designed to perform a Monte Carlo simulation to generate probability distributions of clinically significant renal stones, as well as provide an associated uncertainty in the estimate. Initially, early versions will be used to test integration of the components and assess component validation and verification (V&V), with later versions used to address questions regarding design reference mission scenarios. Once integrated with the deterministic component, the credibility assessment of the integrated model will follow NASA STD 7009 requirements.

  2. Stones, bones, and heredity.

    PubMed

    Milliner, Dawn S

    2006-07-01

    Genetic disorders of mineral metabolism cause urolithiasis, renal disease, and osteodystrophy. Most are rare, such that the full spectrum of clinical expression is difficult to appreciate. Diagnosis is further complicated by overlap of clinical features. Dent's disease and primary hyperoxaluria, inherited causes of calcium urolithiasis, are both associated with nephrocalcinosis and urolithiasis in early childhood and renal failure that can occur at any age but is seen more often in adulthood. Bone disease is an inconsistent feature of each. Dent's disease is caused by mutations of the CLCN-5 gene with impaired kidney-specific CLC-5 chloride channel expression in the proximal tubule, thick ascending limb of Henle, and the collecting ducts. Resulting hypercalciuria and proximal tubule dysfunction, including phosphate wasting, are primarily responsible for the clinical manifestations. Low-molecular-weight proteinuria is characteristic. Definitive diagnosis is made by DNA mutation analysis. Primary hyperoxaluria, type I, is due to mutations of the AGXT gene leading to deficient hepatic alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase activity. Marked overproduction of oxalate by hepatic cells results in the hyperoxaluria responsible for clinical features. Definitive diagnosis is by liver biopsy with measurement of enzyme activity, with DNA mutation analysis used increasingly as mutations and their frequency are defined. These disorders of calcium urolithiasis illustrate the value of molecular medicine for diagnosis and the promise it provides for innovative and more effective future treatments.

  3. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  4. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  5. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II) oxalate precursor layers

    PubMed Central

    Rückriem, Kai; Grotheer, Sarah; Vieker, Henning; Penner, Paul; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copper(II) oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM) using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II) acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II) oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Helium ion microscopy (HIM) reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor. PMID:27547602

  6. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II) oxalate precursor layers.

    PubMed

    Rückriem, Kai; Grotheer, Sarah; Vieker, Henning; Penner, Paul; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Copper(II) oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM) using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II) acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II) oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Helium ion microscopy (HIM) reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor. PMID:27547602

  7. The bioreceptivity of building stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mulec, Janez; Muck, Tadeja; Hladnik, Aleš; Mladenovič, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Bioreceptivity is an intrinsic property of stone, and is defined as the ability of a material to be colonized by living organisms. The fouling and staining of building stone material due to the activity of microorganisms presents a serious problem in modern as well as historical buildings, not only due to the aesthetic impact but also due to the deterioration of the material. Biological colonisation on stone materials is influenced by a number of factors, e.g. the intrinsic properties of the stone (porosity, roughness, permeability, mineral composition), environmental parameters (e.g. solar radiation, temperature, water regime, climate, etc.), and specific microclimatic parameters (e.g. orientation, exposure to shadow, permanent capillary humidity, etc.). In order to assess the bioreceptivity of building stones, use is often made of artificial colonisation experiments compromising the inoculation of stones with a single species or a few isolated strains under laboratory conditions. In the present work the authors present the development of a method for the determination of bioreceptivity, as well as a study of the bioreceptivity of selected natural stone versus the latter's intrinsic properties. Field examples of biodeterioration are also presented. The study was supported by the Slovenian Research Agency (L1-5453).

  8. Lost Stones During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Arozamena, C.; Gutierrez, L.; Bracco, J.; Mon, A.; Almeyra, R. Sanchez; Secchi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Gallbladder perforation, with loss of calculi in the abdomen is frequent during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Recent publications report complications in port sites or in the abdominal cavity. A study of 3686 laparsocopic cholecystectomies performed by 6 surgeons was undertaken. In 627 patients, perforation of the gallbladder occurred and in 254 stones were spilled into the abdominal cavity. In 214 they were retrieved and in 40 left in the abdomen. Twelve patients developed complications. Percutaneous drainage was successful in 2 with serous collections. Two patients with abdominal abscesses were reoperated, stones retrieved and the abdomen drained. One patient developed an intestinal obstruction due to a stone in the ileum. One patient who had a cholecystectomy in another hospital developed a paraumbilical tumor. At reoperation a stone was retrieved. In another six patients, stones were found in port sites. Stones lost into the abdomen should be removed because of their potential morbidity, especially if they are large or if infection is present in the gallbladder at the time of initial surgery. There is no indication for routine conversion to open surgery when stone spillage occurs, although patients should be informed to avoid legal consequence, and to hasten early diagnosis of later complications. PMID:9893240

  9. Identification of human urinary trefoil factor 1 as a novel calcium oxalate crystal growth inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Sritippayawan, Suchai; Pittayamateekul, Jeeraporn; Parichatikanond, Paisal; Westley, Bruce R.; May, Felicity E.B.; Malasit, Prida; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on proteins that inhibit kidney stone formation has identified a relatively small number of well-characterized inhibitors. Identification of additional stone inhibitors would increase understanding of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of nephrolithiasis. We have combined conventional biochemical methods with recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) to identify a novel calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal growth inhibitor in normal human urine. Anionic proteins were isolated by DEAE adsorption and separated by HiLoad 16/60 Superdex 75 gel filtration. A fraction with potent inhibitory activity against CaOx crystal growth was isolated and purified by anion exchange chromatography. The protein in 2 subfractions that retained inhibitory activity was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight MS and electrospray ionization–quadrupole–time-of-flight tandem MS as human trefoil factor 1 (TFF1). Western blot analysis confirmed the mass spectrometric protein identification. Functional studies of urinary TFF1 demonstrated that its inhibitory potency was similar to that of nephrocalcin. The inhibitory activity of urinary TFF1 was dose dependent and was inhibited by TFF1 antisera. Anti–C-terminal antibody was particularly effective, consistent with our proposed model in which the 4 C-terminal glutamic residues of TFF1 interact with calcium ions to prevent CaOx crystal growth. Concentrations and relative amounts of TFF1 in the urine of patients with idiopathic CaOx kidney stone were significantly less (2.5-fold for the concentrations and 5- to 22-fold for the relative amounts) than those found in controls. These data indicate that TFF1 is a novel potent CaOx crystal growth inhibitor with a potential pathophysiological role in nephrolithiasis. PMID:16308573

  10. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  11. Nutritional Management of Kidney Stones (Nephrolithiasis)

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Adam M.; Seifter, Julian L.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of kidney stones is common in the United States and treatments for them are very costly. This review article provides information about epidemiology, mechanism, diagnosis, and pathophysiology of kidney stone formation, and methods for the evaluation of stone risks for new and follow-up patients. Adequate evaluation and management can prevent recurrence of stones. Kidney stone prevention should be individualized in both its medical and dietary management, keeping in mind the specific risks involved for each type of stones. Recognition of these risk factors and development of long-term management strategies for dealing with them are the most effective ways to prevent recurrence of kidney stones. PMID:26251832

  12. Short term tolvaptan increases water intake and effectively decreases urinary calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid supersaturations

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Erickson, Stephen B.; Rule, Andrew D.; Enders, Felicity; Lieske, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many patients cannot effectively increase water intake and urine volume to prevent urinary stones. Tolvaptan, a V2 receptor antagonist, blocks water reabsorption in the collecting duct and should reduce urinary supersaturation (SS) of stone forming solutes, but this has never been proven. Materials and Methods We conducted a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 21 adult calcium urinary stone formers stratified as majority calcium oxalate(CaOx, n=10) or calcium phosphate(CaP, n=11). Patients received tolvaptan 45 mg/day or placebo for 1 week, followed by a washout week and crossover to tolvaptan or placebo for week 3. A 24h urines was collected at the end of weeks 1 and 3. Results Tolvaptan vs. placebo decreased urinary osmolality (204±96 vs 529±213 mOsm/kg, P<0.001) and increased urinary volume (4.8±2.9 vs 1.8±0.9 L, P<0.001). The majority of urinary solute excretion rates including sodium and calcium did not significantly change, although oxalate secretion slightly increased (23±8 to 15±8 mg/24h, P = 0.009). Urinary CaOx SS (−0.01±1.14 vs 0.95±0.87 DG, P<0.001), CaP SS (−1.66±1.17 vs −0.13±1.02 DG, P<0.001) and Uric Acid SS (−2.05±4.05 vs −5.24±3.12 DG, P=0.04) all dramatically decreased. Effects did not differ between CaOx and CaP groups (P>0.05 for all interactions). Conclusions Tolvaptan increases urine volume and decreases urinary SS in calcium stone formers. Further study is needed to determine if long term use of V2 receptor antagonists results in fewer stone events. PMID:26598423

  13. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate on native oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Pattillo, M.J.; Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    The aqueous deposition of calcium oxalate onto colloidal oxides has been studied as a model system for understanding heterogeneous nucleation processes of importance in biomimetic synthesis of ceramic thin films. Calcium oxalate nucleation has been monitored by measuring induction times for nucleation using Constant Composition techniques and by measuring nucleation densities on extended oxide surfaces using an atomic force microscope. Results show that the dependence of calcium oxalate nucleation on solution supersaturation fits the functional form predicted by classical nucleation theories. Anionic surfaces appear to promote nucleation better than cationic surfaces, lowering the effective energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation.

  14. [Management of proximal ureteral stones].

    PubMed

    Lechevallier, E; Taxer, O; Saussine, C

    2008-12-01

    Proximal ureteral stone less than 4-6mm may initially be treated by surveillance. Generally, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the first line treatment for proximal ureteral stones, specially for stones less than 1cm. For stones greater than 1cm, the results of ureteroscopy (URS) are better than the results of ESWL and in these cases URS may be an option. In case of failure of ESWL, URS can be proposed. URS can be the first line treatment in case of severe ureteral obstruction with no urinary infection. Proximal ureteroscopy must be careful because severe complications are not infrequent. Open surgery has very rare indication. Metabolic check-up and annually follow-up with at least a renal imaging at three months are recommended.

  15. A review of oxalate poisoning in domestic animals: tolerance and performance aspects.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Abdullah, R B; Wan Khadijah, W E

    2013-08-01

    Published data on oxalate poisoning in domestic animals are reviewed, with a focus on tolerance and performance. Oxalic acid is one of a number of anti-nutrients found in forage. It can bind with dietary calcium (Ca) or magnesium (Mg) to form insoluble Ca or Mg oxalate, which then may lead to low serum Ca or Mg levels as well as to renal failure because of precipitation of these salts in the kidneys. Dietary oxalate plays an important role in the formation of Ca oxalate, and a high dietary intake of Ca may decrease oxalate absorption and its subsequent urinary excretion. Oxalate-rich plants can be supplemented with other plants as forage for domestic animals, which may help to reduce the overall intake of oxalate-rich plants. Non-ruminants appear to be more sensitive to oxalate than ruminants because in the latter, rumen bacteria help to degrade oxalate. If ruminants are slowly exposed to a diet high in oxalate, the population of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the rumen increases sufficiently to prevent oxalate poisoning. However, if large quantities of oxalate-rich plants are eaten, the rumen is overwhelmed and unable to metabolize the oxalate and oxalate-poisoning results. Based on published data, we consider that <2.0% soluble oxalate would be an appropriate level to avoid oxalate poisoning in ruminants, although blood Ca level may decrease. In the case of non-ruminants, <0.5% soluble oxalate may be acceptable. However, these proposed safe levels of soluble oxalate should be regarded as preliminary. Further studies, especially long-term studies, are needed to validate and improve the recommended safe levels in animals. This review will encourage further research on the relationships between dietary oxalate, other dietary factors and renal failure in domestic animals.

  16. Weekend versus weekday urine collections in assessment of stone-formers.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, R W

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour urine collections are an important part of the metabolic evaluation of stone-formers, but are difficult for patients at work. At weekends the results might be different. Forty-five stone-formers who worked at day jobs from Monday to Friday collected urine for 24 h on a normal working day and also on a Saturday or Sunday and the differences were evaluated. Average 24 h urine volume was higher on weekdays than at weekends. Calcium, oxalate, and uric acid excretion did not differ. These results imply an increased risk of crystalluria at the weekend. Therefore weekend collections are most likely to show abnormalities and should be acceptable to clinicians. PMID:8976890

  17. The preservation of urine samples for determination of renal stone risk factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicar, M. J.; Hsu, M. C.; Johnson, T.; Pak, C. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A preservation technique for urine specimens before determination of stone risk factors was evaluated. The purpose of these experiments was to prove the effectiveness of the preservatives used to prevent changes in the concentrations of those constituents measured. Measured concentrations in fresh specimens were compared with those in the same specimens after storage with the preservatives. Refrigeration at 4 degrees C up to five days was appropriate in a laboratory setting, as no significant changes in urinary concentrations occurred. Refrigeration, however, did not offer a convenient method for shipping. Chemical preservation was found to be an effective alternative to refrigeration. Thymol prevented changes in concentration of pH, citrate, uric acid, sulfate, sodium, potassium, and cyclic AMP, while a mixture of hydrochloric (HCl) acid and boric acid prevented changes in calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, oxalate, ammonium, and creatinine. Thus, the addition of thymol or HCl/boric acid to urine specimens will prevent significant changes in the concentrations of stone risk factors.

  18. Infrared spectroscopic analysis of staghorn calculi obtained after open renal surgery in a urology unit of Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijayarathna, K S; Weerasingha, G G; Weligamage, A S; Chandrajith, R; Abeygunasekera, A M

    2016-06-01

    The composition of renal stones varies widely among populations. The aim of our study was to determine the composition of staghorn renal stones using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in a cohort of Sri Lankan patients. Forty two staghorn calculi removed from kidneys of adult patients during open surgery were analysed. There were 32 men. Nineteen (45%) were calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) stones. Stones containing a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyl phosphate (apatite) were found in 16 (38%). Only 4 (10%) staghorn calculi were coposed of struvite. Three (7%) were uric acid stones. So most staghorn renal stones in Sri Lanka are calcium oxalate. Contrary to the traditional view based on studies done in the western world, only 10% of staghorn calculi removed from patients in Sri Lanka are struvite or infection stones. This could be the reason for kidneys with staghorn calculi in Sri Lanka to retain their function. PMID:27423749

  19. Structure of Dehydroergosterol Monohydrate and Interaction with Sterol Carrier Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Gallegos, Adalberto M.; Storey, Stephen M.; Reibenspies, Joseph H.; Kier, Ann B.; Meyer, Edgar; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol [ergosta-5,7,9(11),22-tetraen-3β-ol] is a naturally-occurring, fluorescent sterol utilized extensively to probe membrane cholesterol distribution, cholesterol-protein interactions, and intracellular cholesterol transport both in vitro and in vivo. In aqueous solutions, the low solubility of dehydroergosterol results in the formation of monohydrate crystals similar to cholesterol. Low temperature x-ray diffraction analysis reveals that dehydroergosterol monohydrate crystallizes in the space group P21 with 4 molecules in the unit cell and monoclinic crystal parameters a = 9.975(1)Å, b = 7.4731(9)Å, c = 34.054(4)Å, and β = 92.970(2)° somewhat similar to ergosterol monohydrate. The molecular arrangement is in a slightly closer packed bilayer structure resembling cholesterol monohydrate. Since dehydroergosterol fluorescence emission undergoes a quantum yield enhancement and red-shift of its maximum wavelength when crystallized, formation or disruption of microcrystals was monitored with high sensitivity using cuvette-based spectroscopy and multi-photon laser scanning imaging microscopy (MPLSM). This manuscript reports on the dynamical effect of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) interacting between aqueous dispersions of dehydroergosterol monohydrate microcrystal donors and acceptors consisting not only of model membranes but also vesicles derived from plasma membranes isolated by biochemical fractionation and affinity purification from Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, this study provides real-time measurements of the effect of increased SCP-2 levels on the rate of disappearance of dehydroergosterol microcrystals in living cells. PMID:19020914

  20. Lunar stone saw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Tom; Croker, Todd; Hines, Ken; Knight, Mike; Walton, Todd

    1988-01-01

    This project addresses the problem of cutting lunar stones into blocks to be used to construct shelters to protect personnel and equipment from harmful solar radiation. This plant will manufacture 6 in x 1 ft x 2 ft blocks and will be located near the south pole to allow it to be in the shade at all times. This design uses a computer controlled robot, a boulder handler that uses hydraulics for movement, a computer system that used 3-D vision to determine the size of boulders, a polycrystalline diamond tipped saw blade that utilizes radiation for cooling, and a solar tower to collect solar energy. Only two electric motors are used in this plant because of the heavy weight of electric motors and the problem of cooling them. These two motors will be cooled by thermoelectric cooling. All other motors and actuators are to be hydraulic. The architectural design for the building as well as the conceptual design of the machines for cutting the blocks are described.

  1. Rapid oxalate determination in blood and synthetic urine using a newly developed oxometer.

    PubMed

    Canales, Benjamin K; Richards, Nigel G; Peck, Ammon B

    2013-02-01

    Blood and urine oxalate determinations have been limited to the laboratory setting because of complex sample storage and processing methods as well as the need for color spectrophotometry and ion chromatography. We hypothesized that glucometer test strips, impregnated with glucose oxidase and dyes that measure secondary hydrogen peroxide production, could be infused with oxalate oxidase and produce enhanced color changes in the presence of oxalate. By increasing the amount of sodium oxalate in fresh blood, we found that glucometer-measured oxalate increased on a linear scale. In addition, oxalate levels in synthetic urine could be measured using a visual scale, suggesting that strip dwell time or oxalate/oxalate oxidase concentrations could be manipulated to enhance optimal sensitivity. Although further testing is necessary, this simple, first-generation oxometer may eventually allow point of care testing in the home or office, empowering patients with oxalate-based medical conditions and giving healthcare providers real-time oxalate feedback.

  2. An oxalyl-CoA dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism plays a role in regulating calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and defending against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants pos...

  3. Why sildenafil and sildenafil citrate monohydrate crystals are not stable?

    PubMed Central

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Pakawatchai, Chaveng; Nitichai, Kwanjai; Srichana, Teerapol; Phetmung, Hirihattaya

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate was crystallized by various techniques aiming to determine the behavior and factors affecting the crystal growth. There are only 2 types of sildenafil obtaining from crystallization: sildenafil (1) and sildenafil citrate monohydrate (2). The used techniques were (i) crystallization from saturated solutions, (ii) addition of an antisolvent, (iii) reflux and (iv) slow solvent evaporation method. By pursuing these various methods, our work pointed that the best formation of crystal (1) was obtained from technique no. (i). Surprisingly, the obtained crystals (1) were perfected if the process was an acidic pH at a cold temperature then perfect crystals occurred within a day. Crystals of compound (2) grew easily using technique no. (ii) which are various polar solvents over a wide range of pH and temperature preparation processes. The infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra fit well with these two X-ray crystal structures. The crystal structures of sildenafil free base and salt forms were different from their different growing conditions leading to stability difference. PMID:26594116

  4. Why sildenafil and sildenafil citrate monohydrate crystals are not stable?

    PubMed

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Pakawatchai, Chaveng; Nitichai, Kwanjai; Srichana, Teerapol; Phetmung, Hirihattaya

    2015-10-01

    Sildenafil citrate was crystallized by various techniques aiming to determine the behavior and factors affecting the crystal growth. There are only 2 types of sildenafil obtaining from crystallization: sildenafil (1) and sildenafil citrate monohydrate (2). The used techniques were (i) crystallization from saturated solutions, (ii) addition of an antisolvent, (iii) reflux and (iv) slow solvent evaporation method. By pursuing these various methods, our work pointed that the best formation of crystal (1) was obtained from technique no. (i). Surprisingly, the obtained crystals (1) were perfected if the process was an acidic pH at a cold temperature then perfect crystals occurred within a day. Crystals of compound (2) grew easily using technique no. (ii) which are various polar solvents over a wide range of pH and temperature preparation processes. The infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra fit well with these two X-ray crystal structures. The crystal structures of sildenafil free base and salt forms were different from their different growing conditions leading to stability difference. PMID:26594116

  5. 9-O-Ethyl­berberrubinium iodide monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Grundt, Peter; Pernat, Jennifer; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Halverson, Melanie A.; Berry, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound (systematic name: 9-eth­oxy-10-meth­oxy-5,6-dihydro-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquinolino­[3,2-a]isoquin­olin-7-ium iodide monohydrate), 2C21H20NO4 +·2I−·H2O, two independent mol­ecules pack in the unit cell, where interactions between the molecules are stabilized by weak inter­molecular π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distances in the range 3.571 (4) to 3.815 (4)Å]. Inter­molecular C—H⋯O inter­actions are also observed. The iodide anions are disordered with occupancy ratios of 0.94 (1):0.06 (1) and 0.91 (1):0.09 (1). The cationic molecule is planar in structure with a small torsion resulting from the dihydropyridine ring. PMID:21587567

  6. Why sildenafil and sildenafil citrate monohydrate crystals are not stable?

    PubMed

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Pakawatchai, Chaveng; Nitichai, Kwanjai; Srichana, Teerapol; Phetmung, Hirihattaya

    2015-10-01

    Sildenafil citrate was crystallized by various techniques aiming to determine the behavior and factors affecting the crystal growth. There are only 2 types of sildenafil obtaining from crystallization: sildenafil (1) and sildenafil citrate monohydrate (2). The used techniques were (i) crystallization from saturated solutions, (ii) addition of an antisolvent, (iii) reflux and (iv) slow solvent evaporation method. By pursuing these various methods, our work pointed that the best formation of crystal (1) was obtained from technique no. (i). Surprisingly, the obtained crystals (1) were perfected if the process was an acidic pH at a cold temperature then perfect crystals occurred within a day. Crystals of compound (2) grew easily using technique no. (ii) which are various polar solvents over a wide range of pH and temperature preparation processes. The infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra fit well with these two X-ray crystal structures. The crystal structures of sildenafil free base and salt forms were different from their different growing conditions leading to stability difference.

  7. Biogeochemistry of oxalate in the antarctic cryptoendolithic lichen-dominated community.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C G; Vestal, J R

    1993-05-01

    Cryptoendolithic (hidden in rock) lichen-dominated microbial communities from the Ross Desert of Antarctica were shown to produce oxalate (oxalic acid). Oxalate increased mineral dissolution, which provides nutrients, creates characteristic weathering patterns, and may ultimately influence the biological residence time of the community. Oxalate was the only organic acid detectable by HPLC, and its presence was verified by GC/MS. Community photosynthetic metabolism was involved in oxalate production since rates of (14)C-oxalate production from (14)C02 were higher in light than in dark incubations. Flaking of the sandstone at the level of the lichen-dominated zone a few millimeters beneath the rock surface can be explained by dissolution of the sandstone cement, which was enhanced by Si, Fe, and Al oxalate complex formation. Added oxalate was observed to increase the solubility of Si, Fe, Al, P, and K. Oxalate's ability to form soluble trivalent metal-oxalate complexes correlated with the observed order of metal oxide depletion from the lichen-dominated zone (Mn > Fe > Al). Thermodynamic calculations predict that Fe oxalate complex formation mobilizes amorphous Fe oxides (ferrihydrite) in the lichen-dominated zone, and where oxalate is depleted, ferrihydrite should precipitate. Hematite, a more crystalline Fe oxide, should remain solid at in situ oxalate concentrations. Oxalate was not a carbon source for the indigenous heterotrophs, but the microbiota were involved in oxalate mineralization to CO2, since oxalate mineralization was reduced in poisoned incubations. Photooxidation of oxalate to C02 coupled with photoreduction of Fe(Ill) may be responsible for oxalate removal in situ, since rates of (14)C-oxalate mineralization in dark incubations were at least 50% lower than those in the light. Removal of oxalate from Si, Fe, and Al complexes should allow free dissolved Si, Fe, and Al to precipitate as amorphous silicates and metal oxides. This may explain increased

  8. Purbeck Stone - A possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    By definition, a Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR) should have international significance. The Purbeck Group of uppermost Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous age (Tithonian- Berriasian) outcrops mainly in the Purbeck area of Dorset, England. It was deposited in shallow freshwater to brackish lagoons with occasional marine incursions. Limestones, mainly biosparites, occur at 6 main levels. Differences in bed thickness, jointing and hardness make it suitable for a variety of purposes including dimension stone, monumental and ornamental stone, roofing tiles, paving, flooring and rockery stone. Near the top of the sequence is a dark gastropod biosparite, traditionally called Purbeck Marble, easily carved, which has been extensively used for decorative interior work in churches and cathedrals particularly for fonts, tombs, flooring and facings on columns for example in the medieval cathedrals of Salisbury, Exeter, Durham, York and Wells and Worcester and Westminster Abbey. The stone was extracted at least from Roman times (1st century AD) through the medieval period. Quarrying expanded from about 1700 reaching a peak in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Stone was transported first by sea but later by rail for wider use. Used in many local buildings, it gives an important element of local character. Many of the villages are designated conservation areas with a requirement for repair, maintenance and new building using local stone. Initially the stone was taken from quarries but was later mined. The number of operating companies declined from 15 to 5 over the past 40 years, with 10 active small quarries. Outputs are from few hundred tonnes to a few thousand tonnes per annum or about 9 to 12 years of permitted reserves but the Planning Authority intends to make sufficient provision for production at recent levels for their development plan period. The extraction sites are in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and close to Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. This might

  9. Multiorgan crystal deposition following intravenous oxalate infusion in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfrucht, M.J.; Cheeks, C.; Wedeen, R.P.

    1986-06-01

    Deposition of calcium oxalate is responsible for the pathologic manifestations of oxalosis and may contribute to multiorgan dysfunction in uremia and to the progression of renal damage after renal failure is established. We have developed a rat model of oxalosis using a single intravenous injection of sodium oxalate, 0.3 mmol./kg. body weight, in rats. Polarized light microscopy and section freeze-dry autoradiography were used to identify /sup 14/C-oxalate within the renal parenchyma and in extrarenal organs. /sup 14/C-oxalate crystals under three mu in length were identified within one min. of injection in proximal tubule lumens. Section freeze-dry autoradiography showed occasional minute crystals within glomeruli, heart, lung and liver at one hr. In contrast to concentrative cellular uptake demonstrated in rat renal cortical slices in vitro, intracellular accumulation of /sup 14/C-oxalate could not be detected in vivo. Within the first 24 hr., renal oxalate retention reached a maximum of 25 +/- 4 per cent of the injected dose/gm. kidney compared to a maximum of only 7 +/- 3 per cent/gm. kidney after intraperitoneal administration. Although less than one per cent dose/gm. kidney remained after one week, crystal fragments were scattered throughout the cortex and medulla, often surrounded by foci of interstitial nephritis. The retention of crystals in kidney and other body organs following i.v. oxalate provides a model of oxalosis which stimulates pathophysiologic events in a variety of clinical situations characterized by transiently or persistently elevated serum oxalate.

  10. Oxalic acid, epsom salt and the poison bottle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, W A

    1982-03-01

    1 During the 19th century inadequate control of the sale of poisons, widespread illiteracy, and the English addiction to self-medication contributed to the high incidence of accidental poisoning by oxalic acid mistaken for Epsom salt. 2 Chemical methods for identifying oxalic acid failed when the product was adulterated. 3 Many mechanical devices were proposed to prevent careless dispensing; designs for poison bottles of distinctive shape, colour and texture appeared regularly for 40 years. PMID:6757103

  11. Production and degradation of oxalic acid by brown rot fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, E.; Agosin, E. )

    1991-07-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted {sup 14}C-labeled oxalic acid to CO{sub 2} during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized {sup 14}C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize {sup 14}C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi.

  12. Production and Degradation of Oxalic Acid by Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Eduardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted 14C-labeled oxalic acid to CO2 during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized 14C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize 14C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi. PMID:16348522

  13. Oxalate nephropathy in free-living American bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Kadekaru, Sho; Ito, Masao; Yoshida, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2015-10-27

    In February 2014, wild American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus tadpoles from an artificial pond in the Kyusyu region, Japan, presented with coelomic and subcutaneous edema and erythema within the skin. A pathological examination of 57 tadpoles of American bullfrogs in the region was conducted to evaluate the disease. Crystal deposition of varying degrees was found in the kidneys of 35 tadpoles (61.4%). The crystals were transparent, pleomorphic in shape, highly birefringent in polarized light, and arranged in a radial pattern within the renal tubular lumen. Using Alizarin Red S stain and liquid chromatography, these crystals were identified as calcium oxalate. Severe coelomic and subcutaneous edema was observed in 7 of these 35 tadpoles (20.0%). Ammonia levels in coelomic fluid were extremely elevated (>1000 µg dl(-1)) in 4 tadpoles examined. These findings suggest that oxalate deposition in kidneys causes metabolic disorder with renal nephropathy. The source of the oxalate could not be determined; however, the presence of calcium oxalates in pond sediments, as revealed by liquid chromatography, suggested that the deposition was most likely due to ingestion of oxalate materials from the environment. This is the first report of oxalate nephropathy in free-living amphibians. PMID:26503774

  14. Acute oxalate nephropathy after ingestion of star fruit.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Fang, H C; Chou, K J; Wang, J S; Chung, H M

    2001-02-01

    Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of star fruit (carambola) has not been reported before. We report the first two cases. These patients developed nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and backache within hours of ingesting large quantities of sour carambola juice; then acute renal failure followed. Both patients needed hemodialysis for oliguric acute renal failure, and pathologic examinations showed typical changes of acute oxalate nephropathy. The renal function recovered 4 weeks later without specific treatment. Sour carambola juice is a popular beverage in Taiwan. The popularity of star fruit juice is not compatible with the rare discovery of star fruit-associated acute oxalate nephropathy. Commercial carambola juice usually is prepared by pickling and dilution processes that reduce oxalate content markedly, whereas pure fresh juice or mild diluted postpickled juice for traditional remedies, as used in our cases, contain high quantities of oxalate. An empty stomach and dehydrated state may pose an additional risk for development of renal injury. To avoid acute oxalate nephropathy, pure sour carambola juice or mild diluted postpickled juice should not be consumed in large amounts, especially on an empty stomach or in a dehydrated state.

  15. Oxalate nephropathy in free-living American bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Kadekaru, Sho; Ito, Masao; Yoshida, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2015-10-27

    In February 2014, wild American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus tadpoles from an artificial pond in the Kyusyu region, Japan, presented with coelomic and subcutaneous edema and erythema within the skin. A pathological examination of 57 tadpoles of American bullfrogs in the region was conducted to evaluate the disease. Crystal deposition of varying degrees was found in the kidneys of 35 tadpoles (61.4%). The crystals were transparent, pleomorphic in shape, highly birefringent in polarized light, and arranged in a radial pattern within the renal tubular lumen. Using Alizarin Red S stain and liquid chromatography, these crystals were identified as calcium oxalate. Severe coelomic and subcutaneous edema was observed in 7 of these 35 tadpoles (20.0%). Ammonia levels in coelomic fluid were extremely elevated (>1000 µg dl(-1)) in 4 tadpoles examined. These findings suggest that oxalate deposition in kidneys causes metabolic disorder with renal nephropathy. The source of the oxalate could not be determined; however, the presence of calcium oxalates in pond sediments, as revealed by liquid chromatography, suggested that the deposition was most likely due to ingestion of oxalate materials from the environment. This is the first report of oxalate nephropathy in free-living amphibians.

  16. The risk of renal stone formation during and after long duration space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Pietrzyk, R. A.; Morukov, B. V.; Sams, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The formation of a renal stone during space flight may have serious negative effects on the health of the crewmember and the success of the mission. Urinary biochemical factors and the influence of dietary factors associated with renal stone development were assessed during long duration Mir Space Station missions. METHODS: Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected prior to, during and following long duration space flight. The relative urinary supersaturation of calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate (brushite), sodium urate, struvite and uric acid were determined. RESULTS: Changes in the urinary biochemistry of crewmembers during long duration spaceflight demonstrated increases in the supersaturation of the stone-forming salts. In-flight hypercalciuria was evident in a number of individual crewmembers and 24-hour dietary fluid intake and urine volume were significantly lower. During flight, there was a significant increase in brushite supersaturation. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest acute effects of space flight and postflight changes in the urinary biochemistry favoring increased crystallization in the urine. The effects of dietary intake, especially fluid intake, may have a significant impact on the potential for renal stone formation. Efforts are now underway to assess the efficacy of a countermeasure to mitigate the increased risk. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The effects of the recommended dose of creatine monohydrate on kidney function.

    PubMed

    Taner, Basturk; Aysim, Ozagari; Abdulkadir, Unsal

    2011-02-01

    We report a case of a heretofore healthy 18-year-old man who presented with a 2-day history of nausea, vomiting and stomach ache while taking creatine monohydrate for bodybuilding purposes. The patient had acute renal failure, and a renal biopsy was performed to determine the cause of increased creatinine and proteinuria. The biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. In the literature, creatine monohydrate supplementation and acute tubular necrosis coexistence had not been reported previously. Twenty-five days after stopping the creatine supplements, the patient recovered fully. Even recommended doses of creatine monohydrate supplementation may cause kidney damage; therefore, anybody using this supplement should be warned about this possible side effect, and their renal functions should be monitored regularly.

  18. Characterization of a new anhydrous form of Rotundine and its monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiying; Du, Guanhua; Lu, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Rotundine is a chemical drug developed from Chinese traditional medicines that exhibits pseudopolymorphism. The anhydrous form and monohydrate are isolated and prepared via systemic crystallization screening, and the anhydrous form is reported for the first time. In this article single crystal X-ray diffractometry, powder X-ray diffractometry and FT-IR spectroscopy are used to characterize the Rotundine modifications. The analysis results show that the factors of crystal symmetry, intermolecular arrangements, conformational flexibility, hydrogen bonding interactions, and the incorporation of water finally lead to produce the polymorphic phenomenon. Via the in-vivo bioavailability of two forms, it is found that the new anhydrous form presents absorbable superiority relative to monohydrate, specifically Cmax and AUC of anhydrous form were approximately 1.5 times those of monohydrate. Study on the transformation of two forms show that they can convert to each other in certain conditions at solid state.

  19. Treating stones in transplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Saxena, S; Sadideen, H; Goldsmith, D

    2013-02-01

    The formation of calculi in renal allografts is an uncommon complication in renal transplant recipients, with a reported incidence of 0.2-1.7% according to retrospective studies. Although the majority of these stones appear to form de novo following renal transplantation (RTX), there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that more often than previously thought they may be transplanted with the donor graft itself. The etiology and pathophysiology of renal graft stones is multifactorial. A combination of metabolic and urodynamic factors predispose to stone formation and these are generally found more frequently in allograft rather than native kidneys. In addition tertiary hyperparathyroidism (following RTX) plays an important role. Renal allograft stones can pose significant challenges for the clinician. The diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and must be prompt, as these patients' reliance on a solitary kidney for their renal function leaves them susceptible to significant morbidity. However, reports in the literature come largely from anecdotal experience and case reports, meaning that there is a limited consensus regarding how best to manage the condition. We suggest that interventional treatment should be guided primarily by stone size and individual patient presentation. Good outcomes have been reported with shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and ureteroscopy, but optimal management of the risk factors leading to calculi formation (i.e., prevention) will remain the most cost-effective management.

  20. Canada's National Building Stone: Tyndall Stone from Manitoba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Brian R.; Young, Graham A.; Dobrzanski, Edward P.

    2016-04-01

    Tyndall Stone is a distinctively mottled and highly fossiliferous dolomitic limestone that belongs to the Selkirk Member of the Red River Formation, of Late Ordovician (Katian) age. It has been quarried at Garson, Manitoba, 37 km northeast of Winnipeg, since 1895, although other quarries in the area go back to 1832. Tyndall Stone, so named because it was shipped by rail from nearby Tyndall, is currently produced by Gillis Quarries Limited. It has various uses as a dimension stone. Large slabs, most often cut parallel to bedding, face the exterior or interior of many important buildings such as the Parliament Buildings and the Canadian Museum of Civilization in the Ottawa area, the Empress Hotel in Victoria, and the provincial legislatures in Winnipeg and Regina, as well as many commercial buildings especially in the Canadian prairies. At the quarries, the stone is cut vertically, using eight foot (2.44 m) diameter saws mounted on one hundred foot (30.5 m) tracks, then split into 6-8 tonne blocks that are moved using front-end loaders. Gillis Quarries operates a large finishing plant with an area of about 4000 m2. Stone is processed along advanced cutting lines that feature eight primary saws and six gantry saw stations, allowing it to be made into a variety of sizes, shapes, and finishes. The Selkirk Member is 43 m thick and the stone is extracted from a 6-8 m thick interval within the lower part. The upper beds tend to be more buff-coloured than the grey lower beds due to weathering by groundwater. The stone is massive, but extracted blocks are less than ~1m thick due to splitting along stylolites. Consisting of bioturbated wackestone to packstone, the Tyndall Stone was deposited in a shallow-marine environment within the photic zone, in the central part of the vast equatorial epicontinental sea that covered much of Laurentia. Scattered thin, bioclastic grainstone lenses record brief, low-energy storm events. The distinctive mottles are formed by dolomitized

  1. Biomimetic Randall's plaque as an in vitro model system for studying the role of acidic biopolymers in idiopathic stone formation.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Archana; Rodriguez, Douglas; Khan, Saeed; Gower, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Randall's plaque (RP) deposits seem to be consistent among the most common type of kidney stone formers, idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. This group forms calcium oxalate renal stones without any systemic symptoms, which contributes to the difficulty of understanding and treating this painful and recurring disease. Thus, the development of an in vitro model system to study idiopathic nephrolithiasis, beginning with RP pathogenesis, can help in identifying how plaques and subsequently stones form. One main theory of RP formation is that calcium phosphate deposits initially form in the basement membrane of the thin loops of Henle, which then fuse and spread into the interstitial tissue, and ultimately make their way across the urothelium, where upon exposure to the urine, the mineralized tissue serves as a nidus for overgrowth with calcium oxalate into a stone. Our group has found that many of the unusual morphologies found in RP and stones, such as concentrically laminated spherulites and mineralized collagenous tissue, can be reproduced in vitro using a polymer-induced liquid precursor (PILP) process, in which acidic polypeptides induce a liquid phase amorphous precursor to the mineral, yielding non-equilibrium crystal morphologies. Given that there are many acidic proteins and polysaccharides present in the renal tissue and urine, we have put forth the hypothesis that the PILP system may be involved in urolithiasis. Therefore, our goal is to develop an in vitro model system of these two stages of composite stone formation to study the role that various acidic macromolecules may play. In our initial experiments presented here, the development of "biomimetic" RP was investigated, which will then serve as a nidus for calcium oxalate overgrowth studies. To mimic the tissue environment, MatriStem(®) (ACell, Inc.), a decellularized porcine urinary bladder matrix was used, because it has both an intact epithelial basement membrane surface and a tunica propria

  2. A test of the hypothesis that the collecting duct calcium-sensing receptor limits rise of urine calcium molarity in hypercalciuric calcium kidney stone formers.

    PubMed

    Bergsland, Kristin J; Coe, Fredric L; Gillen, Daniel L; Worcester, Elaine M

    2009-10-01

    The process of kidney stone formation depends on an imbalance between excretion of water and insoluble stone-forming salts, leading to high concentrations that supersaturate urine and inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) fluid. For common calcium-containing stones, a critical mechanism that has been proposed for integrating water and calcium salt excretions is activation of the cell surface calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on the apical membranes of IMCD cells. High deliveries of calcium into the IMCD would be predicted to activate CaSR, leading to reduced membrane abundance of aquaporin-2, thereby limiting water conservation and protecting against stone formation. We have tested this hypothesis in 16 idiopathic hypercalciuric calcium stone formers and 14 matched normal men and women in the General Clinical Research Center. Subjects were fed identical diets; we collected 14 urine samples at 1-h intervals during a single study day, and one sample overnight. Hypercalciuria did not increase urine volume, so urine calcium molarity and supersaturation with respect to calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate rose proportionately to calcium excretion. Thus CaSR modulation of urine volume via IMCD CaSR activation does not appear to be an important mechanism of protection against stone formation. The overnight period, one of maximal water conservation, was a time of maximal stone risk and perhaps a target of specific clinical intervention.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1542 - Oxalate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... treatment of urinary stones or certain other metabolic disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1542 - Oxalate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... treatment of urinary stones or certain other metabolic disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1542 - Oxalate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... treatment of urinary stones or certain other metabolic disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1542 - Oxalate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... treatment of urinary stones or certain other metabolic disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  7. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  8. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    PubMed

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  9. Colonic preservation reduces need for parenteral therapy, increases incidence of renal stones, but does not change high prevalence of gall stones in patients with a short bowel.

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, J M; Lennard-Jones, J E; Gertner, D J; Wood, S R; Bartram, C I

    1992-01-01

    Forty six patients with less than 200 cm of normal jejunum and no functioning colon were compared with 38 patients with similar jejunal lengths in continuity with a functioning colon. Women predominated (67%), and the most common diagnosis in each group was Crohn's disease (33 of 46 no colon, 16 of 38 with colon). All patients without a colon and less than 85 cm of jejunum and all those with a colon and less than 45 cm jejunum needed long term parenteral nutrition. Six months after the last resection 12 of 17 patients with less than 100 cm jejunum and no colon needed intravenous supplements compared with 7 of 21 with a colon. Between 6 months and 2 years, little change occurred in the nutritional/fluid requirements in either group, though there was weight gain. Of 71 patients assessed clinically at a median of 5 years, none with more than 50 cm of jejunum and a colon needed parenteral supplements. Most (25 of 27) of those without a colon who did not need parenteral supplements required oral electrolyte replacement compared with few (4 of 27) with a colon. None of the patients without a colon developed symptomatic renal stones compared with 9 of 38 (24%) with a colon (p < 0.001). Stone analysis in three patients showed calcium oxalate. Gall stone prevalence was high but equal in the two groups--43% of those without and 44% of those with a colon. PMID:1452074

  10. Kidney Stones in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Kidney Stones in Children and Teens Page Content Article ... teen girls having the highest incidence. Types of Kidney Stones There are many different types of kidney ...

  11. "Stone Age" Fun: Releasing the Animal Within.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Janet Marie

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a fifth-grade sculpture project that uses a subtractive, rather than additive, technique. Students carve an animal sculpture from a block of simulated stone compound. Explains the process and how to make the simulated stone compound. (CMK)

  12. Luserna Stone: A nomination for "Global Heritage Stone Resource"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primavori, Piero

    2015-04-01

    Luserna Stone (Pietra di Luserna) is the commercial name of a grey-greenish leucogranitic orthogneiss, probably from the Lower Permian Age, that outcrops in the Luserna-Infernotto basin (Cottian Alps, Piedmont, NW Italy) on the border between the Turin and Cuneo provinces. Geologically speaking, it pertains to the Dora-Maira Massif that represents a part of the ancient European margin annexed to the Cottian Alps during the Alpine orogenesis; from a petrographic point of view, it is the metamorphic result of a late-Ercinian leucogranitic rock transformation. Lithological features and building applications allow the recognition of two main varieties: 1) a micro-augen gneiss with very regular schistosity planes with centimetric spacing and easy split workability, known as Splittable facies; 2) a micro-Augen gneiss characterized by lower schistosity and poor split, suitable for blocks cutting machines (diamond wires, gang-saws, traditional saws), known as Massive facies. A third, rare, white variety also exists, called "Bianchetta". Luserna stone extends over an area of approximately 50 km2, where more than fifty quarries are in operation, together with a relevant number of processing plants and artisanal laboratories. The stone is quarried and processed since almost the Middle Age, and currently represents one of the three most important siliceous production cluster in Italy (together with the Ossola and Sardegna Island granites). Some characteristics of this stone - such as the relevant physical-mechanical properties, an intrinsic versatility and its peculiar splittability - have made it one of the most widely used stone materials in Italy and in the countries surrounding the North Western border of Italy. Apart from its intrinsic geological, petrographic, commercial and technical properties, several issues related to the Luserna Stone are considered to be of relevant importance for its designation as a Global Heritage Stone Resource, such as the distinctive mark on

  13. DETERMINATION OF OXALATE ION DOPANT LEVEL IN POLYPYRROLE USING FT-IR

    PubMed Central

    Benally, Kristal J.; GreyEyes, Shawn D.; McKenzie, Jason T.

    2014-01-01

    A pellet method using standard addition and FT-IR was used to estimate oxalate ion doping levels in electrosynthesized polypyrrole. The method is useful for materials where removal of analyte from an insoluble material is problematic. Here, electrosynthesized oxalate doped polypyrrole is dispersed in potassium bromide. Spikes of sodium oxalate are added and the mixtures pressed into pellets. The oxalate carbonyl absorption peak is then used to quantify the amount of oxalate present in the polypyrrole. The mass fraction of oxalate dopant in polypyrrole was determined to be 0.4 ± 0.1 % and coincides with the original synthesis solution composition. PMID:25598749

  14. Calcium oxalate crystal deposition in kidneys of hypercalciuric mice with disrupted type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed R; Glenton, Patricia A

    2008-05-01

    The most common theories about the pathogenesis of idiopathic kidney stones consider precipitation of calcium phosphate (CaP) within the kidneys critical for the development of the disease. We decided to test the hypothesis that a CaP substrate can promote the deposition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the kidneys. Experimental hyperoxaluria was induced by feeding glyoxylate to male mice with knockout (KO) of NaP(i) IIa (Npt2a), a sodium-phosphate cotransporter. Npt2a KO mice are hypercalciuric and produce CaP deposits in their renal tubules. Experimental hyperoxaluria led to CaOx crystalluria in both the hypercalciuric KO mice and the normocalciuric control B6 mice. Only the KO mice produced CaOx crystal deposits in their kidneys, but the CaOx crystals deposited separately from the CaP deposits. Perhaps CaP deposits were not available for a CaOx overgrowth. These results also validate earlier animal model observations that showed that CaP substrate is not required for renal deposition of CaOx and that other factors, such as local supersaturation, may be involved. The absence of CaOx deposition in the B6 mice despite extreme hyperoxaluria also signifies the importance of both calcium and oxalate in the development of CaOx nephrolithiasis.

  15. M1/M2-macrophage phenotypes regulate renal calcium oxalate crystal development

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Okada, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Unno, Rei; Moritoki, Yoshinobu; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Kohri, Kenjiro; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous report, M2-macrophage (Mφs) deficient mice showed increased renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal formation; however, the role of Mφs-related-cytokines and chemokines that affect kidney stone formation remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of M1/M2s in crystal development by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. The crystal phagocytic rate of bone marrow-derived M2Mφs was higher than that of bone marrow-derived Mφs and M1Mφs and increased on co-culture with renal tubular cells (RTCs). However, the amount of crystal attachment on RTCs reduced on co-culture with M2Mφs. In six hyperoxaluric C57BL/6J mice, M1Mφ transfusion and induction by LPS and IFN-γ facilitated renal crystal formation, whereas M2Mφ transfusion and induction by IL-4 and IL-13 suppressed renal crystal formation compared with the control. These M2Mφ treatments reduced the expression of crystal-related genes, such as osteopontin and CD44, whereas M1Mφ treatment increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and adhesion-related genes such as IL-6, inducible NOS, TNF-α, C3, and VCAM-1. The expression of M2Mφ-related genes was lower whereas that of M1Mφ-related genes was higher in papillary tissue of CaOx stone formers. Overall, our results suggest that renal crystal development is facilitated by M1Mφs, but suppressed by M2Mφs. PMID:27731368

  16. Chronic kidney disease in kidney stone formers.

    PubMed

    Rule, Andrew D; Krambeck, Amy E; Lieske, John C

    2011-08-01

    Recent population studies have found symptomatic kidney stone formers to be at increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although kidney stones are not commonly identified as the primary cause of ESRD, they still may be important contributing factors. Paradoxically, CKD can be protective against forming kidney stones because of the substantial reduction in urine calcium excretion. Among stone formers, those with rare hereditary diseases (cystinuria, primary hyperoxaluria, Dent disease, and 2,8 dihydroxyadenine stones), recurrent urinary tract infections, struvite stones, hypertension, and diabetes seem to be at highest risk for CKD. The primary mechanism for CKD from kidney stones is usually attributed to an obstructive uropathy or pyelonephritis, but crystal plugs at the ducts of Bellini and parenchymal injury from shockwave lithotripsy may also contribute. The historical shift to less invasive surgical management of kidney stones has likely had a beneficial impact on the risk for CKD. Among potential kidney donors, past symptomatic kidney stones but not radiographic stones found on computed tomography scans were associated with albuminuria. Kidney stones detected by ultrasound screening have also been associated with CKD in the general population. Further studies that better classify CKD, better characterize stone formers, more thoroughly address potential confounding by comorbidities, and have active instead of passive follow-up to avoid detection bias are needed.

  17. Intraperitoneal stone migration during percutaneos nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Diri, Akif; Karakan, Tolga; Resorlu, Mustafa; Kabar, Mucahit; Germiyanoglu, Cankon

    2014-12-01

    Percutaneos nephrolithotomy (PNL) is the standard care for renal stones larger than 2 cm. The procedure has some major and minor complications. Renal pelvis laceration and stone migration to the retroperitoneum is one of the rare condition. We report the first case of intraperitoneal stone migration during PNL. PMID:25641455

  18. Means for reducing oxalic acid to a product

    SciTech Connect

    Morduchowitz, A.; Sammells, A.F.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes an apparatus for reducing oxalic acid to a product comprising: a cell including a separator for separating the cell into two chambers, a catholyte chamber and an anolyte chamber, each chamber having an inlet and an outlet; a porous anode arranged within the anolyte section in a manner so that an electrolyte entering through the inlet of the anolyte section will pass through the anode and exit through the outlet of the anolyte section; means for providing an electrolyte to the inlet of the anolyte chamber in a manner so that it will exit through the outlet of the anolyte chamber; means for providing a mixture of oxalic acid and an electrolyte to the inlet of the catholyte chamber; porous cathode means located in the catholyte chamber for reducing the oxalic acid in the oxalic acid-electrolyte mixture to the product within the cathode means when a d.c. voltage provided across the anode and the cathode means, the product exiting the cell by way of the catholyte chamber's outlet; and means for providing a d.c. voltage across the cathode means and the anode so as to cooperate in the reduction of the oxalic acid; and in which the cathode means includes a porous cathode having discrete sites of platinum and mercury as catalysts and the product is ethylene glycol.

  19. [Determination of glyoxalate and oxalate by capillary zone electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Guan, Jin; Wang, Huize; Ren, Liyan; Niu, Qiuling

    2012-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of glyoxalate and oxalate by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was developed. The influences of type, concentration and pH of the running buffer, and the applied voltage on separation were investigated. Glyoxalate and oxalate were separated within 11 min under the conditions of 20 mmol/L borax-5.5 mmol/L potassium hydrogen phthalate (pH 9.0), applied voltage of 20 kV, and detected wavelength of 212 nm. The calibration curves of glyoxalate and oxalate showed good linearity in the ranges of 0.8 -20 g/L and 1.2-20 g/L, respectively. The correlation coefficients were 0.999 3 and 0.997 5, respectively. The limits of detection for glyoxalate and oxalate were 0.2 and 0.4 g/L (S/N = 3), respectively. The average recoveries at three spiked levels were 98.3%-102.5% with acceptable relative standard deviations of 0.35%-0.61%. This method is simple, low cost and high performance. The method was successfully used for the determination of glyoxalate and oxalate in real samples, and the assay results were satisfactory. PMID:22667103

  20. Influence of solvents on the habit modification of alpha lactose monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimaladevi, P.; Srinivasan, K.

    2013-02-01

    Restricted evaporation of solvent method was adopted for the growth of alpha lactose monohydrate single crystals from different solvents. The crystal habits of grown crystals were analysed. The form of crystallization was confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction analysis. Thermal behaviour of the grown crystals was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry.

  1. 75 FR 16346 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Orbifloxacin, Mometasone Furoate Monohydrate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... orbifloxacin, mometasone furoate monohydrate, and posaconazole for the treatment of otitis externa in dogs... of otitis externa in dogs associated with susceptible strains of yeast (Malassezia pachydermatis) and... posaconazole. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in Sec. 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in...

  2. Barium stone impaction in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Y; Koyuncu, A; Osmanoglu, N

    1995-06-01

    Autonomic symptoms such as orthostatic hypotension, abnormal sweating and constipation occur frequently in Parkinson's disease. In our case, barium meal used for upper gastrointestinal study caused barium stone formation and a paralytic-ileus-like syndrome. Therefore, attention should be paid while using barium meal for diagnostic purpose in Parkinsonism. PMID:7474296

  3. Developing disease resistant stone fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stone fruit (Prunus spp.) (peach, nectarine, plum, apricot, cherry) and almonds are susceptible to a number of pathogens. These pathogens can cause extensive losses in the field, during transport and storage, and in the market. Breeding for disease resistance requires an extensive knowledge of the...

  4. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  5. Crystal structure of di­methyl­ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemi(oxalic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Diallo, Waly; Gueye, Ndongo; Crochet, Aurélien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of the title salt, Me2NH2 +·HC2O4 −·0.5H2C2O4, were isolated as a side product from the reaction involving Me2NH, H2C2O4 and Sn(n-Bu)3Cl in a 1:2 ratio in methanol or by the reaction of the (Me2NH2)2C2O4 salt and Sn(CH3)3Cl in a 2:1 ratio in ethanol. The asymmetric unit comprises a di­methyl­ammonium cation (Me2NH2 +), an hydrogenoxalate anion (HC2O4 −), and half a mol­ecule of oxalic acid (H2C2O4) situated about an inversion center. From a supra­molecular point of view, the three components inter­act together via hydrogen bonding. The Me2NH2 + cations and the HC2O4 − anions are in close proximity through bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds, while the HC2O4 − anions are organized into infinite chains via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, propagating along the a-axis direction. In addition, the oxalic acid (H2C2O4) mol­ecules play the role of connectors between these chains. Both the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of each diacid are involved in four inter­molecular inter­actions with two Me2NH2 + and two HC2O4 − ions of four distinct polymeric chains, via two N—H⋯O and two O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The resulting mol­ecular assembly can be viewed as a two-dimensional bilayer-like arrangement lying parallel to (010), and reinforced by a C—H⋯O hydrogen bond. PMID:25995858

  6. Crystal structure of di-methyl-ammonium hydrogen oxalate hemi(oxalic acid).

    PubMed

    Diallo, Waly; Gueye, Ndongo; Crochet, Aurélien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Cattey, Hélène

    2015-05-01

    Single crystals of the title salt, Me2NH2 (+)·HC2O4 (-)·0.5H2C2O4, were isolated as a side product from the reaction involving Me2NH, H2C2O4 and Sn(n-Bu)3Cl in a 1:2 ratio in methanol or by the reaction of the (Me2NH2)2C2O4 salt and Sn(CH3)3Cl in a 2:1 ratio in ethanol. The asymmetric unit comprises a di-methyl-ammonium cation (Me2NH2 (+)), an hydrogenoxalate anion (HC2O4 (-)), and half a mol-ecule of oxalic acid (H2C2O4) situated about an inversion center. From a supra-molecular point of view, the three components inter-act together via hydrogen bonding. The Me2NH2 (+) cations and the HC2O4 (-) anions are in close proximity through bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds, while the HC2O4 (-) anions are organized into infinite chains via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, propagating along the a-axis direction. In addition, the oxalic acid (H2C2O4) mol-ecules play the role of connectors between these chains. Both the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of each diacid are involved in four inter-molecular inter-actions with two Me2NH2 (+) and two HC2O4 (-) ions of four distinct polymeric chains, via two N-H⋯O and two O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, respectively. The resulting mol-ecular assembly can be viewed as a two-dimensional bilayer-like arrangement lying parallel to (010), and reinforced by a C-H⋯O hydrogen bond.

  7. Growth and adhesion properties of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Clare M.

    The presence of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals in the synovial fluid has long been associated with the joint disease gout. To elucidate the molecular level growth mechanism and adhesive properties of MSU crystals, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques were employed in the characterization of the (010) and (1-10) faces of MSU, as well as physiologically relevant solutions supersaturated with urate. Topographical AFM imaging of both MSU (010) and (1-10) revealed the presence of crystalline layers of urate arranged into v-shaped features of varying height. Growth rates were measured for both monolayers (elementary steps) and multiple layers (macrosteps) on both crystal faces under a wide range of urate supersaturation in physiologically relevant solutions. Step velocities for monolayers and multiple layers displayed a second order polynomial dependence on urate supersaturation on MSU (010) and (1-10), with step velocities on (1-10) generally half of those measured on MSU (010) in corresponding growth conditions. Perpendicular step velocities on MSU (010) were obtained and also showed a second order polynomial dependence of step velocity with respect to urate supersaturation, which implies a 2D-island nucleation growth mechanism for MSU (010). Extensive topographical imaging of MSU (010) showed island adsorption from urate growth solutions under all urate solution concentrations investigated, lending further support for the determined growth mechanism. Island sizes derived from DLS experiments on growth solutions were in agreement with those measured on MSU (010) topographical images. Chemical force microscopy (CFM) was utilized to characterize the adhesive properties of MSU (010) and (1-10). AFM probes functionalized with amino acid derivatives and bio-macromolecules found in the synovial fluid were brought into contact with both crystal faces and adhesion forces were tabulated into

  8. Prevention of hypercalciuria and stone-forming propensity during prolonged bedrest by alendronate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Dubois, S. K.; Roberts, M. L.; Pak, C. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The bone loss and hypercalciuria induced by immobilization or the decreased gravitational forces of space are well described. Using a model of bedrest immobilization, the ability of a potent aminobisphosphonate, alendronate, to avert hypercalciuria and stone-forming propensity was tested. Sixteen male subjects participated in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in which they received either 20 mg of alendronate or placebo 2 weeks prior to and during 3 weeks of strict bedrest. Parameters of bone and calcium metabolism and urinary crystallization of stone-forming salts were measured before and at the end of bedrest. In the placebo group, bedrest increased urinary calcium (209 +/- 47 to 267 +/- 60 mg/day, p < 0.01) and the saturation of calcium phosphate. Before bedrest, the alendronate group had a significantly lower serum calcium (8.8 +/- 0.4 vs. 9.6 +/- 0.5 mg/dl, p < 0.01) and higher serum PTH (62.4 +/- 33.1 vs. 23.1 +/- 7.5 pg/ml, p < 0.01) compared with the placebo group. Moreover, the alendronate group had a lower urinary calcium (75 +/- 41 mg/day) and saturation of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. These effects of alendronate were sustained during bedrest. Following bedrest in the alendronate group, urinary calcium rose to 121 +/- 50 mg/day, a value less than that in the placebo group before or during bedrest. Similarly, urinary saturation of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate rose with bedrest in the alendronate-treated patients but remained lower than values obtained in placebo-treated patients before or during bedrest. Alendronate inhibits bone mineral loss and averts the hypercalciuria and increased propensity for the crystallization of stone-forming calcium salts which occurs during 3 weeks of strict bedrest.

  9. Characterization of wheat germin (oxalate oxidase) expressed by Pichia pastoris

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Heng-Yen; Whittaker, Mei M.; Bouveret, Romaric; Berna, Anne; Bernier, Francois; Whittaker, James W. . E-mail: jim@ebs.ogi.edu

    2007-05-18

    High-level secretory expression of wheat (Triticum aestivum) germin/oxalate oxidase was achieved in Pichia pastoris fermentation cultures as an {alpha}-mating factor signal peptide fusion, based on the native wheat cDNA coding sequence. The oxalate oxidase activity of the recombinant enzyme is substantially increased (7-fold) by treatment with sodium periodate, followed by ascorbate reduction. Using these methods, approximately 1 g (4 x 10{sup 4} U) of purified, activated enzyme was obtained following eight days of induction of a high density Pichia fermentation culture, demonstrating suitability for large-scale production of oxalate oxidase for biotechnological applications. Characterization of the recombinant protein shows that it is glycosylated, with N-linked glycan attached at Asn47. For potential biomedical applications, a nonglycosylated (S49A) variant was also prepared which retains essentially full enzyme activity, but exhibits altered protein-protein interactions.

  10. The influence of scale inhibitors on calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium oxalate is a common occurrence in mammalian urinary tract deposits and in various industrial processes such as paper making, brewery fermentation, sugar evaporation, and tannin concentration. Between pH 3.5 to 4.5 the driving force for calcium oxalate precipitation increases almost by three fold. It is a complicated process to predict both the nature of a deposit and at which stage of a multi-effect evaporator a particular mineral will deposit, as this depends on temperature, pH, total solids, and kinetics of mineralization. It is quite a challenge to inhibit calcium oxalate precipitation in the pH range of 4--6. Al{sup 3+} ions provide excellent threshold inhibition in this pH range and can be used to augment traditional inhibitors such as polyphosphates and polycarboxylates.

  11. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  12. Effects of mineral composition of drinking water on risk for stone formation and bone metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Marangella, M; Vitale, C; Petrarulo, M; Rovera, L; Dutto, F

    1996-09-01

    1. To assess whether the mineral content of drinking water influences both risk of stone formation and bone metabolism in idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis, 21 patients were switched from their usual home diets to a 10 mmol calcium, low-oxalate, protein-controlled diet, supplemented with 21 of three different types of mineral water. Drinking water added 1, 6 and 20 mmol of calcium and 0.5, 10 and 50 mmol of bicarbonate respectively to the controlled diet. 2. The three controlled study periods lasted 1 month each and were separated by a 20 day washout interval. Blood and urine chemistries, including intact parathyroid hormone, calcitriol and two markers of bone resorption, were performed at the end of each study period. The stone-forming risk was assessed by calculating urine saturation with calcium oxalate (beta CaOx), calcium phosphate (beta bsh) and uric acid (beta UA). 3. The addition of any mineral water produced the expected increase in urine output and was associated with similar decreases in beta CaOx and beta UA, whereas beta bsh varied marginally. These equal decreases in beta CaOx, however, resulted from peculiar changes in calcium, oxalate and citrate excretion during each study period. The increase in overall calcium intake due to different drinking water induced modest increases in calcium excretion, whereas oxalate excretion tended to decrease. The changes in oxalate excretion during any one study period compared with another were significantly related to those in calcium intake. Citrate excretion was significantly higher with the high-calcium, alkaline water. 4. Parathyroid hormone, calcitriol and markers of bone resorption increased when patients were changed from the high-calcium, alkaline to the low-calcium drinking water. 5. We suggest that overall calcium intake may be tailored by supplying calcium in drinking water. Adverse effects on bone turnover with low-calcium diets can be prevented by giving high-calcium, alkaline drinking water, and the

  13. Management of lower-pole caliceal stones.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Glenn S

    2003-09-01

    A series of 205 urologists answered questions about their choice of treatment for lower-caliceal stones. The preferred approaches were extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for stones <1 cm and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for those >2 cm. For stones of 1 to 2 cm, 65% preferred SWL and 30% would advise PCNL. Thus, SWL is recommended for lower-caliceal stones more frequently than is justified by published success rates. Continued efforts need to be made to inform practicing urologists regarding the most appropriate therapy for patients with lower-pole stones >1 cm.

  14. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract stones.

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, D. A.; Buist, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    In a two year period from March 1983, 157 patients with upper urinary tract stones were managed primarily by endoscopy. Of 90 patients with renal stones, extraction was achieved in 91% of patients with complete extraction in 76%. Of the remaining patients with ureteric stones, successful extraction was achieved in 75%. Ten patients required open surgery which was for failed extraction in 9. Morbidity is low with a mean hospital stay of 4.7 days for patients with kidney stones, and of 3.7 days for patients undergoing extraction of ureteric stones. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3954313

  15. NADPH Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target for Oxalate Induced Injury in Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Ammon B.; Khan, Saeed R.

    2013-01-01

    A major role of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family of enzymes is to catalyze the production of superoxides and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS, in turn, play a key role as messengers in cell signal transduction and cell cycling, but when they are produced in excess they can lead to oxidative stress (OS). Oxidative stress in the kidneys is now considered a major cause of renal injury and inflammation, giving rise to a variety of pathological disorders. In this review, we discuss the putative role of oxalate in producing oxidative stress via the production of reactive oxygen species by isoforms of NADPH oxidases expressed in different cellular locations of the kidneys. Most renal cells produce ROS, and recent data indicate a direct correlation between upregulated gene expressions of NADPH oxidase, ROS, and inflammation. Renal tissue expression of multiple NADPH oxidase isoforms most likely will impact the future use of different antioxidants and NADPH oxidase inhibitors to minimize OS and renal tissue injury in hyperoxaluria-induced kidney stone disease. PMID:23840917

  16. Plutonium oxalate precipitation for trace elemental determination in plutonium materials

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Ning; Gallimore, David; Lujan, Elmer; Garduno, Katherine; Walker, Laurie; Taylor, Fiona; Thompson, Pam; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    In this study, an analytical chemistry method has been developed that removes the plutonium (Pu) matrix from the dissolved Pu metal or oxide solution prior to the determination of trace impurities that are present in the metal or oxide. In this study, a Pu oxalate approach was employed to separate Pu from trace impurities. After Pu(III) was precipitated with oxalic acid and separated by centrifugation, trace elemental constituents in the supernatant were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy with minimized spectral interferences from the sample matrix.

  17. THORIUM OXALATE-URANYL ACETATE COUPLED PROCEDURE FOR THE SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Gofman, J.W.

    1959-08-11

    The recovery of fission products from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in acid and thorium oxalate is precipitated in ihe solution formed, whereby the fission products are carried on the thorium oxalate. The separated thorium oxalate precipitate is then dissolved in an aqueous oxalate solution and the solution formed is acidified, limiting ihe excess acidity to a maximum of 2 N, whereby thorium oxalate precipitates and carries lanthanum-rareearth- and alkaline-earth-metal fission products while the zirconium-fission-product remains in solution. This precipitate, too, is dissolved in an aqaeous oxalate solution at elevated temperature, and lanthanum-rare-earth ions are added to the solution whereby lanthanum-rare-earth oxalate forms and the lanthanum-rare-earth-type and alkalineearth-metal-type fission products are carried on the oxalate. The precipitate is separated from the solution.

  18. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  19. An Oxalyl-CoA Dependent Pathway of Oxalate Catabolism Plays a Role in Regulating Calcium Oxalate Crystal Accumulation and Defending against Oxalate-Secreting Phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Luo, Bin; Nakata, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants possess this activity. Recently, an Acyl Activating Enzyme 3 (AAE3), encoding an oxalyl-CoA synthetase, was identified in Arabidopsis. AAE3 has been proposed to catalyze the first step in an alternative pathway of oxalate degradation. Whether this enzyme and proposed pathway is important to other plants is unknown. Here, we identify the Medicago truncatula AAE3 (MtAAE3) and show that it encodes an oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity exhibiting high activity against oxalate with a Km = 81 ± 9 μM and Vmax = 19 ± 0.9 μmoles min-1mg protein-1. GFP-MtAAE3 localization suggested that this enzyme functions within the cytosol of the cell. Mtaae3 knock-down line showed a reduction in its ability to degrade oxalate into CO2. This reduction in the capacity to degrade oxalate resulted in the accumulation of druse crystals of calcium oxalate in the Mtaae3 knock-down line and an increased susceptibility to oxalate-secreting phytopathogens such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Taken together, these results suggest that AAE3 dependent turnover of oxalate is important to different plants and functions in the regulation of tissue calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and in defense against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens. PMID:26900946

  20. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  1. E057: Renal Stone Risk Assessment During Space Flight: Assessment and Countermeasure Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Pietrzyk, Robert A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to the microgravity environment results in many metabolic and physiological changes to humans. Body fluid volumes, electrolyte levels, and bone and muscle undergo changes as the human body adapts to the weightless environment. Changes in the urinary biochemistry occur as early as flight day 3-4 in the short duration Shuttle crewmembers. Significant decreases were observed both in fluid intake and urinary output. Other significant changes were observed in the urinary pH, calcium, potassium and uric acid levels. During Shuttle missions, the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation increased early in the flight, continued at elevated levels throughout the flight and remained in the increased risk range on landing day. The calcium phosphate risk was significantly increased early in-flight and remained significantly elevated throughout the remainder of the mission. Results from the long duration Shuttle-Mir missions followed a similar trend. Most long duration crewmembers demonstrated increased urinary calcium levels despite lower dietary calcium intake. Fluid intake and urine volumes were significantly lower during the flight than during the preflight. The calcium oxalate risk was increased relative to the preflight levels during the early in-flight period and continued in the elevated risk range for the remainder of the space flight and through two weeks postflight. Calcium phosphate risk for these long duration crewmembers increased during flight and remained in the increased risk range throughout the flight and following landing. The complexity, expense and visibility of the human space program require that every effort be made to protect the health of the crewmembers and ensure the success of the mission. Results from our early investigations clearly indicate that exposure to the microgravity environment of space significantly increases the risk of renal stone formation. The early studies have indicated specific avenues for development of countermeasures

  2. PREPARATION OF OXALATES OF METALS OF ATOMIC NUMBER GREATER THAN 88

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for the preparation of oxalates of metals of atomic number greater than 88. A solid peroxide of the heavy metal is contacted with an aqueous oxalic acid solution ai a temperature of about 50 C for a period of time sufficient to form the insoluble metal oxalate which is subsequentiy recovered as a pures crystalline compound.

  3. Determining the Structure of Oxalate Anion Using Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy Coupled with Gaussian Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Karen I.; Pullman, David P.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory project for the upper-division physical chemistry laboratory is described, and it combines IR and Raman spectroscopies with Gaussian electronic structure calculations to determine the structure of the oxalate anion in solid alkali oxalates and in aqueous solution. The oxalate anion has two limiting structures whose vibrational spectra…

  4. Evaluation of Oxalate Concentration in the U.S. Spinach Germplasm Collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Oxalic acid may form crystals with minerals to reduce the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets, and calcium oxalate may deposit in the...

  5. Analysis of bulk and inorganic degradation products of stones, mortars and wall paintings by portable Raman microprobe spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alonso, M; Castro, K; Martinez-Arkarazo, I; Angulo, M; Olazabal, M A; Madariaga, J M

    2004-05-01

    This work reports the use of a portable Raman microprobe spectrometer for the analysis of bulk and decaying compounds in carbonaceous materials such as stones, mortars and wall paintings. The analysed stones include limestone, dolomite and carbonaceous sandstone, gypsum and calcium oxalate, both mono- and dihydrated, being the main inorganic degradation products detected. Mortars include bulk phases with pure gypsum, calcite and mixtures of both or with sand, soluble salts being the most important degradation products. The pigments detected in several wall paintings include Prussian blue, iron oxide red, iron oxide yellow, vermilion, carbon black and lead white. Three different decaying processes have been characterised in the mortars of the wall paintings: (a) a massive absorption of nitrates that reacted with calcium carbonate and promoted the unbinding of pigment grains, (b) the formation of black crusts in the vault of the presbytery and (c) the thermodecomposition of pigments due to a fire.

  6. Greco-Roman Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.; Ruzhansky, Katherine

    2008-09-01

    Greek and Roman thought had a profound influence upon Western medical practice. From the fall of the Greek civilization to the fall of the Roman, remarkable progress of our understanding of human anatomy and physiology occurred. Here we review the attempts of Greek and Roman thinkers to develop the first understanding of the pathophysiology of urolithiasis, its epidemiology, differential diagnosis of renal versus bladder stones, medications for both colic and prevention, the role of familial syndromes, and dietary management.

  7. The Matariki Stone of Rapanui

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockey, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Anthropological studies of Rapanui (Easter Island) are valuable insofar as the island's remoteness allowed its culture to develop independently until western contact. Of special importance to cultural astronomers is the indigenous inhabitants' expressed interest in the sky, through lore, monumental architecture, and rock art. 1 The Matariki Stone is a unique basaltic boulder found on Rapanui; my analysis of it is the result of in situ investigation (2000). The boulder is 1 m x 1.5 m x 2 m in approximate size and weighs in excess of 10,000 kg. According to local informants, at least six cupules, averaging 6 cm in diameter and 5 cm in depth, were placed in it prior to western contact with the island and prior to transport to the boulder's present location. Information about the Matariki Stone's original setting, orientation, and context is lost. "Matariki" means "Pleiades" (or, more generally, a group of stars). However, the pattern of the Matariki Stone cupules strongly resembles another familiar asterism of third-magnitude stars. 2 These zodiac stars were placed significantly in the Rapanui sky of 1500 CE. Yet no local ethnographic evidence mentions these stars, nor is association with these stars and other regional cultures (e. g., Australian aboriginal and Mayan) compelling. 3 Moreover, there is no Polynesian tradition of constellation depiction in rock art at all, whereas the Pleiades figure prominently in that culture's oral tradition. 4 Thus, the Matariki Stone remains a conundrum. 1 Liller, William. The Ancient Solar Observatories of Rapanui: The Archaeoastronomy of Easter Island. (1993) 2 Hockey, Thomas and Hoffman, Alice. "An Archaeoastronomical Investigation: Does A Constellation Pattern Appear in Rapanui Rock Art?" Rapa Nui Journal. 14, no. 3. (2000) 3 For example, Kelly, David H. and Milone, Eugene F. Exploring Ancient Skies: An Encyclopedic Survey of Archaeoastronomy. (2005) 4 For example, Makemson, Maude. The Morning Star Rises. (1941)

  8. Flexible ureteroscopy for kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Defidio, Lorenzo; De Dominicis, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and management of different pathological conditions involving the upper urinary tract using rigid or flexible endoscopes, is now readily feasible and has been shown to be safe and efficacious even in the smallest children. Paediatric ureteroscopic procedures are similar to their adult counterparts, so that basic endoscopic principles should be observed. Aims of the management should be complete clearance of stones, preservation of renal function and prevention of stone recurrence. In order to select the most appropriate surgical treatment, location, composition, and size of the stone(s), the anatomy of the collecting system, and the presence of obstruction along with the presence of infection of the urinary tract should be considered. Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the most important procedure for treating urinary stones, advances in flexible endoscopes, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and extraction instruments have led to a shift in the range of indications. According to the location of the stone the treatment can be done with the rigid or flexible ureteroscope. To obtain stone fragments is essentialfor biochemical analysis. The stone composition may give significant information to prevent the high rate of recurrence, with dietary modification and specific therapy. Successful outcomes for the retrograde treatment of renal calculi are similar to the ones obtained in the adult population (stone free rate 91-98%). The retrograde semirigid and flexible ureteropyeloscopy, using a small calibre ureteroscope, are a valuable technique for kidney stones treatment in children. With excellent technique and meticulous attention to details, the significant complications are rare.

  9. Preventing stone retropulsion during intracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Osama M; Tawfik, Ahmad M

    2012-12-01

    Several studies of ureteroscopic treatment for ureteral stones have reported that most stone clearance failures can be attributed to stone fragment retropulsion. Stone retropulsion can result in increased operative time and cost-resulting from the need to change from the semi-rigid ureteroscope to a flexible instrument to chase migrated calculi-and additional procedures to treat residual migrated fragments are often required. The degree of migration depends mainly on the energy source used for lithotripsy; pneumatic and electrohydraulic lithotripters are associated with a greater degree of retropulsion than lasers. Different stone-trapping strategies and devices have been developed to minimize stone migration. Novel devices include the Lithovac(®) suction device, the Passport(™) balloon, the Stone Cone(™), the PercSys Accordion(®), the NTrap(®), and stone baskets such as the LithoCatch(™), the Parachute(™), and the Escape(®). Some authors have also reported on the use of lubricating jelly and BackStop(®) gel (a reverse thermosensitive polymeric plug); these devices are instilled proximal to the stone prior to the application of kinetic energy in order to prevent retrograde stone migration.

  10. Flexible ureteroscopy for kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Defidio, Lorenzo; De Dominicis, Mauro

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic evaluation and management of different pathological conditions involving the upper urinary tract using rigid or flexible endoscopes, is now readily feasible and has been shown to be safe and efficacious even in the smallest children. Paediatric ureteroscopic procedures are similar to their adult counterparts, so that basic endoscopic principles should be observed. Aims of the management should be complete clearance of stones, preservation of renal function and prevention of stone recurrence. In order to select the most appropriate surgical treatment, location, composition, and size of the stone(s), the anatomy of the collecting system, and the presence of obstruction along with the presence of infection of the urinary tract should be considered. Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the most important procedure for treating urinary stones, advances in flexible endoscopes, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and extraction instruments have led to a shift in the range of indications. According to the location of the stone the treatment can be done with the rigid or flexible ureteroscope. To obtain stone fragments is essentialfor biochemical analysis. The stone composition may give significant information to prevent the high rate of recurrence, with dietary modification and specific therapy. Successful outcomes for the retrograde treatment of renal calculi are similar to the ones obtained in the adult population (stone free rate 91-98%). The retrograde semirigid and flexible ureteropyeloscopy, using a small calibre ureteroscope, are a valuable technique for kidney stones treatment in children. With excellent technique and meticulous attention to details, the significant complications are rare. PMID:20593723

  11. Comparative study of erythritol and lactose monohydrate as carriers for inhalation: atomic force microscopy and in vitro correlation.

    PubMed

    Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Jones, Matthew; Edge, Stephen; Price, Robert

    2006-02-01

    The adhesion of micronised salbutamol sulphate to two carrier excipients, lactose monohydrate and erythritol, was investigated using the atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe technique and correlated with their respective physico-mechanical properties and aerosolisation performance. The particle size, morphology and moisture sorption properties of the carriers were similar thereby allowing direct comparison of functionality. AFM force measurements (n = 1024 force curves) were obtained between salbutamol sulphate drug probes (n = 4) and the excipients, as 63-90 microm sieve fractions and atomically smooth crystals. In general, significant differences in drug adhesion to lactose monohydrate and erythritol were observed (ANOVA, p<0.05), with erythritol exhibiting relatively greater adhesiveness. A linear relationship between drug probe adhesion to lactose monohydrate and drug probe adhesion to erythritol was established with salbutamol sulphate-lactose monohydrate adhesion being 60-70% of that of the erythritol system. In vitro analysis suggested good correlation with the adhesion measurements. The aerosolisation of salbutamol sulphate from erythritol carrier particles was significantly less (ANOVA, p<0.05) than from lactose monohydrate, with a fine particle dose (<6.4 microm) of 41.9 +/- 7.4 microg and 24.9 +/- 3.1 microg for the lactose monohydrate and erythritol carriers, respectively (n = 3).

  12. Production of battery grade materials via an oxalate method

    SciTech Connect

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2014-04-29

    An active electrode material for electrochemical devices such as lithium ion batteries includes a lithium transition metal oxide which is free of sodium and sulfur contaminants. The lithium transition metal oxide is prepared by calcining a mixture of a lithium precursor and a transition metal oxalate. Electrochemical devices use such active electrodes.

  13. Oxalate Mass Balance During Chemical Cleaning in Tank 5F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 5F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate.

  14. Acute Oxalate Nephropathy following Ingestion of Averrhoa bilimbi Juice

    PubMed Central

    George, Jacob; Kumar, Sajeev; Gracious, Noble

    2014-01-01

    Plant toxins are known to cause acute kidney injury in tropical countries. We report two cases of acute kidney injury with tubular oxalate deposition following ingestion of Averrhoa bilimbi fruit juice. Both patients had complete renal recovery though one required dialytic support. PMID:24995136

  15. Formation of solid solutions between racemic and enantiomeric citalopram oxalate.

    PubMed

    de Diego, Heidi Lopez; Bond, Andrew D; Dancer, Robert James

    2011-05-01

    The X-ray powder diffractograms of racemic citalopram oxalate and (S)-citalopram oxalate are very similar, but the melting point of the racemate is higher than that of the pure enantiomer. The higher melting point indicates that the racemate is a racemic compound, rather than a conglomerate. The crystal structure of the enantiomer contains two molecules of (S)-citalopram in the asymmetric unit. The conformation of the two molecules is different but they approximate mirror images of each other if the aromatic groups are interchanged. The crystal structure of the racemate is essentially isostructural with that of the enantiomer, having almost the same cell parameters but containing a crystallographic inversion centre that is not retained in the enantiomer structure. The closely-comparable crystal structures permit solid solutions to be formed between racemic and enantiomeric citalopram oxalate. Phase diagrams of the (R)-citalopram and (S)-citalopram oxalate system are constructed, and they show that solid solutions are formed at all ratios of the two enantiomers.

  16. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Rivenet, M.; Grandjean, S.; Abraham, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am2(C2O4)3(H2O)3·xH2O, Th(C2O4)2·6H2O, M2+x[PuIV2-xPuIIIx(C2O4)5]·nH2O and M1-x[PuIII1-xPuIVx(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds.

  17. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy: is gall stone recurrence inevitable?

    PubMed Central

    Donald, J J; Cheslyn-Curtis, S; Gillams, A R; Russell, R C; Lees, W R

    1994-01-01

    Using radiological interventional techniques the gall bladder can be cleared of stones with a high success rate. As with any treatment option that leaves the gall bladder in situ there is an accompanying risk of stone recurrence, which is currently unknown for the radiological method. One hundred patients were studied prospectively to determine the recurrence rate of stones and clinical outcome after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Follow up included both clinical assessment and ultrasound examination at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annual intervals thereafter. The overall stone recurrence rate was 31% at a mean follow up of 26 months (range, 3-50 months). By actuarial life table analysis, the cumulative proportion of gall stone recurrence was 7, 19, 28, 35, and 44% at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months respectively. Of the 31 patients with recurrent stones; 17 remain asymptomatic, seven have experienced biliary colic, two abdominal pain, three non-specific upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and two jaundice secondary to common duct stones. Thirteen of the stone free patients have remained symptomatic; six with abdominal pain and seven with nonspecific upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Eight patients have subsequently had a cholecystectomy. No significant difference was found between the sex of the patient or the number of stones before treatment and the stone recurrence rates. The cumulative stone recurrence rate was significantly less in the 56 patients who received adjuvant chemolitholysis (p < 0.05). These data show that stone recurrence after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy occurs in the minority, and is usually asymptomatic. It is concluded that the technique remains justified in the management of selected patients with gall stones. PMID:8200568

  18. Management of stone disease in infants.

    PubMed

    Azili, Mujdem Nur; Ozturk, Fatma; Inozu, Mihriban; Çayci, Fatma Şemsa; Acar, Banu; Ozmert, Sengul; Tiryaki, Tugrul

    2015-11-01

    Evaluating and treating renal stone disease in infants are technically challenging. In this study, we evaluated the surgical treatment of renal stones in children under 1 year of age. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients under 1 year old who were treated with ESWL, endourological or open surgical procedures for renal stone disease between January, 2009 and December, 2012. The patients' age, gender, stone size, stone location and number, complications, stone-free status, and postoperative complications were recorded. 19 of 121 infants with a mean age of 10.2 ± 3.07 months were treated with surgical procedures. Six (75%) of eight cystinuria patients required a surgical intervention. Retrograde endoscopic management was performed in thirteen patients (63.4%) as an initial surgical approach. There were three major (15.7%) complications. The rate of open surgical procedures was 31.6% (6 of 19 infants). The cutoff value of stone size for open surgery was 10 mm. There was a significant relationship between the conversion to open procedures and stone size, stone location, and symptom presentation especially the presence of obstruction (p < 0.05). After repeated treatments, the stone clearance rate of RIRS reached 84.6%. Retrograde intrarenal surgery is an effective and safe treatment method for renal stones in infants and can be used as a first-line therapy in most patients under 1 year old. This is especially important if an associated ureteral stone or lower pole stone that requires treatment is present and for patients with cystinuria, which does not respond favorably to ESWL.

  19. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    2012-02-22

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. For 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 10.5 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2 g/L and 0.25 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}.

  20. Oxalate absorption and postprandial urine supersaturation in an experimental human model of absorptive hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Erickson, S B; Cooper, K; Broadus, A E; Smith, L H; Werness, P G; Binder, H J; Dobbins, J W

    1984-07-01

    The effect of 1.25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D] on dietary oxalate absorption and postprandial urine supersaturation with calcium oxalate was determined in 11 normal subjects. 1,25-(OH)2D increased the urinary excretion of orally administered [14C]oxalate in the 8 h period after a liquid meal containing 1.875 mmol of calcium and 0.83 mmol of oxalate (P less than 0.01), and during a 48 h period when the subjects ingested a diet containing 25 mmol of calcium and 3.3 mmol of oxalate/day (P less than 0.01); however, 1,25-(OH)2D administration had no effect on [14C]oxalate excretion when calcium was removed from the liquid meal. 1.25-(OH)2D increased 24 h urinary oxalate excretion from 28.7 +/- 2.1 mmol/mol of creatinine to 36.8 +/- 2.6 mmol/mol of creatinine (P less than 0.05) on the 10 mmol/day calcium diet and from 26.4 +/- 2.9 to 33.2 +/- 2.2 mmol/mol of creatinine (P less than 0.1) on the 25 mmol/day calcium diet. A linear correlation (r = 0.72) was found between plasma 1,25-(OH)2D levels and urinary [14C]oxalate excretion after the liquid meal. 1,25-(OH)2D administration produced postprandial supersaturation of urine with calcium oxalate and calcium oxalate crystalluria. These studies suggest that 1,25-(OH)2D increases oxalate absorption (and urinary excretion) by increasing calcium absorption, which results in less binding of calcium to oxalate in the intestine; therefore more oxalate is available for absorption. The combined effect of increased calcium and oxalate absorption results in postprandial supersaturation of urine with calcium oxalate, with resultant crystalluria. PMID:6547378

  1. Transcellular oxalate and Cl- absorption in mouse intestine is mediated by the DRA anion exchanger Slc26a3, and DRA deletion decreases urinary oxalate.

    PubMed

    Freel, Robert W; Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2013-10-01

    Active transcellular oxalate transport in the mammalian intestine contributes to the homeostasis of this important lithogenic anion. Several members of the Slc26a gene family of anion exchangers have a measurable oxalate affinity and are expressed along the gut, apically and basolaterally. Mouse Slc26a6 (PAT1) targets to the apical membrane of enterocytes in the small intestine, and its deletion results in net oxalate absorption and hyperoxaluria. Apical exchangers of the Slc26a family that mediate oxalate absorption have not been established, yet the Slc26a3 [downregulated in adenoma (DRA)] protein is a candidate mediator of oxalate uptake. We evaluated the role of DRA in intestinal oxalate and Cl(-) transport by comparing unidirectional and net ion fluxes across short-circuited segments of small (ileum) and large (cecum and distal colon) intestine from wild-type (WT) and DRA knockout (KO) mice. In WT mice, all segments demonstrated net oxalate and Cl(-) absorption to varying degrees. In KO mice, however, all segments exhibited net anion secretion, which was consistently, and solely, due to a significant reduction in the absorptive unidirectional fluxes. In KO mice, daily urinary oxalate excretion was reduced 66% compared with that in WT mice, while urinary creatinine excretion was unchanged. We conclude that DRA mediates a predominance of the apical uptake of oxalate and Cl(-) absorbed in the small and large intestine of mice under short-circuit conditions. The large reductions in urinary oxalate excretion underscore the importance of transcellular intestinal oxalate absorption, in general, and, more specifically, the importance of the DRA exchanger in oxalate homeostasis.

  2. Separation and recovery of plutonium from oxalate supernatant using CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Rizvi, G.H.; Iyer, R.H.; Michael, K.M.; Kapoor, S.C.; Dhumwad, R.K.; Badheka, L.P.; Banerji, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A simple and efficient procedure has been developed to quantitatively recover Pu from oxalate supernatant using a mixture of octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and TBP in dodecane. Pu(IV) in the range of 6.9 to 34.6 mg/l was quantitatively extracted into 0.2M CMPO + 1.2 M TBP in dodecane from an aqueous solution containing 3.0 M HNO[sub 3] and 0.1 M H[sub 2]C[sub 2]O[sub 4]. At such low concentrations of Pu, the distribution ratio (D) did not change but the increase in oxalic acid concentration drastically reduced these values. The variation in HNO[sub 3] concentration at a fixed concentration of 0.2 M CMPO + U 1.2 M TBP has shown a dramatic increase in the D values, being 0.3 at 1.0 M and >10[sup 4] at 7.5 M. The extraction was almost quantitative even at the aqueous-to-organic ratio of 10:1. Plutonium could be quantitatively recovered by (i) stripping with 0.5 M acetic acid and (ii) coprecipitating it directly from the organic phase with 0.3 M oxalic acid + 0.3 M calcium nitrate + sodium nitrite. [approximately] 92% of the Pu was found in the precipitate and [approximately] 7% in the supernant. Using this procedure, Pu in a concentrated form ([approximately] 50 times) could be recovered from the oxalate supernatant solutions without recourse to the destruction of oxalate ion. 19 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Biogeochemistry of oxalate in the antarctic cryptoendolithic lichen-dominated community.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C G; Vestal, J R

    1993-05-01

    Cryptoendolithic (hidden in rock) lichen-dominated microbial communities from the Ross Desert of Antarctica were shown to produce oxalate (oxalic acid). Oxalate increased mineral dissolution, which provides nutrients, creates characteristic weathering patterns, and may ultimately influence the biological residence time of the community. Oxalate was the only organic acid detectable by HPLC, and its presence was verified by GC/MS. Community photosynthetic metabolism was involved in oxalate production since rates of (14)C-oxalate production from (14)C02 were higher in light than in dark incubations. Flaking of the sandstone at the level of the lichen-dominated zone a few millimeters beneath the rock surface can be explained by dissolution of the sandstone cement, which was enhanced by Si, Fe, and Al oxalate complex formation. Added oxalate was observed to increase the solubility of Si, Fe, Al, P, and K. Oxalate's ability to form soluble trivalent metal-oxalate complexes correlated with the observed order of metal oxide depletion from the lichen-dominated zone (Mn > Fe > Al). Thermodynamic calculations predict that Fe oxalate complex formation mobilizes amorphous Fe oxides (ferrihydrite) in the lichen-dominated zone, and where oxalate is depleted, ferrihydrite should precipitate. Hematite, a more crystalline Fe oxide, should remain solid at in situ oxalate concentrations. Oxalate was not a carbon source for the indigenous heterotrophs, but the microbiota were involved in oxalate mineralization to CO2, since oxalate mineralization was reduced in poisoned incubations. Photooxidation of oxalate to C02 coupled with photoreduction of Fe(Ill) may be responsible for oxalate removal in situ, since rates of (14)C-oxalate mineralization in dark incubations were at least 50% lower than those in the light. Removal of oxalate from Si, Fe, and Al complexes should allow free dissolved Si, Fe, and Al to precipitate as amorphous silicates and metal oxides. This may explain increased

  4. Emergency management of ureteral stones: Recent advances.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Luis; Lima, Estêvão; Autorino, Riccardo; Marcelo, Filinto

    2008-10-01

    Most ureteral stones can be observed with reasonable expectation of uneventful stone passage. When an active ureteral stone treatment is warranted, the best procedure to choose is dependent on several factors, besides stone size and location, including operators' experience, patients' preference, available equipment and related costs. Placement of double-J stent or nephrostomy tube represents the classical procedures performed in a renal colic due to acute ureteral obstruction when the conservative drug therapy does not resolve the symptoms. These maneuvers are usually followed by ureteroscopy or extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, which currently represent the mainstay of treatment for ureteral stones. In this review paper a literature search was performed to identify reports dealing with emergency management of renal colic due to ureteral stones. The main aspects related to this debated issue are analyzed and the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are carefully discussed.

  5. Investigations of stone consolidants by neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, F.; Schillinger, B.; Rohatsch, A.; Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H.

    2009-06-01

    The chemical preservation and structural reintegration of natural stones applied in historical buildings is carried out by the use of different stone strengtheners. As these agents contain hydrogen, they offer good properties for neutron imaging. The main interest in the restoration process is the development of a suitable stone consolidant. In cooperation with the St. Stephans Cathedral and the geologists at Vienna University of Technology, we are investigating the penetration depth and distribution of different stone consolidants. These studies are being carried out with different stone samples, mostly porous natural building stones, limestones and sandstones. The two strengtheners used in this study are ethyl silicate ester (Wacker OH100) and dissolved polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA, Paraloid B72). Neutron radiography and neutron tomography can be used successfully to visualize the distribution of consolidants both in two and three dimensions.

  6. Clonorcis sinensis eggs are associated with calcium carbonate gallbladder stones.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tie; Ma, Rui-hong; Luo, Zhen-liang; Yang, Liu-qing; Luo, Xiao-bing; Zheng, Pei-ming

    2014-10-01

    Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones were easily neglected because they were previously reported as a rare stone type in adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between calcium carbonate stones and Clonorchis sinensis infection. A total of 598 gallbladder stones were studied. The stone types were identified by FTIR spectroscopy. The C. sinensis eggs and DNA were detected by microscopic examination and real-time fluorescent PCR respectively. And then, some egg-positive stones were randomly selected for further SEM examination. Corresponding clinical characteristics of patients with different types of stones were also statistically analyzed. The detection rate of C. sinensis eggs in calcium carbonate stone, pigment stone, mixed stone and cholesterol stone types, as well as other stone types was 60%, 44%, 36%, 6% and 30%, respectively, which was highest in calcium carbonate stone yet lowest in cholesterol stone. A total of 182 stones were egg-positive, 67 (37%) of which were calcium carbonate stones. The C. sinensis eggs were found adherent to calcium carbonate crystals by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Patients with calcium carbonate stones were mainly male between the ages of 30 and 60, the CO2 combining power of patients with calcium carbonate stones were higher than those with cholesterol stones. Calcium carbonate gallbladder stones are not rare, the formation of which may be associated with C. sinensis infection.

  7. 6. GRIST MILL STONES IN CENTER (VERTICAL STAND WITH HANDLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GRIST MILL STONES IN CENTER (VERTICAL STAND WITH HANDLE TO LEFT OF STONES ADJUSTS SPACE BETWEEN STONES, THUS CONTROLING FINENESS OF FLOUR. STONE CRANE AT RIGHT USED TO LIFT STONES FOR DRESSING). OTHER EQUIPMENT NOT IDENTIFIED. NOTE STAIRS IN LEFT REAR. - Hildebrand's Mill, Flint, Delaware County, OK

  8. Growth and characterization of Cu (II) doped negatively soluble lithium sulfate monohydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathi, K.; Ramasamy, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of pure and Cu (II) doped negatively soluble lithium sulfate monohydrate have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique. In the present work, to improve the crystalline quality of lithium sulfate monohydrate crystal, metal dopant was incorporated into the pure crystals. The as grown crystals are clear, transparent and the sizes of the crystals were up to 18×12×3 mm3 and 50×15×5 mm3. The presence of metal dopant has been confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy analysis. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies were carried out to ascertain lattice parameters and identify different phase nature. Optical transmission spectrum of the grown crystals was recorded. FT-IR and thermal analysis were carried out to investigate the functional group and thermal behavior of the grown crystals respectively. The grown crystal was subjected to Vickers micro hardness, HRXRD, piezoelectric, laser damage threshold measurements and second harmonic generation efficiency studies.

  9. Caoxite-hydroxyapatite composition as consolidating material for the chalk stone from Basarabi-Murfatlar churches ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Turcanu-Caruţiu, Daniela; Fierăscu, Radu-Claudiu; Fierăscu, Irina; Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia; Teodorescu, Sofia; Vasilievici, Gabriel; Rădiţoiu, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    The development of new composition for surface conservation of some architectural monuments represents now an important research topic. The Basarabi-Murfatlar Ensemble, recognized as the first religious monument from mediaeval Dobrogea (Romania) (from 9th to 11th century), is one of the most impressive archaeological sites of Europe. This ensemble is built from amorphous calcium carbonate, very sensitive to humidity, frost, salts, etc. The aim of this paper is to test on chalk stone samples a new consolidant - hydroxyapatite (HAp) mixed with calcium oxalate trihydrate (caoxite) (COT). Some specific techniques for evaluation its impact on chalk stone surface are used, as follows: petrographical and physical-chemical techniques: SEM, OM, ICP-AES, TGA, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, chromatic parameters changes, the accelerated weathering tests: heating, freeze-thaw, and their effects on porosity and capillary water uptake by the chalk surface. All these have been evaluated before and after treatment with COT-HAp, putting into evidence the effect of the new composition on the chalk stone surface. HAp induces COT stabilization, and their joint composition can bind weathered stone blocks providing a substantial reinforcement of chalk surface.

  10. The recurrence rate of stones following ESWL.

    PubMed

    Köhrmann, K U; Rassweiler, J; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    With extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) stone fragmentation and the potential creation of residual stones has become an integral part of the treatment strategy. Therefore true recurrence, regrowth and pseudo-recurrence determine the rate of new stone formation. In unselected series the overall recurrence rate after ESWL varies between 6% after 1 year and 20% after 4 years. The comparison between the recurrence rate after ESWL and the natural recurrence rate reveals that the results of ESWL are better than expected. Lithotripsy has no special effect on true stone recurrence, and even pseudo-recurrence is of minor clinical significance.

  11. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  12. Influence of storage condition on properties of MCC II-based pellets with theophylline-monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Cornelia; Thommes, Markus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose II (MCC II(1)) is a polymorph of commonly used MCC I; in 2010 it was introduced as new pelletization aid in wet-extrusion/spheronization leading to fast disintegrating pellets. Previous investigations suggested that the storage of the resulting pellets affect the disintegration behavior, the non-hygroscopic substance chloramphenicol that showed no polymorphism or hydrate formation due to relative humidity was used for the investigations. Therefore, theophylline-monohydrate that can dehydrate during storage, but also during manufacturing and drying was used for this study to confirm the results of the previous study and give a more detailed overview of the influence of recrystallization of theophylline monohydrate on disintegration. Storage recommendations should be derived. MCC II-based pellets were prepared of binary mixtures containing 10%, 20% or 50% MCCII as pelletization aid and theophylline-monohydrate as API. These pellets were stored at different relative humidity (0-97%rH; 20°C); the influence on their disintegration and drug release was investigated. The storage conditions had an impact on pellet disintegration. Low relative humidities (⩽ 40%rH) led to a conversion of the monohydrate to the anhydrous form. Newly grown crystals formed a kind of network around the pellet and inhibited the disintegration. High relative humidity (>80%rh) affected the disintegration caused by changes in the MCCII as already seen in the previous study. Due to the changed disintegration behavior also the drug release and release kinetic changed. Therefore, for theophylline containing pellets a storage humidity of 55%rH to 80%rH (20°C) is recommended. All in all, these investigations substantiate the knowledge of MCCII-based pellets providing a better basis for adequate storage conditions of MCCII based pellets. PMID:24950003

  13. Influence of storage condition on properties of MCC II-based pellets with theophylline-monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Cornelia; Thommes, Markus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose II (MCC II(1)) is a polymorph of commonly used MCC I; in 2010 it was introduced as new pelletization aid in wet-extrusion/spheronization leading to fast disintegrating pellets. Previous investigations suggested that the storage of the resulting pellets affect the disintegration behavior, the non-hygroscopic substance chloramphenicol that showed no polymorphism or hydrate formation due to relative humidity was used for the investigations. Therefore, theophylline-monohydrate that can dehydrate during storage, but also during manufacturing and drying was used for this study to confirm the results of the previous study and give a more detailed overview of the influence of recrystallization of theophylline monohydrate on disintegration. Storage recommendations should be derived. MCC II-based pellets were prepared of binary mixtures containing 10%, 20% or 50% MCCII as pelletization aid and theophylline-monohydrate as API. These pellets were stored at different relative humidity (0-97%rH; 20°C); the influence on their disintegration and drug release was investigated. The storage conditions had an impact on pellet disintegration. Low relative humidities (⩽ 40%rH) led to a conversion of the monohydrate to the anhydrous form. Newly grown crystals formed a kind of network around the pellet and inhibited the disintegration. High relative humidity (>80%rh) affected the disintegration caused by changes in the MCCII as already seen in the previous study. Due to the changed disintegration behavior also the drug release and release kinetic changed. Therefore, for theophylline containing pellets a storage humidity of 55%rH to 80%rH (20°C) is recommended. All in all, these investigations substantiate the knowledge of MCCII-based pellets providing a better basis for adequate storage conditions of MCCII based pellets.

  14. GADOLINIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R. A.

    2012-03-12

    HB-Line will begin processing Pu solutions during FY2012 that will involve the recovery of Pu using oxalate precipitation and filtration. After the precipitation and filtration processes, the filtrate solution will be transferred from HB-Line to H-Canyon. The presence of excess oxalate and unfiltered Pu oxalate solids in these solutions create a criticality safety issue if they are sent to H-Canyon without controls in H-Canyon. One approach involves H-Canyon receiving the filtrate solution into a tank that is poisoned with soluble gadolinium (Gd). Decomposition of the oxalate will occur within a subsequent H-Canyon vessel. The receipt of excess oxalate into the H-Canyon receipt tanks has the potential to precipitate a portion of the Gd poison in the receipt tanks. Because the amount of Gd in solution determines the maximum amount of Pu solids that H-Canyon can receive, H-Canyon Engineering requested that SRNL determine the solubility of Gd in aqueous solutions of 4-10 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 4-12 g/L Gd, and 0.15-0.25 M oxalic acid (H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) at 25 °C. The target soluble Gd concentration is 6 g/L. The data indicate that the target can be achieved above 6 M HNO{sub 3} and below 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}. At 25 °C, for 6 M HNO{sub 3}, 11 g/L and 7 g/L Gd are soluble in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. In 4 M HNO{sub 3}, the Gd solubility drops significantly to 2.5 g/L and 0.8 g/L in 0.15 M and 0.25 M H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively. The solubility of Gd at 8-10 M HNO{sub 3} exceeds the solubility at 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The data for 4 M HNO{sub 3} showed good agreement with data in the literature. To achieve a target of 6 g/L soluble Gd in solution in the presence of 0.15-0.25 M oxalate, the HNO{sub 3} concentration must be maintained at or above 6 M HNO{sub 3}. The solubility of Gd in 4 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate at 10 °C is about 1.5 g/L. For 6 M HNO{sub 3} with 0.15 M oxalate, the solubility of Gd at 10

  15. STONES: Passing a stone in your sleep might be easier than you think

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Passing kidney calculi can be excruciatingly painful for patients, likened to childbirth in intensity. The mechanism of the simple act of passing a stone, however, is not well understood. A recent research article examined a novel approach for optimizing kidney stone clearance—sleep position, a simple noninvasive concept that might improve urinary stone passage. PMID:21878879

  16. Calcium oxalate contribution to calcium cycling in forests of contrasting nutrient status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (Ca oxalate) is an insoluble biomineral that forms in plants and fungi, and occurs in soils across many types of ecosystems. Assessing how Ca oxalate may shape ecosystem Ca cycling requires information on the distribution of Ca oxalate among plant biomass, detritus, and mineral soil, and how it varies with ecosystem Ca status. We compared two Douglas-fir forests of contrasting ecosystem Ca availability, and found that Ca oxalate was partitioned similarly among plant biomass, detritus and mineral soil major ecosystem compartments at both sites, and total pools of Ca oxalate were greater in the high-Ca forest. However, the proportional importance of Ca oxalate was greater in the low-Ca than high-Ca forest (18% versus 4% of actively cycling ecosystem Ca, respectively). And calcium oxalate in mineral soil, which is of particular interest as a potential long-term Ca reservoir, was a larger portion of total available Ca (exchangeable Ca plus Ca oxalate Ca) in the low-Ca site than the high-Ca site (9% versus 1% of available soil Ca, respectively). Calcium oxalate was the dominant form of Ca returned from plants to soil as leaf litterfall at the high-Ca site, yet calcium oxalate disappeared rapidly from decomposing litter (0.28 yr−1 or faster) at both sites. We conclude that accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest ecosystems appears most closely related to overall Ca supply for live biomass pools, and that the accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest floor and mineral soil is limited by rapid microbial degradation of putatively unavailable Ca oxalate.

  17. Preservation of urine samples for metabolic evaluation of stone-forming patients.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Renato Ribeiro Nogueira; Baxmann, Alessandra Calábria; Ferreira, Larissa Gorayb; Nishiura, José Luiz; Siliano, Priscila Reina; Gomes, Samirah Abreu; Moreira, Silvia Regina Silva; Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman

    2006-10-01

    Metabolic evaluation of stone-forming (SF) patients is based on the determination of calcium, oxalate, citrate, uric acid and other parameters in 24-h urine samples under a random diet. A reliable measurement of urinary oxalate requires the collection of urine in a receptacle containing acid preservative. However, urinary uric acid cannot be determined in the same sample under this condition. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the addition of preservatives (acid or alkali) after urine collection would not modify the results of those lithogenic parameters. Thirty-four healthy subjects (HS) were submitted to two non-consecutive collections of 24-h urine. The first sample was collected in a receptacle containing hydrochloric acid (HCl 6 N) and the second in a dry plastic container, with HCl being added as soon as the urine sample was received at the laboratory. Additionally, 34 HS and 34 SF patients collected a spot urine sample that was divided into four aliquots, one containing HCl, another containing sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3 )5 g/l), and two others in which these two preservative agents were added 24 h later. Urinary oxalate, calcium, magnesium, citrate, creatinine and uric acid were determined. Urinary parameters were also evaluated in the presence of calcium oxalate or uric acid crystals. Mean values of all urinary parameters obtained from previously acidified 24-h urine samples did not differ from those where acid was added after urine collection. The same was true for spot urine samples, with the exception of urinary citrate that presented a slight albeit significant change of 5.9% between samples in HS and 3.1% in SF. Uric acid was also not different between pre- and post-alkalinized spot urine samples. The presence of crystals did not alter these results. We concluded that post-delivery acidification or alkalinization of urine samples does not modify the measured levels of urinary oxalate, calcium, magnesium, creatinine and uric acid, and that the

  18. Preparation of bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate

    DOEpatents

    Naud, Darren L.; Hiskey, Michael A.

    2003-05-27

    A process of preparing bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate is provided including combining a dicyanamide salt, an azide salt and water to form a first reaction mixture, adding a solution of a first strong acid characterized as having a pKa of less than about 1 to said first reaction mixture over a period of time characterized as providing a controlled reaction rate so as to gradually form hydrazoic acid without loss of significant quantities of hydrazoic acid from the solution while heating the first reaction mixture at temperatures greater than about 65.degree. C., heating the resultant reaction mixture at temperatures greater than about 65.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to substantially completely form a reaction product, treating the reaction product with a solution of a second strong acid to form a product of bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate, and, recovering the bis-(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine monohydrate product.

  19. Global stone heritage: larvikite, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldal, Tom; Dahl, Rolv

    2013-04-01

    Larvikite has for more than hundred years been appreciated as one of the world's most attractive dimension-stones, and at present time its production and use is more extensive than ever. The main reason for the continuous success of the larvikite on the world market is the blue iridescence displayed on polished surfaces, which is caused by optical interference in microscopic lamellae within the ternary feldspars. The larvikite complex consists of different intrusions defining several ring-shaped structures, emplaced during a period of approximately five million years. Following this pattern, several commercial subtypes of larvikite, characterised by their colour and iridescence, have been identified. The name "larvikite" was first applied by Waldemar Brøgger, in his descriptions of the monzonitic rocks within the southern part of the Carboniferous-Permian Oslo Igneous Province. The name has its origin in the small coastal town of Larvik, situated almost right in the centre of the main plutonic complex of larvikite. From a geologist's point of view, the larvikites are important for understanding the igneous mechanisms behind the formation of the Oslo rift, representing a series of semi-circular intrusions, varying from quartz-bearing monzonites in the east (earliest phases) towards nepheline-bearing monzonites and nepheline syenite in the west (latest phases). However, most other people see larvikite as a particularly beautiful rock. Production started already in the 1880s, and at present time the export value of rough blocks of dimension-stone from the Larvik Region is close to 100 million euro, distributed on approximately 20 individual quarries. Different types of larvikite have different market value, and the customers can choose between a range of types and qualities under trade names such as "Blue Pearl", "Emerald Pearl" and "Marina Pearl". Globally, larvikite has put a significant mark on architecture around the world, and should be included in the global

  20. Ammonium reduces oxalate accumulation in different spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) genotypes by inhibiting root uptake of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Lu, Lingli; Chen, Qiuhui; Ding, Wenya; Dai, Peibin; Hu, Yan; Yu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2015-11-01

    Excessive accumulation of oxalate negatively affects nutritional value of many vegetables, such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Mixed solution of ammonium and nitrate could effectively reduce oxalate accumulation, while the mechanism involved remains unknown. High (Heizhenzhu) and low (Weilv) oxalate-accumulated spinach genotypes were used in this study to investigate the association of oxalate accumulation and root uptake of nitrogen. Exposure of increasing nitrate or mixed-nitrogen (nitrate:ammonium = 1:1) significantly increased leaf total and soluble oxalate contents. In contrast, increasing ammonium did not result in elevation of leaf oxalate. Correlation analysis confirmed that leaf oxalate accumulation was positively associated with root uptake of nitrate but not ammonium. Moreover, addition of ammonium significantly reduced nitrate uptake rate, and subsequently decreased leaf oxalate accumulation. The results suggest that oxalate synthesis in spinach leaves is associated with its root uptake of nitrate, and ammonium is able to reduce oxalate accumulation by inhibiting uptake of nitrate.

  1. A Lion of a Stone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image of the rock called 'Lion Stone' was acquired by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera on sol 104 (May 9, 2004). The rock stands about 10 centimeters tall (about 4 inches) and is about 30 centimeters long (12 inches). Plans for the coming sols include investigating the rock with the spectrometers on the rover's instrument arm.

    This image was generated using the camera's L2 (750-nanometer), L5 (530-nanometer) and L6 (480-nanometer) filters.

  2. Changes in stone composition over two decades: evaluation of over 10,000 stone analyses.

    PubMed

    Moses, Rachel; Pais, Vernon M; Ursiny, Michal; Prien, Edwin L; Miller, Nicole; Eisner, Brian H

    2015-04-01

    To examine the changes in stone composition from 1990 to 2010. A retrospective review was performed of all renal and ureteral stones submitted from the state of Massachusetts to a single laboratory (Laboratory for Stone Research, Newton, MA) for the years 1990 and 2010. Stone composition was determined by infrared spectroscopy and/or polarizing microscopy. A total of 11,099 stones were evaluated (56.7% from 1990, 43.3% from 2010). From 1990 to 2010, the percentage of stones from females (i.e., female/male ratio) increased significantly (29.8% in 1990 to 39.1% in 2010, p < 0.001). Among women, from 1990 to 2010, there was a significant increase in stones which were >50% uric acid (7.6-10.2%, p < 0.005) and a significant decrease in struvite stones (7.8-3.0%, p < 0.001). Among women with calcium stones, the % apatite per stone decreased significantly (20.0 vs. 11.7%, p < 0.001). Among men, there were no changes in stones which were majority uric acid (11.7-10.8%, p = 0.2). Among men with calcium stones, the % apatite per stone increased significantly (9.8 vs. 12.5%, p < 0.001). Males also demonstrated a significant increase in both cystine (0.1-0.6%, p < 0.001) and struvite stones (2.8-3.7%, p = 0.02). The epidemiology of stone disease continues to evolve and appears to vary according to gender. While some of these findings may be related to population changes in body mass index and obesity, the etiology of others remains unclear. PMID:25689875

  3. Biomimetic Randall’s Plaque as an In Vitro Model System for Studying the Role of Acidic Biopolymers in Idiopathic Stone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chidambaram, Archana; Rodriguez, Douglas; Khan, Saeed; Gower, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Randall’s plaque (RP) deposits seem to be consistent among the most common type of kidney stone formers, idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. This group forms calcium oxalate renal stones without any systemic symptoms, which contributes to the difficulty of understanding and treating this painful and recurring disease. Thus, the development of an in vitro model system to study idiopathic nephrolithiasis, beginning with RP pathogenesis, can help in identifying how plaques, and subsequently stones, form. One main theory of RP formation is that calcium phosphate deposits initially form in the basement membrane of the thin loops of Henle, which then fuse and spread into the interstitial tissue, and ultimately make their way across the urothelium, where upon exposure to the urine, the mineralized tissue serves as a nidus for overgrowth with calcium oxalate into a stone. Our group has found that many of the unusual morphologies found in RP and stones, such as concentrically-laminated spherulites and mineralized collagenous tissue, can be reproduced in vitro using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, in which acidic polypeptides induce a liquid-phase amorphous precursor to the mineral, yielding non-equilibrium crystal morphologies. Given that there are many acidic proteins and polysaccharides present in the renal tissue and urine, we have put for the hypothesis that the PILP system may be involved in urolithiasis. Therefore, our goal is to develop an in vitro model system of these two stages of composite stone formation in order to study the role that various acidic macromolecules may play. In our initial experiments presented here, the development of “biomimetic” RP was investigated, which will then serve as a nidus for calcium oxalate overgrowth studies. In order to mimic the tissue environment, MatriStem® (ACell, Inc.), a decellularized porcine urinary bladder matrix was used, because it has both an intact epithelial basement membrane surface

  4. Synthesis, structural and spectroscopic investigations of nanostructured samarium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Vimal, G; Mani, Kamal P; Biju, P R; Joseph, Cyriac; Unnikrishnan, N V; Ittyachen, M A

    2014-03-25

    Nanostructured samarium oxalate crystals were prepared via microwave assisted co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and morphology of the sample were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction, Scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy. The presence of functional groups is ascertained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Samarium oxalate nanocrystals of average size 20 nm were aggregated together to form nano-plate structure in sub-microrange. Detailed spectroscopic investigation of the prepared phosphor material was carried out by Judd-Ofelt analysis based on the UV-Visible-NIR absorption spectra and photoluminescence emission spectra. The analysis reveals that the transition from energy level (4)G5/2 to (6)H7/2 of Sm(3+) ion has maximum branching ratio and the corresponding orange emission can be used for display applications.

  5. Purification of 238Pu Oxide using the Pu Oxalate Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mew, D A; Krikorian, O H; Dodson, K E; Schmitz, J A

    2001-11-28

    The Pu oxalate process is used to remove {sup 234}U from aged {sup 238}Pu-enriched PuO{sub 2} ({sup 234}U grows into the PuO{sub 2} material with time from a-decay of {sup 238}Pu). The Pu oxalate process was first used on a mixture of weapons grade PuO{sub 2} with UO{sub 2} to work out the processing parameters. It was then applied to aged {sup 238}Pu-enriched PuO{sub 2} ({sup 238}PuO{sub 2}). The {sup 234}U content of the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} was reduced from 13.2 wt% to 0.0254 wt%, and the Pu recovery yield was 78.5%. The process is complex and is complicated by radiolysis problems when working with {sup 238}Pu. Details of the experiments are described.

  6. Coupling Ratio for Ca(2+) Transport by Calcium Oxalate Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Pankaj; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The SERCA isoform 1a is constructed to transport 2 Ca(2+) ions across the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane coupled to the hydrolysis of one molecule of MgATP. However, observed coupling ratios for Ca(2+) transported/ATP hydrolzyed are usually less than 2:1, since part of the Ca(2+) accumulated at high intravesicular concentrations by the active transport of Ca(2+) leaks out of the vesicles because of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) exchange. However, in the presence of a high concentration of oxalate (5 mM) Ca(2+) will precipitate as Ca-oxalate inside the vesicles and thereby be prevented from leaking out and, in addition, this treatment will reduce the intravesicular free concentration of Ca(2+) to a level where optimal coupling ratios of 2:1 can be achieved.

  7. Oxalate oxidases and differentiating surface structure in wheat: germins.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B G

    2000-01-01

    Oxalate oxidases (OXOs) have been found to be concentrated in the surface tissues of wheat embryos and grains: germin is concentrated in root and leaf sheaths that surround germinated embryos; pseudogermin (OXO-psi) is concentrated in the epidermis and bracts that 'encircle' mature grains. Most strikingly, the epidermal accumulation of OXO-psi was found to presage the transition of a delicate 'skin', similar to the fragile epidermis of human skin, into the tough shell (the miller's 'beeswing') that is typical of mature wheat grains. A narrow range of oxalate concentration (1--2 mM) in the hydrated tissues of major crop cereals (barley, maize, oat, rice, rye and wheat) contrasted with wide variations in their OXO expression, e.g. cold-tolerant and cold-sensitive varieties of maize have similar oxalate contents but the former was found to contain approx. 20-fold more germin than did the latter. Well-known OXOs in sorghum, a minor cereal, and beet, a dicotyledon, were found to have little antigenic relatedness to the germins, but the beet enzyme did share some of the unique stability properties that are peculiar to the germin-like OXOs that are found only in the major crop cereals. Their concentration in surface structures of domesticated wheat suggests a biochemical role for germin-like OXOs: programmed cell death in surface tissues might be a constitutive as well as an adaptive form of differentiation that helps to produce refractory barriers against tissue invasion by predators. Incidental to the principal investigation, and using an OXO assay (oxalate-dependent release of CO(2)) that did not rely on detecting H(2)O(2), which is often fully degraded in cell extracts, it was found that OXO activity in soluble extracts of wheat was manifested only in standard solution assays if the extract was pretreated in a variety of ways, which included preincubation with pepsin or highly substituted glucuronogalactoarabinoxylans (cell-wall polysaccharides). PMID:10861243

  8. Raman spectra of oxalates in lichen encrustations on Renaissance frescoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Seaward, M. R. D.

    The vibrational Raman spectra of lichen encrustations on biodeteriorated Renaissance frescoes have been recorded using a laser Raman microprobe. The major chemical species identified in the encrustations is calcium oxalate. Other vibrational features in the Raman spectra have been assigned to fragments of the substratum incorporated from the biodeterioration process and to organic by-products of lichen metabolism such as erythrin, lecanoric acid and meso-erythritol.

  9. Equilibrium studies of oxalate and aluminum containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; King, W. D.; Peters, T. B.; Jones, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked to develop data on the solubility and conditions leading to precipitation of sodium oxalate, sodium nitrate, Bayerite (a polymorph of gibbsite, Al(OH)3), and sodium aluminosilicate solids recently found in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The data generated will be used to improve the OLI Systems thermodynamic database for these compounds allowing better prediction of solids formation by the modeling software in the future.

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic duct stones.

    PubMed

    Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Burhenne, H J

    1992-01-01

    Encouraging results with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic duct stones have been reported from Europe. We present our experience with the first two North American patients, treated with excellent results in one and limited clinical improvement in the other patient at 1 year follow-up. Targeting of pancreatic duct stones was achieved with either fluoroscopy or ultrasound.

  11. Ventricular candidiasis in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus).

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Valentina; Bull, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Ventricular candidiasis is consistently one of the most prominent pathologic conditions diagnosed in stone curlews (Burhinus oedicnemus) in the United Arab Emirates, predominately affecting the captive population. Predisposing factors are a humid environment, stress, immunosuppression, inadequate nutrition, and an extended use of oral antibiotics. In this report, we describe the clinical signs, diagnosis, and pathologic result in stone curlews with ventricular candidiasis.

  12. Sludge, stones and sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, A A; Olatunji, P O

    2002-12-01

    A total of ninety-seven paediatric and adult patients with sickle cell anaemia and fourty-eight control subjects were investigated with the aim of determining the content of the gallbladder. The patients and control subjects were categorised according to the presence or otherwise of gallbladder stones, and, or sludge. The age last birthday, PCV and number of crises per year were recorded in order to determine their influence on the development of gallbladder stones and sludge. The gallbladder contents were examined using ultrasonographic technique. The age and number of crises per year was determined from the clinical record files and direct questioning of patients. Seventy patients had normal gallbladder content while eighteen had sludge, six had stones, and three had a combination of sludge and stones. None of the control subjects had sludge or stone. The age of patients increased from progressively from those with normal content through those with sludge to those with stones. The PCV and number of crises per year only differentiated between normal and abnormal gallbladder contents. While the prevalence of gallbladder stones in this study falls within the range in previous studies, a high prevalence of sludge was observed. The association between the occurrence of sludge and stones with age, PVC and number of crises per year suggests the need for a larger series and that they may identify a group of patients requiring closer monitoring.

  13. Effect of Dietary Oxalate on the Gut Microbiota of the Mammalian Herbivore Neotoma albigula

    PubMed Central

    Oakeson, Kelly F.; Dale, Colin; Dearing, M. Denise

    2016-01-01

    Diet is one of the primary drivers that sculpts the form and function of the mammalian gut microbiota. However, the enormous taxonomic and metabolic diversity held within the gut microbiota makes it difficult to isolate specific diet-microbe interactions. The objective of the current study was to elucidate interactions between the gut microbiota of the mammalian herbivore Neotoma albigula and dietary oxalate, a plant secondary compound (PSC) degraded exclusively by the gut microbiota. We quantified oxalate degradation in N. albigula fed increasing amounts of oxalate over time and tracked the response of the fecal microbiota using high-throughput sequencing. The amount of oxalate degraded in vivo was linearly correlated with the amount of oxalate consumed. The addition of dietary oxalate was found to impact microbial species diversity by increasing the representation of certain taxa, some of which are known to be capable of degrading oxalate (e.g., Oxalobacter spp.). Furthermore, the relative abundances of 117 operational taxonomic units (OTU) exhibited a significant correlation with oxalate consumption. The results of this study indicate that dietary oxalate induces complex interactions within the gut microbiota that include an increase in the relative abundance of a community of bacteria that may contribute either directly or indirectly to oxalate degradation in mammalian herbivores. PMID:26896138

  14. The Metabolic and Ecological Interactions of Oxalate-Degrading Bacteria in the Mammalian Gut

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron W.; Dearing, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate-degrading bacteria comprise a functional group of microorganisms, commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Oxalate is a plant secondary compound (PSC) widely produced by all major taxa of plants and as a terminal metabolite by the mammalian liver. As a toxin, oxalate can have a significant impact on the health of mammals, including humans. Mammals do not have the enzymes required to metabolize oxalate and rely on their gut microbiota for this function. Thus, significant metabolic interactions between the mammalian host and a complex gut microbiota maintain the balance of oxalate in the body. Over a dozen species of gut bacteria are now known to degrade oxalate. This review focuses on the host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that regulate the degradation of oxalate by the gut microbiota. We discuss the pathways of oxalate throughout the body and the mammalian gut as a series of differentiated ecosystems that facilitate oxalate degradation. We also explore the mechanisms and functions of microbial oxalate degradation along with the implications for the ecological and evolutionary interactions within the microbiota and for mammalian hosts. Throughout, we consider questions that remain, as well as recent technological advances that can be employed to answer them. PMID:25437337

  15. Oxalic Acid Has an Additional, Detoxifying Function in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Annerose; Witt-Geiges, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the diseases caused by the necrotroph plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not well understood. To investigate the role of oxalic acid during infection high resolution, light-, scanning-, transmission electron microscopy and various histochemical staining methods were used. Our inoculation method allowed us to follow degradation of host plant tissue around single hyphae and to observe the reaction of host cells in direct contact with single invading hyphae. After penetration the outer epidermal cell wall matrix appeared degraded around subcuticular hyphae (12-24 hpi). Calcium oxalate crystals were detected in advanced (36-48 hpi) and late (72 hpi) infection stages, but not in early stages. In early infection stages, surprisingly, no toxic effect of oxalic acid eventually secreted by S. sclerotiorum was observed. As oxalic acid is a common metabolite in plants, we propose that attacked host cells are able to metabolize oxalic acid in the early infection stage and translocate it to their vacuoles where it is stored as calcium oxalate. The effects, observed on healthy tissue upon external application of oxalic acid to non-infected, living tissue and cell wall degradation of dead host cells starting at the inner side of the walls support this idea. The results indicate that oxalic acid concentrations in the early stage of infection stay below the toxic level. In plant and fungi oxalic acid/calcium oxalate plays an important role in calcium regulation. Oxalic acid likely could quench calcium ions released during cell wall breakdown to protect growing hyphae from toxic calcium concentrations in the infection area. As calcium antimonate-precipitates were found in vesicles of young hyphae, we propose that calcium is translocated to the older parts of hyphae and detoxified by building non-toxic, stable oxalate crystals. We propose an infection model where oxalic acid plays a detoxifying role in late infection stages. PMID:23951305

  16. Intestinal permeability in subjects from two different race groups with diverse stone-risk profiles.

    PubMed

    Theka, Takalani; Rodgers, Allen; Ravenscroft, Neil; Lewandowski, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    It is well established that calcium oxalate stones may be caused by colonic or ileum oxalate (Ox) hyperabsorption (secondary to intestinal dysfunction). Studies have reported that increased intestinal permeability (IP) can cause hyperabsorption of nutrients culminating in passive diffusion of Ox. In South Africa, renal stones occur in the white population (W) but are extremely rare in the black population (B). Previous studies have shown that despite B having a hyperoxalurogenic diet relative to W, urinary Ox in the former is not higher. It has been suggested that different Ox handling mechanisms in the groups are the cause of this disparity. The present study was undertaken to examine whether the IP index, a reliable and accurate measure of intestinal integrity, plays a role in this anomaly. Ten healthy males from each group ingested a dual-sugar isotonic solution containing 5 g lactulose (LA) and 2 g mannitol (MA). IP was assessed by comparing the LA:MA ratio in 5 h urine samples using high performance anion exchange chromatography coupled with pulse amperometric detection to measure the concentration of each sugar. 24 h dietary intake and urine composition were also determined. LA excretion was identical in both groups (0.03 %) while MA excretion was 8.3 % in B and 11.3 % in W. IP index was 0.004 for B and 0.003 for W. It is concluded that IP is not a contributory factor in the apparent different handling of dietary Ox in B and W South Africans. It is speculated that differences in renal transporters may play a role. PMID:23503872

  17. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of primary intrahepatic stones.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Lee, S K; Min, Y I; Lee, M G; Sung, K B; Cho, K S; Lee, S G; Min, P C

    1992-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy (ESWL) was performed in intrahepatic stone patients (n = 18) by Dornier MPL 9,000 with ultrasound guidance. The patients had T-tube (n = 9) or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tube (n = 9). Average treatment session was four and shock-wave numbers were in the range of 3,064 to 12,000 (average 6,288 shocks). Intrahepatic stones were removed completely in 16 patients over a 3 month period by ESWL and combined stone extraction maneuver such as cholangioscopic or interventional radiologic method. Extracorporeal shockwave lithothripsy was very helpful in facilitating extraction of stones in unfavorable locations or located above the severe stricture. In summary, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, followed by percutaneous stone extraction, will provide an improvement in the success rate and duration of treatment required for complete removal of primary hepatolithiasis.

  18. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones.

  19. Kidney stone risk following modern bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ricardo D; Canales, Benjamin K

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 10 years, a variety of reports have linked bariatric surgery to metabolic changes that alter kidney stone risk. Most of these studies were retrospective, lacked appropriate controls, or involved bariatric patients with a variety of inclusion criteria. Despite these limitations, recent clinical and experimental research has contributed to our understanding of the pathophysiology of stone disease in this high-risk population. This review summarizes the urinary chemistry profiles that may be responsible for the increased kidney stone incidence seen in contemporary epidemiological bariatric studies, outlines the mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and potential therapies through a newly described experimental bariatric animal model, and provides a focused appraisal of recommendations for reducing stone risk in bariatric stone formers.

  20. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    PubMed

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. PMID:26378390